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Sample records for human keratin type

  1. Organization of the human keratin type II gene cluster at 12q13

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    Yoon, S.J.; LeBlanc-Straceski, J.; Krauter, K. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Keratin proteins constitute intermediate filaments and are the major differentiation products of mammalian epithelial cells. The epithelial keratins are classified into two groups, type I and type II, and one member of each group is expressed in a given epithelial cell differentiation stage. Mutations in type I and type II keratin genes have now been implicated in three different human genetic disorders, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Members of the type I keratins are mapped to human chromosome 17, and the type II keratin genes are mapped to chromosome 12. To understand the organization of the type II keratin genes on chromosome 12, we isolated several yeast artificial chromosomes carrying these keratin genes and examined them in detail. We show that eight already known type II keratin genes are located in a cluster at 12q13, and their relative organization reflects their evolutionary relationship. We also determined that a type I keratin gene, KRT8, is located next to its partner, KRT18, in this cluster. Careful examination of the cluster also revealed that there may be a number of additional keratin genes at this locus that have not been described previously. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Keratins in the human trophoblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauster, Martin; Blaschitz, Astrid; Siwetz, Monika; Huppertz, Berthold

    2013-07-01

    Besides microfilaments and microtubules, intermediate filaments are major components of the cytoskeleton. In epithelial cells intermediate filaments are formed by heterodimers of specific keratins, whose expression pattern highly depends on the type of epithelium and differentiation degree of the cell. During the process of blastocyst implantation and subsequent development of the human placenta a very specialized epithelium appears at the feto-maternal interface. Arising from the trophectoderm of the blastocyst, the epithelium-like layer surrounding the early embryoblast, different trophoblast subtypes differentiate. They either develop into polar cells fulfilling real epithelial functions, or apolar tumor-like cells invading the maternal uterine wall to adapt the maternal tissue to progressing pregnancy. Thus, the whole trophoblast population, with all its subtypes, can be considered as an epithelial compartment and hence expresses keratin filaments. However, differentiation of trophoblast into different phenotypes may be linked to remodeling of the cytoskeletal composition, depending on spatiotemporal requirements of the respective cells. Here, we focus on the keratin composition of different trophoblast subtypes, how these keratins are used in trophoblast research and what is known about placental keratins in pregnancy pathologies.

  3. A group of type I keratin genes on human chromosome 17: Characterization and expression

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    Rosenberg, M.; Chaudhury, A.R.; Shows, T.B.; LeBeau, M.M.; Fuchs, E.

    1988-02-01

    The human type I keratins K16 and K14 are coexpressed in a number of epithelial tissues, including esophagus, tongue, and hair follicles. The authors determined that two genes encoding K16 and three genes encoding K14 were clustered in two distinct segments of chromosome 17. The genes within each cluster were tightly linked, and large parts of the genome containing these genes have been recently duplicated. The sequences of the two K16 genes showed striking homology not only within the coding sequences, but also within the intron positions and sequences and extending at least 400 base pairs 5' upstream and 850 base pairs 3' downstream from these genes. Despite the strong homologies between these two genes, only one of the genes encoded a protein which assembled into keratin filaments when introduced into simple epithelial cells. While there were no obvious abnormalities in the sequence of the other gene, its promoter seemed to be significantly weaker, and even a hybrid gene with the other gene's promoter gave rise to a much reduced mRNA level after gene transfection. To demonstrate that the functional K16 gene that they identified was in fact responsible for the K16 expressed in human tissues, we made a polyclonal antiserum which recognized our functional K16 gene product in both denatured and filamentous form and which was specific for bona fide human K16.

  4. A mutation in human keratin K6b produces a phenocopy of the K17 disorder pachyonychia congenita type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, FJD; Jonkman, MF; van Goor, H; Coleman, CM; Covello, SP; Uitto, J; McLean, WHI

    Type I and type II keratins form the heteropolymeric intermediate filament cytoskeleton, which is the main stress-bearing structure within epithelial cells. Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a group of autosomal dominant disorders whose most prominent phenotype is hypertrophic nail dystrophy

  5. Identification of intermediate cell types by keratin expression in the developing human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y; Smedts, F; Debruyne, FMJ; de la Rosette, JJMCH; Schalken, JA

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The secretory acini of the adult human prostate contain basal, luminal, and intermediate types of exocrine cells. Intermediate cells are thought to play an important role in normal growth and neoplastic transformation. In this study we investigated whether this cell type is present in

  6. Identification of intermediate cell types by keratin expression in the developing human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y; Smedts, F; Debruyne, FMJ; de la Rosette, JJMCH; Schalken, JA

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The secretory acini of the adult human prostate contain basal, luminal, and intermediate types of exocrine cells. Intermediate cells are thought to play an important role in normal growth and neoplastic transformation. In this study we investigated whether this cell type is present in ea

  7. Human keratin diseases: hereditary fragility of specific epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corden, L D; McLean, W H

    1996-12-01

    Keratins are heteropolymeric proteins which form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in epithelial cells. Since 1991, mutations in several keratin genes have been found to cause a variety of human diseases affecting the epidermis and other epithelial structures. Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was the first mechanobullous disease for which the underlying genetic lesion was found, with mutations in both the K5 and K14 genes rendering basal epidermal keratinocytes less resilient to trauma, resulting in skin fragility. The site of mutation in the keratin protein correlates with phenotypic severity in this disorder. Since mutations were identified in the basal cell keratins, the total number of keratin genes associated with diseases has risen to eleven. The rod domains of suprabasal keratins K1 and K10 are mutated in bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (BCIE; also called epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, EH) and mosaicism for K1/K10 mutations results in a nevoid distribution of EH. An unusual mutation in the VI domain of K1 has also been found to cause diffuse non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (DNEPPK). Mutations in palmoplantar specific keratin K9 cause epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) and mutations in the late differentiation suprabasal keratin K2e cause ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). In the last year or so, mutations were discovered in differentiation specific keratins K6a and K16 causing pachyonychia congenita type 1 and K17 mutations occur in pachyonychia congenita type 2. K16 and K17 mutations have also been reported to produce phenotypes with little or no nail changes: K16 mutations can present as focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (NEPPK) and K17 mutations can result in a phenotype resembling steatocystoma multiplex. Recently, mutation of mucosal keratin pair K4 and K13 has been shown to underlie white sponge nevus (WSN). This year, the first mutations in a keratin-associated protein, plectin, were shown to

  8. Human keratin diseases: the increasing spectrum of disease and subtlety of the phenotype-genotype correlation.

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    Irvine, A D; McLean, W H

    1999-05-01

    Keratins are obligate heterodimer proteins that form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. Keratins are tissue and differentiation specific and are expressed in pairs of types I and II proteins. The spectrum of inherited human keratin diseases has steadily increased since the causative role of mutations in the basal keratinocyte keratins 5 and 14 in epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was first reported in 1991. At the time of writing, mutations in 15 epithelial keratins and two trichocyte keratins have been associated with human diseases which include EBS, bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens, diffuse and focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, pachyonychia congenita and monilethrix. Mutations in extracutaneous keratins have been reported in oral white sponge naevus and Meesmann's corneal dystrophy. New subtleties of phenotype-genotype correlation are emerging within the keratin diseases with widely varying clinical presentations attributable to similar mutations within the same keratin. Mutations in keratin-associated proteins have recently been reported for the first time. This article reviews clinical, ultrastructural and molecular aspects of all the keratin diseases described to date and delineates potential future areas of research in this field.

  9. Electrospun human keratin matrices as templates for tissue regeneration.

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    Sow, Wan Ting; Lui, Yuan Siang; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of fabricating human hair keratin matrices through electrospinning and to evaluate the potential of these matrices for tissue regeneration. Keratin was extracted from human hair using Na2S and blended with poly(ethylene oxide) in the weight ratio of 60:1 for electrospinning. Physical morphology and chemical properties of the matrices were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Cell viability and morphology of murine and human fibroblasts cultured on the matrices were evaluated through the Live/Dead(®) assay and scanning electron microscopy. Electrospun keratin matrices were successfully produced without affecting the chemical conformation of keratin. Fibroblasts cultured on keratin matrices showed healthy morphology and penetration into matrices at day 7. Electrospun human hair keratin matrices provide a bioinductive and structural environment for cell growth and are thus attractive as alternative templates for tissue regeneration.

  10. Chronological ageing of human hair keratin fibres.

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    Thibaut, S; de Becker, E; Bernard, B A; Huart, M; Fiat, F; Baghdadli, N; Luengo, G S; Leroy, F; Angevin, P; Kermoal, A M; Muller, S; Peron, M; Provot, G; Kravtchenko, S; Saint-Léger, D; Desbois, G; Gauchet, L; Nowbuth, K; Galliano, A; Kempf, J Y; Silberzan, I

    2010-12-01

    Examination of very long hair (length > 2.4 m) using a large range of evaluation methods including physical, chemical, biochemical and microscopic techniques has enabled to attain a detailed understanding of natural ageing of human hair keratin fibres. Scrutinizing hair that has undergone little or no oxidative aggression--because of the absence of action of chemical agents such as bleaching or dyeing--from the root to the tip shows the deterioration process, which gradually takes place from the outside to the inside of the hair shaft: first, a progressive abrasion of the cuticle, whilst the cortex structure remains unaltered, is evidenced along a length of roughly 1 m onwards together with constant shine, hydrophobicity and friction characteristics. Further along the fibre, a significant damage to cuticle scales occurs, which correlates well with ceramides and 18-Methyl Eicosanoic Acid (18-MEA) decline, and progressive decrease in keratin-associated protein content. Most physical descriptors of mechanical and optical properties decay significantly. This detailed description of natural ageing of human hair fibres by a fine analysis of hair components and physical parameters in relationship with cosmetic characteristics provides a time-dependent 'damage scale' of human hair, which may help in designing new targeted hair care formulations.

  11. Keratin Gene Mutations in Disorders of Human Skin and its Appendages

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    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Syed, Deeba N.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia, are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 21 different genes including hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been associated with diverse hereditary disorders. The exact phenotype of each disease mostly reflects the spatial level of expression and types of the mutated keratin genes, the positions of the mutations as well as their consequences at sub-cellular levels. The identification of specific mutations in keratin disorders is the basis of our understanding that lead to reclassification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe cutaneous keratin genodermatoses. A disturbance in cutaneous keratins as a result of mutation(s) in the gene(s) that encode keratin intermediate filaments (KIF) causes keratinocytes and cutaneous tissue fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by a loss of structural integrity in keratinocytes expressing mutated keratins in vivo, often manifested as keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI), pachyonychia congenital (PC), monilethrix, steatocystoma multiplex and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). These keratins also have been identified to have roles in cell growth, apoptosis, tissue polarity, wound healing and tissue remodeling. PMID:21176769

  12. Sequence, evolution and tissue expression patterns of an epidermal type I keratin from the shark Scyliorhinus stellaris.

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    Schaffeld, Michael; Höffling, Simon; Jürgen, Markl

    2004-08-01

    From the shark Scyliorhinus stellaris we cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding a novel type I keratin, termed SstK10. By MALDI-MS peptide mass fingerprinting of cytoskeletal proteins separated on polyacrylamide gels, we assigned SstK10 to a 46-kDa protein which is the major epidermal type I ("IE") keratin in this fish and is specifically expressed in stratified epithelia. In a phylogenetic tree based on type I keratin sequences and with lamprey keratins applied as outgroup, SstK10 branches off in a rather basal position. This tree strongly supports the concept that teleost keratins and tetrapod keratins resulted from two independent gene radiation processes. The only exception is human K18 because its orthologs have been found in all jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata) studied; in the tree, they form a common, most early branch, with the shark version, SstK18, in the most basal position. Thus, the sequences of SstK10 and SstK18 also favor the classical view of vertebrate evolution that considers the cartilaginous fishes as the most ancient living Gnathostomata. To determine the overall expression patterns of epidermal ("E") and simple epithelial ("S") keratins in this shark, we furthermore tested a panel of monoclonal anti-keratin antibodies by immunofluorescence microscopy of frozen tissue sections, and in immunoblots of cytoskeletal preparations, demonstrating that immunodetection of specific keratins is a convenient method to characterize epithelial tissues in shark.

  13. Keratin gene mutations in disorders of human skin and its appendages.

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    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; Syed, Deeba N; Adhami, Vaqar M; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-04-15

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 22 different genes including, the cornea, hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been implicated in a wide range of hereditary diseases. The exact phenotype of each disease usually reflects the spatial expression level and the types of mutated keratin genes, the location of the mutations and their consequences at sub-cellular levels as well as other epigenetic and/or environmental factors. The identification of specific pathogenic mutations in keratin disorders formed the basis of our understanding that led to re-classification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe keratin genodermatoses. Molecular defects in cutaneous keratin genes encoding for keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) causes keratinocytes and tissue-specific fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS; K5, K14), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI; K1, K2, K10) i.e. epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI; K1, K10) and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS; K2), pachyonychia congenita (PC; K6a, K6b, K16, K17), epidermolytic palmo-plantar keratoderma (EPPK; K9, (K1)), monilethrix (K81, K83, K86), ectodermal dysplasia (ED; K85) and steatocystoma multiplex. These keratins also have been identified to have roles in apoptosis, cell proliferation

  14. Ultrastructural localization of hair keratins, high sulfur keratin-associated proteins and sulfhydryl oxidase in the human hair.

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    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    Hardening of the human hair shaft during cornification results from the bonding of keratins and keratin-associated proteins. In situ hybridization and light immunocytochemical studies have shown the general distribution of different keratins and some associated proteins but not determined their ultrastructural localization. I report here the localization of hair keratins, two high-sulfur keratin-associated proteins and sulfhydryl oxidase has been studied under the transmission electron microscope in the cornification zone of the human hair. The ultrastructural study on keratin distribution in general confirms previous light microscopic studies. Sulfur-rich KAP1 is mainly cortical but the labeling disappears in fully cornified cortical cells while a diffuse labeling is also present in differentiating cuticle cells. Sulfur-rich K26 immunolocalization is only detected in the exocuticle and endocuticle. Sparse labeling for sulfhydryl oxidase occurs in differentiating cortical cells but is weak and uneven in cuticle cells and absent in medulla and inner root sheath. Labeling disappears in the upper fully cornified cortex and cuticle. The observations indicate that sulfhydryl oxidase and keratin associated proteins are initially produced in the cytoplasm among keratin bundles accumulating in cortical and cuticle cells but these proteins undergo changes during the following cornification that alter the epitopes tagged by the antibodies.

  15. Mass spectrometric identification of isocyanate-induced modifications of keratins in human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, A.G.; Verstappen, D.R.W.; Riet-van Oeveren, D. van der; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Noort, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the current paper we show that exposure of human callus to isocyanates leads to covalent modifications within keratin proteins. Mass spectrometric analyses of pronase digests of keratin isolated from exposed callus show that both mono- and di-adducts (for di-isocyanates) are predominantly formed

  16. Immunochemical detection of sulfur mustard adducts with keratins in the stratum corneum of human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Noort, D.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Fidder, A.; Chau, L.F.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a program to develop methods for diagnosis of exposure to chemical warfare agents, we developed immunochemical methods for detection of adducts of sulfur mustard to keratin in human skin. Three partial sequences of keratins containing glutamine or asparagine adducted with a

  17. Cysteine Prevents the Reduction in Keratin Synthesis Induced by Iron Deficiency in Human Keratinocytes.

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    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Irace, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonella; Piccolo, Marialuisa; Di Pascale, Antonio; Russo, Annapina; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Lepre, Fabio; Russo, Giulia; Santamaria, Rita

    2016-02-01

    L-cysteine is currently recognized as a conditionally essential sulphur amino acid. Besides contributing to many biological pathways, cysteine is a key component of the keratin protein by its ability to form disulfide bridges that confer strength and rigidity to the protein. In addition to cysteine, iron represents another critical factor in regulating keratins expression in epidermal tissues, as well as in hair follicle growth and maturation. By focusing on human keratinocytes, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cysteine supplementation as nutraceutical on keratin biosynthesis, as well as to get an insight on the interplay of cysteine availability and cellular iron status in regulating keratins expression in vitro. Herein we demonstrate that cysteine promotes a significant up-regulation of keratins expression as a result of de novo protein synthesis, while the lack of iron impairs keratin expression. Interestingly, cysteine supplementation counteracts the adverse effect of iron deficiency on cellular keratin expression. This effect was likely mediated by the up-regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin, the main cellular proteins involved in iron homeostasis, at last affecting the labile iron pool. In this manner, cysteine may also enhance the metabolic iron availability for DNA synthesis without creating a detrimental condition of iron overload. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first study in an in vitro keratinocyte model providing evidence that cysteine and iron cooperate for keratins expression, indicative of their central role in maintaining healthy epithelia.

  18. Cytomorphometric analysis of keratinized round cells in human oral carcinoma

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    Abhimanyu Mohanta

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Cellular keratinization, hyperchromasia and increased N/C ratios in both LKRCs and SKRCs indicates the state of malignancy and thus the present finding has a practical value in early detection and diagnosis of OSCC patients.

  19. Biological evaluation of human hair keratin scaffolds for skin wound repair and regeneration

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    Xu, Songmei; Sang, Lin [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhang, Yaping [Engineering Research Center of Biomass Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Wang, Xiaoliang [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Li, Xudong, E-mail: xli20004@yahoo.com [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2013-03-01

    The cytocompatibility, in vivo biodegradation and wound healing of keratin biomaterials were investigated. For the purposes, three groups of keratin scaffolds were fabricated by freeze-drying reduced solutions at 2 wt.%, 4 wt.% and 8 wt.% keratins extracted from human hairs. These scaffolds exhibited evenly distributed high porous structures with pore size of 120-220 {mu}m and the porosity > 90%. NIH3T3 cells proliferated well on these scaffolds in culture lasting up to 22 days. Confocal micrographs stained with AO visually revealed cell attachment and infiltration as well as scaffold architectural stability. In vivo animal experiments were conducted with 4 wt.% keratin scaffolds. Early degradation of subcutaneously implanted scaffolds occurred at 3 weeks in the outermost surface, in concomitant with inflammatory response. At 5 weeks, the overall porous structure of scaffolds severely deteriorated while the early inflammatory response in the outermost surface obviously subsided. A faster keratin biodegradation was observed in repairing full-thickness skin defects. Compared with the blank control, keratin scaffolds gave rise to more blood vessels at 2 weeks and better complete wound repair at 3 weeks with a thicker epidermis, less contraction and newly formed hair follicles. These preliminary results suggest that human hair keratin scaffolds are promising dermal substitutes for skin regeneration. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of highly-interconnected human hair keratin scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-term cell culturing and in vivo animal experiments with keratin scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biodegradation is dependent on implantation site and function Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early vascularization and better repair in treating full-thickness skin wounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thicker epidermis, less contraction and newly formed hair follicles are observed.

  20. Skin Keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin.

  1. Keratin film made of human hair as a nail plate model for studying drug permeation.

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    Lusiana; Reichl, Stephan; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2011-08-01

    The limited source of human nail plate for studying drug permeation inspired us to develop a nail plate model made of human hair keratin. The manufacturing process consisted of keratin extraction, dialysis, molding, solvent evaporation, and curing, producing a water-resistant film. The permeability of the film was examined using three markers: sodium fluorescein, rhodamine B, and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran as water-soluble, lipid-soluble, and large molecule models, respectively. Bovine hoof was used for comparison. First investigation showed that keratin films (thickness 120 μm) resembled hooves (thickness 100 μm) except that these films were more permeable to rhodamine B compared with hooves (1.8-fold, pnail plate substitute. However, inclusion of the penetration enhancer must be carefully interpreted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Toward unraveling the complexity of simple epithelial keratins in human disease.

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    Omary, M Bishr; Ku, Nam-On; Strnad, Pavel; Hanada, Shinichiro

    2009-07-01

    Simple epithelial keratins (SEKs) are found primarily in single-layered simple epithelia and include keratin 7 (K7), K8, K18-K20, and K23. Genetically engineered mice that lack SEKs or overexpress mutant SEKs have helped illuminate several keratin functions and served as important disease models. Insight into the contribution of SEKs to human disease has indicated that K8 and K18 are the major constituents of Mallory-Denk bodies, hepatic inclusions associated with several liver diseases, and are essential for inclusion formation. Furthermore, mutations in the genes encoding K8, K18, and K19 predispose individuals to a variety of liver diseases. Hence, as we discuss here, the SEK cytoskeleton is involved in the orchestration of several important cellular functions and contributes to the pathogenesis of human liver disease.

  3. Expression of basal cell keratins in human prostate cancer metastases and cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Aalders, M.W.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Ruiter, D.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Within normal human prostate epithelium, basal and luminal cells can be discriminated by their expression of keratins (K). While basal cells express K5/14, luminal cells show expression of K8/18 and an intermediate cell population can be identified by co-expression of K5/18. Prostate cancer is predo

  4. A Mouse Model of Hyperproliferative Human Epithelium Validated by Keratin Profiling Shows an Aberrant Cytoskeletal Response to Injury

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    Samal Zhussupbekova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A validated animal model would assist with research on the immunological consequences of the chronic expression of stress keratins KRT6, KRT16, and KRT17, as observed in human pre-malignant hyperproliferative epithelium. Here we examine keratin gene expression profile in skin from mice expressing the E7 oncoprotein of HPV16 (K14E7 demonstrating persistently hyperproliferative epithelium, in nontransgenic mouse skin, and in hyperproliferative actinic keratosis lesions from human skin. We demonstrate that K14E7 mouse skin overexpresses stress keratins in a similar manner to human actinic keratoses, that overexpression is a consequence of epithelial hyperproliferation induced by E7, and that overexpression further increases in response to injury. As stress keratins modify local immunity and epithelial cell function and differentiation, the K14E7 mouse model should permit study of how continued overexpression of stress keratins impacts on epithelial tumor development and on local innate and adaptive immunity.

  5. Degradation of human hair keratin scaffold material used to repair injured skeletal muscles of rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Dong-fang; LU Yan-meng; FU Wen-yu; PIAO Ying-jie

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To explore the mechanism of the degradation of human hair keratin (HHK) scaffold material implanted in damaged skeletal muscle tissues. Methods: Six New Zealand rabbits with HHK scaffold material implants (composed of 3 different types of HHK material with varied degradation speed) after musclectomy were divided into 3 groups (2 in each group) to observe the degradation of the material at 1, 3, 6weeks after operation. Another rabbit without operation was used as the control group. The degradation of HHK was observed with light microscopy, histochemistry of ubiquitin and electron microscopy. Results:Light microscopy showed that human hair cuticles fell off from the HHK material and emerged, and the macrophagocytes and multinucleate giant cells were attached onto the surface of the material, which became homogeneous at the first postoperative week. The HHK scaffold material was degraded into particles that was phagocytosed by macrophagocytes and multinucleate giant cells at the third week. Ubiquitin enzymatic histochemistry showed that the macrophagocytes and the multinucleate giant cells were positive at the first week. Under electron microscope, HHK scaffold material was degraded into particles, and at the sixth week,part of HHK scaffold material was further degraded. Conclusion: Large mass of the HHK scaffold material is degraded via ubiquitin system, and the resultant particles are phagocytosed and degraded with the cooperation of lysosome and ubiquitin.

  6. Exons I and VII of the gene (Ker10) encoding human keratin 10 undergo structural rearrangements within repeats.

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    Tkachenko, A V; Buchman, V L; Bliskovsky, V V; Shvets YuP; Kisselev, L L

    1992-07-15

    A genomic fragment containing the K51 gene previously isolated from a rat genomic library by hybridization with the v-mos probe in nonstringent conditions [Chumakov et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290 (1986) 1252-1254], resembles a human keratin type-I-encoding gene [Shvets et al., Mol. Biol. 24 (1990) 663-677]. This genomic clone, K51, has been used as a probe to search for related human genes. A recombinant clone, HK51, with a 1.5-kb insert, was isolated from a human embryonic skin cDNA library, and its nucleotide (nt) sequence was determined. Analysis has shown that the cloned cDNA encodes human keratin 10 (Ker10). All presently known nt sequences of the human Ker10-encoding gene (Ker10) are not identical. Differences are concentrated in the 5'-end of the first exon and in the middle of the seventh exon within repeats. In spite of structural rearrangements in two of eight exons, the reading frame and position of the stop codon are preserved. The genetic rearrangements cause changes in hydrophobicity profiles of the N and C termini of Ker10. It was also noticed that insertion of one nt leads to the formation of an unusual 3'-end of the transcript.

  7. S-arylcysteine-keratin adducts as biomarkers of human dermal exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang-Sickel, Juei-Chuan C; Fox, Donii D; Nam, Tae-Gyu; Jayaraj, Karupiah; Ball, Louise M; French, John E; Klapper, David G; Gold, Avram; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2008-04-01

    To measure biomarkers of skin exposure to ubiquitous industrial and environmental aromatic hydrocarbons, we sought to develop an ELISA to quantitate protein adducts of metabolites of benzene and naphthalene in the skin of exposed individuals. We hypothesized that electrophilic arene oxides formed by CYP isoforms expressed in the human skin react with nucleophilic sites on keratin, the most abundant protein in the stratum corneum that is synthesized de novo during keratinocyte maturation and differentiation. The sulfhydryl groups of cysteines in the head region of the keratin proteins 1 (K1) and 10 (K10) are likely targets. The following synthetic S-arylcysteines were incorporated into 10-mer head sequences of K1 [GGGRFSS( S-aryl-C)GG] and K10 [GGGG( S-aryl-C)GGGGG] to form the predicted immunogenic epitopes for antibody production for ELISA: S-phenylcysteine-K1 (SPK1), S-phenylcysteine-K10 (SPK10), S-(1-naphthyl)cysteine-K1 (1NK1), S-(1-naphthyl)cysteine-K10 (1NK10), S-(2-naphthyl)cysteine-K1 (2NK1), and S-(2-naphthyl)cysteine-K10 (2NK10). Analysis by ELISA was chosen based on its high throughput and sensitivity, and low cost. The synthetic modified oligopeptides, available in quantity, served both as immunogens and as chemical standards for quantitative ELISA. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies produced against the naphthyl-modified keratins reacted with their respective antigens with threshold sensitivities of 15-31 ng/mL and high specificity over a linear range up to 500 ng/mL. Anti- S-phenylcysteine antibodies were not sufficiently specific or sensitive toward the target antigens for use in ELISA under our experimental conditions. In dermal tape-strip samples collected from 13 individuals exposed to naphthalene-containing jet fuel, naphthyl-conjugated peptides were detected at levels from 0.343 +/- 0.274 to 2.34 +/- 1.61 pmol adduct/microg keratin but were undetectable in unexposed volunteers. This is the first report of adducts of naphthalene (or of any polycyclic

  8. Patterns of expression of keratin 17 in human epithelia: dependency on cell position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanovsky, S M; Guelstein, V I; Tchipysheva, T A; Krutovskikh, V A; Bannikov, G A

    1989-07-01

    By immunomorphology, using keratin 17-specific monoclonal antibody, it has been shown that this keratin is expressed only in the basal cells of a group of complex epithelia: glandular epithelium with myoepithelial component, transitional and pseudostratified epithelia. Immunolocalization of keratin 17 provides evidence that the expression of this keratin strongly depends on the cell position within epithelial structures. The topographical character of the keratin expression suggests that these proteins may be implicated in the generation of spatial organization of epithelial tissues.

  9. Regulation of keratin network organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschke, Fanny; Seltmann, Kristin; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-02-01

    Keratins form the major intermediate filament cytoskeleton of epithelia and are assembled from heterodimers of 28 type I and 26 type II keratins in cell- and differentiation-dependent patterns. By virtue of their primary sequence composition, interactions with cell adhesion complexes and components of major signaling cascades, keratins act as targets and effectors of mechanical force and chemical signals to determine cell mechanics, epithelial cohesion and modulate signaling in keratin isotype-specific manners. Therefore, cell-specific keratin expression and organization impact on cell growth, migration and invasion. Here, we review the recent literature, focusing on the question how keratin networks are regulated and how the interplay of keratins with adhesion complexes affects these processes and provides a framework to understand keratins contribution to blistering and inflammatory disorders and to tumor metastasis.

  10. Keratins and lipids in ethnic hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, C F; Fernandes, M M; Gomes, A C; Coderch, L; Martí, M; Méndez, S; Gales, L; Azoia, N G; Shimanovich, U; Cavaco-Paulo, A

    2013-06-01

    Human hair has an important and undeniable relevance in society due to its important role in visual appearance and social communication. Hair is mainly composed of structural proteins, mainly keratin and keratin associated proteins and lipids. Herein, we report a comprehensive study of the content and distribution of the lipids among ethnic hair, African, Asian and Caucasian hair. More interestingly, we also report the study of the interaction between those two main components of hair, specifically, the influence of the hair internal lipids in the structure of the hair keratin. This was achieved by the use of a complete set of analytical tools, such as thin layer chromatography-flame ionization detector, X-ray analysis, molecular dynamics simulation and confocal microscopy. The experimental results indicated different amounts of lipids on ethnic hair compositions and higher percentage of hair internal lipids in African hair. In this type of hair, the axial diffraction of keratin was not observed in X-ray analysis, but after hair lipids removal, the keratin returned to its typical packing arrangement. In molecular dynamic simulation, lipids were shown to intercalate dimers of keratin, changing its structure. From those results, we assume that keratin structure may be influenced by higher concentration of lipids in African hair. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  11. Analysis of internal structure changes in black human hair keratin fibers with aging using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, Akio; Fujiwara, Nobuki; Hori, Teruo

    To investigate the internal structure changes in virgin black human hair keratin fibers due to aging, the structure of cross-sections at various depths of virgin black human hair (sections of new growth hair: 2 mm from the scalp) from a group of eight Japanese females in their twenties and another group of eight Japanese females in their fifties were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. For the first time, we have succeeded in recording the Raman spectra of virgin black human hair, which had been impossible due to high melanin granule content. The key points of this method are to cross-section hair samples to a thickness of 1.50-microm, to select points at various depths of the cortex with the fewest possible melanin granules, and to optimize laser power, cross slit width as well as total acquisition time. The reproducibility of the Raman bands, namely the alpha-helix (alpha) content, the beta-sheet and/or random coil (beta/R) content, the disulfide (--SS--) content, and random coil content of two adjoining cross-sections of a single hair keratin fiber was clearly good. The --SS-- content of virgin black human hair from the Japanese females in their fifties for the cortex region decreased compared with that of the Japanese females in their twenties. On the other hand, the beta/R and alpha contents of the cortex region did not change.

  12. [Fine structural study of keratinization of the filiform papillae in the tongue in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placková, A; Skach, M

    1975-01-01

    The fine structure of the keratinization of the papilla filiformis of the human tongue was described for the first time; Two biopsies of normal tongue tissue were fixed in 2,5% phosphate-buffered glutaraldehyde, postfixed in 1% osmiumtetroxyde, embedded in Durcopan und contrasted ultrathin sections were examined by electron microscopes JEM 7A and 100B. The findings show a highly configurated epithel-connective tissue border with basal lamina and irregular hemidesmosomes. The epithelial structure of the interpapillary area is identical with the fine structure of the human buccal mucosa, which was classified as non-keratinized or incompletely keratinized. Accordingly, a stratum granulosum is missing. After loss of nucleus and organelles, surface cells become flattened, parallel to the surface of the tongue and have a fine fibrillar cytoplasm. The papilla filiformis is formed by cell growth along the secondary connective tissue papillae and consequently tube-like epithelial structures appear. In the papillary area basal and stratum spinosum cells show epidermal structural features. A difference from epidermal and other oral epithelial cells becomes apparent for the first time in the stratum granulosum by the appearance of a great number of round, small, electron-dense KHG, surrounded by ribosomes. The KHG are not associated with tonofilaments. In the area of the walls of the tubes 1...3 mum large, electron-dense structures are formed by fusion of several KHG. With further differentiation these large KHG disintegrate into bulky or granular masses, filling the cell cytoplasm and thus mask the tonofilaments. The cells at the borders of the tubes show a great structural variability. After the disintegration of nucleus and organelles, the cytoplasm is formed by randomly oriented filaments of different packing or by fiber-bundles. Yet the interfibrilla embedding substance, typical of orthokeratinization is mostly lackingmin some cells of the tubeborders, masses of

  13. A quantitative electron microscopic analysis of the keratinizing epithelium of noral human hard palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M; Schroeder, H E

    1975-01-01

    The epithelium of normal human hard palate was subjected to sterologic analysis. Ten biosies were selected from a total of twenty specimens collected from 9 to 16 year old females, and processed for light- and electron microscopy. At two levels of magnification, electron micrographs were sampled from three strata (basale, spinosum, granulosum) in two locations (epithelial ridges and portions over connective tissue papillae). Stereologic point counting procedures were employed to analyse a total 1560 electron micrographs. In general, the thickness of the palate epithelium was 0.12 mm (over papillae) and 0.31 mm (in ridges), the epithelium is distinctly stratified, and homogeneously ortho-keratinized. From basal to granular layers, the composition of strata revealed decreasing densities of nuclei, mitochondria, membrane-bound organelles and aggregates of free ribosomes. Keratohyalin bodies and membrane coating granules increased, and cytoplasmic filaments with a constant diameter of about 85 A increased from 14 to 30% of cytoplasmic unit volume. The cytoplasmic ground substance occupied a stable 50% of the epithelial cytoplasm in all strata. The composition of basal layers in ridges differed from that over connective tissue papillae. The data are discussed in relation to the observations that (1) an increasing gradient of filament density is not the most characteristic feature of ortho-keratinizing oral epithelium and (2) differences in the degree of differentiation in cells of the stratum basale coincided with the comparable frequency distribution pattern of dividing cells.

  14. Monoclonal antibody mapping of keratins 8 and 17 and of vimentin in normal human mammary gland, benign tumors, dysplasias and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelstein, V I; Tchypysheva, T A; Ermilova, V D; Litvinova, L V; Troyanovsky, S M; Bannikov, G A

    1988-08-15

    The distribution of keratins 8 and 17 and of vimentin in 28 normal human mammary tissue samples, 16 benign tumors, 26 fibrocytic diseases and 52 malignant breast tumors have been studied using monoclonal antibodies HI, E3 and NT30, respectively. Three cell populations in normal mammary epithelium have been identified: luminal epithelium containing keratin 8, myoepithelium of the lobular structures positive for vimentin, and myoepithelium of extralobular ducts positive for keratin 17. In different kinds of benign tumor and dysplastic proliferation a mosaic of cells with all normal phenotypes has been observed. The majority of cells co-expressed keratins 8 and 17 or vimentin. In the overwhelming majority of carcinomas, cells did not contain myoepithelial markers (keratin 17 and vimentin) but expressed only keratin 8 specific to normal luminal epithelium.

  15. Simple Epithelial Keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnad, Pavel; Guldiken, Nurdan; Helenius, Terhi O; Misiorek, Julia O; Nyström, Joel H; Lähdeniemi, Iris A K; Silvander, Jonas S G; Kuscuoglu, Deniz; Toivola, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Simple epithelial keratins (SEKs) are the cytoplasmic intermediate filament proteins of single-layered and glandular epithelial cells as found in the liver, pancreas, intestine, and lung. SEKs have broad cytoprotective functions, which are facilitated by dynamic posttranslational modifications and interaction with associated proteins. SEK filaments are composed of obligate heteropolymers of type II (K7, K8) and type I (K18-K20, K23) keratins. The multifaceted roles of SEKs are increasingly appreciated due to findings obtained from transgenic mouse models and human studies that identified SEK variants in several digestive diseases. Reorganization of the SEK network into aggregates called Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs) is characteristic for specific liver disorders such as alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To spur further research on SEKs, we here review the methods and potential caveats of their isolation as well as possibilities to study them in cell culture. The existing transgenic SEK mouse models, their advantages and potential drawbacks are discussed. The tools to induce MDBs, ways of their visualization and quantification, as well as the possibilities to detect SEK variants in humans are summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The molecular genetics of keratin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frances

    2003-01-01

    Keratins are the type I and II intermediate filament proteins which form a cytoskeletal network within all epithelial cells. They are expressed in pairs in a tissue- and differentiation-specific fashion. Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was the first human disorder to be associated with keratin mutations. The abnormal keratin filament aggregates observed in basal cell keratinocytes of some EBS patients are composed of keratins K5 and K14. Dominant mutations in the genes encoding these proteins were shown to disrupt the keratin filament cytoskeleton resulting in cells that are less resilient and blister with mild physical trauma. Identification of mutations in other keratin genes soon followed with attention focussed on disorders showing abnormal clumping of keratin filaments in specific cells. For example, in bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, clumping of filaments in the suprabasal cells led to the identification of mutations in the suprabasal keratins, K1 and K10. Mutations have now been identified in 18 keratins, all of which produce a fragile cell phenotype. These include ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (K2e), epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (K1, K9), pachyonychia congenita (K6a, K6b, K16, K17), white sponge nevus (K4, K13), Meesmann's corneal dystrophy (K3, K12), cryptogenic cirrhosis (K8, K18) and monilethrix (hHb6, hHb1).In general, these disorders are inherited as autosomal dominant traits and the mutations act in a dominant-negative manner. Therefore, treatment in the form of gene therapy is difficult, as the mutant gene needs to be inactivated. Ways of achieving this are actively being studied. Reliable mutation detection methods from genomic DNA are now available. This enables rapid screening of patients for keratin mutations. For some of the more severe phenotypes, prenatal diagnosis may be requested and this can now be performed from chorionic villus samples at an early stage of the pregnancy. This review article describes the

  17. Mechanistic investigation of a hemostatic keratin biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmany, Maria Bahawdory

    Traumatic injury leads to more productive years lost than heart disease, cancer and stroke combined. Trauma is often accompanied and complicated by uncontrolled bleeding. Human hair keratin biomaterials have demonstrated efficacy in controlling hemorrhage in both small and large animal models; however little is known about the mechanism by which these proteins aid in blood clotting. Inspection of the amino acid sequence of known keratins shows the presence of several cellular binding motifs, suggesting a possible mechanism and potentially eliminating the need to functionalize the material's surface for cellular interaction. In addition to small animal studies, the hemostatic activity of keratin hydrogels was explored through porcine hemorrhage models representing both a high flow and low flow bleed. In both studies, keratin hydrogels appeared to lead to a significant reduction in blood loss. The promising results from these in vivo studies provided the motivation for this project. The objective of this dissertation work was to assess the mechanism of action of a hemostatic keratin biomaterial, and more broadly assess the biomaterial-cellular interaction(s). It is our hypothesis that keratin biomaterials have the capacity to specifically interact with cells and lead to propagation of intracellular signaling pathway, specifically contributing to hemostasis. Through application of biochemical and molecular tools, we demonstrate here that keratin biomaterials contribute to hemostasis through two probable mechanisms; integrin mediated platelet adhesion and increased fibrin polymerization. Platelets are the major cell type involved in coagulation both by acting as a catalytic surface for the clotting cascade and adhering to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins providing a soft platelet plug. Because keratin biomaterials have structural and biochemical characteristics similar to ECM proteins, we utilized several adhesion assays to investigate platelet adhesion to keratin

  18. Analysis of structural changes in bleached keratin fibers (black and white human hair) using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, Akio

    2006-04-15

    To investigate the influence of bleaching treatments on keratin fibers, the structure of cross-sections at various depths of bleached human hair (black and white human hair) was directly analyzed without isolating the cuticle and cortex, using Raman spectroscopy. The S-S band intensity existing from the cuticle region to the center of cortex region of virgin white human hair decreased, while the S-O band intensity at 1040 cm(-1), assigned to cysteic acid, increased by performing the bleaching treatment. Especially, the S-O band intensity of the cuticle region increased remarkably compared with that of the cortex region. Also, the amide III (unordered) band intensity in the cortex region increased, indicating that some of the proteins existing throughout the cortex region changed to the random coil form. Moreover, it has been found that the S-S band intensity existing from the cuticle region to the center of the cortex region of the virgin black human hair decreased remarkably, while the S-O band intensity increased significantly compared with that of the virgin white human hair by performing the bleaching treatment. From these experiments, we concluded that the melanin granules including metal ions act as a decomposition accelerator for the oxidizing agent, thereby leading to a higher level of disulfide (-SS-) group cleavage in the black human hair compared with that of the white human hair. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Keratins 2 and 4/13 in reconstituted human skin are reciprocally regulated by retinoids binding to nuclear receptor RARalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marie; Sirsjö, Allan; Vahlquist, Anders; Törmä, Hans

    2010-07-01

    Disorders of keratinization are often treated with vitamin A derivatives (retinoids) which affect keratinocyte differentiation, including keratin (KRT) gene expression. In vivo, suprabasal keratinocytes normally express only keratin (K) 1, K2 and K10, but after topical application of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), the granular cells will additionally express K4 and K13, i.e. keratins normally present in oral mucosa and in cultured epidermal keratinocytes. To learn more about the retinoid regulation of keratin expression under in vivo-like conditions, we cultured keratinocytes on de-epidermized dermis in only 0.5% serum. These cells produce a normal-looking epidermis that expresses high mRNA levels of KRT1, KRT2 and KRT10, but minimal amounts of KRT4 and KRT13. Addition of ATRA to the medium for 48 h caused a dose-dependent increase in KRT4/KRT13 and a down-regulation of KRT2 mRNA. An increase in K4 protein was also found. The response was greater than the up-regulation of another retinoid-regulated gene, CRABPII. By studying 10 retinoids with different affinities for the retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR) isoforms, the reciprocal expression of KRT2 and KRT4/KRT13 could be connected with agonists for RARalpha. Two of these agonists, CD336/Am580 and CD2081, altered the expression profile with similar potency as the pan-RAR agonists ATRA and CD367. Co-addition of a pan-RAR antagonist (CD3106/AGN193109) markedly inhibited the induction of KRT4/KRT13 expression, whereas the down-regulation of KRT2 was less affected. In conclusion, RARalpha agonists elicit a reciprocal modulation of KRT2 and KRT4/KRT13 expression in human epidermis, but whether or not the keratin genes also possess RARalpha-specific regulatory elements is still unclear.

  20. Experimental co-expression of vimentin and keratin intermediate filaments in human breast cancer cells results in phenotypic interconversion and increased invasive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, M J; Seftor, E A; Seftor, R E; Trevor, K T

    1997-02-01

    The expression of intermediate filament proteins is remarkably tissue specific, which suggests that the intermediate filament type(s) present in cells is somehow related to their biological function. However, in some cancers, particularly malignant breast carcinoma, there is a strong indication that vimentin is co-expressed with keratins, thus presenting as a dedifferentiated or interconverted (between epithelial and mesenchymal) phenotype. In the present study, we recapitulated the interconverted phenotype by developing stable transfectants of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, termed MoVi clones, to express both vimentin and keratins. Overexpression of vimentin in these cells led to augmentation of motility and invasiveness in vitra. These activities could be transiently down-regulated by vimentin antisense oligonucleotides in MoVi clones and MDA-MB-231 cells (which constitutively co-express keratins and vimentin). Furthermore, in the MoVi experimental transfectants expressing the highest percentage of vimentin-positive cells, their proliferative capacity, clonogenic potential, and tumorigenicity increased. However, the metastatic ability of the MoVi transfectants remained unchanged compared with MCF-7neo controls. The MDA-MB-231 cells metastasized to axillary lymph nodes in a SCID mouse model. Finally, we explored the possibility that potential changes could occur with respect to cell surface integrins. These studies revealed a decrease in the alpha 2- and alpha 3-containing promiscuous integrins, in addition to beta 1 containing integrins, concomitant with an increase in the alpha 6-containing laminin receptor integrin. Further functional analysis of the alpha 6 observation showed an increase in the baptotactic migration of MoVi transfectants toward a laminin substrate. From these data, it is postulated that the ability to co-express vimentin and keratins confers a selective advantage to breast cancer cells in their interpretation of signaling cues from the

  1. Effects of keratin phosphorylation on the mechanical properties of keratin filaments in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fois, Giorgio; Weimer, Michael; Busch, Tobias; Felder, Erika T; Oswald, Franz; von Wichert, Götz; Seufferlein, Thomas; Dietl, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Keratin filaments impart resilience against mechanical extension of the cell. Despite the pathophysiological relevance of this function, very little is known about the mechanical properties of intermediate filaments in living cells and how these properties are modulated. We used keratin mutants that mimic or abrogate phosphorylation of keratin 8-serine(431) and keratin 18-serine(52) and investigated their effect on keratin tortuousness after cell stretch release in squamous cell carcinoma cells. Cells transfected with the wild-type keratins were used as controls. We can show that keratin dephosphorylation alters the stretch response of keratin in living cells since keratin tortuousness was abolished when phosphorylation of keratin18-serine(52) was abrogated. Additional experiments demonstrate that keratin tortuousness is not simply caused by a plastic overextension of keratin filaments because tortuousness is reversible and requires an intact actin-myosin system. The role of actin in this process remains unclear, but we suggest anchorage of keratin filaments to actin during stretch that leads to buckling on stretch release. Dephosphorylated keratin18-serine(52) might strengthen the recoil force of keratin filaments and hence explain the abolished buckling. The almost exclusive immunolabeling for phosphorylated keratin18-serine (52) in the cell periphery points at a particular role of the peripheral keratin network in this regard.

  2. Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma due to a novel type of keratin mutation, a 3-bp insertion in the keratin 9 helix termination motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, C M; Munro, C S; Smith, F J; Uitto, J; McLean, W H

    1999-03-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by diffuse keratoderma, typically with an erythematous border. Histologically, palmoplantar epidermis shows suprabasal cytolysis and ultrastructurally, tonofilament aggregation with overlying epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Mutations in the KRT9 gene, encoding keratin 9 (K9), a cytoskeletal protein expressed exclusively in suprabasal keratinocytes of palmoplantar epidermis, have been reported to cause EPPK. To date, all KRT9 defects reported in EPPK have been missense mutations in exon 1, which encodes the start of the alpha-helical rod domain. However, based on studies of other keratin disorders, it was postulated that mutations at the other end of the rod domain might also produce the EPPK phenotype. Here, we report the first mutation in the 2B domain of KRT9, 1362ins3, leading to an insertion of histidine in the helix termination motif of the K9 polypeptide. Insertional mutations have not been previously described in keratins. The phenotype of this case is similar to EPPK caused by 1A domain mutations, demonstrating that mutations in either of the helix boundary motif sequences of K9 are detrimental to keratin function and keratinocyte structure.

  3. Keratinizing odontogenic cyst with verrucous pattern featuring negative human papillomavirus status by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyris, Prokopios P; Nelson, Andrew C; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2015-04-01

    Verrucous odontogenic cysts (OCs) are extremely rare. Here, we report the clinicopathologic features of this unusual entity and investigate the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) by p16INK4A immunohistochemistry and HPV-DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A 32-year-old male presented with a 8.3 × 4.0 cm, multilocular radiolucency of the left ascending ramus of the mandible. Microscopically, the cystic cavity was lined by hyperplastic stratified squamous epithelium demonstrating marked verrucous morphology with multiple sharp or blunt projections. Mild dysplastic features were also identified. A final diagnosis of keratinizing OC with verrucous hyperplasia and epithelial dysplasia was rendered. Immunohistochemically, the verrucous OC showed foci of moderate-to-intense and diffuse, nuclear, and cytoplasmic p16INK4A positivity as well as weak or absent p53 immunopositivity in the p16INK4A labeled areas. The Ki-67 expression was increased. Interestingly, HPV-DNA PCR failed to reveal transcriptionally active HPV genotypes. Complete surgical excision was performed, with no recurrences seen during a 66-month follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutation of a type II keratin gene (K6a) in pachyonychia congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, P E; Haley, J L; Kansky, A; Rothnagel, J A; Jones, D O; Turner, R J

    1995-07-01

    Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple ectodermal abnormalities. Patients with Jadassohn-Lewandowsky Syndrome (MIM #167200; PC-1) have nail defects (onchyogryposis), palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, follicular hyperkeratosis and oral leukokeratosis. Those with the rarer Jackson-Lawler Syndrome (MIM #167210; PC-2) lack oral involvement but have natal teeth and cutaneous cysts. Ultra-structural studies have identified abnormal keratin tonofilaments and linkage to the keratin gene cluster on chromosome 17 has been found in PC families. Keratins are the major structural proteins of the epidermis and associated appendages and the nail, hair follicle, palm, sole and tongue are the main sites of constitutive K6, K16 and K17 expression. Furthermore, mutations in K16 and K17 have recently been identified in some PC patients. Although we did not detect K16 or K17 mutations in PC families from Slovenia, we have found a heterozygous deletion in a K6 isoform (K6a) in the affected members of one family. This 3 bp deletion (AAC) in exon 1 of K6a removes a highly conserved asparagine residue (delta N170) from position 8 of the 1A helical domain (delta N8). This is the first K6a mutation to be described and this heterozygous K6a deletion is sufficient to explain the pathology observed in this PC-1 family.

  5. Giant axonal neuropathy alters the structure of keratin intermediate filaments in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Asfia; Alsop, Richard J; Negishi, Atsuko; Kreplak, Laurent; Fudge, Douglas; Kuczmarski, Edward R; Goldman, Robert D; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2017-04-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) follows an autosomal recessive genetic inheritance and impedes the peripheral and central nervous system due to axonal swellings that are packed with neurofilaments. The patients display a number of phenotypes, including hypotonia, muscle weakness, decreased reflexes, ataxia, seizures, intellectual disability, pale skin and often curled hair. We used X-ray diffraction and tensile testing to determine potential changes to the structure of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) in the hair of patients with GAN. A statistically significant decrease in the 47 and the 27 Å diffraction signals were observed. Tensile tests determined that the hair was slightly stiffer, stronger and more extensible in GAN patients. These results suggest that the structure of keratin IFs in hair is altered in GAN, and the findings are compatible with an increased positional disorder of the keratin tetramers within the hair fibres. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Theoretical Considerations and a Mathematical Model for the Analysis of the Biomechanical Response of Human Keratinized Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Tsaira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Removable complete and partial dentures are supported by the residual alveolar ridges consisting of mucosa, submucosa, periosteum and bone. An understanding of the biomechanical behavior of the oral mucosa is essential in order to improve the denture-bearing foundations for complete and partially edentulous patients. The purpose of this paper was to examine the biomechanical behavior of the soft tissues supporting a removable denture and develop a model for that reason. Keratinized oral mucosa blocks with their underlying bone were harvested from the maxillary palatal area adjacent to the edentulous ridges of a cadaver. The compressive response of the oral mucosa was tested by using atomic force microscopy. The specimens were first scanned in order their topography to be obtained. The mechanical properties of the specimens were tested using a single crystal silicon pyramidal tip, which traversed towards the keratinized oral mucosa specimens. Loading-unloading cycles were registered and four mathematical models were tested using MATLAB to note which one approximates the force-displacement curve as close as possible: a. spherical, b. conical, c. third order polynomial, d. Murphy (fourth order polynomial, non-linear Hertzian based. The third order polynomial model showed the best accuracy in representing the force-displacement data of the tested specimens. A model was developed in order to analyze the biomechanical behavior of the human oral keratinized mucosa and obtain information about its mechanical properties.

  7. Keratin 9 gene mutations in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A; Hennies, H C; Langbein, L; Digweed, M; Mischke, D; Drechsler, M; Schröck, E; Royer-Pokora, B; Franke, W W; Sperling, K

    1994-02-01

    We have isolated the gene for human type I keratin 9 (KRT9) and localised it to chromosome 17q21. Patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK), an autosomal dominant skin disease, were investigated. Three KRT9 mutations, N160K, R162Q, and R162W, were identified. All the mutations are in the highly conserved coil 1A of the rod domain, thought to be important for heterodimerisation. R162W was detected in five unrelated families and affects the corresponding residue in the keratin 14 and keratin 10 genes that is also altered in cases of epidermolysis bullosa simplex and generalised epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, respectively. These findings provide further evidence that mutations in keratin genes may cause epidermolysis and hyperkeratosis and that hyperkeratosis of palms and soles may be caused by different mutations in the KRT9 gene.

  8. Analysis of internal structure changes in black human hair keratin fibers resulting from bleaching treatments using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, Akio

    2013-09-01

    In order to investigate in detail the internal structure changes in virgin black human hair keratin fibers resulting from bleaching treatments, the structure of cross-sections at various depths of black human hair, which had been impossible due to high melanin grande content, was directly analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The gauche-gauche-gauche (GGG) content of the sbnd SSsbnd groups existing from the cuticle region to the center of cortex region of the virgin black human hair remarkably decreased, while the gauche-gauche-trans and trans-gauche-trans contents were not changed by performing the excessive bleaching treatment. In particular, it was found that not only the β-sheet and/or random coil content, but also the α-helix content existing throughout the cortex region of virgin black human hair decreased. In addition, the transmission electron microscope observation shows that the proteins in the cell membrane complex, the cuticle and cortex of the virgin black human hair were remarkably eluted by performing the excessive bleaching treatment. From these experiments, the author concluded that the sbnd SSsbnd groups, which have a GGG conformation were decomposed and finally converted to cysteic acid, and the α-helix structure of some of the proteins existing in the keratin was changed to the random coil structure, or eluted from the cortex region, thereby leading to the reduction in the protein density of the virgin human hair after the excessive bleaching treatment.

  9. Characterizing Wool Keratin

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Keratin from wool is a reactive, biocompatible, and biodegradable material. As the biological structural component of skin (soft keratins) and of nails, claws, hair, horn, feathers, and scales (hard keratins) pure keratin comprises up to 90% by weight of wool. Wool was treated in alkaline solutions to extract from 68% to 82% keratin within 2 to 5 hours of exposure at 6 5 ∘ C . The keratin products were water-soluble and were confirmed to contain intermediate filament and microfibrillar compon...

  10. Origin of archosaurian integumentary appendages: the bristles of the wild turkey beard express feather-type beta keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Roger H; Washington, Lynette D; Salvatore, Brian A; Glenn, Travis C; Knapp, Loren W

    2003-06-15

    The discovery that structurally unique "filamentous integumentary appendages" are associated with several different non-avian dinosaurs continues to stimulate the development of models to explain the evolutionary origin of feathers. Taking the phylogenetic relationships of the non-avian dinosaurs into consideration, some models propose that the "filamentous integumentary appendages" represent intermediate stages in the sequential evolution of feathers. Here we present observations on a unique integumentary structure, the bristle of the wild turkey beard, and suggest that this non-feather appendage provides another explanation for some of the "filamentous integumentary appendages." Unlike feathers, beard bristles grow continuously from finger-like outgrows of the integument lacking follicles. We find that these beard bristles, which show simple branching, are hollow, distally, and express the feather-type beta keratins. The significance of these observations to explanations for the evolution of archosaurian integumentary appendages is discussed.

  11. The X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Keratin 1-Keratin 10 Helix 2B Heterodimer Reveals Molecular Surface Properties and Biochemical Insights into Human Skin Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunick, Christopher G; Milstone, Leonard M

    2017-01-01

    Keratins 1 (K1) and 10 (K10) are the primary keratins expressed in differentiated epidermis. Mutations in K1/K10 are associated with human skin diseases. We determined the crystal structure of the complex between the distal (2B) helices of K1 and K10 to better understand how human keratin structure correlates with function. The 3.3 Å resolution structure confirms many features inferred by previous biochemical analyses, but adds unexpected insights. It demonstrates a parallel, coiled-coil heterodimer with a predominantly hydrophobic intermolecular interface; this heterodimer formed a higher order complex with a second K1-K10-2B heterodimer via a Cys401(K10) disulfide link, although the bond angle is unanticipated. The molecular surface analysis of K1-K10-2B identified several pockets, one adjacent to the disulfide linkage and conserved in K5-K14. The solvent accessible surface area of the K1-K10 structure is 20-25% hydrophobic. The 2B region contains mixed acidic and basic patches proximally (N-terminal), whereas it is largely acidic distally (C-terminal). Mapping of conserved and nonconserved residues between K1-K10 and K5-K14 onto the structure demonstrated the majority of unique residues align along the outer helical ridge. Finally, the structure permitted a fresh analysis of the deleterious effects caused by K1/K10 missense mutations found in patients with phenotypic skin disease.

  12. Bioprospecting keratinous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L N; Sinclair, R D; Carver, J; Ecroyd, H; Lui, Y; Bennett, L E

    2010-01-01

    The concept of bioprospecting for bioactive peptides from keratin-containing materials such as wool, hair, skin and feathers presents an exciting opportunity for discovery of novel functional food ingredients and nutraceuticals, while value-adding to cheap and plentiful natural sources. The published literature reports multiple examples of proline-rich peptides with productive bio-activity in models of human disease including tumour formation, hypertension control and Alzheimer's disease. Bioactive peptides have been identified from food and other protein sources however the bioactivity of keratin-related proteins and peptides is largely unknown. Considering the high representation of proline-rich peptides among proven bioactive peptides, the proline-rich character of keratinous proteins supports current research. A selection of mammalian (cow epidermis, sheep wool) and avian (chicken feather) keratinous materials were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis using established processing methods. A bio-assay of determining inhibition of early stage amyloid aggregation involved using a model fibril-forming protein - reduced and carboxymethylated bovine K-casein (RCMk-CN) and quantitation of fibril development with the amyloid-specific fluorophore, Thioflavin T (ThT). The assay was fully validated for analytical repeatability and used together with appropriate positive controls. Peptide library products derived from chicken feather (n=9), sheep wool (n=9) and bovine epidermis (n=9) were screened in the fibril inhibition assay based on K-casein. 3 of 27 products exhibited interesting levels of bio-activity with regard to fibril inhibition. HPLC profiles provide an indication of the complexity of the assemblage of peptides in the three active products. We conclude the bioprospecting research using keratinous materials shows promise for discovery of useful bioactive peptides.

  13. Characterizing Wool Keratin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette M. Cardamone

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratin from wool is a reactive, biocompatible, and biodegradable material. As the biological structural component of skin (soft keratins and of nails, claws, hair, horn, feathers, and scales (hard keratins pure keratin comprises up to 90% by weight of wool. Wool was treated in alkaline solutions to extract from 68% to 82% keratin within 2 to 5 hours of exposure at 65∘C. The keratin products were water-soluble and were confirmed to contain intermediate filament and microfibrillar component-proteins of fractured, residual cuticle, and cortical cells. Oxidation of wool by peroxycarboximidic acid in alkaline hydrogen peroxide produced keratin products with distinct microcrystalline structures: descaled fibers, fibrous matrices, and lyophilized powders. Morphology and confirmation of peptide functionality were documented by SEM, Amino Acid Analysis, SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis, MALDI-TOF/TOF, and FTIR analyses. The reactivity of keratin from wool models the reactivity of keratin from low-value sources such as cattle hair.

  14. Downregulation of keratin 76 expression during oral carcinogenesis of human, hamster and mouse.

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    Srikant Ambatipudi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keratins are structural marker proteins with tissue specific expression; however, recent reports indicate their involvement in cancer progression. Previous study from our lab revealed deregulation of many genes related to structural molecular integrity including KRT76. Here we evaluate the role of KRT76 downregulation in oral precancer and cancer development. METHODS: We evaluated KRT76 expression by qRT-PCR in normal and tumor tissues of the oral cavity. We also analyzed K76 expression by immunohistochemistry in normal, oral precancerous lesion (OPL, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and in hamster model of oral carcinogenesis. Further, functional implication of KRT76 loss was confirmed using KRT76-knockout (KO mice. RESULTS: We observed a strong association of reduced K76 expression with increased risk of OPL and OSCC development. The buccal epithelium of DMBA treated hamsters showed a similar trend. Oral cavity of KRT76-KO mice showed preneoplastic changes in the gingivobuccal epithelium while no pathological changes were observed in KRT76 negative tissues such as tongue. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates loss of KRT76 in oral carcinogenesis. The KRT76-KO mice data underlines the potential of KRT76 being an early event although this loss is not sufficient to drive the development of oral cancers. Thus, future studies to investigate the contributing role of KRT76 in light of other tumor driving events are warranted.

  15. Keratinizing dentigerous cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishnavi Sivasankar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratinizing dentigerous cyst is a rare entity. This article reports a case of keratinizing dentigerous cyst associated with an impacted mandibular canine. Clinical and radiological features, cone-beam computed tomography findings and histological features of the case are reported along with a discussion on keratinizing odontogenic cysts and the need for follow-up.

  16. Keratinizing dentigerous cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Vaishnavi; Ranganathan, Kannan; Praveen, B

    2014-01-01

    Keratinizing dentigerous cyst is a rare entity. This article reports a case of keratinizing dentigerous cyst associated with an impacted mandibular canine. Clinical and radiological features, cone-beam computed tomography findings and histological features of the case are reported along with a discussion on keratinizing odontogenic cysts and the need for follow-up. PMID:24808713

  17. Keratins extracted from Merino wool and Brown Alpaca fibres: thermal, mechanical and biological properties of PLLA based biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunati, E; Aluigi, A; Armentano, I; Morena, F; Emiliani, C; Martino, S; Santulli, C; Torre, L; Kenny, J M; Puglia, D

    2015-02-01

    Keratins extracted from Merino wool (KM) and Brown Alpaca fibres (KA) by sulphitolysis and commercial hydrolyzed keratins (KH) were used as fillers in poly(l-lactic) acid based biocomposites processed by solvent casting in chloroform. Different contents (1 wt.% and 5 wt.%) of keratins were considered and the morphological, thermal, mechanical, chemical and biological behaviours of the developed PLLA biocomposites were investigated. The results confirmed that surface morphologies of biocomposites revealed specific round-like surface topography function of different microsized keratin particles in different weight contents, such as the analysis of bulk morphologies which confirmed a phase adhesion strictly dependent by the keratin source. Transparency and thermal responses were deeply affected by the presence of the different keratins and their interaction with the PLLA matrix. Tensile test results underlined the possibility to modulate the mechanical behaviour of PLLA selecting the keratin type and content in order to influence positively the elastic and/or plastic response. It was demonstrated that surface characteristics of PLLA/KA systems also influenced the bovine serum albumin adsorption, moreover PLLA and PLLA biocomposites based on different kinds of keratins supported the culture of human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells, indicating that these biocomposites could be useful materials for medical applications.

