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Sample records for human jurkat t-cells

  1. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells

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    Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N-glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4+ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:28665310

  2. Comparative proteomics of exosomes secreted by tumoral Jurkat T cells and normal human T cell blasts unravels a potential tumorigenic role for valosin-containing protein

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    Sanclemente, Manuel; Iturralde, María; Naval, Javier; Alava, María Angeles; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Anel, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have previously characterized that FasL and Apo2L/TRAIL are stored in their bioactive form inside human T cell blasts in intraluminal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies. These vesicles are rapidly released to the supernatant in the form of exosomes upon re-activation of T cells. In this study we have compared for the first time proteomics of exosomes produced by normal human T cell blasts with those produced by tumoral Jurkat cells, with the objective of identify proteins associated with tumoral exosomes that could have a previously unrecognized role in malignancy. We have identified 359 and 418 proteins in exosomes from T cell blasts and Jurkat cells, respectively. Interestingly, only 145 (around a 40%) are common. The major proteins in both cases are actin and tubulin isoforms and the common interaction nodes correspond to these cytoskeleton and related proteins, as well as to ribosomal and mRNA granule proteins. We detected 14 membrane proteins that were especially enriched in exosomes from Jurkat cells as compared with T cell blasts. The most abundant of these proteins was valosin-containing protein (VCP), a membrane ATPase involved in ER homeostasis and ubiquitination. In this work, we also show that leukemic cells are more sensitive to cell death induced by the VCP inhibitor DBeQ than normal T cells. Furthermore, VCP inhibition prevents functional exosome secretion only in Jurkat cells, but not in T cell blasts. These results suggest VCP targeting as a new selective pathway to exploit in cancer treatment to prevent tumoral exosome secretion. PMID:27086912

  3. Inhibition of Kv1.3 Channels in Human Jurkat T Cells by Xanthohumol and Isoxanthohumol.

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    Gąsiorowska, Justyna; Teisseyre, Andrzej; Uryga, Anna; Michalak, Krystyna

    2015-08-01

    Using whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated influence of selected compounds from groups of prenylated chalcones and flavonoids: xanthohumol and isoxanthohumol on the activity of Kv1.3 channels in human leukemic Jurkat T cells. Obtained results provide evidence that both examined compounds were inhibitors of Kv1.3 channels in these cells. The inhibitory effects occurred in a concentration-dependent manner. The estimated value of the half-blocking concentration (EC50) was about 3 μM for xanthohumol and about 7.8 μM for isoxanthohumol. The inhibition of Kv1.3 channels by examined compounds was not complete. Upon an application of the compounds at the maximal concentrations equal to 30 μM, the activity of Kv1.3 channels was inhibited to about 0.13 of the control value. The inhibitory effect was reversible. The application of xanthohumol and isoxanthohumol did not change the currents' activation and inactivation rate. These results may confirm our earlier hypothesis that the presence of a prenyl group in a molecule is a factor that facilitates the inhibition of Kv1.3 channels by compounds from the groups of flavonoids and chalcones. The inhibition of Kv1.3 channels might be involved in antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of the compounds observed in cancer cell lines expressing these channels.

  4. Antiproliferative effect of rapamycin on human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat by cell cycle arrest and telomerase inhibition

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    Yan-min ZHAO; Qian ZHOU; Yun XU; Xiao-yu LAI; He HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To examine the ability of rapamycin to suppress growth and regulate telomerase activity in the human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. Methods:Cell proliferation was assessed after exposure to rapamycin by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. The proteins important for cell cycle progres-sion and Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling cascade were assessed by Western blotting. Telomerase activity was quantified by telomeric repeat amplication protocol assay. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA levels were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Results:Rapamycin inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat, induced G1 phase arrest, unregulated the pro-tein level of p21 as well as p27, and downregulated cyclinD3, phospho-p70s6k, and phospho-s6, but had no effect on apoptosis. Treatment with rapamycin reduced telomerase activity, and reduced hTERT mRNA and protein expression. Conclusion:Rapamycin displayed a potent antileukemic effect in the human T-cell leukemia cell line by inhibition of cell proliferation through G1 cell cycle arrest and also through the suppression of telomerase activity, suggesting that rapamycin may have potential clinical implications in the treatment of some leukemias.

  5. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways.

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    Yang, Tingfang; Yao, Shuluan; Zhang, Xianfeng; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro), the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 μg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells' apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro's dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days.

  6. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

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    Yang T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tingfang Yang,1 Shuluan Yao,2 Xianfeng Zhang,3 Yan Guo2 1Department of Pediatrics, Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jining Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychiatry, Jining Psychiatric Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro, the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 µg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells’ apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro’s dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days. Keywords: andrographolide, PI3K, AKT, Burkitt lymphoma, Jurkat cell

  7. GABAA receptor plasticity in Jurkat T cells.

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    Dionisio, Leonardo; Arias, Verónica; Bouzat, Cecilia; Esandi, María del Carmen

    2013-12-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAAR) mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the human brain. Neurons modify subunit expression, cellular distribution and function of GABAAR in response to different stimuli, a process named plasticity. Human lymphocytes have a functional neuronal-like GABAergic system with GABAAR acting as inhibitors of proliferation. We here explore if receptor plasticity occurs in lymphocytes. To this end, we analyzed human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells exposed to different physiological stimuli shown to mediate plasticity in neurons: GABA, progesterone and insulin. The exposure to 100 μM GABA differently affected the expression of GABAAR subunits measured at both the mRNA and protein level, showing an increase of α1, β3, and γ2 subunits but no changes in δ subunit. Exposure of Jurkat cells to different stimuli produced different changes in subunit expression: 0.1 μM progesterone decreased δ and 0.5 μM insulin increased β3 subunits. To identify the mechanisms underlying plasticity, we evaluated the Akt pathway, which is involved in the phosphorylation of β subunits and receptor translocation to the membrane. A significant increase of phosphorylated Akt and on the expression of β3 subunit in membrane occurred in cells exposed 15 h to GABA. To determine if plastic changes are translated into functional changes, we performed whole cell recordings. After 15 h GABA-exposure, a significantly higher percentage of cells responded to GABA application when compared to 0 and 40 h exposure, thus indicating that the detected plastic changes may have a role in GABA-modulated lymphocyte function. Our results reveal that lymphocyte GABAAR are modified by different stimuli similarly and by similar mechanisms to those in neurons. This property is of significance for the development of future therapies involving pharmacological modulation of the immune response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro study of AFB1 and AFM1 effects on human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cell model.

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    Luongo, D; Russo, R; Balestrieri, A; Marzocco, S; Bergamo, P; Severino, L

    2014-10-01

    Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus spp. that can occur as a natural contaminant in foods and feeds of vegetable origin. Post-ingestion, AFB(1) can be metabolized in the liver of mammals into hydroxylated aflatoxin M(1) (AFM(1)) that is excreted with milk. Although several studies have been carried out to evaluate effects of AFB(1) on the immune system, studies regarding AFM(1) are moreover lacking. The aim of the current study was to investigate effects of AFB(1) and AFM(1) on immune function using a lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cell line as an experimental model. Both AFB(1) and AFM(1) produced significant decreases in Jurkat cell proliferation, whereas only minor effects were noted on interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ cytokines mRNA expression in stimulated cells that had been pre-incubated with AFB(1) and AFM(1). Particularly, AFB(1), but not AFM(1), at the highest concentration (50 µM) induced a marked increase in IL-8 mRNA expression. The results of the current study suggested the existence of a concentration threshold for AFB(1) and AFM(1) needed to exert biological activity on cell viability and innate immunity.

  9. A synthesized nostocionone derivative potentiates programmed cell death in human T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells through mitochondria via the release of endonuclease G.

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    Itoh, Tomohiro; Muramatsu, Yuji; Masu, Masayo; Tsuge, Ayaka; Taniguchi, Masaki; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Koketsu, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Nostocionone (Nost), a compound isolated from Nostoc commune, and its synthesized derivatives (NostDs) were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against human T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells. NostD3 [(1E,4E)-1-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-enyl)penta-1,4-dien-3-one] inhibited cell growth more potently than Nost. To elucidate the mechanisms of NostD3-induced cell death, we examined changes in cell morphology, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMT), and DNA fragmentation. From these results, the cytotoxic effects of NostD3 were found to be mainly due to Type I programmed cell death (PCDI; i.e., apoptosis). Using caspase inhibitors, we further found that NostD-3-induced PCDI occurred through a caspase-independent pathway. Moreover, NostD3 decreased MMT and modulated multiple signaling molecules (MAPKs, Akt, Bcl-2, Bax, and c-Myc) in Jurkat cells, thereby inducing the release of endonuclease G (Endo-G) from mitochondria. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells treated with NostD3 was elevated up to 1 h after the treatment. However, suppression of ROS by N-acetyl-l-cysteine restored Jurkat cell growth. Taken together, our data suggested that ROS production acted as a trigger in NostD3-induced PCDI in Jurkat cells through release of Endo-G from the mitochondria.

  10. Combined treatment with fenretinide and indomethacin induces AIF-mediated, non-classical cell death in human acute T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells

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    Hojka-Osinska, Anna, E-mail: hojka@immuno.iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland); Ziolo, Ewa, E-mail: ziolo@immuno.iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland); Rapak, Andrzej, E-mail: rapak@immuno.iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of fenretinide and indomethacin induces a high level of cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic pathway is caspase-independent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jurkat cells undergo AIF-mediated cell death. -- Abstract: Currently used cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy have a similar mechanism of action and low specificity. Applied simultaneously, they show an additive effect with strong side effects. Clinical trials with the use of different agents in cancer therapy show that the use of these compounds alone is not very effective in fighting cancer. An alternative solution could be to apply a combination of these agents, because their combination has a synergistic effect on some cancer cells. Therefore, in our investigations we examined the effects of a synthetic retinoid-fenretinide when combined with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-indomethacin on the process of apoptosis in the acute human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. We demonstrate that treatment with the combination of the tested compounds induces the death of cells, that is peculiar and combines features of apoptosis as well as non-apoptotic cell death. In detail we observed, cell membrane permeabilization, phosphatydylserine exposure, no oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation, no caspase-3 activation, but apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation. Taken together these results indicate, that Jurkat cells after treatment with a combination of fenretinide and indomethacin undergo AIF-mediated programmed cell death.

  11. Cytoskeletal forces during signaling activation in Jurkat T-cells

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    Hui, King Lam; Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    T-cells are critical for the adaptive immune response in the body. The binding of the T-cell receptor (TCR) with antigen on the surface of antigen-presenting cells leads to cell spreading and signaling activation. The underlying mechanism of signaling activation is not completely understood. Although cytoskeletal forces have been implicated in this process, the contribution of different cytoskeletal components and their spatial organization are unknown. Here we use traction force microscopy to measure the forces exerted by Jurkat T-cells during TCR activation. Perturbation experiments reveal that these forces are largely due to actin assembly and dynamics, with myosin contractility contributing to the development of force but not its maintenance. We find that Jurkat T-cells are mechanosensitive, with cytoskeletal forces and signaling dynamics both sensitive to the stiffness of the substrate. Our results delineate the cytoskeletal contributions to interfacial forces exerted by T-cells during activation. PMID:25518938

  12. Kaempferol Activates G₂-Checkpoint of the Cell Cycle Resulting in G₂-Arrest and Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Acute Leukemia Jurkat T Cells.

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    Kim, Ki Yun; Jang, Won Young; Lee, Ji Young; Jun, Do Youn; Ko, Jee Youn; Yun, Young Ho; Kim, Young Ho

    2016-02-01

    The effect of kaempferol (3,5,7,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonoid compound that was identified in barnyard millet (Echinochloa crus-galli var. frumentacea) grains, on G2-checkpoint and apoptotic pathways was investigated in human acute leukemia Jurkat T cell clones stably transfected with an empty vector (J/Neo) or a Bcl-xL expression vector (J/Bcl-xL). Exposure of J/Neo cells to kaempeferol caused cytotoxicity and activation of the ATM/ATR-Chk1/Chk2 pathway, activating the phosphorylation of p53 (Ser-15), inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc25C (Ser-216), and inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), with resultant G2- arrest of the cell cycle. Under these conditions, apoptotic events, including upregulation of Bak and PUMA levels, Bak activation, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) loss, activation of caspase-9, -8, and -3, anti-poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and accumulation of apoptotic sub-G1 cells, were induced without accompanying necrosis. However, these apoptotic events, except for upregulation of Bak and PUMA levels, were completely abrogated in J/Bcl-xL cells overexpressing Bcl-xL, suggesting that the G2-arrest and the Bcl-xL-sensitive mitochondrial apoptotic events were induced, in parallel, as downstream events of the DNA-damage-mediated G2-checkpoint activation. Together these results demonstrate that kaempferol-mediated antitumor activity toward Jurkat T cells was attributable to G2-checkpoint activation, which caused not only G2-arrest of the cell cycle but also activating phosphorylation of p53 (Ser-15) and subsequent induction of mitochondriadependent apoptotic events, including Bak and PUMA upregulation, Bak activation, Δpsim loss, and caspase cascade activation.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of the human IL5 gene by ionizing radiation in Jurkat T cells: evidence for repression by an NF-AT-like element.

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    Lu-Hesselmann, J; Messer, G; van Beuningen, D; Kind, P; Peter, R U

    1997-12-01

    Eosinophilia is often observed in patients with parasitic infections and atopic diseases like allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. Additionally, it is a typical feature of the inflammatory reaction after therapeutic and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. This uniquely specific phenomenon regulated by the cytokine interleukin 5 (IL-5) suggests specific control for IL5 gene expression. In this study, we generated promoter-CAT constructs containing different human IL-5 promoter regions spanning from positions -507 to +43. Transfection experiments in Jurkat T cells revealed that the promoter sequence from -57 to +43 was required for constitutive and inducible IL-5 promoter activity. Low baseline CAT activity could be enhanced by treatment with phenylmercuric acetate (PMA) or the combination of PMA and calcium ionophore. The promoter region between positions -97 and +43 showed responsiveness to low-dose X rays. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the region from -117 to -97 was responsive to irradiation. Transcription factors specifically bound to this sequence showed a dose-dependent response to single doses of X rays between 1 and 8 Gy. Competition analysis indicated that the protein-DNA complexes at this region were related to the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT). Further confirmation was obtained by the addition of specific antibodies into protein-DNA reactions. For the first time, we have demonstrated that specific DNA binding of NF-ATp at the promoter region from -117 to -97 is involved in transcriptional regulation of the human IL5 gene in response to ionizing radiation.

  14. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND CYTOTOXICITY EFFECTS OF SALVADORA PERSICA (MESWAK EXTRACTS ON JURKAT T-CELLS

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    Farimah Sardari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Salvadora persica (S. persica, Meswak, is an evergreen shrub to 6-7 m. It has many biological activities such as antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and antifungal activities. This study evaluated in vitro cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of S. persica extracts on human oral Jurkat (T leukemia cells. Extracts from Meswak stick and leaves were tested in different concentrations for their cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory activities on human oral Jurkat T- cells. So treated cells viability with increasing concentrations of S. persica stick extract (0.008-0.2 μg/ml and leaves extract (0.016-0.5 μg/ml for 24, 48 or 72 hours was assessed by using the mitochondrial dependent reduction of yellow MTT (3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide to purple formazan. Also Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was performed on supernatants from treated Jurkat T-cells with phytohemagglutinin (PHA and both extracts to quantify IL-6, IL-8 pro-inflammatory cytokines. Statistically significant differences were indicated by p <0.05. Incubation of Jurkat cells with sterile distilled water, negative control, didn't show any mortality through the incubation period. Against PHA, positive control, both stick and leaves extracts of S. persica like resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion (p <0.01. Although both extracts significantly inhibited survival of Jurkat cells (p < 0.01 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, stick extract exerted more cytotoxic effects on Jurkat cells than leaves extract of S. persica (p <0.03. In conclusion, although with increasing concentrations of both extracts anti-inflammatory properties were boosted, S. persica extracts had dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on human oral Jurkat T-cells.

  15. Detailed Analysis of Apoptosis and Delayed Luminescence of Human Leukemia Jurkat T Cells after Proton Irradiation and Treatments with Oxidant Agents and Flavonoids

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    Irina Baran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following previous work, we investigated in more detail the relationship between apoptosis and delayed luminescence (DL in human leukemia Jurkat T cells under a wide variety of treatments. We used menadione and hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress and two flavonoids, quercetin, and epigallocatechin gallate, applied alone or in combination with menadione or H2O2. 62 MeV proton beams were used to irradiate cells under a uniform dose of 2 or 10 Gy, respectively. We assessed apoptosis, cell cycle distributions, and DL. Menadione, H2O2 and quercetin were potent inducers of apoptosis and DL inhibitors. Quercetin decreased clonogenic survival and the NAD(PH level in a dose-dependent manner. Proton irradiation with 2 Gy but not 10 Gy increased the apoptotic rate. However, both doses induced a substantial G2/M arrest. Quercetin reduced apoptosis and prolonged the G2/M arrest induced by radiation. DL spectroscopy indicated that proton irradiation disrupted the electron flow within Complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, thus explaining the massive necrosis induced by 10 Gy of protons and also suggested an equivalent action of menadione and quercetin at the level of the Fe/S center N2, which may be mediated by their binding to a common site within Complex I, probably the rotenone-binding site.

  16. Reactive oxygen species-dependent necroptosis in Jurkat T cells induced by pathogenic free-living Naegleria fowleri.

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    Song, K-J; Jang, Y S; Lee, Y A; Kim, K A; Lee, S K; Shin, M H

    2011-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba, is the causative pathogen of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans and experimental mice. N. fowleri is capable of destroying tissues and host cells through lytic necrosis. However, the mechanism by which N. fowleri induces host cell death is unknown. Electron microscopy indicated that incubation of Jurkat T cells with N. fowleri trophozoites induced necrotic morphology of the Jurkat T cells. N. fowleri also induced cytoskeletal protein cleavage, extensive poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase hydrolysis and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Although no activation of caspase-3 was observed in Jurkat T cells co-incubated with amoebae, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were strongly generated by NADPH oxidase (NOX). Pretreating cells with necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 or NOX inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) strongly inhibited amoeba-induced ROS generation and Jurkat cell death, whereas pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. N. fowleri-derived secretory products (NfSP) strongly induced intracellular ROS generation and cell death. Necroptotic effects of NfSP were effectively inhibited by pretreating NfSP with proteinase K. Moreover, NfSP-induced LDH release and intracellular ROS accumulation were inhibited by pretreating Jurkat T cells with DPI or necrostatin-1. These results suggest that N. fowleri induces ROS-dependent necroptosis in Jurkat T cells.

  17. Amoebic PI3K and PKC is required for Jurkat T cell death induced by Entamoeba histolytica.

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    Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-08-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amebiasis. During infection, adherence of E. histolytica through Gal/GalNAc lectin on the surface of the amoeba can induce caspase-3-dependent or -independent host cell death. Phosphorylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) in E. histolytica play an important function in the adhesion, killing, or phagocytosis of target cells. In this study, we examined the role of amoebic PI3K and PKC in amoeba-induced apoptotic cell death in Jurkat T cells. When Jurkat T cells were incubated with E. histolytica trophozoites, phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were markedly increased compared to those of cells incubated with medium alone. However, when amoebae were pretreated with a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin before being incubated with E. histolytica, E. histolytica-induced PS externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were significantly reduced compared to results for amoebae pretreated with DMSO. In addition, pretreatment of amoebae with a PKC inhibitor, staurosporine strongly inhibited Jurkat T cell death. However, E. histolytica-induced cleavage of caspase-3, -6, and -7 were not inhibited by pretreatment of amoebae with wortmannin or staurosporin. In addition, we found that amoebic PI3K and PKC have an important role on amoeba adhesion to host compartment. These results suggest that amebic PI3K and PKC activation may play an important role in caspase-independent cell death in Entamoeba-induced apoptosis.

  18. Constituents of French Marigold (Tagetes patula L. Flowers Protect Jurkat T-Cells against Oxidative Stress

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    Irakli Chkhikvishvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flowers of French marigold (Tagetes patula L. are widely used in folk medicine, in particular for treating inflammation-related disorders. However, cellular mechanisms of this activity demand further investigation. In the present work, we studied the potential of T. patula compounds to alleviate the oxidative stress in hydrogen peroxide-challenged human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cells. Crude extracts of marigold flowers and purified fractions containing flavonoids patuletin, quercetagetin, and quercetin and their derivatives, as well as the carotenoid lutein, were brought in contact with Jurkat cells challenged with 25 or 50 μM H2O2. Hydrogen peroxide caused oxidative stress in the cells, manifested as generation of superoxide and peroxyl radicals, reduced viability, arrested cell cycle, and enhanced apoptosis. The stress was alleviated by marigold ingredients that demonstrated high radical-scavenging capacity and enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes involved in neutralization of reactive oxygen species. Flavonoid fraction rich in quercetin and quercetagetin showed the highest cytoprotective activity, while patuletin in high dose exerted a cytotoxic effect associated with its anticancer potential. T. patula compounds enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant interleukin-10 (IL-10 in Jurkat cells. Both direct radical-scavenging capacity and stimulation of protective cellular mechanisms can underlay the anti-inflammatory properties of marigold flowers.

  19. MUC1 (CD227) interacts with lck tyrosine kinase in Jurkat lymphoma cells and normal T cells.

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    Mukherjee, P; Tinder, T L; Basu, G D; Gendler, S J

    2005-01-01

    MUC1 (CD227) is a large transmembrane epithelial mucin glycoprotein, which is aberrantly overexpressed in most adenocarcinomas and is a target for immune therapy for epithelial tumors. Recently, MUC1 has been detected in a variety of hematopoietic cell malignancies including T and B cell lymphomas and myelomas; however, its function in these cells is not clearly defined. Using the Jurkat T cell lymphoma cell line and normal human T cells, we demonstrate that MUC1 is not only expressed in these cells but is also phosphorylated upon T cell receptor (TCR) ligation and associates with the Src-related T cell tyrosine kinase, p56lck. Upon TCR-mediated activation of Jurkat cells, MUC1 is found in the low-density membrane fractions, where linker of T cell activation is contained. Abrogation of MUC1 expression in Jurkat cells by MUC1-specific small interfering RNA resulted in defects in TCR-mediated downstream signaling events associated with T cell activation. These include reduction in Ca2+ influx and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, leading to a decrease in CD69 expression, proliferation, and interleukin-2 production. These results suggest a regulatory role of MUC1 in modulating proximal signal transduction events through its interaction with proteins of the activation complex.

  20. T-cell activation. V. Anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody-induced activation and clonal abortion in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells

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    Claesson, M H; Dissing, S; Tscherning, T;

    1993-01-01

    We have studied activation-induced changes in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i, interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion, and clonal abortion of the human leukaemic T-cell line Jurkat and three T-cell receptor (TcR)/CD3 receptor negative clones deficient for the TcR alpha, TcR beta and CD3 gamma chains respec...

  1. Effect of polyamine analogues on hypusine content in JURKAT T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, R J; Weimar, W R; Müller, R; Zimmerman, C O; McCosar, B H; Yao, H; Smith, R E

    1998-09-24

    The availability of synthetic hypusine and deoxyhypusine has made it possible to develop analytical methods which allow for the measurement of these compounds in various tissues. The methods involve dansylation of extracts from the pellet remaining after perchloric acid precipitation of cell or tissue homogenates, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, the impact of four polyamine analogues, N1,N11-diethylnorspermine (DENSPM), N1,N14-diethylhomospermine (DEHSPM), 1,6,12-triazadodecane [(4,5) triamine], and 1,7, 13-triazatridecane [(5,5) triamine], on hypusine levels in a human T-cell line (JURKAT) is evaluated. All four analogues are active in controlling cell growth and compete well with spermidine for the polyamine transport apparatus. After 144 h of exposure to JURKAT cells, DENSPM reduces putrescine to below detectable limits and spermidine to 10% of the level in control cells. The other three analogues diminish both putrescine and spermidine to below detectable limits. The effectiveness with which the compounds lower spermine levels is DENSPM > DEHSPM > (4,5) triamine > (5,5) triamine. The analogues decrease the activities of ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase in a similar fashion. Of the four polyamines, DENSPM and DEHSPM are potent at lowering intracellular hypusine levels after 144 h: 59 +/- 9% and 73 +/- 12% of control levels, respectively. The other two analogues have marginal effects.

  2. Butterfat fatty acids differentially regulate growth and differentiation in Jurkat T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamo, Paolo; Luongo, Diomira; Maurano, Francesco; Rossi, Mauro

    2005-10-01

    Synthetic Conjugated Linoleic Acid mixture (CLA; c9,t11; t10,c12-18:2) has been previously shown to inhibit growth, and enhance apoptosis and IL-2 mRNA synthesis in human lymphoblastic Jurkat T-cells. In this study, two different butterfat types were evaluated and compared for their effects on Jurkat cell viability, oxidative stress, pro-apoptotic activity, and cytokine synthesis: the conventionally produced butterfat (CBF), and organic butterfat (OBF) containing significantly higher amounts of c9,t11 (Rumenic Acid, RA), trans-vaccenic acid (VA; t11-18:1), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), and lower levels of linoleic acid (LA). Results from cell treatment with both butterfat mixtures showed comparable oxidative stress (superoxide production, intracellular GSH depletion,and lipid peroxides yield), NADPH oxidase activation, cytotoxicity (LDH release), and IL-2 transcript level, whereas the effects of enhanced growth-inhibitory and pro-apoptotic activities were associated with OBF treatment. To then investigate each butterfat-induced effect caused by RA, VA, LA, and ALA, cells were exposed to synthetic FA concentrations similar to those from the different butterfats. Higher oxidative stress (superoxide production, intracellular GSH depletion) was induced by alpha-linolenic (ALA) and linoleic (LA) incubation (P<0.01) and superoxide production was suppressed by specific PKCalpha inhibitor (Gö 6976) and linked to increased toxicity and IL-2 synthesis inhibition. By contrast, cell treatment with RA increased apoptosis and IL-2 synthesis. These results suggest that a supply of ALA and LA is responsible for BF-induced oxidative stress via PKCalpha-NADPH oxidase pathway, and that enhanced antiproliferative effects in OBF treated cells is essentially determined by RA-induced pro-apoptotic activity. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. n-Hexane toxicity in Jurkat T-cells is mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Catherine; O'Donoghue, Maria Hutch; Heffron, James J A

    2008-03-01

    Here we assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the manifestation of n-hexane toxicity in Jurkat T-cells and the chemo-protective potential of the antioxidants epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and thymoquinone (TQ) against n-hexane toxicity in vitro. n-Hexane is an important industrial solvent and ambient air pollutant. Subchronic exposure to n-hexane results in a concentration-dependent increase in ROS formation with a corresponding decrease in Jurkat T-cell proliferation. Results from time-course studies indicate that ROS formation plays a causal role in n-hexane induced alterations in Jurkat T-cell proliferation and membrane integrity. Treatment of cells with EGCG, at a concentration reached in plasma, reduced the ROS formation caused by exposure to n-hexane and inhibited the decrease in cell proliferation. Similar effects were obtained with TQ. Both EGCG and TQ significantly reduced n-hexane-induced LDH leakage to control levels. The combined results show that oxidative stress plays a role in the development of n-hexane toxicity.

  4. A comprehensive characterization of the impact of mycophenolic acid on the metabolism of Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ramos, Ana A; Marchetti-Laurent, Catherine; Poindessous, Virginie; Antonio, Samantha; Petitgas, Céline; Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Bortoli, Sylvie; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Pallet, Nicolas

    2017-09-05

    Metabolic reprogramming is critical for T cell fate and polarization and is regulated by metabolic checkpoints, including Myc, HIF-1α, AMPK and mTORC1. Our objective was to determine the impact of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in comparison with rapamycin (Rapa), an inhibitor of mTORC1, on the metabolism of Jurkat T cells. We identified a drug-specific transcriptome signature consisting of the key enzymes and transporters involved in glycolysis, glutaminolysis or nucleotide synthesis. MPA produced an early and transient drop in the intracellular ATP content related to the inhibition of de novo synthesis of purines, leading to the activation of the energy sensor AMPK. MPA decreases glycolytic flux, consistent with a reduction in glucose uptake, but also in the oxidation of glutamine. Additionally, both drugs reduce aerobic glycolysis. The expression of HIF-1α and Myc, promoting the activation of glycolysis and glutaminolysis, was inhibited by MPA and Rapa. In conclusion, we report that MPA profoundly impacts the cellular metabolism of Jurkat T cells by generating an energetic distress, decreasing the glycolytic and glutaminolytic fluxes and by targeting HIF-1α and Myc. These findings open interesting perspectives for novel combinatorial therapeutic strategies targeting metabolic checkpoints to block the proliferation of T cells.

  5. Effects of in vitro Brevetoxin Exposure on Apoptosis and Cellular Metabolism in a Leukemic T Cell Line (Jurkat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Sleasman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Significant health effects associated with red tide toxin exposure have been reported in sea life and in humans, with brevetoxins documented within immune cells from many species. The objective of this research was to investigate potential immunotoxic effects of brevetoxins using a leukemic T cell line (Jurkat as an in vitro model system. Viability, cell proliferation, and apoptosis assays were conducted using brevetoxin congeners PbTx-2, PbTx-3, and PbTx-6. The effects of in vitro brevetoxin exposure on cell viability and cellular metabolism or proliferation were determined using trypan blue and MTT (1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-3,5- diphenylformazan, respectively. Using MTT, cellular metabolic activity was decreased in Jurkat cells exposed to 5 - 10 μg/ml PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. After 3 h, no significant effects on cell viability were observed with any toxin congener in concentrations up to 10 μg/ml. Viability decreased dramatically after 24 h in cells treated with PbTx-2 or -6. Apoptosis, as measured by caspase-3 activity, was significantly increased in cells exposed to PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. In summary, brevetoxin congeners varied in effects on Jurkat cells, with PbTx-2 and PbTx-6 eliciting greater cellular effects compared to PbTx-3.

  6. Molecular regulation of MICA expression after HDAC-inhibitor treatment of Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Pedersen, Marianne T.

    pathways that lead to MICA expression after HDAC-inhibitor treatment of Jurkat T cells. Chelating Calcium with Bapta-AM or EGTA potently inhibited HDAC-inhibitor mediated MICA/B expression. It was further observed that ER Calcium stores were depleted after HDAC-inhibitor treatment. NF-kB activity can......, we made a promoter construct consisting of ~3kb of the proximal MICA promoter in front of GFP. Deletion analysis showed that a GC-box containing a putative Sp1 site from position -113 to -93 relative to the mRNA start site, was important for HDAC-inhibitor induced promoter activity. Sp1...

  7. The ruthenium complex cis-(dichloro)tetraammineruthenium(III) chloride presents selective cytotoxicity against murine B cell lymphoma (A-20), murine ascitic sarcoma 180 (S-180), human breast adenocarcinoma (SK-BR-3), and human T cell leukemia (Jurkat) tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula; Vilanova-Costa, Cesar Augusto Sam Tiago; Hamaguchi, Amélia; Pavanin, Luiz Alfredo; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Homsi-Brandenburgo, Maria Inês; Dos Santos, Wagner Batista; Soares, Andreimar Martins; Nomizo, Auro

    2010-06-01

    The aim of present study was to verify the in vitro antitumor activity of a ruthenium complex, cis-(dichloro)tetraammineruthenium(III) chloride (cis-[RuCl(2)(NH(3))(4)]Cl) toward different tumor cell lines. The antitumor studies showed that ruthenium(III) complex presents a relevant cytotoxic activity against murine B cell lymphoma (A-20), murine ascitic sarcoma 180 (S-180), human breast adenocarcinoma (SK-BR-3), and human T cell leukemia (Jurkat) cell lines and a very low cytotoxicity toward human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The ruthenium(III) complex decreased the fraction of tumor cells in G0/G1 and/or G2-M phases, indicating that this compound may act on resting/early entering G0/G1 cells and/or precycling G2-M cells. The cytotoxic activity of a high concentration (2 mg mL(-1)) of cis-[RuCl(2)(NH(3))(4)]Cl toward Jurkat cells correlated with an increased number of annexin V-positive cells and also the presence of DNA fragmentation, suggesting that this compound induces apoptosis in tumor cells. The development of new antineoplastic medications demands adequate knowledge in order to avoid inefficient or toxic treatments. Thus, a mechanistic understanding of how metal complexes achieve their activities is crucial to their clinical success and to the rational design of new compounds with improved potency.

  8. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Hong-yun; MA Li; MENG Min-jie; YAO Xin-sheng; LIN Ying; WU Zhen-qiang; HE Xiao-wei; WANG Ju-fang; WANG Xiao-ning

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether the receptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkat human T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) gene recombination.Methods TCR Dβ-Jβ signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVβ chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVβ chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique.Results RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dβ2-Jβ2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dβ25' and Dβ 23' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVβ chain did not change during cell proliferation.Conclusions RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire. However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  9. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hong-yun; Ma, Li; Meng, Min-jie; Yao, Xin-sheng; Lin, Ying; Wu, Zhen-qiang; He, Xiao-wei; Wang, Ju-fang; Wang, Xiao-ning

    2007-03-05

    Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether thebreceptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkathuman T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of Tcell receptor (TCR) gene recombination. TCR Dbeta-Jbeta signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVbeta chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVbeta chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique. RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dbeta2-Jbeta2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dbeta2 5' and Dbeta 2 3' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVbeta chain did not change during cell proliferation. RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire.However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  10. Docosahexaenoic acid and other fatty acids induce a decrease in pHi in Jurkat T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Virginie; Hichami, Aziz; Moutairou, Kabirou; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2003-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) induced rapid (t1/2=33 s) and dose-dependent decreases in pHi in BCECF-loaded human (Jurkat) T-cells. Addition of 5-(N,N-dimethyl)-amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchanger, prolonged DHA-induced acidification as a function of time, indicating that the exchanger is implicated in pHi recovery. Other fatty acids like oleic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, but not palmitic acid, also induced a fall in pHi in these cells. To assess the role of calcium in the DHA-induced acidification, we conducted experiments in Ca2+-free (0% Ca2+) and Ca2+-containing (100% Ca2+) buffer. We observed that there was no difference in the degree of DHA-induced transient acidification in both the experimental conditions, though pHi recovery was faster in 0% Ca2+ medium than that in 100% Ca2+ medium. In the presence of BAPTA, a calcium chelator, a rapid recovery of DHA-induced acidosis was observed. Furthermore, addition of CaCl2 into 0% Ca2+ medium curtailed DHA-evoked rapid pHi recovery. In 0% Ca2+ medium, containing BAPTA, DHA did not evoke increases in [Ca2+]i, though this fatty acid still induced a rapid acidification in these cells. These observations suggest that calcium is implicated in the long-lasting DHA-induced acidosis. DHA-induced rapid acidification may be due to its deprotonation in the plasma membrane (flip-flop model), as suggested by the following observations: (1) DHA with a –COOH group induced intracellular acidification, but this fatty acid with a –COOCH3 group failed to do so, and (2) DHA, but not propionic acid, -induced acidification was completely reversed by addition of fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin in these cells. These results suggest that DHA induces acidosis via deprotonation and Ca2+ mobilization in human T-cells. PMID:14645139

  11. Effects of valproic acid and pioglitazone on cell cycle progression and proliferation of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Mohammadi, Saeed; Yazdani, Yaghoub; Sedighi, Sima; Memarian, Ali; Aghaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematologic malignant tumor. Administration of chemical compounds influencing apoptosis and T cell development has been discussed as promising novel therapeutic strategies. Valproic acid (VPA) as a recently emerged anti-neoplastic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and pioglitazone (PGZ) as a high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonist have been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in different studies. Here, we aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in anti-proliferative effects of these compounds on human Jurkat cells. Materials and Methods: Treated cells were evaluated for cell cycle progression and apoptosis using flowcytometry and MTT viability assay. Real-time RT-PCR was carried out to measure the alterations in key genes associated with cell death and cell cycle arrest. Results: Our findings illustrated that both VPA and PGZ can inhibit Jurkat E6.1 cells in vitro after 24 hr; however, PGZ 400 μM presents the most anti-proliferative effect. Interestingly, treated cells have been arrested in G2/M with deregulated cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A) phosphatase and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B or p27) expression. Expression of cyclin D1 gene was inhibited when DNA synthesis entry was declined. Cell cycle deregulation in PGZ and VPA-exposed cells generated an increase in the proportion of aneuploid cell population, which has not reported before. Conclusion: These findings define that anti-proliferative effects of PGZ and VPA on Jurkat cell line are mediated by cell cycle deregulation. Thus, we suggest PGZ and VPA may relieve potential therapeutic application against apoptosis-resistant malignancies. PMID:27635203

  12. Effects of valproic acid and pioglitazone on cell cycle progression and proliferation of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Saghaeian Jazi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is an aggressive hematologic malignant tumor. Administration of chemical compounds influencing apoptosis and T cell development has been discussed as promising novel therapeutic strategies. Valproic acid (VPA as a recently emerged anti-neoplastic histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor and pioglitazone (PGZ as a high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ agonist have been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in different studies. Here, we aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in anti-proliferative effects of these compounds on human Jurkat cells. Materials and Methods: Treated cells were evaluated for cell cycle progression and apoptosis using flowcytometry and MTT viability assay. Real-time RT-PCR was carried out to measure the alterations in key genes associated with cell death and cell cycle arrest. Results: Our findings illustrated that both VPA and PGZ can inhibit Jurkat E6.1 cells in vitro after   24 hr; however, PGZ 400 μM presents the most anti-proliferative effect. Interestingly, treated cells have been arrested in G2/M with deregulated cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A phosphatase and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B or p27 expression. Expression of cyclin D1 gene was inhibited when DNA synthesis entry was declined. Cell cycle deregulation in PGZ and VPA-exposed cells generated an increase in the proportion of aneuploid cell population, which has not reported before. Conclusion: These findings define that anti-proliferative effects of PGZ and VPA on Jurkat cell line are mediated by cell cycle deregulation. Thus, we suggest PGZ and VPA may relieve potential therapeutic application against apoptosis-resistant malignancies.

  13. Fractionation of T cell subsets on Ig anti-Ig columns: isolation of helper T cells from nonresponder mice, demonstration of antigen-specific T suppressor cells, and selection of CD-3 negative variants of Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, B; Geisler, C; Kuhlmann, J

    1989-01-01

    In the present experiments we have explored the possibilities of a modified immunoadsorbent technique to select for (1) mutagenized T cell receptor (Tcr) negative variants of Jurkat T lymphoma cells and (2) purified CD-4+ or CD-8+ T lymphocytes. The basic principle was to make large numbers...... of immunoglobulin (Ig) negative T cells Ig+ by T cell subset-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb), and to select such cells on Ig anti-Ig columns. Our results demonstrated that Thy-1+, Fc receptor positive, antigen-specific T cells regulate the immune response in mice nonresponders to pork insulin......." The most important finding is the demonstration of antigen-specific Thy-1+, CD-8+, and Fc receptor+ T suppressor cell that apparently react with antigen in a non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted manner....

  14. Bcl-2 over-expression and activation of protein kinase C suppress the Trail-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Trail,a tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand,is a novel potent endogenous activator of the cell death pathway through the activation of cell surface death receptors Trail-R1 and Trail-R2.Its role,like FasL in activation-induced cell death(AICD),has been demonstrated in immune system.However the mechanism of Trail induced apoptosis remains unclear.In this report,the recombinant Trail protein was expressed and purified.The apoptosis-inducing activity and the regulation mechanism of recombinant Trail on Jurkat T cells were explored in vitro.Trypan blue exclusion assay demonstrated that the recombinant Trail protein actively killed Jurkat T cells in a dose-dependent manner.Trail-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells were remarkably reduced by Bcl-2 over expression in Bcl-2 gene transfected cells.Treatment with PMA(phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate),a PKC activator,suppressed Trail-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells.The inhibition of apoptosis by PMA was abolished by pretreatment with Bis,a PKC inhibitor.Taken together,it was suggested that Bcl-2 over-expression and PMA activated PKC actively down-regulated the Trail-mediated apoptosis in Jurkat T cell.

  15. Coumestrol, Bisphenol-A, DDT, and TCDD Modulation of Interleukin-2 Expression in Activated CD+4 Jurkat T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. McMurray

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous estrogens are known to modulate several components of immune response, including interleukin-2 (IL-2 production. IL-2 is a cytokine that plays an important role in adaptive immune responses. These responses may be modulated by xenoestrogens such as coumestrol, bisphenol A (BPA, DDT, and TCDD. In this research, we examined the effects and potential mechanisms of action of these estrogenic compounds on IL-2 production in activated CD4+ Jurkat T cells. IL-2 production was analyzed by ELISA and Western Blot. At the transcriptional level, protein expression was examined by RT-PCR. Coumestrol, DDT and TCDD (but not BPA significantly suppressed IL-2 production in activated CD4+ Jurkat T cells, at the transcriptional and translational levels. The transcriptional suppression of IL-2 was associated with decreased protein levels of NF-κβ, an important IL-2 positive transcription factor, without affecting the expression of Iκ−Βα protein expression, an important inhibitor of NF-κβ nuclear translocation. Although the direct mechanisms of xenoestrogens modulation of the immune system remain to be elucidated, coumestrol-, DDT- and TCDD-induced suppression of IL-2 may have ramifications for our understanding of the impact of xenoestrogens on health and disease.