  18. Keratin 8 modulation of desmoplakin deposition at desmosomes in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranger, Anne; Gilbert, Stéphane; Brouard, Jean-Simon; Magin, Thomas M; Marceau, Normand

    2006-12-10

    Keratins, the intermediate filament proteins of epithelial cells, connect to desmosomes, the cell-cell adhesion structures at the surface membrane. The building elements of desmosomes include desmoglein and desmocollin, which provide the actual cell adhesive properties, and desmoplakins, which anchor the keratin intermediate filaments to desmosomes. In the work reported here, we address the role of keratin 8 in modulating desmoplakin deposition at surface membrane in mouse hepatocytes. The experimental approach is based on the use of keratin 8- and keratin 18-null mouse hepatocytes as cell models. In wild-type mouse hepatocytes, desmoplakin is aligned with desmoglein and keratin 8 at the surface membrane. In keratin 8-null hepatocytes, the intermediate filament loss leads to alterations in desmoplakin distribution at the surface membrane, but not of desmoglein. Intriguingly, a significant proportion of keratin 18-null hepatocytes express keratin 8 at the surface membrane, associated with a proper desmoplakin alignment with desmoglein at desmosomes. A Triton treatment of the monolayer reveals that most of the desmoplakin present in either wild-type, keratin 8- or keratin 18-null hepatocytes is insoluble. Deletion analysis of keratin 8 further suggests that the recovery of desmoplakin alignment requires the keratin 8 rod domain. In addition, similarly to other works revealing a key role of desmoplakin phosphorylation on its interaction with intermediate filaments, we find that the phosphorylation status of the keratin 8 head domain affects desmoplakin distribution at desmosomes. Together, the data indicate that a proper alignment/deposition of desmoplakin with keratins and desmoglein in hepatocytes requires keratin 8, through a reciprocal phosphoserine-dependent process.

  19. Induction of Human Squamous Cell-Type Carcinomas by Arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor D. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a potent human carcinogen. Around one hundred million people worldwide have potentially been exposed to this metalloid at concentrations considered unsafe. Exposure occurs generally through drinking water from natural geological sources, making it difficult to control this contamination. Arsenic biotransformation is suspected to have a role in arsenic-related health effects ranging from acute toxicities to development of malignancies associated with chronic exposure. It has been demonstrated that arsenic exhibits preference for induction of squamous cell carcinomas in the human, especially skin and lung cancer. Interestingly, keratins emerge as a relevant factor in this arsenic-related squamous cell-type preference. Additionally, both genomic and epigenomic alterations have been associated with arsenic-driven neoplastic process. Some of these aberrations, as well as changes in other factors such as keratins, could explain the association between arsenic and squamous cell carcinomas in humans.

  20. Immunolocalization of alpha-keratins and associated beta-proteins in lizard epidermis shows that acidic keratins mix with basic keratin-associated beta-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-07-01

    The differentiation of the corneous layers of lizard epidermis has been analyzed by ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using specific antibodies against alpha-keratins and keratin associated beta-proteins (KAbetaPs, formerly indicated as beta-keratins). Both beta-cells and alpha-cells of the corneous layer derive from the same germinal layer. An acidic type I alpha-keratin is present in basal and suprabasal layers, early differentiating clear, oberhautchen, and beta-cells. Type I keratin apparently disappears in differentiated beta- and alpha-layers of the mature corneous layers. Conversely, a basic type II alpha-keratin rich in glycine is absent or very scarce in basal and suprabasal layers and this keratin likely does not pair with type I keratin to form intermediate filaments but is weakly detected in the pre-corneous and corneous alpha-layer. Single and double labeling experiments show that in differentiating beta-cells, basic KAbetaPs are added and replace type-I keratin to form the hard beta-layer. Epidermal alpha-keratins contain scarce cysteine (0.2-1.4 %) that instead represents 4-19 % of amino acids present in KAbetaPs. Possible chemical bonds formed between alpha-keratins and KAbetaPs may derive from electrostatic interactions in addition to cross-linking through disulphide bonds. Both the high content in glycine of keratins and KAbetaPs may also contribute to increase the hydrophobicy of the beta- and alpha-layers and the resistance of the corneous layer. The increase of gly-rich KAbetaPs amount and the bonds to the framework of alpha-keratins give rise to the inflexible beta-layer while the cys-rich KAbetaPs produce a pliable alpha-layer.

  1. The effect of culture medium and carrier on explant culture of human limbal epithelium: A comparison of ultrastructure, keratin profile and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Meeta; Olstad, O K; Drolsum, Liv; Moe, Morten C; Smorodinova, Natalia; Kalasova, Sarka; Jirsova, Katerina; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Noer, Agate

    2016-12-01

    Patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) often experience pain and photophobia due to recurrent epithelial defects and chronic inflammation of the cornea. Successfully restoring a healthy corneal surface in these patients by transplantation of ex vivo expanded human limbal epithelial cells (LECs) may alleviate these symptoms and significantly improve their quality of life. The clinical outcome of transplantation is known to be influenced by the quality of transplanted cells. Presently, several different protocols for cultivation and transplantation of LECs are in use. However, no consensus on an optimal protocol exists. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of culture medium and carrier on the morphology, staining of selected keratins and global gene expression in ex vivo cultured LECs. Limbal biopsies from cadaveric donors were cultured for three weeks on human amniotic membrane (HAM) or on tissue culture coated plastic (PL) in either a complex medium (COM), containing recombinant growth factors, hormones, cholera toxin and fetal bovine serum, or in medium supplemented only with human serum (HS). The expanded LECs were examined by light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemistry (IHC) for keratins K3, K7, K8, K12, K13, K14, K15 and K19, as well as microarray and qRT-PCR analysis. The cultured LECs exhibited similar morphology and keratin staining on LM, TEM and IHC examination, regardless of the culture condition. The epithelium was multilayered, with cuboidal basal cells and flattened superficial cells. Cells were attached to each other by desmosomes. Adhesion complexes were observed between basal cells and the underlying carrier in LECs cultured on HAM, but not in LECs cultured on PL. GeneChip Human Gene 2.0 ST microarray (Affymetrix) analysis revealed that 18,653 transcripts were ≥2 fold up or downregulated (p ≤ 0.05). Cells cultured in the same medium (COM or HS) showed more similarities in gene

  2. Molecular characterization, gene expression and dependence on thyroid hormones of two type I keratin genes (sseKer1 and sseKer2 in the flatfish Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cañavate José

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Keratins make up the largest subgroup of intermediate filaments, and, in chordates, represent the most abundant proteins in epithelial cells. They have been associated with a wide range of functions in the cell, but little information is still available about their expression profile and regulation during flatfish metamorphosis. Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis is a commercially important flatfish in which no keratin gene has been described yet. Results The development of large-scale genomics of Senegalese sole has facilitated the identification of two different type I keratin genes referred to as sseKer1 and sseKer2. Main characteristics and sequence identities with other fish and mammal keratins are described. Phylogenetic analyses grouped sseKer1 and sseKer2 in a significant clade with other teleost epidermal type I keratins, and have allowed for the identification of sseKer2 as a novel keratin. The expression profile of both genes was studied during larval development and in tissues using a real-time approach. sseKer1 and sseKer2 mRNA levels were significantly higher in skin than in other tissues examined. During metamorphosis, sseKer1 transcripts increased significantly at first stages, and reduced thereafter. In contrast, sseKer2 mRNA levels did not change during early metamorphosis although a significant drop at metamorphosis climax and late metamorphosis was also detected. To study the possible regulation of sseKer gene expressions by thyroid hormones (THs, larvae were exposed to the goitrogen thiourea (TU. TU-treated larvae exhibited higher sseKer1 and sseKer2 mRNA levels than untreated control at both 11 and 15 days after treatment. Moreover, addition of exogenous T4 hormone to TU-treated larvae restored or even reduced the steady-state levels with respect to the untreated control, demonstrating that expression of both genes is negatively regulated by THs. Conclusion We have identified two keratin genes, referred

  3. Fine genetic mapping of diffuse non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma to chromosome 12q11-q13: exclusion of the mapped type II keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsell, D P; Stevens, H P; Purkis, P E; Talas, U; Rustin, M H; Leigh, I M

    1999-10-01

    Diffuse non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (NEPPK) belongs to the heterogeneous group of skin diseases characterized by thickening of the stratum corneum of the palms and soles (1). This autosomal dominant PPK is characterized by a diffuse pattern of palmar and plantar hyperkeratosis giving the affected areas a thickened yellowish appearance with a marked erythematous edge. Linkage of diffuse NEPPK to chromosome 12q11-q13 has been demonstrated in two independent reports (2, 3). In this study, we describe detailed haplotyping with microsatellite markers mapping to this chromosomal region in three diffuse NEPPK pedigrees from the south of England. Fine mapping of a previously identified recombination event and the identification of a common disease haplotype segregating in the three pedigrees places the diffuse NEPPK locus proximal to the type II keratin gene cluster.

  4. Fundamental DSC investigations of alpha-keratinous materials as basis for the interpretation of specific effects of chemical, cosmetic treatments on human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, F-J; Sendelbach, G; Popescu, C

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-keratinous materials can be considered as two-phase, filament/matrix composites, in which partly crystalline, alpha-helical intermediate filaments (if) are embedded in an amorphous matrix of IF-associated proteins (IFAP). Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) of keratins in water was found to be especially suited to analyze various aspects of the thermal stability of these main morphological components. Results and considerations are reviewed, which were gained by applying the principles derived from fundamental investigations to the specific effects of oxidation (bleaching) and reduction (perm-waving). Properties and interactions of the main morphological components of human hair are considered that are specifically related to the various aspects of their thermal stability. The overall view of the results shows that the course of the thermal unfolding of the alpha-helix in the IFs is independent of the chemical history of hair. The matrix properties are the primary factor controlling the kinetics of the onset of the denaturation process in the IF/IFAP-composite.

  5. The Structure, Functions, and Mechanical Properties of Keratin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKittrick, J.; Chen, P.-Y.; Bodde, S. G.; Yang, W.; Novitskaya, E. E.; Meyers, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Keratin is one of the most important structural proteins in nature and is widely found in the integument in vertebrates. It is classified into two types: α-helices and β-pleated sheets. Keratinized materials can be considered as fiber-reinforced composites consisting of crystalline intermediate filaments embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. They have a wide variety of morphologies and properties depending on different functions. Here, we review selected keratin-based materials, such as skin, hair, wool, quill, horn, hoof, feather, and beak, focusing on the structure-mechanical property-function relationships and finally give some insights on bioinspired composite design based on keratinized materials.

  6. Zinc iodide-osmium staining of membrane-coating granules in keratinized and non-keratinized mammalian oral epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squier, C A

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of keratinized and non-keratinized oral epithelium were examined in the electron microscope after being stained with zinc iodide-osmium. In both types of tissue, reaction was seen in unmyelinated nerves, in the specific granules of epithelial Langerhans cells and within lysosome-like organelles and small vesicles associated with Golgi systems. In keratinized epithelia, the reaction was also present in the membrane-coating granules and between the deepest cells of the keratinized layer. In contrast, the membrane-coating granules of non-keratinized epithelia lacked Zn iodide-osmium staining despite the presence of reaction in adjacent Golgi systems. It is suggested that Zn iodide-osmium stains glycolipid or glycoprotein material in the cell. This material is elaborated in the Golgi systems from which lysosomes and the membrane-coating granules of keratinized tissues are probably derived.

  7. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  8. Effect of Gloriosa superba and Catharanthus roseus Extracts on IFN-γ-Induced Keratin 17 Expression in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

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    Nattaporn Pattarachotanant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gloriosa superba and Catharanthus roseus are useful in traditional medicine for treatment of various skin diseases and cancer. However, their molecular effect on psoriasis has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of ethanol extracts derived from G. superba leaves and C. roseus stems on the expression of psoriatic marker, keratin 17 (K17, was investigated in human keratinocytes using biochemical and molecular experimental approaches. Both extracts could reduce the expression of K17 in a dose-dependent manner through JAK/STAT pathway as demonstrated by an observation of reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 (p-STAT3. The inhibitory activity of G. superba extract was more potent than that of C. roseus. The Pearson's correlation between K17 and cell viability was shown positive. Taken together, the extracts of G. superba and C. roseus may be developed as alternative therapies for psoriasis.

  9. Multidimensional Monitoring of Keratin Intermediate Filaments in Cultured Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Nicole; Moch, Marcin; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf E

    2016-01-01

    Keratin filaments are a hallmark of epithelial differentiation. Their cell type-specific spatial organization and dynamic properties reflect and support epithelial function. To study this interdependency, imaging of fluorescently tagged keratins is a widely used method by which the temporospatial organization and behavior of the keratin intermediate filament network can be analyzed in living cells. Here, we describe methods that have been adapted and optimized to dissect and quantify keratin intermediate filament network dynamics in vital cultured cells and functional tissues.

  10. A case of spontaneous mutation in the keratin 9 gene associated with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, V A; Byron, K; Paiman, L; Varigos, G A

    1999-11-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma appears to be due to defects in keratin 9, the palmoplantar specific type 1 keratin. We report a case of spontaneous mutation, a C to T transition at codon 162, resulting in an arginine to tryptophan substitution in the 1 A region of the alpha helical rod domain of keratin 9. This provides further evidence that this codon is an important spot for mutation in keratin 9.

  11. Sustainable Management of Keratin Waste Biomass: Applications and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratin is a durable, fibrous protein which is mainly present in higher vertebrates (mammals, birds and reptiles and humans epithelial cells. Food industry especially the meat market, slaughter house and wool industry produces million of tons of keratin containing biomass. These industries are constantly growing and the major producers include USA, Brazil and China, account for more than 40 million tons per year. These proteins constitute keratin by-products have from 15 to 18% nitrogen, 2-5% sulphur, 3.20% mineral elements and 1.27% fat and 90% of proteins. The organic waste rich in keratin can be utilized as a natural source using chemical and mechanical methods. The natural keratin obtained by biomass does not contain any harmful chemical and can be used directly to produce variety of cosmetics, creams, shampoos, hair conditioners and biomedical products. The natural protein is more compatible to use or apply on human skin and hairs. The monomeric units of natural keratin can penetrate in the skin and hair cuticle and able to nourish the skin without any side effects. In the present review various strategies for the purification and separation of keratin from the organic waste have been described and use of natural keratin in cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry has also been explored.

  12. In-vitro permeability of the human nail and of a keratin membrane from bovine hooves: penetration of chloramphenicol from lipophilic vehicles and a nail lacquer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, D; Lippold, B C

    1997-03-01

    Lipophilic vehicles and especially nail lacquers are more appropriate for topical application on the nail than aqueous systems because of their better adhesion. This work has, therefore, studied the penetration through the human nail plate of the model compound chloramphenicol from the lipophilic vehicles medium chain triglycerides and n-octanol and from a lacquer based on quaternary poly(methyl methacrylates) (Eudragit RL). The results were compared with data obtained with a keratin membrane from bovine hooves. If the swelling of the nail plate or the hoof membrane is not altered by use of lipophilic vehicles, the maximum flux of the drug is independent of its solubility in the vehicle and is the same as that from a saturated aqueous solution. These vehicles are not able to enter the hydrophilic keratin membrane because of their non-polar character and so cannot change the solubility of the penetrating substance in the barrier. If the concentration of the drug in the nail lacquer is sufficiently high, the maximum flux through both barriers equals that from aqueous vehicles or even exceeds it because of the formation of a supersaturated system. Penetration through the nail plate follows first order kinetics after a lag-time of 400 h. The course of penetration through the hoof membrane is initially membrane-controlled and later becomes a matrix-controlled process because of the membrane's greater permeability. Chloramphenicol is dissolved in the lacquer up to a concentration of 31%. The relative release rates from these solution matrices are independent of the drug concentration but they decrease on changing to a suspension matrix. These results show that drug flux is independent of the character of the vehicle and that penetration of the drug is initially membrane-controlled and changes to being matrix-controlled as the drug content of the lacquer decreases.

  13. Study of thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from α-keratin protein found in human hairs and nails: potential use in radiation dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D R; Soni, A; Rawat, N S; Bokam, G

    2016-05-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of human nails and hairs containing α-keratin proteins have been investigated. For the present studies, black hairs and finger nails were selectively collected from individuals with ages between 25 and 35 years. The collected hairs/nails were cut to a size of TL glow peaks in the temperature range from 70 to 210 ° C. Continuous wave (CW)-OSL measurements of hair samples at a wavelength of 470 nm showed the presence of two distinct OSL components with photoionization cross section (PIC) values of about 1.65 × 10(-18) cm(2) and about 3.48 × 10(-19) cm(2), while measurements of nail samples showed PIC values of about 6.98 × 10(-18) cm(2) and about 8.7 × 10(-19) cm(2), respectively. This difference in PIC values for hair and nail samples from the same individual is attributed to different arrangement of α-keratin protein concentrations in the samples. The OSL sensitivity was found to vary ± 5 times among nail and hair samples from different individuals, with significant fading (60% in 11 h) at room temperature. The remaining signal (after fading) can be useful for dose estimation when a highly sensitive OSL reader is used. In the absorbed dose range of 100 mGy-100 Gy, both the TL and OSL signals of hair and nail samples showed linear dose dependence. The results obtained in the present study suggest that OSL using hair and nail samples may provide a supplementary method of dose estimation in radiological and nuclear emergencies.

  14. Keratins mediate localization of hemidesmosomes and repress cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltmann, Kristin; Roth, Wera; Kröger, Cornelia; Loschke, Fanny; Lederer, Marcell; Hüttelmaier, Stefan; Magin, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The keratin (K)-hemidesmosome (HD) interaction is crucial for cell-matrix adhesion and migration in several epithelia, including the epidermis. Mutations in constituent proteins cause severe blistering skin disorders by disrupting the adhesion complex. Despite extensive studies, the role of keratins in HD assembly and maintenance is only partially understood. Here we address this issue in keratinocytes in which all keratins are depleted by genome engineering. Unexpectedly, such keratinocytes maintain many characteristics of their normal counterparts. However, the absence of the entire keratin cytoskeleton leads to loss of plectin from the hemidesmosomal plaque and scattering of the HD transmembrane core along the basement membrane zone. To investigate the functional consequences, we performed migration and adhesion assays. These revealed that, in the absence of keratins, keratinocytes adhere much faster to extracellular matrix substrates and migrate approximately two times faster compared with wild-type cells. Reexpression of the single keratin pair K5 and K14 fully reversed the above phenotype. Our data uncover a role of keratins, which to our knowledge is previously unreported, in the maintenance of HDs upstream of plectin, with implications for epidermal homeostasis and pathogenesis. They support the view that the downregulation of keratins observed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition supports the migratory and invasive behavior of tumor cells.

  15. Effects of Plectin Depletion on Keratin Network Dynamics and Organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Moch

    Full Text Available The keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton protects epithelial cells against various types of stress and is involved in fundamental cellular processes such as signaling, differentiation and organelle trafficking. These functions rely on the cell type-specific arrangement and plasticity of the keratin system. It has been suggested that these properties are regulated by a complex cycle of assembly and disassembly. The exact mechanisms responsible for the underlying molecular processes, however, have not been clarified. Accumulating evidence implicates the cytolinker plectin in various aspects of the keratin cycle, i.e., by acting as a stabilizing anchor at hemidesmosomal adhesion sites and the nucleus, by affecting keratin bundling and branching and by linkage of keratins to actin filament and microtubule dynamics. In the present study we tested these hypotheses. To this end, plectin was downregulated by shRNA in vulvar carcinoma-derived A431 cells. As expected, integrin β4- and BPAG-1-positive hemidesmosomal structures were strongly reduced and cytosolic actin stress fibers were increased. In addition, integrins α3 and β1 were reduced. The experiments furthermore showed that loss of plectin led to a reduction in keratin filament branch length but did not alter overall mechanical properties as assessed by indentation analyses using atomic force microscopy and by displacement analyses of cytoplasmic superparamagnetic beads using magnetic tweezers. An increase in keratin movement was observed in plectin-depleted cells as was the case in control cells lacking hemidesmosome-like structures. Yet, keratin turnover was not significantly affected. We conclude that plectin alone is not needed for keratin assembly and disassembly and that other mechanisms exist to guarantee proper keratin cycling under steady state conditions in cultured single cells.

  16. Identificación de Virus Papiloma Humano 16 (vph-16 en carcinoma queratinizante de pulmón IDENTIFICATION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS 16 (HPV 16 IN KERATINIZING LUNG CARCINOMA

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    Francisco Aguayo G.

    2002-04-01

    histological type squamous cell carcinoma represents between 35% to 50% of the cases. Strong evidence exists about the association between this histological type and the human papilloma virus (HPV infection, being genotypes HPV-16 and 18 those that have an strong association. We analyzed cases of lung squamous cell carcinoma of the keratinizing type to evaluate the presence of HPV 16 and 18 genotypes in Chile. Thirteen cases with histological diagnosis of keratinizing highly or moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma were analyzed. Samples were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. DNA was extracted with proteinase K and it was amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR using specific primers for generic HPV, HPV 16, HPV 18 and human betaglobin as internal positive control. The amplified products were revealed in polyacrilamide gels. We identified the presence of HPV in 6 of 13 cases (42.2%. Of these cases, five corresponded to HPV-16 and none of them was HPV 18. The presence of HPV 16 in the analyzed series would indicate that HPV can have some function in the etiology of lung cancer of the keratinizing squamous cell type. The absence of HPV 18 in the analyzed series could indicate unique epidemiological characteristics of our studied population. It is necessary to perform another study with other genotypes of HPV and greater number of cases to confirm these results

  17. Preparation and characterization of keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mira; Kim, Byoung-Suhk [Department of Organic Materials and Fiber Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hye Kyoung [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Yong, E-mail: khy@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Organic Materials and Fiber Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    The biocompatible and highly porous keratin-based hydrogels were prepared using electron beam irradiation (EBI). The conditions for keratin-based hydrogel formation were investigated depending on several conditions, including the presence of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), concentration of keratin solution, EBI dose, and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) additives. The pure keratin (human hair and wool) aqueous solution was not gelled by EBI, while the aqueous keratin solutions blended with PVA were gelled at an EBI dose of more than 90 kGy. Furthermore, in the presence of PEI, the aqueous keratin solution blended with PVA could be gelled at a considerably lower EBI dose, even at 10 kGy. This finding suggests that the PEI additives significantly influence the rate of gelation and that PEIs function as an accelerator during gelation. The resulting keratin-based hydrogels were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), gel fraction, degree of swelling, gel strength, and kinetics of swelling analyses. - Highlights: • The biocompatible and highly porous keratin-based hydrogels were prepared using EBI. • The conditions for keratin-based hydrogel formation were examined. • PEI would play an accelerator role in the formation of keratin-based hydrogels. • The resulting keratin-based hydrogels are expected to be more environmentally friendly.

  18. Development of feather keratin nanoparticles and investigation of their hemostatic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ju; Hao, Shilei; Luo, Tiantian; Yang, Qian; Wang, Bochu

    2016-11-01

    Chicken feathers are considered as the major waste in poultry industry, which are mostly constituted of keratin proteins. Development of feather keratin for biomedical application is very attractive for chicken feather recycling. Human hair keratins have been demonstrated the significant hemostatic efficacy in the previous studies, but there are few reports of feather keratin for the hemostatic application. Here, the chicken feather keratin nanoparticle was developed for use as a hemostatic agent. Keratin was extracted from chicken feather in the present study, and a modified ultrasonic dispersion method was used to prepare keratin nanoparticles. The characterizations of feather keratin extracts and nanoparticles were investigated, including electrophoretic separation, amino acid composition, particle size, zeta potential, morphology, chemical structure and crystal form. Additionally, the hemostatic efficacy in vitro and in vivo of keratin nanoparticles were also studied. The results of hemostatic tests showed that the bleeding time and blood loss in tail amputation and liver scratch rat models can be significantly decreased after application of feather keratin nanoparticles, which demonstrated the potential application of feather keratin nanoparticles for hemostasis.

  19. The Biocompatibility of Wool Keratin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Mei; YU Wei-dong; WANG Xue-lei

    2007-01-01

    Keratin is the major structural fibrous protein providing outer covering such as hair, wool, feathers, etc. When being used as a kind of biomaterials, the biocompatibility of wool keratin is one of the most critical questions. By now, there has not been systemic study on the biocompatibiiity of keratin. Therefore, in this article we used the procedures of skin irritation, haemolysis and subcutaneous implantation according to ISO 10993 to study it. Moreover, the Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was utilized to analyse the impurity and structure modification of wool keratin film. The part of the animal tests showed that the wool keratin films prepared by authors were biocompatible. But the residual of sodium dodecyi sulfate (SDS) affected the results of other tests. Consequently, the wool keratin membrane is one kind of favourable and promising biomaterial for biomedical and histological utilization. The residual SDS used as an agent should be eliminated from the keratin solution or membrane completely if for biological usage. In conclusion, wool keratin, as a kind of natural protein, prospectively could be applied in biomedical materials and scaffolds of tissue engineering.

  20. Membrane-Active Epithelial Keratin 6A Fragments (KAMPs Are Unique Human Antimicrobial Peptides with a Non-αβ Structure

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    Judy Tsz Ying Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a pressing global health problem that threatens millions of lives each year. Natural antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic derivatives, including peptoids and peptidomimetics, are promising candidates as novel antibiotics. Recently, the C-terminal glycine-rich fragments of human epithelial keratin 6A were found to have bactericidal and cytoprotective activities. Here, we used an improved 2-dimensional NMR method coupled with a new protocol for structural refinement by low temperature simulated annealing to characterize the solution structure of these kerain-derived antimicrobial peptides (KAMPs. Two specific KAMPs in complex with membrane mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS micelles displayed amphipathic conformations with only local bends and turns, and a central 10-residue glycine-rich hydrophobic strip that is central to bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of non-αβ structure for human antimicrobial peptides. Direct observation of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that KAMPs deformed bacterial cell envelopes and induced pore formation. Notably, in competitive binding experiments, KAMPs demonstrated binding affinities to LPS and LTA that did not correlate with their bactericidal activities, suggesting peptide-LPS and peptide-LTA interactions are less important in their mechanisms of action. Moreover, immunoprecipitation of KAMPs-bacterial factor complexes indicated that membrane surface lipoprotein SlyB and intracellular machineries NQR sodium pump and ribosomes are potential molecular targets for the peptides. Results of this study improve our understanding of the bactericidal function of epithelial cytokeratin fragments, and highlight an unexplored class of human antimicrobial peptides, which may serve as non-αβ peptide scaffolds for the design of novel peptide-based antibiotics.

  1. Generation and characterisation of keratin 7 (K7 knockout mice.

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    Aileen Sandilands

    Full Text Available Keratin 7 (K7 is a Type II member of the keratin superfamily and despite its widespread expression in different types of simple and transitional epithelia, its functional role in vivo remains elusive, in part due to the lack of any appropriate mouse models or any human diseases that are associated with KRT7 gene mutations. Using conventional gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells, we report here the generation and characterisation of the first K7 knockout mouse. Loss of K7 led to increased proliferation of the bladder urothelium although this was not associated with hyperplasia. K18, a presumptive type I assembly partner for K7, showed reduced expression in the bladder whereas K20, a marker of the terminally differentiated superficial urothelial cells was transcriptionally up-regulated. No other epithelia were seen to be adversely affected by the loss of K7 and western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy analysis revealed that the expression of K8, K18, K19 and K20 were not altered in the absence of K7, with the exception of the kidney where there was reduced K18 expression.

  2. Role of Autophagy in Keratin Homeostasis in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    rheumatoid arthritis . Arthritis Res Ther 13, 235. Brisken, C., and O’Malley, B. (2010). Hormone action in the mammary gland. Cold Spring Harb...distinct Keratin 6 cells in Beclin1+/- glands irrespective of the pregnancy status, while the wild-type gland had few Keratin 6 positive cells... Pregnancy increases side-branching and promotes the formation of alveoli, which are the structures responsible for the production of milk. Upon the

  3. Regulation of keratin expression by ultraviolet radiation: differential and specific effects of ultraviolet B and ultraviolet a exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernerd, F; Del Bino, S; Asselineau, D

    2001-12-01

    Skin, the most superficial tissue of our body, is the first target of environmental stimuli, among which is solar ultraviolet radiation. Very little is known about the regulation of keratin gene expression by ultraviolet radiation, however, although (i) it is well established that ultraviolet exposure is involved in skin cancers and photoaging and (ii) keratins represent the major epidermal proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze the regulation of human keratin gene expression under ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) or ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) irradiation using a panel of constructs comprising different human keratin promoters cloned upstream of a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene and transfected into normal epidermal keratinocytes. By this approach, we demonstrated that ultraviolet B upregulated the transcription of keratin 19 gene and to a lesser extent the keratin 6, keratin 5, and keratin 14 genes. The DNA sequence responsible for keratin 19 induction was localized between -130 and +1. In contrast to ultraviolet B, ultraviolet A irradiation induced only an increase in keratin 17, showing a differential gene regulation between these two ultraviolet ranges. The induction of keratin 19 was confirmed by studying the endogenous protein in keratinocytes in classical cultures as well as in skin reconstructed in vitro and normal human skin. These data show for the first time that keratin gene expression is regulated by ultraviolet radiation at the transcriptional level with a specificity regarding the ultraviolet domain of solar light.

  4. PLA/chitosan/keratin composites for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanase, Constantin Edi, E-mail: etanase@live.com [Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, ‘Grigore T. Popa’ University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 9-13 Kogalniceanu Street, 700454 Iasi (Romania); Spiridon, Iuliana [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2014-07-01

    Novel composites based on PLA, chitosan and keratin was obtained via blend preparation. The goal of this contribution was to evaluate mechanical and in vitro behavior of the composites. The results point out composites with improved Young modulus and decreased tensile strength, significant increase in hardness (compared to PLA) and a good uptake of the surface properties. Biological assessments using human osteosarcoma cell line on these composites indicate a good viability/proliferation outcome. Hence preliminary results regarding mechanical behavior and in vitro osteoblast response suggest that these composites might have prospective application in medical field. - Highlights: • PLA, chitosan and keratin composites are prepared by blend preparation. • PLA, chitosan and keratin composites present improved mechanical properties and water uptake compare to PLA. • PLA, chitosan and keratin composites present good in vitro behavior.

  5. In-vitro permeability of the human nail and of a keratin membrane from bovine hooves: influence of the partition coefficient octanol/water and the water solubility of drugs on their permeability and maximum flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, D; Lippold, B C

    1997-01-01

    Penetration of homologous nicotinic acid esters through the human nail and a keratin membrane from bovine hooves was investigated by modified Franz diffusion cells in-vitro to study the transport mechanism. The partition coefficient octanol/water PCOct/W of the esters was over the range 7 to > 51,000. The permeability coefficient P of the nail plate as well as the hoof membrane did not increase with increasing partition coefficient or lipophilicity of the penetrating substance. This indicates that both barriers behave like hydrophilic gel membranes rather than lipophilic partition membranes as in the case of the stratum corneum. Penetration studies with the model compounds paracetamol and phenacetin showed that the maximum flux was first a function of the drug solubility in water or in the swollen keratin matrix. Dissociation hindered the diffusion of benzoic acid and pyridine through the hoof membrane. Since keratin, a protein with an isoelectric point of about 5, is also charged, this reduction can be attributed to an exclusion of the dissociating substance due to the Donnan equilibrium. Nevertheless, the simultaneous enhancement of the water solubility makes a distinct increase of the maximum flux possible. In order to screen drugs for potential topical application to the nail plate, attention has to be paid mainly to the water solubility of the compound. The bovine hoof membrane may serve as an appropriate model for the nail.

  6. Keratin 8 absence down-regulates colonocyte HMGCS2 and modulates colonic ketogenesis and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Terhi O; Misiorek, Julia O; Nyström, Joel H; Fortelius, Lina E; Habtezion, Aida; Liao, Jian; Asghar, M Nadeem; Zhang, Haiyan; Azhar, Salman; Omary, M Bishr; Toivola, Diana M

    2015-06-15

    Simple-type epithelial keratins are intermediate filament proteins important for mechanical stability and stress protection. Keratin mutations predispose to human liver disorders, whereas their roles in intestinal diseases are unclear. Absence of keratin 8 (K8) in mice leads to colitis, decreased Na/Cl uptake, protein mistargeting, and longer crypts, suggesting that keratins contribute to intestinal homeostasis. We describe the rate-limiting enzyme of the ketogenic energy metabolism pathway, mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), as a major down-regulated protein in the K8-knockout (K8(-/-)) colon. K8 absence leads to decreased quantity and activity of HMGCS2, and the down-regulation is not dependent on the inflammatory state, since HMGCS2 is not decreased in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, a transcriptional activator of HMGCS2, is similarly down-regulated. Ketogenic conditions-starvation or ketogenic diet-increase K8(+/+) HMGCS2, whereas this response is blunted in the K8(-/-) colon. Microbiota-produced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), substrates in the colonic ketone body pathway, are increased in stool, which correlates with decreased levels of their main transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1). Microbial populations, including the main SCFA-butyrate producers in the colon, were not altered in the K8(-/-). In summary, the regulation of the SCFA-MCT1-HMGCS2 axis is disrupted in K8(-/-) colonocytes, suggesting a role for keratins in colonocyte energy metabolism and homeostasis.

  7. Absence of keratin 19 in mice causes skeletal myopathy with mitochondrial and sarcolemmal reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Michele R; O'Neill, Andrea; Lovering, Richard M; Strong, John; Resneck, Wendy G; Reed, Patrick W; Toivola, Diana M; Ursitti, Jeanine A; Omary, M Bishr; Bloch, Robert J

    2007-11-15

    Intermediate filaments, composed of desmin and of keratins, play important roles in linking contractile elements to each other and to the sarcolemma in striated muscle. We examined the contractile properties and morphology of fast-twitch skeletal muscle from mice lacking keratin 19. Tibialis anterior muscles of keratin-19-null mice showed a small but significant decrease in mean fiber diameter and in the specific force of tetanic contraction, as well as increased plasma creatine kinase levels. Costameres at the sarcolemma of keratin-19-null muscle, visualized with antibodies against spectrin or dystrophin, were disrupted and the sarcolemma was separated from adjacent myofibrils by a large gap in which mitochondria accumulated. The costameric dystrophin-dystroglycan complex, which co-purified with gamma-actin, keratin 8 and keratin 19 from striated muscles of wild-type mice, co-purified with gamma-actin but not keratin 8 in the mutant. Our results suggest that keratin 19 in fast-twitch skeletal muscle helps organize costameres and links them to the contractile apparatus, and that the absence of keratin 19 disrupts these structures, resulting in loss of contractile force, altered distribution of mitochondria and mild myopathy. This is the first demonstration of a mammalian phenotype associated with a genetic perturbation of keratin 19.

  8. Synthesis of Keratin-based Nanofiber for Biomedical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Zanshe S; Rijal, Nava P; Jarvis, David; Edwards, Angela; Bhattarai, Narayan

    2016-02-07

    Electrospinning, due to its versatility and potential for applications in various fields, is being frequently used to fabricate nanofibers. Production of these porous nanofibers is of great interest due to their unique physiochemical properties. Here we elaborate on the fabrication of keratin containing poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers (i.e., PCL/keratin composite fiber). Water soluble keratin was first extracted from human hair and mixed with PCL in different ratios. The blended solution of PCL/keratin was transformed into nanofibrous membranes using a laboratory designed electrospinning set up. Fiber morphology and mechanical properties of the obtained nanofiber were observed and measured using scanning electron microscopy and tensile tester. Furthermore, degradability and chemical properties of the nanofiber were studied by FTIR. SEM images showed uniform surface morphology for PCL/keratin fibers of different compositions. These PCL/keratin fibers also showed excellent mechanical properties such as Young's modulus and failure point. Fibroblast cells were able to attach and proliferate thus proving good cell viability. Based on the characteristics discussed above, we can strongly argue that the blended nanofibers of natural and synthetic polymers can represent an excellent development of composite materials that can be used for different biomedical applications.

  9. A mutation in the V1 end domain of keratin 1 in non-epidermolytic palmar-plantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimonis, V; DiGiovanna, J J; Yang, J M; Doyle, S Z; Bale, S J; Compton, J G

    1994-12-01

    Mutations in keratin 9 have been found in families with an epidermolytic form of palmar-plantar keratoderma (PPK). In another form of PPK (Unna-Thost type), epidermolysis is not observed histologically. We studied a pedigree with this non-epidermolytic form of PPK. By gene linkage analysis, the type I keratin locus could be excluded but complete linkage with the type II keratin region was found. Sequence analysis identified a single base change in the amino-terminal V1 variable subdomain of keratin 1, which caused a lysine to isoleucine substitution. This non-conservative mutation completely cosegregated with the disease and was not observed in 50 unrelated unaffected individuals. An examination of keratin amino-terminal sequences revealed a previously unreported 22-residue window in the V1 subdomain that is conserved among most type II keratins. The altered lysine is an invariant residue in this conserved sequence. Previously described keratin mutations affect the central regions important for filament assembly and stability, and cause diseases characterized by cellular degeneration or disruption. This is the first disease mutation in a keratin chain variable end region. The observation that it is not associated with epidermolysis supports the concept that the amino-terminal domain of keratins may be involved in supramolecular interactions of keratin filaments rather than stability. Therefore, hyperkeratosis associated with this mutation may be due to perturbations in the interactions of the keratin end domain with other cellular components.

  10. Empigen BB: a useful detergent for solubilization and biochemical analysis of keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowthert, L A; Ku, N O; Liao, J; Coulombe, P A; Omary, M B

    1995-01-05

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins make up some of the most insoluble proteins known, and within the IF protein family, keratins are the least soluble. We compared the efficiency of nonionic, cationic, mixed nonionic and anionic, and zwitterionic detergents in solubilizing keratins from insect cells that express recombinant human keratins and from human colonic cell lines and normal keratinocytes. The cationic detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide was similar to the zwitterionic detergent Empigen BB in its ability to efficiently solubilize keratins, but the latter detergent was superior in that it maintained antibody reactivity and allowed for immunoprecipitation of the keratins. Although Nonidet-P40 partially solubilizes keratins, Empigen BB solubilizes a significant amount of keratins not solubilized by Nonidet-P40. In the case of vimentin, differences in solubilization efficiency among the detergents was not as dramatic as with keratins. Our results show that Empigen BB solubilizes a significant amount of epidermal and glandular keratins while preserving antigenicity. This detergent should prove useful for carrying out biochemical and molecular studies on these proteins and may be similarly beneficial for other IF proteins.

  11. Genetic ablation of caspase-7 promotes solar-simulated light-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis: the involvement of keratin-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Sung-Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Yao, Ke; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Dickinson, Sally E; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Timothy; Stratton, Steven; Curiel, Clara; Einspahr, Janine; Bode, Ann M; Surh, Young-Joon; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2015-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation is an environmental carcinogen that causes skin cancer. Caspase-7 is reportedly expressed at reduced levels in many cancers. The present study was designed to examine the role of caspase-7 in solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin cancer and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our study revealed that mice with genetic deficiency of caspase-7 are highly susceptible to SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis. Epidermal hyperplasia, tumor volume and the average number of tumors were significantly increased in caspase-7 knockout (KO) mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice irradiated with SSL. The expression of cell proliferation markers, such as survivin and Ki-67, was elevated in SSL-irradiated skin of caspase-7 KO mice compared with those observed in SSL-exposed wild-type SKH1 mouse skin. Moreover, SSL-induced apoptosis was abolished in skin from caspase-7 KO mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis of skin tissue lysates from SSL-irradiated SKH1 wild-type and caspase-7 KO mice revealed an aberrant induction of keratin-17 in caspase-7 KO mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin tumors also showed an increase of keratin-17 expression in caspase-7 KO mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice. The expression of keratin-17 was also elevated in SSL-irradiated caspase-7 KO keratinocytes as well as in human basal cell carcinomas. The in vitro caspase activity assay showed keratin-17 as a substrate of caspase-7, but not caspase-3. Overall, our study demonstrates that genetic loss of caspase-7 promotes SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis by blocking caspase-7-mediated cleavage of keratin-17.

  12. Assays to Study Consequences of Cytoplasmic Intermediate Filament Mutations: The Case of Epidermal Keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tong San; Ng, Yi Zhen; Badowski, Cedric; Dang, Tram; Common, John E A; Lacina, Lukas; Szeverényi, Ildikó; Lane, E Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the causative link between keratin mutations and a growing number of human diseases opened the way for a better understanding of the function of the whole intermediate filament families of cytoskeleton proteins. This chapter describes analytical approaches to identification and interpretation of the consequences of keratin mutations, from the clinical and diagnostic level to cells in tissue culture. Intermediate filament pathologies can be accurately diagnosed from skin biopsies and DNA samples. The Human Intermediate Filament Database collates reported mutations in intermediate filament genes and their diseases, and can help clinicians to establish accurate diagnoses, leading to disease stratification for genetic counseling, optimal care delivery, and future mutation-aligned new therapies. Looking at the best-studied keratinopathy, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, the generation of cell lines mimicking keratinopathies is described, in which tagged mutant keratins facilitate live-cell imaging to make use of today's powerful enhanced light microscopy modalities. Cell stress assays such as cell spreading and cell migration in scratch wound assays can interrogate the consequences of the compromised cytoskeletal network. Application of extrinsic stresses, such as heat, osmotic, or mechanical stress, can enhance the differentiation of mutant keratin cells from wild-type cells. To bring the experiments to the next level, 3D organotypic human cultures can be generated, and even grafted onto the backs of immunodeficient mice for greater in vivo relevance. While development of these assays has focused on mutant K5/K14 cells, the approaches are often applicable to mutations in other intermediate filaments, reinforcing fundamental commonalities in spite of diverse clinical pathologies.

  13. Mutations in the 1A domain of keratin 9 in patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothnagel, J A; Wojcik, S; Liefer, K M; Dominey, A M; Huber, M; Hohl, D; Roop, D R

    1995-03-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles. Ultrastructurally the disease exhibits abnormal keratin filament networks and tonofilament clumping like that found in the keratin disorders of epidermolysis bullosa simplex and epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. The disease has been mapped to chromosome 17q11-q23 in the region of the type 1 keratin gene locus and more recently mutations have been found in the palmoplantar specific keratin, keratin 9. We have analyzed six unrelated incidences of epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma for mutations in their keratin 9 genes. In two of these, we have identified mutations that alter critical residues within the highly conserved helix initiation motif at the beginning of the rod domain of keratin 9. In a three-generation Middle Eastern kindred we found a C to T transition at codon 162 that results in an arginine to tryptophan substitution at position 10 of the 1A alpha-helical domain, thus confirming this codon as a hot spot for mutation in keratin 9. The other mutation found involves a T to C transition at codon 167 that results in the expression of a serine residue in place of the normal leucine at position 15 of the 1A segment and is the first documentation of this mutation in this gene. The identification of these substitutions extends the current catalog of disease causing mutations in keratin 9.

  14. An extended database of keratin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Steffi; Selzer, Dominik; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Kasting, Gerald B

    2011-05-01

    Diffusion modeling of dermal absorption relies in large part on high quality input data. Currently, estimates of corneocyte-phase partitioning are based on an analysis of a dataset of limited size and diversity. Therefore, we have updated and broadened the analysis. For this purpose, binding coefficients to different keratins, namely, bovine hoof and horn, human delipidized callus, human delipidized stratum corneum (SC), human nail, human hair, and sheep wool were collected from the literature. In addition, binding coefficients to hoof/horn and delipidized SC were measured for eight hydrophilic compounds including three ionizable compounds that were measured at different pH values. Important results are: (i) only hoof/horn, callus, and delipidized SC are suitable keratins for estimating corneocyte protein binding; (ii) binding coefficients to hoof/horn, callus, and delipidized SC can be predicted from the octanol-water partition coefficients log K(o/w) confirming the analysis of the limited dataset; (iii) binding of ionizable compounds can be predicted by correcting log K(o/w) for pH; (iv) the correlation derived for the extended database is steeper than the relationship derived for the limited dataset. This has consequences for the estimates of SC partition and diffusion coefficients for diffusion modeling of dermal absorption. .

  15. The expression profiles of acidic epithelial keratins in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Samir Kumar; Sakamoto, Kei; Aragaki, Tadanobu; Akashi, Takumi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2013-04-01

    To characterize the subtypes of ameloblastoma by differentiation markers. Expression of 9 major acidic epithelial keratins was immunohistochemically examined in 28 ameloblastomas. Keratin 15 (K15) expression patterns corresponded to histological variants: follicular, plexiform and acanthomatous. Tumor nests comprising K15-expressing basal cells mimicked oral epithelium or dental lamina, and tumor nests comprising K15-negative basal cells mimicked outer enamel epithelium. Keratin 19 (K19) was consistently expressed in solid/multicystic ameloblastoma and unicystic ameloblastoma, while peripheral ameloblastoma and desmoplastic ameloblastoma contained K19-negative cells. The 4 current subtypes had unvaried expression patterns within each group. However, they could be divided into 2 groups by K19 expression pattern: solid/multicystic and unicystic versus extraosseous/peripheral and desmoplastic. K15 expression pattern represented various types of differentiation for tumor nests mimicking tooth germ and oral epithelium. The results clarify the homogeneity and heterogeneity of ameloblastoma cell lineage and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Keratin 9 gene mutational heterogeneity in patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennies, H C; Zehender, D; Kunze, J; Küster, W; Reis, A

    1994-06-01

    Mutations in the human keratin 9 gene have recently been shown to be involved in the etiology of palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK). We have investigated eleven unrelated German kindreds with the epidermolytic variant of PPK (EPPK) for mutations in the keratin 9 gene. We have identified two novel mutations, M156V and Q171P, both in the coil 1A segment of keratin 9. Mutation M156V was detected in two unrelated patients with EPPK, and mutation Q171P was shown to cosegregate with the disease in a large four-generation family. These findings confirm the functional importance of coil 1A integrity for heterodimerisation in keratins and for intermediate filament assembly. Our results provide further evidence for mutational heterogeneity in EPPK, and for the involvement of keratins in diseases of hyperkeratinisation and epidermolysis.

  17. Heterogeneity of keratin expression in epithelial tumor cells of adenolymphoma in paraffin sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orito, T; Shinohara, H; Okada, Y; Mori, M

    1989-06-01

    Immunohistochemical expressions of keratin polypeptides detected by monoclonal antibodies were described in tumor cells of adenolymphoma, and the possibility of intercalated duct and ductal basal cells in the salivary glands being the progenitors was discussed. Basal cells in the tumor showed positive staining for keratin nos. 8, 13, 16, 18 and 19 detecting for monoclonal keratin antibodies (PKK 1, K 4.62, K 8.12, K 8.13), columnar tumor cells displayed strongly positive reactions with RPN 1164 and K4.62 suggesting keratin nos. 8 and 19. Great heterogeneity of distribution for keratin polypeptides was displayed by epithelial cells of adenolymphoma. Intercalated duct cells of normal salivary glands reacted with RPN 1164, RPN 1165, K 4.62 and K 8.13 monoclonal antibodies, which indicates the presence of keratins 8 and 19; and ductal basal cells reacted with PKK 1, K 4.62 and K 8.12, suggesting nos. 8, 13, 16, 18 and 19 keratins. Distribution of involucrin was variable in tumor epithelium of adenolymphoma, and was negative in the normal gland. The immunohistochemical distribution of keratin types between basal tumor cells of adenolymphoma and ductal basal cells of the normal salivary gland was compared.

  18. Anatomical characteristics and histocompatibility of artificial nerve grafts of human-hair keratin%人发角蛋白非神经移植材料的解剖学特点及组织相容性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进; 邹云雯; 罗学勤

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artificial nerve grafts of human hair keratin are a kind of biological products. It has low antigenicity, absorbability and stimulation to nerve fiber growth following specific biochemistry. It is hoped to have better effect than other artificial nerve grafts.  OBJECTIVE: To investigate the anatomy and histocompatibility of artificial nerve grafts of the human-hair keratin, and to observe its effects on the repair of peripheral nerves.   DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized, controlled, animal experiment. The study was performed at the Animal Central Laboratory of Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College between November 2006 and June 2008. MATERIALS: Artificial nerve grafts of human hair keratin is a compound of human hair processed by specific controlled biochemistry based on ground substance, embedded with a layer of biological membrane. It has low antigenicity, absorbability and stimulation to nerve fiber growth following specific biochemistry. METHODS: Eighteen Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. The sciatic nerve, 10 mm, was removed and transplanted with human-hair keratin graft, skeletal muscle and untreated hair, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The characteristics of histomorphology and anatomy were observed at 8, 12, 24 weeks after the surgery. RESULTS: White tissues appeared between the broken ends of the sciatic nerve at 8 post-operative week in the graft group, and appeared in the graft space in human-hair keratin at the 12th week. At the 24th week, a large amount of infantile myelinated nerve fibers were observed under optical microscope regenerating around the human hair, which was partially degraded and absorbed. Schwann cells were observed under an electron microscope and myelinization.   CONCLUSION: The artificial nerve grafts of the human-hair keratin are well compatible with the body tissues, and could induce nerve regeneration.%背景:人发角蛋白非神经移植材料是一种生物性

  19. In-vitro permeability of the human nail and of a keratin membrane from bovine hooves: prediction of the penetration rate of antimycotics through the nail plate and their efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertin, D; Lippold, B C

    1997-09-01

    In contrast to the partition coefficient octanol/water the molecular size of penetrating drugs has a noticeable influence on the permeability of the human nail plate and a keratin membrane from bovine hooves. The relationship between permeability and molecular weight is founded on well-established theories. The correlation between the permeability of the nail plate and that of the hoof membrane allows a prediction of the nail permeability after determination of the drug penetration through the hoof membrane. The maximum flux of ten antimycotics (amorolfine, bifonazole, ciclopirox, clotrimazole, econazole, griseofulvin, ketoconazole, naftifine, nystatin and tolnaftate) through the nail plate was predicted on the basis of their penetration rates through the hoof membrane and their water solubilities. An efficacy coefficient against onychomycoses was calculated from the maximum flux and the minimum inhibitory concentration. Accordingly, amorolfine, ciclopirox, econazole and naftifine are expected to be especially effective against dermatophytes, whereas in the case of an infection with yeasts only, amorolfine and ciclopirox are promising.

  20. Building models for keratin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Maranke I

    2012-05-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma is a hallmark of pachyonychia congenita (PC) and focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (FNEPPK). By generating keratin 16 (Krt16)-deficient mice, Lessard and Coulombe, as described in this issue, have generated a mouse model to replicate these palmoplantar lesions. Studies using this model may provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the formation of palmoplantar lesions in PC and FNEPPK patients.

  1. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation.

  2. Novel mutations in keratin 16 gene underly focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (NEPPK) in two families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsher, M K; Navsaria, H A; Stevens, H P; Ratnavel, R C; Purkis, P E; Kelsell, D P; McLean, W H; Cook, L J; Griffiths, W A; Gschmeissner, S

    1995-10-01

    Keratins K6 and K16 are expressed in suprabasal interfollicular epidermis in wound healing and other pathological conditions associated with hyperproliferation, such as psoriasis and are induced when keratinocytes are cultured in vitro. However, these keratins are also constitutively expressed in normal suprabasal mucosal and palmoplantar keratinocytes. Mutations in keratins have been reported in the basal keratin pair K5 and K14 in epidermolysis bullosa simplex and in suprabasal epidermal keratins K1, K2 and K10 in epidermolytic ichthyoses. Two families with autosomal dominant disorder of focal non epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, have oral mucosal and follicular lesions in addition to the palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. Previous studies have shown linkage in these families to the type I keratin gene cluster at 17q12-q21 and this report shows that the cDNA of affected members of both families have novel heterozygous mutations in the expressed keratin 16 gene. These mutations (R10C and N8S) lie in the helix initiation motif of the 1A domain. These mutations do not appear to cause epidermolysis on light or electron microscopy, which may reflect differences in function, assembly or interaction of the 'hyperproliferative' or 'mucoregenerative' keratins from other major types of keratins. The mutations reported here are the first to describe the molecular pathology of focal non epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

  3. The structure of the "amorphous" matrix of keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Murat; Wang, Xinwei; Zhu, Bowen; Liu, Jing; Harland, Duane; Popescu, Crisan

    2017-05-01

    Various keratin fibers, particularly human hairs, were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, TEM, solid-state (1)H NMR and Transient Electro-Thermal Technique, TET. The results converge to suggest that the matrix of keratin fiber cortex, far from being amorphous, has a well-defined nano-scale grainy structure, the size of these grains being around 2-4nm. The size of the grains appears to strongly depend on the chemical treatment of the fiber, on the temperature and on the relative humidity of the environment, as well as on the physiological factors at the level of fiber production in follicle. By suggesting an organization at the nano-scale of the protein chains in these grains, likely to be Keratin Associated Proteins, the results challenge the view of matrix as a homogeneous glassy material. Moreover, they indicate the potential of further investigating the purpose of this structure that appears to reflect not only chemical treatments of keratins but also biological processes at the level of the follicle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 绵羊毛角蛋白Ⅱ型中间丝9基因的扩增及表达%Amplification and Expression of Sheep Keratin Type Ⅱ Intermediate Filament 9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于永生; 王晓阳; 朴庆林; 罗晓彤; 金海国

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a follicle-specific vector expression of keratin type Ⅱ intermediate filament 9(KIF Ⅱ-9) ,then transfer it into Liaoning Cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts cells to obtain a transgenic cell by selection,which could be used for nuclear transfer. KIF Ⅱ -9 cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR from Xinji Fine Wool sheep. Then pcDNA3. 1-KK,a follicle-specific expression vector of KIF Ⅱ-9, was constructed by connecting with KAP6-1 gene promoter sequence amplified by PCR from Xinji Fine Wool sheep and, KIF Ⅱ -9 cDNA. The Liaoning Cashmere goat fetal fibroblast cells were transfected with the expression vector by lipofectamine, and the transgenic cell clones were obtained after selecting by G418. These results have paved the way to obtain the new transgenic cashmere goat strain by nuclear transfer in the future.%本试验旨在构建绵羊毛角蛋白Ⅱ型中间丝9(keratin typeⅡintermediate filament 9,KIFⅡ-9)基因cDNA的毛囊特异性表达载体,转染辽宁绒山羊胎儿成纤维细胞,筛选出稳定表达外源基因并可用于核移植的转基因细胞克隆.通过PCR扩增得到的KAP6-1基凶启动子,然后与RT-PCR扩增得到的KIFⅡ-9 cDNA序列连接构成皮肤特异性表达载体pcDNA3.1-KK,将重组表达载体以脂质体介导转染胎儿成纤维细胞,通过G418筛选获得转基因细胞克隆,结果显示,外源KAP6-1启动子序列和KIFⅡ-9 cDNA整合到细胞基因组中,为下一步通过核移植方法获得转基凶绒山羊提供了条件.

  5. Cytoskeleton in motion: the dynamics of keratin intermediate filaments in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windoffer, Reinhard; Beil, Michael; Magin, Thomas M; Leube, Rudolf E

    2011-09-05

    Epithelia are exposed to multiple forms of stress. Keratin intermediate filaments are abundant in epithelia and form cytoskeletal networks that contribute to cell type-specific functions, such as adhesion, migration, and metabolism. A perpetual keratin filament turnover cycle supports these functions. This multistep process keeps the cytoskeleton in motion, facilitating rapid and protein biosynthesis-independent network remodeling while maintaining an intact network. The current challenge is to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the keratin cycle in relation to actin and microtubule networks and in the context of epithelial tissue function.

  6. Keratin materials for new product development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keratin from wool is a reactive, biocompatible, and biodegradable material found as pure protein in over 90% by weight of fiber. As a polymeric amide, keratin is a rich source of intermediate filament proteins (IFPs) which are being investigated for a wide range of biomaterial applications. The po...

  7. Keratin network modifications lead to the mechanical stiffening of the hair follicle fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Bildstein, Lucien; Thibaut, Sébastien; Santoprete, Roberto; Fiat, Françoise; Luengo, Gustavo S.; Doucet, Jean; Bernard, Bruno A.; Baghdadli, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical properties of tissues often emerge from fibrous protein networks spanning multiple cell lengths. For the first time, to our knowledge, atomic force microscopy was used to measure the mechanical properties of the human hair follicle. We find a considerable stiffening along the first millimeter that we link to changes in the keratin network architecture and composition. In early keratinization stages, the thickening, densification, and increasing orientation of fibers are responsible...

  8. In vitro phosphorylation as tool for modification of silk and keratin fibrous materials

    OpenAIRE

    Volkov, Vadim; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    An overview is given of the recent work on in vitro enzymatic phosphorylation of silk fibroin and human hair keratin. Opposing to many chemical "conventional" approaches, enzymatic phosphorylation is in fact a mild reaction and the treatment falls within "green chemistry" approach. Silk and keratin are not phosphorylated in vivo, but in vitro. This enzyme-driven modification is a major technological breakthrough. Harsh chemical chemicals are avoided, and mild conditions make enzymatic phospho...

  9. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Matsuda

    Full Text Available Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeated full-thickness human nails more deeply than luliconazole. Amorolfine and terbinafine did not show any detectable permeation. The free-drug concentration of efinaconazole in a 5% human nail keratin suspension was 24.9%, which was significantly higher than those of the other drugs (1.1-3.9%. Additionally, efinaconazole was released from human nail keratin at a greater proportion than the other drugs. The MICs of the five drugs for Trichophyton rubrum were determined at various concentrations of keratin (0-20% in RPMI 1640 medium. The MICs of ciclopirox were not affected by keratin, whereas those of efinaconazole were slightly increased and those of luliconazole and terbinafine were markedly increased in the presence of 20% keratin. Efficacy coefficients were calculated using the nail permeation flux and MIC in media without or with keratin. Efinaconazole showed the highest efficacy coefficient, which was determined using MIC in media with keratin. The order of efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media rather than keratin-free media was consistent with that of complete cure rates in previously reported clinical trials. The present study revealed that efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media are useful for predicting the clinical efficacies of topical drugs. In order to be more effective, topical drugs have to possess higher efficacy coefficients.

  10. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoshiki; Sugiura, Keita; Hashimoto, Takashi; Ueda, Akane; Konno, Yoshihiro; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeated full-thickness human nails more deeply than luliconazole. Amorolfine and terbinafine did not show any detectable permeation. The free-drug concentration of efinaconazole in a 5% human nail keratin suspension was 24.9%, which was significantly higher than those of the other drugs (1.1-3.9%). Additionally, efinaconazole was released from human nail keratin at a greater proportion than the other drugs. The MICs of the five drugs for Trichophyton rubrum were determined at various concentrations of keratin (0-20%) in RPMI 1640 medium. The MICs of ciclopirox were not affected by keratin, whereas those of efinaconazole were slightly increased and those of luliconazole and terbinafine were markedly increased in the presence of 20% keratin. Efficacy coefficients were calculated using the nail permeation flux and MIC in media without or with keratin. Efinaconazole showed the highest efficacy coefficient, which was determined using MIC in media with keratin. The order of efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media rather than keratin-free media was consistent with that of complete cure rates in previously reported clinical trials. The present study revealed that efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media are useful for predicting the clinical efficacies of topical drugs. In order to be more effective, topical drugs have to possess higher efficacy coefficients.

  11. beta-Keratins in crocodiles reveal amino acid homology with avian keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Changjiang; Wu, Xiaobing; Yan, Peng; Amato, George

    2010-03-01

    The DNA sequences encoding beta-keratin have been obtained from Marsh Mugger (Crocodylus palustris) and Orinoco Crocodiles (Crocodylus intermedius). Through the deduced amino acid sequence, these proteins are rich in glycine, proline and serine. The central region of the proteins are composed of two beta-folded regions and show a high degree of identity with beta-keratins of aves and squamates. This central part is thought to be the site of polymerization to build the framework of beta-keratin filaments. It is believed that the beta-keratins in reptiles and birds share a common ancestry. Near the C-terminal, these beta-keratins contain a peptide rich in glycine-X and glycine-X-X, and the distinctive feature of the region is some 12-amino acid repeats, which are similar to the 13-amino acid repeats in chick scale keratin but absent from avian feather keratin. From our phylogenetic analysis, the beta-keratins in crocodile have a closer relationship with avian keratins than the other keratins in reptiles.

  12. Functional testing of keratin 14 mutant proteins associated with the three major subtypes of epidermolysis bullosa simplex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte B; Andresen, Brage S; Jensen, Uffe B

    2003-01-01

    in either the keratin 5 (KRT5) or keratin 14 (KRT14) gene. Previously, we identified three novel KRT14 missense mutations in Danish EBS patients associated with the three different forms of EBS (1). The identified KRT14 mutations represent the full spectrum of the classical EBS subtypes. In the present...... study we investigated these mutations in a cellular expression system in order to analyse their effects on the keratin cytoskeleton. KRT14 expression vectors were constructed by fusing the nucleotide sequence encoding the FLAG reporter peptide to the 3' end of the KRT14 cDNA sequences. The expression...... vectors were transiently transfected into normal human primary keratinocytes (NHK), HaCaT or HeLa cells in order to analyze the ability of the mutant K14 proteins to integrate into the existing endogenous keratin filament network (KFN). No effect on the keratin cytoskeleton was observed upon transfection...

  13. Phosphoprotein Keratin 23 accumulates in MSS but not MSI colon cancers in vivo and impacts viability and proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Mansilla, Francisco; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Cabezón, Teresa; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Verspaget, Hein W; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2007-09-01

    Transcript profiling of 27 normal colon mucosas and 258 adenocarcinomas showed Keratin23 to be increased in 78% microsatellite-stable tumors, while microsatellite-instable tumors showed low transcript levels, comparable to normal mucosas. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that 88% of microsatellite-instable tumors were negative for Keratin23 protein, while 70% of MSS tumors and metastases derived from MSS-tumors showed high Keratin23 levels. Immunofluorescence analysis localized Keratin23 in the Golgi-apparatus. Golgi accumulation was unique for gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. Immunoprecipitation and 2D-blot analysis revealed Keratin23 to be a 46.8 kDa phosphoprotein. Keratin23 impaired the proliferation of human colon cancer cells significantly, leading to cell death in microsatellite-instable but not microsatellite-stable cell lines, while COS7 cells experienced multiple nuclei and apoptosis. Keratin23 expression correlated significantly with transcription factor CEBPB. In conclusion, Keratin23 expression is a novel and important difference between microsatellite-stable and microsatellite-instable colon cancers.

  14. Dominant and recessive compound heterozygous mutations in epidermolysis bullosa simplex demonstrate the role of the stutter region in keratin intermediate filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Kana; Sawamura, Daisuke; McMillan, James R; Nakamura, Hideki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2002-06-28

    Keratin intermediate filaments are important cytoskeletal structural proteins involved in maintaining cell shape and function. Mutations in the epidermal keratin genes, keratin 5 or keratin 14 lead to the disruption of keratin filament assembly, resulting in an autosomal dominant inherited blistering skin disease, epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). We investigated a large EBS kindred who exhibited a markedly heterogeneous clinical presentation and detected two distinct keratin 5 mutations in the proband, the most severely affected. One missense mutation (E170K) in the highly conserved helix initiation peptide sequence of the 1A rod domain was found in all the affected family members. In contrast, the other missense mutation (E418K) was found only in the proband. The E418K mutation was located in the stutter region, an interruption in the heptad repeat regularity, whose function as yet remains unclear. We hypothesized that this mutated stutter allele was clinically silent when combined with the wild type allele but aggravates the clinical severity of EBS caused by the E170K mutation on the other allele. To confirm this in vitro, we transfected mutant keratin 5 cDNA into cultured cells. Although only 12.7% of the cells transfected with the E170K mutation alone showed disrupted keratin filament aggregations, significantly more cells (30.0%) cotransfected with both E170K and E418K mutations demonstrated keratin aggregation (p stutter region in the assembly and organization of the keratin intermediate filament network in vitro.

  15. Complete Structure of an Epithelial Keratin Dimer: Implications for Intermediate Filament Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Bray

    Full Text Available Keratins are cytoskeletal proteins that hierarchically arrange into filaments, starting with the dimer sub-unit. They are integral to the structural support of cells, in skin, hair and nails. In skin, keratin is thought to play a critical role in conferring the barrier properties and elasticity of skin. In general, the keratin dimer is broadly described by a tri-domain structure: a head, a central rod and a tail. As yet, no atomistic-scale picture of the entire dimer structure exists; this information is pivotal for establishing molecular-level connections between structure and function in intermediate filament proteins. The roles of the head and tail domains in facilitating keratin filament assembly and function remain as open questions. To address these, we report results of molecular dynamics simulations of the entire epithelial human K1/K10 keratin dimer. Our findings comprise: (1 the first three-dimensional structural models of the complete dimer unit, comprising of the head, rod and tail domains; (2 new insights into the chirality of the rod-domain twist gained from analysis of the full domain structure; (3 evidence for tri-subdomain partitioning in the head and tail domains; and, (4 identification of the residue characteristics that mediate non-covalent contact between the chains in the dimer. Our findings are immediately applicable to other epithelial keratins, such as K8/K18 and K5/K14, and to intermediate filament proteins in general.

  16. Complete Structure of an Epithelial Keratin Dimer: Implications for Intermediate Filament Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, David J.; Walsh, Tiffany R.; Noro, Massimo G.; Notman, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Keratins are cytoskeletal proteins that hierarchically arrange into filaments, starting with the dimer sub-unit. They are integral to the structural support of cells, in skin, hair and nails. In skin, keratin is thought to play a critical role in conferring the barrier properties and elasticity of skin. In general, the keratin dimer is broadly described by a tri-domain structure: a head, a central rod and a tail. As yet, no atomistic-scale picture of the entire dimer structure exists; this information is pivotal for establishing molecular-level connections between structure and function in intermediate filament proteins. The roles of the head and tail domains in facilitating keratin filament assembly and function remain as open questions. To address these, we report results of molecular dynamics simulations of the entire epithelial human K1/K10 keratin dimer. Our findings comprise: (1) the first three-dimensional structural models of the complete dimer unit, comprising of the head, rod and tail domains; (2) new insights into the chirality of the rod-domain twist gained from analysis of the full domain structure; (3) evidence for tri-subdomain partitioning in the head and tail domains; and, (4) identification of the residue characteristics that mediate non-covalent contact between the chains in the dimer. Our findings are immediately applicable to other epithelial keratins, such as K8/K18 and K5/K14, and to intermediate filament proteins in general. PMID:26181054

  17. Keratin gene mutations influence the keratinocyte response to DNA damage and cytokine induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Tina; Sersa, Gregor; Törmä, Hans; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Herrmann, Harald; Komel, Radovan; Liovic, Mirjana

    2017-06-24

    The keratin filament cytoskeleton is vital to the normal function of epithelial cells. It provides structural support and regulates different aspects of cell metabolism. Mutations in keratins 5 and 14 cause a skin fragility disorder, epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). Patients with severe EBS have an increased cumulative risk for basal cell carcinoma. In this study, we tested how keratin 5 and 14 mutant EBS patient-derived keratinocytes behave in the face of two different types of stressors that are able to induce cell death: ionizing radiation and cytokines TNF-α and TRAIL. The data point out to a substantial difference between how normal and keratin mutant keratinocytes deal with such stresses. When case of DNA damage, the ATM/Chk2-pathway is one of the two main tracks that can prevent the progression of mitosis and so allow repair. This was altered in all investigated keratin mutants with a particular down-regulation of the activated form of checkpoint kinase 2 (pChk2). Keratin mutants also appear less sensitive than normal cells to treatment with TNF-α or TRAIL, and this may be linked to the up-regulation of two pro-survival proteins, Bcl-2 and FLIP. Such changes are likely to have a profound effect on mutant keratinocytes ability to survive and withstand stress, and in theory this may be also a contributing factor to cell transformation.

  18. Immunofluorescence and Immunohistochemical Detection of Keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumptner, Cornelia; Gogg-Kamerer, Margit; Viertler, Christian; Denk, Helmut; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Reliable detection of keratins in tissues is important for investigating their physiological role and for using keratin expression as a biomarker in medical diagnostics. A particular challenge for the detection of keratins by immunofluorescence microscopy or immunohistochemistry relates to the fact that keratin intermediate filaments are obligatory heteropolymers, which may result in dissociation between RNA and protein expression levels in the event that the homeostasis of the expression of the proper keratin partners is disturbed. Furthermore, variable accessibility of epitopes on keratin polypeptides due to conformational changes may lead to false negative results. Preanalytical effects, such as warm/cold ischemia, fixation, tissue processing, and embedding may result in false negative or inappropriate reactions. An experimental design for how to systematically test preanalytical effects and to validate immunohistochemistry protocols is presented. This kind of evaluation should be performed for each antigen and antibody since the various epitopes recognized by antibodies may behave differently. In this context, one has to be aware that different cell structures may be affected or modified differently by various preanalytical procedures and may thus require different preanalytical and staining protocols.

  19. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L; Morasso, Maria I

    2014-12-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder-associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75(A161T) and KRT75(E337K), are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75(A161T) variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries.

  20. Porous hydrogel of wool keratin prepared by a novel method: An extraction with guanidine/2-mercaptoethanol solution followed by a dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Yuki; Takagi, Yusuke; Mori, Hideki; Hara, Masayuki, E-mail: hara@b.s.osakafu-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we show a novel simple method to prepare a sponge-like porous keratin hydrogel through the extraction of wool keratin in a solution containing guanidine hydrochloride and 2-mercaptoethanol followed by dialysis for both aggregation of keratin and recrosslink. The gel had a highly porous structure and a fast-swelling property in rehydration after freeze-drying. It had also high mechanical strength both in the tensile test and the measurement of dynamic viscoelasticity. Three types of animal cells, PC12 cells, HOS cells and murine embryonic fibroblasts, well attached and grew on the surface of the porous hydrogel. - Graphical abstract: We show a novel simple method to prepare a sponge-like porous keratin hydrogel (A, B) through the extraction of wool keratin in a solution containing guanidine hydrochloride and 2-mercaptoethanol followed by dialysis for both aggregation of keratin and recrosslink. The gel had a highly porous structure (B) and a fast-swelling property in rehydration after freeze-drying. It had also high mechanical strength both in the tensile test (C) and the measurement of dynamic viscoelasticity (D). Three types of animal cells, PC12 cells (E), HOS cells (F) and murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) (G), well attached and grew on the surface of the porous hydrogel. - Highlights: • We prepared a sponge-like porous keratin hydrogel by a novel method. • We used guanidine with 2-mercaptoethanol to extract keratin from wool fiber. • Extracted keratin was recrosslinked to form a porous keratin hydrogel in dialysis. • The keratin hydrogel had a high mechanical strength. • Three types of cells attached on the keratin hydrogel proliferated well.

  1. Population diversity and adaptive evolution in keratinization genes: impact of environment in shaping skin phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Pramod; Chaurasia, Amit; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Grover, Ritika; Mukerji, Mitali; Natarajan, Vivek T

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of climatic factors in shaping skin phenotypes, particularly pigmentation. Keratinization is another well-designed feature of human skin, which is involved in modulating transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Although this physiological process is closely linked to climate, presently it is not clear whether genetic diversity is observed in keratinization and whether this process also responds to the environmental pressure. To address this, we adopted a multipronged approach, which involved analysis of 1) copy number variations in diverse Indian and HapMap populations from varied geographical regions; 2) genetic association with geoclimatic parameters in 61 populations of dbCLINE database in a set of 549 genes from four processes namely keratinization, pigmentation, epidermal differentiation, and housekeeping functions; 3) sequence divergence in 4,316 orthologous promoters and corresponding exonic regions of human and chimpanzee with macaque as outgroup, and 4) protein sequence divergence (Ka/Ks) across nine vertebrate classes, which differ in their extent of TEWL. Our analyses demonstrate that keratinization and epidermal differentiation genes are under accelerated evolution in the human lineage, relative to pigmentation and housekeeping genes. We show that this entire pathway may have been driven by environmental selection pressure through concordant functional polymorphisms across several genes involved in skin keratinization. Remarkably, this underappreciated function of skin may be a crucial determinant of adaptation to diverse environmental pressures across world populations.

  2. Isoelectric focusing of human hair keratins: correlation with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns and effect of cosmetic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Calvo, M S; Carracedo, A; Muñoz, I; Concheiro, L

    1992-03-01

    A new isoelectric focusing (IEF) technique in polyacrylamide gels with 6M urea and 1.5% Nonidet P40 has been developed to characterize human hair samples. The phenotypes demonstrated with this procedure has been correlated with the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns described by other authors. The method described can be applied in the forensic science analysis of a single human hair. Using the same IEF technique we have studied the changes in electrophoretic patterns of cosmetically treated hair. The characteristics of the modifications observed and its utility in forensic science work are also discussed in this paper.

  3. FAM83H and casein kinase I regulate the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and formation of desmosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Takahisa; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Mikami, Toshinari; Miake, Yasuo; Adachi, Jun; Shimizu, Maiko; Saito, Youhei; Koura, Minako; Takeda, Yasunori; Matsuda, Junichiro; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    FAM83H is essential for the formation of dental enamel because a mutation in the FAM83H gene causes amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). We previously reported that the overexpression of FAM83H often occurs and disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton in colorectal cancer cells. We herein show that FAM83H regulates the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and maintains the formation of desmosomes in ameloblastoma cells. FAM83H is expressed and localized on keratin filaments in human ameloblastoma cell lines and in mouse ameloblasts and epidermal germinative cells in vivo. FAM83H shows preferential localization to keratin filaments around the nucleus that often extend to cell-cell junctions. Alterations in the function of FAM83H by its overexpression, knockdown, or an AI-causing truncated mutant prevent the proper organization of the keratin cytoskeleton in ameloblastoma cells. Furthermore, the AI-causing mutant prevents desmosomal proteins from being localized to cell-cell junctions. The effects of the AI-causing mutant depend on its binding to and possible inhibition of casein kinase I (CK-1). The suppression of CK-1 by its inhibitor, D4476, disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest that AI caused by the FAM83H mutation is mediated by the disorganization of the keratin cytoskeleton and subsequent disruption of desmosomes in ameloblasts. PMID:27222304

  4. DNA from keratinous tissue. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla Friis; Olsen, Maia E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2012-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle - although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  5. Regulatory Divergence among Beta-Keratin Genes during Bird Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Maloyjo Joyraj; Yu, Chun-Ping; Lin, Jinn-Jy; Ng, Chen Siang; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2016-11-01

    Feathers, which are mainly composed of α- and β-keratins, are highly diversified, largely owing to duplication and diversification of β-keratin genes during bird evolution. However, little is known about the regulatory changes that contributed to the expressional diversification of β-keratin genes. To address this issue, we studied transcriptomes from five different parts of chicken contour and flight feathers. From these transcriptomes we inferred β-keratin enriched co-expression modules of genes and predicted transcription factors (TFs) of β-keratin genes. In total, we predicted 262 TF-target gene relationships in which 56 TFs regulate 91 β-keratin genes; we validated 14 of them by in vitro tests. A dual criterion of TF enrichment and "TF-target gene" expression correlation identified 26 TFs as the major regulators of β-keratin genes. According to our predictions, the ancestral scale and claw β-keratin genes have common and unique regulators, whereas most feather β-keratin genes show chromosome-wise regulation, distinct from scale and claw β-keratin genes. Thus, after expansion from the β-keratin gene on Chr7 to other chromosomes, which still shares a TF with scale and claw β-keratin genes, most feather β-keratin genes have recruited distinct or chromosome-specific regulators. Moreover, our data showed correlated gene expression profiles, positive or negative, between predicted TFs and their target genes over the five studied feather regions. Therefore, regulatory divergences among feather β-keratin genes have contributed to structural differences among different parts of feathers. Our study sheds light on how feather β-keratin genes have diverged in regulation from scale and claw β-keratin genes and among themselves. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Brazilian keratin hair treatment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathersby, Courtney; McMichael, Amy

    2013-06-01

    Brazilian keratin treatments are widely available products that are used by women all over the world to straighten hair. Marketers of these products claim that the keratin treatments render naturally curly hair more manageable and frizz-free while enhancing color and shine, giving the hair a healthier appearance. Although widely used, there have been virtually no reports of adverse side effects. Unfortunately, many of the products that are applied by salon professionals contain formaldehyde or its derivatives and are being marketed as safe.

  7. Recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex phenotype reproduced in vitro - Ablation of keratin 14 is partially compensated by keratin 17

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Ghalbzouri, A; Jonkman, M; Kempenaar, J; Ponec, M

    2003-01-01

    Recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex (REBS) is characterized by generalized cutaneous blistering in response to mechanical trauma. This results from fragility of the basal keratinocytes that lack keratin tonofilaments because of homozygote null mutation in the keratin 14 gene. REBS patients

  8. Stabilization of solutions of feather keratins by sodium dodecyl sulphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooyen, P.M.M.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Oberthür, Radulf C.; Bantjes, A.; Bantjes, Adriaan; Feijen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Feather keratins were extracted from chicken feathers with aqueous solutions of urea and 2-mercaptoethanol. After filtration of the insoluble residue, a feather keratin solution was obtained. Removal of 2-mercaptoethanol and urea by dialysis resulted in aggregation of the keratin polypeptide chains

  9. Harvesting the potential of the human umbilical cord: isolation and characterisation of four cell types for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Cindy J; Fradette, Julie; Galbraith, Todd; Rémy, Murielle; Guignard, Rina; Gauvin, Robert; Germain, Lucie; Auger, François A

    2013-01-01

    The human umbilical cord (UC) has attracted interest as a source of cells for many research applications. UC solid tissues contain four cell types: epithelial, stromal, smooth muscle and endothelial cells. We have developed a unique protocol for the sequential extraction of all four cell types from a single UC, allowing tissue reconstruction using multiple cell types from the same source. By combining perfusion, immersion and explant techniques, all four cell types have been successfully expanded in monolayer cultures. We have also characterised epithelial and Wharton's jelly cells (WJC) by immunolabelling of specific proteins. Epithelial cell yields averaged at 2.3 × 10(5) cells per centimetre UC, and the cells expressed an unusual combination of keratins typical of simple, mucous and stratified epithelia. Stromal cells in the Wharton's jelly expressed desmin, α-smooth muscle actin, elastin, keratins (K12, K16, K18 and K19), vimentin and collagens. Expression patterns in cultured cells resembled those found in situ except for basement membrane components and type III collagen. These stromal cells featured a sustained proliferation rate up to passage 12 after thawing. The mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character of the WJC was confirmed by their expression of typical MSC surface markers and by adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assays. To emphasise and demonstrate their potential for regenerative medicine, UC cell types were successfully used to produce human tissue-engineered constructs. Both bilayered stromal/epithelial and vascular substitutes were produced, establishing the versatility and importance of these cells for research and therapeutic applications.

  10. Ultrastructural changes resulting from keratin-9 gene mutations in two families with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navsaria, H A; Swensson, O; Ratnavel, R C; Shamsher, M; McLean, W H; Lane, E B; Griffiths, D; Eady, R A; Leigh, I M

    1995-03-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma of Voerner type (or epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of keratinization with histologic features of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. We studied members of two large unrelated kindreds with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, and biopsy specimens of lesional palmar skin from both families confirmed the histologic changes of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Whorls of abnormally aggregated keratin filaments were seen ultrastructurally to be associated with signs of cellular disintegration in spinous and granular cells. Direct sequencing of genomic DNA samples obtained from several members of each family established the substitution of a highly conserved arginine by tryptophan (R162W) in the 1A region of the alpha-helical rod domain of keratin 9. This arginine residue in a highly conserved region of keratins 1 and 10 is affected by disruptive missense point mutations in many patients with bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma. An equivalent position in the sole and palm restricted keratin 9 appears to be the mutation hot spot in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. To date, R162W is the most prevalent genetic defect reported in this genodermatosis.

  11. DNA from keratinous tissue. Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Maia E.; Bengtsson, Camilla Friis; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    2012-01-01

    Although good quality DNA can be recovered from the base of the calamus of freshly sampled feathers, as from other fully keratinized tissues such as nail or hair shaft, the quality and quantity of DNA in the majority of feather structures is much poorer. Little research has been performed...

  12. DNA extraction from keratin and chitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Paula F; Gilbert, Thomas M P

    2012-01-01

    DNA extracted from keratinous and chitinous materials can be a useful source of genetic information. To effectively liberate the DNA from these materials, buffers containing relatively high levels of DTT, proteinase K, and detergent are recommended, followed by purification using either silica-column or organic methods.

  13. Degradation of keratin substrates by keratinolytic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Călin

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Among the tested strains, Fusarium sp. 1A was the most active organism in the degradation process with the strongest denaturation of polypeptide chains. Because keratinolytic microorganisms and their enzymes keratinases represent a subject of scientific and economic interest because of their capability to hydrolyze keratin, Fusarium sp. 1A was selected for further studies.

  14. Experiment Study of Human Hair Keratin Transplanted To Adult Rats After Spinal Cord Cross-Injury%人发角蛋白修复大鼠脊髓横断损伤的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪江东; 宋德业; 谢宏明; 李贺君; 谭进

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study the function of human hair keratin [HHK] in repairing acute spinal cord cross-injury (SCCI) of SD adult rats.Methods:18 adult female SD rats were selected and devided into three groups (control group, HHK group, SCCI group). Movement and sensation of SD adult rats were evaluated.The samples from spinal cord at injuryed or insertion site,9 and 11 precessus spinosus were observed with optical microscope and electronic microscope in 1, 3, 6 weeks after operation.Results:Campared with SCCI group,HHK group recovered better in sensation, motion and histological changes.Conclusions:HHK can repair spinal cord injury and promote the function recovery. HHK can boost the regeneration of nervous cord and reduce necrosis of nerve cells. This study is the base of clinical practices in treating spinal cord injury with HHK.%目的:研究人发角蛋白(HHK)在大鼠脊髓横断损伤(SCCI)修复中的作用.方法:选用18只SD大鼠,建立正常对照组、SCCI组,SCCI后植入HHK组.于术后1W,3W,6W对大鼠的运动,感觉进行评估;并在横断部位及近,远断3个断面分别取材,用HE,铀铅双染,在光镜及电子显微镜下观察其组织学结构.结果:大鼠脊髓横断损伤后植入HHK,运动,感觉逐渐好转,术后6W基本恢复正常;而未植入HHK大鼠无明显变化.光镜观察:植入HHK组白质有明显的神经纤维沿着HHK再生,部分区域有坏死,无明显的空洞形成;灰质有部分异常神经元,大部分形态正常.未植入HHK组断面有神经呈编织状再生,未见纤维超过离断面,有大面积坏死和空洞形成;灰质神经元大量坏死,形态异常.结论:HHK对横断脊髓的功能及形态恢复有促进作用,本实验为HHK应用于临床奠定基础.

  15. Keratin 8 sequence variants in patients with pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treiber, M.; Schulz, H.U.; Landt, O.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Castellani, C.; Real, F.X.; Akar, N.; Ammann, R.W.; Bargetzi, M.; Bhatia, E.; Demaine, A.G.; Battagia, C.; Kingsnorth, A.; O'reilly, D.; Truninger, K.; Koudova, M.; Spicak, J.; Cerny, M.; Menzel, H.J.; Moral, P.; Pignatti, P.F.; Romanelli, M.G.; Rickards, O.; Stefano, G.F. De; Zarnescu, N.O.; Choudhuri, G.; Sikora, S.S.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Weiss, F.U.; Pietschmann, M.; Teich, N.; Gress, T.M.; Ockenga, J.; Schmidt, H.; Kage, A.; Halangk, J.; Rosendahl, J.; Groneberg, D.A.; Nickel, R.; Witt, H.

    2006-01-01

    Keratin 8 (KRT8) is one of the major intermediate filament proteins expressed in single-layered epithelia of the gastrointestinal tract. Transgenic mice over-expressing human KRT8 display pancreatic mononuclear infiltration, interstitial fibrosis and dysplasia of acinar cells resulting in exocrine p

  16. Genes coding for intermediate filament proteins closely related to the hagfish "thread keratins (TK)" alpha and gamma also exist in lamprey, teleosts and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffeld, Michael; Schultess, Jan

    2006-05-15

    The "thread keratins (TK)" alpha and gamma so far have been considered highly specialized intermediate filament (IF) proteins restricted to hagfish. From lamprey, we now have sequenced five novel IF proteins closely related to TKalpha and TKgamma, respectively. Moreover, we have detected corresponding sequences in EST and genomic databases of teleosts and amphibians. The structure of the TKalpha genes and the positions of their deduced amino acid sequences in a phylogenetic tree clearly support their classification as type II keratins. The genes encoding TKgamma show a structure typical for type III IF proteins, whereas their positions in phylogenetic trees favor a close relationship to the type I keratins. Considering that most keratin-like sequences detected in the lancelet also exhibit a gene structure typical for type III IF proteins, it seems likely that the keratin gene(s) originated from an ancient type III IF protein gene. According to EST analyses, the expression of the thread keratins in teleost fish and amphibians may be particularly restricted to larval stages, which, in conjunction with the observed absence of TKalpha and TKgamma genes in any of the available Amniota databases, indicates a thread keratin function closely related to larval development in an aquatic environment.

  17. How do keratinizing disorders and blistering disorders overlap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Fukuda, Shunpei; Ishii, Norito; Teye, Kwesi; Numata, Sanae; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Inherited keratinizing disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding cornified cell envelope proteins, enzymes and their inhibitors, adhesion molecules, cytoskeletal proteins and others in the epidermis. These molecules are known to regulate differentiation, proliferation and cell adhesions. Intriguingly, some keratinizing disorders show blistering skin lesions, while some inherited blistering disorders show abnormal keratinization. Therefore, hereditary keratinizing and blistering diseases are closely related and show overlapping genetic backgrounds. In this review, we overviewed keratinizing and blistering disorders in terms of overlapping of the two disease groups. Gene mutations in desmosomal components cause striate keratoderma, Naxos disease, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma and plakophilin deficiency, which first show skin fragility and blisters and later hyperkeratosis. Gene mutations in hemidesmosomal components cause various forms of epidermolysis bullosa, some of which show hyperkeratosis on the nails, palms and soles, in addition to blister formation. Diseases with gene mutations in calcium pump proteins are Darier disease and Hailey-Hailey disease, which show clinicopathological overlaps and develop both keratinizing and blistering skin lesions. Finally, gene mutations in epidermal keratins cause epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic ichthyosis, superficial epidermolytic ichthyosis, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma and pachyonychia congenita/focal palmoplantar keratoderma, which show thickening of the palms and soles with underlying blister formation. In general, responsible proteins for diseases developing both keratinizing and blistering conditions are adhesion molecules, calcium pump proteins and keratins, but not connexins, cornified cell envelop proteins, enzymes or inhibitors. It is still unknown how particular keratinizing diseases develop blisters and vice versa. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Mutations in the 1A rod domain segment of the keratin 9 gene in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J M; Lee, S; Kang, H J; Lee, J H; Yeo, U C; Son, I Y; Park, K B; Steinert, P M; Lee, E S

    1998-11-01

    Palmoplantar keratodermas (PPK) constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases marked by the thickening of palms and soles of affected individuals. They are divided into autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive groups by the mode of transmission. The autosomal dominantly transmitted group is further divided into epidermolytic (EPPK, Voerner) and non-epidermolytic (NEPPK, Unna-Thost) types according to the histopathologic findings. Recent development of molecular approaches has confirmed that EPPK and NEPPK are caused by the mutations in keratin 9 and 1 genes, respectively. We have studied three families of EPPK to find the mutation in the keratin 9 gene. DNA sequence analyses revealed single base changes in sequences encoding the highly conserved 1A rod domain segment of the keratin 9 gene in two of the three families. These mutations caused Arg (CGG) to Glu (CAG; R162Q) and Arg (CGG) to Try (TGG; R162W) substitutions. The same arginine position has been mutated in the keratin 10 gene in epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, the keratin 14 gene in epidermolysis bullosa simplex, and the keratin 9 gene in hereditary EPPK in Western patients. In this study we show that unrelated Korean patients have similar mutations.

  19. Free radical facilitated damage of ungual keratin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khengar, Rajeshree H; Brown, Marc B; Turner, Rob B; Traynor, Matthew J; Holt, Katherine B; Jones, Stuart A

    2010-09-01

    Thioglycolic acid (TA) and urea hydrogen peroxide (urea H(2)O(2)) are thought to disrupt alpha-keratin disulfide links in the nail. However, optimal clinical use of these agents to improve the treatment of nail disorders is currently hindered by a lack of fundamental data to support their mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to investigate how the redox environment of ungual keratin, when manipulated by TA and urea H(2)O(2), influenced the properties of the nail barrier. Potentiometric and voltammetric measurements demonstrated that urea H(2)O(2) obeyed the Nernst equation for a proton coupled one-electron transfer redox process while TA underwent a series of redox reactions that was complicated by electrode adsorption and dimer formation. The functional studies demonstrated that nail permeability, measured through TBF penetration (38.51+/-10.94 microg/cm(2)/h) and nail swelling (244.10+/-14.99% weight increase), was greatest when relatively low concentrations of the thiolate ion were present in the applied solution. Limiting the thiolate ion to low levels in the solution retards thiolate dimerisation and generates thiyl free radicals. It appeared that this free radical generation was fundamental in facilitating the redox-mediated keratin disruption of the ungual membrane. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigating the microstructure of keratin extracted from wool: Peptide sequence (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and protein conformation (FTIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardamone, Jeanette M.

    2010-04-01

    Investigations of keratins extracted from wool by reduction hydrolysis and by alkaline hydrolysis showed that their chemical compositions and secondary structures were similar to original wool. The keratin isolates were similar in amino acid, Amides I and II, and secondary structure to each other and to original wool. From SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, keratin isolated by reduction contained protein homologs of molecular weight, ˜40-60 kDa and keratin isolate from alkaline hydrolysis contained peptide fragments of ˜6-8 kDa. MALDI-TOF/TOF spectrometry confirmed that the reduction isolate contained Type II microfibrillar component 7C, hair Type II intermediate filament, Type I microfibrillar 48 kDa component 8C-1, and Type I microfibrillar 47.6 kDa protein homologs which contained alanine, glutamine, glutamic acid, leucine, serine, leucine, and cystine with highest amounts glutamic acid and leucine amino acids. FTIR spectroscopy was applied to examine secondary structure to confirm the content of α-helix/β-sheet/disordered regions for original wool (58.2%/37.9%/3.9%); keratin from reduction (36.7%/50.2%/13.1%); and keratin from alkaline hydrolysis (25.7%/51.8%/22.5%). The higher content of β-sheet secondary structure and intact α-helical conformation characterized these isolates as viable starting materials for chemical modification to form novel bio-based materials useful in industrial formulations and compositions. In particular keratin extracted by reduction with the molecular weight of original wool and the probability of useful mechanical properties can be transformed into stand-alone products of various shapes and forms such as porous foams, sponges, mats, and films for bio-based, adaptable structures.

  1. Fabrication of keratin-silica hydrogel for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakkar, Prachi; Madhan, Balaraman, E-mail: bmadhan76@yahoo.co.in

    2016-09-01

    In the recent past, keratin has been fabricated into different forms of biomaterials like scaffold, gel, sponge, film etc. In lieu of the myriad advantages of the hydrogels for biomedical applications, a keratin-silica hydrogel was fabricated using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Textural analysis shed light on the physical properties of the fabricated hydrogel, inturn enabling the optimization of the hydrogel. The optimized keratin-silica hydrogel was found to exhibit instant springiness, optimum hardness, with ease of spreadability. Moreover, the hydrogel showed excellent swelling with highly porous microarchitecture. MTT assay and DAPI staining revealed that keratin-silica hydrogel was biocompatible with fibroblast cells. Collectively, these properties make the fabricated keratin-silica hydrogel, a suitable dressing material for biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Keratin-silica hydrogel has been fabricated using sol–gel technique. • The hydrogel shows appropriate textural properties. • The hydrogel promotes fibroblast cells proliferation. • The hydrogel has potential soft tissue engineering applications like wound healing.

  2. Assembly characteristics of plant keratin intermediate filaments in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵光伟; 杨澄; 佟向军; 翟中和

    1999-01-01

    After selective extraction and purification, plant keratin intermediate filaments were reassembled in vitro. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs showed that acidic keratins and basic keratins can assemble into dimers and further into 10 nm filaments in vitro. In higher magnification images, it can be seen that fully assembled plant keratin intermediate filaments consist of several thinner filaments of 3 nm in diameter, which indicates the formation of protofilaments in the assembly processes. One of the explicit features of plant keratin intermediate filaments is a 24—25 nm periodic structural repeat alone the axis of beth the 10 nm filaments and protofilaments. The periodic repeat is one of the fundamental characteristic of all intermediate filaments, and demonstrates the half staggered arrangement of keratin molecules within the filaments.

  3. Keratins significantly contribute to cell stiffness and impact invasive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltmann, Kristin; Fritsch, Anatol W; Käs, Josef A; Magin, Thomas M

    2013-11-12

    Cell motility and cell shape adaptations are crucial during wound healing, inflammation, and malignant progression. These processes require the remodeling of the keratin cytoskeleton to facilitate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. However, the role of keratins for biomechanical properties and invasion of epithelial cells is only partially understood. In this study, we address this issue in murine keratinocytes lacking all keratins on genome engineering. In contrast to predictions, keratin-free cells show about 60% higher cell deformability even for small deformations. This response is compared with the less pronounced softening effects for actin depolymerization induced via latrunculin A. To relate these findings with functional consequences, we use invasion and 3D growth assays. These experiments reveal higher invasiveness of keratin-free cells. Reexpression of a small amount of the keratin pair K5/K14 in keratin-free cells reverses the above phenotype for the invasion but does not with respect to cell deformability. Our data show a unique role of keratins as major players of cell stiffness, influencing invasion with implications for epidermal homeostasis and pathogenesis. This study supports the view that down-regulation of keratins observed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition directly contributes to the migratory and invasive behavior of tumor cells.

  4. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuovo, G.J. (Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (USA)); Pedemonte, B.M. (Harlem Hospital Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  5. Oblongifolin C inhibits metastasis by up-regulating keratin 18 and tubulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Lao, Yuanzhi; Xu, Naihan; Xi, Zhichao; Wu, Man; Wang, Hua; Li, Xiyi; Tan, Hongsheng; Sun, Menghong; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-05-14

    Tumor metastasis is the main cause of cancer-related patient death. In this study, we performed a wound healing migration screen to search for a metastatic inhibitor within our library of natural compounds. We found that oblongifolin C (OC), a natural compound extracted from Garcinia yunnanensis Hu, is an effective inhibitor of metastasis in human esophageal squamous carcinoma Eca109 cells. The transwell migration and matrigel invasion assay results also showed that OC inhibits the migration of Eca109 cells and HepG2 cells. OC can increase the expression of tubulin, indicating that OC inhibits metastasis via tubulin aggregation. In addition, the Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunostaining results indicated that OC increases the expression of keratin18. Furthermore, the knockdown of keratin 18 by small interfering RNAs inhibited the expression of tubulin and increased the metastasis of cancer cells, suggesting that keratin 18 is the upstream signal of tubulin and plays a vital role in metastasis. A subsequent study in a tail vein injection metastasis model showed that OC can significantly inhibit pulmonary metastasis, as revealed by immunohistochemistry staining. Taken together, our results suggest that OC inhibits metastasis through the induction of the expression of keratin 18 and may be useful in cancer therapy.

  6. Loss of keratin 8 phosphorylation leads to increased tumor progression and correlates with clinico-pathological parameters of OSCC patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunain Alam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keratins are cytoplasmic intermediate filament proteins expressed in tissue specific and differentiation dependent manner. Keratins 8 and 18 (K8 and K18 are predominantly expressed in simple epithelial tissues and perform both mechanical and regulatory functions. Aberrant expression of K8 and K18 is associated with neoplastic progression, invasion and poor prognosis in human oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs. K8 and K18 undergo several post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, which are known to regulate their functions in various cellular processes. Although, K8 and K18 phosphorylation is known to regulate cell cycle, cell growth and apoptosis, its significance in cell migration and/or neoplastic progression is largely unknown. In the present study we have investigated the role of K8 phosphorylation in cell migration and/or neoplastic progression in OSCC. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the role of K8 phosphorylation in neoplastic progression of OSCC, shRNA-resistant K8 phospho-mutants of Ser73 and Ser431 were overexpressed in K8-knockdown human AW13516 cells (derived from SCC of tongue; generated previously. Wound healing assays and tumor growth in NOD-SCID mice were performed to analyze the cell motility and tumorigenicity respectively in overexpressed clones. The overexpressed K8 phospho-mutants clones showed significant increase in cell migration and tumorigenicity as compared with K8 wild type clones. Furthermore, loss of K8 Ser73 and Ser431 phosphorylation was also observed in human OSCC tissues analyzed by immunohistochemistry, where their dephosphorylation significantly correlated with size, lymph node metastasis and stage of the tumor. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide first evidence of a potential role of K8 phosphorylation in cell migration and/or tumorigenicity in OSCC. Moreover, correlation studies of K8 dephosphorylation with clinico-pathological parameters of OSCC

  7. Comparison of nanomechanical properties of in vivo and in vitro keratin 8/18 networks

    CERN Document Server

    Paust, Tobias; Nolte, Ulla; Beil, Michael; Herrmann, Harald; Marti, Othmar

    2015-01-01

    In our work we compare the mechanical properties of the extracted keratin cytoskeleton of pancreatic carcinoma cells with the mechanical properties of in vitro assembled keratin 8/18 networks. For this purpose we use microrheology measurements with embedded tracer beads. This method is a suitable tool, because the size of the beads compared to the meshsize of the network allows us to treat the network as a continuum. Observing the beads motion with a CCD-High-Speed-Camera then leads to the dynamic shear modulus. Our measurements show lower storage moduli with increasing distance between the rim of the nucleus and the bead, but no clear tendency for the loss modulus. The same measurement method applied to in vitro assembled keratin 8/18 networks shows different characteristics of storage and loss moduli. The storage modulus is one order of magnitude lower than that of the extracted cytoskeleton and the loss modulus is higher. We draw conclusions on the network topology of both keratin network types based on th...

  8. Intrinsically water-stable keratin nanoparticles and their in vivo biodistribution for targeted delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Helan; Shi, Zhen; Reddy, Narendra; Yang, Yiqi

    2014-09-17

    Highly water-stable nanoparticles of around 70 nm and capable of distributing with high uptake in certain organs of mice were developed from feather keratin. Nanoparticles could provide novel veterinary diagnostics and therapeutics to boost efficiency in identification and treatment of livestock diseases to improve protein supply and ensure safety and quality of food. Nanoparticles could penetrate easily into cells and small capillaries, surpass detection of the immune system, and reach targeted organs because of their nanoscale sizes. Proteins with positive and negative charges and hydrophobic domains enable loading of various types of drugs and, hence, are advantageous over synthetic polymers and carbohydrates for drug delivery. In this research, the highly cross-linked keratin was processed into nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm under mild conditions. Keratin nanoparticles were found supportive to cell growth via an in vitro study and highly stable after stored in physiological environments for up to 7 days. At 4 days after injection, up to 18% of the cells in kidneys and 4% of the cells in liver of mice were penetrated by the keratin nanoparticles.

  9. Porous hydrogel of wool keratin prepared by a novel method: an extraction with guanidine/2-mercaptoethanol solution followed by a dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Yuki; Takagi, Yusuke; Mori, Hideki; Hara, Masayuki

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we show a novel simple method to prepare a sponge-like porous keratin hydrogel through the extraction of wool keratin in a solution containing guanidine hydrochloride and 2-mercaptoethanol followed by dialysis for both aggregation of keratin and recrosslink. The gel had a highly porous structure and a fast-swelling property in rehydration after freeze-drying. It had also high mechanical strength both in the tensile test and the measurement of dynamic viscoelasticity. Three types of animal cells, PC12 cells, HOS cells and murine embryonic fibroblasts, well attached and grew on the surface of the porous hydrogel.

  10. Binding Interactions of Keratin-Based Hair Fiber Extract to Gold, Keratin, and BMP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Roche C; Tsuda, Shanel M; Ton, Minh-Thi N; Zhang, Xiao; Esker, Alan R; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Hair-derived keratin biomaterials composed mostly of reduced keratin proteins (kerateines) have demonstrated their utility as carriers of biologics and drugs for tissue engineering. Electrostatic forces between negatively-charged keratins and biologic macromolecules allow for effective drug retention; attraction to positively-charged growth factors like bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) has been used as a strategy for osteoinduction. In this study, the intermolecular surface and bulk interaction properties of kerateines were investigated. Thiol-rich kerateines were chemisorbed onto gold substrates to form an irreversible 2-nm rigid layer for surface plasmon resonance analysis. Kerateine-to-kerateine cohesion was observed in pH-neutral water with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 1.8 × 10(-4) M, indicating that non-coulombic attractive forces (i.e. hydrophobic and van der Waals) were at work. The association of BMP-2 to kerateine was found to be greater (KD = 1.1 × 10(-7) M), within the range of specific binding. Addition of salts (phosphate-buffered saline; PBS) shortened the Debye length or the electrostatic field influence which weakened the kerateine-BMP-2 binding (KD = 3.2 × 10(-5) M). BMP-2 in bulk kerateine gels provided a limited release in PBS (~ 10% dissociation in 4 weeks), suggesting that electrostatic intermolecular attraction was significant to retain BMP-2 within the keratin matrix. Complete dissociation between kerateine and BMP-2 occurred when the PBS pH was lowered (to 4.5), below the keratin isoelectric point of 5.3. This phenomenon can be attributed to the protonation of keratin at a lower pH, leading to positive-positive repulsion. Therefore, the dynamics of kerateine-BMP-2 binding is highly dependent on pH and salt concentration, as well as on BMP-2 solubility at different pH and molarity. The study findings may contribute to our understanding of the release kinetics of drugs from keratin biomaterials and allow for the

  11. Binding Interactions of Keratin-Based Hair Fiber Extract to Gold, Keratin, and BMP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roche C de Guzman

    Full Text Available Hair-derived keratin biomaterials composed mostly of reduced keratin proteins (kerateines have demonstrated their utility as carriers of biologics and drugs for tissue engineering. Electrostatic forces between negatively-charged keratins and biologic macromolecules allow for effective drug retention; attraction to positively-charged growth factors like bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2 has been used as a strategy for osteoinduction. In this study, the intermolecular surface and bulk interaction properties of kerateines were investigated. Thiol-rich kerateines were chemisorbed onto gold substrates to form an irreversible 2-nm rigid layer for surface plasmon resonance analysis. Kerateine-to-kerateine cohesion was observed in pH-neutral water with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD of 1.8 × 10(-4 M, indicating that non-coulombic attractive forces (i.e. hydrophobic and van der Waals were at work. The association of BMP-2 to kerateine was found to be greater (KD = 1.1 × 10(-7 M, within the range of specific binding. Addition of salts (phosphate-buffered saline; PBS shortened the Debye length or the electrostatic field influence which weakened the kerateine-BMP-2 binding (KD = 3.2 × 10(-5 M. BMP-2 in bulk kerateine gels provided a limited release in PBS (~ 10% dissociation in 4 weeks, suggesting that electrostatic intermolecular attraction was significant to retain BMP-2 within the keratin matrix. Complete dissociation between kerateine and BMP-2 occurred when the PBS pH was lowered (to 4.5, below the keratin isoelectric point of 5.3. This phenomenon can be attributed to the protonation of keratin at a lower pH, leading to positive-positive repulsion. Therefore, the dynamics of kerateine-BMP-2 binding is highly dependent on pH and salt concentration, as well as on BMP-2 solubility at different pH and molarity. The study findings may contribute to our understanding of the release kinetics of drugs from keratin biomaterials and allow for the

  12. Feather keratin hydrolysates obtained from microbial keratinases: effect on hair fiber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Villa, Ana Lúcia Vazquez; Aragão, Márcia Regina Senrra; Dos Santos, Elisabete Pereira; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Zingali, Russolina B; de Souza, Edilma Paraguai; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    .... Most of these hydrolysates are obtained by chemical hydrolysis and hydrothermal methods, but recently hydrolyzed hair keratin, feather keratin peptides, and feather meal peptides have been obtained...

  13. Shape Memory Investigation of α-Keratin Fibers as Multi-Coupled Stimuli of Responsive Smart Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang Xiao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Like the water responsive shape memory (SM effect of β-keratin bird feathers, α-keratin hairs either existing broadly in nature are found responsive to many types of coupled stimuli in SM behaviors. In this article, α-keratin hairs were investigated for the combined stimuli of thermo-solvent, solvent-solvent, and UV (radiation-reductant sensitive SM abilities. The related netpoints and switches from the hair molecular networks were identified. The experimental results showed that α-keratin hairs manifested a higher ability of shape fixation under thermal stimulus followed with the stimuli of solvent and UV-radiation. Shape recovery from the hair with a temporarily fixed shape showed a higher recovery ability using solvent than the stimuli of heat and UV-radiation. The effects of coupled stimuli on hair’s shape fixation and recovery and on variations of the crystal, disulfide, and hydrogen bonds were studied systematically. A structural network model was thereafter proposed to interpret the multi-coupled stimuli sensitive SM of α-keratin hair. This original study is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural fibers to reveal related smart functions and for making more types of remarkable adapted synthetic materials.

  14. Multicenter Clinical Trial of Keratin Biomaterial for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    hydrogel scaffolds. Tissue Eng Part A 2011:17(11-12):1499-505 Lin YC, Ram adan M, Van Dyke, M, Kokai LE, Philips BJ, Rubin JP, Marra KG. Keratin gel f...Ram adan M, Van Dyke, M, Kokai LE, Philips BJ, Rubin JP, Marra KG. Keratin gel f iller for peripheral nerve repair in a rodent sciatic nerve injury

  15. Feather keratin hydrolysates obtained from microbial keratinases: effect on hair fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hair is composed mainly of keratin protein and a small amount of lipid. Protein hydrolysates, in particular those with low molecular weight distribution have been known to protect hair against chemical and environmental damage. Many types of protein hydrolysates from plants and animals have been used in hair and personal care such as keratin hydrolysates obtained from nails, horns and wool. Most of these hydrolysates are obtained by chemical hydrolysis and hydrothermal methods, but recently hydrolyzed hair keratin, feather keratin peptides, and feather meal peptides have been obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis using Bacillus spp in submerged fermentation. Results Keratin peptides were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of keratinases using Bacillus subtilis AMR. The microorganism was grown on a feather medium, pH 8.0 (1% feathers) and supplemented with 0.01% of yeast extract, for 5 days, at 28°C with agitation. The supernatant containing the hydrolysates was colleted by centrifugation and ultra filtered in an AMICON system using nano–membranes (Millipore – YC05). The Proteins and peptides were analyzed using HPTLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Commercial preparations of keratin hydrolysates were used as a comparative standard. After five days the feather had been degraded (90-95%) by the peptidases and keratinases of the microorganism. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry showed multiple peaks that correspond to peptides in the range of 800 to 1079 Daltons and the commercial hydrolysate was in the range of 900 to 1400 Da. HPTLC showed lower molecular mass peptides and amino acids in the enzymatic hydrolysate when compared with the commercial hydrolysate . A mild shampoo and a rinse off conditioner were formulated with the enzymatic hydrolysate and applied to hair fibers to evaluate the hydration, with and without heat, using a Corneometer® CM 825. The hydration was more efficient with heat, suggesting a more complete incorporation of hydrolysates into the fibers

  16. Utilization of keratin-containing biowaste to produce biohydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balint, B.; Rakhely, G.; Kovacs, K.L. [Szeged Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biotechnology; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged (Hungary). Inst. of Biophysics; Bagi, Z.; Perei, K. [Szeged Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biotechnology; Toth, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged (Hungary). Inst. of Biophysics

    2005-12-01

    A two-stage fermentation system was constructed to test and demonstrate the feasibility of biohydrogen generation from keratin-rich biowaste. We isolated a novel aerobic Bacillus strain (Bacillus licheniformis KK1) that displays outstanding keratinolytic activity. The isolated strain was employed to convert keratin-containing biowaste into a fermentation product that is rich in amino acids and peptides. The process was optimized for the second fermentation step, in which the product of keratin fermentation-supplemented with essential minerals-was metabolized by Thermococcus litoralis, an anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon. T. litoralis grew on the keratin hydrolysate and produced hydrogen gas as a physiological fermentation byproduct. Hyperthermophilic cells utilized the keratin hydrolysate in a similar way as their standard nutrient, i.e., bacto-peptone. The generalization of the findings to protein-rich waste treatment and production of biohydrogen is discussed and possible means of further improvements are listed. (orig.)

  17. Surface active complexes formed between keratin polypeptides and ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fang; Lu, Zhiming; Tucker, Ian; Hosking, Sarah; Petkov, Jordan; Lu, Jian R

    2016-12-15

    Keratins are a group of important proteins in skin and hair and as biomaterials they can provide desirable properties such as strength, biocompatibility, and moisture regaining and retaining. The aim of this work is to develop water-soluble keratin polypeptides from sheep wool and then explore how their surface adsorption behaves with and without surfactants. Successful preparation of keratin samples was demonstrated by identification of the key components from gel electrophoresis and the reproducible production of gram scale samples with and without SDS (sodium dodecylsulphate) during wool fibre dissolution. SDS micelles could reduce the formation of disulphide bonds between keratins during extraction, reducing inter-molecular crosslinking and improving keratin polypeptide solubility. However, Zeta potential measurements of the two polypeptide batches demonstrated almost identical pH dependent surface charge distributions with isoelectric points around pH 3.5, showing complete removal of SDS during purification by dialysis. In spite of different solubility from the two batches of keratin samples prepared, very similar adsorption and aggregation behavior was revealed from surface tension measurements and dynamic light scattering. Mixing of keratin polypeptides with SDS and C12TAB (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide) led to the formation of keratin-surfactant complexes that were substantially more effective at reducing surface tension than the polypeptides alone, showing great promise in the delivery of keratin polypeptides via the surface active complexes. Neutron reflection measurements revealed the coexistence of surfactant and keratin polypeptides at the interface, thus providing the structural support to the observed surface tension changes associated with the formation of the surface active complexes.

  18. Polyurethane-Keratin Membranes: Structural Changes by Isocyanate and pH, and the Repercussion on Cr(VI Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María D. Manrique-Juárez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratin has the capacity to interact with metal ions. In order to take advantage of this potential, a novel membrane with polyurethane and keratin has been developed and studied for removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution. Physicochemical and morphological properties of these hybrid membranes were studied, varying synthesis parameters such as the type of isocyanate and pH in keratin solution. The effects of using diphenyl-methane-diisocyanate or toluene-diisocyanate and modifying the pH in keratin solutions were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamical mechanical analysis. Results show that pH has a strong influence on morphology and on Cr(VI removal efficiency. When pH in keratin solution is low (2.5, the protein separates from water, and a more closed cell in the membrane is obtained affecting its mechanical properties. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI was also assessed at different pH values of chromium solutions. These results show that when pH of the Cr solution is acidic (at 1.5, the Cr(VI removal percentages increase significantly, reaching up to a 58%. Thus this paper demonstrates the successful combination of synthetic and natural polymers depending on the process parameters to be applied in the critical purpose of remediation of Cr(VI contamination.

  19. Ultrastructural studies of the transitional zone in the nasopharyngeal epithelium, with special reference to the keratinizing process in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, T

    1986-01-01

    In the nasopharynx of the SMA mouse, the 'intermediate epithelium' occupies the transitional zone between the ciliated columnar and the stratified squamous epithelia. The intermediate epithelium showed gradations ranging from ciliated stratified low-columnar through stratified cuboidal to stratified squamous type. It is suggested that the intermediate epithelium shows the various stages of the epithelium transforming from the ciliated columnar to the stratified squamous epithelium, and that the basal cells of the ciliated columnar epithelium serve as the germinal layer for the transformation. The intermediate epithelium containing a few keratohyalin granules and many membrane-coating granules represented earlier stages of keratinization. The width of the microprojections in the stratified squamous epithelium was about doubled compared to that in the intermediate epithelium. It is suggested that the difference in width is caused by cell membrane distortion associated with keratinization and is regarded as an important marker of the start of keratinization.

  20. Isolation and Analysis of Keratins and Keratin-Associated Proteins from Hair and Wool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Plowman, Jeffrey E; Harland, Duane P

    2016-01-01

    The presence of highly cross-linked protein networks in hair and wool makes them very difficult substrates for protein extraction, a prerequisite for further protein analysis and characterization. It is therefore imperative that these cross-links formed by disulfide bridges are first disrupted for the efficient extraction of proteins. Chaotropes such as urea are commonly used as efficient extractants. However, a combination of urea and thiourea not only improves recovery of proteins but also results in improved resolution of the keratins in 2DE gels. Reductants also play an important role in protein dissolution. Dithiothreitol effectively removes keratinous material from the cortex, whereas phosphines, like Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, remove material from the exocuticle. The relative extractability of the keratins and keratin-associated proteins is also dependent on the concentration of chaotropes, reductants, and pH, thus providing a means to preferentially extract these proteins. Ionic liquids such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM(+)[Cl](-)) are known to solubilize wool by disrupting noncovalent interactions, specifically intermolecular hydrogen bonds. BMIM(+)[Cl](-) proved to be an effective extractant of wool proteins and complementary in nature to chaotropes such as urea and thiourea for identifying unique peptides of wool proteins using mass spectrometry (MS). Successful identification of proteins resolved by one- or two-dimensional electrophoresis and MS is highly dependent on the optimal recovery of its protease-digested peptides with an efficient removal of interfering substances. The detergent sodium deoxycholate used in conjunction with Empore™ disks improved identification of proteins by mass spectrometry leading to higher percentage sequence coverage, identification of unique peptides and higher score.

  1. Keratins Stabilize Hemidesmosomes through Regulation of β4-Integrin Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltmann, Kristin; Cheng, Fang; Wiche, Gerhard; Eriksson, John E; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-06-01

    Epidermal integrity and wound healing depend on remodeling of cell-matrix contacts including hemidesmosomes. Mutations in β4-integrin and plectin lead to severe epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Whether mutations in keratins K5 or K14, which cause EB simplex, also compromise cell-matrix adhesion through altering hemidesmosomal components is not well investigated. In particular, the dependence of β4-integrin endocytosis and turnover on keratins remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that the absence of keratins causes loss of plectin-β4-integrin interaction and elevated β4-integrin phosphorylation at Ser1354 and Ser1362. This triggered a caveolin-dependent endocytosis of β4-integrin but not of other integrins through Rab5 and Rab11 compartments in keratinocytes. Expressing a phospho-deficient β4-integrin mutant reduces β4-integrin endocytosis and rescues plectin localization in keratin-free cells. β4-integrin phosphorylation in the absence of keratins resulted from elevated Erk1/2 activity downstream of increased EGFR and PKCα signaling. Further, increased Erk1/2 phosphorylation and altered plectin localization occur in keratin-deficient mouse epidermis in vivo. Strikingly, expression of the K14-R125P EBS mutant also resulted in plectin mislocalization and elevated β4-integrin turnover, suggesting disease relevance. Our data underscore a major role of keratins in controlling β4-integrin endocytosis involving a plectin-Erk1/2-dependent mechanism relevant for epidermal differentiation and pathogenesis.

  2. Calcification provides mechanical reinforcement to whale baleen alpha-keratin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewciw, L J; de Kerckhove, D G; Grime, G W; Fudge, D S

    2010-09-01

    Hard alpha-keratins such as hair, nail, wool and horn are stiff epidermal appendages used by mammals in a variety of functions including thermoregulation, feeding and intraspecific competition. Hard alpha-keratins are fibre-reinforced structures consisting of cytoskeletal elements known as 'intermediate filaments' embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. Recent research has shown that intermediate filaments are soft and extensible in living keratinocytes but become far stiffer and less extensible in keratinized cells, and this stiffening may be mediated by air-drying. Baleen, the keratinous plates used by baleen whales during filter feeding, is an unusual mammalian keratin in that it never air dries, and in some species, it represents the most heavily calcified of all the hard alpha-keratins. We therefore tested the hypothesis that whale baleen is stiffened by calcification. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive description of baleen material properties and show that calcification contributes to overcoming the shortcomings of stiffening this hard alpha-keratin without the benefit of air-drying. We also demonstrate striking interspecies differences in the calcification patterns among three species of baleen whales and provide novel insights into the function and evolution of this unusual biomaterial.

  3. Immunohistochemical expression of keratin proteins in urinary bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoto, M; Fukushima, S; Tatemoto, Y; Yamada, K; Fukui, S; Mori, M

    1989-02-01

    Transitional carcinomas of the urinary bladder were examined immunohistochemically for keratin proteins with the use of polyclonal antiserum (TK, 41-65 kDa) and 3 monoclonal antibodies (KL 1, 55-57 kDa; PKK 1, nos. 19, 18, 8; and K 8.12, nos. 16, 13). Umbrella cells gave particularly strong staining for TK, KL 1 and PKK 1, whereas they were negative for K 8.12. Basal- and intermediate-layer cells in urothelial epithelium were moderately positive for all keratins. Brunn's nests cells showed comparatively slight or moderate keratin staining, and K 8.12 staining of Brunn's nests was higher than in urothelial epithelial cells. Transitional carcinoma (grades I and II) indicated uniform keratin distribution, and staining was strong with TK, while that of KL 1, PKK 1 and K 8.12 varied, and grade III tumors showed the lowest intensity of staining. K 8.12 staining in papillary transitional carcinomas was strongly positive in basal located tumor cells, as compared with apical tumor cells. Squamous cell carcinoma was varying positive to keratin reactions dependent on the degree of keratinization. Heterogenity of keratin distribution in papillary transitional carcinomas was given between basal tumor cells and well differentiated tumor cells including umbrella-like cells.

  4. MEMBRANE-COATING GRANULES OF KERATINIZING EPITHELIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATOLTSY, A G; PARAKKAL, P F

    1965-02-01

    The purpose of this study has been to obtain information on the development of the envelop of horny cells that resists the action of keratinolytic agents. Toward this end the epidermis, oral mucosa, and tongue epithelium of various vertebrates, as well as the isolated envelopes of horny cells, were examined by electron microscopy. It was found that small cytoplasmic granules (1,000 to 5,000 A) that develop within differentiating epithelial cells move toward the cell periphery, and after fusion with the plasma membrane, empty their contents into the intercellular spaces. The content of the granules spreads over the cell surfaces, and subsequently a thickened and coated cell envelope is formed that resists the action of keratinolytic agent. The membrane-coating granule is regarded as a specific differentiation product of the keratinizing epithelium. It contains numerous inner membranes and is assumed to engage in synthetic activities such as, perhaps, the formation of polysaccharides.

  5. The permeability of a keratinizing squamous epithelium in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squier, C A; Fejerskov, O; Jepsen, A

    1978-05-01

    Horseradish peroxidase or lanthanum was applied to the surface of keratinized oral epithelium growing in tissue culture and the extent of penetration of these substances examined with the electron microscope. Both tracer substances penetrated between the superficial keratinized squames of the tissue, the lanthanum reaching the basal cell layer and the peroxidase diffusing to within 3--8 cells of the basal layer. The permeability of the keratinized layer in this epithelium is in contrast to the situation in vivo where an intercellular barrier is found in the superficial layer. This difference might be related to the absence of membrane-coating granules from the tissue maintained in culture.

  6. Wool Keratin 3D Scaffolds with Light-Triggered Antimicrobial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Claudia; Sotgiu, Giovanna; Sagnella, Anna; Varchi, Greta; Guerrini, Andrea; Giuri, Demetra; Polo, Eleonora; Orlandi, Viviana Teresa; Marras, Emanuela; Gariboldi, Marzia; Monti, Elena; Aluigi, Annalisa

    2016-09-12

    Photoactivatable keratin sponges were prepared from protein aqueous solutions by the freeze-drying method, followed by photofunctionalization with two different photosensitizers (PS): Azure A (AzA) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis [4-(2-N,N,N-trimethylethylthio)-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl]porphyrin tetraiodide salt (TTFAP). The prepared sponges have a porosity between 49% and 80% and a mean pore size in the 37-80 μm range. As compared to AzA, TTFAP interacts more strongly with the sponges as demonstrated by a lower PS release (6% vs 20%), a decreased swelling ratio (1.6 vs 7.4), and a slower biodegradation rate. Nevertheless, AzA-loaded sponges showed the highest photoactivity, as also demonstrated by their higher antibactericidal activity toward both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The obtained results suggest that the antimicrobial photodynamic effect can be finely triggered through a proper selection of the amount and type of photosensitizer, as well as through the irradiation time. Finally, all the prepared sponges support human fibroblast cells growth, while no significant cell viability impairment is observed upon light irradiation.

  7. K-type human endogenous retroviral elements in human melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincon L

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Liliana Rincon,1 Michael P Sedrak,1 Huijian Sun,2 Gregorio Garza,3 Brent Kelly,4 Jianli Dong11Department of Pathology, 2School of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, TX, USA; 3Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico; 4Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Medical Branch, TX, USAAbstract: Human endogenous retroviral elements (HERVs are thought to be germline-integrated genetic remnants of exogenous retroviral infections. HERVs comprise approximately 5%–8% of the human genome. Although all HERV genomes are highly defective, some, especially the K type (HERV-K, have the potential to be expressed and have biological activities. HERV-K expression has been detected in human melanomas. There are also reports on the regulation and potential activities of HERV-K in melanoma cells. Although a causal link between the activation of HERV-K and melanoma development has yet to be determined, existing data support the further research efforts in this area. In this review, we summarize the published studies on the expression, regulation, and activity of HERV-K in human melanoma.Keywords: HERV, HERV-K, melanoma development

  8. Screening for a new Streptomyces strain capable of efficient keratin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Keratinous wastes could be degraded by some microorganisms in nature.Native human foot skin (NHFS) was used as sole nitrogen source to screen microorganisms with keratin-degrading capability.From approximately 200 strains,a strain of Streptomyces sp.strain No.16 was found to possess the strongest keratinolytic activity,and the total activity in the culture was 110 KU/ml with specific activity of 2870 KU/mg protein (KU:keratinase unit).Substrate specificity test indicated that the crude keratinase could degrade keratin azure,human hair,cock feathers and collagen.The optimal pH of the crude keratinase ranged from 7.5 to 10 and the temperature ranged from 40℃ to 55℃.Metal chelating agent ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid obviously stimulated the keratinolytic activity but suppressed the proteolytic activity.To our knowledge.this is the first report on specific induction of kemtinases by NHFS from an actinomycete.Moreover,excellent characteristics of its crude keratinase may lead to the potential application in waste treatment and recovery,poultry and leather industry,medicine,and cosmetic development.

  9. Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type IIB and Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA tested the hypothesis that human papillomavirus type 16 oncoprotein E6 (HPV16 E6 is present in human focal cortical dysplasia type IIB (FCDIIB specimens.

  10. Evidence that the deep keratin filament systems of the Xenopus embryo act to ensure normal gastrulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Klymkowsky, M. W.; Shook, D R; Maynell, L A

    1992-01-01

    To study the role of keratin filaments in Xenopus development, fertilized eggs were injected with anti-keratin monoclonal antibodies. The anti-keratin monoclonal antibodies AE1 and AE3 induce abnormal gastrulation; in the most severely affected embryos gastrulation fails completely. In contrast, embryos injected with the anti-keratin antibody 1h5 develop normally. Immunocytochemical data indicate that injected 1h5 binds to the dense superficial keratin filament system of the embryo but not to...