  16. Galectin-8 Induces Apoptosis in Jurkat T Cells by Phosphatidic Acid-mediated ERK1/2 Activation Supported by Protein Kinase A Down-regulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norambuena, Andrés; Metz, Claudia; Vicuña, Lucas; Silva, Antonia; Pardo, Evelyn; Oyanadel, Claudia; Massardo, Loreto; González, Alfonso; Soza, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Galectins have been implicated in T cell homeostasis playing complementary pro-apoptotic roles. Here we show that galectin-8 (Gal-8) is a potent pro-apoptotic agent in Jurkat T cells inducing a complex phospholipase D/phosphatidic acid signaling pathway that has not been reported for any galectin before. Gal-8 increases phosphatidic signaling, which enhances the activity of both ERK1/2 and type 4 phosphodiesterases (PDE4), with a subsequent decrease in basal protein kinase A activity. Strikingly, rolipram inhibition of PDE4 decreases ERK1/2 activity. Thus Gal-8-induced PDE4 activation releases a negative influence of cAMP/protein kinase A on ERK1/2. The resulting strong ERK1/2 activation leads to expression of the death factor Fas ligand and caspase-mediated apoptosis. Several conditions that decrease ERK1/2 activity also decrease apoptosis, such as anti-Fas ligand blocking antibodies. In addition, experiments with freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, previously stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, show that Gal-8 is pro-apoptotic on activated T cells, most likely on a subpopulation of them. Anti-Gal-8 autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus block the apoptotic effect of Gal-8. These results implicate Gal-8 as a novel T cell suppressive factor, which can be counterbalanced by function-blocking autoantibodies in autoimmunity. PMID:19276072

  17. Exosomes derived from renal cancer cells induce Jurkat T cell apoptosis in vitro%肾癌细胞来源的exosomes诱导Jurkat T细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨林; 吴小候; 罗春丽; 王丹; 陈力学

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the underlying mechanism of exosomes derived from renal cancer cell lines 786-0 to mediate tumor immune escape in vitro. Methods CCK-8 assay was used to determine the effects of exosomes on proliferation in Jurkat T cells. Morphological changes were by wright-giemsa staining;flow cytometry with Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was used to detect the apoptosis; secretion functions of Jurkat T cell were detected by ELISA assay; effects of exosomes on apoptosis of Jurkat T cell were detected by soluble Fas block experiment; effects on the protein expression of FasL, caspase, Bax and Bcl-2 were assessed by Western blot analysis. Results Exosomes could inhibit Jurkat T cell proliferation, 10 μg/mL exosomes act on Jurkat T cell for 24 and 72 h, growth inhibition rate was (19. 64 ±0. 92)% and (36. 24 ± 1. 12)% ; while 400 μg/mL exosomes act on it for 24 h and 72 h, growth inhibition rate was (55.96 ± 1.35)% and (76.51 ± 1. 37)% respectively. Exosomes could induce Jurkat T cell apoptosis, 10 μg/mL exosomes act on Jurkat T cell for 8 h, apoptosis rate was (7. 31 ±1.32)% , extending this monitoring to 24 h, apoptosis rate was (20. 19 ± 1.47)% ; while 400μg/mL exosomes act on it for 8 and 24 h, apoptosis rate was (27. 28 ± 1. 29)% and (41.72 ±0.88)% respectively. Exosomes also suppressed IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-10 secretion obviously. FasL was highly expressed in exosomes, soluble Fas block could reverse Jurkat T cell apoptosis. In this course, caspase-3 , caspase-8, caspase-9 were activated, and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 increased. Conclusion Exosomes could inhibit the growth of Jurkat T cell and induce apoptosis. It could mediate tumor immune escape.%目的 体外研究肾癌786-0细胞来源的exosomes介导肿瘤免疫逃逸的机制.方法 采用CCK-8法检测肾癌786-0细胞来源的exosomes对Jurkat T细胞生长的影响,瑞氏-姬姆萨染色检测Jurkat T细胞形态变化,Annexin V-FITC/PI双染色流式细胞术检测Jurkat T细胞凋亡率,ELISA法检测Jurkat

  18. Different effects of two cyclic chalcone analogues on redox status of Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmer, Zsuzsanna; Berki, Tímea; Maász, Gábor; Perjési, Pál

    2014-12-01

    Chalcones are intermediary compounds of the biosynthetic pathway of the naturally flavonoids. Previous studies have demonstrated that chalcones and their conformationally rigid cyclic analogues have tumour cell cytotoxic and chemopreventive effects. It has been shown that equitoxic doses of the two cyclic chalcone analogues (E)-2-(4'-methoxybenzylidene)-(2) and (E)-2-(4'-methylbenzylidene)-1-benzosuberone (3) have different effect on cell cycle progress of the investigated Jurkat cells. It was also found that the compounds affect the cellular thiol status of the treated cells and show intrinsic (non-enzyme-catalyzed) reactivity towards GSH under cell-free conditions. In order to gain new insights into the cytotoxic mechanism of the compounds, effects on the redox status and glutathione level of Jurkat cells were investigated. Detection of intracellular ROS level in Jurkat cells exposed to 2 and 3 was performed using the dichlorofluorescein-assay. Compound 2 did not influence ROS activity either on 1 or 4h exposure; in contrast, chalcone 3 showed to reduce ROS level at both timepoints. The two compounds had different effects on cellular glutathione status as well. Compound 2 significantly increased the oxidized glutathione (GSSG) level showing an interference with the cellular antioxidant defence. On the contrary, chalcone 3 enhanced the reduced glutathione level, indicating enhanced cellular antioxidant activity. To investigate the chalcone-GSH conjugation reactions under cellular conditions, a combination of a RP-HPLC method with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was performed. Chalcone-GSH adducts could not be observed either in the cell supernatant or the cell sediment after deproteinization. The investigations provide further details of dual - cytotoxic and chemopreventive - effects of the cyclic chalcone analogues.

  19. Proteomic profiling of the human T-cell nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboui, Mohamed Ali; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Hall, William W; Gautier, Virginie W

    2011-12-01

    The nucleolus, site of ribosome biogenesis, is a dynamic subnuclear organelle involved in diverse cellular functions. The size, number and organisation of nucleoli are cell-specific and while it remains to be established, the nucleolar protein composition would be expected to reflect lineage-specific transcriptional regulation of rDNA genes and have cell-type functional components. Here, we describe the first characterisation of the human T-cell nucleolar proteome. Using the Jurkat T-cell line and a reproducible organellar proteomic approach, we identified 872 nucleolar proteins. In addition to ribosome biogenesis and RNA processing networks, network modeling and topological analysis of nucleolar proteome revealed distinct macromolecular complexes known to orchestrate chromatin structure and to contribute to the regulation of gene expression, replication, recombination and repair, and chromosome segregation. Furthermore, among our dataset, we identified proteins known to functionally participate in T-cell biology, including RUNX1, ILF3, ILF2, STAT3, LSH, TCF-1, SATB1, CTCF, HMGB3, BCLAF1, FX4L1, ZAP70, TIAM1, RAC2, THEMIS, LCP1, RPL22, TOPK, RETN, IFI-16, MCT-1, ISG15, and 14-3-3τ, which support cell-specific composition of the Jurkat nucleolus. Subsequently, the nucleolar localisation of RUNX1, ILF3, STAT3, ZAP70 and RAC2 was further validated by Western Blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Overall, our T-cell nucleolar proteome dataset not only further expands the existing repertoire of the human nucleolar proteome but support a cell type-specific composition of the nucleolus in T cell and highlights the potential roles of the nucleoli in lymphocyte biology.

  20. Effects of parathyroid hormone-related protein and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α in Jurkat T-cells on tumor formation in vivo and expression of apoptosis regulatory genes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Sherry T; Dirksen, Wessel P; Lanigan, Lisa G; Martin, Chelsea K; Thudi, Nanda K; Werbeck, Jillian L; Fernandez, Soledad A; Hildreth, Blake E; Rosol, Thomas J

    2012-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, but their effects on T-cells have not been well studied. Here we analyzed the functions of PTHrP and MIP-1α on T-cell growth and death both in vitro and in vivo by overexpressing either factor in human Jurkat T-cells. PTHrP or MIP-1α did not affect Jurkat cell growth in vitro, but PTHrP increased their sensitivity to apoptosis. Importantly, PTHrP and MIP-1α decreased both tumor incidence and growth in vivo. To investigate possible mechanisms, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays were performed. Both PTHrP and MIP-1α increased the expression of several factors including signal transducer and activator of transcription 4, tumor necrosis factor α, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand and death-associated protein kinase 1, and decreased the expression of inhibitor of DNA binding 1, interferon γ and CD40 ligand in Jurkat cells. In addition, MIP-1α also increased the expression of transcription factor AP-2α and PTHrP increased expression of the vitamin D3 receptor. These data demonstrate that PTHrP and MIP-1α exert a profound antitumor effect presumably by increasing the sensitivity to apoptotic signals through modulation of transcription and apoptosis factors in T-cells.

  1. CD147 and CD98 complex-mediated homotypic aggregation attenuates the CypA-induced chemotactic effect on Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Na; Zhang, Kui; Lv, Minghua; Miao, Jinlin; Chen, Zhinan; Zhu, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Homotypic cell aggregation plays important roles in physiological and pathological processes, including embryogenesis, immune responses, angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion and metastasis. CD147 has been implicated in most of these phenomena, and it was identified as a T cell activation-associated antigen due to its obvious up-regulation in activated T cells. However, the explicit function and mechanism of CD147 in T cells have not been fully elucidated. In this study, large and compact aggregates were observed in Jurkat T cells after treatment with the specific CD147 monoclonal antibody HAb18 or after the expression of CD147 was silenced by RNA interference, which indicated an inhibitory effect of CD147 in T cell homotypic aggregation. Knocking down CD147 expression resulted in a significant decrease in CD98, along with prominent cell aggregation, similar to that treated by CD98 and CD147 monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, decreased cell chemotactic activity was observed following CD147- and CD98-mediated cell aggregation, and increased aggregation was correlated with a decrease in the chemotactic ability of the Jurkat T cells, suggesting that CD147- and CD98-mediated homotypic cell aggregation plays a negative role in T cell chemotaxis. Our data also showed that p-ERK, p-ZAP70, p-CD3ζ and p-LCK were significantly decreased in the CD147- and CD98-knocked down Jurkat T cells, which suggested that decreased CD147- and/or CD98-induced homotypic T cell aggregation and aggregation-inhibited chemotaxis might be associated with these signaling pathways. A role for CD147 in cell aggregation and chemotaxis was further indicated in primary CD4(+) T cells. Similarly, low expression of CD147 in primary T cells induced prominent cell aggregation and this aggregation attenuated primary T cell chemotactic ability in response to CypA. Our results have demonstrated the correlation between homotypic cell aggregation and the chemotactic response of T cells to CypA, and these data

  2. Novel HIV-1 knockdown targets identified by an enriched kinases/phosphatases shRNA library using a long-term iterative screen in Jurkat T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rato

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is a complex retrovirus that uses host machinery to promote its replication. Understanding cellular proteins involved in the multistep process of HIV-1 infection may result in the discovery of more adapted and effective therapeutic targets. Kinases and phosphatases are a druggable class of proteins critically involved in regulation of signal pathways of eukaryotic cells. Here, we focused on the discovery of kinases and phosphatases that are essential for HIV-1 replication but dispensable for cell viability. We performed an iterative screen in Jurkat T-cells with a short-hairpin-RNA (shRNA library highly enriched for human kinases and phosphatases. We identified 14 new proteins essential for HIV-1 replication that do not affect cell viability. These proteins are described to be involved in MAPK, JNK and ERK pathways, vesicular traffic and DNA repair. Moreover, we show that the proteins under study are important in an early step of HIV-1 infection before viral integration, whereas some of them affect viral transcription/translation. This study brings new insights for the complex interplay of HIV-1/host cell and opens new possibilities for antiviral strategies.

  3. Down-regulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 by bortezomib sensitizes Jurkat leukemia T cells against glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis.

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    Yi Tao

    Full Text Available 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases type 2 (11β-HSD2, a key regulator for pre-receptor metabolism of glucocorticoids (GCs by converting active GC, cortisol, to inactive cortisone, has been shown to be present in a variety of tumors. But its expression and roles have rarely been discussed in hematological malignancies. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been shown to not only possess antitumor effects but also potentiate the activity of other chemotherapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that 11β-HSD2 was highly expressed in two GC-resistant T-cell leukemic cell lines Jurkat and Molt4. In contrast, no 11β-HSD2 expression was found in two GC-sensitive non-hodgkin lymphoma cell lines Daudi and Raji as well as normal peripheral blood T cells. Inhibition of 11β-HSD2 by 11β-HSD inhibitor 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid or 11β-HSD2 shRNA significantly increased cortisol-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Additionally, pretreatment of Jurkat cells with low-dose bortezomib resulted in increased cellular sensitivity to GC as shown by elevated induction of apoptosis, more cells arrested at G1 stage and up-regulation of GC-induced leucine zipper which is an important mediator of GC action. Furthermore, we clarified that bortezomib could dose-dependently inhibit 11β-HSD2 messenger RNA and protein levels as well as activity (cortisol-cortisone conversion through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Therefore, we suggest 11β-HSD2 is, at least partially if not all, responsible for impaired GC suppression in Jurkat cells and also indicate a novel mechanism by which proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may influence GC action.

  4. Integrated mRNA and micro RNA profiling reveals epigenetic mechanism of differential sensitivity of Jurkat T cells to AgNPs and Ag ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Chatterjee, Nivedita; Lee, Jeongsoo; Choi, Jinhee

    2014-08-17

    In our previous in vitro study of the toxicity on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), we observed a dramatically higher sensitivity of Jurkat T cells to AgNPs than to Ag ions, and DNA damage and apoptosis were found to be involved in that toxicity. In this study, to understand underlying mechanism of different sensitivity of Jurket T cells to AgNPs and Ag ions, mRNA microarray and micro RNA microarray were concomitantly conducted on AgNPs and Ag ions exposed Jurkat T cells. Surprisingly only a small number of genes were differentially expressed by exposure to each of the silver (15 altered mRNA by AgNPs exposure, whereas 4 altered mRNA by Ag ions exposure, as determined 1.5-fold change as the cut-off value). miRNA microarray revealed that the expression of 63 miRNAs was altered by AgNPs exposure, whereas that of 32 miRNAs was altered by Ag ions exposure. An integrated analysis of mRNA and miRNA expression revealed that the expression of hsa-miR-219-5p, was negatively correlated with the expression of metallothionein 1F (MT1F) and tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3), in cells exposed to AgNPs; whereas, the expression of hsa-miR-654-3p was negatively correlated with the expression of mRNA, endonuclease G-like 1 (EDGL1) in cells exposed to Ag ions. Network analysis were further conducted on mRNA-miRNA pairs, which revealed that miR-219-5p-MT1F and -TRIB3 pairs by AgNPs are being involved in various cellular processes, such as, oxidative stress, cell cycle and apoptosis, whereas, miR-654-3p and ENDOGL1 pair by Ag ions generated a much simpler network. The putative target genes of AgNPs-induced miR-504, miR-33 and miR-302 identified by Tarbase 6.0 are also found to be involved in DNA damage and apoptosis. These results collectively suggest that distinct epigenetic regulation may be an underlying mechanism of different sensitivity of Jurkat T cells to AgNPs and Ag ion. Further identification of putative target genes of DE miRNA by AgNPs and Ag ions may provide additional clues for the

  5. Molecular regulation of MHC class I chain-related protein A expression after HDAC-inhibitor treatment of Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars; Jensen, Helle; Pedersen, Marianne T

    2007-01-01

    /B expression. It was further observed that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were depleted after HDAC treatment. NF-kappaB activity can be induced by HDAC treatment. However, nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p65 was not observed after HDAC treatment of Jurkat T cells and even though we could effectively...... inhibit p65 expression by siRNA, it did not modify MICA/B expression. To identify important elements in MICA regulation, we made a promoter construct consisting of approximately 3 kb of the proximal MICA promoter in front of GFP. Deletion analysis showed that a germinal center-box containing a putative Sp...

  6. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  7. Markers of T Cell Senescence in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing the aging of their population, and many more will face a similar obstacle in the near future, which could be a burden to many healthcare systems. Increased susceptibility to infections, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, cancer as well as reduced efficacy of vaccination are important matters for researchers in the field of aging. As older adults show higher prevalence for a variety of diseases, this also implies higher risk of complications, including nosocomial infections, slower recovery and sequels that may reduce the autonomy and overall quality of life of older adults. The age-related effects on the immune system termed as “immunosenescence” can be exemplified by the reported hypo-responsiveness to influenza vaccination of the elderly. T cells, which belong to the adaptive arm of the immune system, have been extensively studied and the knowledge gathered enables a better understanding of how the immune system may be affected after acute/chronic infections and how this matters in the long run. In this review, we will focus on T cells and discuss the surface and molecular markers that are associated with T cell senescence. We will also look at the implications that senescent T cells could have on human health and diseases. Finally, we will discuss the benefits of having these markers for investigators and the future work that is needed to advance the field of T cell senescence markers.

  8. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench modulates human T-cell cytokine response☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fabiana N.; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Lin, Hong; Lau, Clara B.S.; Kennelly, Edward J.; Cassileth, Barrie R.; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the composition of a neutral and weakly acidic water-soluble extract from Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EchNWA) previously shown to modify murine influenza infection, and to assess immunomodulatory effects on human T-cells. EchNWA extract from fresh aerial parts was extracted with water, ethanolic precipitation, and size-exclusion chromatography. The chemical profile of EchNWA was characterized by chromatography (size-exclusion, HPLC, GC–MS), and small molecule finger-print analysis performed by HPLC–PDA. Jurkat T-cells at high and low cell density were pretreated or not with doses of EchNWA, followed by activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin (PMA+I). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFNg) cytokine secretions were measured by multi-cytokine luminex technology. Results showed that EchNWA contains 80% polysaccharides, predominantly a 10 kDa entity; phenolic compounds, cynarin, cichoric and caftaric acids, but no detectable alkylamides. Cytokine production required stimulation and was lower after PMA+I activation in high-density compared to low-density conditions. EchNWA mediated a strong dose-dependent enhancement of high-density T-cell production of IL-2 and IFNg response to PMA+I. EchNWA alone did not stimulate T-cells. EchNWA enhanced mean fluorescence intensity of IL-2 in Jurkat T-cells activated by PMA+1 or ionomycin alone. Conversely EchNWA mediated modest but significant suppression of IFNg response and reduced the percentage of CD25+ T-cells under low-density conditions. Conclusions are that EchNWA polysaccharides, but not phenolic compounds have dose-related adjuvant effects on human T-cell cytokine responses characterized by enhancing and suppressive effects that are regulated by T-cell density. PMID:24434371

  9. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench modulates human T-cell cytokine response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fabiana N; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Lin, Hong; Lau, Clara B S; Kennelly, Edward J; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2014-03-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the composition of a neutral and weakly acidic water-soluble extract from Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EchNWA) previously shown to modify murine influenza infection, and to assess immunomodulatory effects on human T-cells. EchNWA extract from fresh aerial parts was extracted with water, ethanolic precipitation, and size-exclusion chromatography. The chemical profile of EchNWA was characterized by chromatography (size-exclusion, HPLC, GC-MS), and small molecule fingerprint analysis performed by HPLC-PDA. Jurkat T-cells at high and low cell density were pretreated or not with doses of EchNWA, followed by activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin (PMA+I). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFNg) cytokine secretions were measured by multi-cytokine luminex technology. Results showed that EchNWA contains 80% polysaccharides, predominantly a 10kDa entity; phenolic compounds, cynarin, cichoric and caftaric acids, but no detectable alkylamides. Cytokine production required stimulation and was lower after PMA+I activation in high-density compared to low-density conditions. EchNWA mediated a strong dose-dependent enhancement of high-density T-cell production of IL-2 and IFNg response to PMA+I. EchNWA alone did not stimulate T-cells. EchNWA enhanced mean fluorescence intensity of IL-2 in Jurkat T-cells activated by PMA+1 or ionomycin alone. Conversely EchNWA mediated modest but significant suppression of IFNg response and reduced the percentage of CD25+ T-cells under low-density conditions. Conclusions are that EchNWA polysaccharides, but not phenolic compounds have dose-related adjuvant effects on human T-cell cytokine responses characterized by enhancing and suppressive effects that are regulated by T-cell density. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cyclophosphamide Perturbs Cytosine Methylation in Jurkat-T Cells through LSD1-mediated Stabilization of DNMT1 Protein

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Jing; Yuan, Bifeng; Zhang, Fan; Xiong, Lei; Wu, Jiang; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Wang, Yinsheng

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine methylation is known to be associated with cancer development. Here we assessed how common cancer chemotherapeutic agents perturb cytosine methylation in Jurkat-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We tested six anti-tumor agents and found that cyclophosphamide induced the most pronounced increase in global DNA cytosine methylation after a 24-hr treatment. Long-term treatment with cyclophosphamide led to a time-dependent increase in cytosine methylation level with up to 4 d...

  11. The oncogenic 70Z Cbl mutation blocks the phosphotyrosine binding domain-dependent negative regulation of ZAP-70 by c-Cbl in Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, J E; Paik, P K; Samelson, L E

    1999-10-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement results in the activation of Src family (Lck and Fyn) and ZAP-70 protein tyrosine kinases, leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple cellular substrates including the complex adapter protein c-Cbl. Moreover, Cbl is tyrosine phosphorylated upon engagement of growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors, and immunoreceptors and functions as a negative regulator of tyrosine kinase signalling pathways. Cbl associates via its phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain to the ZAP-70 pY292 negative regulatory phosphotyrosine. We recently demonstrated that the oncogenic Cbl mutant, 70Z Cbl, requires its PTB domain to upregulate NFAT in unstimulated Jurkat T cells. Here, we demonstrate that kinase-dead but not wild-type forms of Fyn, Lck, and ZAP-70 block 70Z Cbl-mediated NFAT activation. Moreover, 70Z Cbl does not upregulate NFAT in the ZAP-70-deficient P116 Jurkat T-cell line. The requirement for Fyn, Lck, and ZAP-70 is not due to tyrosine phosphorylation of 70Z Cbl, as mutation of all tyrosines in, or deletion of, the C-terminal region of 70Z Cbl (amino acids 655 to 906) blocks 70Z Cbl tyrosine phosphorylation but enhances 70Z Cbl-mediated NFAT activation. Further, 70Z Cbl does not cooperate with ZAP-70 Y292F to upregulate NFAT, indicating that 70Z Cbl and ZAP-70 do not activate parallel signalling pathways. Finally, the upregulation of NFAT observed upon ZAP-70 overexpression is blocked by Cbl in a PTB domain-dependent manner. We conclude that oncogenic 70Z Cbl acts as a dominant negative to block the PTB domain-dependent negative regulatory role of endogenous Cbl on ZAP-70, leading to constitutive ZAP-70 signalling and activation of transcription factors.