  11. Study on the Handle of Keratin Transgenic Cotton Fabric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋培清; 严文源; 严灏景

    2004-01-01

    Gene of animal keratin can be inoculated into cotton fiber and thus get the keratin transgenic cotton fiber through transgenic technology. Handle of two kinds of pure cotton poplin, one of which is made of the keratin transgenic cotton while the other is made of the ordinary cotton of the same breed as control group and both with absolutely identical spinning, weaving, and dyeing process, was objectively evaluated with KES system. The result of analysis indicates that the principal changes of keratin transgenic cotton fabric are that the bending and shearing property of the fabric are considerably enhanced, KOSHI (Stiffness) and HARI (Anti-drape stiffness) of the fabric are good, while SHINAYAKASA (Flexibility with soft feeling) and SHARI (Crispness) decline.

  12. "Panta rhei": Perpetual cycling of the keratin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leube, Rudolf E; Moch, Marcin; Kölsch, Anne; Windoffer, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous cytoskeletal systems fulfil seemingly incompatible functions by maintaining a stable scaffolding to ensure tissue integrity and simultaneously facilitating rapid adaptation to intracellular processes and environmental stimuli. This paradox is particularly obvious for the abundant keratin intermediate filaments in epithelial tissues. The epidermal keratin cytoskeleton, for example, supports the protective and selective barrier function of the skin while enabling rapid growth and remodelling in response to physical, chemical and microbial challenges. We propose that these dynamic properties are linked to the perpetual re-cycling of keratin intermediate filaments that we observe in cultured cells. This cycle of assembly and disassembly is independent of protein biosynthesis and consists of distinct, temporally and spatially defined steps. In this way, the keratin cytoskeleton remains in constant motion but stays intact and is also able to restructure rapidly in response to specific regulatory cues as is needed, e.g., during division, differentiation and wound healing.

  13. Blood type biochemistry and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, D Rose; Sumner, Susan C J

    2016-11-01

    Associations between blood type and disease have been studied since the early 1900s when researchers determined that antibodies and antigens are inherited. In the 1950s, the chemical identification of the carbohydrate structure of surface antigens led to the understanding of biosynthetic pathways. The blood type is defined by oligosaccharide structures, which are specific to the antigens, thus, blood group antigens are secondary gene products, while the primary gene products are various glycosyltransferase enzymes that attach the sugar molecules to the oligosaccharide chain. Blood group antigens are found on red blood cells, platelets, leukocytes, plasma proteins, certain tissues, and various cell surface enzymes, and also exist in soluble form in body secretions such as breast milk, seminal fluid, saliva, sweat, gastric secretions, urine, and amniotic fluid. Recent advances in technology, biochemistry, and genetics have clarified the functional classifications of human blood group antigens, the structure of the A, B, H, and Lewis determinants and the enzymes that produce them, and the association of blood group antigens with disease risks. Further research to identify differences in the biochemical composition of blood group antigens, and the relationship to risks for disease, can be important for the identification of targets for the development of nutritional intervention strategies, or the identification of druggable targets. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:517-535. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1355 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  14. Grafting of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes with Chicken Feather Keratin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoxkin Estévez-Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratin, obtained from chicken feathers, was grafted on the surface of commercially available carbon nanotubes. The original procedure developed allows a covalent interaction between some specific chemical groups characteristic of the keratin, with some functional groups introduced on purpose on the surface of the nanotubes, as revealed by infrared and Raman spectroscopies, which also allowed to determine structural changes introduced during the process, such as crystallinity, which lead to changes in other properties, as well.

  15. Multicenter Clinical Trial of Keratin Biomaterials for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    purity (size exclusion chromatography for molecular weight, amino acids analysis, ELISA for protein identification, and gel rheology ) and 2) a cell...distribution study. Labeled keratin gel will be placed inside nerve conduits. The ends of the conduits will be closed, and the conduits will be implanted in...Marra KG. Keratin gel filler for peripheral nerve repair in a rodent sciatic nerve injury model. Plast Reconstr Surg 2012;129:67-78. Pace LA

  16. Differences in cytocompatibility between collagen, gelatin and keratin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanfang; Zhang, Weiwei; Yuan, Jiang, E-mail: jyuan@njnu.edu.cn; Shen, Jian, E-mail: jshen@njnu.edu.cn

    2016-02-01

    Keratins are cysteine-rich intermediate filament proteins found in the cytoskeleton of the epithelial cells and in the matrix of hair, feathers, wool, nails and horns. The natural abundance of cell adhesion sequences, RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) and LDV (Leu-Asp-Val), makes them suitable for tissue engineering applications. The purpose of our study is to evaluate their cytocompatibility as compared to well-known collagen and gelatin proteins. Herein, collagen, gelatin and keratin were blended with poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and electrospun to afford nanofibrous mats, respectively. These PHBV/protein composite mats were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The cytocompatibility was evaluated with cell adhesion, cell viability and cell proliferation. The data from MTT and BrDU revealed that collagen had significantly superior cytocompatibility as compared to gelatin and keratin. Gelatin showed a better cytocompatibility than keratin without statistical significance difference. Finally, we gave the reasons to account for the above conclusions. - Highlights: • Collagen, gelatin and keratin were coelectrospun with PHBV to afford nanofibrous mats. • Cytocompatibility was evaluated with cell adhesion, cell viability and cell proliferation. • Collagen had significantly superior cytocompatibility as compared to gelatin and keratin.

  17. Keratin 9 Is Required for the Structural Integrity and Terminal Differentiation of the Palmoplantar Epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dun Jack; Thomson, Calum; Lunny, Declan P; Dopping-Hepenstal, Patricia J; McGrath, John A; Smith, Frances J D; Irwin McLean, W H; Pedrioli, Deena M Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Keratin 9 (K9) is a type I intermediate filament protein whose expression is confined to the suprabasal layers of the palmoplantar epidermis. Although mutations in the K9 gene are known to cause epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, a rare dominant-negative skin disorder, its functional significance is poorly understood. To gain insight into the physical requirement and importance of K9, we generated K9-deficient (Krt9−/−) mice. Here, we report that adult Krt9−/−mice develop calluses marked by hyperpigmentation that are exclusively localized to the stress-bearing footpads. Histological, immunohistochemical, and immunoblot analyses of these regions revealed hyperproliferation, impaired terminal differentiation, and abnormal expression of keratins K5, K14, and K2. Furthermore, the absence of K9 induces the stress-activated keratins K6 and K16. Importantly, mice heterozygous for the K9-null allele (Krt9+/−) show neither an overt nor histological phenotype, demonstrating that one Krt9 allele is sufficient for the developing normal palmoplantar epidermis. Together, our data demonstrate that complete ablation of K9 is not tolerable in vivo and that K9 is required for terminal differentiation and maintaining the mechanical integrity of palmoplantar epidermis. PMID:23962810

  18. Keratin 9 is required for the structural integrity and terminal differentiation of the palmoplantar epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dun Jack; Thomson, Calum; Lunny, Declan P; Dopping-Hepenstal, Patricia J; McGrath, John A; Smith, Frances J D; McLean, W H Irwin; Pedrioli, Deena M Leslie

    2014-03-01

    Keratin 9 (K9) is a type I intermediate filament protein whose expression is confined to the suprabasal layers of the palmoplantar epidermis. Although mutations in the K9 gene are known to cause epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, a rare dominant-negative skin disorder, its functional significance is poorly understood. To gain insight into the physical requirement and importance of K9, we generated K9-deficient (Krt9(-/-)) mice. Here, we report that adult Krt9(-/-)mice develop calluses marked by hyperpigmentation that are exclusively localized to the stress-bearing footpads. Histological, immunohistochemical, and immunoblot analyses of these regions revealed hyperproliferation, impaired terminal differentiation, and abnormal expression of keratins K5, K14, and K2. Furthermore, the absence of K9 induces the stress-activated keratins K6 and K16. Importantly, mice heterozygous for the K9-null allele (Krt9(+/-)) show neither an overt nor histological phenotype, demonstrating that one Krt9 allele is sufficient for the developing normal palmoplantar epidermis. Together, our data demonstrate that complete ablation of K9 is not tolerable in vivo and that K9 is required for terminal differentiation and maintaining the mechanical integrity of palmoplantar epidermis.

  19. Preparation and comparative characterization of keratin-chitosan and keratin-gelatin composite scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, S.; Kumar, Ramadhar; Sripriya, R.; Kakkar, Prachi; Ramesh, D. Vijaya [Bio-products Laboratory, Biomaterial Division (India); Reddy, P. Neela Kanta [Bioorganic and Neurochemistry Department, Central Leather Research Institute, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai-20 (India); Sehgal, P.K., E-mail: sehgal_pk@yahoo.co.in [Bio-products Laboratory, Biomaterial Division (India)

    2012-05-01

    We report fabrication of three dimensional scaffolds with well interconnected matrix of high porosity using keratin, chitosan and gelatin for tissue engineering and other biomedical applications. Scaffolds were fabricated using porous Keratin-Gelatin (KG), Keratin-Chitosan (KC) composites. The morphology of both KG and KC was investigated using SEM. The scaffolds showed high porosity with interconnected pores in the range of 20-100 {mu}m. They were further tested by FTIR, DSC, CD, tensile strength measurement, water uptake and swelling behavior. In vitro cell adhesion and cell proliferation tests were carried out to study the biocompatibility behavior and their application as an artificial skin substitute. Both KG and KC composite scaffolds showed similar properties and patterns for cell proliferation. Due to rapid degradation of gelatin in KG, we found that it has limited application as compared to KC scaffold. We conclude that KC scaffold owing to its slow degradation and antibacterial properties would be a better substrate for tissue engineering and other biomedical application. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extraction of reduced keratin from horn meal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of keratin-gelatin and keratin-chitosan composite scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterizations of the composite scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparative cytotoxicity analysis on NIH3T3 fibroblasts.

  20. Renal Pelviceal Keratinizing Squamous Metaplasia with Sparing of Pyramidal Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Siderits

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metaplastic changes in the urothelium of the upper urinary tract are relatively infrequent. Metaplasia may present as either squamous or less often glandular differentiation. The process may be associated with chronic inflammation or associated chronic infections. There may be malignant transformation to either squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. The demarcation of the metaplastic process in the minor calyces has not been well documented to date. We report the case of a 74-year-old female patient who presented with a history of chronic renal disease and acute pyohydronephrosis. The patient underwent a nephroureterectomy which revealed keratinizing desquamative squamous metaplasia throughout the renal pelvis and upper urinary tract with abrupt termination of metaplasia at the junction of the renal pelvis and the minor calyx (pyramidal zone. Immunohistochemical evaluation documents metaplastic urothelium stained positive for CK5, before converting sharply to simple cuboidal epithelium in the minor calyx (pyramidal zones which stained positive CK7. At the junction of the metaplastic components and low cuboidal lined minor calyceal surfaces, the underlying stroma showed loss of ureteral muscularis mucosa with transition to renal parenchymal type stroma. We believe that this observation is unique and potentially relevant to the etiology and pathophysiology of pelviceal metaplasia.

  1. Effect of discarded keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels on the wound healing process in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mira [Department of Organic Materials & Fiber Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hye Kyoung [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Incheon 402–751 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung-Suhk [Department of BIN fusion technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung Jin; Kim, In-Shik [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-safety Research institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung-Yong, E-mail: parkb@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-safety Research institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Yong, E-mail: khy@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of BIN fusion technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation (EBI) were examined in wound healing. As the EBI dose increased to 60 kGy, the tensile strength of the hydrogels increased, while the percentage of elongation of the hydrogels decreased. After 7 days, the dehydrated wool-based hydrogels show the highest mechanical properties (the % elongation of 1341 and the tensile strength of 6030 g/cm{sup 2} at an EBI dose of 30 kGy). Excision wound models were used to evaluate the effects of human hair-based hydrogels and wool-based hydrogels on various phases of healing. On post-wounding days 7 and 14, wounds treated with either human hair-based or wool-based hydrogels were greatly reduced in size compared to wounds that received other treatments, although the hydrocolloid wound dressing-treated wound also showed a pronounced reduction in size compared to an open wound as measured by a histological assay. On the 14th postoperative day, the cellular appearances were similar in the hydrocolloid wound dressing and wool-based hydrogel-treated wounds, and collagen fibers were substituted with fibroblasts and mixed with fibroblasts in the dermis. Furthermore, the wound treated with a human hair-based hydrogel showed almost complete epithelial regeneration, with the maturation of immature connective tissue and hair follicles and formation of a sebaceous gland. - Highlights: • Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels were examined for wound healing process. • Human hair-based hydrogel is superior to wool-based hydrogel in wound healing. • Discarded keratin-based hydrogels are expected more eco-friendly therapeutic agents.

  2. PKC412 normalizes mutation‐related keratin filament disruption and hepatic injury in mice by promoting keratin–myosin binding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwan, Raymond; Chen, Lu; Looi, Koksun; Tao, Guo‐Zhong; Weerasinghe, Sujith V; Snider, Natasha T; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S; Xie, Qing; Omary, M. Bishr

    2015-01-01

    Keratins, among other cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins, are mutated at a highly conserved arginine with consequent severe disease phenotypes due to disruption of keratin filament organization...

  3. Transgenic Studies with a Keratin Promoter-Driven Growth Hormone Transgene: Prospects for Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zinkel, Sandra; Polonsky, Kenneth; Fuchs, Elaine

    1997-01-01

    Keratinocytes are potentially appealing vehicles for the delivery of secreted gene products because they can be transferred to human skin by the relatively simple procedure of grafting. Adult human keratinocytes can be efficiently propagated in culture with sufficient proliferative capacity to produce enough epidermis to cover the body surface of an average adult. However, the feasibility of delivering secreted proteins through skin grafting rests upon (i) the strength of the promoter in keratinocytes and (ii) the efficiency of protein transport through the basement membrane of the stratified epithelium and into the bloodstream. In this paper, we use transgenic technology to demonstrate that the activity of the human keratin 14 promoter remains high in adult skin and that keratinocyte-derived human growth hormone (hGH) can be produced, secreted, and transported to the bloodstream of mice with efficiency that is sufficient to exceed by an order of magnitude the circulating hGH concentration in growing children. Transgenic skin grafts from these adults continue to produce and secrete hGH stably, at ≈ 1/10 physiological levels in the bloodstream of nontransgenic recipient mice. These studies underscore the utility of the keratin 14 promoter for expressing foreign transgenes in keratinocytes and demonstrate that keratinocytes can be used as effective vehicles for transporting factors to the bloodstream and for eliciting metabolic changes. These findings have important implications for considering the keratinocyte as a possible vehicle for gene therapy.

  4. The keratin intermediate filament—like system in maize protoplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SuFei; GuWei; 等

    1990-01-01

    The application of Penman's method of cell fractionation to plant protoplasts leads to our finding of keratin intermediate filament(IF)-like system in maize protoplasts,which was identified by using immunogold labelling with monoclonal antibody of cytokeratin from animal cells.Many gold particles were found to be bound on filaments,linked by 3 nm filaments.After further digestion and extraction with DNase I and ammonium sulphate.IF-like framework-lamina-nuclear matrix system was shown under electron microscope.That IF system exists in plant protoplasts just like in animal cells,and their main component is keratin-like protein.

  5. Keratin capped silver nanoparticles - synthesis and characterization of a nanomaterial with desirable handling properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) were produced with keratin stabilizer and the NPs exhibited unimodal Gaussian distribution with average diameter of 3.5nm +/- 0.7 nm. The molecular mass of keratin stabilizer was 6-8 kDa. The mass of keratin capped NPs was >250 kDa to indicate the formation of crosslinked...

  6. Human intestinal microbiota and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi

    2013-10-01

    The role of intestinal microbiota in immune-mediated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, has deservedly received a lot of attention. Evidently, changes in the intestinal microbiota are associated with type 1 diabetes as demonstrated by recent studies. Children with beta-cell autoimmunity have shown low abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and increase in the abundance of members of the Bacteroidetes phylum in fecal microbiota. These alterations could explain increased gut permeability, subclinical small intestinal inflammation, and dysregulation of oral tolerance in type 1 diabetes. However, these studies do not provide evidence of the causative role of the gut microbiota in the development of beta-cell autoimmunity, yet. In animal models, the composition of gut microbiota modulates the function of both innate and adaptive immunity, and intestinal bacteria are regulators of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, prevention of type 1 diabetes could, in the future, be based on the interventions targeted to the gut microbiota.

  7. Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashimoto,Noriaki

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity was detected in human serum. Serum was preincubated with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate and trypsin to activate the enzyme prior to assay. Type IV collagen, purified from human placentas and radiolabeled with [1-14C] acetic anhydride, was used as the substrate. The enzyme activity was measured at pH 7.5 and inhibited by treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or heat. The assay of type IV collagen-degrading enzyme in human serum might be useful for estimating the degradation of type IV collagen.

  8. Mapping of a gene for epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma to the region of the acidic keratin gene cluster at 17q12-q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A; Küster, W; Eckardt, R; Sperling, K

    1992-01-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) (Vörner-Unna-Thost) is an autosomal dominantly inherited skin disease of unknown etiology characterized by diffuse severe hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles and, histologically, by cellular degeneration. We have mapped a gene for EPPK to chromosome 17q11-q23, with linkage analysis using microsatellite DNA-polymorphisms, in a single large family of 7 generations. A maximum lod score of z = 6.66 was obtained with the probe D17S579 at a recombination fraction of theta = 0.00. This locus maps to the same region as the type I (acidic) keratin gene cluster. Keratins, members of the intermediate filament family, the major proteins of the cytoskeleton in epidermis, are differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. One acidic keratin, keratin 9 (KRT9), is expressed only in the terminally differentiated epidermis of palms and soles. The KRT9 gene has not yet been cloned; however, since the genes for most acidic keratins are clustered, it is highly probable that it too will map to this region. We therefore propose KRT9 as the candidate gene for EPPK.

  9. Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma cosegregates with a keratin 9 mutation in a pedigree with breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchard, D; Blanchet-Bardon, C; Serova, O; Langbein, L; Narod, S; Janin, N; Goguel, A F; Bernheim, A; Franke, W W; Lenoir, G M

    1994-01-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratosis (EPPK) cosegregates with breast and ovarian cancers in a large French pedigree, raising the possibility that a single genetic mutation might cause these conditions and offering a potential lead to the identification of a hereditary breast/ovarian cancer gene. We have performed linkage analysis and show that the EPPK locus lies on the long arm of chromosome 17 near the type I keratin gene cluster and the proposed breast cancer gene (BRCA1). The type I keratin 9 gene has been partially sequenced in four affected individuals. A single base mutation within the rod domain of the protein cosegregates with EPPK in all affected individuals tested. Although inheritance of this mutation is likely responsible for EPPK, it is unlikely to be the cause of the breast and ovarian cancer.

  10. The three types of human viral hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Infections with hepatitis A and B viruses are common in all parts of the world and constitute a major public health problem. The identification of specific antigenic markers of these viruses has led to the development of sensitive laboratory tests. These, in turn, have resulted in a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, immunology, and the nature of these common infections. In the case of hepatitis type B, laboratory tests revealed a persistent carrier state of the surface antigen in some 120-175 million people and established the significance of hepatitis B virus in the pathogenesis of serious chronic liver disease, including a strong association with primary hepatocellular carcinoma in tropical and some subtropical regions. In addition, the specific diagnosis of hepatitis types A and B has revealed a previously unrecognized form of hepatitis which is clearly unrelated to either type. This new form of infection of the liver is now the most common type of hepatitis after the transfusion of blood and blood products in some areas of the world and it also appears to be an important cause of sporadic hepatitis, particularly among adults. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:78770

  11. Keratin sponge/hydrogel II, active agent delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogels from oxidation and reduction hydrolysis of fine and coarse wool fibers were formed to behave as cationic hydrogels to swell and release active agents in the specific region of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Their porous, interpenetrating networks (IPN) were effective for...

  12. Keratin sponge/hydrogel part 1. fabrication and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogel products formed by either the oxidation or reduction of U.S. domestic fine- or coarse-grade wool exhibited distinctively different topologies and molecular weights of 6- 8 kDa and 40-60 kDa, each with unique macro-porous structure and microstructural behaviors. The sponge/ ...

  13. NAIL KERATIN AS MONITOR-TISSUE FOR SELENIUM EXPOSURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANNOORD, PAH; MAAS, MJ; DEBRUIN, M

    1992-01-01

    Nail clippings might provide a way to monitor exposure to selenium in the recent past of an individual, since a clipping collected from a toe would reflect exposures months before actual clipping date. The relation between levels of exogenous selenium exposure and selenium levels in nail keratin was

  14. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: Impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2015-01-01

    /or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared to type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4......-responses to insulin adjusted for protein level were not different between fiber types. Independently of fiber type, insulin signaling was similar (TBC1D1, GS and PDH-E1α) or decreased (Akt and TBC1D4) in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared to lean and obese subjects. We conclude that human type I...

  15. Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity in human serum.

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Michio; Watanabe,Akiharu; Higashi, Toshiro; Tsuji, Takao

    1988-01-01

    Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity was detected in human serum. Serum was preincubated with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate and trypsin to activate the enzyme prior to assay. Type IV collagen, purified from human placentas and radiolabeled with [1-14C] acetic anhydride, was used as the substrate. The enzyme activity was measured at pH 7.5 and inhibited by treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or heat. The assay of type IV collagen-degrading enzyme in human serum might be useful...

  16. Autophagy regulates keratin 8 homeostasis in mammary epithelial cells and in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongara, Sameera; Kravchuk, Olga; Teplova, Irina; Lozy, Fred; Schulte, Jennifer; Moore, Dirk; Barnard, Nicola; Neumann, Carola A.; White, Eileen; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is activated in response to cellular stressors and mediates lysosomal degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic material and organelles as a temporary cell survival mechanism. Defective autophagy is implicated in human pathology, as disruption of protein and organelle homeostasis enables disease-promoting mechanisms such as toxic protein aggregation, oxidative stress, genomic damage and inflammation. We previously showed that autophagy-defective immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) are susceptible to metabolic stress, DNA damage and genomic instability. We now report that autophagy deficiency was associated with ER and oxidative stress, and deregulation of p62-mediated keratin homeostasis in mammary cells and allograft tumors and in mammary tissues from genetically engineered mice. In human breast tumors, high phospho(Ser73)-K8 levels inversely correlated with Beclin 1 expression. Thus, autophagy preserves cellular fitness by limiting ER and oxidative stress, a function potentially important in autophagy-mediated suppression of mammary tumorigenesis. Furthermore, autophagy regulates keratin homeostasis in the mammary gland via a p62-dependent mechanism. High phospho(Ser73)-K8 expression may be a marker of autophagy functional status in breast tumors and, as such, could have therapeutic implications for breast cancer patients. PMID:20530580

  17. Retinoids strongly and selectively correlate with keratin 13 and not keratin 19 expression in cutaneous warts of renal transplant recipients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokx, W.A.M.; Smit, J.V.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Link, M.M.G.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Ruiter, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the expression of keratin (K) 13 and K19 in cutaneous warts of renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and immunocompetent individuals (ICIs). DESIGN: Retrospective, nonrandomized immunohistochemical study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Specimens from cutaneous warts of RTRs and ICIs were

  18. Non-coding keratin variants associate with liver fibrosis progression in patients with hemochromatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Strnad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18 are intermediate filament proteins that protect the liver from various forms of injury. Exonic K8/K18 variants associate with adverse outcome in acute liver failure and with liver fibrosis progression in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection or primary biliary cirrhosis. Given the association of K8/K18 variants with end-stage liver disease and progression in several chronic liver disorders, we studied the importance of keratin variants in patients with hemochromatosis. METHODS: The entire K8/K18 exonic regions were analyzed in 162 hemochromatosis patients carrying homozygous C282Y HFE (hemochromatosis gene mutations. 234 liver-healthy subjects were used as controls. Exonic regions were PCR-amplified and analyzed using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and DNA sequencing. Previously-generated transgenic mice overexpressing K8 G62C were studied for their susceptibility to iron overload. Susceptibility to iron toxicity of primary hepatocytes that express K8 wild-type and G62C was also assessed. RESULTS: We identified amino-acid-altering keratin heterozygous variants in 10 of 162 hemochromatosis patients (6.2% and non-coding heterozygous variants in 6 additional patients (3.7%. Two novel K8 variants (Q169E/R275W were found. K8 R341H was the most common amino-acid altering variant (4 patients, and exclusively associated with an intronic KRT8 IVS7+10delC deletion. Intronic, but not amino-acid-altering variants associated with the development of liver fibrosis. In mice, or ex vivo, the K8 G62C variant did not affect iron-accumulation in response to iron-rich diet or the extent of iron-induced hepatocellular injury. CONCLUSION: In patients with hemochromatosis, intronic but not exonic K8/K18 variants associate with liver fibrosis development.

  19. O-GlcNAcylation determines the solubility, filament organization, and stability of keratins 8 and 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Budnar; Vaidya, Milind M; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2010-10-29

    Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/18) are intermediate filament proteins expressed specifically in simple epithelial tissues. Dynamic equilibrium of these phosphoglycoproteins in the soluble and filament pool is an important determinant of their cellular functions, and it is known to be regulated by site-specific phosphorylation. However, little is known about the role of dynamic O-GlcNAcylation on this keratin pair. Here, by comparing immortalized (Chang) and transformed hepatocyte (HepG2) cell lines, we have demonstrated that O-GlcNAcylation of K8/18 exhibits a positive correlation with their solubility (Nonidet P-40 extractability). Heat stress, which increases K8/18 solubility, resulted in a simultaneous increase in O-GlcNAc on these proteins. Conversely, increasing O-GlcNAc levels were associated with a concurrent increase in their solubility. This was also associated with a notable decrease in total cellular levels of K8/18. Unaltered levels of transcripts and the reduced half-life of K8 and K18 indicated their decreased stability on increasing O-GlcNAcylation. On the contrary, the K18 glycosylation mutant (K18 S29A/S30A/S48A) was notably more stable than the wild type K18 in Chang cells. The K18-O-GlcNAc mutant accumulated as aggregates upon stable expression, which possibly altered endogenous filament architecture. These results strongly indicate the involvement of O-GlcNAc on K8/18 in regulating their solubility and stability, which may have a bearing on the functions of these keratins.

  20. HTLV-I Tax and Cytokeratin: Tax-Expressing Cells Show Morphological Changes in Keratin-Containing Cytoskeletal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trihn, D.; Jeang, K.-T.; Semmes, O.J.

    1997-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) has been linked to the development of an aggressive lymphoproliferative disorder (adult T cell leukemia), a chronic neurodegenerative presentation (HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and numerous less well-defined inflammatory conditions. The viral regulatory protein Tax has been implicated in cellular transformation events leading to the onset of adult T cell leukemia. Details on the stepwise processes through which Tax induces morphological changes in cells are poorly understood. We show here that Tax can bind to a class of intermediate filaments, the cytokeratins (Ker). Tax interacts with the 1B helical coil of keratin 8, a domain critical for higher-order intermediate filament matrix formation. Expression of Tax in epithelial cells visibly altered the structural pattern of the Ker network. In a T lymphocyte cell line, induction of Tax expression resulted in increased cellular adherence/invasion of Matrigel filters. We propose that one aspect of Tax function is the induction of morphological changes in cellular cytoskeletal structures. This finding for Tax-expressing cells might be one factor contributing directly to the pathogenesis of HTLV-I disease(s). Copyright 1997 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Knuckle pads, in an epidermal palmoplantar keratoderma patient with Keratin 9 R163W transgrediens expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codispoti, Andrea; Colombo, Enrico; Zocchi, Loredana; Serra, Valeria; Pertusi, Ginevra; Leigheb, Giorgio; Tiberio, Rossana; Bornacina, Guido; Zuccoli, Riccardo; Ramponi, Antonio; Campione, Elena; Melino, Gerry; Terrinoni, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Epidermolytic PalmoPlantar keratoderma (EPPK) Vörner-type is an autosomal dominantly inherited skin disease, characterized by severe thickening of the palms and soles, caused by mutations in the keratin K9 (KRT9) gene. To date, a number of KRT9 mutations have been detected, most of which affect the highly conserved 1A region of the central alpha-helical domain, important for keratin heterodimerization. The most common mutation is the substitution of the arginine in position 163 with a tryptophan (R163W), which has been reported in North American, European, and Japanese populations. In a small number of cases, EPPK is associated with knuckle pad keratosis, but no correlation between this additional phenotype and a specific mutation has been found. Moreover, K9 is not normally expressed in knuckle skin, raising the question of the pathogenic mechanism leading to this additional phenotype. Here we show that in a family affected by EPPK and knuckle pad keratosis, carrying the R163W substitution, wild type (wt) and mutated K9 are strongly expressed in knuckle pads. These results suggest that the knuckle pad phenotype is due to ectopical expression of K9.

  2. Enzymatic Breakdown of Type II Collagen in the Human Vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Pas, Hendri H.; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate whether enzymatic collagen breakdown is an active process in the human vitreous. METHODS. Human donor eyes were used for immunohistochemistry to detect the possible presence of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced type II collagen breakdown product col2-3/4C-short in

  3. Enzymatic Breakdown of Type II Collagen in the Human Vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Pas, Hendri H.; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate whether enzymatic collagen breakdown is an active process in the human vitreous. METHODS. Human donor eyes were used for immunohistochemistry to detect the possible presence of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced type II collagen breakdown product col2-3/4C-short in th

  4. Beta-catenin accelerates human papilloma virus type-16 mediated cervical carcinogenesis in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Bulut

    Full Text Available Human papilloma virus (HPV is the principal etiological agent of cervical cancer in women, and its DNA is present in virtually all of these tumors. However, exposure to the high-risk HPV types alone is insufficient for tumor development. Identifying specific collaborating factors that will lead to cervical cancer remains an unanswered question, especially because millions of women are exposed to HPV. Our earlier work using an in vitro model indicated that activation of the canonical Wnt pathway in HPV-positive epithelial cells was sufficient to induce anchorage independent growth. We therefore hypothesized that constitutive activation of this pathway might function as the "second hit." To address this possibility, we developed two double-transgenic (DT mouse models, K14-E7/ΔN87βcat and K14-HPV16/ΔN87βcat that express either the proteins encoded by the E7 oncogene or the HPV16 early region along with constitutively active β-catenin, which was expressed by linking it to the keratin-14 (K14 promoter. We initiated tumor formation by treating all groups with estrogen for six months. Invasive cervical cancer was observed in 11% of the K14-ΔN87βcat mice, expressing activated β-catenin and in 50% of the animals expressing the HPV16 E7 oncogene. In double-transgenic mice, coexpression of β-catenin and HPV16 E7 induced invasive cervical cancer at about 7 months in 94% of the cases. We did not observe cervical cancer in any group unless the mice were treated with estrogen. In the second model, K14-HPV16 mice suffered cervical dysplasias, but this phenotype was not augmented in HPV16/ΔN87βcat mice. In summary, the phenotypes of the K14-E7/ΔN87βcat mice support the hypothesis that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HPV-associated premalignant lesions plays a functional role in accelerating cervical carcinogenesis.

  5. TMEM45A Is Dispensable for Epidermal Morphogenesis, Keratinization and Barrier Formation.

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    Aurélie Hayez

    Full Text Available TMEM45A gene encodes an initially uncharacterized predicted transmembrane protein. We previously showed that this gene is highly expressed in keratinocytes where its expression correlates with keratinization, suggesting a role in normal epidermal physiology. To test this hypothesis, we generated TMEM45A knockout mice and found that these mice develop without any evident phenotype. The morphology of the epidermis assessed by histology and by labelling differentiation markers in immunofluorescence was not altered. Toluidine blue permeability assay showed that the epidermal barrier develops normally during embryonic development. We also showed that depletion of TMEM45A in human keratinocytes does not alter their potential to form in vitro 3D-reconstructed epidermis. Indeed, epidermis with normal morphogenesis were generated from TMEM45A-silenced keratinocytes. Their expression of differentiation markers quantified by RT-qPCR and evidenced by immunofluorescence labelling as well as their barrier function estimated by Lucifer yellow permeability were similar to the control epidermis. In summary, TMEM45A gene expression is dispensable for epidermal morphogenesis, keratinization and barrier formation. If this protein plays a role in the epidermis, its experimental depletion can possibly be compensated by other proteins in the two experimental models analyzed in this study.

  6. Keratin-dependent regulation of Aire and gene expression in skin tumor keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Ryan P; DePianto, Daryle J; Jacob, Justin T; Han, Minerva C; Chung, Byung-Min; Batazzi, Adriana S; Poll, Brian G; Guo, Yajuan; Han, Jingnan; Ong, SuFey; Zheng, Wenxin; Taube, Janis M; Čiháková, Daniela; Wan, Fengyi; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2015-08-01

    Expression of the intermediate filament protein keratin 17 (K17) is robustly upregulated in inflammatory skin diseases and in many tumors originating in stratified and pseudostratified epithelia. We report that autoimmune regulator (Aire), a transcriptional regulator, is inducibly expressed in human and mouse tumor keratinocytes in a K17-dependent manner and is required for timely onset of Gli2-induced skin tumorigenesis in mice. The induction of Aire mRNA in keratinocytes depends on a functional interaction between K17 and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein hnRNP K. Further, K17 colocalizes with Aire protein in the nucleus of tumor-prone keratinocytes, and each factor is bound to a specific promoter region featuring an NF-κB consensus sequence in a relevant subset of K17- and Aire-dependent proinflammatory genes. These findings provide radically new insight into keratin intermediate filament and Aire function, along with a molecular basis for the K17-dependent amplification of inflammatory and immune responses in diseased epithelia.

  7. Characterization of the Casein/Keratin Self-Assembly Nanomicelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Xiao-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex nanomicelles were made from casein and keratin through electrostatic self-assembly and transglutaminase fixation that was proved to be harmless and green. The complex nanomicelles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and steady-state florescence. The results show that the complex nanomcelles acquired at the neutral pH in the mass ratio of casein to keratin 4 : 1 exhibit an anomalous sphere shape with uniform size which the diameter is about 40–70 nm. The complex nanomicelles in solution possess excellent dilution and storage stability due to the fixation and their high ζ-potential (22.8 mV. The complex nanomicelles are relatively hydrophilic and have a good potential for industrial application.

  8. Keratinization Disorders and Genetic Aspects in Palmar and Plantar Keratodermas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypczyńska, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar; Zegarska, Barbara; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2016-06-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a heterogeneous group of hereditary and acquired disorders characterized by abnormal thickening of the palms and soles. There are three clinical patterns: diffuse, focal, and punctuate. Palmoplantar keratodermas can be divided into the following functional subgroups: disturbed gene functions in structural proteins (keratins), cornified envelope (loricrin, transglutaminase), cohesion (plakophilin, desmoplakin, desmoglein 1), cell-to-cell communication (connexins) and transmembrane signal transduction (cathepsin C). Unna-Thost disease is the most common variety of hereditary PPK. Mutations in keratin 1 have been reported in Unna-Thost disease. We report 12 cases in which Unna-Thost disease was diagnosed. Genealogical study demonstrated that the genodermatosis was a familial disease inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. Dermatological examination revealed yellowish hyperkeratosis on the palms and soles. Oral mucosa, teeth, and nails remained unchanged. Histopathological examination of the biopsy sample taken from the soles of the patients showed orthokeratotic keratosis, hypergranulosis, and acanthosis without epidermolysis.

  9. Gene therapy for autosomal dominant disorders of keratin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Alfred S; Glazer, Peter M; Milstone, Leonard M

    2005-10-01

    Dominant mutations that interfere with the assembly of keratin filaments cause painful and disfiguring epidermal diseases like pachyonychia congenita and epidermolysis bullosa simplex. Genetic therapies for such diseases must either suppress the production of the toxic proteins or correct the genetic defect in the chromosome. Because epidermal skin cells may be genetically modified in tissue culture or in situ, gene correction is a legitimate goal for keratin diseases. In addition, recent innovations, such as RNA interference in animals, make an RNA knockdown approach plausible in the near future. Although agents of RNA reduction (small interfering RNA, ribozymes, triplex oligonucleotides, or antisense DNA) can be delivered as nucleotides, the impermeability of the skin to large charged molecules presents a serious impediment. Using viral vectors to deliver genes for selective inhibitors of gene expression presents an attractive alternative for long-term treatment of genetic disease in the skin.

  10. Mutations in keratin K9 in kindreds with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma and epidemiology in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covello, S P; Irvine, A D; McKenna, K E; Munro, C S; Nevin, N C; Smith, F J; Uitto, J; McLean, W H

    1998-12-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK, MIM #144200) is an autosomal dominant disorder in which hyperkeratosis confined to the palms and soles is characterized histologically by cytolysis of suprabasal keratinocytes. Mutations in the keratin 9 gene (KRT9), a type 1 keratin expressed exclusively in the suprabasal keratinocytes of palmoplantar epidermis, have previously been demonstrated in this disorder. Here, we have studied four Northern Irish kindreds presenting with EPPK. By direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products, heterozygous missense mutations in exon 1 of KRT9 were detected in all the families. These included a novel mutation M156T; as well as M156V in two kindreds; and R162Q in the remaining family. All mutations were confirmed by reverse strand sequencing and restriction enzyme analysis. The point prevalence of EPPK in Northern Ireland was found to be 4.4 per 100,000. To date, all reported EPPK mutations occur in the helix initiation motif at the start of the central coiled-coil rod domain of K9.

  11. Keratin 8 is required for the maintenance of architectural structure in thymus epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikako Odaka

    Full Text Available Keratins (Ks, the intermediate filament (IF proteins of epithelia, are coordinately expressed as pairs in a cell-lineage and differentiation manner. Cortical thymic epithelial cells (cTECs predominantly express the simple epithelium keratin 8/18 (K8/K18 pair, whereas medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs express the stratified epithelium K5/K14 pair, with TECs exhibiting K5 and K8 at the cortico-medullary junction in mature thymus. In the work reported here, we used wild-type (WT and K8-knockout (K8-null mice to address the contribution of K8/K18 IFs in the maintenance of the thymic epithelial structure. K8-null thymus maintained the differential cell segregation at the cortex versus the medulla observed in WT thymus, and the distribution of immature thymocytes at the cortex. The K8/K18 loss did not affect thymocyte development. However, it massively perturbed the TEC morphology both at the cortex and the medulla, along with a prominent depletion of cTECs. Such tissue alterations coincided with an increase in apoptosis and a reduced expression of Albatross (Fas-binding factor-1, also known for its capacity to bind K8/18 IFs. In addition, the K8/K18 loss affected the distribution of K5/K14-positive mTECs, but not their differentiation status. Together, the results indicate that K8/K18 IFs constitute key promoters of the thymic epithelium integrity.

  12. Multicenter Clinical Trial of Keratin Biomaterial for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    tests to determine purity (size exclusion chromatography for molecular weight, amino acids analysis, ELISA for protein identification, and gel rheology ...labeled hydrogel will be used in a fate and distribution study in a rat model. The hydrogel gel has been successfully labeled and adequate labeled...distribution study. Labeled keratin gel will be placed inside nerve conduits. The ends of the conduits will be closed, and the conduits will be

  13. Nanogrooves and keratin nanofibers on titanium surfaces aimed at driving gingival fibroblasts alignment and proliferation without increasing bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, S; Truffa Giachet, F; Miola, M; Bertone, E; Varesano, A; Vineis, C; Cochis, A; Sorrentino, R; Rimondini, L; Spriano, S

    2017-07-01

    Periimplantitis and epithelial downgrowth are nowadays the main conditions associated to transmucosal dental implants. Gingival fibroblasts can play an important role in periimplantitis because they are the promoters of the inflammatory process and eventual tissue homeostasis and destruction. Moreover, the related inflammatory state is commonly driven also to counteract bacteria implants colonization. In the present research, a new technology based on mechanically produced nanogrooves (0.1-0.2μm) and keratin nanofibers deposited by electrospinning has been proposed in order to obtain titanium surfaces able to drive gingival fibroblasts alignment and proliferation without increasing bacterial adhesion. The prepared surfaces have been characterized for their morphology (FESEM), chemical composition (FTIR, XPS), surface charge (zeta potential) and wettability (contact angle). Afterwards, their performances in terms of cells (human primary gingival fibroblasts) and bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) adhesion were compared to mirror-like polished titanium surfaces. Results revealed that gingival fibroblasts viability was not negatively affected by the applied surface roughness or by keratin nanofibers. On the opposite, cells adhesion and spread were strongly influenced by surface roughness revealing a significant cell orientation along the produced nanogrooves. However, the keratin influence was clearly predominant with respect to surface topography, thus leading to increased cells proliferation on the surfaces with nanofibers, disregarding the presence of the surfaces grooves. Moreover, nor nanogrooves nor keratin nanofibers increase bacterial biofilm adhesion in comparison with mirror polished surfaces. Thus, the present research represents a promising innovative strategy and technology for a surface modification finalized to match the main requirements for transmucosal dental implants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary cystic keratinizing squamous cell lesions of rats after inhalation/instillation of different particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittinghausen, S; Mohr, U; Dungworth, D L

    1997-12-01

    Cystic keratinizing squamous cell lesions from three inhalation studies (Study A, B, C) and one intratracheal instillation study (Study D) in rats were reclassified and a certain number of lesions examined immunohistochemically for PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) as a marker of cellular proliferation. The following classification was used: squamous cell metaplasia with marked keratinization, keratinizing cyst, cystic keratinizing epithelioma, cystic keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma and non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. In study A (inhalation of coal oven exhaust and subcutaneous injection of a high dose of DB (ah)A) 49.3% of rats developed cystic keratinizing squamous cell carcinomas. Inhalation of coal oven exhaust gas together with intratracheal instillation of crocidolite or subcutaneous injection of a low dose DB(ah)A (dibenz(ah)anthracene) resulted in cystic keratinizing squamous cell carcinomas in 23% to 24% of the rats. High incidences of cystic squamous cell carcinomas in the range of 31.9% to 76.4% were observed in rats of Study B1 after a 10-months exposure to tar/pitch condensation aerosol (different B(a)P (benzo(a)pyrene) concentrations) with added carbon black in some groups. After a 20-months exposure period to the same inhalation atmospheres (Study B2) the incidence of squamous cell carcinomas was increased up to 95.8%. Exposure of rats to various concentrations of unfiltered diesel exhaust (Study C) resulted in incidences of cystic keratinizing epitheliomas ranging from 2.5% (2.5 mg/m3) to 10.7% (7.5 mg/m3). Epitheliomas were also observed in 16.2% of carbon black and 16.0% of titanium dioxide exposed rats. Only a few cystic keratinizing squamous cell carcinomas occurred. In the intratrachel instillation study (Study D) increased incidences of cystic keratinizing epitheliomas occurred in rats exposed to native diesel exhaust particles (16.7%), high dose of extracted diesel exhaust particles

  15. [The location of keratins 17 and 8 in the metaplastic proliferates of the endocervix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, E A; Chipysheva, T A; Ermilova, V D; Gel'shteĭn, V I

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to keratin 8 which is characteristic for glandular epithelium and those to keratin 17 characteristic of basal cells of complex epithelium were used. Material from 14 females after surgery because of ovarian tumours and uterine carcinoma and from 10 females with dysplasias of various degree and uterine carcinoma was investigated. In addition, ectocervix of vaginal portion at a distance from the point of two epithelia junction was studied in 42 samples. It is shown that keratins 8 and 17 are expressed in the ectocervix sporadically and have a basal location. Keratin 8 is expressed in column epithelium of the areas having normal structure of endocervix. Proliferation of subcolumn reserve cells is followed by an active expression of keratin 17. Proliferative multilayer areas with foci of the immature metaplasia, dysplasias and carcinoma in situ are characterized by cells with coexpression of both keratins, i.e. cells with double differentiation (glandular and squamous).

  16. 瘦素调节HaCaT细胞角蛋白17的表达%Leptin regulates keratin 17 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏; 苗叶; 薛柯; 李承新

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of leptin on K17 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes.Methods Some cultured HaCaT cells were treated with leptin (100 ng/ml) or remained untreated for 24 hours followed by the quantification of K17 mRNA expression by real-time PCR and detection of K17 protein expression by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining.To investigate the action mechanism of leptin,some cultured HaCaT cells were divided into several groups to be treated with leptin (100 ng/ml) alone,Piceatannol (an inhibitor of the STAT3 pathway) + leptin (100 ng/ml),PD-98059 (an inhibitor of the Erk1/2 pathway) + leptin (100 ng/ml),respectively for 24 hours,with the cells receiving no treatment as the negative control.Subsequently,the mRNA and protein expressions of K17 were measured by the above methods.Statistical analysis was done by the two-sample ttest.Results The mRNA expression of K17 was significantly higher in HaCaT cells treated with leptin alone than in those remaining untreated (3.086 7 ± 0.186 1 vs.1.000 0 ± 0.000 0,P < 0.01),but significantly downregulated in HaCaT cells treated with Piceatannol + leptin and those with PD-98059 + leptin compared with those treated leptin alone (0.674 1 ± 0.060 0 and 0.855 0 ± 0.390 3 vs.2.242 7 ± 0.188 7,both P < 0.01).The results of Western blot and immunofluorescence staining were in agreement with those of real-time PCR.Conclusions Leptin can induce K17 expression in HaCaT cells,likely by activating the STAT3 and Erk1/2 signaling pathways.%目的 探讨瘦素对HaCaT细胞角蛋白17(K17)表达的影响.方法 体外培养HaCaT细胞,给予100 ng/ml的瘦素作用24 h,应用实时PCR检测K17 mRNA表达水平、Western印迹及免疫荧光染色法检测K17蛋白表达水平变化.结果与阴性对照组(1.000 0±0.000 0)相比较,瘦素组(3.086 7±0.186 1)K17mRNA表达显著升高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).Western印迹结果表明,瘦素组K17蛋白较阴性对照组显著上调,细胞免疫

  17. Mutation S233L in the 1B domain of keratin 1 causes epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma with "tonotubular" keratin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana; van Steensel, Maurice A M; van Geel, Michel; Lane, E Birgitte; McLean, W H Irwin; Steijlen, Peter M

    2006-03-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by epidermolytic hyperkeratosis restricted to the palm and sole epidermis. The disorder is normally associated with dominant-negative mutations in the keratin 9 (K9) gene; however, a small number of cases have been reported where causative mutations were identified in the K1 gene. Here, we present two unrelated Dutch EPPK families with striking ultrastructural findings: tubular keratin structures in the cytoplasm of suprabasal cells. Similar structures were reported previously in a German EPPK family and were termed "tonotubular" keratin. After excluding the involvement of the K9 gene by complete sequencing, we identified a novel mutation, S233L, at the beginning of the 1B domain of K1 in both families. Protein expression studies in cultured cells indicated pathogenicity of this mutation. This is the first report of a genetic defect in this domain of K1. The unusual gain-of-function mutation points to a subtle role of the 1B domain in mediating filament-filament interactions with regular periodicity.

  18. Keratin: Structure, mechanical properties, occurrence in biological organisms, and efforts at bioinspiration

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, B.; Yang, W.; McKittrick, J; Meyers, MA

    2016-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A ubiquitous biological material, keratin represents a group of insoluble, usually high-sulfur content and filament-forming proteins, constituting the bulk of epidermal appendages such as hair, nails, claws, turtle scutes, horns, whale baleen, beaks, and feathers. These keratinous materials are formed by cells filled with keratin and are considered 'dead tissues'. Nevertheless, they are among the toughest biological materials, serving as a wide variety of interesting func...

  19. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peter H; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper B; Kristensen, Dorte E; Vind, Birgitte F; Baba, Otto; Nøhr, Jane; Højlund, Kurt; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue composed of different fiber types. Studies suggest that insulin-mediated glucose metabolism is different between muscle fiber types. We hypothesized that differences are due to fiber type-specific expression/regulation of insulin signaling elements and/or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese, and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared with type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4, hexokinase II, glycogen synthase (GS), and pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDH-E1α) and a lower protein content of Akt2, TBC1 domain family member 4 (TBC1D4), and TBC1D1. In type I fibers compared with type II fibers, the phosphorylation response to insulin was similar (TBC1D4, TBC1D1, and GS) or decreased (Akt and PDH-E1α). Phosphorylation responses to insulin adjusted for protein level were not different between fiber types. Independently of fiber type, insulin signaling was similar (TBC1D1, GS, and PDH-E1α) or decreased (Akt and TBC1D4) in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared with lean and obese subjects. We conclude that human type I muscle fibers compared with type II fibers have a higher glucose-handling capacity but a similar sensitivity for phosphoregulation by insulin.

  20. Density-dependent expression of keratins in transformed rat liver cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanovsky, S M; Bannikov, G A; Montesano, R; Vasiliev, J M

    1986-04-01

    Immunomorphological examination of the distribution of three keratins in cultured rat liver-derived epithelial cell lines of the IAR series was performed in order to find out the effects of neoplastic evolution on the expression of these epithelium-specific markers. Specific monoclonal antibodies were used to reveal various intermediate filament proteins: keratins with molecular masses of 55, 49 or 40 kD (K55, K49 or K40), and vimentin. The expression of keratins was negligible in sparse and dense cultures of non-transformed lines, which had typical epithelial morphology. The examined keratins were also absent in the sparse cultures of transformed lines, which have lost partially or completely the morphological features of epithelia. However, cells in dense cultures of most transformed lines contained numerous keratin filaments. It is suggested that the paradoxical increase of keratin expression after transformation is due to increased saturation density of transformed cultures; this high density favours the expression. As shown by the experiments with culture wounding, the effects of density are local and reversible. While K55 was present in all the cells of dense cultures, the expression of the other two keratins was dependent on the cell position within these cultures. It is suggested that the expression of the latter two keratins, besides high cell density, also requires the presence (K40) or the absence (K49) of cell-substratum contacts. Possible mechanisms of the effects of cell density on the expression of keratins are discussed.

  1. Novel approach to fabricate keratin sponge scaffolds with controlled pore size and porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Kazunori; Tanabe, Toshizumi; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2004-08-01

    A compression-molding/particulate-leaching (CM/PL) method was developed to fabricate S-sulfo keratin sponges with the controlled pore size and porosity. The S-sulfo keratin was extracted from wool and was then spray-dried to give S-sulfo keratin powder. The S-sulfo keratin powder mixed with urea in advance was compression-molded together with the sieved NaCl particulates above the melting temperature of urea. The following removal of the salts and urea in water created the sponges composed of interconnected pores and the continuous S-sulfo keratin matrix. The S-sulfo keratin sponges were strong enough to handle and water-insoluble. By contrast, the sponges prepared without urea were very fragile and readily collapsed, because most of S-sulfo keratin matrix remained powdery. The pore size was in good accordance with the size of the salts, indicating that the pores were formed by leaching-out the salts. The S-sulfo keratin sponges with the regulated sizes of pores (<100, 100-300 and 300-500 microm) were fabricated, all of which had more than 90% of the porosity. Thus, CM/PL method is able to give the S-sulfo keratin sponge with the desired pore size and porosity, which might be a good scaffold for the cells in tissue engineering.

  2. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  3. Human parainfluenza virus type 3 in wild nonhuman primates, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michihito; Ishii, Akihiro; Orba, Yasuko; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Moonga, Ladslav; Mweene, Aaron S; Ogawa, Hirohito; Nakamura, Ichiro; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) genome was detected in 4 baboons in Zambia. Antibody for HPIV3 was detected in 13 baboons and 6 vervet monkeys in 2 distinct areas in Zambia. Our findings suggest that wild nonhuman primates are susceptible to HPIV3 infection.

  4. Selecting Human Error Types for Cognitive Modelling and Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mioch, T.; Osterloh, J.P.; Javaux, D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method that has enabled us to make a selection of error types and error production mechanisms relevant to the HUMAN European project, and discusses the reasons underlying those choices. We claim that this method has the advantage that it is very exhaustive in determining the re

  5. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  6. Evidence for two types of brown adipose tissue in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof; Heglind, Mikael; Elander, Louise; Slawik, Marc; Mussack, Thomas; Nilsson, Daniel; Romu, Thobias; Nuutila, Pirjo; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Beuschlein, Felix; Persson, Anders; Borga, Magnus; Enerbäck, Sven

    2013-05-01

    The previously observed supraclavicular depot of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans was commonly believed to be the equivalent of the interscapular thermogenic organ of small mammals. This view was recently disputed on the basis of the demonstration that this depot consists of beige (also called brite) brown adipocytes, a newly identified type of brown adipocyte that is distinct from the classical brown adipocytes that make up the interscapular thermogenic organs of other mammals. A combination of high-resolution imaging techniques and histological and biochemical analyses showed evidence for an anatomically distinguishable interscapular BAT (iBAT) depot in human infants that consists of classical brown adipocytes, a cell type that has so far not been shown to exist in humans. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that infants, similarly to rodents, have the bona fide iBAT thermogenic organ consisting of classical brown adipocytes that is essential for the survival of small mammals in a cold environment.

  7. Biomimetic interconnected porous keratin-fibrin-gelatin 3D sponge for tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, Sivakumar; Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Raja, M D; Nagiah, Naveen; Padmapriya, P; Kaveri, Krishnasamy; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli

    2016-05-01

    The medicated wound dressing material with highly interconnected pores, mimicking the function of the extracellular matrix was fabricated for the promotion of cell growth. In this study, keratin (K), fibrin (F) and gelatin (G) composite scaffold (KFG-SPG) was fabricated by freeze drying technique and the mupirocin (D) drug was successfully incorporated with KFG-SPG (KFG-SPG-D) intended for tissue engineering applications. The fabrication of scaffold was performed without the use of any strong chemical solvents, and the solid sponge scaffold was obtained with well interconnected pores. The porous morphology of the scaffold was confirmed by SEM analysis and exhibited competent mechanical properties. KFG-SPG and KFG-SPG-D possess high level of biocompatibility, cell proliferation and cell adhesion of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) cell lines thereby indicating the scaffolds potential as a suitable medicated dressing for wound healing.

  8. A four-fold humanity: Margaret Mead and psychological types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    Beginning in 1933, while working in New Guinea, Margaret Mead developed her so-called squares hypothesis. Mead never published its terms, though she made a brief comment on it in her autobiography, Blackberry Winter (1972), and the arguments found in Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies (1935) and the research leading to Balinese Character (Bateson & Mead, 1942) bore its imprint. Beginning with William McDougall's distinction between temperament (innate predispositions) and character (learned organization of habit), Mead articulated a morphological approach to the interplay between biology and culture that yielded four primary and four intermediary personality types. Under specified but not inevitable circumstances, the conscious choices of a given people could render one or another of these types characteristic or predominantly stable within their population, giving each of the other types a definite relation to the dominant type and thereby the cultural ethos of its society. Persons of each type followed a developmental path specific to their type different both from that of other types and in its manifestations given the various relations of the individual's type to the dominant type. Mead's hypothesis was, therefore, a vision of the unity and diversity of a single human species as well as an approach to the differing psychological positioning of individuals in cultures. In examining Mead's hypothesis, this essay also takes up Mead's debts to several leading psychologists (McDougall, C. G. Jung, and Erik Erikson), and (provisionally) how her vision differed from that of Ruth Benedict.

  9. [A pathological and histochemical study of capsules of impacted teeth with special reference to keratin immunohistochemistry in the lining epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawana, T; Yamamoto, H

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and understand the nature of capsules consisted of fifty cases of unerupted wisdom teeth using radiological, pathological and immunohistochemical methods. Radiologically, the pericoronal space was measured with slide caliper and divided into three groups (-0.9 mm, 1.0-1.9 mm, 2.0mm). Pathologically, all specimens were examined by the routine paraffin method and were stained with hematoxylin.eosin and PAS-alcian blue pH 2.5 stainings. Immunohistochemically, PAP (peroxidase-antiperoxidase) method using various keratin antibodies, such as, anti-keratin K 528 (40-68 KD), anti-cytokeratin PKK 1 (40, 45, 52.5 KD), anti-cytokeratin PKK 2 (40, 46, 48, 54 KD), anti-keratin A 575 (56, 64 KD) and anti-cytokeratin high molecular weight (68 KD), and other various antibodies of anti-EMA, anti-IgA and anti-SC was used in order to study the nature of the epithelium of capsule of impacted teeth. The following results were obtained; 1. Radiologically, the width of the capsules was 1.6 mm in the average. Histopathologically, the inner surface of the capsule was covered with two types of epithelium which were composed of non-typical epithelium with cuboidal (basal layer) and columnar (superficial layer) cells, and typical stratified squamous epithelium. The epithelium lining was observed in 74% of all cases. Among the cases, cyst like structure was more often seen in the cases with typical squamous epithelial lining and with pericoronal space more than 1.0 mm width. 2. In the connective tissue's findings of capsules of impacted teeth, fibrosis was found in almost all the cases. Inflammatory and myxomatous changes were recognized in ca. half cases. Epithelial rest and calcification with dystrophy and epithelial product were observed in about one third of the cases. The epithelial proliferation in the capsule was also rarely seen in the specimens. 3. Immunohistochemically, keratins of 56 KD and 64 KD were identified in the superficial layer of

  10. Effects of scalp dermatitis on chemical property of hair keratin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Shin, Min Kyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-05-01

    The effects of scalp dermatitis (seborrheic dermatitis (SD), psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis (AD)) on chemical properties of hair keratin were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Hairs were collected from lesional regions affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD and non-lesional regions separately. The hairs with SD were taken from patients with ages of 16-80 years. The ages of patients with psoriasis ranged from 8 to 67 years, and all patients exhibited moderate disease. Hairs with AD were taken from the patients with ages of 24-45 years and the average SCORing atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) was 48.75. Hairs from 20 normal adults were collected as a control. The FT-IR absorbance bands were analyzed by the Gaussian model to obtain the center frequency, half width, height, and area of each band. The height and area of all bands in the spectra were normalized to the amide I centered at 1652 cm-1 to quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of keratin. The spectra of hair with scalp dermatitis were different with that of control, the amide A components centered at 3278 cm-1 were smaller than those of the control. The psoriasis hair showed a large difference in the IR absorbance band between lesional and non-lesional hairs indicating good agreement with the morphological changes. The hairs with diseases did not show differences in the content of cystine, which was centered at 1054 cm-1, from the control. The chemical properties of keratin were not significantly different between the hairs affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD. However, the changes induced by scalp dermatitis were different with weathering. Therefore, FT-IR analysis could be used to screen differences between the physiological and pathological conditions of scalp hair.

  11. Reticular and myxoid non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma: an unusual case mimicking a salivary gland carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Fredrik; Vijayadwaja, Desai; Loh, Kwok Seng; Tan, Kong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of non-keratinizing carcinoma of the nasopharynx (NK-NPC) with an unusual histopathological pattern. The neoplastic cells were arranged in anastomosing cords embedded in a stroma which contained a significant component of alcian blue-positive myxoid substance forming a reticular pattern. These histopathological features gave an initial impression of a salivary gland-type carcinoma. On immunohistochemistry the tumor cells were strongly and diffusely positive for cytokeratins (AE1-3 and 5/6) and p63 and there was strong and diffuse nuclear positivity for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA on in situ hybridization. This case highlights the histomorphological variability of NK-NPC. Awareness of the histological spectrum of NK-NPC is important in clinical practice and this is not always adequately highlighted in currently used standard textbooks of Head and Neck Pathology.

  12. Intestinal cell barrier function in vitro is severely compromised by keratin 8 and 18 mutations identified in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zupancic

    Full Text Available Keratin 8 and 18 (K8/K18 mutations have been implicated in the aetiology of certain pathogenic processes of the liver and pancreas. While some K8 mutations (K8 G62C, K8 K464N are also presumed susceptibility factors for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, the only K18 mutation (K18 S230T discovered so far in an IBD patient is thought to be a polymorphism. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that these mutations might also directly affect intestinal cell barrier function. Cell monolayers of genetically engineered human colonocytes expressing these mutations were tested for permeability, growth rate and resistance to heat-stress. We also calculated the change in dissociation constant (Kd, measure of affinity each of these mutations introduces into the keratin protein, and present the first model of a keratin dimer L12 region with in silico clues to how the K18 S230T mutation may affect keratin function. Physiologically, these mutations cause up to 30% increase in paracellular permeability in vitro. Heat-stress induces little keratin clumping but instead cell monolayers peel off the surface suggesting a problem with cell junctions. K18 S230T has pronounced pathological effects in vitro marked by high Kd, low growth rate and increased permeability. The latter may be due to the altered distribution of tight junction components claudin-4 and ZO-1. This is the first time intestinal cells have been suggested also functionally impaired by K8/K18 mutations. Although an in vitro colonocyte model system does not completely mimic the epithelial lining of the intestine, nevertheless the data suggest that K8/K18 mutations may be also able to produce a phenotype in vivo.

  13. Intestinal cell barrier function in vitro is severely compromised by keratin 8 and 18 mutations identified in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Tina; Stojan, Jure; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Komel, Radovan; Bedina-Zavec, Apolonija; Liovic, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Keratin 8 and 18 (K8/K18) mutations have been implicated in the aetiology of certain pathogenic processes of the liver and pancreas. While some K8 mutations (K8 G62C, K8 K464N) are also presumed susceptibility factors for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the only K18 mutation (K18 S230T) discovered so far in an IBD patient is thought to be a polymorphism. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that these mutations might also directly affect intestinal cell barrier function. Cell monolayers of genetically engineered human colonocytes expressing these mutations were tested for permeability, growth rate and resistance to heat-stress. We also calculated the change in dissociation constant (Kd, measure of affinity) each of these mutations introduces into the keratin protein, and present the first model of a keratin dimer L12 region with in silico clues to how the K18 S230T mutation may affect keratin function. Physiologically, these mutations cause up to 30% increase in paracellular permeability in vitro. Heat-stress induces little keratin clumping but instead cell monolayers peel off the surface suggesting a problem with cell junctions. K18 S230T has pronounced pathological effects in vitro marked by high Kd, low growth rate and increased permeability. The latter may be due to the altered distribution of tight junction components claudin-4 and ZO-1. This is the first time intestinal cells have been suggested also functionally impaired by K8/K18 mutations. Although an in vitro colonocyte model system does not completely mimic the epithelial lining of the intestine, nevertheless the data suggest that K8/K18 mutations may be also able to produce a phenotype in vivo.

  14. Development of keratin-chitosan-gelatin composite scaffold for soft tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Prachi; Verma, Sudhanshu; Manjubala, I; Madhan, B

    2014-12-01

    Keratin has gained much attention in the recent past as a biomaterial for wound healing owing to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, intrinsic biological activity and presence of cellular binding motifs. In this paper, a novel biomimetic scaffold containing keratin, chitosan and gelatin was prepared by freeze drying method. The prepared keratin composite scaffold had good structural integrity. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed the retention of the native structure of individual biopolymers (keratin, chitosan, and gelatin) used in the scaffold. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) results revealed a high thermal denaturation temperature of the scaffold (200-250°C). The keratin composite scaffold exhibited tensile strength (96 kPa), compression strength (8.5 kPa) and water uptake capacity (>1700%) comparable to that of a collagen scaffold, which was used as control. The morphology of the keratin composite scaffold observed using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) exhibited good porosity and interconnectivity of pores. MTT assay using NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells demonstrated that the cell viability of the keratin composite scaffold was good. These observations suggest that the keratin-chitosan-gelatin composite scaffold is a promising alternative biomaterial for tissue engineering applications.

  15. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the -Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species 5 (HPV51), 6 (HPV56), 7 (H...

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of Electrospun Wool Keratin/Poly(vinyl alcohol Blend Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wool keratin/poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA blend nanofibers were fabricated using the electrospinning method in formic acid solutions with different weight ratios of keratin to PVA. The resultant blend nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA, and tensile test. SEM images showed that the diameter of the blend nanofibers was affected by the content of keratin in blend solution. FTIR and XRD analyses data demonstrated that there were good interactions between keratin and PVA in the blended nanofibers caused by possibly hydrogen bonds. The TGA study revealed that the thermal stability of the blend nanofibers was between those of keratin and PVA. Tensile test indicated that the addition of PVA was able to improve the mechanical properties of the electrospun nanofibers.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Keratin Blended Films using Biopolymers for Drug Controlled Release Application

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    Ansaya Thonpho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Keratin solution was separately blended with collagen, gelatin, sericin and starch for films preparation. All the blended films had smooth surfaces without phase separation, except the keratin/starch blend film. The native keratin film showed small particles embedded in all the film surfaces that resulted in them being rough. The structure of the native keratin film changed from beta-sheet to random coil at high blend ratio of other substances. This result increased the dissolution of the films especially the keratin/starch blend. The results relate directly to the decreased thermal stability of this film. However, the changes in structure did not affect the chlorhexidine release pattern. It is possible that the interaction between the drug and blending substances, and the substances to water molecules are the main factor influencing the drug release pattern from the films.

  18. Click chemistry modification of natural keratin fibers for sustained shrink-resist performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan; Cai, Jackie Y; Church, Jeffrey S; Wang, Lijing

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel chemical treatment for achieving sustained shrink-resist performance on natural keratin fibers. The new treatment involves the controlled reduction of keratin in the cuticle region of the fiber, and the application of a water soluble diacrylate, namely glycerol 1,3-diglycerolate diacrylate (GDA), on the reduced keratin substrate. The acrylate groups of the GDA react with cysteine residues in the reduced keratin through thiol-ene click reactions at room temperature, leading to GDA grafting and the formation of GDA crosslinks in the keratin structure. The modified substrates were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and assessed for its shrink-resistance and wet burst strength. This chemical modification has shown to alter the fiber surface morphology and hydrophilicity, resulting in substantially improved shrink-resistance with good fiber strength retention. Possible shrink-resistance mechanisms were also discussed.

  19. Study on the structure and properties of wool keratin regenerated from formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluigi, A; Zoccola, M; Vineis, C; Tonin, C; Ferrero, F; Canetti, M

    2007-08-01

    Structural characteristics of keratin regenerated from water (KW) and from formic (KF) acid solutions were compared. Amino acid composition and molecular weight distribution of KW and KF samples were studied by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Turbidity measurement showed that keratin dissolved in formic acid forms transparent and stable solutions and no flocculation occurs. In addition, because of its good solvation properties, studied by viscosity measurements, formic acid can be used as a co-solvent to prepare keratin-based blend solutions. Structural studies carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and near infrared (NIR) suggest that formic acid stabilizes the beta-sheet structure. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) reveals a higher thermal stability of keratin regenerated from formic acid with respect to keratin regenerated from water.

  20. Structure and assembly of calf hoof keratin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Z; Michon, A M; Sicre, P; Koch, M H

    1990-05-01

    Keratin filament polypeptides were purified from calf hoof stratum corneum with the aim of studying the in vitro assembly process and determining structural parameters of reconstituted filaments. Anion exchange chromatography was used to obtain the most complete fractionation and identification of the acidic and basic components in the purified polypeptide mixture to date. The reassembly products of the fractionated components were investigated by electron microscopy. Fully reconstituted filaments yield homogeneous solutions, and values of 9.8 nm for the filament diameter and 25 kDa/nm for the mass per unit length (M/L) were obtained by X-ray solution scattering. The structures formed in solution at various stages of filament assembly were not sufficiently homogeneous to be studied by this technique. X-ray diffraction patterns from native stratum corneum display strong maxima at 3.6 and 5.4 nm. Contrary to previous reports, these maxima do not appear to be due to lipids since they are also observed with delipidated rehydrated specimens. A series of weak maxima is also detected in the patterns of dry tissue. The absence of these features in the patterns of reconstituted filaments suggests that, in contrast to some electron microscopic observations, there are no prominent regularities in the structure of calf hoof keratin filaments.

  1. Characterisation of keratin biomass from butchery and wool industry wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccola, Marina; Aluigi, Annalisa; Tonin, Claudio

    2009-12-01

    The chemical and structural characteristics of wool and horn-hoof were compared with the aim of better addressing possible exploitation of protein biomasses available as waste from textile industry and butchery. Amino acid analysis showed that wool has a higher amount of cystine and a lower amount of the amino acids that favour α-helix formation than horn-hoof. The difference in the α-helix content is confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. Electrophoresis separation patterns showed two characteristic protein fractions related to low-sulphur proteins (between 60,000 and 45,000 Da) in wool, while different low-sulphur proteins are present in horn-hoof. These data are partially confirmed by DSC analyses that showed different endothermic peaks at temperatures higher than 200 °C in the horn-hoof thermograms, probably due to denaturation of α-keratins at different molecular weights. Moreover, wool keratin was more hygroscopic and showed a higher extractability with reducing agents than horn-hoof. On the basis of these results, waste wool is a more suitable source than horn-hoof for uses involving protein extraction, but application can be envisaged also in surfactant foams for fire extinguishers and slow-release nitrogen fertilizer.

  2. Citation Type Analysis on Humanity Literature of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yueh Tsay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Using informetrics and citation analysis, the present study explores and compares characteristics and types of citations in the humanity journal articles that published in Taiwan. Research articles published in 2011, from top humanity journals, assessed by the Institute of Humanities and Social Sciences, National Science Council in Taiwan, were collected and analyzed. The analysis was done by structure of journal article and location of citations. In addition to citations appearing in the text, the phenomena of citation type will be compared and discussed in the latter part. The results of this study revealed articles of literature, history, philosophy and arts were mostly argumentative, while linguistic articles tended to comply with IMRAD (Introduction, Methods and Materials, Results,And Discussion formats. Introducing primary materials from original works, humanity scholars tended to cite for factual descriptions or to support authors’ perspectives. Secondary materials, such as later studies on the original works by other scholars, were seen the most in the disciplines of linguistics while the least in that of history. In general, the distribution of citation types is similar between articles in domestic and foreign journals; merely minor differences occurred among disciplines. While citing characteristics and information needs of humanities scholars revealed in this study may contribute to collection development of libraries or refinement of information services to researchers, suggestions based on analysis of research results may also serve as reference for standardization of writing and publication of journal articles in Taiwan. Aiming at further exploration of citations, this study is expected to provide a better understanding of the nature of citations and to serve as a foundation for future empirical studies.

  3. Investigating the microstructure of keratin extracted from wool: peptide sequence (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and protein conformation (FTIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keratin was extracted from wool by reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol. It was isolated as intact keratin and characterized by its similar molecular weight, protein composition, and secondary structure to native keratin. Gel electrophoresis patterns and MALDI-TOF/TOF peptide sequences provided the ide...

  4. Brain tumors induced in rats by human adenovirus type 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murao,Tsuyoshi

    1974-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenesis of human adenovirus type 12 in the brain of rats was examined. Newborn rats of Sprague-Dawley and Donryu strains were injected intracranially with human adenovirus type 12. The incidence of intracranial tumors was 91% (30/33 in SpragueDawley and 56% (14/25 in Donryu rats. Except for one tumor nodule located in the parietal cortex of a Sprague.Dawley rat, all tumors developed in the paraventricular areas or in the meninges. Tumors were quite similar histologically to those induced in hamsters and mice resembling the undifferentiated human brain tumors such as medulloblastoma, ependymoblastoma and embryonic gliomas. From the histological features and primary sites of tumor development, it is suggested that the tumors in the brain of rats induced by adenovirus type 12 originate from the embryonic cells in the paraventricular area and also from the undifferentiated supporting cells of the peripheral nerves in the leptomeninges.

  5. Keratins provide virus-dependent protection or predisposition to injury in coxsackievirus-induced pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Toivola, SE Ostrowski

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available DM Toivola1, SE Ostrowski2, H Baribault3, TM Magin4, AI Ramsingh2, MB Omary51Åbo Akademi University, Dept. Biology, BioCity, Turku, Finland and Stanford University School of Medicine and Digestive Disease Center; 2New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA; 3Amgen, South San Francisco, CA, USA; 4University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; 5Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Mi, USAAbstract: Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18 are the two major intermediate filament proteins in hepatocytes and pancreatic acinar cells. Acinar cell keratins are organized as cytoplasmic and apicolateral filaments. An important role of hepatocyte K8/K18 is to maintain cellular integrity, while this cytoprotective function of K8/K18 is not evident in the pancreas since keratin-deficient mice cope well with pancreatitis models. To further study the roles of keratins in the exocrine pancreas, we used coxsackievirus B4-models, CVB4-V and CVB4-P, to induce severe acute/chronic pancreatitis and acute pancreatitis, respectively, in K8-null (which lack acinar keratins and K18-null (which lack cytoplasmic keratins mice. Despite similar virus titers in all mice, CVB4-V resulted in 40% mortality of the K8-null mice 14 days post-infection compared to no lethality of WT and K18-null mice. In contrast, K8-null mice were far less susceptible to CVB4-P-induced damage as determined by histology and serology analysis, and they recover faster than WT and K18-null mice. After CVB4 virus infection, keratins aggregated during acinar degranulation, and K8/K18 site-specific phosphorylation was observed during degranulation and recovery. Hence, keratins significantly affect CVB4 virulence, positively or negatively, depending on the virus subtype and keratin makeup, in a virus replication-independent manner.Keywords: keratin, pancreatitis, coxsackievirus

  6. Human papillomavirus typing of warts and response to cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomson, N; Sterling, J; Ahmed, I; Hague, J; Berth-Jones, J

    2011-09-01

    Cutaneous warts are common and caused by a number of different types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the HPV types causing common warts and to determine any association between the HPV type and the duration of warts and response to cryotherapy. Eighty wart samples from 76 immunocompetent patients were taken from warts by paring prior to cryotherapy and analysed by in situ hybridization (ISH) with HPV probes specific to HPV 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 57 and PCR analysis using degenerate cutaneous HPV primers with subsequent DNA sequencing. Each patient's details, including site, duration and response of the wart to cryotherapy were recorded. Cryotherapy was performed at 2 week intervals for a maximum of 12 weeks. An HPV type was identified in 65 samples. The majority of warts (58 samples) were typed as HPV 2/27/57 by ISH and/or PCR. Three of the 18 samples that were HPV negative with ISH were HPV positive by PCR. Response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type, duration or location. In the 21 wart parings taken from patients aged 16 and under, response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type but warts of shorter duration were more likely to resolve with cryotherapy treatment than longer standing lesions. This study demonstrates that HPV type can be determined from wart parings. HPV-2 related viruses are the prevalent HPV types causing common warts on the hands and feet in this population. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. Molecular epidemiology and pathogenic potential of underdiagnosed human papillomavirus types

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    Sisti Stefano

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV tests are crucial diagnostic tools for the prevention of neoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix. However most commercial methods are designed to detect high-risk (HR HPV types and a limited selection of low-risk ones, thus missing a fair number of intermediate/low-risk types. As a result, many HPV infections remain undiagnosed, generating distrust in virological diagnosis among gynaecologists, who continue to rely preferentially on cytological and colposcopic findings. Results In this study, we tested 6,335 consecutive clinical samples, most of them from Italian patients with cytological abnormalities. The samples, collected in 2000–2007, were analyzed using PCR amplification of a 173–206 bp (depending on HPV type conserved region in the L1 open reading frame, restriction endonuclease analysis and, where required, sequence analysis for type determination. Analysis of a smaller male sample and long term follow-up of a few female subjects was also performed. A total of 2,161 samples tested positive for HPV DNA (32.1%; 21.3% of them were mixed infections. Overall, 59 known and 2 unknown HPV types were detected. Their relative prevalence was calculated; notably, types not clearly identifiable using the most common commercial method accounted for 36% of infections. Clinical findings associated with the underdiagnosed types ranged from H-SIL to low-grade abnormalities, although none of these infections resulted in invasive cancer. Conclusion Given the high prevalence of some underdiagnosed HPV types in the population (principally HPV53, HPV66, HPV84, and HPV87 and their frequent association with cytological abnormalities, techniques capable of detecting and typing them would prove extremely useful.

  8. Two types of brown adipose tissue in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    During the last years the existence of metabolically active brown adipose tissue in adult humans has been widely accepted by the research community. Its unique ability to dissipate chemical energy stored in triglycerides as heat makes it an attractive target for new drugs against obesity and its related diseases. Hence the tissue is now subject to intense research, the hypothesis being that an expansion and/or activation of the tissue is associated with a healthy metabolic phenotype. Animal studies provide evidence for the existence of at least two types of brown adipocytes. Apart from the classical brown adipocyte that is found primarily in the interscapular region where it constitutes a thermogenic organ, a second type of brown adipocyte, the so-called beige adipocyte, can appear within white adipose tissue depots. The fact that the two cell types develop from different precursors suggests that they might be recruited and stimulated by different cues and therefore represent two distinct targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this commentary is to discuss recent work addressing the question whether also humans possess two types of brown adipocytes and to highlight some issues when looking for molecular markers for such cells.

  9. Sorafenib enhances proteasome inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity via inhibition of unfolded protein response and keratin phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru, E-mail: msrharada@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2013-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly resistant to conventional systemic therapies and prognosis for advanced HCC patients remains poor. Recent studies of the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor initiation and progression have identified several potential molecular targets in HCC. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor shown to have survival benefits in advanced HCC. It acts by inhibiting the serine/threonine kinases and the receptor type tyrosine kinases. In preclinical experiments sorafenib had anti-proliferative activity in hepatoma cells and it reduced tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib include its inhibitory effects on protein ubiquitination, unfolded protein response (UPR) and keratin phosphorylation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, we show that combined treatment with sorafenib and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) synergistically induced a marked increase in cell death in hepatoma- and hepatocyte-derived cells. These observations may open the way to potentially interesting treatment combinations that may augment the effect of sorafenib, possibly including drugs that promote ER stress. Because sorafenib blocked the cellular defense mechanisms against hepatotoxic injury not only in hepatoma cells but also in hepatocyte-derived cells, we must be careful to avoid severe liver injury. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •We examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib in hepatoma cells. •Sorafenib induces cell death via apoptotic and necrotic fashion. •Sorafenib inhibits protein ubiquitination and unfolded protein response. •Autophagy induced by sorafenib may affect its cytotoxicity. •Sorafenib inhibits keratin phosphorylation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation.

  10. Influence of keratinized tissue on spontaneous exposure of submerged implants: classification and clinical observations

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    G. Mendoza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The reasons for spontaneous early exposure (SEE of dental implants during healing have not been established yet. The objective of this study was to assess whether the width of keratinized tissue (KT and other site-related conditions could be associated with implants’ SEE. Materials and methods: Data from 500 implants placed in 138 non-smoking patients, between September 2009 and June 2010, were evaluated. Implants were submerged and allowed to heal for 3 to 6 months. At baseline, the following conditions were documented: the presence of keratinized tissue width > 2 mm; the type of implant site (i.e. fresh extraction socket or edentulous alveolar ridge; concomitant use of guided tissue regeneration. During the healing period, the occurrence of partial or total implants SEE was recorded; thus, a mixed-effects logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the association between implant site conditions and implant exposure. Results: One hundred and eighty-five implants (37.0% remained submerged after healing and were classified as Class I, whereas 215 (43.0% showed partial spontaneous early exposure (SEE at the first week after implant placement (Class II, and 100 implants (20.0% developed more extensive exposures (Class III. The variables, baseline width of KT (p = 0.18, fresh extraction socket (p = 0.88 and guided tissue regeneration (GTR plus bone substitutes (p = 0.42, were not found to be correlated with implants` SEE, with an odds ratio (OR of 1.29 (95% confidence interval: -0.12–0.63, 1.03 (95% confidence interval: -0.46–0.53 and 1.22 (95% confidence interval: -0.29–0.68, respectively. Conclusion: It was not possible to establish an association between SEE and some implant-related factors; therefore, further investigations focused on the reasons associated to implants’ SEE are needed.

  11. T cells display mitochondria hyperpolarization in human type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Chernatynskaya, Anna V; Li, Jian-Wei; Kimbrell, Matthew R; Cassidy, Richard J; Perry, Daniel J; Muir, Andrew B; Atkinson, Mark A; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E

    2017-09-07

    T lymphocytes constitute a major effector cell population in autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Despite essential functions of mitochondria in regulating activation, proliferation, and apoptosis of T cells, little is known regarding T cell metabolism in the progression of human type 1 diabetes. In this study, we report, using two independent cohorts, that T cells from patients with type 1 diabetes exhibited mitochondrial inner-membrane hyperpolarization (MHP). Increased MHP was a general phenotype observed in T cell subsets irrespective of prior antigen exposure, and was not correlated with HbA1C levels, subject age, or duration of diabetes. Elevated T cell MHP was not detected in subjects with type 2 diabetes. T cell MHP was associated with increased activation-induced IFNγ production, and activation-induced IFNγ was linked to mitochondria-specific ROS production. T cells from subjects with type 1 diabetes also exhibited lower intracellular ATP levels. In conclusion, intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction observed in type 1 diabetes alters mitochondrial ATP and IFNγ production; the latter is correlated with ROS generation. These changes impact T cell bioenergetics and function.

  12. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A;

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...... proviruses, one with a wild-type gag/gag-pol and the other with a mutant gag that cannot express functional Gag/Gag-Pol. Viral titers and RNA analyses revealed that mutant viral RNAs can be packaged at efficiencies comparable to that of viral RNA from which wild-type Gag/Gag-Pol is translated. These results...... do not support the cis-packaging hypothesis but instead indicate that trans packaging is the major mechanism of HIV-2 RNA packaging. To further characterize the mechanisms of HIV-2 RNA packaging, we visualized HIV-2 RNA in individual particles by using fluorescent protein-tagged RNA-binding proteins...

  13. Human papillomavirus type 29 (HPV-29), an HPV type cross-hybridizing with HPV-2 and with HPV-3-related types.

    OpenAIRE

    Favre, M.; Croissant, O; Orth, G

    1989-01-01

    The cloning and partial characterization of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 29 is presented. By hybridization analyses, this virus appears to be related to HPV types associated with common warts and HPV types associated with flat warts.

  14. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Selby, Katja; Miethe, Sebastian; Frenzel, André; Liu, Yvonne; Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Pelat, Thibaut; Urbain, Remi; Fontayne, Alexandre; Thullier, Philippe; Sesardic, Dorothea; Lindström, Miia; Hust, Michael; Korkeala, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis)-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18) by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E). In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD) in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans. PMID:27626446

  15. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yağmur Derman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18 by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E. In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans.

  16. Transient structures of keratins from hoof and horn influence their self association and supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Prachi; Balaraman, Madhan; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2016-12-01

    Keratins as fibrous proteins, offer structural integrity to various tissues in providing the functional role of protection or load bearing. This work is a prelude to understand the structure - property correlation for a wide variety of keratins. The kinetics of aggregation of bovine hoof keratin (KF) and horn keratin (KR) were monitored by different biophysical methods. pH dependent studies indicated that initially both keratins existed in pre-aggregated form and the efficiency of aggregation decreased with increasing pH. The size of the aggregates was found to be larger in KF compared to KR. UV-vis and particle size analysis clearly revealed that the pre-aggregated forms of KF and KR dissociated to intermediate transient structures with smaller aggregate size, which acted as stronger nucleating agents for further self association of the keratins to form higher order supramolecular assemblies. Conformational analysis indicated that there was no significant conformational change during the aggregation of KF and KR. Morphology of the KF aggregates showed fractal arrangement while KR aggregates formed an ordered structure with no particular arrangement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which shows an interesting and unique observation on changes in the structure during self-association of keratins.

  17. The keratin-binding protein Albatross regulates polarization of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masahiko; Inoko, Akihito; Shiromizu, Takashi; Nakayama, Masanori; Zou, Peng; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Yuko; Izawa, Ichiro; Sasoh, Mikio; Uji, Yukitaka; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Kiyono, Tohru; Inagaki, Masaki

    2008-10-06

    The keratin intermediate filament network is abundant in epithelial cells, but its function in the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity is unclear. Here, we show that Albatross complexes with Par3 to regulate formation of the apical junctional complex (AJC) and maintain lateral membrane identity. In nonpolarized epithelial cells, Albatross localizes with keratin filaments, whereas in polarized epithelial cells, Albatross is primarily localized in the vicinity of the AJC. Knockdown of Albatross in polarized cells causes a disappearance of key components of the AJC at cell-cell borders and keratin filament reorganization. Lateral proteins E-cadherin and desmoglein 2 were mislocalized even on the apical side. Although Albatross promotes localization of Par3 to the AJC, Par3 and ezrin are still retained at the apical surface in Albatross knockdown cells, which retain intact microvilli. Analysis of keratin-deficient epithelial cells revealed that keratins are required to stabilize the Albatross protein, thus promoting the formation of AJC. We propose that keratins and the keratin-binding protein Albatross are important for epithelial cell polarization.

  18. Extraction and characterization of keratin from bovine hoof: A potential material for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Prachi; Madhan, Balaraman; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Keratin from the hoof is a less explored source for making valuable products. In this paper we present the extraction of pure keratin from bovine hooves and characterized them to better address the possible exploitation of this bio-resource as an alternative material for tissue engineering applications. The keratin protein from the pulverized hooves was extracted by reduction, which was observed to be pure, and two polypeptide chains of molecular weight in the range of 45-50 and 55-60 KDa were determined using SDS-PAGE assay. FTIR analysis complementing circular dichroism (CD) data, established that hoof keratin predominantly adopted α-helical conformation with admixture of β-sheet. The keratin was shown to have appreciably high denaturation temperature (215°C) as indicated by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) also showed the retention of 50% of the original weight of the sample even at a temperature of 346°C. The keratin from the hoof had been observed to be biocompatible when analyzed with MTT assay using fibroblast cells, showing more than 90% cell viability. Hence, hoof keratin would be useful for high value biomedical applications.

  19. NOVEL USE OF WASTE KERATIN AND COTTON LINTER FIBERS FOR PROTOTYPE TISSUE PAPERS AND THEIR EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Shi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Corporate environmental sustainability calls for sustainable product manufacturing with less creation of waste material or increased reuse of waste materials. One example is the use of keratin fiber from the poultry industry and cotton linter from the textile industry for paper and tissue manufacturing. In this paper, the feasibility of using these waste fibers to make paper was demonstrated in handsheets. The properties of these handsheets were compared to the properties of handsheets made with standard bleached eucalyptus tropical hardwood fibers. A blend of cotton linter and keratin fibers at 80/20 and 60/40 ratios showed a 59% and 73% improvement in sheet bulk, respectively, compared to eucalyptus handsheets. Similarly, air permeability of the cotton / keratin fiber handsheets improved 414% and 336%, respectively, versus the eucalyptus. However, the tensile index of the cotton and keratin fiber blends was lower than the eucalyptus sheets. There was no remarkable difference in water absorbency up to 20% keratin fiber. Above 20% of keratin fibers the water absorbency started to decrease, which is likely attributable to the hydrophobic nature of the protein-based keratin fiber.

  20. Human skeletal muscle fibre types and force: velocity properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntosh, B R; Herzog, W; Suter, E; Wiley, J P; Sokolosky, J

    1993-01-01

    It has been reported that there is a relationship between power output and fibre type distribution in mixed muscle. The strength of this relationship is greater in the range of 3-8 rad.s-1 during knee extension compared to slower or faster angular knee extensor speeds. A mathematical model of the force: velocity properties of muscle with various combinations of fast- and slow-twitch fibres may provide insight into why specific velocities may give better predictions of fibre type distribution. In this paper, a mathematical model of the force:velocity relationship for mixed muscle is presented. This model demonstrates that peak power and optimal velocity should be predictive of fibre distribution and that the greatest fibre type discrimination in human knee extensor muscles should occur with measurement of power output at an angular velocity just greater than 7 rad.s-1. Measurements of torque:angular velocity relationships for knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer and fibre type distribution in biopsies of vastus lateralis muscles were made on 31 subjects. Peak power and optimal velocity were determined in three ways: (1) direct measurement, (2) linear regression, and (3) fitting to the Hill equation. Estimation of peak power and optimal velocity using the Hill equation gave the best correlation with fibre type distribution (r < 0.5 for peak power or optimal velocity and percentage of fast-twitch fibres). The results of this study confirm that prediction of fibre type distribution is facilitated by measurement of peak power at optimal velocity and that fitting of the data to the Hill equation is a suitable method for evaluation of these parameters.

  1. Polymorphism of the human vitronectin gene causes vitronectin blood type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, K; Hayashi, M; Oishi, N; Sakaki, Y

    1990-03-30

    Human blood plasma/sera are classified into three distinct vitronectin types based on the relative amount of the 75 kDa polypeptide to its cleavage product of 65 kDa. We asked whether the vitronectin blood types correlated with the polymorphism of the vitronectin gene. A portion of the vitronectin gene was amplified by using polymerase chain reaction and digested with a restriction enzyme PmaC I which may distinguish the base sequence causing the polymorphic change at the amino acid position 381. Amplified DNAs of the blood type I (75 kDa-rich), II (75/65 kDa-even), and III (65 kDa-rich) were shown to be resistant, moderately sensitive and completely sensitive to PmaC I, respectively. These results suggest that Thr at position 381 is essential for the cleavage of the vitronectin 75 kDa polypeptide and that three possible combinations of two codominant alleles of vitronectin determine three vitronectin blood types.

  2. Effect of discarded keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels on the wound healing process in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mira; Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Kim, Myung Jin; Kim, In-Shik; Park, Byung-Yong; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2015-10-01

    Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation (EBI) were examined in wound healing. As the EBI dose increased to 60 kGy, the tensile strength of the hydrogels increased, while the percentage of elongation of the hydrogels decreased. After 7 days, the dehydrated wool-based hydrogels show the highest mechanical properties (the % elongation of 1341 and the tensile strength of 6030 g/cm(2) at an EBI dose of 30 kGy). Excision wound models were used to evaluate the effects of human hair-based hydrogels and wool-based hydrogels on various phases of healing. On post-wounding days 7 and 14, wounds treated with either human hair-based or wool-based hydrogels were greatly reduced in size compared to wounds that received other treatments, although the hydrocolloid wound dressing-treated wound also showed a pronounced reduction in size compared to an open wound as measured by a histological assay. On the 14th postoperative day, the cellular appearances were similar in the hydrocolloid wound dressing and wool-based hydrogel-treated wounds, and collagen fibers were substituted with fibroblasts and mixed with fibroblasts in the dermis. Furthermore, the wound treated with a human hair-based hydrogel showed almost complete epithelial regeneration, with the maturation of immature connective tissue and hair follicles and formation of a sebaceous gland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  4. Human bile sorption by cancrinite-type zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, Carlos F. [Laboratorio de Catalisis y Metales de Transicion, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia. Edo. Carabobo, Apartado Postal 3336 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: clinares@uc.edu.ve; Colmenares, Maryi; Ocanto, Freddy [Laboratorio de Catalisis y Metales de Transicion, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia. Edo. Carabobo, Apartado Postal 3336 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Valbuena, Oscar [Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Departamento de Biologia, Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia. Edo. Carabobo, Apartado Postal 3336 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: ovalbuena@uc.edu.ve

    2009-01-01

    A nitrated cancrinite-type zeolite was synthesized from zeolite X, NaOH and NaNO{sub 3} solutions under autogeneous pressure at 80 deg. C for 48 h. This zeolite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR-spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET surface area. XRD, SEM and FT-IR confirmed the presence of nitrated cancrinite-type zeolite without other collateral phases as sodalite. Then, this sodium zeolite was exchanged with potassium and calcium cations and finally, these modified zeolites were reacted with biliar solutions from human gallbladder. Several factors such as: mass of used cancrinite, nature of the exchanged cation and reaction time of the cancrinite-bile solution interactions were studied. The composition of bile solutions (bile acids, phospholipids and bilirubin) was analyzed before and after the cancrinite-bile solution reaction. Results showed that the components of the bile were notably reduced after the contact with solids. Ca-cancrinite, 120 min of reaction time and 500 mg of solids were the best conditions determined for the bile acid reduction in human bile. When the modified zeolites were compared with the commercial cholestyramine, it was found that zeolites were more active than the latter. These zeolites may be an alternative choice to diminish cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemic patients.

  5. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  6. Multiplexed serologic assay for nine anogenital human papillomavirus types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalka, David; Matys, Katie; Bojczuk, Paul; Green, Tina; Gesser, Richard; Saah, Alfred; Haupt, Richard; Dutko, Frank; Esser, Mark T

    2010-05-01

    A multiplexed human papillomavirus (HPV) immunoassay has been developed for the detection of human IgG antibodies to HPV type 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 virus-like particle (VLP) types in serum following natural infection or immunization with VLP-based vaccines. The VLP antigens were covalently conjugated to carboxyl Luminex microspheres (MS) using a carbodiimide chemistry. Antibody (Ab) titers were determined in a direct binding format, in which an IgG1- to -4-specific, phycoerythrin (PE)-labeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) (HP6043) binds to human serum IgG antibodies. Pooled serum samples from rhesus macaques immunized with a 9-valent VLP-based vaccine served as the reference standard. The overall specificity of the assay was >99%, and the linearity (parallelism) of the assay was <7% per 10-fold dilution. Total assay precision was <19% across 3 different VLP-microsphere lots, 2 secondary antibody lots, and 2 different operators over a period of 3 weeks. Three different methods were used to evaluate serostatus cutoffs (SCO): (i) a clinical sensitivity/specificity analysis based on "likely negative" and "likely positive" samples from nonvaccinees, (ii) stringent upper tolerance limits on samples from "likely negatives," and (iii) stringent upper tolerance limits from the same "likely negative" sample set after VLP adsorption. Depending on the method to set the serostatus cutoff, the percentage of seropositive samples at the month 48 time point following vaccination with the HPV 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent vaccine ranged from 70% to 100%. This assay has proven useful for measuring the levels of serum antibody to the nine HPV VLPs following natural infection or administration of VLP-based vaccines.

  7. Mobile phone types and SAR characteristics of the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Hong, Seon-Eui; Kwon, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Hyung-Do; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    Mobile phones differ in terms of their operating frequency, outer shape, and form and location of the antennae, all of which affect the spatial distributions of their electromagnetic field and the level of electromagnetic absorption in the human head or brain. For this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated for four anatomical head models at different ages using 11 numerical phone models of different shapes and antenna configurations. The 11 models represent phone types accounting for around 86% of the approximately 1400 commercial phone models released into the Korean market since 2002. Seven of the phone models selected have an internal dual-band antenna, and the remaining four possess an external antenna. Each model was intended to generate an average absorption level equivalent to that of the same type of commercial phone model operating at the maximum available output power. The 1 g peak spatial SAR and ipsilateral and contralateral brain-averaged SARs were reported for all 11 phone models. The effects of the phone type, phone position, operating frequency, and age of head models on the brain SAR were comprehensively determined.

  8. Mobile phone types and SAR characteristics of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Hong, Seon-Eui; Kwon, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Hyung-Do; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2017-03-07

    Mobile phones differ in terms of their operating frequency, outer shape, and form and location of the antennae, all of which affect the spatial distributions of their electromagnetic field and the level of electromagnetic absorption in the human head or brain. For this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated for four anatomical head models at different ages using 11 numerical phone models of different shapes and antenna configurations. The 11 models represent phone types accounting for around 86% of the approximately 1400 commercial phone models released into the Korean market since 2002. Seven of the phone models selected have an internal dual-band antenna, and the remaining four possess an external antenna. Each model was intended to generate an average absorption level equivalent to that of the same type of commercial phone model operating at the maximum available output power. The 1 g peak spatial SAR and ipsilateral and contralateral brain-averaged SARs were reported for all 11 phone models. The effects of the phone type, phone position, operating frequency, and age of head models on the brain SAR were comprehensively determined.

  9. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insulitis in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedgwood, Kyle C. A.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Morgan, Noel G.; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an auto-immune disease characterized by the selective destruction of the insulin secreting beta cells in the pancreas during an inflammatory phase known as insulitis. Patients with T1D are typically dependent on the administration of externally provided insulin in order to manage blood glucose levels. Whilst technological developments have significantly improved both the life expectancy and quality of life of these patients, an understanding of the mechanisms of the disease remains elusive. Animal models, such as the NOD mouse model, have been widely used to probe the process of insulitis, but there exist very few data from humans studied at disease onset. In this manuscript, we employ data from human pancreases collected close to the onset of T1D and propose a spatio-temporal computational model for the progression of insulitis in human T1D, with particular focus on the mechanisms underlying the development of insulitis in pancreatic islets. This framework allows us to investigate how the time-course of insulitis progression is affected by altering key parameters, such as the number of the CD20+ B cells present in the inflammatory infiltrate, which has recently been proposed to influence the aggressiveness of the disease. Through the analysis of repeated simulations of our stochastic model, which track the number of beta cells within an islet, we find that increased numbers of B cells in the peri-islet space lead to faster destruction of the beta cells. We also find that the balance between the degradation and repair of the basement membrane surrounding the islet is a critical component in governing the overall destruction rate of the beta cells and their remaining number. Our model provides a framework for continued and improved spatio-temporal modeling of human T1D. PMID:28082906

  10. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insulitis in Human Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedgwood, Kyle C A; Richardson, Sarah J; Morgan, Noel G; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an auto-immune disease characterized by the selective destruction of the insulin secreting beta cells in the pancreas during an inflammatory phase known as insulitis. Patients with T1D are typically dependent on the administration of externally provided insulin in order to manage blood glucose levels. Whilst technological developments have significantly improved both the life expectancy and quality of life of these patients, an understanding of the mechanisms of the disease remains elusive. Animal models, such as the NOD mouse model, have been widely used to probe the process of insulitis, but there exist very few data from humans studied at disease onset. In this manuscript, we employ data from human pancreases collected close to the onset of T1D and propose a spatio-temporal computational model for the progression of insulitis in human T1D, with particular focus on the mechanisms underlying the development of insulitis in pancreatic islets. This framework allows us to investigate how the time-course of insulitis progression is affected by altering key parameters, such as the number of the CD20+ B cells present in the inflammatory infiltrate, which has recently been proposed to influence the aggressiveness of the disease. Through the analysis of repeated simulations of our stochastic model, which track the number of beta cells within an islet, we find that increased numbers of B cells in the peri-islet space lead to faster destruction of the beta cells. We also find that the balance between the degradation and repair of the basement membrane surrounding the islet is a critical component in governing the overall destruction rate of the beta cells and their remaining number. Our model provides a framework for continued and improved spatio-temporal modeling of human T1D.

  11. Fabrication of nanofibrous scaffold using a PLA and hagfish thread keratin composite; its effect on cell adherence, growth, and osteoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Park, Ko Eun; Park, Won Ho; Lee, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Electrospinning is a useful method for the production of nanofibrous scaffolds in the field of tissue engineering. Keratin has been used as a biomaterial for electrospinning and can be used in a variety of biomedical applications because it is a natural protein, giving it the ability to improve cell affinity of scaffolds. In this study, keratin was extracted from hagfish slime thread (H-keratin) and blended with polylactic acid (PLA) polymer solution to construct a nanofibrous scaffold. Wool keratin (W-keratin) was used as a control for the comparison of morphological, physical, and biological properties. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of both W-keratin and H-keratin in the electrospun PLA/keratin. Observations with a scanning electron microscope revealed that PLA, PLA/W-keratin, and PLA/H-keratin had similar average diameters (~800 nm). Cell attachment experiments showed that MG-63 cells adhered more rapidly and spread better onto PLA/H-keratin than onto the pure PLA or PLA/W-keratin. Cell proliferation assay, DNA content, live/dead, and alkaline phosphatase activity assays showed that PLA/H-keratin scaffolds could accelerate the viability, proliferation, and osteogenesis of MG-63 cells relative to pure PLA or PLA/W-keratin nanofibrous scaffolds. These findings suggest that H-keratin can improve cellular attraction and has great potential to be used as a biomaterial in bone tissue engineering.

  12. Microbial decomposition of keratin in nature—a new hypothesis of industrial relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Lene; Huang, Yuhong; Kamp Busk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of keratin-degrading enzymes from fungi and bacteria has primarily focused on finding one protease with efficient keratinase activity. Recently, an investigation was conducted of all keratinases secreted from a fungus known to grow on keratinaceous materials, such as feather, horn......, and hooves. The study demonstrated that a minimum of three keratinases is needed to break down keratin, an endo-acting, an exo-acting, and an oligopeptide-acting keratinase. Further, several studies have documented that disruption of sulfur bridges of the keratin structure acts synergistically...... with the keratinases to loosen the molecular structure, thus giving the enzymes access to their substrate, the protein structure. With such complexity, it is relevant to compare microbial keratin decomposition with the microbial decomposition of well-studied polymers such as cellulose and chitin. Interestingly...

  13. Preparation of stable aqueous solution of keratins, and physiochemical and biodegradational properties of films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, K; Yamauchi, A; Kusunoki, T; Kohda, A; Konishi, Y

    1996-08-01

    A stable aqueous solution of reduced keratins was prepared by extracting the proteins from wool (Corriedale) with a mixture of urea, mercaptanol, surfactant, and water at 40-60 degrees C. Sodium dodecyl sulfate was especially effective as a surfactant, not only in promoting extraction but also in stabilizing the aqueous protein solution. The proteins had the following constants: MW, 52,000-69,000 daltons; cysteine content, 8-9 mol%; pl about 6.7. A clear film was readily prepared from a keratin solution containing glycerol. The film was insoluble in water and organic solvents including dimethyl sulfoxide. The keratin film was permeable to glucose, urea, and sodium chloride. The keratin film was degraded in vitro (by trypsin) and in vivo (by subcutaneous embedding in mice).

  14. [The expression of keratins Nos. 8, 17 and vimentin in pleomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gel'shteĭn, V I; Chipysheva, T A; Ermilova, V D; Bannikov, G A

    1989-01-01

    In the normal salivary gland, the monoclonal antibody to keratin 8 immuno-morphologically identifies the epithelium that covers acini and ducts. The monoclonal antibodies to keratin 17 and vimentin detect normal myoepithelium. The two keratins are found both in the epithelioid and mesenchyma-like components of pleomorphic adenoma, suggesting a single epithelial nature of this tumor. In all the morphological components of the pleomorphic adenoma, there are cells that combine protein expression of intermediate filaments normally labelling different cell subpopulations. This fact provides support for the hypothesis that the pleomorphic adenoma originates from bipotent precursor cells. A particular phenotype of pleomorphic adenoma elements is realized under the control of the local density of cells and microenvironment, as a result of which the cells expressing vimentin predominate in the mesenchymal component, keratin 8 in the epithelial tubular one.

  15. Dissolution and characterization of biofunctional keratin particles extracted from chicken feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Gupta, Arun; Chik, Syed Mohd Saufi Bin Tuan; Yeo Gek Kee, Chua; Poddar, Pradeep Kumar

    2017-04-01

    In the present study chicken feathers were hydrolyzed in alkaline environment. The pH value of feather hydrolyzed solution was adjusted according to the principle of isoelectric precipitation. Three kinds of precipitates of keratin polypeptide were collected at pH of 3.5, 5.5 and 7.5 respectively. The keratin solution were freeze dried and denoted as FKP1, FKP2, FKP3 respectively. All keratin particles possessed smooth, uniform and round surface by scanning electron microscope (SEM). FKP1, FKP2 and FKP3 had higher glass transition temperature examined by thermogravimetry (TG). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed that the extracted keratin retained the most of protein backbone, with the breakage of disulfide cross-links and hydrogen bonds.

  16. A keratin 9 Gene mutation (Asn160Ser) in a Japanese patient with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Hattori, Naoko; Saeki, Hidehisa; Adachi, Makoto; Komine, Mayumi; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Tamaki, Kunihiko

    2002-12-01

    We described a 5-year-old Japanese girl with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma and examined her for a keratin 9 gene mutation. Physical examination disclosed diffuse yellowish hyperkeratosis with an erythematous border limited strictly to the palms and soles. Histological examination revealed hyperkeratosis with vacuolar degeneration in the spinous and granular layers of the epidermis. Sequence analysis demonstrated an A to G transition at the middle position of codon 160 in the 1A domain of the keratin 9 gene. The amino acid at codon 160 was deduced to have changed from asparagine (Asn) to serine (Ser). This is the first case with an Asn160Ser mutation in a Japanese. The substitution of Ser for Asn at codon 160 of the keratin 9 gene is assumed to be fatal for keratin filament assembly regardless of race or ethnicity.

  17. Effect of zinc deficiency on keratins in buccal epithelium of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, D J; Daniel, J C; Gerson, S J

    1991-01-01

    Weanling rats fed a zinc-deficient diet (less than 1 part/10(6)) for 4 weeks develop parakeratotic and hyperplastic buccal epithelium with increased mitotic activity. Normal buccal epithelium contains major keratin polypeptides of 56, 46 and 43 kDa. Four-week zinc-deficient rats lacked the 43 kDa keratin. It appears that the 46 and 43 kDa keratins are related, differing as a result of some post-translation modification. A proteolytic cleavage of the 46 kDa keratin to the 43 kDa species is the most likely mechanism. The findings point to a decrease of keratinolytic enzyme activity in the zinc-deficient rats.

  18. Innovative Application of Biopolymer Keratin as a Filler of Synthetic Acrylonitrile-Butadiene Rubber NBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Prochoń

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current investigations show the influence of keratin, recovered from the tanning industry, on the thermal and mechanical properties of vulcanizates with synthetic rubber acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber NBR. The addition of waste protein to NBR vulcanizates influences the improvement of resistance at high temperatures and mechanical properties like tensile strength and hardness. The introduction of keratin to the mixes of rubber previously blended with zinc oxide (ZnO before vulcanization process leads to an increase in the cross-linking density of vulcanizates. The polymer materials received including addition of proteins will undergo biodecomposition in natural conditions. After soil test, vulcanizates with keratin especially keratin with ZnO showed much more changes on the surface area than vulcanizates without protein. In that aerobic environment, microorganisms, bacteria, and fungus digested better polymer materials containing natural additives.

  19. Preparation and characterization of keratin-K2Ti6O13 whisker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-10

    May 10, 2010 ... hexatitanate (K2Ti6O13) whiskers be used to reinforce keratin film. The effects of ... reinforced composite manufacturing Co., and the optical micrograph is .... on the mechanical properties of jute-polypropylene composites.

  20. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of human and animal Clostridium difficile isolates of various toxigenic types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemee, Ludovic; Dhalluin, Anne; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Lemeland, Jean-François; Pons, Jean-Louis

    2004-06-01

    A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed to study the genetic relationships and population structure of 72 Clostridium difficile isolates from various hosts, geographic sources, PCR ribotypes, and toxigenic types (determined by PCR targeting tcdA and tcdB genes). MLST was performed by DNA sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes (aroE, ddl, dutA, tpi, recA, gmk, and sodA). The number of alleles ranged from five (dutA and ddl) to eleven (recA). Allelic profiles allowed the definition of 34 different sequence types (STs). These STs lacked correlation with geographic source but were well correlated to toxigenic type. The dendrogram generated from a matrix of pairwise genetic distances showed that animal isolates did not constitute a distinct lineage from human isolates and that there was no hypervirulent lineage within the population of toxigenic human isolates (isolates recovered from pseudomembranous colitis and antibiotic-associated diarrhea did not cluster in distinct lineages). However, A(-) B(+) variant isolates shared the same ST that appeared as a divergent lineage in the population studied, indicating a single evolutionary origin. The population structure was further examined by analysis of allelic polymorphism. The dendrogram generated from composite sequence-based analysis revealed a homogeneous population associated with three divergent lineages, one of which was restricted to A(-) B(+) variant isolates. C. difficile exhibited a clonal population structure, as revealed by the estimation of linkage disequilibrium (Ia) between loci. The analysis of alleles within clonal complexes estimated that point mutation generated new alleles at a frequency eightfold higher than recombinational exchange, and the congruence of the dendrograms generated from separate housekeeping loci confirmed the mutational evolution of this species.

  1. In vivo measurement of non-keratinized squamous epithelium using a spectroscopic microendoscope with multiple source-detector separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Gage J.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    In the non-keratinized epithelia, dysplasia typically arises near the basement membrane and proliferates into the upper epithelial layers over time. We present a non-invasive, multimodal technique combining high-resolution fluorescence imaging and broadband sub-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (sDRS) to monitor health at various tissue layers. This manuscript focuses on characterization of the sDRS modality, which contains two source-detector separations (SDSs) of 374 μm and 730 μm, so that it can be used to extract in vivo optical parameters from human oral mucosa at two tissue thicknesses. First, we present empirical lookup tables (LUTs) describing the relationship between reduced scattering (μs') and absorption coefficients (μa) and absolute reflectance. LUTS were shown to extract μs' and μa with accuracies of approximately 4% and 8%, respectively. We then present LUTs describing the relationship between μs', μa and sampling depth. Sampling depths range between 210-480 and 260-620 μm for the 374 and 730 μm SDSs, respectively. We then demonstrate the ability to extract in vivo μs', μa, hemoglobin concentration, bulk tissue oxygen saturation, scattering exponent, and sampling depth from the inner lip of thirteen healthy volunteers to elucidate the differences in the extracted optical parameters from each SDS (374 and 730 μm) within non-keratinized squamous epithelia.

  2. Effect of concentration of wool keratin on the rebuilding of disulfur bond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate the effect of concentration of extracted keratin on the rebuilding of disulfur bond during dialysis against deionized water: cross-linked networks can be formed in the aggregate when the concentration is high, whereas at low concentration, intramolecular disulfur bond is preferred. This preliminary study illustrates, for the first time, the potential of controlling the cross-linking between keratin chains by facile means without addition of other chemicals, which is helpful to construct the biomacromolecular self-assemblies.

  3. Innovative Application of Biopolymer Keratin as a Filler of Synthetic Acrylonitrile-Butadiene Rubber NBR

    OpenAIRE

    Mirosława Prochoń; Anita Przepiórkowska

    2013-01-01

    The current investigations show the influence of keratin, recovered from the tanning industry, on the thermal and mechanical properties of vulcanizates with synthetic rubber acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber NBR. The addition of waste protein to NBR vulcanizates influences the improvement of resistance at high temperatures and mechanical properties like tensile strength and hardness. The introduction of keratin to the mixes of rubber previously blended with zinc oxide (ZnO) before vulcanization ...

  4. Specific degradation of keratin in Xenopus laevis egg extracts undergoing apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cytochrome c activates apoptosis specific protease XCPP32 when being added to Xenopus laevis egg extracts, and induces apoptosis in this cell-free system. During apoptosis, cyto-skeleton proteins in egg extracts are degraded. Western blot assay indicates that 42-ku acidic keratin in egg extracts has been degraded by XCPP32. The degradation of 42-ku keratin may be crucial in apoptosis.

  5. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A;

    2011-01-01

    that specifically recognize stem-loop motifs in the viral genomes, an assay termed single virion analysis. These studies revealed that >90% of the HIV-2 particles contained viral RNAs and that RNAs derived from different viruses were copackaged frequently. Furthermore, the frequencies of heterozygous particles...... two monomeric RNAs. Additionally, single virion analyses demonstrated a similar RNA distribution in viral particles regardless of whether both viruses had a functional gag or one of the viruses had a nonfunctional gag, providing further support for the trans-packaging hypothesis. Together......Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...

  6. Inverted Pendulum-type Personal Mobility Considering Human Vibration Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misaki Masuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An inverted pendulum-type PM (personal mobility has been attracting attention as a low-carbon vehicle. For many people who like to use the PM, ride comfort is important. However, ride comfort of PM has not been focused on in previous studies. The vibration is one of causes that make riders feel uncomfortable. The PM is unstable system and horizontal vibration may be caused by a stabilizing control. Additionally, vertical vibration may also be caused by road disturbances. This study analyzes the vibration of the rider’s head in these two directions when the PM runs on a road with disturbances in numerical simulations, and evaluates ride comfort with the frequency characteristics of the vibration. To consider human vibration sensitivity, the frequency weighting proposed in ISO 2631-1 is used as an evaluation standard. The improvement methods are proposed from both software and hardware, and it is confirmed that the proposed method can improve ride comfort.

  7. Two-dimensional Fourier analysis of the spongy medullary keratin of structurally coloured feather barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, R. O.; Torres, R.; Williamson, S.; Dyck, J.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted two-dimensional (2D) discrete Fourier analyses of the spatial variation in refractive index of the spongy medullary keratin from four different colours of structurally coloured feather barbs from three species of bird: the rose-faced lovebird, Agapornis roseicollis (Psittacidae), the budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulatus (Psittacidae), and the Gouldian finch, Poephila guttata (Estrildidae). These results indicate that the spongy medullary keratin is a nanostructured tissue that functions as an array of coherent scatterers. The nanostructure of the medullary keratin is nearly uniform in all directions. The largest Fourier components of spatial variation in refractive index in the tissue are of the appropriate size to produce the observed colours by constructive interference alone. The peaks of the predicted reflectance spectra calculated from the 2D Fourier power spectra are congruent with the reflectance spectra measured by using microspectrophotometry. The alternative physical models for the production of these colours, the Rayleigh and Mie theories, hypothesize that medullary keratin is an incoherent array and that scattered waves are independent in phase. This assumption is falsified by the ring-like Fourier power spectra of these feathers, and the spacing of the scattering air vacuoles in the medullary keratin. Structural colours of avian feather barbs are produced by constructive interference of coherently scattered light waves from the optically heterogeneous matrix of keratin and air in the spongy medullary layer.

  8. Repair of peripheral nerve defects in rabbits using keratin hydrogel scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Paulina S; Apel, Peter J; Barnwell, Jonathan; Smith, Tom; Koman, L Andrew; Atala, Anthony; Van Dyke, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Entubulation of transected nerves using bioabsorbable conduits is a promising alternative to sural nerve autografting, but full functional recovery is rarely achieved. Numerous studies have suggested that scaffold-based conduit fillers may promote axon regeneration, but no neuroinductive biomaterial filler has been identified. We previously showed that a nerve guide filled with keratin hydrogel actively stimulates regeneration in a mouse model, and results in functional outcomes superior to empty conduits at early time points. The goal of the present study was to develop a peripheral nerve defect model in a rabbit and assess the effectiveness of a keratin hydrogel filler. Although repairs with keratin-filled conduits were not as consistently successful as autograft overall, the use of keratin resulted in a significant improvement in conduction delay compared to both empty conduits and autograft, as well as a significant improvement in amplitude recovery compared to empty conduits when measurable regeneration did occur. Taking into account all study animals (i.e., regenerated and nonregenerated), histological assessment showed that keratin-treated nerves had significantly greater myelin thickness than empty conduits. These data support the findings of our earlier study and suggest that keratin hydrogel fillers have the potential to be used clinically to improve conduit repair.

  9. Assessment of Deep Partial Thickness Burn Treatment with Keratin Biomaterial Hydrogels in a Swine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Poranki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial thickness burns can advance to full thickness after initial injury due to inadequate tissue perfusion and increased production of inflammatory cytokines, which has been referred to as burn wound progression. In previous work, we demonstrated that a keratin biomaterial hydrogel appeared to reduce burn wound progression. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a modified keratin hydrogel could reduce burn wound progression and speed healing. Standardized burn wounds were created in Yorkshire swine and treated within 30 minutes with keratin hydrogel (modified and unmodified, collagen hydrogel, or silver sulfadiazine (SSD. Digital images of each wound were taken for area measurements immediately prior to cleaning and dressing changes. Wound tissue was collected and assessed histologically at several time points. Wound area showed a significant difference between hydrogels and SSD groups, and rates of reepithelialization at early time points showed an increase when keratin treatment was used compared to both collagen and SSD. A linear regression model predicted a time to wound closure of approximately 25 days for keratin hydrogel while SSD treatment required 35 days. There appeared to be no measurable differences between the modified and unmodified formulations of keratin hydrogels.

  10. Cytotoxicity of dietary flavonoids on different human cancer types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are ubiquitous in nature. They are also in food, providing an essential link between diet and prevention of chronic diseases including cancer. Anticancer effects of these polyphenols depend on several factors: Their chemical structure and concentration, and also on the type of cancer. Malignant cells from different tissues reveal somewhat different sensitivity toward flavonoids and, therefore, the preferences of the most common dietary flavonoids to various human cancer types are analyzed in this review. While luteolin and kaempferol can be considered as promising candidate agents for treatment of gastric and ovarian cancers, respectively, apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin have good perspectives as potent antitumor agents for cervical cancer; cells from main sites of flavonoid metabolism (colon and liver reveal rather large fluctuations in anticancer activity probably due to exposure to various metabolites with different activities. Anticancer effect of flavonoids toward blood cancer cells depend on their myeloid, lymphoid, or erythroid origin; cytotoxic effects of flavonoids on breast and prostate cancer cells are highly related to the expression of hormone receptors. Different flavonoids are often preferentially present in certain food items, and knowledge about the malignant tissue-specific anticancer effects of flavonoids could be purposely applied both in chemoprevention as well as in cancer treatment.

  11. Human cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Smith, Charles D; Abner, Erin A; Schmitt, Frederick A; Scheff, Stephen W; Davis, Gregory J; Keller, Jeffrey N; Jicha, Gregory A; Davis, Daron; Wang-Xia, Wang; Hartman, Adria; Katz, Douglas G; Markesbery, William R

    2009-05-01

    The cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes (CNDM2) has not been positively defined. This review includes a description of CNDM2 research from before the 'Pubmed Era'. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on cerebrovascular and white matter pathology. These and prior studies about cerebrovascular histopathology in diabetes are reviewed. Evidence is also described for and against the link between CNDM2 and Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. To study this matter directly, we evaluated data from University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Center (UK ADC) patients recruited while non-demented and followed longitudinally. Of patients who had come to autopsy (N = 234), 139 met inclusion criteria. These patients provided the basis for comparing the prevalence of pathological and clinical indices between well-characterized cases with (N = 50) or without (N = 89) the premortem diagnosis of diabetes. In diabetics, cerebrovascular pathology was more frequent and Alzheimer-type pathology was less frequent than in non-diabetics. Finally, a series of photomicrographs demonstrates histopathological features (including clinical-radiographical correlation) observed in brains of persons that died after a history of diabetes. These preliminary, correlative, and descriptive studies may help develop new hypotheses about CNDM2. We conclude that more work should be performed on human material in the context of CNDM2.

  12. Infection with human herpesvirus type 8 and human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 among individuals participating in a case–control study in Havana City, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, L; Serraino, D; Rezza, G; Lence, J; Ortiz, R M; Cruz, T; Vaccarella, S; Sarmati, L; Andreoni, M; Franceschi, S

    2002-01-01

    Infection with human herpesvirus type 8 and with human T-cell leukaemia virus type-1 shows strong geographic variations. We conducted this study to assess prevalence and risk factors for human herpesvirus type 8 infection in Havana City, Cuba. Information and residual serum samples already collected for a hospital based case–control study were used. A total of 379 individuals (267 males and 112 females; median age=63 years) were evaluated. Antibodies to the lytic antigen of human herpesvirus type 8 were detected by using an immunofluorescence assay, while human T-cell leukaemia virus type-1 serology was performed by means of an ELISA test (alpha Biotech). Overall, 64 subjects (16.9%, 95% confidence interval: 13.1–20.0) were positive for human herpesvirus type 8 antibodies. Human herpesvirus type 8 seroprevalence significantly increased with age (odds ratio=1.9 for ⩾65 vs Havana City, Cuba, suggesting that Cuba may represent an intermediate endemical area. Sexual transmission does not seem to play a major role in the spread human herpesvirus type 8 infection. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 1253–1256. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600613 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12439714

  13. Dynamic evolution of the alpha (α) and beta (β) keratins has accompanied integument diversification and the adaptation of birds into novel lifestyles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenwold, Matthew J.; Bao, Weier; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vertebrate skin appendages are constructed of keratins produced by multigene families. Alpha (α) keratins are found in all vertebrates, while beta (β) keratins are found exclusively in reptiles and birds. We have studied the molecular evolution of these gene families in the genomes...... of 48 phylogenetically diverse birds and their expression in the scales and feathers of the chicken. RESULTS: We found that the total number of α-keratins is lower in birds than mammals and non-avian reptiles, yet two α-keratin genes (KRT42 and KRT75) have expanded in birds. The β-keratins, however......, demonstrate a dynamic evolution associated with avian lifestyle. The avian specific feather β-keratins comprise a large majority of the total number of β-keratins, but independently derived lineages of aquatic and predatory birds have smaller proportions of feather β-keratin genes and larger proportions...

  14. Terahertz spectroscopy of human skin constituents in suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Cecil; Yaroslavsky, Anna; Al-Arashi, Munir; Gatesman, Andrew; Goyette, Thomas; Giles, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz imaging has the potential to offer a non-invasive medical imaging modality for detecting different types of human cancers. The aim of this study was to identify frequencies of interest for continuous wave terahertz imaging of skin cancer. The absorption characteristics of water, collagen, and elastin were studied in the range between 20 and 100cm-1. In addition, we have recorded and analyzed the teraherz absorption spectra of several substances that are present in human skin (i.e. tryptophan, tyrosine, melanin, urocanic acid, keratin) and their water suspensions with the goal of using them as biomarkers for skin cancer detection.

  15. Novel Picornavirus Associated with Avian Keratin Disorder in Alaskan Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine Zylberberg

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Avian keratin disorder (AKD, characterized by debilitating overgrowth of the avian beak, was first documented in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus in Alaska. Subsequently, similar deformities have appeared in numerous species across continents. Despite the widespread distribution of this emerging pathology, the cause of AKD remains elusive. As a result, it is unknown whether suspected cases of AKD in the afflicted species are causally linked, and the impacts of this pathology at the population and community levels are difficult to evaluate. We applied unbiased, metagenomic next-generation sequencing to search for candidate pathogens in birds affected with AKD. We identified and sequenced the complete coding region of a novel picornavirus, which we are calling poecivirus. Subsequent screening of 19 AKD-affected black-capped chickadees and 9 control individuals for the presence of poecivirus revealed that 19/19 (100% AKD-affected individuals were positive, while only 2/9 (22% control individuals were infected with poecivirus. Two northwestern crows (Corvus caurinus and two red-breasted nuthatches (Sitta canadensis with AKD-consistent pathology also tested positive for poecivirus. We suggest that poecivirus is a candidate etiological agent of AKD.

  16. Keratin 8 expression in head and neck epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berghaus Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intermediate filament forming protein keratin 8 (K8 is a tumour-associated antigen, which was shown to be over-expressed in a variety of malignancies. Here, we present a study of K8 expression in squamous epithelia of the head and neck area, including normal mucosa, hyperplastic and dysplastic leukoplakia, carcinomas of different sub-localisations, and lymph node metastases. Methods K8 expression was assessed upon immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies in cryosections of primary tumours of the head and neck area. Results K8 expression was characteristic of transformed tissue and marked early stages of disease, i.e. dysplastic oral leukoplakia, but not normal or hyperplastic epithelium. With the exception of carcinomas of the larynx and the tongue, K8 expression also strictly differentiated carcinomas from normal epithelium of the same origin. Furthermore, K8high was characteristic of cells, which had detached from the sites of primary tumours and had been invading the surrounding tissue at the time point of surgery. Conclusion K8 is an excellent marker for head and neck malignancies, which allows for early detection as well as for visualisation of potentially disseminating tumour cells in vivo.

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1, human protein interaction database at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, William; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E; Katz, Kenneth S; Maglott, Donna R; Pruitt, Kim D; Ptak, Roger G

    2009-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Protein Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/HIVInteractions, was created to catalog all interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins published in the peer-reviewed literature. The database serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. To facilitate this discovery approach, the following information for each HIV-1 human protein interaction is provided and can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, Entrez Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. Currently, 2589 unique HIV-1 to human protein interactions and 5135 brief descriptions of the interactions, with a total of 14,312 PMID references to the original articles reporting the interactions, are stored in this growing database. In addition, all protein-protein interactions documented in the database are integrated into Entrez Gene records and listed in the 'HIV-1 protein interactions' section of Entrez Gene reports. The database is also tightly linked to other databases through Entrez Gene, enabling users to search for an abundance of information related to HIV pathogenesis and replication.