  12. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

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    Derek C. Macallan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katika, Madhumohan R. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Hendriksen, Peter J.M. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Shao, Jia [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Loveren, Henk van [Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Peijnenburg, Ad, E-mail: ad.peijnenburg@wur.nl [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  14. CD45 immunoaffinity depletion of vesicles from Jurkat T cells demonstrates that exosomes contain CD45: no evidence for a distinct exosome/HIV-1 budding pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ott David E

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of relatively high levels of cellular protein contamination in density-purified virion preparations is a confounding factor in biochemical analyses of HIV and SIV produced from hematopoietic cells. A major source of this contamination is from vesicles, either microvesicles or exosomes, that have similar physical properties as virions. Thus, these particles can not be removed by size or density fractionation. Although virions and vesicles have similar cellular protein compositions, CD45 is excluded from HIV-1 yet is present in vesicles produced from hematopoietic cells. By exploiting this finding, we have developed a CD45 immunoaffinity depletion procedure that removes vesicles from HIV-1 preparations. While this approach has been successfully applied to virion preparations from several different cell types, some groups have concluded that "exosomes" from certain T cell lines, specifically Jurkat, do not contain CD45. If this interpretation is correct, then these vesicles could not be removed by CD45 immunoaffinity depletion. Here we show that dense vesicles produced by Jurkat and SupT1/CCR5 cells contain CD45 and are efficiently removed from preparations by CD45-immunoaffinity depletion. Also, contaminating cellular proteins were removed from virion preparations produced by these lines. Previously, the absence of CD45 from both "exosomes" and virions has been used to support the so called Trojan exosome hypothesis, namely that HIV-1 is simply an exosome containing viral material. The presence of CD45 on vesicles, including exosomes, and its absence on virions argues against a specialized budding pathway that is shared by both exosomes and HIV-1.

  15. The molecular mechanism of curcumol on inducing cell growth arrest and apoptosis in Jurkat cells, a model of CD4⁺ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Xiaoji; Wang, Zhizhong; Zhong, Bing; Fang, Yongfei

    2014-08-01

    CD4(+) T cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) express growth signaling pathway in association with deregulated growth and resistance to apoptosis. The janus kinase (Jak) 3 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway play a critical role in interleukin-2 (IL-2)-induced CD4(+) T cell proliferation. The present study aimed to explore the anti-cell proliferation mechanism of curcumol, a pure monomer extracted from Chinese medical plant Rhizoma curcumae. Cell proliferation was determined using WST-1 assay after curcumol treatment. The cell cycle distribution and Bcl-2 protein expression were assessed by flow cytometry. The cellular morphology of apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst 33258 staining. The expressions of phosphorylated-Jak3 (p-Jak3), p-STAT3, and p-STAT5a following IL-2 stimulation were determined by western blot analysis. The Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay was used to detect the DNA binding activities of transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5. The study results showed that curcumol could inhibit the IL-2-induced Jurkat cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vitro. Curcumol could cause cell cycle arrest at the S phase, induce cell apoptosis, and inhibit the expression of Bcl-2 in a dose-dependent manner. Curcumol at 50μg/mL and Jak3 inhibitor ZM39923 could inhibit the phosphorylation of Jak3 and STAT5a. In conclusion, the underlying mechanism of curcumol on suppressing CD4(+) T cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis might partly be mediated by inhibition of Jak3-STAT5-related molecular activities and Bcl-2 expression, respectively; further studies are required in vivo to test the use of curcumol as a promising therapeutic option for RA.

  16. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  17. Failure to synthesize the human T-cell CD3-zeta chain and its consequence for the T-cell receptor-CD3 complex expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Kuhlmann, J; Plesner, T;

    1989-01-01

    The T-cell antigen receptor is composed of two variable chains (alpha and beta, termed TcR) which confer ligand specificity, and four constant chains (gamma, delta, epsilon, and zeta, collectively termed CD3) whose functions are not fully understood. To explore the role of the individual CD3...... components, the human T-cell tumour line Jurkat was chemically mutagenized followed by negative selection with F101.01 (a monoclonal antibody against the TcR-CD3 complex), and cloning. Growing clones were analysed for TcR-CD3 expression by immunofluorescence. One clone, J79, was found to express greatly...... the normal intracellular fate of the TcR-CD3 complex, and that the CD3-zeta is necessary for the intracellular transport and expression at the cell surface of the TcR-CD3 complex....

  18. Increase of RhoB in {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis is regulated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase in Jurkat T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chun-Ho [Laboratory of Cytogenetics and Tissue Regeneration, KIRAMS, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Won, Misun; Choi, Chung-Hae; Ahn, Jiwon; Kim, Bo-Kyung [Genome Research Center, KRIBB, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kyung-Bin [Department of Food Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang-Mo, E-mail: kangcm@kcch.re.kr [Laboratory of Cytogenetics and Tissue Regeneration, KIRAMS, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyung-Sook, E-mail: kschung@kribb.re.kr [Genome Research Center, KRIBB, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-08

    The Ras-related small GTP-binding protein RhoB is known to be a pro-apoptotic protein and immediate-early inducible by genotoxic stresses. In addition, JNK activation is known to function in {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis. However, it is unclear how JNK activation and {gamma}-radiation-dependent RhoB induction are related. Here we verified the relationship between JNK activation and RhoB induction. RhoB induction by {gamma}-radiation occurred at the transcriptional level and transcriptional activation of RhoB was concomitant with an increase in RhoB protein. {gamma}-Radiation-induced RhoB expression was markedly attenuated by pretreatment with a JNK-specific inhibitor, SP600125, but not by a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580. Inhibition of JNK caused a decrease in early apoptotic cell death that correlated with RhoB expression. However, PI3K inhibition had no significant effects, indicating that the AKT survival pathway was not involved. The siRNA knockdown of JNK resulted in a decrease in RhoB expression and the siRNA knockdown of RhoB restored cell growth even in the {gamma}-irradiated cells. These results suggest that RhoB regulation involves the JNK pathway and contributes to the early apoptotic response of Jurkat T cells to {gamma}-radiation.

  19. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: Involvement of interleukin-2 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervia, Davide, E-mail: d.cervia@unitus.it [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, “Luigi Sacco” University Hospital, University of Milan, Milano (Italy); Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Perrotta, Cristiana [Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, “Luigi Sacco” University Hospital, University of Milan, Milano (Italy); Picchietti, Simona [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Alimenti, Claudio [Department of Environmental and Natural Sciences, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy); Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Vallesi, Adriana [Department of Environmental and Natural Sciences, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy)

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell–cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth. -- Highlights: ► Euplotes pheromone Er-1 increases the growth of human Jurkat T-cells. ► Er-1 increases the T-cell production of specific cytokines. ► Er-1 activates interleukin-2 receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. ► The immuno-enhancing effect of Er-1 on Jurkat cells translates to an inhibition of human glioma cell growth.

  20. Molecular characterization of a fully human chimeric T-cell antigen receptor for tumor-associated antigen EpCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasu, Naoto; Yamada, Hiromi; Shibaguchi, Hirotomo; Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR) is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ) specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy.

  1. Molecular Characterization of a Fully Human Chimeric T-Cell Antigen Receptor for Tumor-Associated Antigen EpCAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Shirasu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy.

  2. Vaccinia Virus Inhibits T Cell Receptor–Dependent Responses by Human γδ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O.; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S.; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C. David

    2008-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human γδ T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in γδ T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light–inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vγ2Vδ2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vγ2Vδ2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of γδ T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens. PMID:17152007

  3. Vaccinia virus inhibits T cell receptor-dependent responses by human gammadelta T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C David

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human gammadelta T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in gammadelta T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light-inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of gammadelta T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens.

  4. Influence of expressed TRAIL on biophysical properties of the human leukemic cell line Jurkat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai CHEN; Zong Yao WEN; Shu CHIEN; Dan LI; Yu Hui JIANG; Wei Juan YAO; Xin Juan WANG; Xiao Chao WEI; Jing GAO; Li De XIE; Zong Yi YAN

    2004-01-01

    The cDNA fragment of human TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand) was cloned into RevTet-On, a Tetregulated and high-level gene expression system. The gene expression system was constructed in a human leukemic cell line: Jurkat. By using RevTet-On TRAIL gene expression system in Jurkat as a cell model, we studied the influence of TRAIL gene on the changes of cellular apoptosis before and after the TRAIL gene expression, which was induced by adding tetracycline derivative doxycycline (Dox). The results indicated that the cellular apoptosis ratio was largely dependent on the TRAIL gene expression level. Moreover, it was found that the apoptosis-inducing TRAIL could cause significant changes in the biophysical properties of Jurkat cells. The cell surface charge density decreased, the membrane fluidity declined, the elastic coefficients K1 increased, and the proportion of o-helix in membrane protein secondary structure decreased. Thus, the apoptosis-inducing TRAIL gene caused significant changes on the biomechanic properties of Jurkat cells.

  5. Benzo[a]pyrene affects Jurkat T cells in the activated state via the antioxidant response element dependent Nrf2 pathway leading to decreased IL-2 secretion and redirecting glutamine metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Rockstroh, Maxie; Wagner, Juliane [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Baumann, Sven [Department of Metabolomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Schorsch, Katrin [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Trump, Saskia; Lehmann, Irina [Department of Environmental Immunology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Bergen, Martin von [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Environmental Immunology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg (Denmark); Tomm, Janina M., E-mail: Janina.tomm@ufz.de [Department of Proteomics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    There is a clear evidence that environmental pollutants, such as benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), can have detrimental effects on the immune system, whereas the underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. Jurkat T cells share many properties with native T lymphocytes and therefore are an appropriate model to analyze the effects of environmental pollutants on T cells and their activation. Since environmental compounds frequently occur at low, not acute toxic concentrations, we analyzed the effects of two subtoxic concentrations, 50 nM and 5 μM, on non- and activated cells. B[a]P interferes directly with the stimulation process as proven by an altered IL-2 secretion. Furthermore, B[a]P exposure results in significant proteomic changes as shown by DIGE analysis. Pathway analysis revealed an involvement of the AhR independent Nrf2 pathway in the altered processes observed in unstimulated and stimulated cells. A participation of the Nrf2 pathway in the change of IL-2 secretion was confirmed by exposing cells to the Nrf2 activator tBHQ. tBHQ and 5 μM B[a]P caused similar alterations of IL-2 secretion and glutamine/glutamate metabolism. Moreover, the proteome changes in unstimulated cells point towards a modified regulation of the cytoskeleton and cellular stress response, which was proven by western blotting. Additionally, there is a strong evidence for alterations in metabolic pathways caused by B[a]P exposure in stimulated cells. Especially the glutamine/glutamate metabolism was indicated by proteome pathway analysis and validated by metabolite measurements. The detrimental effects were slightly enhanced in stimulated cells, suggesting that stimulated cells are more vulnerable to the environmental pollutant model compound B[a]P. - Highlights: • B[a]P affects the proteome of Jurkat T cells also at low concentrations. • Exposure to B[a]P (50 nM, 5 μM) did not change Jurkat T cell viability. • Both B[a]P concentrations altered the IL-2 secretion of stimulated cells.

  6. T cells display mitochondria hyperpolarization in human type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Chernatynskaya, Anna V; Li, Jian-Wei; Kimbrell, Matthew R; Cassidy, Richard J; Perry, Daniel J; Muir, Andrew B; Atkinson, Mark A; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E

    2017-09-07

    T lymphocytes constitute a major effector cell population in autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Despite essential functions of mitochondria in regulating activation, proliferation, and apoptosis of T cells, little is known regarding T cell metabolism in the progression of human type 1 diabetes. In this study, we report, using two independent cohorts, that T cells from patients with type 1 diabetes exhibited mitochondrial inner-membrane hyperpolarization (MHP). Increased MHP was a general phenotype observed in T cell subsets irrespective of prior antigen exposure, and was not correlated with HbA1C levels, subject age, or duration of diabetes. Elevated T cell MHP was not detected in subjects with type 2 diabetes. T cell MHP was associated with increased activation-induced IFNγ production, and activation-induced IFNγ was linked to mitochondria-specific ROS production. T cells from subjects with type 1 diabetes also exhibited lower intracellular ATP levels. In conclusion, intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction observed in type 1 diabetes alters mitochondrial ATP and IFNγ production; the latter is correlated with ROS generation. These changes impact T cell bioenergetics and function.

  7. Reishi immuno-modulation protein induces interleukin-2 expression via protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways within human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Wei-Chi; Hsu, Jason; Weng, Shih-Ting; Lin, Tsai-Leng; Liu, Chun-Yi; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang; Huang, Ching-Tsan

    2008-04-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a medicinal fungus is thought to possess and enhance a variety of human immune functions. An immuno-modulatory protein, Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8) isolated from G. lucidum exhibited potent mitogenic effects upon human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). However, LZ-8-mediated signal transduction in the regulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene expression within human T cells is largely unknown. Here we cloned the LZ-8 gene of G. lucidum, and expressed the recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) by means of a yeast Pichia pastoris protein expression system. We found that rLZ-8 induces IL-2 gene expression via the Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), via reactive oxygen species (ROS), and differential protein kinase-dependent pathways within human primary T cells and cultured Jurkat T cells. In essence, we have established the nature of the rLZ-8-mediated signal-transduction pathways, such as PTK/protein kinase C (PKC)/ROS, PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/ERK1/2, and PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/p38 pathways in the regulation of IL-2 gene expression within human T cells. Our current results of analyzing rLZ-8-mediated signal transduction in T cells might provide a potential application for rLZ-8 as a pharmacological immune-modulating agent.

  8. Prometaphase arrest-dependent phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bim reduces the association of Bcl-2 with Bak or Bim, provoking Bak activation and mitochondrial apoptosis in nocodazole-treated Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cho Rong; Jun, Do Youn; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of Jurkat T cells with the microtubule-depolymerizing agent nocodazole (NOC) caused prometaphase arrest and apoptosis. NOC-induced mitochondrial apoptotic events including Bak activation, Δψm loss, cytochrome c release, and caspase cascade activation were blocked by Bcl-2 overexpression. However, mitotic arrest, Cdc25C activation, upregulation of cyclin B1 levels, Cdk1 activation, Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Thr-56 and Ser-70, and Bim phosphorylation were retained. The treatment of Jurkat T cells concomitantly with NOC and the G1/S-blocking agent hydroxyurea resulted in G1/S arrest and complete abrogation of all apoptotic events. The association of Bcl-2 with Bim or Bak declined after the prometaphase arrest-dependent phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bim, whereas the association of Bcl-2 with Bax remained relatively constant. Although Bax was redistributed from the cytosol to the mitochondria, resulting in an increase in the mitochondrial level of Bax following NOC treatment, the subcellular localization of Bcl-2, Bim, Bak and apoptosis-inducing factor was confined to the mitochondrial fraction irrespective of NOC treatment. Experiments using selective caspase inhibitors showed that mitochondria-dependent activation of caspase-9 and -3 was crucial for NOC-induced apoptosis. NOC-induced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bim, Δψm loss, and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic events were significantly suppressed by a Cdk1 inhibitor roscovitine, but not by the JNK inhibitor SP600125 or the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. These results show that the prometaphase arrest-dependent phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bim, which was mediated by Cdk1, could reduce the association of Bcl-2 with Bak or Bim to allow Bak activation and mitochondrial apoptotic events in Jurkat T cells exposed to NOC.

  9. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  10. Effector Vγ9Vδ2 T cells dominate the human fetal γδ T-cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Tanya; Brouwer, Margreet; Gosselin, Françoise; Tassignon, Joël; Leo, Oberdan; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud; Vermijlen, David

    2015-02-10

    γδ T cells are unconventional T cells recognizing antigens via their γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) in a way that is fundamentally different from conventional αβ T cells. γδ T cells usually are divided into subsets according the type of Vγ and/or Vδ chain they express in their TCR. T cells expressing the TCR containing the γ-chain variable region 9 and the δ-chain variable region 2 (Vγ9Vδ2 T cells) are the predominant γδ T-cell subset in human adult peripheral blood. The current thought is that this predominance is the result of the postnatal expansion of cells expressing particular complementary-determining region 3 (CDR3) in response to encounters with microbes, especially those generating phosphoantigens derived from the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis. However, here we show that, rather than requiring postnatal microbial exposure, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are the predominant blood subset in the second-trimester fetus, whereas Vδ1(+) and Vδ3(+) γδ T cells are present only at low frequencies at this gestational time. Fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are phosphoantigen responsive and display very limited diversity in the CDR3 of the Vγ9 chain gene, where a germline-encoded sequence accounts for >50% of all sequences, in association with a prototypic CDR3δ2. Furthermore, these fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are functionally preprogrammed (e.g., IFN-γ and granzymes-A/K), with properties of rapidly activatable innatelike T cells. Thus, enrichment for phosphoantigen-responsive effector T cells has occurred within the fetus before postnatal microbial exposure. These various characteristics have been linked in the mouse to the action of selecting elements and would establish a much stronger parallel between human and murine γδ T cells than is usually articulated.

  11. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  12. Distinct Pattern of Human Vδ1 T Cells Recognizing MICA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianqiang Li; Lianxian Cui; Wei He

    2005-01-01

    γδ T cells represent one unique recognition pattern, the limited recognition, which distinguishes from the specific recognition for αβ T cells and pattern recognition for macrophages. Vδ1 γδ T cell is the major subset of human γδT cells, which predominates in mucosal tissue including the intestinal epithelia. Presently, a few antigens that human Vδ1TCR can recognize have been identified. Among them, MHC class Ⅰ chain-related molecules A (MICA)have been studied most intensively. Besides Vδ1TCR, MICA is also the ligand of NKG2D, a C-type lectin-like activating immunoreceptor. In human, only Vδ1 cells can simultaneously express both types of receptors of MICA while NK cells, αβ T cells and other subsets of γδ T cells likewise express NKG2D. Although the precise mechanisms are still enigmatic, this distinct pattern of Vδ1 cells recognizing MICA predicts unique biological significance of Vδ1 cells in immune defense. Recent years, some progresses have been made in this issue. In this review we summarize the related reports and put forward some novel views based on our group's studies.

  13. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  14. RHAMNAZIN INHIBITS PROLIFERATION AND INDUCES APOPTOSIS OF HUMAN JURKAT LEUKEMIA CELLS IN VITRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philchenkov, A A; Zavelevych, M P

    2015-01-01

    Antiproliferative and apoptogenic effects of rhamnazin, a dimethoxylated derivative of quercetin, were studied in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells. The cytotoxicity and apoptogenic activity of rhamnazin in vitro are inferior to that of quercetin. The apoptogenic activity of rhamnazin is realized via mitochondrial pathway and associated with activation of caspase-9 and -3. The additive apoptogenic effect of rhamnazin and suboptimal doses of etoposide, a DNA topoisomerase II inhibitor, is demonstrated. Therefore, methylation of quercetin modifies its biological effects considerably.

  15. Two essential regulatory elements in the human interferon gamma promoter confer activation specific expression in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penix, L; Weaver, W M; Pang, Y; Young, H A; Wilson, C B

    1993-11-01

    Like interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) is an early response gene in T cells and both are prototypical T helper cell type 1 (Th-1) lymphokines. Yet IL-2 and IFN-gamma production are independently regulated, as demonstrated by their differential expression in certain T cell subsets, suggesting that the regulatory elements in these two genes must differ. To explore this possibility, the 5' flank of the human IFN-gamma gene was analyzed. Expression of IFN-gamma promoter-driven beta-galactosidase reporter constructs containing 538 bp of 5' flank was similar to that by constructs driven by the IL-2 promoter in activated Jurkat T cells; expression nearly as great was observed with the construct containing only 108 bp of IFN-gamma 5' flank. These IFN-gamma promoter constructs faithfully mirrored expression of the endogenous gene, in that expression required activation both with ionomycin and PMA, was inhibited by cyclosporin A, and was not observed in U937 or THP-1 cells. The region between -108 and -40 bp in the IFN-gamma promoter was required for promoter function and contained two elements that are conserved across species. Deletion of 10 bp within either element reduced promoter function by 70%, whereas deletions in nonconserved portions of this region had little effect on promoter function. The distal conserved element (-96 to -80 bp) contained a consensus GATA motif and a potential regulatory motif found in the promoter regions of the GM-CSF and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) genes. Factors binding to this element, including GATA-3, were found in Jurkat nuclear extracts by electromobility shift assays and two of the three complexes observed were altered in response to activation. One or both of these motifs are present in the 5' flank of multiple, other lymphokine genes, including IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, and GM-CSF, but neither is present in the promoter of the IL-2 gene. The proximal conserved element (-73 to -48 bp) shares homology with the NFIL-2

  16. Human regulatory T cell suppressive function is independent of apoptosis induction in activated effector T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Vercoulen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD4(+CD25(+FOXP3(+ Regulatory T cells (Treg play a central role in the immune balance to prevent autoimmune disease. One outstanding question is how Tregs suppress effector immune responses in human. Experiments in mice demonstrated that Treg restrict effector T cell (Teff responses by deprivation of the growth factor IL-2 through Treg consumption, resulting in apoptosis of Teff. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the relevance of Teff apoptosis induction to human Treg function. To this end, we studied naturally occurring Treg (nTreg from peripheral blood of healthy donors, and, to investigate Treg function in inflammation in vivo, Treg from synovial fluid of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA patients (SF-Treg. Both nTreg and SF-Treg suppress Teff proliferation and cytokine production efficiently as predicted. However, in contrast with murine Treg, neither nTreg nor SF-Treg induce apoptosis in Teff. Furthermore, exogenously supplied IL-2 and IL-7 reverse suppression, but do not influence apoptosis of Teff. SIGNIFICANCE: Our functional data here support that Treg are excellent clinical targets to counteract autoimmune diseases. For optimal functional outcome in human clinical trials, future work should focus on the ability of Treg to suppress proliferation and cytokine production of Teff, rather than induction of Teff apoptosis.