  18. The Low Keratin Affinity of Efinaconazole Contributes to Its Nail Penetration and Fungicidal Activity in Topical Onychomycosis Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, Keita; Sugimoto, Noriaki; HOSAKA, Shinya; Katafuchi-Nagashima, Maria; Arakawa, Yoshio; TATSUMI, Yoshiyuki; Jo Siu, William; Pillai, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal nail disease that is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. Keratin affinity of topical drugs is an important physicochemical property impacting therapeutic efficacy. To be effective, topical drugs must penetrate the nail bed and retain their antifungal activity within the nail matrix, both of which are adversely affected by keratin binding. We investigated these properties for efinacona...

  19. The Low Keratin Affinity of Efinaconazole Contributes to Its Nail Penetration and Fungicidal Activity in Topical Onychomycosis Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, Keita; Sugimoto, Noriaki; Hosaka, Shinya; Katafuchi-Nagashima, Maria; Arakawa, Yoshio; TATSUMI, Yoshiyuki; Jo Siu, William; Pillai, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal nail disease that is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. Keratin affinity of topical drugs is an important physicochemical property impacting therapeutic efficacy. To be effective, topical drugs must penetrate the nail bed and retain their antifungal activity within the nail matrix, both of which are adversely affected by keratin binding. We investigated these properties for efinacona...

  20. HPLC-MS/MS method for quantification of paclitaxel from keratin containing samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Emily A; Stenson, Alexandra C; Yazdani, Saami K

    2017-05-30

    Local drug delivery of paclitaxel is becoming ever more prevalent. As complex drug/excipient combinations are being developed and tested, new high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) techniques capable of quantifying paclitaxel from such formulations are needed. Here a method for quantifying paclitaxel from aqueous, protein and oil containing samples was developed and validated. Keratin, derived from human hair, is the protein component/paclitaxel excipient in the development and validation of said method. The novelty of this method is described by its ability to overcome water solubility issues and address clean-up of residual solvents in clinical grade paclitaxel injection composition. The method evaluates tert-butyl methyl ether and ethanol as extraction solvents with an extraction efficiency of 31.9±2.3% and 86.4±4.5% respectively. Upon evaporation and rehydration, samples were evaluated by HPLC-MS and a method was developed for paclitaxel quantification. The method developed had an inter-day precision of 9.1% relative standard deviation and an intra-day precision of 4.3% relative standard deviation normalized to a docetaxel internal standard. The described method is applicable to any aqueous paclitaxel sample containing protein and/or oils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of Keratin Waste into Keratin Hydrolysate%角蛋白废弃物转化为角蛋白水解物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Mokrejs; D.Janacova; F.Langmaier; M.Mladek; K.Kolomaznik; V.Vasek

    2007-01-01

    角蛋白废弃物主要来源于家禽肉联加工厂生产时没有正确处理掉的大量废物.而且,在革和毛织品的生产过程中也存在大量的未加利用的角蛋白废弃物.角蛋白因其含有较高的有利用价值的蛋白,可以增加食物中的营养.另一种价值较高的角蛋白是角蛋白水解物,可以将其加工成可生物降解的覆盖物或者包装袋,作为农业薄膜、化妆用品的包装.然而由于角蛋白含有大量的双硫键而很难溶于普通的溶剂中,并且抗蛋白酶作用.要想角蛋白溶解就必须破坏双硫键.已有的研究报道指出用2步法处理角蛋白材料,从小鸡羽毛和绒毛中萃取的角蛋白可以转化成可溶解的角蛋白水解物.第一步,原角蛋白保温培养在巯基乙醇溶液中,第二步在同第一步一样的溶液(同样的温度,pH和时间)中加入酶.正交试验为2因素,3水平,重复2次.定量测定不可溶解的角蛋白百分数.根据统计学分析结果.%Keratin waste arising mainly from meat-industry processing of poultry represents a great quantity of waste annually which has not been utilised properly.In addition,in the production of hides into leathers and in wool production there is another large quantity of under-utilised keratin waste.Keratin,due to its high proportion of valuable protein,could be used e.g.as a nutrition in feed.Another high-value added product is soluble keratin hydrolysate that may be processed into biodegradable coatings or packaging,for agricultural films,for encapsulating chemicals,in cosmetics etc.Nevertheless,kertatin contains large amount of disulphide bonds and therefore is insoluble in most common solvents and resistant to proteolytic enzymes.To make keratin soluble,disulphide bonds have to be cleavage.Presented research paper studies the possibilities of extraction keratin from chicken feathers and from fleece to produce soluble keratin hydrolysate.Keratin material was treated through two phase

  2. Basal keratin expression in breast cancer by quantification of mRNA and by immunohistochemistry

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    Pluciennik Elzbieta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definitions of basal-like breast cancer phenotype vary, and microarray-based expression profiling analysis remains the gold standard for the identification of these tumors. Immunohistochemical identification of basal-like carcinomas is hindered with a fact, that on microarray level not all of them express basal-type cytokeratin 5/6, 14 and 17. We compared expression of cytokeratin 5, 14 and 17 in 115 patients with operable breast cancer estimated by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Despite the method of dichotomization and statistical analysis, there were cases with discordant results comparing immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis. For dichotomisation based on quartiles and ROC, 14% of cases were negative on immunohistochemical examination for CK5/6, but presented high CK5 mRNA levels. There were also 48-55% cases, which were CK5/6-immunopositive, but were negative by mRNA examination. Similar discordances were observed for CK14 and CK17. Basal keratin mRNAs did not correlate with ER mRNA levels, while immunohistochemistry produced significant relationship with ER status. Our observation suggest that both method may produce different results in a small proportion of cases. Discordance between immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR may confound attempts to establish a simple methods for identification of basal-like tumors.

  3. Keratinase production and keratin degradation by a mutant strain of Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-gang CAI; Bing-gan LOU; Xiao-dong ZHENG

    2008-01-01

    A new feather-degrading bacterium was isolated from a local feather waste site and identified as Bacillus subtilis based on morphological, physiochemical, and phylogenetic characteristics. Screening for mutants with elevated keratinolytic activity using N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis resulted in a mutant strain KD-N2 producing keratinolytic activity about 2.5 times that of the wild-type strain. The mutant strain produced inducible keratinase in different substrates of feathers, hair, wool and silk under submerged cultivation. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed the degradation of feathers, hair and silk by the keratinase. The optimal conditions for keratinase production include initial pH of 7.5, inoculum size of 2% (v/v), age of inoculum of 16 h, and cultivation at 23 ℃. The maximum keratinolytic activity of KD-N2 was achieved after 30 h. Essential amino acids like threonine, valine, methionine as well as ammonia were produced when feathers were used as substrates. Strain KD-N2,therefore, shows great promise of finding potential applications in keratin hydrolysis and keratinase production.

  4. Keratin 9 mutations in the coil 1A region in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalai, S; Szalai, C; Becker, K; Török, E

    1999-01-01

    The palmoplantar keratodermas (PPK) are a heterogeneous group of conditions, most frequently inherited in autosomal dominant fashion. A few are well-documented autosomal recessive disorders; other are acquired in association with certain metabolic disorders and malignancies. Recently different point mutations of the keratin 9 (K9) gene have been identified in unrelated families with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK). We investigated two unrelated Hungarian families with EPPK. In one, a mutation consisting of a G-->A transversion at nucleotide position 551, which changes codon arginine to glutamine at codon 162 (R162Q), was found. In the other, we observed a novel mutation at nucleotide position 571, which changes codon 169 lysine (AAG) into the amber stop codon (TAG) (K169X). Each found mutation is present in the highly conserved coil 1A region of the rod domain. In the case of a stop codon type of mutation, it is questionable whether it really results in a clinical phenotype, but segregation analysis revealed cosegregation of the PPK phenotype with the mutant allele.

  5. Human hair keratin-collagen sponge-poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) complex for treatment of burn wound in rats%复合生物敷料人发角蛋白-胶原海绵-聚甲基丙烯酸羟乙酯对大鼠烧伤创面的治疗作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英华; 董为人; 陈清元; 赵冰雷; 邹仲之; 肖应庆; 胡国栋; 仇新霞

    2009-01-01

    率均较阴性对照组高(P=0.000),且实验组在14 d的愈合率较阳性对照组高(P<0.05).②覆敷料后2周,光镜下观察可见创面肉芽组织中有较细小的胶原纤维填充创面.实验组较其他2组明显.胶原蛋白及弹性蛋白的免疫组织化学染色显示:第2周,实验组创面真皮基质中,Ⅰ型胶原呈棕黄色细密条带状;且有少量破染成棕黄色细丝状的弹性纤维,阳性对照组不明显,而阴性对照组中弹性蛋白无阳情表达.第8周,3组创面均愈合良好.实验组及阳性对照组胶原纤维束改造塑形,无瘢痕形成趋势.阴性对照组真皮层组织排列紊乱.结论:人发角蛋白-胶原海绵聚甲基内烯酸羟乙酯/虎杖复合生物敷料可促进深Ⅱ度烧伤实验大鼠创面的愈合.%BACKGROUND: Based on our previous researches in mechanism studies and clinical applications of human hair keratin (HHK), a new concept "in vivol in situ tissue engineering" has been proposed. Under the guidance of this theory, a scaffold of HHK-collagan sponge (inner layer) combined with poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) (outer layer as a drug delivery carrier) would be developed to investigate its feasibility to be as a dermal dressing. OBJECTIVE: To develop a scaffold composed of HHK-collagan sponge (inner layer) combined with PHEMA film containing polydatin(PD)(outer layer as a drug delivery carrier) and to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the HHK-collagen sponge-PHEMA/PD complex on burn wound healing. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized controlled animal experiment was performed at the Department of Histology and Embryology, Southern Medical University between March and December 2005. MATERIALS: Burn was induced in 15 male Sprague-Dawiey (SD) rats, Rat models of burn were evenly randomized to 3 groups: experimental, positive control, and negative control. METHODS: ①HHK-collagen sponge was prepared through combination of a HHK meshwork (1mm × 1 mm in size for each

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms in human adenovirus type 12 oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Walter

    2009-06-01

    For the past 30 years, my laboratory has concentrated its work on demonstrating that the epigenetic consequences of foreign DNA insertion into established mammalian genomes -de novo DNA methylation of the integrate and alterations of methylation patterns across the recipient genome - are essential elements in setting the stage towards oncogenic transformation. We have primarily studied human adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) which induces undifferentiated tumors in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) either at the site of subcutaneous Ad12 injection or intraperitoneally upon intramuscular injection. Up to 90% of the hamsters injected with Ad12 develop tumors within 3-6 weeks. Integration of foreign DNA, its de novo methylation, and the consequences of insertion on the cellular methylation and transcription profiles have been studied in detail. While viral infections are a frequent source of foreign genomes entering mammalian and other hosts and often their genomes, we have also pursued the fate of food-ingested foreign DNA in the mouse organism. The persistence of this DNA in the animals is transient and there is no evidence for the expression or germ line fixation of foreign DNA. Nevertheless, the occasional cell that carries integrated genomes from that foreign source deserves the oncologist's sustained interest.

  7. Target cell cyclophilins facilitate human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV-induced diseases.

  8. Temperature-dependent dielectric properties of slightly hydrated horn keratin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Tasneem Zahra; Khan, Muhammad Abdullah

    2008-04-01

    With an aim to reveal the mechanism of protein-water interaction in a predominantly two phase model protein system this study investigates the frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric constant epsilon' and loss factor epsilon'' in cow horn keratin in the frequency range 30 Hz to 3 MHz and temperature range 30-200 degrees C at two levels of hydration. These two levels of hydration were achieved by exposing the sample to air at 50% relative humidity (RH) at ambient temperature and by evacuating the sample for 72 h at 105 degrees C. A low frequency dispersion (LFD) and an intermediate frequency alpha-dispersion were the two main dielectric responses observed in the air-dried sample. The LFD and the high frequency arm of the alpha-dispersion followed the same fractional power law of frequency. Within the framework of percolation cluster model these dispersions, respectively have been attributed to percolation of protons between and within the clusters of hydrogen-bonded water molecules bound to polar or ionizable protein components. The alpha-dispersion peak, which results from intra-cluster charge percolation conformed to Cole-Cole modified Debye equation. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant in the air-dried sample exhibited peaks at 120 and 155 degrees C which have been identified as temperatures of onset of release of water bound to polar protein components in the amorphous and crystalline regions, respectively. An overall rise in the permittivity was observed above 175 degrees C, which has been identified as the onset of chain melting in the crystalline region of the protein.

  9. Free Gingival Graft to Increase Keratinized Mucosa after Placing of Mandibular Fixed Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcantonio, Elcio

    2017-01-01

    Insufficiently keratinized tissue can be increased surgically by free gingival grafting. The presence or reconstruction of keratinized mucosa around the implant can facilitate restorative procedure and allow the maintenance of an oral hygiene routine without irritation or discomfort to the patient. The aim of this clinical case report is to describe an oral rehabilitation procedure of an edentulous patient with absence of keratinized mucosa in the interforaminal area, using a free gingival graft associated with a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis. The treatment included the manufacturing of a maxillary complete denture and a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis followed by a free gingival graft to increase the width of the mandibular keratinized mucosa. Free gingival graft was obtained from the palate and grafted on the buccal side of interforaminal area. The follow-up of 02 and 12 months after mucogingival surgery showed that the free gingival graft promoted peri-implant health, hygiene, and patient comfort. Clinical Significance. The free gingival graft is an effective treatment in increasing the width of mandibular keratinized mucosa on the buccal side of the interforaminal area and provided an improvement in maintaining the health of peri-implant tissues which allows for better oral hygiene. PMID:28293441

  10. Keratin network modifications lead to the mechanical stiffening of the hair follicle fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Bildstein, Lucien; Thibaut, Sébastien; Santoprete, Roberto; Fiat, Françoise; Luengo, Gustavo S; Doucet, Jean; Bernard, Bruno A; Baghdadli, Nawel

    2016-05-24

    The complex mechanical properties of biomaterials such as hair, horn, skin, or bone are determined by the architecture of the underlying fibrous bionetworks. Although much is known about the influence of the cytoskeleton on the mechanics of isolated cells, this has been less studied in tridimensional tissues. We used the hair follicle as a model to link changes in the keratin network composition and architecture to the mechanical properties of the nascent hair. We show using atomic force microscopy that the soft keratinocyte matrix at the base of the follicle stiffens by a factor of ∼360, from 30 kPa to 11 MPa along the first millimeter of the follicle. The early mechanical stiffening is concomitant to an increase in diameter of the keratin macrofibrils, their continuous compaction, and increasingly parallel orientation. The related stiffening of the material follows a power law, typical of the mechanics of nonthermal bending-dominated fiber networks. In addition, we used X-ray diffraction to monitor changes in the (supra)molecular organization within the keratin fibers. At later keratinization stages, the inner mechanical properties of the macrofibrils dominate the stiffening due to the progressive setting up of the cystine network. Our findings corroborate existing models on the sequence of biological and structural events during hair keratinization.

  11. Keratin network modifications lead to the mechanical stiffening of the hair follicle fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Bildstein, Lucien; Thibaut, Sébastien; Santoprete, Roberto; Fiat, Françoise; Luengo, Gustavo S.; Doucet, Jean; Bernard, Bruno A.; Baghdadli, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    The complex mechanical properties of biomaterials such as hair, horn, skin, or bone are determined by the architecture of the underlying fibrous bionetworks. Although much is known about the influence of the cytoskeleton on the mechanics of isolated cells, this has been less studied in tridimensional tissues. We used the hair follicle as a model to link changes in the keratin network composition and architecture to the mechanical properties of the nascent hair. We show using atomic force microscopy that the soft keratinocyte matrix at the base of the follicle stiffens by a factor of ∼360, from 30 kPa to 11 MPa along the first millimeter of the follicle. The early mechanical stiffening is concomitant to an increase in diameter of the keratin macrofibrils, their continuous compaction, and increasingly parallel orientation. The related stiffening of the material follows a power law, typical of the mechanics of nonthermal bending-dominated fiber networks. In addition, we used X-ray diffraction to monitor changes in the (supra)molecular organization within the keratin fibers. At later keratinization stages, the inner mechanical properties of the macrofibrils dominate the stiffening due to the progressive setting up of the cystine network. Our findings corroborate existing models on the sequence of biological and structural events during hair keratinization. PMID:27162354

  12. Multitrait plant growth promoting (PGP) rhizobacterial isolates from Brassica juncea rhizosphere : Keratin degradation and growth promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mohmmad Shahbaz; Siddique, Mohammad Tahir; Verma, Amit; Rao, Yalaga Rama; Nailwal, Tapan; Ansari, Mohammad; Pande, Veena

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth promoting (PGP) rhizobacteria, a beneficial microbe colonizing plant roots, enhanced crop productivity and offers an attractive way to replace chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and supplements. The keratinous waste which comprises feathers, hairs, nails, skin and wool creates problem of solid waste management due to presence of highly recalcitrant keratin. The multi traits rhizobacteria effective to remove both keratine from the environment by producing keratinase enzyme and to eradicate the chemical fertilizer by providing different PGP activity is novel achievement. In the present study, the effective PM2 strain of PGPR was isolated from rhizospheric soil of mustard (Brassica juncea) field, Pantnagar and they were identified on the basis of different biochemical tests as belonging to Bacillus genera. Different plant growth promoting activity, feather degradation and keratinolytic activity was performed and found very effective toward all the parameters. Furthermore, the efficient strain PM2 was identified on the basis of 16s rRNA sequencing and confirmed as Bacillus cereus. The strain PM2 might be used efficiently for keratinous waste management and PGP activity. Therefore, the present study suggests that Bacillus cereus have multi traits activity which extremely useful for different PGP activity and biotechnological process involving keratin hydrolysis, feather biodegradation or in the leather industry.

  13. Keratin decomposition by trogid beetles: evidence from a feeding experiment and stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    The decomposition of vertebrate carcasses is an important ecosystem function. Soft tissues of dead vertebrates are rapidly decomposed by diverse animals. However, decomposition of hard tissues such as hairs and feathers is much slower because only a few animals can digest keratin, a protein that is concentrated in hairs and feathers. Although beetles of the family Trogidae are considered keratin feeders, their ecological function has rarely been explored. Here, we investigated the keratin-decomposition function of trogid beetles in heron-breeding colonies where keratin was frequently supplied as feathers. Three trogid species were collected from the colonies and observed feeding on heron feathers under laboratory conditions. We also measured the nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) stable isotope ratios of two trogid species that were maintained on a constant diet (feathers from one heron individual) during 70 days under laboratory conditions. We compared the isotopic signatures of the trogids with the feathers to investigate isotopic shifts from the feathers to the consumers for δ15N and δ13C. We used mixing models (MixSIR and SIAR) to estimate the main diets of individual field-collected trogid beetles. The analysis indicated that heron feathers were more important as food for trogid beetles than were soft tissues under field conditions. Together, the feeding experiment and stable isotope analysis provided strong evidence of keratin decomposition by trogid beetles.

  14. Various Techniques to Increase Keratinized Tissue for Implant Supported Overdentures: Retrospective Case Series

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    Ahmed Elkhaweldi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this retrospective case series is to describe and compare different surgical techniques that can be utilized to augment the keratinized soft tissue around implant-supported overdentures. Materials and Methods. The data set was extracted as deidentified information from the routine treatment of patients at the Ashman Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry at New York University College of Dentistry. Eight edentulous patients were selected to be included in this study. Patients were treated for lack of keratinized tissue prior to implant placement, during the second stage surgery, and after delivery of the final prosthesis. Results. All 8 patients in this study were wearing a complete maxillary and/or mandibular denture for at least a year before the time of the surgery. One of the following surgical techniques was utilized to increase the amount of keratinized tissue: apically positioned flap (APF, pedicle graft (PG, connective tissue graft (CTG, or free gingival graft (FGG. Conclusions. The amount of keratinized tissue should be taken into consideration when planning for implant-supported overdentures. The apical repositioning flap is an effective approach to increase the width of keratinized tissue prior to the implant placement.

  15. Effect of Keratin Structures from Chicken Feathers on Expansive Soil Remediation

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    Elda Montes-Zarazúa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chicken feathers are composed mainly of avian keratin, a fibrillar protein with a complex structure, and important properties such as durability, hydrophobicity, being chemically unreactive, and depending on the specific function can change its morphological and inner structure. This study takes advantage of these features and for the first time the use of keratin from chicken feathers to modify characteristics on expansive soils is reported. Swelling characteristics of remolded expansive soil specimens were studied through varying the percentage of keratin fiber content using 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 and 3.00 wt%. One-dimensional swell-consolidation tests were conducted on oedometric specimens, specific surface area was determined using methylene blue, and degree of saturation was also analyzed. Finally random distribution and interaction between keratin structures and soil were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that randomly distributed fibers are useful in restraining the swelling tendency of expansive soils. The maximum reduction of pressure (43.99% due to swelling is achieved by reducing the void ratio, which can be reached with the addition of chicken feather keratin structures to the expansive soil. Finally, the mechanism by which discrete and randomly distributed fibers reduce swelling pressure of expansive soil is explained.

  16. All Green Composites from Fully Renewable Biopolymers: Chitosan-Starch Reinforced with Keratin from Feathers

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    Cynthia G. Flores-Hernández

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance as reinforcement of a fibrillar protein such as feather keratin fiber over a biopolymeric matrix composed of polysaccharides was evaluated in this paper. Three different kinds of keratin reinforcement were used: short and long biofibers and rachis particles. These were added separately at 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% to the chitosan-starch matrix and the composites were processed by a casting/solvent evaporation method. The morphological characteristics, mechanical and thermal properties of the matrix and composites were studied by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis. The thermal results indicated that the addition of keratin enhanced the thermal stability of the composites compared to pure matrix. This was corroborated with dynamic mechanical analysis as the results revealed that the storage modulus of the composites increased with respect to the pure matrix. The morphology, evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, indicated a uniform dispersion of keratin in the chitosan-starch matrix as a result of good compatibility between these biopolymers, also corroborated by FTIR. These results demonstrate that chicken feathers can be useful to obtain novel keratin reinforcements and develop new green composites providing better properties, than the original biopolymer matrix.

  17. The life-cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T; Nakai, M; Ikuta, K

    1998-01-01

    The life-cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been studied using several techniques including immunoelectron microscopy and cryomicroscopy. The HIV-1 particle consists of an envelope, a core and the region between the core and the envelope (matrix). Virus particles in the extracellular space are observed as having various profiles: a central or an eccentric round electron-dense core, a bar-shaped electron-dense core, and immature doughnut-shaped particle. HIV-1 particles in the hydrated state were observed by high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy to be spherical and the lipid membrane was clearly resolved as a bilayer. Projections around the circumference were seen to be knob-like. The shapes and sizes of the projections, especially the head parts, were found to vary with each projection. HIV-1 cores were isolated with a mixture of Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde, and were confirmed to consist of HIV-1 Gag p24 protein by immunogold labelling. On infection, the HIV-1 virus was found to enter the cell in two ways: membrane fusion and endocytosis. After viral entry, no structures resembling virus particles could be seen in the cytoplasm. In the infected cells, positive reactions by immunolabelling suggest that HIV-1 Gag is produced in membrane-bound structures and transported to the cell surface by the cytoskeletons. A crescent electron-dense layer is then formed underneath the cell membrane. Finally, the virus particle is released from the cell surface and found extracellularly to be a complete virus particle with an electron-dense core. However, several cell clones producing defective mature, doughnut-shaped (immature) or teardrop-shaped particles were found to be produced in the extracellular space. In the doughnut-shaped particles, Gag p17 and p24 proteins exist facing each other against an inner electron-dense ring, suggesting that the inner ring consists of a precursor Gag protein showing a defect at the viral proteinase.

  18. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC.

  19. Influence of anti-keratin autoantibodies on telomerase activity of squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Meng; ZHANG Yan-guo; LIU Yu-feng; CHEN Yan; WANG Qiu-feng; LI Wei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of anti-keratin autoantibodies (AK auto Abs) on telomerase activity of squamous cell carcinoma cultured in vitro and the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of AK auto Abs on squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: Influence of AK auto Abs on the proliferation of Tca cells was observed by MTT colorimetry. Telomerase activity of cultured Tca cells and human keratinocytes was determined by telomeric repeat amplication protocol-ELISA (TRAP-ELISA) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). After being treated with AK auto Abs for 36 h at a concentration of 4, 8, 16 mg/L respectively, the changes of telomerase activity of Tca cells were also detected by TRAP-ELISA and PAGE.Results: MTT colorimetric determination showed that the capacity of proliferation of Tca cells correlated negatively with the concentration of AK auto Abs (r=-0. 74, P<0. 01). TRAP-ELISA and PAGE showed that telomerase activity of Tca cells increased significantly compared to that of cultured human keratinocytes(t=3. 5396, P<0. 01). AK auto Abs at a concentrations of 4, 8, 16 mg/L had significant dose-dependent inhibitory effects on telomerase activity of Tca cells (r=- 0. 8358, P<0. 01). Conclusion: AK auto Abs have a significant dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of cultured Tca cells. AK auto Abs inhibit telomerase activity of cultured Tca cells with dose-dependent pattern. It suggests that decrease of telomerase activity may play an important role in the inhibitory effects of AK auto Aba on squamous cell carcinoma.

  20. Morphological and structural investigation of wool-derived keratin nanofibres crosslinked by thermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluigi, Annalisa; Corbellini, Alessandro; Rombaldoni, Fabio; Zoccola, Marina; Canetti, Maurizio

    2013-06-01

    Mats of wool-derived keratin nanofibre have been prepared by electrospinning solutions of keratin in formic acid at 20 and 15 wt.%, and obtaining nanofibres with mean diameter of about 400 and 250 nm, respectively. These mats can find applications in tissue engineering (they can mimic the native extracellular matrix) and in wastewater treatment (they can trap small particles and adsorb heavy-metals). A drawback to overcome is their solubility in water. A stabilization method, based on a thermal treatment alternative to the use of formaldehyde, is proposed. The solubility test in the dithiothreitol/urea extraction buffer, the amino acid composition analysis and studies on keratin secondary structures suggest that the improved stability in water of thermally treated mats can be ascribed to the formation of amide bonds between acid and basic groups of some amino acid side chains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimization of keratin/alginate scaffold using RSM and its characterization for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratima; Nayak, Kush Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The scaffold for tissue engineering was fabricated from a binary blend of keratin/alginate. The concentration and ratio of keratin and alginate was optimized by response surface methodology in a scaffold. The structural compatibility between keratin and alginate was examined by X-ray diffractometer and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy. Apparent porosity of the scaffold was calculated by Archimedes principles and its observed value of was found 96.25 ± 0.04%. The pore size of the scaffold was observed in the range between 10 and 200 μm. Tensile strength (0.33 ± 0.26 MPa) and percent of elongation at break (23.33 ± 2.52%) are the reported mechanical strength of the scaffold. Positive antimicrobial activity and in vitro degradation further confirms the fabrication of a scaffold required for tissue engineering application.

  2. Keratin Protein-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry Reaction and Comparison with Other Biopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen Häring

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a preliminary investigation on the ability of natural keratin to catalyze the nitroaldol (Henry reaction between aldehydes and nitroalkanes. Both aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups were converted into the corresponding β-nitroalcohol products in both DMSO and in water in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB as a phase transfer catalyst. Negligible background reactions (i.e., negative control experiment in the absence of keratin protein were observed in these solvent systems. Aromatic aldehydes bearing electron-donating groups and aliphatic aldehydes showed poor or no conversion, respectively. In general, the reactions in water/TBAB required twice the amount of time than in DMSO to achieve similar conversions. Moreover, comparison of the kinetics of the keratin-mediated nitroaldol (Henry reaction with other biopolymers revealed slower rates for the former and the possibility of fine-tuning the kinetics by appropriate selection of the biopolymer and solvent.

  3. Keratin Protein-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reaction and Comparison with Other Biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häring, Marleen; Pettignano, Asja; Quignard, Françoise; Tanchoux, Nathalie; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-08-25

    Here we describe a preliminary investigation on the ability of natural keratin to catalyze the nitroaldol (Henry) reaction between aldehydes and nitroalkanes. Both aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups were converted into the corresponding β-nitroalcohol products in both DMSO and in water in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) as a phase transfer catalyst. Negligible background reactions (i.e., negative control experiment in the absence of keratin protein) were observed in these solvent systems. Aromatic aldehydes bearing electron-donating groups and aliphatic aldehydes showed poor or no conversion, respectively. In general, the reactions in water/TBAB required twice the amount of time than in DMSO to achieve similar conversions. Moreover, comparison of the kinetics of the keratin-mediated nitroaldol (Henry) reaction with other biopolymers revealed slower rates for the former and the possibility of fine-tuning the kinetics by appropriate selection of the biopolymer and solvent.

  4. A novel mutation of keratin 9 in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma combined with knuckle pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong; Guo, Chenhong; Liu, Qiji; Zhang, Xiyu; Cheng, Lin; Li, Jiangxia; Chen, Bingxi; Gao, Guimin; Zhou, Haibin; Guo, Yishou; Li, Yefu; Gong, Yaoqin

    2003-07-30

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease. We studied a family from Shandong, China, having patients suffering from EPPK with a unique symptom-knuckle pads. We noticed that both the hyperkeratosis and knuckle pads in the Chinese family were friction-related. Candidate gene analysis was carried out using linkage analysis and direct sequencing. A novel L160F mutation in keratin 9 was found, and its effects on the secondary structure of keratin 9 were studied. We predict that the L160F mutation is also responsible for the knuckle pads in the family. Our study provides a new clue for the study of the function of keratin 9.

  5. De novo mutation of keratin 9 gene in two Taiwanese patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei-Hui; Lee, Julia Yu-Yun; Lin, Jeng-Hsien; Chao, Sheau-Chiou

    2003-07-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is an autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of keratinization. Recent molecular studies have shown that EPPK is caused by mutations in keratin 9 gene (K9). We report 2 unrelated sporadic cases of EPPK in Taiwanese, confirmed by histopathology and electron microscopy. A de novo mutation with a C to T transition at the first nucleotide of codon 162 in K9 was detected in both patients, but not in their parents. The mutation is expected to result in an arginine to tryptophan substitution (R162W) in the beginning region of the alpha-helical 1A domain of K9. Mutations in this region could disrupt keratin filament assembly, leading to degeneration or cytolysis of keratinocytes. Mutations of this arginine codon (R162W, R162Q) are common in pedigrees with EPPK. Our mutation analysis suggests that codon 162 in K9 gene is an important hot spot for mutation in EPPK.

  6. Keratin 34betaE12/keratin7 expression is a prognostic factor of cancer-specific and overall survival in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen Ege; Holst, Rene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carcinomas and their metastases often retain the keratin patterns of their epithelial origin, and are therefore useful as lineage-specific markers in diagnostic pathology. Recently, it has become clear that intermediate filaments composed by keratins play a role in modulation of cell...... proliferation, migration, and possibly cancer invasion, factors impacting prognosis in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tumor tissue from a retrospective Danish cohort of 177 patients with completely resected NSCLC, stage I-IIIA tumors, were analyzed for keratin 7 (K7......) and keratin 34βE12 expression by immunohistochemistry and validated in a comparable independent Norwegian cohort of 276 stage I-IIIA NSCLC patients. RESULTS: Based on keratin 34βE12/K7 expression, three subgroups with significantly different median cancer-specific survival rates were identified (34βE12+/K7...

  7. Effects of keratin 14 ablation on the clinical and cellular phenotype in a kindred with recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, MF; Heeres, K; Pas, HH; vanLuyn, MJ; Elema, JD; Corden, LD; Smith, FJD; McLean, WHI; Ramaekers, FCS; Scheffer, H; Burton, M.

    1996-01-01

    We studied a kindred with recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex in which the affected members lacked expression of the basal cell keratin 14, The patients had severe generalized skin blistering that improved slightly with age, The basal cells of the patients did not express keratin 14 and

  8. Re-evaluation of the hydrogen stable isotopic composition of keratin calibration standards for wildlife and forensic science applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, David X; Koehler, Geoff; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Hobson, Keith A

    2017-07-30

    Determination of non-exchangeable hydrogen isotopic compositions (δ(2) H values) of bulk complex organic materials is difficult due to uncontrolled H isotope exchange between the organic material and ambient water vapor. A number of calibration keratinous materials with carefully measured hydrogen isotopic compositions of the non-exchangeable fraction were proposed to enable stable isotope laboratories to normalize their (2) H measurements. However, it was recently reported that high-temperature carbon-reactor methods for measuring the hydrogen isotopic composition of nitrogenous organic materials is biased by the production of HCN in the reactor. As a result, the reported values of these calibration materials needed to be re-evaluated. We evaluated the non-exchangeable δ(2) HVSMOW values of keratins EC1 (CBS) and EC2 (KHS), USGS hair standards, and a range of other nitrogenous widely used organic laboratory calibration materials (collagen and chitin) using pre-treatment with a preparation device designed to eliminate residual moisture and quantify exchangeable H. The revised non-exchangeable δ(2) HVSMOW values of EC-1 (CBS) and EC-2 (KHS) keratin standard materials were -157.0 ± 0.9 and -35.3 ± 1.1 ‰, respectively. The revised values of USGS42 and USGS43 were -72.2 ± 0.9 and -44.2 ± 1.0 ‰, respectively, in excellent agreement with previous results. For routine H isotope analyses, with proper sample pre-treatment, we show that the Comparative Equilibration approach can provide accurate and reproducible non-exchangeable δ(2) H values among laboratories regardless of the reactor type used. © 2017 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Reproduced with the permission of the Environment and Climate Change Canada. © 2017 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Reproduced with the permission of the

  9. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 16 pseudovirus containing histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kwag, Hye-Lim; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-08-27

    Pseudoviruses (PsVs) that encapsidate a reporter plasmid DNA have been used as surrogates for native human papillomavirus (HPV), whose continuous production is technically difficult. HPV PsVs have been designed to form capsids made up of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid proteins L2. HPV PsVs have been produced in 293TT cells transfected with plasmid expressing L1 and L2 protein and plasmid containing the reporter gene. Several studies have suggested that naturally occurring HPV virions contain cellular histones, and histones have also been identified in mature HPV PsVs. However, the effect of the histones on the properties of the PsVs has not been investigated. Using heparin chromatography, we separated mature HPV type 16 PsVs into three fractions (I, II, and III) according to their heparin-binding affinities. The amounts of cellular histone and cellular nucleotides per PsV were found to increase in the order fraction I, II and III. It appeared that PsVs in fraction I contains just small amount of cellular histone in Western blot analysis. The proportions of the three fractions in PsV preparations were 83.4, 7.5, and 9.1 % for fraction I, II, and III PsVs, respectively. In the electron microscope PsVs in fraction I appeared to have a more condensed structure than those in fractions II and III. Under the electron microscope fraction II and III PsVs appeared to be covered by substantial amounts of cellular histone while there was no visible histone covering PsVs of fraction I. Also the levels of reporter gene expression in infections of fraction II and III PsVs to 293TT cells were significantly lower than those in infections of fraction I PsV, and fraction II and III particles had significantly reduced immunogenicity. Our findings suggest that the involvement of large amounts of cellular histones during PsV formation interferes with the structural integrity of the PsVs and affects their immunogenicity. The fraction I particle therefore has the most

  10. Hemodynamic recovery after hypovolemic shock with lactated Ringer's and keratin resuscitation fluid (KRF), a novel colloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Fiesky A; Callahan, Michael F; Trach, Simon; Burnett, Luke R; Kislukhin, Victor; Smith, Thomas L; Van Dyke, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Death after severe hemorrhage remains an important cause of mortality in people under 50 years of age. Keratin resuscitation fluid (KRF) is a novel resuscitation solution made from keratin protein that may restore cardiovascular stability. This postulate was tested in rats that were exsanguinated to 40% of their blood volume. Test groups received either low or high volume resuscitation with either KRF or lactated Ringer's solution. KRF low volume was more effective than LR in recovering cardiac function, blood pressure and blood chemistry. Furthermore, in contrast to LR-treated rats, KRF-treated rats exhibited vital signs that resembled normal controls at 1-week.

  11. Genome and secretome analyses provide insights into keratin decomposition by novel proteases from the non-pathogenic fungus Onygena corvina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yuhong; Kamp Busk, Peter; Herbst, Florian Alexander

    2015-01-01

    of proteases in keratin-degrading and non-keratin-degrading fungi indicated that 18 putative secreted proteases from four protease families (M36, M35, M43, and S8) may be responsible for keratin decomposition. Twelve of the 18 predicted protease genes could be amplified from O. corvina grown on keratinaceous...... materials and were transformed into Pichia pastoris. One of the recombinant proteases belonging to the S8 family showed high keratin-degrading activity. Furthermore, 29 different proteases were identified by mass spectrometry in the culture broth of O. corvina grown on feathers and bristle. The culture...... broth was fractionated by ion exchange chromatography to isolate active fractions with five novel proteases belonging to three protease families (S8, M28, and M3). Enzyme blends composed of three of these five proteases, one from each family, showed high degree of degradation of keratin in vitro...

  12. Fabrication of highly porous keratin sponges by freeze-drying in the presence of calcium alginate beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamasaki, Shinichi; Tachibana, Akira; Tada, Daisuke; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Tanabe, Toshizumi [Department of Applied Chemistry and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: tanabe@bioa.eng.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    2008-12-01

    Novel fabrication method of highly porous and flexible keratin sponges was developed by combining a particulate-leaching method and a freeze-drying method. Reduced keratin aqueous solution was mixed with dried calcium alginate beads and was lyophilized to give keratin/calcium alginate complex, which was subsequently treated with EDTA solution to leach out calcium alginate beads. The resultant keratin sponge was flexible enough to handle even in dried state because of its quite high porosity (98.9 {+-} 0.1%), which was brought about by the large and small pores formed by the elimination of calcium alginate beads and water. The sponge supported the attachment and the proliferation of mouse fibroblast cells. Thus, the keratin sponge given by the present fabrication method afforded one alternative as a cell scaffold for tissue engineering.

  13. A desmoplakin point mutation with enhanced keratin association ameliorates pemphigus vulgaris autoantibody-mediated loss of cell cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehner, Carina; Rötzer, Vera; Waschke, Jens; Spindler, Volker

    2014-09-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) serves to anchor intermediate filaments in desmosomal complexes. Recent data suggest that a specific DP point mutation (S2849G) exhibits increased keratin filament association and fosters Ca(2+) insensitivity of desmosomes in keratinocytes, presumably by rendering DP inaccessible for protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation. Previously, we have reported that depletion of the desmosomal adhesion molecule desmoglein (Dsg)3 induced by autoantibodies from patients with the blistering skin disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV) IgG is reduced in maturated desmosomes and dependent on PKC signaling. We investigated the role of DP-S2849G for loss of cell cohesion mediated by PV-IgG. In cell dissociation assays, expression of green fluorescent protein-tagged DP-S2849G (DP-S2849G-GFP) increased cell cohesion in two different human keratinocyte cell lines and ameliorated loss of cell adhesion induced by pemphigus autoantibodies. Depletion of Dsg3 was inhibited by DP-S2849G-GFP in the cytoskeletal (Triton X-100 insoluble) fraction, and keratin filament retraction, a hallmark of PV, was efficiently blocked similar to treatment with the PKC inhibitor Bim-X. We found that DP is phosphorylated after incubation with PV-IgG in a PKC-dependent manner and that DP-S2849G-GFP expression prevents DP phosphorylation and increases association of PKC-α with PKC scaffold receptor for activated C-kinase 1. Taken together, our data indicate that DP phosphorylation at S2849 represents an important mechanism in pemphigus pathogenesis, which, by reversing Ca(2+) insensitivity, promotes Dsg3 depletion.

  14. Beta-keratins of turtle shell are glycine-proline-tyrosine rich proteins similar to those of crocodilians and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Valle, Luisa; Nardi, Alessia; Toni, Mattia; Emera, Deena; Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2009-02-01

    This study presents, for the first time, sequences of five beta-keratin cDNAs from turtle epidermis obtained by means of 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences correspond to distinct glycine-proline-serine-tyrosine rich proteins containing 122-174 amino acids. In situ hybridization shows that beta-keratin mRNAs are expressed in cells of the differentiating beta-layers of the shell scutes. Southern blotting analysis reveals that turtle beta-keratins belong to a well-conserved multigene family. This result was confirmed by the amplification and sequencing of 13 genomic fragments corresponding to beta-keratin genes. Like snake, crocodile and avian beta-keratin genes, turtle beta-keratins contain an intron that interrupts the 5'-untranslated region. The length of the intron is variable, ranging from 0.35 to 1.00 kb. One of the sequences obtained from genomic amplifications corresponds to one of the five sequences obtained from cDNA cloning; thus, sequences of a total of 17 turtle beta-keratins were determined in the present study. The predicted molecular weight of the 17 different deduced proteins range from 11.9 to 17.0 kDa with a predicted isoelectric point of 6.8-8.4; therefore, they are neutral to basic proteins. A central region rich in proline and with beta-strand conformation shows high conservation with other reptilian and avian beta-keratins, and it is likely involved in their polymerization. Glycine repeat regions, often containing tyrosine, are localized toward the C-terminus. Phylogenetic analysis shows that turtle beta-keratins are more similar to crocodilian and avian beta-keratins than to those of lizards and snakes.

  15. Is ageing associated with a shift in the balance between Type 1 and Type 2 cytokines in humans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandmand, M; Bruunsgaard, H; Kemp, K

    2002-01-01

    The balance between Type 1 and Type 2 cytokines is important for the outcome of several infectious diseases. As elderly humans show increased morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases, this study tests if ageing is associated with a change towards Type 2 dominance in T cells. Expression...... adjusting for decreased lymphocyte counts in the elderly, the concentration in the blood of IFN-gamma+ and IL-4+ CD8+ T cells was still increased in the 81-year-olds. In centenarians, a shift towards a relative dominance of Type 2 cytokine expression was found within CD8+ T cells. Furthermore...

  16. Rare human papillomavirus 16 E6 variants reveal significant oncogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommasino Massimo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether low prevalence human papillomavirus (HPV 16 E6 variants differ from high prevalence types in their functional abilities. We evaluated functions relevant to carcinogenesis for the rarely-detected European variants R8Q, R10G and R48W as compared to the commonly detected L83V. Human immortalized keratinocytes (NIKS stably transduced with the E6 variants were used in most functional assays. Low and high prevalence E6 variants displayed similar abilities in abrogation of growth arrest and inhibition of p53 elevation induced by actinomycin D. Differences were detected in the abilities to dysregulate stratification and differentiation of NIKS in organotypic raft cultures, modulate detachment induced apoptosis (anoikis and hyperactivate Wnt signaling. No distinctive phenotype could be assigned to include all rare variants. Like L83V, raft cultures derived from variants R10G and R48W similarly induced hyperplasia and aberrantly expressed keratin 5 in the suprabasal compartment with significantly lower expression of keratin 10. Unlike L83V, both variants, and particularly R48W, induced increased levels of anoikis upon suspension in semisolid medium. R8Q induced a unique phenotype characterized by thin organotypic raft cultures, low expression of keratin 10, and high expression of keratins 5 and 14 throughout all raft layers. Interestingly, in a reporter based assay R8Q exhibited a higher ability to augment TCF/β-catenin transcription. The data suggests that differences in E6 variant prevalence in cervical carcinoma may not be related to the carcinogenic potential of the E6 protein.

  17. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X. M.; Ruker, F.; Casale, E.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 degrees. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  18. In vivo alteration of the keratin 17 gene in hair follicles by oligonucleotide-directed gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W; Yoon, K

    2003-12-01

    Using intradermal injection of a chimeric RNA-DNA oligonucleotide (RDO) or a single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssODN) into murine skin, we attempted to make a dominant mutation (R94p) in the conserve alpha-helical domain of keratin 17 (K17), the same mutation found in pachyononychia congenichia type 2 (PC-2) patients with phenotypes ranging from twisted hair and multiple pilosebaceous cysts. Both K17A-RDO and -ssODN contained a single base mismatch (CGC to CCC) to alter the normal K17 sequence to cause an amino acid substitution (R94P). The complexes consisting of oligonucleotides and cationic liposomes were injected to C57B1/6 murine skin at 2 and 5 day after birth. Histological examination of skin biopsies at postnatal day 8 from several mice showed consistent twisted hair shafts or broken hair follicles at the sebaceous gland level and occasional rupture of the hair bulb or epidermal cyst-like changes. In the injected area, the number of full anagen hair follicles decrease by 50%. Injection of the control oligonucleotide, identical to K17A-RDO but containing no mismatch to the normal sequence, did not result in any detectable abnormality. The frequency of gene alteration was lower than 3%, according to the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the genomic DNA isolated by dissection of hair follicles from slides. Although intradermal injection of K17A-RDO or K17-ssODN caused a dominant mutation in K17 affecting hair growth and morphology, these phenotypic changes were transient either due to the compensation of K17 by other keratins or the replacement of the mutated cells by normal surrounding cells during hair growth.

  19. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  20. Salmonella-Typhimurium phage types from human salmonellosis in denmark 1988 to 1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Gaarslev, K.

    1994-01-01

    and 194. It is concluded that phage typing, although here performed retrospectively, produces valuable epidemiological information regarding changes in the relative importance of different sources of infection in humans. It is suggested that phage typing be performed prospectively on both human and animal......A total of 989 isolates of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium from cases of human salmonellosis were investigated by phage typing, The isolates comprised all isolates recovered during the month of August in each of the years from 1988 to 1993. Phage typing assigned 82.......6% of the strains to 36 different definitive types, 11.9% of the strains belonged to types of unknown lysis pattern (RDNC), and 5.5% could not be typed by the phages used (NT). Three phage types (12, 66 and 110) made up approximately 50% of the isolates in each of the years investigated. During the period...

  1. Exempting homologous pseudogene sequences from polymerase chain reaction amplification allows genomic keratin 14 hotspot mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, PHL; van der Vlies, P; Jonkman, MF; Verlind, E; Shimizu, H; Buys, CHCM; Scheffer, H

    In patients with the major forms of epidermolysis bullosa simplex, either of the keratin genes KRT5 or KRT14 is mutated. This causes a disturbance of the filament network resulting in skin fragility and blistering. For KRT5, a genomic mutation detection system has been described previously. Mutation

  2. A new pathogenic keratin 5 mutation in a Hindoestan family with localized epidermolysis bullosa simplex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohil, Sophie C.; Bolling, Maria C.; Kooi, Kristia A.; Lemmink, Henny H.; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    2010-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa simplex is an autosomal dominant inherited skin blistering disorder caused by mutations in the genes KRT5 or KRT14 coding for the basal epidermal keratins 5 and 14, respectively. We describe a novel heterozygous pathogenic missense mutation (KRT5:c.596A>T, p.Lys199Met) in a

  3. The Study on the Expression of Keratin Proteins in Pterygial Epithelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Zhang; Zuguo Liu; Yuhuan Xie

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the expression patterns of several keratin proteins in pterygial epithelium.Methods:The proteins of K8, K10, K14, K16 and AE3 in the epithelium of8 pterygia and 4 normal conjunctiva were detected using immunofluorescent staining.Results: In pterygial epithelium, the staining patterns of 5 keratin proteins were different with normal conjunctiva. No staining of K8, K10 and K16 was detected in normal conjunctival epithelium, but in pterygial epithelium, K8 and K16 were present in full thickness and K10 was present in superficial cells. In normal conjunctiva, only base layer of epithelium showed positive staining with antibody of K14 and AE3 proteins, but they were present in the full thickness in pterygial epithelium and the antibody of AE3 protein stained the superficial cells heavily comparing with base cells.Conclusion: The abnormal expression of keratin proteins (K8, K10, K14, K16 and AE3) in pterygia indicates that the epithelial cells in pterygia are in the state of hyperproliferation and keratinization, which may be the cause of the abnormal tear function in patients with pterygia. Eye Science 2000; 16:48 ~ 52.

  4. The Study on the Eapression of Keratin Protins in Pterygial Epithelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MeiZhang; YuhuanXie; 等

    2002-01-01

    Purpose:To evaluate the expression patterns of several keratin proteins in pterygial epithelium.Methods:The proteins of K8,K10,K14,K16 and AE3 in the epithelium of 8 pterygia and 4 normal conjunctiva were detected using immunofluorescent staining.Results:In pterygial epithelium,the staining patterns of 5 keratin proteins were different with normal conjunctiva.No staining of K8,K10 and K16 was detected in normal conjunctival epithelium,but in pterygial epithelium,K8 and K16 were present in full thickness and K10 was present in superficial cells.In normal conjunctiva, only base layer of epithelium showed positive staining with antibody of K14 and AE3 proteins,but they were present in the full thickness in pterygial epithelium and the antibody of AE3 protein stained the superficial cells heavily comparing with base cells.Conclusion:The abnormal expression of keratin proteins (K8,K10,K14,K16 and AE3) in pterygia indicates that the epithelial cells in pterygia are in the state of hyperproliferation and keratinization,which may be the cause of the abnormal tear function in patients with pterygia.Eye Science 2000;16:48-52.

  5. Identification of stem cells that maintain and regenerate lingual keratinized epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Komai, Yoshihiro; Tokuyama, Yoko; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Ohe, Shuichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2013-05-01

    Lingual keratinized epithelial cells, which constitute the filiform papillae of the tongue, have one of the most rapid tissue turnover rates in the mammalian body and are thought to be the source of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. However, the mechanism of tissue maintenance and regeneration is largely unknown for these cells. Here, we show that stem cells positive for Bmi1, keratin 14 and keratin 5 are present in the base but not at the very bottom of the interpapillary pit (observed most frequently in the second or third layer (position +2 or +3) from the basal cells). Using a multicolour lineage tracing method, we demonstrated that one stem cell per interpapillary pit survives long-term. The cells were shown to be unipotent stem cells for keratinized epithelial cells but not for taste bud cells, and were found to usually be in a slow-growing or resting state; however, on irradiation-induced injury, the cells rapidly entered the cell cycle and regenerated tongue epithelium. The elimination of Bmi1-positive stem cells significantly suppressed the regeneration. Taken together, these results suggest that the stem cells identified in this study are important for tissue maintenance and regeneration of the lingual epithelium.

  6. Two cases of primarily palmoplantar keratoderma associated with novel mutations in keratin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana; Paller, Amy S; Compton, John; Atherton, David J; McLean, W H Irwin; Irvine, Alan D

    2002-10-01

    Mutations in keratin 1 were initially described in the classical form of bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (also known as epidermolytic hyperkeratosis). More recently the range of phenotypes associated with mutations in this gene has been extended to include annular ichthyosiform erythroderma and mild epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Here we present two novel mutations in the keratin 1 gene (KRT1): a 5' donor splice site mutation in exon 1 (591 + 2T > A) that predicts a 22 amino acid in-frame deletion in the keratin 1 1A domain; and an in-frame deletion in exon 7 (1376del24) that predicts a foreshortened 2B coiled-coil domain of keratin 1. In each case these mutations are associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and mild ichthyosis, largely limited to the flexural areas. These mutations appear to have a less damaging effect than previously reported mis-sense mutations sited in the helix boundary motifs. This report extends the range of phenotypes associated with mutations in KRT1.

  7. Human Rights Education in Israel: Four Types of Good Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbaria, Ayman K.; Katz-Pade, Revital

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the involvement of civil society organizations in human rights education (HRE) in Israel. Focussing on the educational programs of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI), as a qualitative instrumental case study, this article examines the conceptions of good citizenship embedded in these programs. Specifically, the…

  8. Fcgamma receptor-mediated suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Bercoff, Danielle; David, Annie; Sudry, Hugues; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Pancino, Gianfranco

    2003-04-01

    Permissiveness of monocytes and macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is modulated by various stimuli. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) through the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (FcgammaR) inhibits HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Viral p24 production was decreased by 1.5 to 3 log units in MDM infected with both R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains upon stimulation by immobilized IgG but not upon stimulation by soluble IgG or by F(ab')(2) IgG fragments. Although MDM activation by immobilized IgG induced high levels of macrophage-derived chemokine secretion as well as a sustained down-regulation of CD4 and a transient decrease in CCR5 expression, these factors did not appear to play a major role in the suppression of HIV-1 replication. Single-cycle infection of FcgammaR-stimulated MDM with HIV-1 virions pseudotyped with either HIV-1 R5 or vesicular stomatitis virus G envelopes was inhibited, suggesting a postentry restriction of viral replication. PCR analyses of HIV-1 DNA intermediate replication forms suggested that reverse transcription is not affected by stimulation with immobilized human IgG, at least during the first replication cycle. The accumulation of PCR products corresponding to nuclear unintegrated two-long-terminal-repeat circles and the relative decrease of integrated HIV-1 DNA signals suggest an inhibition of proviral integration. Our data, showing that FcgammaR-mediated activation of MDM is a potent mechanism of HIV-1 suppression, raise the possibility that FcgammaR cross-linking by immune complexes may contribute to the control of viral replication in macrophages.

  9. Transitions between the Arabidopsis-type and the human-type telomere sequence in green algae (clade Caudivolvoxa, Chlamydomonadales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulnečková, Jana; Ševčíková, Tereza; Lukešová, Alena; Sýkorová, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures that distinguish native chromosomal ends from double-stranded breaks. They are maintained by telomerase that adds short G-rich telomeric repeats at chromosomal ends in most eukaryotes and determines the TnAmGo sequence of canonical telomeres. We employed an experimental approach that was based on detection of repeats added by telomerase to identify the telomere sequence type forming the very ends of chromosomes. Our previous studies that focused on the algal order Chlamydomonadales revealed several changes in telomere motifs that were consistent with the phylogeny and supported the concept of the Arabidopsis-type sequence being the ancestral telomeric motif for green algae. In addition to previously described independent transitions to the Chlamydomonas-type sequence, we report that the ancestral telomeric motif was replaced by the human-type sequence in the majority of algal species grouped within a higher order clade, Caudivolvoxa. The Arabidopsis-type sequence was apparently retained in the Polytominia clade. Regarding the telomere sequence, the Chlorogonia clade within Caudivolvoxa bifurcates into two groups, one with the human-type sequence and the other group with the Arabidopsis-type sequence that is solely formed by the Chlorogonium species. This suggests that reversion to the Arabidopsis-type telomeric motif occurred in the common ancestral Chlorogonium species. The human-type sequence is also synthesized by telomerases of algal strains from Arenicolinia, Dunaliellinia and Stephanosphaerinia, except a distinct subclade within Stephanosphaerinia, where telomerase activity was not detected and a change to an unidentified telomeric motif might arise. We discuss plausible reasons why changes in telomeric motifs were tolerated during evolution of green algae.

  10. The low keratin affinity of efinaconazole contributes to its nail penetration and fungicidal activity in topical onychomycosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Keita; Sugimoto, Noriaki; Hosaka, Shinya; Katafuchi-Nagashima, Maria; Arakawa, Yoshio; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki; Jo Siu, William; Pillai, Radhakrishnan

    2014-07-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal nail disease that is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. Keratin affinity of topical drugs is an important physicochemical property impacting therapeutic efficacy. To be effective, topical drugs must penetrate the nail bed and retain their antifungal activity within the nail matrix, both of which are adversely affected by keratin binding. We investigated these properties for efinaconazole, a new topical antifungal for onychomycosis, compared with those of the existing topical drugs ciclopirox and amorolfine. The efinaconazole free-drug concentration in keratin suspensions was 14.3%, significantly higher than the concentrations of ciclopirox and amorolfine, which were 0.7% and 1.9%, respectively (P nails into the receptor phase and also inhibited the growth of Trichophyton rubrum under the nail. In the presence of keratin, efinaconazole exhibited fungicidal activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes comparable to that of amorolfine and superior to that of ciclopirox. In a guinea pig onychomycosis model with T. mentagrophytes infection, an efinaconazole solution significantly decreased nail fungal burden compared to that of ciclopirox and amorolfine lacquers (P nail permeability of efinaconazole and its potent fungicidal activity in the presence of keratin are related to its low keratin affinity, which may contribute to its efficacy in onychomycosis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Keratins regulate protein biosynthesis through localization of GLUT1 and -3 upstream of AMP kinase and Raptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraj, Preethi; Kröger, Cornelia; Reuter, Ursula; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2009-01-01

    Keratin intermediate filament proteins form cytoskeletal scaffolds in epithelia, the disruption of which affects cytoarchitecture, cell growth, survival, and organelle transport. However, owing to redundancy, the global function of keratins has not been defined in full. Using a targeted gene deletion strategy, we generated transgenic mice lacking the entire keratin multiprotein family. In this study, we report that without keratins, embryonic epithelia suffer no cytolysis and maintain apical polarity but display mislocalized desmosomes. All keratin-null embryos die from severe growth retardation at embryonic day 9.5. We find that GLUT1 and -3 are mislocalized from the apical plasma membrane in embryonic epithelia, which subsequently activates the energy sensor adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK). Analysis of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway reveals that AMPK induction activates Raptor, repressing protein biosynthesis through mTORC1's downstream targets S6 kinase and 4E-binding protein 1. Our findings demonstrate a novel keratin function upstream of mTOR signaling via GLUT localization and have implications for pathomechanisms and therapy approaches for keratin disorders and the analysis of other gene families. PMID:19841136

  12. No difference in keratin thickness between inner and outer foreskins from elective male circumcisions in Rakai, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh H Dinh

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that increased HIV acquisition in uncircumcised men may relate to a more thinly keratinized inner foreskin. However, published data are contradictory and potentially confounded by medical indications for circumcision. We tested the hypothesis that the inner foreskin was more thinly keratinized than the outer foreskin using tissues from 19 healthy, HIV-uninfected men undergoing routine prophylactic circumcision in Rakai, Uganda. Sections from 3 foreskin anatomic sites (inner, outer, and frenar band were snap-frozen separately. Two independent laboratories each separately stained, imaged, and measured keratin thicknesses in a blinded fashion. There was no significant difference in keratin thickness between the inner (mean = 14.67±7.48 µm and outer (mean = 13.30±8.49 µm foreskin, or between the inner foreskin and the frenar band (mean = 16.91±12.42 µm. While the frenar band showed the greatest intra-individual heterogeneity in keratin thickness, there was substantial inter-individual variation seen in all regions. Measurements made by the two laboratories showed high correlation (r = 0.741, 95% CI, 0.533-0.864. We conclude that, despite inter- and intra-individual variability, keratin thickness was similar in the inner and outer foreskin of healthy Ugandan men, and that reduced keratin thickness is not likely to make the inner foreskin more susceptible to HIV acquisition.

  13. Rapid evolution of Beta-keratin genes contribute to phenotypic differences that distinguish turtles and birds from other reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang I; Kong, Lesheng; Ponting, Chris P; Haerty, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing of vertebrate genomes permits changes in distinct protein families, including gene gains and losses, to be ascribed to lineage-specific phenotypes. A prominent example of this is the large-scale duplication of beta-keratin genes in the ancestors of birds, which was crucial to the subsequent evolution of their beaks, claws, and feathers. Evidence suggests that the shell of Pseudomys nelsoni contains at least 16 beta-keratins proteins, but it is unknown whether this is a complete set and whether their corresponding genes are orthologous to avian beak, claw, or feather beta-keratin genes. To address these issues and to better understand the evolution of the turtle shell at a molecular level, we surveyed the diversity of beta-keratin genes from the genome assemblies of three turtles, Chrysemys picta, Pelodiscus sinensis, and Chelonia mydas, which together represent over 160 Myr of chelonian evolution. For these three turtles, we found 200 beta-keratins, which indicate that, as for birds, a large expansion of beta-keratin genes in turtles occurred concomitantly with the evolution of a unique phenotype, namely, their plastron and carapace. Phylogenetic reconstruction of beta-keratin gene evolution suggests that separate waves of gene duplication within a single genomic location gave rise to scales, claws, and feathers in birds, and independently the scutes of the shell in turtles.

  14. Hard alpha-keratin degradation inside a tissue under high flux X-ray synchrotron micro-beam: a multi-scale time-resolved study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Emilie; Gourrier, Aurélien; Doucet, Jean; Briki, Fatma

    2010-04-01

    X-rays interact strongly with biological organisms. Synchrotron radiation sources deliver very intense X-ray photon fluxes within micro- or submicro cross-section beams, resulting in doses larger than the MGy. The relevance of synchrotron radiation analyses of biological materials is therefore questionable since such doses, million times higher than the ones used in radiotherapy, can cause huge damages in tissues, with regard to not only DNA, but also proteic and lipid organizations. Very few data concerning the effect of very high X-ray doses in tissues are available in the literature. We present here an analysis of the structural phenomena which occur when the model tissue of human hair is irradiated by a synchrotron X-ray micro-beam. The choice of hair is supported by its hierarchical and partially ordered keratin structure which can be analysed inside the tissue by X-ray diffraction. To assess the damages caused by hard X-ray micro-beams (1 microm(2) cross-section), short exposure time scattering SAXS/WAXS patterns have been recorded at beamline ID13 (ESRF) after various irradiation times. Various modifications of the scattering patterns are observed, they provide fine insight of the radiation damages at various hierarchical levels and also unexpectedly provide information about the stability of the various hierarchical structural levels. It appears that the molecular level, i.e. the alpha helices which are stabilized by hydrogen bonds and the alpha-helical coiled coils which are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, is more sensitive to radiation than the supramolecular architecture of the keratin filament and the filament packing within the keratin associated proteins matrix, which is stabilized by disulphide bonds.

  15. Hydrogen isotope measurement of bird feather keratin, one laboratory's response to evolving methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Majie; Dettman, David L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen in organic tissue resides in a complex mixture of molecular contexts. Some hydrogen, called non-exchangeable (H(non)), is strongly bound, and its isotopic ratio is fixed when the tissue is synthesized. Other pools of hydrogen, called exchangeable hydrogen (H(ex)), constantly exchange with ambient water vapor. The measurement of the δ(2)H(non) in organic tissues such as hair or feather therefore requires an analytical process that accounts for exchangeable hydrogen. In this study, swan feather and sheep wool keratin were used to test the effects of sample drying and capsule closure on the measurement of δ(2)H(non) values, and the rate of back-reaction with ambient water vapor. Homogenous feather or wool keratins were also calibrated at room temperature for use as control standards to correct for the effects of exchangeable hydrogen on feathers. Total δ(2)H values of both feather and wool samples showed large changes throughout the first ∼6 h of drying. Desiccant plus low vacuum seems to be more effective than room temperature vacuum pumping for drying samples. The degree of capsule closure affects exchangeable hydrogen equilibration and drying, with closed capsules responding more slowly. Using one control keratin standard to correct for the δ(2)H(ex) value for a batch of samples leads to internally consistent δ(2)H(non) values for other calibrated keratins run as unknowns. When placed in the context of other recent improvements in the measurement of keratin δ(2)H(non) values, we make recommendations for sample handing, data calibration and the reporting of results.