  17. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  18. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  19. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: involvement of interleukin-2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervia, Davide; Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina; Perrotta, Cristiana; Picchietti, Simona; Alimenti, Claudio; Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell-cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth.

  20. Functional Assessment of Pharmacological Telomerase Activators in Human T Cells

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    Rita B. Effros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are structures at the ends of chromosomes that shorten during cell division and eventually signal an irreversible state of growth arrest known as cellular senescence. To delay this cellular aging, human T cells, which are critical in the immune control over infections and cancer, activate the enzyme telomerase, which binds and extends the telomeres. Several different extracts from the Astragalus membranaceus root have been documented to activate telomerase activity in human T cells. The objective of this research was to compare two extracts from Astragalus membranaceus, TA-65 and HTA, for their effects on both telomerase and proliferative activity of human CD4 and CD8 T cells. Our results demonstrate that, TA-65 increased telomerase activity significantly (1.3 to 3.3-fold relative to controls in T cell cultures from six donors tested, whereas HTA only increased telomerase levels in two out of six donors. We also demonstrate that TA-65 activates telomerase by a MAPK- specific pathway. Finally, we determine that during a three-day culture period, only the T cells treated with the TA-65 extract showed a statistically significant increase in proliferative activity. Our results underscore the importance of comparing multiple telomerase activators within the same experiment, and of including functional assays in addition to measuring telomerase activity.

  1. Contribution of Herpesvirus Specific CD8 T Cells to Anti-Viral T Cell Response in Humans

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    Elena Sandalova; Diletta Laccabue; Carolina Boni; Tan, Anthony T; Katja Fink; Eng Eong Ooi; Robert Chua; Bahar Shafaeddin Schreve; Carlo Ferrari; Antonio Bertoletti

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 1...

  2. Measuring T cell receptor and T cell gene expression diversity in antigen-responsive human CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Anne; Lindner, Annett; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Wilhelm, Carmen; Dietz, Sevina; Catani, Mara; Ziegler, Anette-G; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2013-12-31

    T cells have diversity in TCR, epitope recognition, and cytokine production, and can be used for immune monitoring. Furthermore, clonal expansion of TCR families in disease may provide opportunities for TCR-directed therapies. We developed methodology for sequencing expressed genes of TCR alpha and beta chains from single cells and applied this to vaccine (tetanus-toxoid)-responsive CD4(+) T cells. TCR alpha and beta chains were both successfully sequenced in 1309 (43%) of 3038 CD4(+) T cells yielding 677 different receptors. TRAV and TRBV gene usage differed between tetanus-toxoid-responsive and non-responsive cells (p=0.004 and 0.0002), and there was extensive TCR diversity in tetanus-toxoid-responsive cells within individuals. Identical TCRs could be recovered in different samples from the same subject: TCRs identified after booster vaccination were frequent in pre-booster memory T cells (31% of pre-booster TCR), and also identified in pre-booster vaccination naïve cells (6.5%). No TCR was shared between subjects, but tetanus toxoid-responsive cells sharing one of their TCR chains were observed within and between subjects. Coupling single-cell gene expression profiling to TCR sequencing revealed examples of distinct cytokine profiles in cells bearing identical TCR. Novel molecular methodology demonstrates extensive diversity of Ag-responsive CD4(+) T cells within and between individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  4. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sandalova

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR, proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV. CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  5. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandalova, Elena; Laccabue, Diletta; Boni, Carolina; Tan, Anthony T; Fink, Katja; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chua, Robert; Shafaeddin Schreve, Bahar; Ferrari, Carlo; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2010-08-19

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza) pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR), proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low)) and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV). CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza) were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  6. Functional heterogeneity of human effector CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Hiroshi; Naruto, Takuya; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-02-09

    Effector CD8(+) T cells are believed to be terminally differentiated cells having cytotoxic activity and the ability to produce effector cytokines such as INF-γ and TNF-α. We investigated the difference between CXCR1(+) and CXCR1(-) subsets of human effector CD27(-)CD28(-)CD8(+) T cells. The subsets expressed cytolytic molecules similarly and exerted substantial cytolytic activity, whereas only the CXCR1(-) subset had IL-2 productivity and self-proliferative activity and was more resistant to cell death than the CXCR1(+) subset. These differences were explained by the specific up-regulation of CAMK4, SPRY2, and IL-7R in the CXCR1(-) subset and that of pro-apoptotic death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in the CXCR1(+) subset. The IL-2 producers were more frequently found in the IL-7R(+) subset of the CXCR1(-) effector CD8(+) T cells than in the IL-7R(-) subset. IL-7/IL-7R signaling promoted cell survival only in the CXCR1(-) subset. The present study has highlighted a novel subset of effector CD8(+) T cells producing IL-2 and suggests the importance of this subset in the homeostasis of effector CD8(+) T cells.

  7. Ex vivo expansion protocol for human tumor specific T cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Anne-Marie; Borelli, Gabriel; Hoel, Hanna Julie; Lislerud, Kari; Gaudernack, Gustav; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Aarvak, Tanja

    2010-04-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy is a promising treatment strategy for patients with different types of cancer. The methods used for generation of high numbers of tumor specific T cells usually require long-term ex vivo culture, which frequently lead to generation of terminally differentiated effector cells, demonstrating low persistence in vivo. Therefore, optimization of protocols for generation of T cells for adoptive cell therapy is warranted. The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for expansion of antigen-specific T cells using Dynabeads CD3/CD28 to obtain T cells expressing markers important for in vivo persistence and survival. To achieve high numbers of antigen-specific T cells following expansion, we have tested the effect of depleting regulatory T cells using Dynabeads CD25 and including a pre-stimulation step with peptide prior to the non-specific expansion with Dynabeads. Our data demonstrate that virus- and tumor specific T cells can be expanded to high numbers using Dynabeads CD3/CD28 following optimization of the culture conditions. The expansion protocol presented here results in enrichment of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells with an early/intermediate memory phenotype. This is observed even when the antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells demonstrated a terminal effector phenotype prior to expansion. This protocol thus results in expanded T cells with a phenotypic profile which may increase the chance of retaining long-term persistence following adoptive transfer. Based on these data we have developed a cGMP protocol for expansion of tumor specific T cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

  8. Human mesenchymal stem cells promote survival of T cells in a quiescent state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuto, Federica; Ferrari, Stefania; Gerdoni, Ezio; Gualandi, Francesca; Frassoni, Francesco; Pistoia, Vito; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Uccelli, Antonio

    2007-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are part of the bone marrow that provides signals supporting survival and growth of bystander hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). MSC modulate also the immune response, as they inhibit proliferation of lymphocytes. In order to investigate whether MSC can support survival of T cells, we investigated MSC capacity of rescuing T lymphocytes from cell death induced by different mechanisms. We observed that MSC prolong survival of unstimulated T cells and apoptosis-prone thymocytes cultured under starving conditions. MSC rescued T cells from activation induced cell death (AICD) by downregulation of Fas receptor and Fas ligand on T cell surface and inhibition of endogenous proteases involved in cell death. MSC dampened also Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of CD95 expressing Jurkat leukemic T cells. In contrast, rescue from AICD was not associated with a significant change of Bcl-2, an inhibitor of apoptosis induced by cell stress. Accordingly, MSC exhibited a minimal capacity of rescuing Jurkat cells from chemically induced apoptosis, a process disrupting the mitochondrial membrane potential regulated by Bcl-2. These results suggest that MSC interfere with the Fas receptor regulated process of programmed cell death. Overall, MSC can inhibit proliferation of activated T cells while supporting their survival in a quiescent state, providing a model of their activity inside the HSC niche. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  9. Potent suppression of Kv1.3 potassium channel and IL-2 secretion by diphenyl phosphine oxide-1 in human T cells.

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    Ning Zhao

    Full Text Available Diphenyl phosphine oxide-1 (DPO-1 is a potent Kv1.5 channel inhibitor that has therapeutic potential for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Many other Kv1.5 channel blockers also potently inhibit the Kv1.3 channel, but whether DPO-1 blocks Kv1.3 channels has not been investigated. The Kv1.3 channel is highly expressed in activated T cells, which is considered a favorable target for immunomodulation. Accordingly, we hypothesized that DPO-1 may exert immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting Kv1.3 channel activity. In this study, DPO-1 blocked Kv1.3 current in a voltage-dependent and concentration-dependent manner, with IC₅₀ values of 2.58 µM in Jurkat cells and 3.11 µM in human peripheral blood T cells. DPO-1 also accelerated the inactivation rate and negatively shifted steady-state inactivation. Moreover, DPO-1 at 3 µM had no apparent effect on the Ca²⁺ activated potassium channel (K(Ca current in both Jurkat cells and human peripheral blood T cells. In Jurkat cells, pre-treatment with DPO-1 for 24 h decreased Kv1.3 current density, and protein expression by 48±6% and 60±9%, at 3 and 10 µM, respectively (both p<0.05. In addition, Ca²⁺ influx to Ca²⁺-depleted cells was blunted and IL-2 production was also reduced in activated Jurkat cells. IL-2 secretion was also inhibited by the Kv1.3 inhibitors margatoxin and charybdotoxin. Our results demonstrate for the first time that that DPO-1, at clinically relevant concentrations, blocks Kv1.3 channels, decreases Kv1.3 channel expression and suppresses IL-2 secretion. Therefore, DPO-1 may be a useful treatment strategy for immunologic disorders.

  10. The human T cell receptor alpha variable (TRAV) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaviner, D; Lefranc, M P

    2000-01-01

    'Human T Cell Receptor Alpha Variable (TRAV) Genes', the eighth report of the 'IMGT Locus in Focus' section, comprises four tables: (1) 'Number of human germline TRAV genes at 14q11 and potential repertoire'; (2) 'Human germline TRAV genes at 14q11'; (3) 'Human TRAV allele table', and (4) 'Correspondence between the different human TRAV gene nomenclatures'. These tables are available at the IMGT Marie-Paule page of IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics database (http://imgt.cines.fr:8104) created by Marie-Paule Lefranc, Université Montpellier II, CNRS, France. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Rhamnazin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human jurkat leukemia cells in vitro

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    А. А. Philchenkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antiproliferative and apoptogenic effects of rhamnazin, a dimethoxylated derivative of quercetin, were studied in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells. The cytotoxicity and apoptogenic activity of rhamnazin in vitro are inferior to that of quercetin. The apoptogenic activity of rhamnazin is realized via mitochondrial pathway and associated with activation of caspase-9 and -3. The additive apoptogenic effect of rhamnazin and suboptimal doses of etoposide, a DNA topoisomerase II inhibitor, is demonstrated. Therefore, methylation of quercetin modifies its biological effects considerably.

  12. Suppression of human T cell proliferation by the caspase inhibitors, z-VAD-FMK and z-IETD-FMK is independent of their caspase inhibition properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, C.P. [Medical Research Council Toxicology Unit, Hodgkin Building, Lancaster Road, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom); Chow, S.C., E-mail: chow.sek.chuen@monash.edu [School of Science, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, 46150 Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2012-11-15

    The caspase inhibitors, benzyloxycarbony (Cbz)-l-Val-Ala-Asp (OMe)-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-FMK) and benzyloxycarbonyl (Cbz)-Ile-Glu (OMe)-Thr-Asp (OMe)-FMK (z-IETD-FMK) at non-toxic doses were found to be immunosuppressive and inhibit human T cell proliferation induced by mitogens and IL-2 in vitro. Both caspase inhibitors were shown to block NF-κB in activated primary T cells, but have little inhibitory effect on the secretion of IL-2 and IFN-γ during T cell activation. However, the expression of IL-2 receptor α-chain (CD25) in activated T cells was inhibited by both z-VAD-FMK and z-IETD-FMK, whereas the expression of the early activated T cell marker, CD69 was unaffected. During primary T cell activation via the antigen receptor, both caspase-8 and caspase-3 were activated and processed to their respective subunits, but neither caspase inhibitors had any effect on the processing of these two caspases. In sharp contrast both caspase inhibitors readily blocked apoptosis and the activation of caspases during FasL-induced apoptosis in activated primary T cells and Jurkat T cells. Collectively, the results demonstrate that both z-VAD-FMK and z-IETD-FMK are immunosuppressive in vitro and inhibit T cell proliferation without blocking the processing of caspase-8 and caspase-3. -- Highlights: ► Caspase-8 and caspase-3 were activated during T cell activation and proliferation. ► T cell proliferation was blocked by caspase inhibitors. ► Caspase activation during T cell proliferation was not block by caspase inhibitors.

  13. γ-Tocotrienol induces apoptosis in human T cell lymphoma through activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilankar, Chandan; Khan, Nazir M; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Patwardhan, Raghavendra; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh Kumar; Devasagayam, T P A

    2011-01-01

    Tocotrienols are members of vitamin E family and possess broad biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects. In the present study, we examine the potential of α-tocotrienol (AT) and γ-tocotrienol (GT) in inhibiting the proliferation of human T cell lymphoma Jurkat cells and elucidate the pathways involved in anti tumor effects of GT. GT but not AT inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells in a dose dependent manner. GT treatment resulted in elevated mitochondrial ROS production, activation of JNK and suppression of ERK and p38 MAPK. GT also induced calcium release, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. These changes were accompanied by increase in Bax expression with a concomitant decrease in Bcl-xl expression suggesting activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. GT induced increase in mitochondrial ROS was abrogated by catalase. Besides, GT also up-regulated surface expression of Fas and FasL on Jurkat cells. Further, caspase activation and PARP degradation were also seen in cells treated with GT. Inhibitors of caspase-8 and caspase-9 significantly abrogated GT mediated apoptosis. In contrast GT was not toxic to normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells suggesting differential cytotoxicity towards normal lymphocytes and transformed lymphoma cells. Cellular uptake studies with tocotrienols showed higher intracellular accumulation of GT as compared to AT which may be responsible for its better antitumor activity. Our results show antitumor effects of GT in human lymphoma cells via increased mitochondrial ROS generation and activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways.

  14. SIRT1 Suppresses Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Gao, Wei-Wei; Chan, Chi-Ping; Cheng, Yun; Deng, Jian-Jun; Yuen, Kit-San; Iha, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated diseases are poorly treatable, and HTLV-1 vaccines are not available. High proviral load is one major risk factor for disease development. HTLV-1 encodes Tax oncoprotein, which activates transcription from viral long terminal repeats (LTR) and various types of cellular promoters. Counteracting Tax function might have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits. In this work, we report on the suppression of Tax activation of HTLV-1 LTR by SIRT1 deacetylase. The transcriptional activity of Tax on the LTR was largely ablated when SIRT1 was overexpressed, but Tax activation of NF-κB was unaffected. On the contrary, the activation of the LTR by Tax was boosted when SIRT1 was depleted. Treatment of cells with resveratrol shunted Tax activity in a SIRT1-dependent manner. The activation of SIRT1 in HTLV-1-transformed T cells by resveratrol potently inhibited HTLV-1 proviral transcription and Tax expression, whereas compromising SIRT1 by specific inhibitors augmented HTLV-1 mRNA expression. The administration of resveratrol also decreased the production of cell-free HTLV-1 virions from MT2 cells and the transmission of HTLV-1 from MT2 cells to uninfected Jurkat cells in coculture. SIRT1 associated with Tax in HTLV-1-transformed T cells. Treatment with resveratrol prevented the interaction of Tax with CREB and the recruitment of CREB, CRTC1, and p300 to Tax-responsive elements in the LTR. Our work demonstrates the negative regulatory function of SIRT1 in Tax activation of HTLV-1 transcription. Small-molecule activators of SIRT1 such as resveratrol might be considered new prophylactic and therapeutic agents in HTLV-1-associated diseases. IMPORTANCE Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes a highly lethal blood cancer or a chronic debilitating disease of the spinal cord. Treatments are unsatisfactory, and vaccines are not available. Disease progression is associated with robust expression of HTLV-1 genes

  15. Fenugreek extract as an inducer of cellular death via autophagy in human T lymphoma Jurkat cells

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    Al-Daghri Nasser M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs used both in classical chemotherapy and the more recent targeted therapy do not have cancer cell specificity and, hence, cause severe systemic side effects. Tumors also develop resistance to such drugs due to heterogeneity of cell types and clonal selection. Several traditional dietary ingredients from plants, on the other hand, have been shown to act on multiple targets/pathways, and may overcome drug resistance. The dietary agents are safe and readily available. However, application of plant components for cancer treatment/prevention requires better understanding of anticancer functions and elucidation of their mechanisms of action. The current study focuses on the anticancer properties of fenugreek, a herb with proven anti-diabetic, antitumor and immune-stimulating functions. Method Jurkat cells were incubated with 30 to 1500 μg/mL concentrations of 50% ethanolic extract of dry fenugreek seeds and were followed for changes in viability (trypan blue assay, morphology (microscopic examination and autophagic marker LC3 transcript level (RT-PCR. Results Incubation of Jurkat cells with fenugreek extract at concentrations ranging from 30 to 1500 μg/mL for up to 3 days resulted in cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Jurkat cell death was preceded by the appearance of multiple large vacuoles, which coincided with transcriptional up-regulation of LC3. GC-MS analysis of fenugreek extract indicated the presence of several compounds with anticancer properties, including gingerol (4.82%, cedrene (2.91%, zingerone (16.5%, vanillin (1.52% and eugenol (1.25%. Conclusions Distinct morphological changes involving appearance of large vacuoles, membrane disintegration and increased expression of LC3 transcripts indicated that fenugreek extract induced autophagy and autophagy-associated death of Jurkat cells. In addition to the already known apoptotic activation, induction of autophagy may be an additional mechanism

  16. First insight into the kinome of human regulatory T cells.

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    Sebastian König

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are essential for controlling peripheral tolerance by the active suppression of various immune cells including conventional T effector cells (Teffs. Downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR, more than 500 protein kinases encoded by the human genome have to be considered in signaling cascades regulating the activation of Tregs and Teffs, respectively. Following TCR engagement, Tregs posses a number of unique attributes, such as constitutive expression of Foxp3, hyporesponsiveness and poor cytokine production. Furthermore, recent studies showed that altered regulation of protein kinases is important for Treg function. These data indicate that signaling pathways in Tregs are distinctly organized and alterations at the level of protein kinases contribute to the unique Treg phenotype. However, kinase-based signaling networks in Tregs are poorly understood and necessitate further systematic characterization. In this study, we analyzed the differential expression of kinases in Tregs and Teffs by using a kinase-selective proteome strategy. In total, we revealed quantitative information on 185 kinases expressed in the human CD4(+ T cell subsets. The majority of kinases was equally abundant in both T cell subsets, but 11 kinases were differentially expressed in Tregs. Most strikingly, Tregs showed an altered expression of cell cycle kinases including CDK6. Quantitative proteomics generates first comparative insight into the kinase complements of the CD4(+ Teff and Treg subset. Treg-specific expression pattern of 11 protein kinases substantiate the current opinion that TCR-mediated signaling cascades are altered in Tregs and further suggests that Tregs exhibit significant specificities in cell-cycle control and progression.

  17. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Swaminathan, Harish; Copin, Richard; Lun, Desmond S; Ernst, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    The HLA (human leukocyte antigen) molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  18. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten E Wiens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The HLA (human leukocyte antigen molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. METHODS: We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. RESULTS: We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  19. NF-kappa B activity in T cells stably expressing the Tax protein of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I

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    Lacoste, J.; Cohen, L.; Hiscott, J. (Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-10-01

    The effect of constitutive Tax expression on the interaction of NF-{kappa} B with its recognition sequence and on NF-{kappa} B-dependent gene expression was examined in T lymphoid Jurkat cell lines (19D and 9J) stably transformed with a Tax expression vector. Tax expressing T cell lines contained a constitutive level of NF-{kappa} B binding activity, detectable by mobility shift assay and uv cross-linking using a palindromic NF-{kappa} B probe homologous to the interferon beta PRDII site. In Jurkat and NC2.10 induction with phorbol esters resulted in the appearance of new DNA binding proteins of 85, 75, and 54 kDa, whereas in Tax expressing cells the 85-kDa protein and a 92-kDa DNA binding protein were constitutively induced. Expression of Tax protein in 19D and 9J resulted in transcription of the endogenous NF-kappa B-dependent granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor gene and increased basal level expression of transfected NF-kappa B-regulated promoters. Nonetheless transcription of both the endogenous and the transfected gene was inducible by PMA treatment. Tax expression in Jurkat T cells may alter the stoichiometry of NF-kappa B DNA binding proteins and thus change the expression of NF-kappa B-regulated promoters.

  20. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1......MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  1. Transcriptional activation of immediate-early gene ETR101 by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I Tax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Ma, Shiliang; Li, Bo;

    2003-01-01

    Human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax regulates viral and cellular gene expression through interactions with multiple cellular transcription pathways. This study describes the finding of immediate-early gene ETR101 expression in HTLV-I-infected cells and its regulation by Tax. ETR101...... was persistently expressed in HTLV-I-infected cells but not in HTLV-I uninfected cells. Expression of ETR101 was dependent upon Tax expression in the inducible Tax-expressing cell line JPX-9 and also in Jurkat cells transiently transfected with Tax-expressing vectors. Tax transactivated the ETR101 gene promoter...... in a transient transfection assay. A series of deletion and mutation analyses of the ETR101 gene promoter indicated that a 35 bp region immediately upstream of the TATA-box sequence, which contains a consensus cAMP response element (CRE) and a G+C-rich sequence, is the critical responsive element for Tax...

  2. Transcriptional activation of immediate-early gene ETR101 by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I Tax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Ma, Shiliang; Li, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax regulates viral and cellular gene expression through interactions with multiple cellular transcription pathways. This study describes the finding of immediate-early gene ETR101 expression in HTLV-I-infected cells and its regulation by Tax. ETR101...... was persistently expressed in HTLV-I-infected cells but not in HTLV-I uninfected cells. Expression of ETR101 was dependent upon Tax expression in the inducible Tax-expressing cell line JPX-9 and also in Jurkat cells transiently transfected with Tax-expressing vectors. Tax transactivated the ETR101 gene promoter......-DNA complex in HTLV-I-infected cell lines. EMSA with specific antibodies confirmed that the CREB transcription factor was responsible for formation of this specific protein-DNA complex. These results suggested that Tax directly transactivated ETR101 gene expression, mainly through a CRE sequence via the CREB...

  3. Cytokine-producing T cell subsets in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre

    2000-01-01

    Leishmania specific Th1/Th2 cells have been identified in humans as well as in mice. There is a correlation between the clinical outcome of the infection and the cytokine response profile. Generally, the production of Th2 cytokines leads to severe infection, whereas the production of Th1 cytokine...... cells mutually down-regulate each other. However, the presence of antigen specific regulatory T cell subsets may provide an environment that allows the presence of both Th1 and Th2 cells....

  4. Heterosybtypic T-cell immunity to influenza in humans: challenges for universal T-cell influenza vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya eSridhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the 21st century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protection against a broad range of influenza strains. Such universal influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognising conserved antigens are a key contributor to reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed.

  5. Photoaffinity antigens for human γδ T cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Liu, Xiao-hui; Lee, Hoi K.; Song, Yongcheng; Distefano, Mark D.; Oldfield, Eric; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Morita, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Vγ2Vδ2 T cells comprise the major subset of peripheral blood γ δ T cells in humans and expand during infections by recognizing small, nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphates. These molecules include (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a microbial isoprenoid intermediate, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an endogenous isoprenoid intermediate. Recognition of these nonpeptide antigens is mediated by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell antigen receptor (TCR). Several findings suggest that prenyl pyrophosphates are presented by an antigen presenting molecule: contact between T cells and APCs is required; the antigens do not bind the Vγ2Vδ2 TCR directly; and antigen recognition is abrogated by TCR mutations in CDRs distant from the putative antigen recognition site. Identification of the putative antigen presenting molecule, however, has been hindered by the inability to achieve stable association of nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphate antigens with the presenting molecule. In this study, we show that photoaffinity analogs of HMBPP, meta/para-benzophenone-(methylene)-prenyl pyrophosphates (m/p-BZ-(C)-C5-OPP), can cross-link to the surface of tumor cell lines and be presented as antigens to γ δ T cells. Mutant tumor cell lines lacking MHC class I, MHC class II, β2-microglobulin, and CD1, as well as tumor cell lines from a variety of tissues and individuals, will all crosslink to and present m-BZ-C5-OPP. Finally, pulsing of BZ-(C)-C5-OPP is inhibited by IPP and an inactive analog, suggesting that they bind to the same molecule. Taken together, these results suggest that nonpeptide antigens are presented by a novel antigen presenting molecule that is widely distributed, non-polymorphic, but not classical MHC class I, MHC class II, or CD1. This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript

  6. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdegaal, Els M. E.; De Miranda, Noel F. C. C.; Visser, Marten

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of neoantigens that are formed as a consequence of DNA damage is likely to form a major driving force behind the clinical activity of cancer immunotherapies such as T-cell checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy. Therefore, strategies to selectively enhance T-cell reactivity...... is constant over time is unclear. Here we analyse the stability of neoantigen-specific T-cell responses and the antigens they recognize in two patients with stage IV melanoma treated by adoptive T-cell transfer. The T-cell-recognized neoantigens can be selectively lost from the tumour cell population, either...

  7. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Brusko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter

  8. Dissection of T-cell antigen specificity in human melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Albæk Thrue, Charlotte; Junker, Niels

    2012-01-01

    -associated antigens and applying a novel technology for high-throughput analysis of T-cell responses, we dissected the composition of melanoma-restricted T-cell responses in 63 TIL cultures. T-cell reactivity screens against 175 melanoma-associated epitopes detected 90 responses against 18 different epitopes...

  9. Regulatory T Cell Effect on CD8(+) T Cell Responses to Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Development of Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepone, Lauren M; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Piazza, Paolo A; Campbell, Diana M; Jenkins, Frank J; Rinaldo, Charles R

    2017-03-02

    We assessed CD8(+) T cell reactivity to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) and the role of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who did or did not develop KS. There were similarly low CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ responses to MHC class I-restricted epitopes of HHV-8 lytic and latent proteins over 5.7 years before KS in participants who developed KS compared to those who did not. T cell reactivity to HHV-8 antigens was low relative to responses to a combination of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and influenza A virus (CEF) peptide epitopes, and dominant HIV peptide epitopes. There was no change in %Treg in the HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did not develop KS, whereas there was a significant increase in %Treg in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who developed KS beginning 1.8 years before development of KS. Removal of Treg enhanced HHV-8-specific T cell responses in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did or did not develop KS, with a similar pattern observed in response to CEF and HIV peptides. Thus, long-term, low levels of anti-HHV-8 CD8(+) T cell reactivity were present in both HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected men who did and did not develop KS. This was related to moderately enhanced Treg function.

  10. An optimized single chain TCR scaffold relying on the assembly with the native CD3-complex prevents residual mispairing with endogenous TCRs in human T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, Diana; Klobuch, Sebastian; Xue, Shao-An; Birtel, Matthias; Echchannaoui, Hakim; Yildiz, Oezlem; Omokoko, Tana; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Stauss, Hans; Sahin, Ugur; Herr, Wolfgang; Theobald, Matthias; Thomas, Simone; Voss, Ralf-Holger

    2016-04-19

    Immunotherapy of cancer envisions the adoptive transfer of T-cells genetically engineered with tumor-specific heterodimeric α/β T-cell receptors (TCRα/β). However, potential mispairing of introduced TCRα/β-chains with endogenous β/α-ones may evoke unpredictable autoimmune reactivities. A novel single chain (sc)TCR format relies on the fusion of the Vα-Linker-Vβ-fragment to the TCR Cβ-domain and coexpression of the TCR Cα-domain capable of recruiting the natural CD3-complex for full and hence, native T-cell signaling. Here, we tested whether such a gp100(280-288)- or p53(264-272) tumor antigen-specific scTCR is still prone to mispairing with TCRα. In a human Jurkat-76 T-cell line lacking endogenous TCRs, surface expression and function of a scTCR could be reconstituted by any cointroduced TCRα-chain indicating mispairing to take place on a molecular basis. In contrast, transduction into human TCRα/β-positive T-cells revealed that mispairing is largely reduced. Competition experiments in Jurkat-76 confirmed the preference of dcTCR to selfpair and to spare scTCR. This also allowed for the generation of dc/scTCR-modified cytomegalovirus/tumor antigen-bispecific T-cells to augment T-cell activation in CMV-infected tumor patients. Residual mispairing was prevented by strenghtening the Vα-Li-Vβ-fragment through the design of a novel disulfide bond between a Vα- and a linker-resident residue close to Vβ. Multimer-stainings, and cytotoxicity-, IFNγ-secretion-, and CFSE-proliferation-assays, the latter towards dendritic cells endogenously processing RNA-electroporated gp100 antigen proved the absence of hybrid scTCR/TCRα-formation without impairing avidity of scTCR/Cα in T-cells. Moreover, a fragile cytomegalovirus pp65(495-503)-specific scTCR modified this way acquired enhanced cytotoxicity. Thus, optimized scTCR/Cα inhibits residual TCR mispairing to accomplish safe adoptive immunotherapy for bulk endogenous TCRα/β-positive T-cells.

  11. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  12. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ju; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y; Peterson, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states.

  13. A human T-cell line with inducible production of interleukins 5 and 4. A model for studies of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordvinov, V A; Peroni, S E; De Boer, M L; Kees, U R; Sanderson, C J

    1999-08-31

    The production of interleukin-5 (IL5) and interleukin-4 (IL4) by activated T-cells is important in the pathogenesis of helminth infections and allergy. Human Jurkat cells express IL4 but one of the main factors restricting studies of human IL5 expression has been the lack of human T-cell lines which express significant levels of IL5 in an inducible fashion. We report that the human T-cell leukemia cell line (PER-117), previously shown to produce IL2, also produces IL5 and IL4, and is a useful model for the study of the regulation of IL5 and IL4 gene expression. We show that expression of IL5 and IL4 mRNAs in PER-117 cells is stimulation dependent. IL5 and IL4 reporter constructs are also transiently expressed in these cells in an inducible fashion. IL5 production in the PER-117 cell line can be activated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate alone and further enhanced by calcium ionophore A23187, cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate or anti-CD28 antibodies. The conditions used to stimulate the PER-117 cells determined whether IL5 production was inhibited by cyclosporin A or dexamethasone. These data indicate that the PER-117 cell line is a model to study signal transduction and transcriptional activation of the human IL5 gene in human T-cells.

  14. Serine Arginine-Rich Splicing Factor 1 (SRSF1) Contributes to the Transcriptional Activation of CD3ζ in Human T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Vaishali R; Gillooly, Andrew R; Perl, Marcel A; Markopoulou, Anastasia; Tsokos, George C

    2015-01-01

    T lymphocytes from many patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express decreased levels of the T cell receptor (TCR)-associated CD3 zeta (ζ) signaling chain, a feature directly linked to their abnormal phenotype and function. Reduced mRNA expression partly due to defective alternative splicing, contributes to the reduced expression of CD3ζ chain. We previously identified by oligonucleotide pulldown and mass spectrometry approaches, the serine arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) binding to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of CD3ζ mRNA. We showed that SRSF1 regulates alternative splicing of the 3'UTR of CD3ζ to promote expression of the normal full length 3`UTR over an unstable splice variant in human T cells. In this study we show that SRSF1 regulates transcriptional activation of CD3ζ. Specifically, overexpression and silencing of SRSF1 respectively increases and decreases CD3ζ total mRNA and protein expression in Jurkat and primary T cells. Using promoter-luciferase assays, we show that SRSF1 enhances transcriptional activity of the CD3ζ promoter in a dose dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that SRSF1 is recruited to the CD3ζ promoter. These results indicate that SRSF1 contributes to transcriptional activation of CD3ζ. Thus our study identifies a novel mechanism whereby SRSF1 regulates CD3ζ expression in human T cells and may contribute to the T cell defect in SLE.

  15. Phosphoproteomics Reveals Regulatory T Cell-Mediated DEF6 Dephosphorylation That Affects Cytokine Expression in Human Conventional T Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joshi, Rubin N.

    2017-09-25

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control key events of immune tolerance, primarily by suppression of effector T cells. We previously revealed that Tregs rapidly suppress T cell receptor (TCR)-induced calcium store depletion in conventional CD4CD25 T cells (Tcons) independently of IP levels, consequently inhibiting NFAT signaling and effector cytokine expression. Here, we study Treg suppression mechanisms through unbiased phosphoproteomics of primary human Tcons upon TCR stimulation and Treg-mediated suppression, respectively. Tregs induced a state of overall decreased phosphorylation as opposed to TCR stimulation. We discovered novel phosphosites (T595_S597) in the DEF6 (SLAT) protein that were phosphorylated upon TCR stimulation and conversely dephosphorylated upon coculture with Tregs. Mutation of these DEF6 phosphosites abrogated interaction of DEF6 with the IP receptor and affected NFAT activation and cytokine transcription in primary Tcons. This novel mechanism and phosphoproteomics data resource may aid in modifying sensitivity of Tcons to Treg-mediated suppression in autoimmune disease or cancer.

  16. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L; Neuhaus, Isaac M; Yu, Siegrid S; Arron, Sarah T; Harris, Hobart W; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A; Sverdrup, Francis M; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C; Johnson, David S; Meyer, Everett H; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y; McGrath, Mary H; Alvarado, Michael D; Ludwig, Connor H; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M; Gratz, Iris K; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease.

  17. Light-induced mutagenicity in Salmonella TA102 and genotoxicity/cytotoxicity in human T-cells by 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine: a chemical used in the manufacture of dyes and pigments and in tattoo inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yan, Jian; Hardy, William; Mosley, Charity; Wang, Shuguang; Yu, Hongtao

    2005-02-28

    DCB, 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine, is used primarily as an intermediate in the manufacture of diarylide yellow or azo red pigments for printing ink, textile, paint, and plastics. It is also used in tattoo inks. In this article, we investigate light-induced toxicity of DCB in both bacteria and human Jurkat T-cells. DCB itself is not toxic or mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium TA102, but is photomutagenic at concentrations as low as 2 microM and phototoxic at concentrations >100 microM when bacteria are exposed to DCB and light at the same time (1.2 J/cm2 of UVA and 2.1 J/cm2 of visible light). Furthermore, DCB is both photocytotoxic and photogenotoxic to human Jurkat T-cells. Under a light irradiation dose of 2.3 J/cm2 of UVA and 4.2 J/cm2 of visible light, it causes the Jurkat T-cells to become nonviable in a DCB dose-dependent manner and the nonviable cells reaches 60% at DCB concentrations higher than 50 microM. At the same time, DNA fragmentation is observed for cells exposed to both DCB and light, determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (alkaline comet assay). As much as 5% (average) DNA fragmentation was observed when exposed to 200 microM DCB and light irradiation. This suggests that DCB can penetrate the cell membrane and enter the cell. Upon light activation, DCB in the cells can cause various cellular damages, leading to nonviable Jurkat T-cells. It appears, the nonviable cells are not caused solely by fragmentation of cellular DNA, but by other damages such as to proteins and cell membranes, or DNA alkylation. Therefore, persons exposed to DCB through environmental contamination or through tattoo piercing using DCB-containing inks must not only concern about its toxicity without exposing to light, but also its phototoxicity.

  18. 金雀异黄素诱导人白血病Jurkat E6-1细胞凋亡作用%Induction of apoptosis by genistein in human leukemia cell line Jurkat E6-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘素芳; 何坚; 杨静静; 李万里

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and its mechanism of genistein (Gen) on human leukemia cell line Jurkat E6-1. Methods Jurkat E6-1 cells were treated with different concentrations of Gen. Inhibitive effect of Gen on cell growth was determined with methy thiazoly tetazolium(MTT) test. DNA-ladder was used to measure the effect of Gen on apoptosis of Jurkat E6-1 cells. Alternative of bcl-2 and bax genes were detected with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Results At a concentration of higher than 0. 5 μmol / L,Gen could inhibit the growth of Jurkat E6-1 cells. After 24 hours, the inhibition ratio was 5.9% compared with that of the control group, with a significant difference (P < 0.01 ) in a time-does-dependent manner( P < 0. 01 ). After 72 hours, the inhibition ratio was 24.9%, with a significant difference compared to that of at 24 hours(P <0. 01 ). The expression rate of bcl-2 decreased after the treatment with the increasing concentration of Gen. However, the expression rate of bax increased after the treatment with the decreased concentrations of Gen. Conclusion Gen can significantly inhibit the growth of human leukemia line Jurkat E6-1. Its mechanism is up-regulation of the bax expression and down-regulation of the bcl-2 expression.%目的 探讨金雀异黄素(genistein,Gen)诱导人白血病Jurkat E6-1细胞凋亡机制.方法 以不同浓度Gem作用于Jurkat E6-1细胞,采用四甲基偶氮噻唑蓝(MTT)法检测Gen对Jurkat E6-1细胞增殖抑制作用;采用DNA-ladder检测Gen对细胞凋亡影响;采用实时定量PCR(RT-PCR)检测凋亡相关基因bax、bcl-2表达水平.结果与对照组比较,P>0.5 μmol/L浓度的Gen明显抑制Jurkat E6-1细胞增殖,培养24 h,10 μmoL/L Gen组抑制率为5.9%,与对照组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),随Gen浓度增加和培养时间延长,抑制作用逐渐增强,72 h后,10μmol/L Gen组抑制率为24.9%;Gen使Jurkat E6-1细胞Bax表达上调,Bcl-2表达下调,

  19. Activated human T cells secrete exosomes that participate in IL-2 mediated immune response signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Wahlgren

    Full Text Available It has previously been shown that nano-meter sized vesicles (30-100 nm, exosomes, secreted by antigen presenting cells can induce T cell responses thus showing the potential of exosomes to be used as immunological tools. Additionally, activated CD3⁺ T cells can secrete exosomes that have the ability to modulate different immunological responses. Here, we investigated what effects exosomes originating from activated CD3⁺ T cells have on resting CD3⁺ T cells by studying T cell proliferation, cytokine production and by performing T cell and exosome phenotype characterization. Human exosomes were generated in vitro following CD3⁺ T cell stimulation with anti-CD28, anti-CD3 and IL-2. Our results show that exosomes purified from stimulated CD3⁺ T cells together with IL-2 were able to generate proliferation in autologous resting CD3⁺ T cells. The CD3⁺ T cells stimulated with exosomes together with IL-2 had a higher proportion of CD8⁺ T cells and had a different cytokine profile compared to controls. These results indicate that activated CD3⁺ T cells communicate with resting autologous T cells via exosomes.

  20. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  1. Human T cell crosstalk is induced by tumor membrane transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Uzana

    Full Text Available Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC. Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+ T-APCs. We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+ T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1 Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2 Fratricide (killing of CD8+ T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response.

  2. Polyfunctional and IFN-γ monofunctional human CD4+ T cell populations are molecularly distinct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Julie G.; Apte, Simon H.; Groves, Penny L.; McCarthy, James S.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogen-specific polyfunctional T cell responses have been associated with favorable clinical outcomes, but it is not known whether molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional cytokine-producing T cells. Here, we report that polyfunctional CD4+ T cells induced during Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) blood-stage infection in humans have a unique transcriptomic profile compared with IFN-γ monofunctional CD4+ T cells and, thus, are molecularly distinct. The 14-gene signature revealed in P. falciparum–reactive polyfunctional T cells is associated with cytokine signaling and lymphocyte chemotaxis, and systems biology analysis identified IL-27 as an upstream regulator of the polyfunctional gene signature. Importantly, the polyfunctional gene signature is largely conserved in Influenza-reactive polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, suggesting that polyfunctional T cells have core characteristics independent of pathogen specificity. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that consistent molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional CD4+ T cells. PMID:28194431

  3. Transformation of human fetal thymus and spleen lymphocytes by human t-cell leukemia virus type Ι

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akagi,Tadaatsu

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available Co-cultivation of human thymus and spleen lymphocytes, which were obtained from 26-week and 27-week fetuses, with a lethally-irradiated human cord T-cell line harboring human T-cell leukemia virus type Ι(HTLV-Ι resultes in the establishment of T-cell lines positive for adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigens and producing HTLV-Ι. These cell lines had the phenotype of a helper/inducer subset of peripheral T-cells as evidenced by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies to human T-cells.

  4. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

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    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  5. ROCKing cytokine secretion balance in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Waksal, Samuel D

    2015-04-01

    Balanced regulation of cytokine secretion in T cells is critical for maintenance of immune homeostasis and prevention of autoimmunity. The Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) 2 signaling pathway was previously shown to be involved in controlling of cellular movement and shape. However, recent work from our group and others has demonstrated a new and important role of ROCK2 in regulating cytokine secretion in T cells. We found that ROCK2 promotes pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 and IL-21, whereas IL-2 and IL-10 secretion are negatively regulated by ROCK2 under Th17-skewing activation. Also, in disease, but not in steady state conditions, ROCK2 contributes to regulation of IFN-γ secretion in T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Thus, ROCK2 signaling is a key pathway in modulation of T-cell mediated immune responses underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeted inhibition of ROCK2 in autoimmunity.

  6. The human IL-2 gene promoter can assemble a positioned nucleosome that becomes remodeled upon T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attema, Joanne L; Reeves, Raymond; Murray, Vincent; Levichkin, Ilya; Temple, Mark D; Tremethick, David J; Shannon, M Frances

    2002-09-01

    Controlled production of the cytokine IL-2 plays a key role in the mammalian immune system. Expression from the gene is tightly regulated with no detectable expression in resting T cells and a strong induction following T cell activation. The IL-2 proximal promoter (+1 to -300) contains many well-defined transcriptional activation elements that respond to T cell stimulation. To determine the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of interleukin-2 gene transcription, nucleosome assembly across the IL-2 promoter region was examined using in vitro chromatin reconstitution assays. The IL-2 promoter assembles a nucleosome that is both translationally and rotationally positioned, spanning some of the major functional control elements. The binding of transcription factors to these elements, with the exception of the architectural protein HMGA1, was occluded by the presence of the nucleosome. Analysis of the chromatin architecture of the IL-2 gene in Jurkat T cells provided evidence for the presence of a similarly positioned nucleosome in vivo. The region encompassed by this nucleosome becomes remodeled following activation of Jurkat T cells. These observations suggest that the presence of a positioned nucleosome across the IL-2 proximal promoter may play an important role in maintaining an inactive gene in resting T cells and that remodeling of this nucleosome is important for gene activation.

  7. In situ depletion of CD4(+) T cells in human skin by Zanolimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, L.S.; Skov, L.; Dam, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    -driving T cells in situ may therefore be a useful approach in the treatment of inflammatory and malignant skin diseases. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in intact inflamed human skin tissue by Zanolimumab, a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (IgG1, kappa) against CD4, was studied in a human psoriasis...