  16. Method for identifying type I diabetes mellitus in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O [Kennewick, WA; Qian, Weijun [Richland, WA; Jacobs, Jon M [Pasco, WA

    2011-04-12

    A method and system for classifying subject populations utilizing predictive and diagnostic biomarkers for type I diabetes mellitus. The method including determining the levels of a variety of markers within the serum or plasma of a target organism and correlating this level to general populations as a screen for predisposition or progressive monitoring of disease presence or predisposition.

  17. C-type natriuretic-derived peptides as biomarkers in human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    and extracellular fluid volume. Atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide have gained considerable diagnostic interest as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease. By contrast, C-type natriuretic peptide has not yet been ascribed a role in human diagnostics. This perspective aims at recapitulating...... the present biochemical and clinical issues concerning C-type natriuretic peptide measurement in plasma as a potential biomarker....

  18. Characterization of Enteroviruses from non-human primates in cameroon revealed virus types widespread in humans along with candidate new types and species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Alain Sadeuh-Mba

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses (EVs infecting African Non-Human Primates (NHP are still poorly documented. This study was designed to characterize the genetic diversity of EVs among captive and wild NHP in Cameroon and to compare this diversity with that found in humans. Stool specimens were collected in April 2008 in NHP housed in sanctuaries in Yaounde and neighborhoods. Moreover, stool specimens collected from wild NHP from June 2006 to October 2008 in the southern rain forest of Cameroon were considered. RNAs purified directly from stool samples were screened for EVs using a sensitive RT-nested PCR targeting the VP1 capsid coding gene whose nucleotide sequence was used for molecular typing. Captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla were primarily infected by EV types already reported in humans in Cameroon and elsewhere: Coxsackievirus A13 and A24, Echovirus 15 and 29, and EV-B82. Moreover EV-A119, a novel virus type recently described in humans in central and west Africa, was also found in a captive Chimpanzee. EV-A76, which is a widespread virus in humans, was identified in wild chimpanzees, thus suggesting its adaptation and parallel circulation in human and NHP populations in Cameroon. Interestingly, some EVs harbored by wild NHP were genetically distinct from all existing types and were thus assigned as new types. One chimpanzee-derived virus was tentatively assigned as EV-J121 in the EV-J species. In addition, two EVs from wild monkeys provisionally registered as EV-122 and EV-123 were found to belong to a candidate new species. Overall, this study indicates that the genetic diversity of EVs among NHP is more important than previously known and could be the source of future new emerging human viral diseases.

  19. DNA typing of Calliphorids collected from human corpses in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, R; Tan, T C; Lee, H L; Nazni, W A; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2013-03-01

    Estimation of post-mortem interval (PMI) is crucial for time of death determination. The advent of DNA-based identification techniques forensic entomology saw the beginning of a proliferation of molecular studies into forensically important Calliphoridae (Diptera). The use of DNA to characterise morphologically indistinguishable immature calliphorids was recognised as a valuable molecular tool with enormous practical utility. The local entomofauna in most cases is important for the examination of entomological evidences. The survey of the local entomofauna has become a fundamental first step in forensic entomological studies, because different geographical distributions, seasonal and environmental factors may influence the decomposition process and the occurrence of different insect species on corpses. In this study, calliphorids were collected from 13 human corpses recovered from indoors, outdoors and aquatic conditions during the post-mortem examination by pathologists from the government hospitals in Malaysia. Only two species, Chrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya rufifacies were recovered from human corpses. DNA sequencing was performed to study the mitochondrial encoded COI gene and to evaluate the suitability of the 1300 base pairs of COI fragments for identification of blow fly species collected from real crime scene. The COI gene from blow fly specimens were sequenced and deposited in GenBank to expand local databases. The sequenced COI gene was useful in identifying calliphorids retrieved from human corpses.

  20. Comparative performances of serologic and molecular assays for detecting human T lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Rodrigues Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study evaluated several techniques currently available (commercial kits and in-house assays for diagnosing human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 in two groups of patients enrolled at HIV/AIDS specialized care services in São Paulo: Group 1 (G1, n = 1608, 1237 male/371 female, median age 44.3 years old, majority using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; G2, n = 1383, 930 male/453 female, median age of 35.6 years old, majority HAART naïve. Enzyme immunoassays [(EIA Murex and Gold ELISA] were employed for human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 screening; Western blotting (WB, INNO-LIA (LIA, real-time PCR pol (qPCR, and nested-PCR-RFLP (tax were used to confirm infection. Samples were considered human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 positive when there was reactivity using at least one of the four confirmatory assays. By serological screening, 127/2991 samples were positive or borderline, and human T lymphotropic virus infection was confirmed in 108 samples (three EIA-borderline: 56 human T lymphotropic virus type 1 [G1 (27 + G2 (29]; 45 human T lymphotropic virus type 2 [G1 (21 + G2 (24]; one human T lymphotropic virus type 1 + human T lymphotropic virus type 2 (G2; six human T lymphotropic virus [G1 (2 + G2 (4]. Although there were differences in group characteristics, human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 prevalence was similar [3.1% (G1 and 4.2% (G2, p = 0.113]. The overall sensitivities of LIA, WB, qPCR, and PCR-RFLP were 97.2%, 82.4%, 68.9%, and 68.4%, respectively, with some differences among groups, likely due to the stage of human T lymphotropic virus infection and/or HAART duration. Indeterminate immunoblotting results were detected in G2, possibly due to the seroconversion period. Negative results in molecular assays could be explained by the use of HAART, the occurrence of defective provirus and/or the low circulating proviral load. In conclusion, when determining the human T

  1. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakweba, Abdul Sekemani; Muhairwa, Amandus Pachificus; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Guardabassi, Luca; Mtambo, Madundo M A; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-02-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Nasal swabs were taken from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. S. aureus was isolated from 22% of humans, 4% of pigs and 11% of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared between humans and dogs. A novel spa type (t10779) was identified in an isolate recovered from a colonized human. Antimicrobials tested revealed resistance to ampicillin in all isolates, moderate resistances to other antimicrobials with tetracycline resistance being the most frequent. S. aureus carrier frequencies in dogs and humans were within the expected range and low in pigs. The S. aureus spa types circulating in the community were generally not shared by different hosts and majority of types belonged to known clones. Besides ampicillin resistance, moderate levels of antimicrobial resistance were observed irrespective of the host species from which the strains were isolated.

  2. Recombinant human Fab fragments neutralize human type 1 immunodeficiency virus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbas, C F; Björling, E; Chiodi, F; Dunlop, N; Cababa, D; Jones, T M; Zebedee, S L; Persson, M A; Nara, P L; Norrby, E

    1992-01-01

    A panel of 20 recombinant Fab fragments reactive with the surface glycoprotein gp120 of human type 1 immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) were examined for their ability to neutralize MN and IIIB strains of the virus. Neutralization was determined as the ability of the Fab fragments to inhibit infection as measured in both a p24 ELISA and a syncytium-formation assay. One group of closely sequence-related Fab fragments was found to neutralize virus in both assays with a 50% neutralization titer at approximately 1 micrograms/ml. Another Fab neutralized in the p24 ELISA but not in the syncytium assay. The other Fab fragments showed weak or no neutralizing ability. The results imply that virion aggregation or crosslinking of gp120 molecules on the virion surface is not an absolute requirement for HIV-1 neutralization. Further, all of the Fab fragments were shown to be competitive with soluble CD4 for binding to gp120 and yet few neutralized the virus effectively, implying that the mechanism of neutralization in this case may not involve receptor blocking. The observation of a preponderance of high-affinity Fab fragments with poor or no neutralizing ability could have implications for vaccine strategies. PMID:1384050

  3. Viral Interactions in Human Lymphoid Tissue: Human Herpesvirus 7 Suppresses the Replication of CCR5-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 via CD4 Modulation▿

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affect...

  4. Morphological method for the diagnosis of human adult type hypolactasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Maiuri, L; M. Rossi; V. Raia; Paparo, F; Coletta, S; Mazzeo, F; Breglia, A; Auricchio, S

    1994-01-01

    The primary adult type hypolactasia is the most common form of genetically determined disaccharidase deficiency. This study examined a large and homogeneous population of the south of Italy: surgical biopsy specimens of proximal jejunum from 178 adult subjects have been assayed for disaccharidase activities; the expression of lactase protein and lactase activity has also been investigated on tissue sections by immunomorphological and enzymohistochemical techniques. Histograms of lactase to su...

  5. Trabecular bone histomorphometry in humans with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Akhter, Mohammed P; Drincic, Andjela; Recker, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) have markedly increased risk of fracture, but little is known about abnormalities in bone microarchitecture or remodeling properties that might give insight into the pathogenesis of skeletal fragility in these patients. We report here a case-control study comparing bone histomorphometric and micro-CT results from iliac biopsies in 18 otherwise healthy subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with those from healthy age- and sex-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Five of the diabetics had histories of low-trauma fracture. Transilial bone biopsies were obtained after tetracycline labeling. The biopsy specimens were fixed, embedded, and scanned using a desktop μCT at 16 μm resolution. They were then sectioned and quantitative histomorphometry was performed as previously described by Recker et al. [1]. Two sections, >250 μm apart, were read from the central part of each biopsy. Overall there were no significant differences between diabetics and controls in histomorphometric or micro-CT measurements. However, fracturing diabetics had structural and dynamic trends different from nonfracturing diabetics by both methods of analysis. In conclusion, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus does not result in abnormalities in bone histomorphometric or micro-CT variables in the absence of manifest complications from the diabetes. However, diabetics suffering fractures may have defects in their skeletal microarchitecture that may underlie the presence of excess skeletal fragility.

  6. Intracellular Immunization of Human Fetal Cord Blood Stem/Progenitor Cells with a Ribozyme Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mang; Leavitt, Mark C.; Maruyama, Midori; Yamada, Osamu; Young, Dennis; Ho, Anthony D.; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1995-01-01

    Successful treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection may ultimately require targeting of hematopoietic stem cells. Here we used retroviral vectors carrying the ribozyme gene to transduce CD34^+ cells from human fetal cord blood. Transduction and ribozyme expression had no apparent adverse effect on cell differentiation and/or proliferation. The macrophage-like cells, differentiated from the stem/progenitor cells in vitro, expressed the ribozyme gene and resisted infection by a macrophage tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1. These results suggest the feasibility of stem cell gene therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

  7. Transformation of human fetal thymus and spleen lymphocytes by human t-cell leukemia virus type Ι

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akagi,Tadaatsu

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available Co-cultivation of human thymus and spleen lymphocytes, which were obtained from 26-week and 27-week fetuses, with a lethally-irradiated human cord T-cell line harboring human T-cell leukemia virus type Ι(HTLV-Ι resultes in the establishment of T-cell lines positive for adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigens and producing HTLV-Ι. These cell lines had the phenotype of a helper/inducer subset of peripheral T-cells as evidenced by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies to human T-cells.

  8. A novel mutation of a leucine residue in coil 1A of keratin 9 in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, H; Hatamochi, A; Shinkai, H

    1997-07-01

    Keratin 9 mutation was examined in a Japanese kindred of epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK), which is a dominantly inherited autosomal disorder of keratinization characterized by diffuse thickening of the palms and soles and by epidermolytic hyperkeratosis histologically. We report herein a novel mutation, a C --> G transversion at nucleotide position 541 that converts a leucine residue (CTC) to a valine (GTC) at codon 159. As in all other reported cases of keratin 9 mutation in EPPK, this mutation lies within the highly conserved coil 1A of the rod domain, which is considered to play a role in the correct alignment of the coiled-coil molecules.

  9. [Enlargement of keratinized peri-implant mucosa at the time of second stage surgery (re-entry)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Regula; Bassetti, Renzo; Mericske-Stern, Regina; Enkling, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    A tightly attached keratinized mucosa around endosseous dental implants is believed to be protective against peri-implant bone loss. Tension caused by buccal frena and mobile non keratinized mucosa is to avoid. This case report documents the optimization of peri-implant mucosal conditions in the upper and lower jaw. At the time of second stage surgery (re-entry) at submucosally osseointegrated dental implants an enlargement of keratinized mucosa and a thickening of soft tissue was obtained administrating a vestibuloplasty combined by a free gingival graft or a vestibuloplasty combined by an apically moved flap.

  10. Fibre type-specific change in FXYD1 phosphorylation during acute intense exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Martin; Murphy, Robyn M; Bangsbo, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine fibre type-specific Na(+)-K(+) pump subunit expression and exercise-induced alterations in phospholemman (FXYD1) phosphorylation in humans. Segments of human skeletal muscle fibres were dissected and fibre typed, and protein expression was determined...... by Western blotting. The protein expression of the Na(+)-K(+) pump a2 isoform was lower in type I than in type II fibres (0.63 ± 0.04 a.u. vs. 1.00 ± 0.07 a.u., P ... channel Kir6.2 was higher in type I compared with type II fibres. In both type I (P type II fibres (P

  11. Developing Educational Computer Animation Based on Human Personality Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Musa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Computer animation in the past decade has become one of the most noticeable features of technology-based learning environments. By its definition, it refers to simulated motion pictures showing movement of drawn objects, and is often defined as the art in movement. Its educational application known as educational computer animation is considered to be one of the most elegant ways for preparing materials for teaching, and its importance in assisting learners to process, understand and remember information efficiently has vastly grown since the advent of powerful graphics-oriented computers era. Based on theories and facts of psychology, colour science, computer animation, geometric modelling and technical aesthetics, this study intends to establish an inter-disciplinary area of research towards a greater educational effectiveness. With today’s high educational demands as well as the lack of time provided for certain courses, classical educational methods have shown deficiencies in keeping up with the drastic changes observed in the digital era. Generally speaking, without taking into account various significant factors as, for instance, gender, age, level of interest and memory level, educational animations may turn out to be insufficient for learners or fail to meet their needs. Though, we have noticed that the applications of animation for education have been given only inadequate attention, and students’ personality types of temperaments (sanguine, choleric, melancholic, phlegmatic, etc. have never been taken into account. We suggest there is an interesting relationship here, and propose essential factors in creating educational animations based on students’ personality types. Particularly, we study how information in computer animation may be presented in a more preferable way based on font types and their families, colours and colour schemes, emphasizing texts, shapes of characters designed by planar quadratic Bernstein-Bézier curves

  12. Expression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Neutralizing Antibody Fragments Using Human Vaginal Lactobacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcobal, Angela; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Wenlei; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Jia, Letong; Lee, Peter P.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Parks, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eradication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by vaccination with epitopes that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies is the ultimate goal for HIV prevention. However, generating appropriate immune responses has proven difficult. Expression of broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaginal colonizing lactobacilli provides an approach to passively target these antibodies to the mucosa. We tested the feasibility of expressing single-chain and single-domain antibodies (dAbs) in Lactobacillus to be used as a topical microbicide/live biotherapeutic. Lactobacilli provide an excellent platform to express anti-HIV proteins. Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been identified against epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope and have been made into active antibody fragments. We tested single-chain variable fragment m9 and dAb-m36 and its derivative m36.4 as prototype antibodies. We cloned and expressed the antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 in Lactobacillus jensenii-1153 and tested the expression levels and functionality. We made a recombinant L. jensenii 1153-1128 that expresses dAb-m36.4. All antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 were expressed by lactobacilli. However, we noted the smaller m36/m36.4 were expressed to higher levels, ≥3 μg/ml. All L. jensenii-expressed antibody fragments bound to gp120/CD4 complex; Lactobacillus-produced m36.4 inhibited HIV-1BaL in a neutralization assay. Using a TZM-bl assay, we characterized the breadth of neutralization of the m36.4. Delivery of dAbs by Lactobacillus could provide passive transfer of these antibodies to the mucosa and longevity at the site of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26950606

  13. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; van Boxtel, A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently,

  14. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, D.B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; Rijen, van M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; Boxtel, van A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently, ho

  15. Life table analysis of Cimex hemipterus F. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) reared on different types of human blood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abd Rahim, Abd Hafis; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the development time of each immature stage and total development time of Cimex hemipterus reared on human blood type A, B, O and AB, and to compare survivorship and fecundity of Cimex...

  16. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  17. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakweba, Abdul S.; Muhairwa, Amandus P.; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Methodology: Nasal swabs were taken...... from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing....... Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. Results: S. aureus was isolated from 22 % of humans, 4 % of pigs and 11 % of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared...

  18. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  19. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 by cdk inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehn-Hall Kylene

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection relies primarily on the administration of anti-retroviral nucleoside analogues, either alone or in combination with HIV-protease inhibitors. Although these drugs have a clinical benefit, continuous therapy with the drugs leads to drug-resistant strains of the virus. Recently, significant progress has been made towards the development of natural and synthetic agents that can directly inhibit HIV-1 replication or its essential enzymes. We previously reported on the pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (PCI r-roscovitine as a potential inhibitor of HIV-1 replication. PCIs are among the most promising novel antiviral agents to emerge over the past few years. Potent activity on viral replication combined with proliferation inhibition without the emergence of resistant viruses, which are normally observed in HAART patients; make PCIs ideal candidates for HIV-1 inhibition. To this end we evaluated twenty four cdk inhibitors for their effect on HIV-1 replication in vitro. Screening of these compounds identified alsterpaullone as the most potent inhibitor of HIV-1 with activity at 150 nM. We found that alsterpaullone effectively inhibits cdk2 activity in HIV-1 infected cells with a low IC50 compared to control uninfected cells. The effects of alsterpaullone were associated with suppression of cdk2 and cyclin expression. Combining both alsterpaullone and r-roscovitine (cyc202 in treatment exhibited even stronger inhibitory activities in HIV-1 infected PBMCs.

  20. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichero, Laura, E-mail: lsichero@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Simao Sobrinho, Joao [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Lina Villa, Luisa [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  1. Enhanced human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 expression and neuropathogenesis in knockout mice lacking Type I interferon responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongxia; Sharer, Leroy R; Chao, Wei; Gu, Chao-Jiang; Borjabad, Alejandra; Hadas, Eran; Kelschenbach, Jennifer; Ichiyama, Koji; Do, Meilan; Potash, Mary Jane; Volsky, David J

    2014-01-01

    The roles of Type I interferon (IFN) in human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) neuropathogenesis are poorly understood; both protective and deleterious effects of IFN signaling have been described. We used genetically modified mice deficient in the Type I IFN receptor (IFNRKO) to analyze the progress of HIV-1 brain infection and neuropathogenesis in the absence of IFN signaling. IFNRKO and wild-type (WT) mice on the 129xSv/Ev or C57BL/6 strain backgrounds were infected systemically with EcoHIV, a chimeric HIV-1 that productively infects mice. IFNRKO mice showed higher HIV-1 expression in spleen and peritoneal macrophages and greater virus infiltration into the brain compared to WT mice. Neuropathogenesis was studied by histopathological, immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and polymerase chain reaction analyses of brain tissues after the virus was inoculated into the brain by stereotaxic intracerebral injection. Both IFNRKO and WT mice showed readily detectable HIV-1 and brain lesions, including microglial activation, astrocytosis, and increased expression of genes coding for inflammatory cytokines and chemokines typical of human HIV-1 brain disease. Parameters of HIV-1 neuropathogenesis, including HIV-1 expression in microglia/macrophages, were significantly greater in IFNRKO than in WT mice. Our results show unequivocally that Type I IFN signaling and responses limit HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis in the brains of mice.

  2. New collagen matrix to avoid the reduction of keratinized tissue during guided bone regeneration in postextraction sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Daniele; Cucchi, Alessandro; de Gemmis, Antonio; Nocini Pier, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    For decades, there has been an ongoing controversy regarding the need for an "adequate" width of keratinized gingiva/mucosa to preserve periodontal and implant health. Today, the presence of a certain width of keratinized tissue is recommended for achieving long-term periodontal and implant success, and therefore, a new collagen matrix has been developed to enhance the width of keratinized gingiva/mucosa. During postextraction socket preservation, guided bone regeneration techniques require complete coverage of the barrier membrane to reduce the risk of infection, occasionally causing a reduction of the width of keratinized tissue. Using the new collagen matrix, it is possible to leave the membrane intentionally uncovered, without suturing the surgical flap above it, to avoid the reduction of such tissue.

  3. A novel keratin 9 gene mutation (Asn160His) in a Taiwanese family with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J-H; Lin, M-H; Yang, M-H; Chao, S-C

    2004-05-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of keratinization. Recent molecular studies have shown that EPPK is caused by mutations in keratin 9 gene (KRT9). We report a Taiwanese family with EPPK with a novel mutation with an A-->C transition at the first nucleotide of codon 160 in KRT9. The mutation is predicted to result in an asparagine to histidine substitution (N160H) at the beginning of the alpha-helical 1A domain of keratin 9. Mutations in this region could disrupt keratin filament assembly, leading to degeneration or cytolysis of keratinocytes. Our mutation analysis confirms that codon 160 in KRT9 is one of the mutation hot spots in EPPK.

  4. A novel mutation in the L12 domain of keratin 1 is associated with mild epidermolytic ichthyosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolling, M. C.; Bladergroen, R. S.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Willemsen, M.; Jonkman, M. F.; van Geel, M.

    P>Background Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI), previously termed bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma or epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, is a clinically heterogeneous genodermatosis caused by mutations in the genes encoding the suprabasal keratins 1 and 10. Classical EI is clinically

  5. Correction: Molecular evolution of the keratin associated protein gene family in mammals, role in the evolution of mammalian hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin David M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Correction to Wu DD, Irwin DM, Zhang YP: Molecular evolution of the keratin associated protein gene family in mammals, role in the evolution of mammalian hair. BMC Evol Biol 2008, 8:241.

  6. Testing the feasibility of DNA typing for human identification by PCR and an oligonucleotide ligation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahunty, C.; Ankener, W.; Deng, Qiang [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The use of DNA typing in human genome analysis is increasing and finding widespread application in the area of forensic and paternity testing. In this report, we explore the feasibility of typing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by using a semiautomated method for analyzing human DNA samples. In this approach, PCR is used to amplify segments of human DNA containing a common SNP. Allelic nucleotides in the amplified product are then typed by a calorimetric implementation of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). The results of the combined assay, PCR/OLA, are read directly by a spectrophotometer; the absorbances are compiled and the genotypes are automatically determined. A panel of 20 markers has been developed for DNA typing and has been tested using a sample panel from the CEPH pedigrees (CEPH parents). The results of this typing, as well as the potential to apply this method to larger populations, are discussed. 62 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. EXPRESSION AND SWITCHING OF TH 1/TH2 TYPE CYTOKINES GENE IN HUMAN GLIOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-sheng Hu; Xin-gang Li; Qing-lin Zhang; Dong-hai Wang; Song-feng Gong

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the expression and switching of Th1/Th2 cytokines gene in hman gliomas and its effects on occurring and developing of human gliomas.Methods Interleukin(IL)-2 and intefferon-γ represent Th1 type cytokines. IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13 represent Th2 type cytokines. The gene expressions of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human glioma cells, glioma infiltrating lymphocytes,and glioma cell lines were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The biological activity of cytokines in the supematant of glioma cell lines was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)method.Results The total positive rates of Th1 and Th2 type cytokines gene in human glioma cells were 14.77% and 75%. The total positive rates of Thl and Th2 type cytokines gene in glioma infiltrating lymphocytes were 22.73% and 68.17%. There was obviously predominant expression of Th2 type cytokines in human glioma tissues, glioma infiltrating lymphocytes, and glioma cell lines. There was no unbalanced expression of Th1/Th2 cytokines in normal brain tissues.Conclusion There is a predominant expression of Th2 type cytokines in human glioma cells. The switching of Th1/Th2 cytokines gene may play an important role in the occurring and developing of human gliomas.

  8. Molecular evolution of the keratin associated protein gene family in mammals, role in the evolution of mammalian hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin David M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hair is unique to mammals. Keratin associated proteins (KRTAPs, which contain two major groups: high/ultrahigh cysteine and high glycine-tyrosine, are one of the major components of hair and play essential roles in the formation of rigid and resistant hair shafts. Results The KRTAP family was identified as being unique to mammals, and near-complete KRTAP gene repertoires for eight mammalian genomes were characterized in this study. An expanded KRTAP gene repertoire was found in rodents. Surprisingly, humans have a similar number of genes as other primates despite the relative hairlessness of humans. We identified several new subfamilies not previously reported in the high/ultrahigh cysteine KRTAP genes. Genes in many subfamilies of the high/ultrahigh cysteine KRTAP genes have evolved by concerted evolution with frequent gene conversion events, yielding a higher GC base content for these gene sequences. In contrast, the high glycine-tyrosine KRTAP genes have evolved more dynamically, with fewer gene conversion events and thus have a lower GC base content, possibly due to positive selection. Conclusion Most of the subfamilies emerged early in the evolution of mammals, thus we propose that the mammalian ancestor should have a diverse KRTAP gene repertoire. We propose that hair content characteristics have evolved and diverged rapidly among mammals because of rapid divergent evolution of KRTAPs between species. In contrast, subfamilies of KRTAP genes have been homogenized within each species due to concerted evolution.

  9. Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels and blood pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Baumunk, Daniel; Krause, Hans;

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) cation channels are involved in the regulation of blood pressure, but this has not been studied using human renal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that the expression of TRPC3 in human renal tissue is associated with blood...

  10. Cultivating New-type Farmers Based on the Theory of Human Resources Development

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Under the direction of theory of human resources development, this thesis analyzes the impact of rural human resources development on cultivating new-type farmers. Firstly, it increases the input of rural basic education; secondly, it reinforces the vocational education and technology training; thirdly, it promotes the rural medical and public health services; fourthly, it quickens the rural labor transfer. The status quo of China’s rural human resources has been analyzed as follows: in ter...

  11. Peritoneal keratin granuloma associated with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the uterine corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayano Hidekazu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a 69-year-old woman with a chief complaint of postmenopausal bleeding. She was diagnosed as having an endometrioid adenocarcinoma by biopsy, and underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. At the time of surgery, granulation tissue-like nodules were found on the peritoneal serosa of the uterus. In the intraoperative cytology of peritoneal washing, atypical cells were noted. The intraoperative frozen section of the peritoneal nodule revealed granulation tissue with proliferating mesothelial cells. Microscopic examination of the permanent section showed keratin granulomas without viable adenocarcinoma cells on the serosal surface of the ovaries, fallopian tubes and broad ligaments. Postoperative chemotherapy was administered. She has been alive with no evidence of recurrence for 6 months postoperatively. It should be noted that the prognosis of cases in peritoneal keratin granuloma without viable cancer cells is favorable, and that the histological examination is essential for its diagnosis.

  12. Keratinous waste decomposition and peptide production by keratinase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegeckas, Audrius; Gudiukaitė, Renata; Debski, Janusz; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    A keratinolytic proteinase was cloned from thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11 and was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase (RecGEOker) with an estimated molecular weight of 57 kDa was purified and keratinase activity was measured. RecGEOker showed optimal activity at pH 9 and 60 °C. Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase showed the highest substrate specificity toward keratin from wool > collagen > sodium caseinate > gelatin > and BSA in descending order. RecGEOker is applicable for efficient keratin waste biodegradation and can replace conventional non-biological hydrolysis processes. High-value small peptides obtained from enzymatic biodegradation by RecGEOker are suitable for industrial application in white and/or green biotechnology for use as major additives in various products.

  13. 50 ku keratin-like protein and β-microtublin coexist in higher plant cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    IF-like proteins have been obtained from suspension cells of Nicotiana tabacum by selective extraction. Western blot analysis shows that the major components of IF-like proteins are 6 keratin-like proteins of 64, 58, 55, 54, 50 and 45 ku. Specially the 50 ku protein also reacts with polyantibody against microtublin. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis shows that the 50 ku protein is composed of two different proteins and their amino acid sequences have been determined. Part of the sequence of one protein is identical to that of -microtublin and the other protein's sequence has no significant homologue, which should be a new sequence-unknown protein. These results suggest that 50 ku keratin-like protein and -microtublin coexist in higher plant cells, and that may lead to the phenomenon of co-distribution of IF and microtuble in plant cells.

  14. Novel splice site mutation in keratin 1 underlies mild epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma in three kindreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsell, S J; Eady, R A; Wennerstrand, L; Dopping-Hepenstal, P; Leigh, I M; Munro, C; Kelsell, D P

    2001-04-01

    We report a novel mutation in the exon 6 splice donor site of keratin 1 (G4134A) that segregates with a palmoplantar keratoderma in three kindreds. The nucleotide substitution leads to the utilization of a novel in-frame splice site 54 bases downstream of the mutation with the subsequent insertion of 18 amino acids into the 2B rod domain. This mutation appears to have a milder effect than previously described mutations in the helix initiation and termination sequence on the function of the rod domain, with regard to filament assembly and stability. Affected individuals displayed only mild focal epidermolysis in the spinous layer of palmoplantar epidermis, in comparison with cases of bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma also due to keratin 1 mutations, which show widespread and severe epidermolysis. This study describes a novel mutation in KRT1 that results in a phenotype distinct from classical bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma.

  15. Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma in a Hispanic kindred resulting from a mutation in the keratin 9 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmuth, I; Cserhalmi-Friedman, P B; Schneiderman, P; Grossman, M E; Christiano, A M

    2000-05-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is a localized keratinization disorder caused by mutations in the highly conserved coil 1A domain of the keratin 9 gene, KRT9. We present a Hispanic pedigree spanning three generations, with affected individuals in all generations. Using polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing we demonstrated a previously reported missense mutation in KRT9, which is expressed almost exclusively in the skin of palms and soles. The C-->T missense mutation R162W changes a basic amino acid (arginine) to a neutral amino acid (tryptophan). We describe this mutation in a Hispanic pedigree with EPPK for the first time, extending the finding of this mutation in other genetic backgrounds, and demonstrating the prevalence of this mutation in diverse populations.

  16. Ingestion of colloid in a keratinized epithelium and its localization in membrane-coating granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, A F

    1976-04-01

    An electron-dense tracer (Thorotrast) was injected into the lamina propria of the keratinized epithelium of the buccal mucosa of rats. Electron microscopy showed that it crossed the basal lamina and penetrated the intercellular spaces of the epithelium up to the proximal layers of the stratum granulosum. Thorotrast was ingested by the epithelial cells in the stratum basale and stratum spinosum and localized in large vesicles and eventually in the membrane-coating granules. The latter, already known to contain lysosomal enzymes, are therefore to be regarded as secondary lysosomes formed in part as a sequel of endocytosis in deeper cell layers. The postulated origin of MCGs directly from the Golgi apparatus is rendered less likely by this observation. Thorotrast remaining in the cells when keratinization is completed is either dispersed into the cytoplasm or else incorporated into keratohyalin granules.

  17. Keratin based materials: a deep-UV inelastic light-scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Benjamin; Chan, Danny; Bäckström, Joakim; Rübhausen, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Using a novel, custom-made triple-stage Raman spectrometer featuring a high-throughput reflective microscope objective with a numerical aperture of 0.5, we performed deep-UV measurements of keratin based bio-organic materials like nails, hair and skin. Measurements were performed using frequency-doubled argon laser lines at 244 nm and 241 nm. The keratin based materials spectra show bands at around 1650 cm-1 und 3200 cm-1 corresponding to vibrations of the C=C bonds and the O-H bonds, respectively. Moreover, we have studied the dehydration behavior of skin samples by analyzing the band at 3200 cm-1, consisting out of at least three separable contributions. These display different intensity changes upon dehydration conditions. We assign the different contributions in the spectrum to the stretching and bending vibration modes of the O-H bond in the water molecule.

  18. Cellulose nanocrystal-reinforced keratin bioadsorbent for effective removal of dyes from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kaili; Xu, Helan; Xu, Lan; Xie, Kongliang; Yang, Yiqi

    2017-05-01

    High-efficiency and recyclable three-dimensional bioadsorbents were prepared by incorporating cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) as reinforcements in keratin sponge matrix to remove dyes from aqueous solution. Adsorption performance of dyes by CNC-reinforced keratin bioadsorbent was improved significantly as a result of adding CNC as filler. Batch adsorption results showed that the adsorption capacities for Reactive Black 5 and Direct Red 80 by the bioadsorbent were 1201 and 1070mgg(-1), respectively. The isotherms and kinetics for adsorption of both dyes on bioadsorbent followed the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second order model, respectively. Desorption and regeneration experiments showed that the removal efficiencies of the bioadsorbent for both dyes could remain above 80% at the fifth recycling cycles. Moreover, the bioadsorbent possessed excellent packed-bed column operation performance. Those results suggested that the adsorbent could be considered as a high-performance and promising candidate for dye wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Worldwide Genomic Diversity of the High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Types 31, 35, 52, and 58, Four Close Relatives of Human Papillomavirus Type 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja-Macias, Itzel E.; Villa, Luisa L.; Prado, Jose C.; Kalantari, Mina; Allan, Bruce; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Chung, Lap-Ping; Collins, Robert J.; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Dunn, S. Terence; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Cubie, Heather A.; Cuschieri, Kate; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Martins, Claudia R.; Sanchez, Gloria I.; Bosch, F. Xavier; Munoz, Nubia; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Among the more than one hundred formally described human papillomavirus (HPV) types, 18 are referred to as high-risk HPV types due to their association with anogenital cancer. Despite pathogenic similarities, these types form three remotely related taxonomic groups. One of these groups is called HPV species 9 and is formed by HPV-16, the most common and best-studied type, together with HPV-31, -33, -35, -52, -58, and -67. Previous worldwide comparisons of HPV-16 samples showed about 2% nucleotide diversity between isolates, which were subsequently termed variants. The distribution of divergent variants has been found to correlate frequently with the geographic origin and the ethnicity of the infected patients and led to the concept of unique African, European, Asian, and Native American HPV-16 variants. In the current study, we address the question of whether geography and ethnicity also correlate with sequence variations found for HPV-31, -35, -52, and -58. This was done by sequencing the long control region in samples derived from Europe, Asia, and Africa, and from immigrant populations in North and South America. We observed maximal divergence between any two variants within each of these four HPV types ranging from 1.8 to 3.6% based on nucleotide exchanges and, occasionally, on insertions and deletions. Similar to the case with HPV-16, these mutations are not random but indicate a relationship between the variants in form of phylogenetic trees. An interesting example is presented by a 16-bp insert in select variants of HPV-35, which appears to have given rise to additional variants by nucleotide exchanges within the insert. All trees showed distinct phylogenetic topologies, ranging from dichotomic branching in the case of HPV-31 to star phylogenies of the other three types. No clear similarities between these types or between these types and HPV-16 exist. While variant branches in some types were specific for Europe, Africa, or East Asia, none of the four trees

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells: viral shedding and cell contact-mediated infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asin, Susana N; Wildt-Perinic, Dunja; Mason, Sarah I; Howell, Alexandra L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-15

    We examined the mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells to gain a clearer understanding of the events by which HIV-1 infects cells within the female reproductive tract. We demonstrated that these cells can be productively infected by HIV-1 and that infection is associated with viral RNA reverse transcription, DNA transcription, and secretion of infectious virus. Levels of viral DNA and secreted virus decreased gradually after infection. Moreover, virus released by the uterine epithelial cells shortly after infection was able to infect human T cell lines, but virus released later did not. In contrast, human CD4(+) T cell lines were infected after cocultivation with epithelial cells at both early and late stages of infection. These data demonstrated that HIV-1 infects human epithelial cells of upper reproductive tract origin and that productive viral infection of epithelial cells may be an important mechanism of transmission of HIV-1 infection in women.

  1. Characterization of human endothelial cell urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor protein and messenger RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnathan, E S; Kuo, A; Karikó, K

    1990-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC) express receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). The immunochemical nature of this receptor and its relationship to u-PA receptors expressed by other cell types is unknown. Cross-linking active site-blocked u-PA to HUVEC...

  2. Human autologous and allogeneic rosettes with erythrocytes of the Bombay type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J M; Bigel, P; Mayer, S

    1977-06-01

    Human red blood cells of the Bombay type which lack ABH group substances can bind to allogeneic lymphocytes just as well as erythrocytes of any other type. A much lower percentage of auto-rosettes between erythrocytes and lymphocytes from the Bombay donor was observed, a result which may be due at least partially to some T lymphocyte defect in the Bombay donor.

  3. Pancreatic duct replication is increased with obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A E; Galasso, R; Matveyenko, A; Rizza, R A; Dry, S; Butler, P C

    2010-01-01

    In a high-fat-fed rat model of type 2 diabetes we noted increased exocrine duct replication. This is a predisposing factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both of which are more common in type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study reported here was to establish if obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication in humans. We obtained pancreas at autopsy from 45 humans, divided into four groups: lean (BMI obese (BMI >27 kg/m(2)); non-diabetic; and with type 2 diabetes. Pancreases were evaluated after immunostaining for the duct cell marker cytokeratin and Ki67 for replication. We show for the first time that both obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication. Specifically, we report that (1) replication of pancreatic duct cells is increased tenfold by obesity, and (2) lean subjects with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a fourfold increase in replication of pancreatic duct cells compared with their lean non-diabetic controls. Pancreatic duct cell replication is increased in humans in response to both obesity and type 2 diabetes, potentially providing a mechanism for the increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in those with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes.

  4. Regional variations of cell surface carbohydrates in human oral stratified epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedtofte, P; Dabelsteen, Erik; Hakomori, S

    1984-01-01

    such as non-keratinized, parakeratinized, and orthokeratinized stratified squamous epithelium. The material included buccal and palatal epithelium from 20 persons with blood group A or O, gingival, and alveolar epithelium from 10 persons with blood group A or B, and buccal metaplastically keratinized......-acetyllactosamine by murine monoclonal antibodies. Each antigen showed a similar staining pattern in buccal and alveolar epithelium (non-keratinized) which differed considerably from that seen in palatal and gingival epithelium (ortho- and parakeratinized). The expression of blood group antigens A or B and the precursor...... antigen H type 2 chains in metaplastically keratinized buccal epithelium was found to differ significantly from that seen in normal non-keratinized buccal epithelium. The regional variations demonstrated in cell surface carbohydrates are suggested to reflect differences in tissue differentiation....

  5. Cross-linked natural gum resins, when inserted in shampooing product, result infallible to eliminate several metallic ions risky for hair keratin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martini Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims of my research is to herald the method of eliminating Calcium and Magnesium ions that remain onto hair and scalp keratin after washing with common hard water and trivial shampooing products, but even of removing other metals as Lead, Silicon and Nickel ions which can be retrieved in manifold building materials like mortar, cement, concrete, pozzolans, limestone and asbest, most of workers throughout the world are directly involved with, because of their continuous contact with those chemical materials. I have selected twelve volunteers (workers who are directly in contact with building materials containing Calcium and Magnesium ions and prayed them to use three types of shampooing products of my invention (containing special gum resins previously cross-linked in order to uptake or sorption the metallic ions after having used, in precedence, trivial shampoos (bought at the same store and used the same tap water, since they live all in the same town. I calculated the difference of quantities of Magnesium and Calcium that remain onto hair and scalp keratin, using a general and trivial shampoo respect to my products, apt to remove the same metallic ions. Results are satisfactory and encouraging.

  6. C-type natriuretic-derived peptides as biomarkers in human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    The natriuretic peptide system comprises three structurally related peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide. In circulation, they play an important endocrine role in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis by maintaining blood pressure...... and extracellular fluid volume. Atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide have gained considerable diagnostic interest as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease. By contrast, C-type natriuretic peptide has not yet been ascribed a role in human diagnostics. This perspective aims at recapitulating...... the present biochemical and clinical issues concerning C-type natriuretic peptide measurement in plasma as a potential biomarker....

  7. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 13 from focal epithelial hyperplasia Heck lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Pfister, H.; Hettich, I; Runne, U.; Gissmann, L; Chilf, G N

    1983-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia Heck lesions of a Turkish patient were shown to contain papillomavirus-specific DNA, which was molecularly cloned into bacteriophage lambda. It proved to be related to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 6 DNA and HPV type 11 DNA. Reassociation kinetics revealed a cross-hybridization of 4 and 3%, respectively. There was no cross-reactivity with HPV type 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, or 10. This papillomavirus type will be referred to as HPV type 13. The DNA was characterized by c...

  8. Clinical evaluation of a collagen matrix to enhance the width of keratinized gingiva around dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kang-Ho; Kim, Byung-Ock; Jang, Hyun-Seon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of collagen matrix with apically positioned flap (APF) on the width of keratinized gingiva, comparing to the results of APF only and APF combined with free gingival graft (FGG) at the second implant surgery. Methods Nine patients were selected from those who had received treatments at the Department of Periodontics, Chosun University Dental Hospital, Gwangju, Korea. We performed APF, APF combined with FGG, and APF combined with coll...

  9. Microspectroscopic soft X-ray analysis of keratin based biofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späth, Andreas; Meyer, Markus; Semmler, Sonja; Fink, Rainer H

    2015-03-01

    Scanning soft X-ray transmission microspectroscopy (STXM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been employed for a high-resolution morphological and chemical analysis of hair fibers from human, sheep and alpaca. STXM allows optimum contrast imaging of the main hair building blocks due to tuneable photon energy. Chemical similarities and deviations for the human hair building blocks as well as for the three investigated species are discussed on the basis of the local near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The spectra of melanosomes corroborate the state-of-the-art model for the chemical structure of eumelanin. Complementary TEM micrographs reveal the occurrence of cortex sectioning in alpaca hair to some extent. A spectroscopic analysis for human hair cortex indicates low mass loss upon soft X-ray irradiation, but transformation of chemical species with decreasing amount of peptide bonds and increasing NEXAFS signal for unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds.

  10. Methylene Blue Doped Films of Wool Keratin with Antimicrobial Photodynamic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluigi, Annalisa; Sotgiu, Giovanna; Torreggiani, Armida; Guerrini, Andrea; Orlandi, Viviana T; Corticelli, Franco; Varchi, Greta

    2015-08-12

    In this work, keratin films doped with different amounts of methylene blue (MB) were developed in order to prepare new biodegradable and biocompatible materials for tissue engineering and wound healing, able to exert antimicrobial photodynamic activity upon irradiation with visible light. Preliminary results indicated that the swelling ratio, as well as the MB release, increases by increasing the pH. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and singlet oxygen can be easily triggered and controlled by a fine-tuning of the irradiation time and MB concentration in the films. As concerns the photodynamic effects on keratin, the ROS attack does not induce any significant photodegradation on the protein, even if a slight photo-oxidation of sulfonated amino acids occurs. Finally, the film with the highest MB concentration (400 μg per gram of keratin) displays a significant photobactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus with a bacterial reduction that increases by increasing the irradiation time. In particular, the irradiation of KFMB400 film incubated with S. aureus at a concentration of 10(8) cfu mL(-1) determined the 99.9% killing rate and the killing effect increased proportionally with irradiation time.

  11. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical detection of keratins and extracellular matrix proteins in lizard skin cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Polazzi, Elisabetta

    2012-04-01

    The present study shows the localization of epidermal and dermal proteins produced in lizard skin cultivated in vitro. Cells from the skin have been cultured for up to one month to detect the expression of keratins, actin, vimentin and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, elastin and collagen I). Keratinocytes and dermal cells weakly immunoreact for Pan-Cytokeratin but not with the K17-antibody at the beginning of the cell culture when numerous keratin bundles are present in keratinocyte cytoplasm. The dense keratin network disappears after 7-12 days in culture, and K17 becomes detectable in both keratinocytes and mesenchymal cells isolated from the dermis. While most epidermal cells are lost after 2 weeks of in vitro cultivation dermal cells proliferate and form a pellicle of variable thickness made of 3-8 cell layers. The fibroblasts of this dermal equivalent produces an extracellular matrix containing chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, collagen I, elastic fibers and fibronectin, explaining the attachment of the pellicle to the substratum. The study indicates that after improving keratinocyte survival a skin equivalent for lizard epidermis would be feasible as a useful tool to analyze the influence of the dermis on the process of epidermal differentiation and the control of the shedding cycle in squamates.

  12. Keratin 9 gene mutations in five Korean families with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Heung; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Lee, Cha-Hui; Youn, Seong-Jae; Kim, Jong-Wook; Lee, Dong-Youn; Lee, Eil-Soo; Steinert, Peter M; Yang, Jun-Mo

    2003-12-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized clinically by localized palmoplantar thickening and histopathologically by granular degeneration of the epidermis. Recent molecular biological studies have revealed that EPPK is caused by mutations of the keratin 9 gene in sequences mainly encoding the highly conserved 1 A rod domain. Here we demonstrate a novel mutation of N160H (position 8 of the 1 A domain) and two other previously reported mutations, R162W and N160S, in five unrelated Korean families with EPPK. The three-dimensional structure of the 1 A domain of the related vimentin intermediate filament protein chain is now known. Based on its likely similarity to the keratin 9 chain, we predict that inappropriate amino acid substitutions in position 10 of 1 A will likely interfere with coiled-coil dimer stability, and those in position 8 will interfere with tetramer stability. Accordingly, these mutations compromise the structural integrity of the keratin intermediate filaments leading to the pathology of EPPK.

  13. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence and association of lipids and keratin in adhesive gecko setae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Lipid and protein aggregates are one of the fundamental materials of biological systems. Examples include cell membranes, insect cuticle, vertebrate epidermis, feathers, hair and adhesive structures known as ‘setae’ on gecko toes. Until recently gecko setae were assumed to be composed entirely of keratin, but analysis of footprints left behind by geckos walking on surfaces revealed that setae include various kinds of lipids. However, the arrangement and molecular-level behavior of lipids and keratin in the setae is still not known. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to confirm the presence of lipids and investigate their association with keratin in ‘pristine' sheds, or natural molts of the adhesive toe pad and non-adhesive regions of the skin. Analysis was also carried on the sheds after they were ‘delipidized’ to remove surface lipids. Our results show a distribution of similar lipids in both the skin and toe shed but with different dynamics at a molecular level. The present study can help us understand the gecko system both biologically and for design of synthetic adhesives, but the findings may be relevant to the characteristics of lipid-protein interactions in other biological systems. PMID:25902194

  14. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K;

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis...

  15. Comparison of virulence factors and capsular types of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from human and bovine infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaneini, Mohammad; Khoramian, Babak; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Abani, Samira; Dabiri, Hossein; Beigverdi, Reza

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a leading cause of human and bovine infections. A total of 194 S. agalactiae isolates, 55 isolates from bovines and 139 from humans, were analyzed for capsular types, virulence genes (scpB, hly, rib, bca and bac) and mobile genetic elements (IS1548 and GBSi1) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex PCR. Capsular type III was predominant (61%), followed by types V, II, Ib, and IV. The scpB, hly, bca and bac virulence genes were only found among human isolates. Twelve and 2 distinct virulence gene profiles were identified among human and bovine isolates respectively. The virulence gene profiles scpB- hly- IS1548- rib-bca (51%) and scpB- hly- IS1548- bca (19%) were only predominant among human isolates. The rib gene was the most common virulence gene in both human and bovine isolates. The study showed a high prevalence of virulence genes in S. agalactiae strains isolated from human infections, these result can support the idea that S. agalactiae isolated from humans and bovines are generally unrelated and probably belonged to separate populations.

  16. Investigating the origins of nanostructural variations in differential ethnic hair types using X-ray scattering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, M; Tucker, I; Cunningham, P; Skinner, R; Bell, F; Lyons, T; Patten, K; Gonzalez, L; Wess, T

    2013-10-01

    Human hair is a major determinant of visual ethnic differentiation. Although hair types are celebrated as part of our ethnic diversity, the approach to hair care has made the assumption that hair types are structurally and chemically similar. Although this is clearly not the case at the macroscopic level, the intervention of many hair treatments is at the nanoscopic and molecular levels. The purpose of the work presented here is to identify the main nanoscopic and molecular hierarchical differences across five different ethnic hair types from hair fibres taken exclusively from the scalp. These are Afro (subdivided into elastic 'rubber' and softer non-elastic 'soft'), Chinese, European and Mullato (mixed race). Small angle X-Ray scattering (SAXS) is a technique capable of resolving nanostructural variations in complex materials. Individual hair fibres from different ethnic hair types were used to investigate structural features found in common and also specific to each type. Simultaneous wide angle X-Ray scattering (WAXS) was used to analyse the submolecular level structure of the fibrous keratin present. The data sets from both techniques were analysed with principal component analysis (PCA) to identify underlying variables. Principal component analysis of both SAXS and WAXS data was shown to discriminate the scattering signal between different hair types. The X-ray scattering results show a common underlying keratin intermediate filament (KIF) structure. However, distinct differences were observed in the preferential orientation and intensity signal from the lipid component of the hair. In addition, differences were observed in the intensity distribution of the very low-angle sample-dependent diffuse scatter surrounding the 'beamstop.' The results indicate that the fibrous keratin scaffold remains consistent between ethnic hair types. The hierarchies made by these may be modulated by variation in the content of keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) and lipids that

  17. Cultivating New-type Farmers Based on the Theory of Human Resources Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Under the direction of theory of human resources development,this thesis analyzes the impact of rural human resources development oncultivating new-type farmers.Firstly,it increases the input of rural basic education;secondly,it reinforces the vocational education and technologytraining;thirdly,it promotes the rural medical and public health services;fourthly,it quickens the rural labor transfer.The status quo of China’s ruralhuman resources has been analyzed as follows:in terms of the quantity of rural human resources,the status quo is large and quick-developed baseof rural human resources,high labor participatory rate,and constitution of low age;in terms of the quality of rural human resources,the status quois the ubiquitous low quality of rural human resources,low technological level of rural human resources,and overall low physical quality of farmers;in terms of the structure of rural human resources,the status quo is the irrational industrial structure distribution and imbalanced regional structuredistribution.The thesis also discusses the edification of theory of human resources development in cultivating new-type farmers.First,in terms ofthe control over quantity of rural human resources,it is to keep the stability of family planning policy,and expedite the transfer of rural surplus la-bor;second,in terms of promoting the quality of rural human resources,it is to bolster the development of reserve rural labor force resources,toconstruct the adult educational training system with Chinese characteristics,and to build rural primary health care system;third,in terms of adjus-ting the structure of rural human resources,it is to perfect rural human resources market,and adjust rural economical structure and talents struc-ture.

  18. MMP-12 catalytic domain recognizes and cleaves at multiple sites in human skin collagen type I and type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddese, Samuel; Jung, Michael C; Ihling, Christian; Heinz, Andrea; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2010-04-01

    Collagens of either soft connective or mineralized tissues are subject to continuous remodeling and turnover. Undesired cleavage can be the result of an imbalance between proteases and their inhibitors. Owing to their superhelical structure, collagens are resistant to many proteases and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are required to initiate further degradation by other enzymes. Several MMPs are known to degrade collagens, but the action of MMP-12 has not yet been studied in detail. In this work, the potential of MMP-12 in recognizing sites in human skin collagen types I and III has been investigated. The catalytic domain of MMP-12 binds to the triple helix and cleaves the typical sites -Gly(775)-Leu(776)- in alpha-2 type I collagen and -Gly(775)-Ile(776)- in alpha-1 type I and type III collagens and at multiple other sites in both collagen types. Moreover, it was observed that the region around these typical sites contains comparatively less prolines, of which some have been proven to be only partially hydroxylated. This is of relevance since partial hydroxylation in the vicinity of a potential scissile bond may have a local effect on the conformational thermodynamics with probable consequences on the collagenolysis process. Taken together, the results of the present work confirm that the catalytic domain of MMP-12 alone binds and degrades collagens I and III. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Herpes Virus Type 2 (HSV2), Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the Male Genital Tract and Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Courtot Anne Marie; Pallier Coralie; Testart Jacques

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of infection of the human male genital tract by human herpes virus type 2 (HSV2) or human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is well established and their sexual transmission has been the object of many studies. Moreover, medically assisted procreation, which helps in numerous fertility problems, raises the question of new viral risks linked to the application of these new technologies. In this review, we shall consider current knowledge in terms of the presence of HSV2 and HCMV in the different parts of the genital tract of immunocompetent or immunodepressed men. We shall also consider the possibility of viral transmission by the sexual act or by the various techniques used in medically assisted procreation. We shall describe studies in human beings and in animals.

  20. DENV inhibits type I IFN production in infected cells by cleaving human STING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Aguirre

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a pathogen with a high impact on human health. It replicates in a wide range of cells involved in the immune response. To efficiently infect humans, DENV must evade or inhibit fundamental elements of the innate immune system, namely the type I interferon response. DENV circumvents the host immune response by expressing proteins that antagonize the cellular innate immunity. We have recently documented the inhibition of type I IFN production by the proteolytic activity of DENV NS2B3 protease complex in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. In the present report we identify the human adaptor molecule STING as a target of the NS2B3 protease complex. We characterize the mechanism of inhibition of type I IFN production in primary human MDDCs by this viral factor. Using different human and mouse primary cells lacking STING, we show enhanced DENV replication. Conversely, mutated versions of STING that cannot be cleaved by the DENV NS2B3 protease induced higher levels of type I IFN after infection with DENV. Additionally, we show that DENV NS2B3 is not able to degrade the mouse version of STING, a phenomenon that severely restricts the replication of DENV in mouse cells, suggesting that STING plays a key role in the inhibition of DENV infection and spread in mice.

  1. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiki Matsuda; Keita Sugiura; Takashi Hashimoto; Akane Ueda; Yoshihiro Konno; Yoshiyuki Tatsumi

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeat...

  2. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiki Matsuda; Keita Sugiura; Takashi Hashimoto; Akane Ueda; Yoshihiro Konno; Yoshiyuki Tatsumi

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeat...

  3. Arsenite suppression of BMP signaling in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Marjorie A.; Qin, Qin [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States); Hu, Qin; Zhao, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Rice, Robert H., E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Arsenic, a human skin carcinogen, suppresses differentiation of cultured keratinocytes. Exploring the mechanism of this suppression revealed that BMP-6 greatly increased levels of mRNA for keratins 1 and 10, two of the earliest differentiation markers expressed, a process prevented by co-treatment with arsenite. BMP also stimulated, and arsenite suppressed, mRNA for FOXN1, an important transcription factor driving early keratinocyte differentiation. Keratin mRNAs increased slowly after BMP-6 addition, suggesting they are indirect transcriptional targets. Inhibition of Notch1 activation blocked BMP induction of keratins 1 and 10, while FOXN1 induction was largely unaffected. Supporting a requirement for Notch1 signaling in keratin induction, BMP increased levels of activated Notch1, which was blocked by arsenite. BMP also greatly decreased active ERK, while co-treatment with arsenite maintained active ERK. Inhibition of ERK signaling mimicked BMP by inducing keratin and FOXN1 mRNAs and by increasing active Notch1, effects blocked by arsenite. Of 6 dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) targeting ERK, two were induced by BMP unless prevented by simultaneous exposure to arsenite and EGF. Knockdown of DUSP2 or DUSP14 using shRNAs greatly reduced FOXN1 and keratins 1 and 10 mRNA levels and their induction by BMP. Knockdown also decreased activated Notch1, keratin 1 and keratin 10 protein levels, both in the presence and absence of BMP. Thus, one of the earliest effects of BMP is induction of DUSPs, which increases FOXN1 transcription factor and activates Notch1, both required for keratin gene expression. Arsenite prevents this cascade by maintaining ERK signaling, at least in part by suppressing DUSP expression. - Highlights: • BMP induces FOXN1 transcription. • BMP induces DUSP2 and DUSP14, suppressing ERK activation. • Arsenite suppresses levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5 and FOXN1 and DUSP mRNA. • These actions rationalize arsenite suppression of keratinocyte

  4. Atomistic modeling of a KRT35/KRT85 keratin dimer: folding in aqueous solution and unfolding under tensile load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchstein, Patrick; Clark, Tim; Zahn, Dirk

    2015-09-14

    We present an atomistic model of a full KRT35/KRT85 dimer, a fundamental building block of human hair. For both monomers initial structures were generated using empirical tools based on homology considerations, followed by the formulation of a naiïve dimer model from docking the monomers in vacuum. Relaxation in aqueous solution was then explored from molecular dynamics simulation. Driven by hydrophobic segregation and protein-protein hydrogen bonding relaxation dynamics result in a folded dimer arrangement which shows a striking encounter of cystein groups. Our simulations hence suggests that (i) cystein groups in the coil regions of keratin are well suited to establish disulfide bonds between the two monomers that constitute the dimer, and (ii) the particularly large number of cystein groups in the head and tail regions promotes the connection of dimers to establish meso- to macroscale fibers. Moreover, we show the molecular mechanisms of elastic and plastic deformation under tensile load. Upon elongation beyond the elastic regime, unfolding was identified as the exposure of hydrophobic moieties and the breaking of protein-protein hydrogen bonds. Therein, the step-wise character of the series of unfolding events leads to a broad regime of constant force in response to further elongation.

  5. Types I and III procollagen extension peptides in serum respond to fracture in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Jensen, L T; Andersen, G R

    1992-01-01

    Markers of types I and III collagen turnover were measured in serial blood samples in 16 patients with a Colles' fracture. The collagen markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP......). Significant increases were found of PIIINP within 1 week and of PICP within 2 weeks. This sequential appearance of PIIINP and PICP was found to be in agreement with the appearance of types III and I collagen during early fracture healing as demonstrated in previous animal experimental studies. PICP had...... prove relevant as non-invasive markers of normal and pathological fracture healing in humans....

  6. Millicurrent stimulation of human articular chondrocytes cultivated in a collagen type-I gel and of human osteochondral explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silny Jiri

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we investigate the effect of millicurrent treatment on human chondrocytes cultivated in a collagen gel matrix and on human osteochondral explants. Methods Human chondrocytes from osteoarthritic knee joints were enzymatically released and transferred into a collagen type-I gel. Osteochondral explants and cell-seeded gel samples were cultivated in-vitro for three weeks. Samples of the verum groups were stimulated every two days by millicurrent treatment (3 mA, sinusoidal signal of 312 Hz amplitude modulated by two super-imposed signals of 0.28 Hz, while control samples remained unaffected. After recovery, collagen type-I, type-II, aggrecan, interleukin-1β, IL-6, TNFα and MMP13 were examined by immunohistochemistry and by real time PCR. Results With regard to the immunostainings 3 D gel samples and osteochondral explants did not show any differences between treatment and control group. The expression of all investigated genes of the 3 D gel samples was elevated following millicurrent treatment. While osteochondral explant gene expression of col-I, col-II and Il-1β was nearly unaffected, aggrecan gene expression was elevated. Following millicurrent treatment, IL-6, TNFα, and MMP13 gene expression decreased. In general, the standard deviations of the gene expression data were high, resulting in rarely significant results. Conclusions We conclude that millicurrent stimulation of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes cultivated in a 3 D collagen gel and of osteochondral explants directly influences cell metabolism.

  7. Growth and characterization of different human rhinovirus C types in three-dimensional human airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapparel, Caroline, E-mail: Caroline.Tapparel@hcuge.ch [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Sobo, Komla [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Constant, Samuel; Huang, Song [Epithelix sárl, 14 Chemin des Aulx, 1228 Plan les Ouates, Geneva (Switzerland); Van Belle, Sandra; Kaiser, Laurent [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    New molecular diagnostic tools have recently allowed the discovery of human rhinovirus species C (HRV-C) that may be overrepresented in children with lower respiratory tract complications. Unlike HRV-A and HRV-B, HRV-C cannot be propagated in conventional immortalized cell lines and their biological properties have been difficult to study. Recent studies have described the successful amplification of HRV-C15, HRV-C11, and HRV-C41 in sinus mucosal organ cultures and in fully differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Consistent with these studies, we report that a panel of clinical HRV-C specimens including HRV-C2, HRV-C7, HRV-C12, HRV-C15, and HRV-C29 types were all capable of mediating productive infection in reconstituted 3D human primary upper airway epithelial tissues and that the virions enter and exit preferentially through the apical surface. Similar to HRV-A and HRV-B, our data support the acid sensitivity of HRV-C. We observed also that the optimum temperature requirement during HRV-C growth may be type-dependent. - Highlights: • A 3D human upper airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro supports HRV-C growth. • HRV-Cs enter and exit preferentially at the apical side of this ALI culture system. • HRV-Cs are acid sensitive. • Temperature sensitivity may be type-dependent for HRV-Cs.

  8. Dynamics and associations of microbial community types across the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Schloss, Patrick D

    2014-05-15

    A primary goal of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) was to provide a reference collection of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences collected from sites across the human body that would allow microbiologists to better associate changes in the microbiome with changes in health. The HMP Consortium has reported the structure and function of the human microbiome in 300 healthy adults at 18 body sites from a single time point. Using additional data collected over the course of 12-18 months, we used Dirichlet multinomial mixture models to partition the data into community types for each body site and made three important observations. First, there were strong associations between whether individuals had been breastfed as an infant, their gender, and their level of education with their community types at several body sites. Second, although the specific taxonomic compositions of the oral and gut microbiomes were different, the community types observed at these sites were predictive of each other. Finally, over the course of the sampling period, the community types from sites within the oral cavity were the least stable, whereas those in the vagina and gut were the most stable. Our results demonstrate that even with the considerable intra- and interpersonal variation in the human microbiome, this variation can be partitioned into community types that are predictive of each other and are probably the result of life-history characteristics. Understanding the diversity of community types and the mechanisms that result in an individual having a particular type or changing types, will allow us to use their community types to assess disease risk and to personalize therapies.