  8. Differential depletion of total T cells and regulatory T cells and prolonged allotransplant survival in CD3Ɛ humanized mice treated with polyclonal anti human thymocyte globulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszko, Maja; Cardini, Benno; Oberhuber, Rupert; Oberhuber, Lukas; Jakic, Bojana; Beierfuss, Anja; Wick, Georg; Cappellano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Thymoglobulin (ATG) is a polyclonal rabbit antibody against human thymocytes used as a T cell-depleting agent to prevent or treat allotransplant rejection. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low dose ATG treatment exclusively on T cells using a humanized BALB/c human CD3Ɛ transgenic mouse model expressing both human and murine T cell receptors (TCR). Mice received a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of ATG. Blood and peripheral lymphoid organs were obtained after different time points. We found a significant T cell depletion in this mouse model. In addition, regulatory T cells (Tregs) proved to be less sensitive to depletion than the rest of T cells and the Treg:non-Treg ratio was therefore increased. Finally, we also investigated the effect of ATG in a heterotopic allogenic murine model of heart transplantation. Survival and transplant function were significantly prolonged in ATG-treated mice. In conclusion, we showed (a) an immunosuppressive effect of ATG in this humanized mouse model which is exclusively mediated by reactivity against human CD3Ɛ; (b) provided evidence for a relative resistance of Tregs against this regimen; and (c) demonstrated the immunomodulatory effect of ATG under these experimental circumstances by prolongation of heart allograft survival. PMID:28257450

  9. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  10. HIV infection of naturally occurring and genetically reprogrammed human regulatory T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Grill, Stacy M; Shariat, Nikki; Leelawong, Mindy; Sundrud, Mark S; Haas, David W; Unutmaz, Derya

    2004-07-01

    A T-cell subset, defined as CD4(+)CD25(hi) (regulatory T-cells [Treg cells]), was recently shown to suppress T-cell activation. We demonstrate that human Treg cells isolated from healthy donors express the HIV-coreceptor CCR5 and are highly susceptible to HIV infection and replication. Because Treg cells are present in very few numbers and are difficult to expand in vitro, we genetically modified conventional human T-cells to generate Treg cells in vitro by ectopic expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor associated with reprogramming T-cells into a Treg subset. Overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve human CD4(+) T-cells recapitulated the hyporesponsiveness and suppressive function of naturally occurring Treg cells. However, FoxP3 was less efficient in reprogramming memory T-cell subset into regulatory cells. In addition, FoxP3-transduced T-cells also became more susceptible to HIV infection. Remarkably, a portion of HIV-positive individuals with a low percentage of CD4(+) and higher levels of activated T-cells have greatly reduced levels of FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(hi) T-cells, suggesting disruption of the Treg cells during HIV infection. Targeting and disruption of the T-cell regulatory system by HIV may contribute to hyperactivation of conventional T-cells, a characteristic of HIV disease progression. Moreover, the ability to reprogram human T-cells into Treg cells in vitro will greatly aid in decoding their mechanism of suppression, their enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection, and the unique markers expressed by this subset.

  11. HIV infection of naturally occurring and genetically reprogrammed human regulatory T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra Oswald-Richter

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A T-cell subset, defined as CD4(+CD25(hi (regulatory T-cells [Treg cells], was recently shown to suppress T-cell activation. We demonstrate that human Treg cells isolated from healthy donors express the HIV-coreceptor CCR5 and are highly susceptible to HIV infection and replication. Because Treg cells are present in very few numbers and are difficult to expand in vitro, we genetically modified conventional human T-cells to generate Treg cells in vitro by ectopic expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor associated with reprogramming T-cells into a Treg subset. Overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve human CD4(+ T-cells recapitulated the hyporesponsiveness and suppressive function of naturally occurring Treg cells. However, FoxP3 was less efficient in reprogramming memory T-cell subset into regulatory cells. In addition, FoxP3-transduced T-cells also became more susceptible to HIV infection. Remarkably, a portion of HIV-positive individuals with a low percentage of CD4(+ and higher levels of activated T-cells have greatly reduced levels of FoxP3(+CD4(+CD25(hi T-cells, suggesting disruption of the Treg cells during HIV infection. Targeting and disruption of the T-cell regulatory system by HIV may contribute to hyperactivation of conventional T-cells, a characteristic of HIV disease progression. Moreover, the ability to reprogram human T-cells into Treg cells in vitro will greatly aid in decoding their mechanism of suppression, their enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection, and the unique markers expressed by this subset.

  12. Analysis of the paired TCR α- and β-chains of single human T cells.

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    Song-Min Kim

    Full Text Available Analysis of the paired i.e. matching TCR α- and β-chain rearrangements of single human T cells is required for a precise investigation of clonal diversity, tissue distribution and specificity of protective and pathologic T-cell mediated immune responses. Here we describe a multiplex RT-PCR based technology, which for the first time allows for an unbiased analysis of the complete sequences of both α- and β-chains of TCR from single T cells. We validated our technology by the analysis of the pathologic T-cell infiltrates from tissue lesions of two T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases, psoriasis vulgaris (PV and multiple sclerosis (MS. In both disorders we could detect various T cell clones as defined by multiple T cells with identical α- and β-chain rearrangements distributed across the tissue lesions. In PV, single cell TCR analysis of lesional T cells identified clonal CD8(+ T cell expansions that predominated in the epidermis of psoriatic plaques. An MS brain lesion contained two dominant CD8(+ T-cell clones that extended over the white and grey matter and meninges. In both diseases several clonally expanded T cells carried dual TCRs composed of one Vβ and two different Vα-chain rearrangements. These results show that our technology is an efficient instrument to analyse αβ-T cell responses with single cell resolution in man. It should facilitate essential new insights into the mechanisms of protective and pathologic immunity in many human T-cell mediated conditions and allow for resurrecting functional TCRs from any αβ-T cell of choice that can be used for investigating their specificity.

  13. Reduced scytonemin isolated from Nostoc commune induces autophagic cell death in human T-lymphoid cell line Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Tsuzuki, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Toshiomi; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Takenaka, Hiroyuki; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Koketsu, Mamoru

    2013-10-01

    Nostoc commune is a terrestrial benthic blue-green alga that often forms an extended mucilaginous layer on the soil, accumulates on stones and mud in aquatic environments. Reduced-scytonemin (R-scy), isolated from N. commune Vaucher, has been shown to suppress the human T-lymphoid Jurkat cell growth. To reveal the mechanisms underlying the R-scy-mediated inhibition of Jurkat cell growth, we examined cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) modification in these cells. We observed multiple vacuoles as well as the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II in R-scy-treated cells. These results suggest that the R-scy induced Jurkat cell growth inhibition is attributable to the induction of type II programmed cell death (PCD II; autophagic cell death or autophagy). We further examined the mechanisms underlying R-scy-induced PCDII. The cells treated with R-scy produced large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the induction of mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the elimination of R-scy-induced ROS by treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) markedly opposed R-scy-induced PCDII. Based on these results, we conclude that ROS formation plays a critical role in R-scy-induced PCDII. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neonatal thymectomy reveals differentiation and plasticity within human naive T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Theo; Delemarre, Eveline M.; Janssen, Willemijn J.M.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Broen, Jasper C.; Tesselaar, Kiki; Borghans, Jose A.M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Prakken, Berent J.; Mokry, Michal; Jansen, Nicolaas J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of naive T cells is dependent on thymic output, but in adults, the naive T cell pool is primarily maintained by peripheral proliferation. Naive T cells have long been regarded as relatively quiescent cells; however, it was recently shown that IL-8 production is a signatory effector function of naive T cells, at least in newborns. How this functional signature relates to naive T cell dynamics and aging is unknown. Using a cohort of children and adolescents who underwent neonatal thymectomy, we demonstrate that the naive CD4+ T cell compartment in healthy humans is functionally heterogeneous and that this functional diversity is lost after neonatal thymectomy. Thymic tissue regeneration later in life resulted in functional restoration of the naive T cell compartment, implicating the thymus as having functional regenerative capacity. Together, these data shed further light on functional differentiation within the naive T cell compartment and the importance of the thymus in human naive T cell homeostasis and premature aging. In addition, these results affect and alter our current understanding on the identification of truly naive T cells and recent thymic emigrants. PMID:26901814

  15. Next generation adoptive immunotherapy--human T cells as carriers of therapeutic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, M W; Kahns, L; Hansen, T; Sorensen, P G; Björkdahl, O; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2007-12-01

    An important step in adoptive immunotherapy in general and specifically with respect to cancer treatment is the initiation of an inflammatory T cell response at the tumor site. Here we suggest a new concept for a controlled inflammatory response in which the intrinsic cytotoxic properties of T cells are upgraded with the properties of nanoparticles transfected into the T cells during the ex vivo expansion process. We report in vitro upgrading of human T cells using PEGylated boron carbide nanoparticles functionalised with a translocation peptide aimed at Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). A key finding is that the metabolism of such upgraded human T cells were not affected by a payload of 0.13 pg boron per cell and that the nanoparticles were retained in the cell population after several cell divisions. This is vital for transporting nanoparticles by T cells to the tumor site.

  16. Cytotoxicity of tumor antigen specific human T cells is unimpaired by arginine depletion.

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    Markus Munder

    Full Text Available Tumor-growth is often associated with the expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells that lead to local or systemic arginine depletion via the enzyme arginase. It is generally assumed that this arginine deficiency induces a global shut-down of T cell activation with ensuing tumor immune escape. While the impact of arginine depletion on polyclonal T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion is well documented, its influence on chemotaxis, cytotoxicity and antigen specific activation of human T cells has not been demonstrated so far. We show here that chemotaxis and early calcium signaling of human T cells are unimpaired in the absence of arginine. We then analyzed CD8(+ T cell activation in a tumor peptide as well as a viral peptide antigen specific system: (i CD8(+ T cells with specificity against the MART-1aa26-35*A27L tumor antigen expanded with in vitro generated dendritic cells, and (ii clonal CMV pp65aa495-503 specific T cells and T cells retrovirally transduced with a CMV pp65aa495-503 specific T cell receptor were analyzed. Our data demonstrate that human CD8(+ T cell antigen specific cytotoxicity and perforin secretion are completely preserved in the absence of arginine, while antigen specific proliferation as well as IFN-γ and granzyme B secretion are severely compromised. These novel results highlight the complexity of antigen specific T cell activation and demonstrate that human T cells can preserve important activation-induced effector functions in the context of arginine deficiency.

  17. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor G Martínez

    Full Text Available Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application.

  18. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. PMID:25613934

  19. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells.

  20. CD8+ regulatory T cells, and not CD4+ T cells, dominate suppressive phenotype and function after in vitro live Mycobacterium bovis-BCG activation of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Mardi C; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Joosten, Simone A; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (M. bovis BCG), the only currently available vaccine against tuberculosis, has been reported to induce regulatory T cells in humans. The activity of regulatory T cells may not only dampen immunogenicity and protective efficacy of tuberculosis-vaccines, but also hamper diagnosis of infection of tuberculosis, when using immune (e.g. IFNγ-release) assays. Still, in settings of infectious diseases and vaccination, most studies have focused on CD4+ regulatory T cells, and not CD8+ regulatory T-cells. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the suppressive phenotype and function of CD4+ versus CD8+ T cells after in vitro live BCG activation of human cells. Moreover, as BCG is administered as a (partly) live vaccine, we also compared the ability of live versus heatkilled BCG in activating CD4+ and CD8+ regulatory T cell responses. BCG-activated CD8+ T cells consistently expressed higher levels of regulatory T cell markers, and after live BCG activation, density and (co-)expression of markers were significantly higher, compared to CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, selection on CD25-expression after live BCG activation enriched for CD8+ T cells, and selection on co-expression of markers further increased CD8+ enrichment. Ultimately, only T cells activated by live BCG were functionally suppressive and this suppressive activity resided predominantly in the CD8+ T cell compartment. These data highlight the important contribution of live BCG-activated CD8+ Treg cells to immune regulation and emphasize their possible negative impact on immunity and protection against tuberculosis, following BCG vaccination.

  1. Signaling through P2X7 receptor in human T cells involves p56lck, MAP kinases, and transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappa B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Brovko, Luba; Orinska, Zane; Fayad, Raja; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-01-17

    ATP-gated ion channel P2X receptors are expressed on the surface of most immune cells and can trigger multiple cellular responses, such as membrane permeabilization, cytokine production, and cell proliferation or apoptosis. Despite broad distribution and pleiotropic activities, signaling pathways downstream of these ionotropic receptors are still poorly understood. Here, we describe intracellular signaling events in Jurkat cells treated with millimolar concentrations of extracellular ATP. Within minutes, ATP treatment resulted in the phosphorylation and activation of p56(lck) kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase but not p38 kinase. These effects were wholly dependent upon the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) ions in the culture medium. Nevertheless, calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium and CaM kinase inhibitor KN-93 both had no effect on the activation of p56(lck) and ERK, whereas a pretreatment of Jurkat cells with MAP kinase kinase inhibitor P098059 was able to abrogate phosphorylation of ERK. Further, expression of c-Jun and c-Fos proteins and activator protein (AP-1) DNA binding activity were enhanced in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, DNA binding activity of NF-kappa B was reduced. ATP failed to stimulate the phosphorylation of ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and activation of AP-1 in the p56(lck)-deficient isogenic T cell line JCaM1, suggesting a critical role for p56(lck) kinase in downstream signaling. Regarding the biological significance of the ATP-induced signaling events we show that although extracellular ATP was able to stimulate proliferation of both Jurkat and JCaM1 cells, an increase in interleukin-2 transcription was observed only in Jurkat cells. The nucleotide selectivity and pharmacological profile data supported the evidence that the ATP-induced effects in Jurkat cells were mediated through the P2X7 receptor. Taken together, these results demonstrate the ability of extracellular ATP to activate

  2. Azathioprine therapy selectively ablates human Vδ2⁺ T cells in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Neil E; Hedin, Charlotte R; Sanders, Theodore J; Amon, Protima; Hoti, Inva; Ayada, Ibrahim; Baji, Vidya; Giles, Edward M; Wildemann, Martha; Bashir, Zora; Whelan, Kevin; Sanderson, Ian; Lindsay, James O; Stagg, Andrew J

    2015-08-03

    Tumor-derived and bacterial phosphoantigens are recognized by unconventional lymphocytes that express a Vγ9Vδ2 T cell receptor (Vδ2 T cells) and mediate host protection against microbial infections and malignancies. Vδ2 T cells are absent in rodents but readily populate the human intestine, where their function is largely unknown. Here, we assessed Vδ2 T cell phenotype and function by flow cytometry in blood and intestinal tissue from Crohn's disease patients (CD patients) and healthy controls. Blood from CD patients included an increased percentage of gut-tropic integrin β7-expressing Vδ2 T cells, while "Th1-committed" CD27-expressing Vδ2 T cells were selectively depleted. A corresponding population of CD27+ Vδ2 T cells was present in mucosal biopsies from CD patients and produced elevated levels of TNFα compared with controls. In colonic mucosa from CD patients, Vδ2 T cell production of TNFα was reduced by pharmacological blockade of retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) signaling, indicating that dietary vitamin metabolites can influence Vδ2 T cell function in inflamed intestine. Vδ2 T cells were ablated in blood and tissue from CD patients receiving azathioprine (AZA) therapy, and posttreatment Vδ2 T cell recovery correlated with time since drug withdrawal and inversely correlated with patient age. These results indicate that human Vδ2 T cells exert proinflammatory effects in CD that are modified by dietary vitamin metabolites and ablated by AZA therapy, which may help resolve intestinal inflammation but could increase malignancy risk by impairing systemic tumor surveillance.

  3. Molecular profiling of cytomegalovirus-induced human CD8+ T cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertoghs, K.M.L.; Moerland, P.D.; van Stijn, A.; Remmerswaal, E.B.M.; Yong, S.L.; van de Berg, P.J.E.J.; Ham, S.M.; Baas, F.; ten Berge, R.J.M.; van Lier, R.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the immune response to viral pathogens. Persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection results in a strong increase in the number of virus-specific, quiescent effector-type CD8+ T cells with constitutive cytolytic activity, but the molecular pathways involved

  4. Human CD8+ T cells mediate protective immunity induced by a human malaria vaccine in human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Funakoshi, Ryota; Sheetij, Dutta; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-08-31

    A number of studies have shown that CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in a mouse model. However, whether human CD8+ T cells play a role in protection against malaria remains unknown. We recently established human immune system (HIS) mice harboring functional human CD8+ T cells (HIS-CD8 mice) by transduction with HLA-A∗0201 and certain human cytokines using recombinant adeno-associated virus-based gene transfer technologies. These HIS-CD8 mice mount a potent, antigen-specific HLA-A∗0201-restricted human CD8+ T-cell response upon immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a human malaria antigen, the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), termed AdPfCSP. In the present study, we challenged AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice with transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing full-length PfCSP and found that AdPfCSP-immunized (but not naïve) mice were protected against subsequent malaria challenge. The level of the HLA-A∗0201-restricted, PfCSP-specific human CD8+ T-cell response was closely correlated with the level of malaria protection. Furthermore, depletion of human CD8+ T cells from AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice almost completely abolished the anti-malaria immune response. Taken together, our data show that human CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in vivo.

  5. Autophagy is associated with cucurbitacin D-induced apoptosis in human T cell leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Tsukasa; Song, Yuan; He, Cuiying; Wang, Duo; Morita, Kentaro; Tsukada, Junichi; Kanazawa, Tamotsu; Yoshida, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that the inflammasome inhibitor cucurbitacin D (CuD) induces apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we investigated the effects of co-treatment with an additional Bcl-xL inhibitor, Z36. Treatment with Z36 induced cell death in leukemia cell lines, with MT-4 cells exhibiting the lowest sensitivity to Z36. Co-treatment of cells with Z36 and CuD resulted in a greater degree of cell death for Hut78 and Jurkat cells than treatment with CuD alone. In contrast, co-treatment of MT-4 cells with Z36 and CuD had a suppressive effect on cell death. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) suppressed the growth of leukemia cell lines HuT78, Jurkat, MT-1, and MT-4. CuD-induced cell death was enhanced by 3-MA in Jurkat cells, but inhibited in MT-4 cells. Western blotting results revealed cleavage of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP), supporting CuD-induced cell death; 3-MA enhanced CuD-Z36-induced PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results indicate that autophagy negatively regulates chemical-induced cell death of leukemia cells, and that controlling autophagy could be beneficial in the development of more effective chemotherapies against leukemia.

  6. Induction of Apoptosis by Recombinant Soluble Human TRAIL in Jurkat Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic potential of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the TNF superfamily, and to analyze TRAIL-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. Methods Expression of TRAIL receptors (DR4 and DR5) was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cytotoxic effects were determined by colony formation assay and a cell counting kit. The effects of recombinant TRAIL on apoptosis of Jurkat cells were determined by DNA fragmentation (DNA ladder) and PI staining. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were detected with JC-1 fluorescence. Results TRAIL inhibited the proliferation and induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation (characteristic of apoptosis) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Conclusion Recombinant soluble TRAIL can be used as a therapy for cancer.

  7. Synthesis and distribution of glycosaminoglycans in human leukemic B- and T-cells and monocytes studied using specific enzymic treatments and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makatsori, E; Karamanos, N K; Papadogiannakis, N; Hjerpe, A; Anastassiou, E D; Tsegenidis, T

    2001-10-01

    Identification of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) synthesized by three human leukaemic cell lines-Jurkat (T-cell leukaemia), Daudi (Burkitt's lymphoma, B-cell leukaemia) and THP-1 (acute monocytic leukemia)-and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and their distribution among cell membrane and culture medium were studied. GAGs were isolated using ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel and their composition and fine chemical structure were studied using high-performance liquid chromatography with radiochemical detection. All cell lines synthesize chondroitin sulphate (CS) and heparan sulphate (HS) in both cell membrane and culture medium. No hyaluronan was detected using treatment with specific lyases and highly sensitive HPLC methodology. CS is the major secreted GAG in all cell lines tested and the major cell retained GAG in Jurkat and Daudi. HS is the major GAG in the cell membrane of THP-1. The amounts of distinct GAGs synthesized by all cancer cell lines differ from those produced by normal PBML indicating a major role of GAGs in malignant transformation of human lymphocytes and monocytes. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Human T cell priming assay: depletion of peripheral blood lymphocytes in CD25(+) cells improves the in vitro detection of weak allergen-specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocanson, Marc; Achachi, Amine; Mutez, Virginie; Cluzel-Tailhardat, Magalie; Varlet, Béatrice Le; Rozières, Aurore; Fournier, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    To develop an in vitro assay that recapitulates the key event of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), that is the priming of effector T cells by hapten-presenting dendritic cells, and then allows for the sensitive detection of chemical allergens represents a major challenge. Classical human T cell priming assays (hTCPA) that have been developed in the past, using hapten-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) as antigen-presenting cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) as responding cells, were not efficient to prime T cells to common allergens with moderate/weak sensitizing properties. Recent progress in the understanding of the effector and regulatory mechanisms of ACD have shown that T cell priming requires efficient uptake of allergens by immunogenic DCs and that it is controlled by several subsets of regulatory cells including CD25(+) Tregs. We therefore analyzed various parameters involved in allergen-specific T cell activation in vitro and showed that priming of allergen-specific T cells is hampered by several subsets of immune cells comprising CD1a(neg) DCs, CD25(+) T cells, and CD56(+) regulatory cells.CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs prevented the in vitro T cell priming to moderate/weak allergens, and depletion of human PBLs in CD25(+) cells significantly increased specific T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. CD56(+) cells exerted an additional control of T cell priming since co-depletion of both CD56(+) and CD25(+) cells improved the magnitude of chemical-specific T cell activation. Finally, CD1a(low) MDDCs were able to inhibit T cell activation obtained by allergen-pulsed CD1a(high) MDDC. Moreover, we showed that uptake by DC of allergen-encapsulated nanoparticles significantly increased their activation status and their ability to prompt specific T cell activation. Hence, by combining the different strategies, i.e., depletion of CD25(+) and CD56(+) cells, use of CD1a(high) MDDC, and nanoparticle encapsulation of allergens, it was

  9. Th1-like human T-cell clones recognizing Leishmania gp63 inhibit Leishmania major in human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Hey, A S; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    The major surface protease of Leishmania major, gp63, has been suggested as a vaccine candidate for cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this study gp63 was purified from L. major promastigotes. A panel of human T-cell clones recognizing this protein were generated from individuals who had previously had...... self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis. The T-cell clones expressed CD4, and the alpha chain of the T-cell antigen receptor. GP63 reactive T-cell clones activated by antigen or by immobilized anti-CD3 antibody released relative large amounts of interferon-gamma and no or little interleukin-4, thereby...... resembling Th1 cells. Autologous mononuclear cells and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cell lines were equally efficient in presenting the antigen to the T cells. The gp63 reactive T cells induced resistance to infection in cultured human macrophages by L. major. The data confirm that human CD4+ T cells...