  9. High seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in French human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréoletti, Laurent; Piednoir, Emmanuel; Legoff, Jérôme; Brodard, Véronique; Beguinot, Isabelle; Strady, Christophe; Rouger, Christine; Piketty, Christophe; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Kazatchkine, Michel Daniel; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Using commercially available herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-specific serological diagnostic tests, HSV type 2 (HSV-2) antibody prevalence was assessed in two parallel prospective studies including 534 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected outpatients living in two areas of northern France. In the first cohort of 434 subjects, 223 (51%) individuals demonstrated a positive HSV-2 serological status while 66 (66%) of 100 subjects in the second cohort were seropositive for HSV-2 (51 versus 66%; P = 0.08). Among the 223 HSV-2-seropositive subjects identified in the first study cohort, only 22 (10%) had suffered from recurrent anogenital lesions during the past 12 months while 154 (69%) had no clinical history of herpesvirus infection. Our findings demonstrate high proportions of subclinical and undiagnosed HSV-2 infection in HIV-1-infected individuals and suggest that HSV type-specific serological testing in the French HIV-1-infected subpopulation could be an efficient strategy to diagnose clinically asymptomatic HSV-2 infections.

  10. Natural variation of the nef gene in human immunodeficiency virus type 2 infections in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Pádua, E.; Jenkins, A.; S. Brown; Bootman, J.; Paixão, M T; Almond, N; Berry, N

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infections cause severe immunodeficiency in humans, although HIV-2 is associated frequently with reduced virulence and pathogenicity compared to HIV-1. Genetic determinants that play a role in HIV pathogenesis are relatively poorly understood but nef has been implicated in inducing a more pathogenic phenotype in vivo. However, relatively little is known about the role of nef in HIV-2 pathogenesis. To address this, the genetic composition of 44 nef a...

  11. Interaction of human dipeptidyl peptidase IV and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 transcription transactivator in Sf9 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reutter Werner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV also known as the T cell activation marker CD26 is a multifunctional protein which is involved in various biological processes. The association of human-DPPIV with components of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV1 is well documented and raised some discussions. Several reports implicated the interaction of human-DPPIV with the HIV1 transcription transactivator protein (HIV1-Tat and the inhibition of the dipeptidyl peptidase activity of DPPIV by the HIV1-Tat protein. Furthermore, enzyme kinetic data implied another binding site for the HIV1-Tat other than the active centre of DPPIV. However, the biological significance of this interaction of the HIV1-Tat protein and human-DPPIV has not been studied, yet. Therefore, we focused on the interaction of HIV1-Tat protein with DPPIV and investigated the subsequent biological consequences of this interaction in Spodoptera frugiperda cells, using the BAC-TO-BAC baculovirus system. Results The HIV1-Tat protein (Tat-BRU co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with human-DPPIV protein, following co-expression in the baculovirus-driven Sf9 cell expression system. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of DPPIV protein was up-regulated in Tat/DPPIV-co-expressing cells after 72 h culturing and also in DPPIV-expressing Sf9 cells after application of purified recombinant Tat protein. As opposed to the expression of Tat alone, serine phosphorylation of the Tat protein was decreased when co-expressed with human-DPPIV protein. Conclusions We show for the first time that human-DPPIV and HIV1-Tat co-immunoprecipitate. Furthermore, our findings indicate that the interaction of HIV1-Tat and human-DPPIV may be involved in signalling platforms that regulate the biological function of both human-DPPIV and HIV1-Tat.

  12. Efficient induction of cross-presentating human B cell by transduction with human adenovirus type 7 vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Lai, Meimei; Lou, Yunyan; Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Huiyan; Zheng, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Although human autologous B cells represent a promising alternative to dendritic cells (DCs) for easy large-scale preparation, the naive human B cells are always poor at antigen presentation. The safe and effective usage record of human adenovirus type 7 (HAdV7) live vaccines makes it attractive as a promising vaccine vector candidate. To investigate whether HAdV7 vector could be used to induce the human B cells cross-presentation, in the present study, we constructed the E3-defective recombinant HAdV7 vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We demonstrated that naive human B cells can efficiently be transduced, and that the MAPKs/NF-κB pathway can be activated by recombinant HAdV7. We proved that cytokine TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, surface molecule MHC class I and the CD86, antigen-processing machinery (APM) compounds ERp57, TAP-1, and TAP-2. were upregulated in HAdV7 transduced human B cells. We also found that CEA-specific IFNγ expression, degranulation, and in vitro and ex vivo cytotoxicities are induced in autologous CD8(+) T cells presensitized by HAd7CEA modified human B cells. Meanwhile, our evidences clearly show that Toll-like receptors 9 (TLR9) antagonist IRS 869 significantly eliminated most of the HAdV7 initiated B cell activation and CD8(+) T cells response, supporting the role and contribution of TLR9 signaling in HAdV7 induced human B cell cross-presentation. Besides a better understanding of the interactions between recombinant HAdV7 and human naive B cells, to our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence to support the use of HAdV7-modified B cells as a vehicle for vaccines and immunotherapy.

  13. Fiber type and metabolic characteristics of lion (Panthera leo), caracal (Caracal caracal) and human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Tertius Abraham; Burroughs, Richard; Hartman, Marthinus Jacobus; Noakes, Timothy David

    2011-06-01

    Lion (Panthera leo) and caracal (Caracal caracal) skeletal muscle samples from Vastus lateralis, Longissimus dorsi and Gluteus medius were analyzed for fiber type and citrate synthase (CS; EC 2.3.3.1), 3-hydroxyacyl Co A dehydrogenase (3HAD; EC 1.1.1.35), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK; EC 2.7.1.11), creatine kinase (CK; EC 2.7.3.2), phosphorylase (PHOS; EC 2.4.1.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) activities and compared to human runners, the latter also serving as validation of methodology. Both felids had predominantly type IIx fibers (range 50-80%), whereas human muscle had more types I and IIa. Oxidative capacity of both felids (CS: 5-9 μmol/min/g ww and 3HAD: 1.4-2.6 μmol/min/g ww) was lower than humans, whereas the glycolytic capacity was elevated. LDH activity of caracal (346 ± 81) was higher than lion (227 ± 62 μmol/min/g ww), with human being the lowest (55 ± 17). CK and PHOS activities were also higher in caracal and lion compared to human, but PFK was lower in both felid species. The current data and past research are illustrated graphically showing a strong relationship between type II fibers and sprinting ability in various species. These data on caracal and lion muscles confirm their sprinting behavior.

  14. Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadja; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J;

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between metabolic diseases and bacterial populations in the gut. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between the composition of the intestinal microbiota in humans with type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic persons as control...... to control metabolic diseases by modifying the gut microbiota....... = 0.04). Conclusions The results of this study indicate that type 2 diabetes in humans is associated with compositional changes in intestinal microbiota. The level of glucose tolerance should be considered when linking microbiota with metabolic diseases such as obesity and developing strategies...

  15. Multilocus sequence types of Finnish bovine Campylobacter jejuni isolates and their attribution to human infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corander Jukka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is the most common bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the sporadic nature of infection, sources often remain unknown. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST has been successfully applied to population genetics of Campylobacter jejuni and mathematical modelling can be applied to the sequence data. Here, we analysed the population structure of a total of 250 Finnish C. jejuni isolates from bovines, poultry meat and humans collected in 2003 using a combination of Bayesian clustering (BAPS software and phylogenetic analysis. Results In the first phase we analysed sequence types (STs of 102 Finnish bovine C. jejuni isolates by MLST and found a high diversity totalling 50 STs of which nearly half were novel. In the second phase we included MLST data from domestic human isolates as well as poultry C. jejuni isolates from the same time period. Between the human and bovine isolates we found an overlap of 72.2%, while 69% of the human isolates were overlapping with the chicken isolates. In the BAPS analysis 44.3% of the human isolates were found in bovine-associated BAPS clusters and 45.4% of the human isolates were found in the poultry-associated BAPS cluster. BAPS reflected the phylogeny of our data very well. Conclusions These findings suggest that bovines and poultry were equally important as reservoirs for human C. jejuni infections in Finland in 2003. Our results differ from those obtained in other countries where poultry has been identified as the most important source for human infections. The low prevalence of C. jejuni in poultry flocks in Finland could explain the lower attribution of human infection to poultry. Of the human isolates 10.3% were found in clusters not associated with any host which warrants further investigation, with particular focus on waterborne transmission routes and companion animals.

  16. Internal structural changes in keratin fibres resulting from combined hair waving and stress relaxation treatments: a Raman spectroscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of our research was to investigate the influence of chemical treatments (reduction, stress relaxation and oxidation) on hair keratin fibres. The structure of cross-sections at various depths of virgin white human hair resulting from permanent waving treatments with stress relaxation process was directly analysed at a molecular level using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the three disulphide (-SS-) conformations in human hair were compared by S-S band analysis. The gauche-gauche-gauche (GGG) and gauche-gauche-trans (GGT) contents of -SS- groups remarkably decreased, while the trans-gauche-trans (TGT) content was not changed by performing the reduction process with thioglycolic acid. In addition, the high-temperature stress relaxation process after reduction accelerated the disconnection of -SS- (GGG and GGT) groups in the human hair, while the low-temperature stress relaxation process after reduction accelerated the reconnection of -SS- (GGG and GGT) groups. Moreover, the S-O band intensity at 1042 cm(-1) , assigned to cysteic acid, existing in the cuticle region and the surface of the cortex region increased, while the GGG content significantly decreased by performing the oxidation process after the reduction and the high-temperature stress relaxation processes. The author concluded that the high-temperature relaxation process after reduction accelerated the disconnection of -SS- (GGG and GGT) groups, thereby leading to the remarkable local molecular disorganization (an increase in the cysteic acid content and a decrease in the GGG content) on the cuticle and cortex cells during the oxidation process. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  17. Functional analysis of the Tat trans activator of human immunodeficiency virus type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Fenrick, R; Malim, M H; Hauber, J; Le, S.Y.; Maizel, J; Cullen, B R

    1989-01-01

    The trans-activator (Tat) proteins of the related but distinct type 1 and type 2 human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) display incomplete functional reciprocity. One possible explanation of this observation, suggested by computer analysis of potential RNA secondary structures within the viral trans-activation response (TAR) elements, is that HIV-2 Tat requires the presentation of two viral RNA stem-loop sequences for full activity whereas HIV-1 Tat is maximally active upon presenta...

  18. Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect the fate of glucose in the human heart

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Linda R.; Herrero, Pilar; Coggan, Andrew R.; Kisrieva-Ware, Zulia; Saeed, Ibrahim; Dence, Carmen; Koudelis, Deborah; McGill, Janet B.; Lyons, Matthew R.; Novak, Eric; Dávila-Román, Víctor G.; Waggoner, Alan D.; Gropler, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect myocardial glucose uptake and utilization. However, their effect on the intramyocellular fate of glucose in humans has been unknown. How the heart uses glucose is important, because it affects energy production and oxygen efficiency, which in turn affect heart function and adaptability. We hypothesized that type 2 diabetes, sex difference, and obesity affect myocardial glucose oxidation, glycolysis, and glycogen production. In a first-in-hum...

  19. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 66 from an invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    Tawheed, A R; Beaudenon, S; Favre, M.; Orth, G

    1991-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences coexisting with HPV16 and HPV45 were cloned from an invasive cervical carcinoma. The cloned HPV was shown to be a novel type, named HPV66, and is related to HPV56 (an HPV detected in cervical cancer). After screening 160 anogenital biopsies, four specimens exhibited histological features of intraepithelial neoplasia and contained HPV66 sequences. Of these, three were found to be associated with another HPV type.

  20. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  1. Detection of human papillomavirus types in balanitis xerotica obliterans and other penile conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16 and 18 in foreskin biopsies from patients with balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) and other penile conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS--Foreskin biopsy specimens from 24 patients with penile lesions and 5 control patients were analysed by type-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS--HPV6 or HPV16 were not detected in patients with BXO. HPV6 was detected in 2 controls. CONCLUSIONS--Genital papilloma...

  2. Simultaneous detection, typing and quantitation of oncogenic human papillomavirus by multiplex consensus real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Andrew; Allum, Anne-Gry; Strand, Linda; Aakre, Randi Kersten

    2013-02-01

    A consensus multiplex real-time PCR test (PT13-RT) for the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and 66 is described. The test targets the L1 gene. Analytical sensitivity is between 4 and 400 GU (genomic units) in the presence of 500 ng of human DNA, corresponding to 75,000 human cells. HPV types are grouped into multiplex groups of 3 or 4 resulting in the use of 4 wells per sample and permitting up to 24 samples per run (including controls) in a standard 96-well real-time PCR instrument. False negative results are avoided by (a) measuring sample DNA concentration to control that sufficient cellular material is present and (b) including HPV type 6 as a homologous internal control in order to detect PCR inhibition or competition from other (non-oncogenic) HPV types. Analysis time from refrigerator to report is 8 h, including 2.5 h hands-on time. Relative to the HC2 test, the sensitivity and specificity were respectively 98% and 83%, the lower specificity being attributable to the higher analytical sensitivity of PT13-RT. To assess type determination comparison was made with a reversed line-blot test. Type concordance was high (κ=0.79) with discrepancies occurring mostly in multiple-positive samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinico-histopathologic and outcome features of cutaneous infundibular keratinizing acanthoma: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavasoly, Abbas; Gholami, Hossein; Rostami, Amir; Anissian, Ali; Touni, Seyed Rashid; Khaleghian, Pooyan; Mokarizadeh, Aram; Javanbakht, Javad; Nasoori, Alireza

    2014-06-03

    The infundibular keratinizing acanthoma (IKA) is a rare epithelial benign keratin-containing neoplasm of hair follicles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the defining histopathologic architecture of IKA. A typical IKA consisted of a keratin-filled crypt in the dermis and subcutis that opened to the skin surface. Most of this tumor occurred on the back, neck, head, and the shoulders. Microscopically, the dermal nodules were focally contiguous in both the dermis and subcutis. Furthermore, most histological lesions are consistent with a simple or multiloculated cyst filled with keratin and lined by a wall of stratified squamous epithelium; keratin appears as a concentric lamellar mass, with a keratotic pearly aspect. Histological examination of the cutaneous lesions revealed that the growths were comprised of IKA. IKA of man and dog were compared, and it was concluded that although they are similar in many respects, they are not identical entities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the prevalence of IKAs among the population of owned dogs in Iran.

  4. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... memoranda entitled ``Revised Recommendations for the Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus...

  5. Effects of human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 oncoproteins on the expression of involucrin in human keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyöngyösi Eszter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human papillomavirus (HPV life cycle is closely linked to keratinocyte differentiation. Oncogenic HPV infection has been shown to hamper the normal differentiation of keratinocytes; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are yet to be clarified. Here, we aimed to study the effects of HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes on the expression of involucrin (IVL, an established marker of keratinocyte differentiation, in human foreskin keratinocyte (HFK cells. Results The differentiation of HFK cells by serum and high calcium significantly increased both the mRNA and the protein levels of IVL. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV16 together caused strong down-regulation of IVL mRNA and protein both in proliferating and in differentiating HFK cells. To study the effects of HPV oncogenes on the IVL promoter, we made transient transfection assays and luciferase tests and found that HPV 16 E6 but not E7 repressed IVL promoter activity in proliferating HFK cells. The inhibitory effect of HPV 16 E6 on the human IVL promoter could be localised to the proximal regulatory region (PRR of the gene. Conclusions These results suggest that the down-regulation of IVL promoter activity by HPV 16 E6 significantly contribute to the inhibition of endogenous IVL expression by the HPV 16 oncoproteins. In contrast, the down-regulation of endogenous IVL expression by HPV16 E7 is probably not caused by a direct and specific effect of E7 on the IVL promoter.

  6. Role of PUFAs, the precursors of endocannabinoids, in human obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Alejandro; Repossi, Gaston; Das, Undurti N; Eynard, Aldo Renato

    2010-06-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) serve as precursors of the endocannabinoids (ECs) that are bioactive lipids molecules. Recent studies revealed that ECs participate in several physiological and pathological processes including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we review the experimental and clinical aspects of the role of endocannabinoids in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus and the modification of the endocannabinoids by exogenously administered PUFAs. Based on these evidences, we propose that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) can be modulated by exogenous manipulation of PUFAs that could help in the prevention and management of human diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Franco M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV. Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types.

  8. Two amino acid residues confer type specificity to a neutralizing, conformationally dependent epitope on human papillomavirus type 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludmerer, S W; Benincasa, D; Mark, G E

    1996-01-01

    Characterization of virus binding by neutralizing antibodies is important both in understanding early events in viral infectivity and in development of vaccines. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV11) have been described, but mapping the binding site has been difficult because of the conformational nature of key type-specific neutralization epitopes on the L1 coat protein. We have determined those residues of the L1 protein of HPV11 which confer type specificity to the binding of HPV11-neutralizing MAbs. Binding of three HPV11-specific neutralizing MAbs could be redirected to HPV6 L1 virus-like particles in which as few as two substitutions of corresponding amino acid residues from HPV11 L1 have been made, thus demonstrating the importance of these residues to MAb binding through the transfer of a conformationally dependent epitope. In addition, a fourth neutralizing MAb could be distinguished from the other neutralizing MAbs in terms of the amino acid residues which affect binding, suggesting the possibility that it neutralizes HPV11 through a different mechanism. PMID:8676509

  9. Modeling deamidation in sheep α-keratin peptides and application to archeological wool textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solazzo, Caroline; Wilson, Julie; Dyer, Jolon M; Clerens, Stefan; Plowman, Jeffrey E; von Holstein, Isabella; Walton Rogers, Penelope; Peacock, Elizabeth E; Collins, Matthew J

    2014-01-07

    Deamidation of glutamine (Q) and asparagine (N) has been recognized as a marker of degradation and aging in ancient proteins. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) to study deamidation in wool textiles, we identified eight peptides from α-keratin proteins in sheep wool that could potentially be used to assess the level of degradation. For each chosen peptide, the extent of deamidation was determined by comparing the calculated theoretical distribution with the measured distribution using a genetic algorithm that gives the best fit to the measured distribution. Variations in the levels of deamidation were observed between peptides and in modern wool samples buried for up to 8 years in which deamidation levels were relatively low under short-term burial. In contrast, deamidation was higher in archeological textile fragments from medieval sites ranging from the 9th to 13th century in York (United Kingdom) and Newcastle (United Kingdom) and from the 13th to 16th century in Reykholt (Iceland). Major differences were observed between the British and the Icelandic samples, showing a negative correlation between age of samples and levels of deamidation, but highlighting the effect of local environment. In addition, nanoscale liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS) data indicated that deamidation in wool's α-keratin was influenced by primary and higher-order structures. Predominance of deamidation on glutamine rather than asparagine in the archeological samples was attributed to a higher abundance of Q in the α-helical core domain of keratins, neighboring residues and steric hindrance preventing deamidation of N.

  10. Epidemiology of drug use in Perugia (Italy through the analysis of the Keratin Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Mercurio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Drugs and their metabolites can be incorporated into hair so hair testing has become s an alternative and complementary method to assess the extent of drugs abuse. The aim of our study has been to use hair samples to rebuild the epidemiology of illicit substances use  in Perugia. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from May to July 2012 asking hairdressers of Perugia to collect hair samples and to compile a schedule for each one. The samples were analyzed in laboratory: the extraction of basic substances was performed adding methanol; the extraction of acid substances was obtained adding  NAOH.  After derivatization, 1μl of each solution was analyzed through gas chromatography / mass spectrometry The data were  organized in a database and processed using R version 3.2.2. Results We collected 238 samples. The most detected drugs were: THC-TMS identified in 15 samples, MDMA in 9, Beg-TMS in 8. There is a statistically significant difference in drug use between centre (23,36% and periphery (5,34%. Age and sex have not represented influencing factors. The substance with the highest concentration in the keratin matrix is ketamine (9834,86 ng/100 mg of hair. Conclusions The use of keratin matrix offers high advantages in the toxicological analysis compared to conventional biological matrices and let us analyze the situation in Perugia where the increased market of drugs caused constant rise of drug addiction. However, because of the limits of this method, only the simultaneous use of keratin matrix and other traditional indicators, could furnish more precise information.

  11. A new method for high yield purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M. van den; Koornneef, I.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1988-01-01

    A new method was developed for the purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets. This method is a three-step procedure including gel filtration, weak cation exchange HPLC and reverse phase HPLC. All steps are carried out at low pH using exclusively volatile acidic buffer

  12. GENOTYPING HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE-16 ISOLATES FROM PERSISTENTLY INFECTED PROMISCUOUS INDIVIDUALS AND CERVICAL NEOPLASIA PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBELKUM, A; JUFFERMANS, L; SCHRAUWEN, L; VANDOORNUM, G; BURGER, M; QUINT, W

    1995-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence variation in the noncoding region of the genome of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was determined by direct sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of DNA fragments amplified by PCR. Individuals of diverse sexual promiscuity and/or cervicopathology we

  13. Genotyping human papillomavirus type 16 isolates from persistently infected promiscuous individuals and cervical neoplasia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); L. Juffermans (Leon); L. Schrauwen (Lianne); M. Burger; G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard); W.G.V. Quint (Wim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide sequence variation in the noncoding region of the genome of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was determined by direct sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of DNA fragments amplified by PCR. Individuals of diverse sex

  14. Patterns of cervical coinfection with multiple human papilloma virus types in a screening population in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Bryan; Rebolj, Matejka; Rygaard, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection suggest that HPV genotypes are not independent of each other. This may be explained by risk factors common to all HPV infections, but type-specific biological factors may also play a role. This raises the question of whether widespread use...

  15. Determination of markers for collagen type I turnover in peritendinous human tissue by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J L; Langberg, Henning; Heinemeier, K M

    2006-01-01

    Previous results from our group have shown that loading of human tendon elevates tendinous type I collagen production measured by microdialysis. However, exclusion of the observed elevation as a response to trauma from inserting the microdialysis catheters or a possible influence from the collagen...

  16. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  17. The early noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 16 is regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Kristiansen, Karen; Durand, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    All human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) early mRNAs are polyadenylated at the poly(A) signal within the early 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). The 3'end of the early E5 open reading frame and the 3'UTR of HPV-16 is very AU-rich, with five regions similar to cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (...

  18. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  19. Simple mucin-type carbohydrates in normal and malignant human endometrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Mandel, U; Svenstrup, B

    1995-01-01

    The simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens, Tn, sialosyl-Tn, and T, are tumor-associated antigens of adenocarcinomas. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the expression of Tn, sialosyl-Tn (s-Tn), T, and sialosyl-T (s-T) antigens in normal nonsecretory, early gestational, and malignant human end...

  20. Identification and characterization of the human type II collagen gene (COL2A1).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S.E. Cheah (Kathryn); N.G. Stoker; J.R. Griffin; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Solomon

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe gene contained in the human cosmid clone CosHcol1, previously designated an alpha 1(I) collagen-like gene, has now been identified. CosHcol1 hybridizes strongly to a single 5.9-kilobase mRNA species present only in tissue in which type II collagen is expressed. DNA sequence analysis

  1. Ultrastructural immunolocalization of alpha-keratins and associated beta-proteins (beta-keratins) suggests a new interpretation on the process of hard and soft cornification in turtle epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, L

    2013-01-01

    The epidermis of soft-shelled and hard-shelled turtles has been compared to determine the origin of the different cornification. Immunolocalization of acidic alpha-keratin (AK2) of 45-50 kDa in tonofilaments of the epidermis in Apalone spinifera and absence in the corneous layer where desquamating corneocytes are present supports the biochemical data. Corneocytes shows a weak to absent immunolabeling for beta-proteins (formerly beta-keratins) of 14-16 kDa while sparse immunolabeled corneous granules are seen in the pre-corneous layer. In the hard-shelled turtle Pseudemys nelsonii differentiating corneocytes contain small level of acidic alpha-keratin while beta-proteins of 10-17 kDa form dense aggregates of corneous material among tonofilaments. Corneocytes do not desquamate but remain tightly connected determining an increase in thickness of the corneous layer that becomes mechanically stiff and resistant. Since both species possess beta-proteins in shelled and non-shelled areas of the epidermis the difference in hardness of the corneous layer is not due to the alternation between beta-keratin versus alpha-keratin. Mechanical resilience of the corneous layer derives from the accumulation of alpha-keratins, beta- and likely of other proteins in corneocytes of the shell in hard-shelled turtles. In the softer epidermis of hard-shelled turtles and in the soft-shelled turtle a more rapid and continuous turnover of corneocytes is present and no accumulation of beta-proteins and corneocytes takes place. It is hypothesized that the dermis derived from the carapacial ridge during development remains localized underneath the shell epidermis in hard-shelled turtles and influences the formation of the hard corneous epidermis.

  2. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution in cervical glandular neoplasias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holl, Katsiaryna; Nowakowski, Andrzej M; Powell, Ned

    2015-01-01

    : 0%). The most common HPV types were restricted to HPV16/18/45, accounting for 98.3% of all HPV-positive ADC. There were variations in HPV prevalence and ADC type-distribution by country. Age at diagnosis differed by ADC subtype, with usual-type diagnosed in younger women (median: 43 years) compared...... to rarer subtypes (medians between 57 and 66 years). Moreover, HPV-positive ADC cases were younger than HPV-negative ADC. The six years difference in median age for women with AIS compared to those with usual-type ADC suggests that cytological screening for AIS may be suboptimal. Since the great majority......Cervical glandular neoplasias (CGN) present a challenge for cervical cancer prevention due to their complex histopathology and difficulties in detecting preinvasive stages with current screening practices. Reports of human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type-distribution in CGN vary, providing...

  3. Identification of multiple HPV types on spermatozoa from human sperm donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Larsen, Peter B; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV...... contain HPV, most of them of high-risk types binding to the equatorial segment of the sperm cell. Most HPV-positive sperm showed decreased staining with DAPI, indicative of reduced content of DNA. Our data demonstrate that oncogenic HPV types are frequent in men....... according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of 35 types of HPV was examined on DNA from semen samples of 188 Danish sperm donors using a sensitive...

  4. Expression of 5α-Reductase Type 2 Gene in Human Testis, Epididymis and Vas Deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德瑜; 吴燕婉; 罗宏志; 张桂元

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To study the expression pattern of 5α-reductase type 2 gene in human malereproductive organsMethods The expression level of 5α-reductase type 2 gene inhuman testis, epididymisand vas deferens tissues was determined by in situ hybridization using Digoxin labeled5α-reductase type 2 cRNA probe.Results The brown granules of hybridizing signals distributed in the cytoplasm ofSertoli and Leydig cells of the testis, the principle cells of epididymis and the epithe-lial cells of vas deferens, but there was no positive signal in the nuclei of above-men-tioned cells. No positive signal was observed in germ cells, basement of the testis,interstium of epididymis and basement, as well as smooth muscle of vas deferens.Conclusion This study confirmed that the 5α-reductase type 2 gene expressed in Ser-toli, Leydig cells of the testis, and the principle cells of epididymis. The expressionpattern of the gene in these cells in human was similar to that of rat and monkey. Thepresence of 5a-reductase type 2 gene in epithelial cells of the vas deferens suggested itmight possess an important physiological role in human reproduction.

  5. Type I collagen synthesis and degradation in peritendinous tissue after exercise determined by microdialysis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D; Petersen, L J;

    1999-01-01

    1. Physical activity is known to increase type I collagen synthesis measured as the concentration of biomarkers in plasma. By the use of microdialysis catheters with a very high molecular mass cut-off value (3000 kDa) we aimed to determine local type I collagen synthesis and degradation...... in the peritendinous region by measuring interstitial concentrations of a collagen propeptide (PICP; 100 kDa) and a collagen degradation product (ICTP; 9 kDa) as well as an inflammatory mediator (PGE2). 2. Seven trained human runners were studied before and after (2 and 72 h) 3 h of running (36 km). Two microdialysis...... catheters were placed in the peritendinous space ventral to the Achilles' tendon under ultrasound guidance and perfused with a Ringer-acetate solution containing 3H-labelled human type IV collagen and [15-3H(N)]PGE2 for in vivo recovery determination. Relative recovery was 37-59 % (range of the s...

  6. Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadja; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between metabolic diseases and bacterial populations in the gut. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between the composition of the intestinal microbiota in humans with type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic persons as control....... Methods and Findings The study included 36 male adults with a broad range of age and body-mass indices (BMIs), among which 18 subjects were diagnosed with diabetes type 2. The fecal bacterial composition was investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and in a subgroup of subjects (N = 20) by tag...... = 0.04). Conclusions The results of this study indicate that type 2 diabetes in humans is associated with compositional changes in intestinal microbiota. The level of glucose tolerance should be considered when linking microbiota with metabolic diseases such as obesity and developing strategies...

  7. Bioinformatics Analysis of the Human Surfaceome Reveals New Targets for a Variety of Tumor Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 10 to 20% of all genes in the human genome encode cell surface proteins and due to their subcellular localization these proteins represent excellent targets for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. Therefore, a precise characterization of the surfaceome set in different types of tumor is needed. Using TCGA data from 15 different tumor types and a new method to identify cancer genes, the S-score, we identified several potential therapeutic targets within the surfaceome set. This allowed us to expand a previous analysis from us and provided a clear characterization of the human surfaceome in the tumor landscape. Moreover, we present evidence that a three-gene set—WNT5A, CNGA2, and IGSF9B—can be used as a signature associated with shorter survival in breast cancer patients. The data made available here will help the community to develop more efficient diagnostic and therapeutic tools for a variety of tumor types.

  8. Pleomorphic adenoma with extensive squamous metaplasia and keratin cyst formations in minor salivary gland: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOULART, Maria Carolina Vaz; FREITAS-FARIA, Patrícia; GOULART, Gláuter Rodrigues; de OLIVEIRA, Adriano Macedo; CARLOS-BREGNI, Roman; SOARES, Cleverson Teixeira; LARA, Vanessa Soares

    2011-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (PA), the most common salivary gland tumor, accounts for 54 to 65% of all salivary gland neoplasias and 80% of the benign salivary gland tumors. It most frequently affects the parotid gland, followed by the submandibular and the minor salivary glands. Microscopically, mucous, sebaceous, oncocytic and squamous metaplasia, sometimes with the formation of keratin pearls, may be present, but the latter rarely results in the formation of extensive keratin-filled cysts lined by squamous epithelium. Extensive squamous metaplasia can be mistaken for malignancy, including mucoepidermoid carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Here, we present an unusual case of PA with extensive squamous metaplasia and keratin cyst formations in a minor salivary gland, and discuss its microscopic features, including the immunohistochemical characteristics, and differential diagnosis of this uncommon presentation. PMID:21552721

  9. Identification of the keratin K9 R162W mutation in patients of Italian origin with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrinoni, Alessandro; Cocuroccia, Barbara; Gubinelli, Emanuela; Zambruno, Giovanna; Candi, Eleonora; Melino, Gerry; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2004-01-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles associated with histologic findings of hyperkeratosis and epidermolysis. Ultrastructurally, there is vacuolization of the cytoplasm and abnormal keratin filament network with tonofilament clumping. EPPK is caused by mutations in the keratin 9 gene (KRT9), which is expressed exclusively in suprabasal keratinocytes of palmoplantar epidermis. The mutation R162W is the most frequent keratin 9 alteration reported in patients from different geographical areas. We present three unrelated Italian families affected by EPPK in which we confirmed the presence of the R162W mutation, by RT-PCR analysis followed by sequencing of the KRT9 gene, in all affected members. The finding of the same mutation in all patients, together with the previous reports of the disease, strongly suggest that position 162 of the KRT9 gene represents a mutation "hot-spot", probably due to the peculiarity of the sequence.

  10. Evaluation of a porcine collagen matrix used to augment keratinized tissue and increase soft tissue thickness around existing dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallhorn, Rachel A; McClain, Pamela K; Charles, Allan; Clem, Donald; Newman, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Implant-supported prostheses often present with mucogingival deficiencies that may cause esthetic or hygienic issues. These issues may present as limited or no keratinized tissue, irregular soft tissue contour or concavity, and gray "showthrough" of the implant abutment and root forms. An interpositional soft tissue graft substitute that generates keratinized tissue and increases soft tissue thickness would be beneficial, as it would reduce donor site morbidity and be available in unlimited, off-the-shelf supply. Thirty patients were assessed as part of a multicenter, practice-based evaluation of the material. A xenogeneic collagen matrix was placed as an interpositional graft on the buccal aspect of implant sites; sites were reassessed at 6 months posttreatment. Results indicated that the collagen matrix increased tissue thickness and keratinized tissue around existing dental implants.

  11. Type I collagen as an extracellular matrix for the in vitro growth of human small intestinal epithelium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jabaji, Ziyad; Brinkley, Garrett J; Khalil, Hassan A; Sears, Connie M; Lei, Nan Ye; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y

    2014-01-01

    .... There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells...

  12. Type I Collagen as an Extracellular Matrix for the In Vitro Growth of Human Small Intestinal Epithelium: e107814

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ziyad Jabaji; Garrett J Brinkley; Hassan A Khalil; Connie M Sears; Nan Ye Lei; Michael Lewis; Matthias Stelzner; Martín G Martín; James C Y Dunn

    2014-01-01

    .... There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells...

  13. Type-dependent association between risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and viral load of oncogenic human papillomavirus types other than types 16 and 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu Xi, Long; Schiffman, Mark; Ke, Yang; Hughes, James P; Galloway, Denise A; He, Zhonghu; Hulbert, Ayaka; Winer, Rachel L; Koutsky, Laura A; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2017-04-15

    Studies of the clinical relevance of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA load have focused mainly on HPV16 and HPV18. Data on other oncogenic types are rare. Study subjects were women enrolled in the atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) triage study who had ≥1 of 11 non-HPV16/18 oncogenic types detected during a 2-year follow-up at 6-month intervals. Viral load measurements were performed on the first type-specific HPV-positive specimens. The association of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (CIN2/3) with type-specific HPV DNA load was assessed with discrete-time Cox regression. Overall, the increase in the cumulative risk of CIN2/3 per 1 unit increase in log10 -transformed viral load was statistically significant for four types within species 9 including HPV31 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR adjusted ] = 1.32: 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-1.52), HPV35 (HR adjusted  = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.23-1.76), HPV52 (HR adjusted  = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.01-1.30) and HPV58 (HR adjusted  = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.23-1.82). The association was marginally significant for HPV33 (species 9) and HPV45 (species 7) and was not appreciable for other types. The per 1 log10 -unit increase in viral load of a group of species 9 non-HPV16 oncogenic types was statistically significantly associated with risk of CIN2/3 for women with a cytologic diagnosis of within normal limits, ASC-US, or LSIL at the first HPV-positive visit but not for those with high-grade SIL. Findings suggest that the viral load-associated risk of CIN2/3 is type-dependent, and mainly restricted to the species of HPV types related to HPV16, which shares this association. © 2017 UICC.

  14. Human T-Lymphotropic virus (HTLV type I in vivo integration in oral keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha C Domínguez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the infection of HTLV-1 to cell components of the mouth have been previously reported, there was not until this report, a detailed study to show the characteristics of such infection. From 14 Tropical Spastic Paraparesis/ HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy (HAM/TSP patients and 11 asymptomatic carrier individuals (AC coming from HTLV-1 endemic areas of southwest Pacific of Colombia, infected oral mucosa cells were primary cultured during five days. These cell cultures were immunophenotyped by dual color fluorescence cell assortment using different lymphocyte CD markers and also were immunohistochemically processed using a polyclonal anti-keratin antibody. Five days old primary cultures were characterized as oral keratinocytes, whose phenotype was CD3- /CD4-/CD8-/CD19-/CD14-/CD45-/A575-keratin+. From DNA extracted of primary cultures LTR, pol, env and tax HTLV-1 proviral DNA regions were differentially amplified by PCR showing proviral integration. Using poly A+ RNA obtained of these primary cultures, we amplify by RT-PCR cDNA of tax and pol in 57.14% (8/14 HAM/TSP patients and 27.28% (3/11 AC. Tax and pol poly A+ RNA were expressed only in those sIgA positive subjects. Our results showed that proviral integration and viral gene expression in oral keratinocytes are associated with a HTLV-1 specific local mucosal immune response only in those HTLV-1 infected individuals with detectable levels of sIgA in their oral fluids. Altogether the results gave strong evidence that oral mucosa infection would be parte of the systemic spreading of HTLV-1 infection.

  15. Limited transmission of bla(CTX-M-9)-type-positive Escherichia coli between humans and poultry in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Shuhei; Ngan, Bui Thi Kim; Huong, Bui Thi Mai; Hirai, Itaru; Tuyen, Le Danh; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether Escherichia coli isolates that produce CTX-M-9-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) are transferred between humans and chickens in a Vietnamese community. The phylogenetic group compositions, sequence types, antimicrobial resistance profiles, the prevalence of plasmid antibiotic resistance genes, and the plasmid replicon types generally differed between the human and chicken E. coli isolates. Our results suggest that transmission of the bla(CTX-M-9)-positive E. coli between humans and poultry was limited.

  16. Growth and characterization of different human rhinovirus C types in three-dimensional human airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapparel, Caroline; Sobo, Komla; Constant, Samuel; Huang, Song; Van Belle, Sandra; Kaiser, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    New molecular diagnostic tools have recently allowed the discovery of human rhinovirus species C (HRV-C) that may be overrepresented in children with lower respiratory tract complications. Unlike HRV-A and HRV-B, HRV-C cannot be propagated in conventional immortalized cell lines and their biological properties have been difficult to study. Recent studies have described the successful amplification of HRV-C15, HRV-C11, and HRV-C41 in sinus mucosal organ cultures and in fully differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Consistent with these studies, we report that a panel of clinical HRV-C specimens including HRV-C2, HRV-C7, HRV-C12, HRV-C15, and HRV-C29 types were all capable of mediating productive infection in reconstituted 3D human primary upper airway epithelial tissues and that the virions enter and exit preferentially through the apical surface. Similar to HRV-A and HRV-B, our data support the acid sensitivity of HRV-C. We observed also that the optimum temperature requirement during HRV-C growth may be type-dependent.

  17. Fiber type composition and maximum shortening velocity of muscles crossing the human shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R C; Lungren, M P; Langenderfer, J E; Hughes, R E

    2007-03-01

    A study of the fiber type composition of fourteen muscles spanning the human glenohumeral joint was carried out with the purpose of determining the contribution of fiber types to overall muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and to estimate the maximum shortening velocity (V(max)) of those muscles. Muscle biopsies were procured from 4 male cadavers (mean age 50) within 24 hr of death, snap frozen, mounted, and transversely sectioned (10 microm). Slides were stained for myofibrillar ATPase after alkaline preincubation. Photoimages were taken of defined areas (100 fibers) using the Bioquant system, and fiber type and CSA were measured from these images. Staining for mATPase produced three different fiber types: slow-oxidative (SO), fast-oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), and fast-glycolytic (FG). On average, the muscle fiber type composition ranged from 22 to 40% of FG, from 17 to 51% of FOG, and from 23 to 56% of SO. Twelve out of the 14 muscles had average SO proportions ranging from 35 to 50%. V(max) was calculated from the fiber type contribution relative to CSA and shortening velocity values taken from the literature. The maximum velocities of shortening presented here provide a physiological basis for the development of human shoulder musculoskeletal models suitable for predicting muscle forces for functionally relevant tasks encompassing conditions of muscle shortening and lengthening.

  18. The nasal mucosa contains a large spectrum of human papillomavirus types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslund, Ola; Johansson, Hanna; Madsen, Klaus Gregaard;

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera are common at cutaneous sites. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of these HPV types in oral and nasal samples....

  19. A comparative study between mixed-type tumours from human salivary and canine mammary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Sérgio V

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparative pathology, canine mammary tumours have special interest because of their similarities with human breast cancer. Mixed tumours are uncommon lesions in the human breast, but they are found most frequently in the mammary gland of the female dogs and in the human salivary glands. The aim of the study was to compare clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical features of human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours, in order to evaluate the latter as an experimental model for salivary gland tumours. Methods Ten examples of each mixed tumour type (human pleomorphic adenoma and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas and canine mixed tumour and metaplastic carcinoma were evaluated. First, clinical and morphologic aspects of benign and malignant variants were compared between the species. Then, streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of cytokeratins, vimentin, p63 protein, estrogen receptor, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Results After standardization, similar age and site distributions were observed in human and canine tumours. Histological similarities were identified in the comparison of the benign lesions as well. Metaplastic carcinomas also resembled general aspects of carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas in morphological evaluation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining further presented similar antigenic expression between lesions. Conclusion There are many similar features between human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours. This observation is of great relevance for those interested in the study and management of salivary gland tumours, since canine lesions may constitute useful comparative models for their investigations.

  20. Seven Types of Ambiguity in Evaluating the Impact of Humanities Provision in Undergraduate Medicine Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan

    2015-12-01

    Inclusion of the humanities in undergraduate medicine curricula remains controversial. Skeptics have placed the burden of proof of effectiveness upon the shoulders of advocates, but this may lead to pursuing measurement of the immeasurable, deflecting attention away from the more pressing task of defining what we mean by the humanities in medicine. While humanities input can offer a fundamental critical counterweight to a potentially reductive biomedical science education, a new wave of thinking suggests that the kinds of arts and humanities currently used in medical education are neither radical nor critical enough to have a deep effect on students' learning and may need to be reformulated. The humanities can certainly educate for tolerance of ambiguity as a basis to learning democratic habits for contemporary team-based clinical work. William Empson's 'seven types of ambiguity' model for analyzing poetry is transposed to medical education to: (a) formulate seven values proffered by the humanities for improving medical education; (b) offer seven ways of measuring impact of medical humanities provision, thereby reducing ambiguity; and

  1. Human APOBEC3 induced mutation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 contributes to adaptation and evolution in natural infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human APOBEC3 proteins are cytidine deaminases that contribute broadly to innate immunity through the control of exogenous retrovirus replication and endogenous retroelement retrotransposition. As an intrinsic antiretroviral defense mechanism, APOBEC3 proteins induce extensive guanosine-to-adenosine (G-to-A mutagenesis and inhibit synthesis of nascent human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1 cDNA. Human APOBEC3 proteins have additionally been proposed to induce infrequent, potentially non-lethal G-to-A mutations that make subtle contributions to sequence diversification of the viral genome and adaptation though acquisition of beneficial mutations. Using single-cycle HIV-1 infections in culture and highly parallel DNA sequencing, we defined trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H. We then compared these APOBEC3 editing contexts with the patterns of G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 DNA in cells obtained sequentially from ten patients with primary HIV-1 infection. Viral substitutions were highest in the preferred trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for the APOBEC3 deaminases. Consistent with the effects of immune selection, amino acid changes accumulated at the APOBEC3 editing contexts located within human leukocyte antigen (HLA-appropriate epitopes that are known or predicted to enable peptide binding. Thus, APOBEC3 activity may induce mutations that influence the genetic diversity and adaptation of the HIV-1 population in natural infection.

  2. Training-induced changes in peritendinous type I collagen turnover determined by microdialysis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Rosendal, L; Kjaer, M

    2001-01-01

    1. Acute exercise is found to increase collagen type I formation locally in peritendinous connective tissue of the Achilles' tendon in humans, as determined from changes in interstitial concentrations of collagen propeptide (PICP) and a collagen degradation product (ICTP) by the use of microdialy...... in local connective tissue of the peritendinous Achilles' region. Early in the process both synthesis and degradation are elevated, whereas later, the anabolic processes are dominating causing a net synthesis of type I collagen in tendon-related tissue in humans.......1. Acute exercise is found to increase collagen type I formation locally in peritendinous connective tissue of the Achilles' tendon in humans, as determined from changes in interstitial concentrations of collagen propeptide (PICP) and a collagen degradation product (ICTP) by the use...... of microdialysis catheters. However, the local collagen type I turnover response to training is unknown. 2. Nineteen young males were studied before and after 4 and 11 weeks of physical training. Microdialysis catheters with a high molecular mass cut-off value (3000 kDa), allowing the determination of PICP...

  3. The human P-glycoprotein transporter enhances the type I interferon response to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Nadejda; Kaplan Zeevi, Millie; Weinstein, Shiri; Peer, Dan; Herskovits, Anat A

    2015-06-01

    Human multidrug efflux transporters are known for their ability to extrude antibiotics and toxic compounds out of cells, yet accumulating data indicate they have additional functions in diverse physiological processes not related to drug efflux. Here, we show that the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (also named MDR1 and ABCB1) is transcriptionally induced in the monocytic cell line THP-1 upon infection with the human intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Notably, we found that P-gp is important for full activation of the type I interferon response elicited against L. monocytogenes bacteria. Both inhibition of P-gp function by verapamil and inhibition of its transcription using mRNA silencing led to a reduction in the magnitude of the type I response in infected cells. This function of P-gp was specific to type I interferon cytokines elicited against cytosolic replicating bacteria and was not observed in response to cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a molecule that was shown to be secreted by L. monocytogenes during infection and to trigger type I interferons. Moreover, P-gp was not involved in activation of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as those triggered by vacuolar-restricted L. monocytogenes or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for P-gp in proper development of an innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, highlighting the complexity in employing therapeutic strategies that involve inhibition of multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps.

  4. Identification of human nonpancreatic-type ribonuclease by antibodies obtained against a synthetic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, M I; Cuchillo, C M; Nogués, M V

    1995-09-01

    An antibody that recognizes human nonpancreatic-type ribonuclease was obtained by immunizing a rabbit with a 14-residue synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal sequence of eosinophil-derived neurotoxin which is identical to human liver ribonuclease. This amino acid sequence is unique to this protein. The anti N-peptide antibody was purified by protein A-Sepharose and by using ELISA and SDS-PAGE immunoblot techniques, the antibody reactivity against EDN and partially purified nonpancreatic-type ribonucleases from human plasma and urine was observed. Cross-reactivity with bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A and other proteins was not detected. In addition, the activity of the nonpancreatic-type ribonuclease was not affected by the antibody. The immune response was elicited without the need for a carrier protein showing that the N-terminal sequence of nonpancreatic ribonuclease contains a specific epitope. This antibody can be used for the immunological identification of both the native and denatured forms of this type of enzyme.

  5. Increased pachyonychia congenita severity in patients with concurrent keratin and filaggrin mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, R; Wilson, N J; Smith, F J D; Grabher, D; Steinwender, L; Fritsch, P O; Schmuth, M

    2009-12-01

    Pachyonychia congenita (PC), a rare autosomal-dominant keratin disorder caused by mutations in keratin genes KRT6A/B, KRT16 or KRT17, is characterized by painful plantar keratoderma and hypertrophic nail dystrophy. Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene underlie the most prevalent skin disorder of cornification, ichthyosis vulgaris (IV), which presents with generalized scaling and is also associated with atopic dermatitis. Recently, FLG mutations have been reported to increase phenotype severity of X-linked ichthyosis and alopecia areata. We report a parent-child trio in which the mother and the son have PC and the father has IV. Both the mother and the son are carriers for the KRT16 mutation p.Leu132Pro. The son, who is much more severely affected than his mother, in addition carries the heterozygous FLG mutation p.R2447X, which was inherited from the father. This observation suggests that coinheritance of mutations in KRT16 and FLG may aggravate the PC phenotype and that FLG could serve as a genetic modifier in PC.

  6. keratinized nuptial spines are used for male combat in the emei moustache toad (leptobrachium boringii)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    we describe the natural history and reproductive behaviour of the emei moustache toad (leptobrachium boringii)with an emphasis on the development of keratinized nuptial spines in males and document combat behaviour for the first time in this species.between february and march of 2011,19 female and 43 male l.boringii from mount emei unesco world heritage site,sichuan,china were observed throughout the breeding season.this species exhibits male-biased sexual size dimorphism (ssd)with limited evidence of paternal care (nest guarding by males).prior to the breeding season males grow 10-16 keratinized spines on their upper lip,which fall off once the season has ended.throughout the breeding season males construct and defend aquatic nests where they produce advertisement calls to attract females.during this time we documented 14 cases involving a total of 22 males where males used their moustaches for aggressive interaction.combat typically occurred at the beginning of the season when males would compete for a limited number of available nest sites.neither male body size,nor body condition significantly affects the outcome of an aggressive interaction,suggesting that size may not be the only factor influencing an individual's chance of victory.our evidence for male competition and aggression,along with observed paternal care are potential mechanisms to explain the evolution of male-biased ssd observed in this species.

  7. Peri-Implant Plastic Surgical Approaches to Increasing Keratinized Mucosa Width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltacıoğlu, Esra; Bağış, Bora; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Aydın, Güven; Yuva, Pınar; Korkmaz, Yavuz Tolga

    2015-06-01

    The long-term efficacy of adequate keratinized mucosa (>2 mm) in dental implants is controversial. Peri-implant plastic surgeries are currently used because they increase keratinized mucosa width (KMW), helping to regain peri-implant health and maintaining it over the long-term. We present the clinical findings using free-gingival-graft (FGG) and free-periosteal-graft (FPG) techniques in peri-implant plastic surgery for implant rehabilitation patients. We included 20 patients with implant indications of inadequate KMW (KMW FGG or FPG techniques would be used was made. FGG/FPG was performed pre-implantation (before monocortical block-bone augmentation) or postimplantation (before/during/after stage 2 surgery). KMW was ≥ 2 mm after application of FGG/FPG pre- or post-implantation. Moreover, peri-implant tissue health was regained/maintained in all cases from 6 months to 4 years. Peri-implant plastic surgery techniques can prevent hard- and soft-tissue problems after implant rehabilitation and during treatment of developing problems. However, surgical design and timing, and an interdisciplinary perspective determine the success of peri-implant plastic surgery.

  8. Colour-producing [beta]-keratin nanofibres in blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) feathers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D; Alba, Liliana; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Clarke, Julia A.; Vinther, Jakob A.; Prum, Richard O.; Shawkey, Matthew D. (Yale); (Akron); (Texas)

    2012-03-26

    The colours of living organisms are produced by the differential absorption of light by pigments (e.g. carotenoids, melanins) and/or by the physical interactions of light with biological nanostructures, referred to as structural colours. Only two fundamental morphologies of non-iridescent nanostructures are known in feathers, and recent work has proposed that they self-assemble by intracellular phase separation processes. Here, we report a new biophotonic nanostructure in the non-iridescent blue feather barbs of blue penguins (Eudyptula minor) composed of parallel {beta}-keratin nanofibres organized into densely packed bundles. Synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and two-dimensional Fourier analysis of electron micrographs of the barb nanostructure revealed short-range order in the organization of fibres at the appropriate size scale needed to produce the observed colour by coherent scattering. These two-dimensional quasi-ordered penguin nanostructures are convergent with similar arrays of parallel collagen fibres in avian and mammalian skin, but constitute a novel morphology for feathers. The identification of a new class of {beta}-keratin nanostructures adds significantly to the known mechanisms of colour production in birds and suggests additional complexity in their self-assembly.

  9. Composition of the Extracellular Matrix of Lymphatic Novel Threadlike Structures: Is It Keratin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyub Huh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The lumen of novel threadlike structures (NTSs is enclosed by a single layer of endothelial cells surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM. We hypothesized that collagen may be a component of the ECM associated with lymphatic NTSs. Methods. Six female New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized, and the NTS structures within lymphatic vessels were identified by contrast-enhanced stereomicroscopy or alcian blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens were stained with acridine orange, YOYO-1, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI. The structural and molecular composition of the ECM was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and proteomic analysis. Results. The lymph vessel wall was stained red by DiI, and rod-shaped nuclei were stained green by YOYO-1. The area surrounding the NTS was also stained red and contained green rod-shaped nuclei. TEM images showed that the NTS consisted of many ECM fibers and the ECM fibers appeared to be ~100 nm in diameter and had narrowly spaced striated bands. Proteomic analysis of the lymphatic NTS-associated ECM identified 4 proteins: keratin 10, cytokeratin 3, cytokeratin 12, and soluble adenylyl cyclase. Conclusion. The TEM study suggested that the lymphatic NTS-associated ECM did not contain collagen. This was confirmed by proteomic analysis, which showed that keratin was the major component of the ECM.

  10. An acellular dermal matrix allograft (Alloderm®) for increasing keratinized attached gingiva: A case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Chitra; Kumar, Baron Tarun; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Context: Adequate amount of keratinized gingiva is necessary to keep gingiva healthy and free of inflammation. Autografts have been used for years with great success to increase the width of attached gingiva. Autografts, however, have the disadvantage of increasing postoperative morbidity and improper color match with the adjacent tissues. Alloderm® allograft has been introduced as an alternative to autografts to overcome these disadvantages. Aim: In this study, the efficacy of alloderm® in increasing the width of attached gingiva and the stability of gained attached gingiva was evaluated clinically. Materials and Methods: Five patients with sites showing inadequate width of attached gingiva (≤1 mm) were enrolled for the study. The width of keratinized gingiva and other clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and 9th month postoperatively. Result: In all cases, there is the average increase of about 2.5 mm of attached gingiva and was maintained for 9-month. Percentage shrinkage of the graft is about 75% at the end of 3rd month in all cases. Excellent colors match with adjacent tissue has been obtained. Conclusion: The study signifies that Alloderm® results in an adequate increase in the amount of attached gingiva and therefore can be used successfully in place of autografts. PMID:26015676

  11. An acellular dermal matrix allograft (Alloderm ® for increasing keratinized attached gingiva: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Adequate amount of keratinized gingiva is necessary to keep gingiva healthy and free of infl ammation. Autografts have been used for years with great success to increase the width of attached gingiva. Autografts, however, have the disadvantage of increasing postoperative morbidity and improper color match with the adjacent tissues. Alloderm ® allograft has been introduced as an alternative to autografts to overcome these disadvantages. Aim: In this study, the efficacy of alloderm ® in increasing the width of attached gingiva and the stability of gained attached gingiva was evaluated clinically. Materials and Methods: Five patients with sites showing inadequate width of attached gingiva (≤1 mm were enrolled for the study. The width of keratinized gingiva and other clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and 9th month postoperatively. Result: In all cases, there is the average increase of about 2.5 mm of attached gingiva and was maintained for 9-month. Percentage shrinkage of the graft is about 75% at the end of 3 rd month in all cases. Excellent colors match with adjacent tissue has been obtained. Conclusion: The study signifi es that Alloderm ® results in an adequate increase in the amount of attached gingiva and therefore can be used successfully in place of autografts.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Methyl Cellulose/Keratin Hydrolysate Composite Membranes

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    Bernd M. Liebeck

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that aqueous keratin hydrolysate solutions can be produced from feathers using superheated water as solvent. This method is optimized in this study by varying the time and temperature of the heat treatment in order to obtain a high solute content in the solution. With the dissolved polypeptides, films are produced using methyl cellulose as supporting material. Thereby, novel composite membranes are produced from bio-waste. It is expected that these materials exhibit both protein and polysaccharide properties. The influence of the embedded keratin hydrolysates on the methyl cellulose structure is investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD. Adsorption peaks of both components are present in the spectra of the membranes, while the X-ray analysis shows that the polypeptides are incorporated into the semi-crystalline methyl cellulose structure. This behavior significantly influences the mechanical properties of the composite films as is shown by tensile tests. Since further processing steps, e.g., crosslinking, may involve a heat treatment, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA is applied to obtain information on the thermal stability of the composite materials.

  13. Differential decomposition of bacterial and viral fecal indicators in common human pollution types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjugi, Pauline; Sivaganesan, Mano; Korajkic, Asja; Kelty, Catherine A; McMinn, Brian; Ulrich, Robert; Harwood, Valerie J; Shanks, Orin C

    2016-11-15

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decomposition of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fecal pollution originating from fresh human feces, septage, and primary effluent sewage in a subtropical marine environment was assessed over a six day period with an emphasis on the influence of ambient sunlight and indigenous microbiota. Ambient water mixed with each fecal pollution type was placed in dialysis bags and incubated in situ in a submersible aquatic mesocosm. Genetic and cultivated fecal indicators including fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci, E. coli, and Bacteroidales), coliphage (somatic and F+), Bacteroides fragilis phage (GB-124), and human-associated genetic indicators (HF183/BacR287 and HumM2) were measured in each sample. Simple linear regression assessing treatment trends in each pollution type over time showed significant decay (p ≤ 0.05) in most treatments for feces and sewage (27/28 and 32/40, respectively), compared to septage (6/26). A two-way analysis of variance of log10 reduction values for sewage and feces experiments indicated that treatments differentially impact survival of cultivated bacteria, cultivated phage, and genetic indicators. Findings suggest that sunlight is critical for phage decay, and indigenous microbiota play a lesser role. For bacterial cultivated and genetic indicators, the influence of indigenous microbiota varied by pollution type. This study offers new insights on the decomposition of common human fecal pollution types in a subtropical marine environment with important implications for water quality management applications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Human type II pneumocyte chemotactic responses to CXCR3 activation are mediated by splice variant A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rong; Lee, Clement M; Gonzales, Linda W; Yang, Yi; Aksoy, Mark O; Wang, Ping; Brailoiu, Eugen; Dun, Nae; Hurford, Matthew T; Kelsen, Steven G

    2008-06-01

    Chemokine receptors control several fundamental cellular processes in both hematopoietic and structural cells, including directed cell movement, i.e., chemotaxis, cell differentiation, and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that CXCR3, the chemokine receptor expressed by Th1/Tc1 inflammatory cells present in the lung, is also expressed by human airway epithelial cells. In airway epithelial cells, activation of CXCR3 induces airway epithelial cell movement and proliferation, processes that underlie lung repair. The present study examined the expression and function of CXCR3 in human alveolar type II pneumocytes, whose destruction causes emphysema. CXCR3 was present in human fetal and adult type II pneumocytes as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. CXCR3-A and -B splice variant mRNA was present constitutively in cultured type II cells, but levels of CXCR3-B greatly exceeded CXCR3-A mRNA. In cultured type II cells, I-TAC, IP-10, and Mig induced chemotaxis. Overexpression of CXCR3-A in the A549 pneumocyte cell line produced robust chemotactic responses to I-TAC and IP-10. In contrast, I-TAC did not induce chemotactic responses in CXCR3-B and mock-transfected cells. Finally, I-TAC increased cytosolic Ca(2+) and activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B kinases only in CXCR3-A-transfected cells. These data indicate that the CXCR3 receptor is expressed by human type II pneumocytes, and the CXCR3-A splice variant mediates chemotactic responses possibly through Ca(2+) activation of both mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI 3-kinase signaling pathways. Expression of CXCR3 in alveolar epithelial cells may be important in pneumocyte repair from injury.

  15. Appropriate clinical use of human leukocyte antigen typing for coeliac disease: an Australasian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Din, J A; Cameron, D J S; Daveson, A J; Day, A S; Dellsperger, P; Hogan, C; Newnham, E D; Shepherd, S J; Steele, R H; Wienholt, L; Varney, M D

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing emerge as a remarkably popular test for the diagnostic work-up of coeliac disease with high patient acceptance. Although limited in its positive predictive value for coeliac disease, the strong disease association with specific HLA genes imparts exceptional negative predictive value to HLA typing, enabling a negative result to exclude coeliac disease confidently. In response to mounting evidence that the clinical use and interpretation of HLA typing often deviates from best practice, this article outlines an evidence-based approach to guide clinically appropriate use of HLA typing, and establishes a reporting template for pathology providers to improve communication of results. PMID:25827511

  16. Metabolism of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen in cultures of human proximal tubular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T; Blaehr, H; Andersen, C B;

    1992-01-01

    Degradation of the intact form of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) has been established in the liver, whereas the col 1 domain of PIIINP is extracted by the kidneys. We used native human PIIINP and col 1 domain of PIIINP to investigate the degradation of PIIINP...... in cultures of human proximal tubular cells. Normal renal tissue was obtained from the healthy part of kidneys surgically removed and from biopsies from a total of 10 patients. The degradation was characterized by incubation of [125I]-PIIINP followed by gel filtration. We found that in physiological...

  17. Influence of different types of trams on human perception of vibrations in buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska-Koczwara Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In an increasingly urbanized areas transport vibration source are closer and closer to the receiver which is a building. At the same time residents requirements for comfort in rooms are higher. In this paper influence of transport vibrations from various types of trams on human perception was tested and analysed. Measurements were made in Cracow on 11 buildings located near tramway. Human perception were investigated according to ISO and Polish standard. Basic RMS method and additional VDV method were applied because of high crest factor of recorded signal. Results of both methods were compared.

  18. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  19. Genomic organization and molecular phylogenies of the beta (β keratin multigene family in the chicken (Gallus gallus and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata: implications for feather evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer Roger H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal appendages of reptiles and birds are constructed of beta (β keratins. The molecular phylogeny of these keratins is important to understanding the evolutionary origin of these appendages, especially feathers. Knowing that the crocodilian β-keratin genes are closely related to those of birds, the published genomes of the chicken and zebra finch provide an opportunity not only to compare the genomic organization of their β-keratins, but to study their molecular evolution in archosaurians. Results The subfamilies (claw, feather, feather-like, and scale of β-keratin genes are clustered in the same 5' to 3' order on microchromosome 25 in chicken and zebra finch, although the number of claw and feather genes differs between the species. Molecular phylogenies show that the monophyletic scale genes are the basal group within birds and that the monophyletic avian claw genes form the basal group to all feather and feather-like genes. Both species have a number of feather clades on microchromosome 27 that form monophyletic groups. An additional monophyletic cluster of feather genes exist on macrochromosome 2 for each species. Expression sequence tag analysis for the chicken demonstrates that all feather β-keratin clades are expressed. Conclusions Similarity in the overall genomic organization of β-keratins in Galliformes and Passeriformes suggests similar organization in all Neognathae birds, and perhaps in the ancestral lineages leading to modern birds, such as the paravian Anchiornis huxleyi. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that evolution of archosaurian epidermal appendages in the lineage leading to birds was accompanied by duplication and divergence of an ancestral β-keratin gene cluster. As morphological diversification of epidermal appendages occurred and the β-keratin multigene family expanded, novel β-keratin genes were selected for novel functions within appendages such as feathers.