  10. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa Perez-Muñoz

    Full Text Available Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states.

  11. Human CD8 T cells generated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells are functionally mature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zúñiga-Pflücker Juan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell development occurs within the highly specialized thymus. Cytotoxic CD8 T cells are critical in adaptive immunity by targeting virally infected or tumor cells. In this study, we addressed whether functional CD8 T cells can be generated fully in vitro using human umbilical cord blood (UCB hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in coculture with OP9-DL1 cells. Results HSC/OP9-DL1 cocultures supported the differentiation of CD8 T cells, which were TCR/CD3hi CD27hi CD1aneg and thus phenotypically resembled mature functional CD8 single positive thymocytes. These in vitro-generated T cells also appeared to be conventional CD8 cells, as they expressed high levels of Eomes and low levels of Plzf, albeit not identical to ex vivo UCB CD8 T cells. Consistent with the phenotypic and molecular characterization, upon TCR-stimulation, in vitro-generated CD8 T cells proliferated, expressed activation markers (MHC-II, CD25, CD38, secreted IFN-γ and expressed Granzyme B, a cytotoxic T-cell effector molecule. Conclusion Taken together, the ability to direct human hematopoietic stem cell or T-progenitor cells towards a mature functional phenotype raises the possibility of establishing cell-based treatments for T-immunodeficiencies by rapidly restoring CD8 effector function, thereby mitigating the risks associated with opportunistic infections.

  12. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting.

  13. ETV6 mutations in early immature human T cell leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Haydu, J. Erika; Rigo, Isaura; Hadler, Michael; Tosello, Valeria; Della Gatta, Giusy; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H.; Luger, Selina M.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Rue, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Early immature T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) account for ∼5–10% of pediatric T-ALLs and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the genetic defects that drive the biology of these tumors remain largely unknown. In this study, analysis of microarray gene expression signatures in adult T-ALL demonstrated a high prevalence of early immature leukemias and revealed a close relationship between these tumors and myeloid leukemias. Many adult immature T-ALLs harbored mutations in myeloid-specific oncogenes and tumor suppressors including IDH1, IDH2, DNMT3A, FLT3, and NRAS. Moreover, we identified ETV6 mutations as a novel genetic lesion uniquely present in immature adult T-ALL. Our results demonstrate that early immature adult T-ALL represents a heterogeneous category of leukemias characterized by the presence of overlapping myeloid and T-ALL characteristics, and highlight the potential role of ETV6 mutations in these tumors. PMID:22162831

  14. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  15. CD43 signals induce Type One lineage commitment of human CD4+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenstein Yvonne

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activation and effector phenotype of T cells depend on the strength of the interaction of the TcR with its cognate antigen and additional signals provided by cytokines and by co-receptors. Lymphocytes sense both the presence of an antigen and also clues from antigen-presenting cells, which dictate the requisite response. CD43 is one of the most abundant molecules on the surface of T cells; it mediates its own signalling events and cooperates with those mediated by the T cell receptor in T cell priming. We have examined the role of CD43 signals on the effector phenotype of adult CD4+ and CD8+ human T cells, both alone and in the presence of signals from the TcR. Results CD43 signals direct the expression of IFNγ in human T cells. In freshly isolated CD4+ T cells, CD43 signals potentiated expression of the IFNγ gene induced by TcR activation; this was not seen in CD8+ T cells. In effector cells, CD43 signals alone induced the expression of the IFNγ gene in CD4+ T cells and to a lesser extent in CD8+ cells. The combined signals from CD43 and the TcR increased the transcription of the T-bet gene in CD4+ T cells and inhibited the transcription of the GATA-3 gene in both populations of T cells, thus predisposing CD4+ T cells to commitment to the T1 lineage. In support of this, CD43 signals induced a transient membrane expression of the high-affinity chains of the receptors for IL-12 and IFNγ in CD4+ T cells. CD43 and TcR signals also cooperated with those of IL-12 in the induction of IFNγ expression. Moreover, CD43 signals induced the co-clustering of IFNγR and the TcR and cooperated with TcR and IL-12 signals, triggering a co-capping of both receptors in CD4+ populations, a phenomenon that has been associated with a T1 commitment. Conclusion Our results suggest a key role for CD43 signals in the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into a T1 pattern.

  16. Dendritic Cells Enhance HIV Infection of Memory CD4(+) T Cells in Human Lymphoid Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rodriguez, Angel L; Reuter, Morgan A; McDonald, David

    2016-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in controlling infections by coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses to invading pathogens. Paradoxically, DCs can increase HIV-1 dissemination in vitro by binding and transferring infectious virions to CD4(+) T cells, a process called transinfection. Transinfection has been well characterized in cultured cell lines and circulating primary T cells, but it is unknown whether DCs enhance infection of CD4(+) T cells in vivo. In untreated HIV infection, massive CD4(+) T-cell infection and depletion occur in secondary lymphoid tissues long before decline is evident in the peripheral circulation. To study the role of DCs in HIV infection of lymphoid tissues, we utilized human tonsil tissues, cultured either as tissue blocks or as aggregate suspension cultures, in single-round infection experiments. In these experiments, addition of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to the cultures increased T-cell infection, particularly in CD4(+) T cells expressing lower levels of HLA-DR. Subset analysis demonstrated that MDDCs increased HIV-1 infection of central and effector memory T-cell populations. Depletion of endogenous myeloid DCs (myDCs) from the cultures decreased memory T-cell infection, and readdition of MDDCs restored infection to predepletion levels. Using an HIV-1 fusion assay, we found that MDDCs equally increased HIV delivery into naïve, central, and effector memory T cells in the cultures, whereas predepletion of myDCs reduced fusion into memory T cells. Together, these data suggest that resident myDCs facilitate memory T-cell infection in lymphoid tissues, implicating DC-mediated transinfection in driving HIV dissemination within these tissues in untreated HIV/AIDS.

  17. Comparative Study of Regulatory T Cell Function of Human CD25+CD4+ T Cells from Thymocytes, Cord Blood, and Adult Peripheral Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikao Morimoto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells suppress T cell activation and regulate multiple immune reactions in in vitro and in vivo studies. To define the regulatory function of human CD25+CD4+ T cells at various stages of maturity, we investigated in detail the functional differences of CD25+CD4+ T cells from thymocytes, cord blood (CB, and adult peripheral blood (APB. CB CD25+CD4+ T cells displayed low-FOXP3 protein expression level and had no suppressive activity. In contrast, CD25+CD4+ T cells from thymocytes or APB expressed high expression level of FOXP3 protein associated with significant suppressive activity. Although CB CD25+CD4+ T cells exhibited no suppressive activity, striking suppressive activity was observed following expansion in culture associated with increased FOXP3 expression and a shift from the CD45RA+ to the CD45RA− phenotype. These functional differences in CD25+CD4+ T cells from Thy, CB, and APB hence suggest a pathway of maturation for Treg in the peripheral immune system.

  18. Dichotomy in the human CD4+ T-cell response to Leishmania parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Kurtzhals, J A; Kharazmi, A

    1994-01-01

    Leishmania parasites cause human diseases ranging from self-healing cutaneous ulcers to fatal systemic infections. In addition, many individuals become infected without developing disease. In mice the two subsets of CD4+ T cells, Th1 and Th2, have different effects on the outcome of experimental...... in humans, and that the balance between subsets of parasite-specific T cells may play an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of the infections....

  19. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  20. T cell responses to human platelet antigen–1a involve a unique form of indirect allorecognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Ida Løken; Skogen, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a pregnancy-related condition caused by maternal antibodies binding an alloantigen on fetal platelets. In most cases the alloantigen is formed by a single amino acid, integrin β3 Leu33, referred to as human platelet antigen–1a (HPA-1a). Production of anti–HPA-1a antibodies likely depends on CD4+ T cells that recognize the same alloantigen in complex with the HLA-DRA/DRB3*01:01 molecule. While this complex is well characterized, T cell recognition of it is not. Here, to examine the nature of antigen recognition by HPA-1a–specific T cells, we assayed native and synthetic variants of the integrin β3 peptide antigen for binding to DRA/DRB3*01:01-positive antigen-presenting cells and for T cell activation. We found that HPA-1a–specific T cells recognize non-allogeneic integrin β3 residues anchored to DRA/DRB3*01:01 by the allogeneic Leu33, which itself is not directly recognized by these T cells. Furthermore, these T cell responses are diverse, with different T cells depending on different residues for recognition. This represents a unique form of indirect allorecognition in which a non-allogeneic peptide sequence becomes immunogenic by stable anchoring to MHC by an allogeneic residue. PMID:27699233

  1. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak, Martin; Rode, Anna K O; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten

    2015-09-08

    Adaptive immune responses require activation and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. Whereas early T cell activation is independent of exogenous cystine (Cys2), T cell proliferation is dependent of Cys2. However, the exact roles of Cys2 in T cell proliferation still need to be determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys2. Vice-versa, the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) and inhibition of Cys2 uptake with glutamate inhibited GSH and DNA synthesis in parallel. We further found that thioredoxin (Trx) can partly substitute for GSH during DNA synthesis. Finally, we show that GSH or Trx is required for the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for generation of the deoxyribonucleotide DNA building blocks. In conclusion, we show that activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 to proliferate and that this is partly explained by the fact that Cys2 is required for production of GSH, which in turn is required for optimal RNR-mediated deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and DNA replication.

  2. RAGE Expression in Human T Cells: A Link between Environmental Factors and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akirav, Eitan M.; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Garyu, Justin; Henegariu, Octavian; Clynes, Raphael; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Herold, Kevan C.

    2012-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) is a scavenger ligand that binds glycated endproducts as well as molecules released during cell death such as S100b and HMGB1. RAGE is expressed on antigen presenting cells where it may participate in activation of innate immune responses but its role in adaptive human immune responses has not been described. We have found that RAGE is expressed intracellularly in human T cells following TCR activation but constitutively on T cells from patients with diabetes. The levels of RAGE on T cells from patients with diabetes are not related to the level of glucose control. It co-localizes to the endosomes. Its expression increases in activated T cells from healthy control subjects but bystander cells also express RAGE after stimulation of the antigen specific T cells. RAGE ligands enhance RAGE expression. In patients with T1D, the level of RAGE expression decreases with T cell activation. RAGE+ T cells express higher levels of IL-17A, CD107a, and IL-5 than RAGE− cells from the same individual with T1D. Our studies have identified the expression of RAGE on adaptive immune cells and a role for this receptor and its ligands in modulating human immune responses. PMID:22509345

  3. Inhibition of TNF-alpha induced cell death in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and Jurkat cells by protocatechuic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou-Stache, J; Buettner, R; Artmann, G; Mittermayer, C; Bosserhoff, A K

    2002-11-01

    The Chinese herb radix Salviae miltiorrhizae (RSM) is used in traditional Chinese medicine as a treatment for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Several components of the plant extract from salvia mitorrhiza bunge have been determined previously, one of which is protocatechuic acid (PAC). It has been found, in the study, that PAC inhibited TNF-alpha-induced cell death of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Jurkat cells in a concentration of 100 microM when applied 2 h prior to TNF-alpha exposure. Molecular studies revealed that PAC activated NF-kappaB with a maximum effect after 30 min of treatment. Inhibition of NF-kappaB action by MG132 and NF-kappaB inhibitory peptide suppressed the cell-protective effect of PAC. Further, degradation of IkBalpha occurred in response to PAC treatment. The results provide evidence that activation of NF-kappaB plays an important role in mediating the cell-protecting effect of PAC on HUVECs and Jurkat cells. Further studies are required to test whether PAC, a component of radix salviae miltiorrhizae, could be useful in preventing in vivo cell death resulting from cardiovascular or cerebrovascular diseases.

  4. Inflammation-Induced Changes in Circulating T-Cell Subsets and Cytokine Production During Human Endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Andreas; Plovsing, Ronni R; Gaardbo, Julie C;

    2016-01-01

    -γ in response to phytohaemagglutinin but did not affect TLR4 expression on Tregs. No changes in the absolute count or frequency of BALF T cells were observed. Systemic inflammation is associated with lymphopenia, a relative increase in the frequency of anti-inflammatory Tregs, and a functional impairment of T......Observational clinical studies suggest the initial phase of sepsis may involve impaired cellular immunity. In the present study, we investigated temporal changes in T-cell subsets and T-cell cytokine production during human endotoxemia. Endotoxin (Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide 4 ng...

  5. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Remodeling Precedes Lineage Specification during Differentiation of Human CD4(+) T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Colm E. Nestor; Antonio Lentini; Cathrine Hägg Nilsson; Danuta R. Gawel; Mika Gustafsson; Lina Mattson; Hui Wang; Olof Rundquist; Richard R. Meehan; Bernward Klocke; Martin Seifert; Stefanie M. Hauck; Helmut Laumen; Huan Zhang; Mikael Benson

    2016-01-01

    5-methylcytosine (5mC) is converted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) by the TET family of enzymes as part of a recently discovered active DNA de-methylation pathway. 5hmC plays important roles in regulation of gene expression and differentiation and has been implicated in T cell malignancies and autoimmunity. Here, we report early and widespread 5mC/5hmC remodeling during human CD4(+) T cell differentiation ex vivo at genes and cell-specific enhancers with known T cell function. We observe s...

  6. A Combined Omics Approach to Generate the Surface Atlas of Human Naive CD4+ T Cells during Early T-Cell Receptor Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graessel, Anke; Hauck, Stefanie M; von Toerne, Christine; Kloppmann, Edda; Goldberg, Tatyana; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schindler, Michael; Knapp, Bettina; Krause, Linda; Dietz, Katharina; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Suttner, Kathrin

    2015-08-01

    Naive CD4(+) T cells are the common precursors of multiple effector and memory T-cell subsets and possess a high plasticity in terms of differentiation potential. This stem-cell-like character is important for cell therapies aiming at regeneration of specific immunity. Cell surface proteins are crucial for recognition and response to signals mediated by other cells or environmental changes. Knowledge of cell surface proteins of human naive CD4(+) T cells and their changes during the early phase of T-cell activation is urgently needed for a guided differentiation of naive T cells and may support the selection of pluripotent cells for cell therapy. Periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation technology was applied with subsequent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS to generate a data set describing the surface proteome of primary human naive CD4(+) T cells and to monitor dynamic changes during the early phase of activation. This led to the identification of 173 N-glycosylated surface proteins. To independently confirm the proteomic data set and to analyze the cell surface by an alternative technique a systematic phenotypic expression analysis of surface antigens via flow cytometry was performed. This screening expanded the previous data set, resulting in 229 surface proteins, which were expressed on naive unstimulated and activated CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we generated a surface expression atlas based on transcriptome data, experimental annotation, and predicted subcellular localization, and correlated the proteomics result with this transcriptional data set. This extensive surface atlas provides an overall naive CD4(+) T cell surface resource and will enable future studies aiming at a deeper understanding of mechanisms of T-cell biology allowing the identification of novel immune targets usable for the development of therapeutic treatments. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. A Combined Omics Approach to Generate the Surface Atlas of Human Naive CD4+ T Cells during Early T-Cell Receptor Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graessel, Anke; Hauck, Stefanie M.; von Toerne, Christine; Kloppmann, Edda; Goldberg, Tatyana; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schindler, Michael; Knapp, Bettina; Krause, Linda; Dietz, Katharina; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B.; Suttner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Naive CD4+ T cells are the common precursors of multiple effector and memory T-cell subsets and possess a high plasticity in terms of differentiation potential. This stem-cell-like character is important for cell therapies aiming at regeneration of specific immunity. Cell surface proteins are crucial for recognition and response to signals mediated by other cells or environmental changes. Knowledge of cell surface proteins of human naive CD4+ T cells and their changes during the early phase of T-cell activation is urgently needed for a guided differentiation of naive T cells and may support the selection of pluripotent cells for cell therapy. Periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation technology was applied with subsequent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS to generate a data set describing the surface proteome of primary human naive CD4+ T cells and to monitor dynamic changes during the early phase of activation. This led to the identification of 173 N-glycosylated surface proteins. To independently confirm the proteomic data set and to analyze the cell surface by an alternative technique a systematic phenotypic expression analysis of surface antigens via flow cytometry was performed. This screening expanded the previous data set, resulting in 229 surface proteins, which were expressed on naive unstimulated and activated CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we generated a surface expression atlas based on transcriptome data, experimental annotation, and predicted subcellular localization, and correlated the proteomics result with this transcriptional data set. This extensive surface atlas provides an overall naive CD4+ T cell surface resource and will enable future studies aiming at a deeper understanding of mechanisms of T-cell biology allowing the identification of novel immune targets usable for the development of therapeutic treatments. PMID:25991687

  8. Hobit and human effector T-cell differentiation: The beginning of a long journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Julian; Frentsch, Marco; Thiel, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Besides growing plants, eating a lot, and drinking beer, Tolkien's Hobbits enjoy maintaining a quiet state. Regarding the latter, the name chosen for a recently discovered transcription factor seems to be unintentionally appropriate. The zinc finger protein ZNF683 was originally named "Hobit" for Homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Braga et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2945-2958] demonstrate that in humans, Hobit is almost exclusively expressed in effector T cells, in particular in quiescent and long-lived effector-type CD8(+) T cells. Hobit may initially appear as another "player" in the quest for transcription factors guiding T-cell differentiation; the discoveries of T-bet, Eomes, Blimp-1, and others have significantly contributed to our understanding of how this process is tightly regulated. However, Hobit may be special--the currently available results suggest substantial differences in Hobit's regulatory functions between mice and humans, such as expression patterns and IFN-γ regulation. And it may turn out that Hobit's function in human T cells is highly adapted to lifelong, periodic challenges with varying, physiological doses of pathogens. Thus, the new study about Hobit in human T cells may be the beginning of a long journey. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Immunoevasive pericytes from human pluripotent stem cells preferentially modulate induction of allogeneic regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domev, Hagit; Milkov, Irina; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Dar, Ayelet

    2014-10-01

    Isolated microvessel-residing pericytes and pericytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) exhibit mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics and therapeutic properties. Despite growing interest in pericyte-based stem cell therapy, their immunogenicity and immunomodulatory effects on nonactivated T cells are still poorly defined, in particular those of vasculogenic hPSC pericytes. We found that tissue-embedded and unstimulated cultured hPSC- or tissue-derived pericytes constitutively expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and the inhibitory programmed cell death-ligand 1/2 (PD-L1/2) molecules but not MHC class II or CD80/CD86 costimulatory molecules. Pretreatment with inflammatory mediators failed to induce an antigen-presenting cell-like phenotype in stimulated pericytes. CD146+ pericytes from hPSCs did not induce activation and proliferation of allogeneic resting T cells independent of interferon (IFN)-γ prestimulation, similarly to pericytes from human brain or placenta. Instead, pericytes mediated a significant increase in the frequency of allogeneic CD25highFoxP3+ regulatory T cells when cocultured with nonactivated peripheral blood T cells. Furthermore, when peripheral blood CD25high regulatory T cells (Tregs) were depleted from isolated CD3+ T cells, pericytes preferentially induced de novo formation of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+CD127-, suppressive regulatory T cells. Constitutive expression of PD-L1/2 and secretion of transforming growth factor-β by hPSC pericytes directly regulated generation of pericyte-induced Tregs. Pericytes cotransplanted into immunodeficient mice with allogeneic CD25- T cells maintained a nonimmunogenic phenotype and mediated the development of functional regulatory T cells. Together, these findings reveal a novel feature of pericyte-mediated immunomodulation distinguished from immunosuppression, shared by native tissue pericytes and hPSC pericytes, and support the notion that pericytes can be applied for allogeneic

  10. Application of Adoptive T-Cell Therapy Using Tumor Antigen-Specific T-Cell Receptor Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Human Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen great strides in the field of cancer immunotherapy, especially the treatment of melanoma. Beginning with the identification of cancer antigens, followed by the clinical application of anti-cancer peptide vaccination, it has now been proven that adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using cancer antigen-specific T cells is the most effective option. Despite the apparent clinical efficacy of ACT, the timely preparation of a sufficient number of cancer antigen-specific T cells for each patient has been recognized as its biggest limitation. Currently, therefore, attention is being focused on ACT with engineered T cells produced using cancer antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR gene transfer. With regard to human leukemia, ACT using engineered T cells bearing the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene still remains in its infancy. However, several reports have provided preclinical data on TCR gene transfer using Wilms' tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and also preclinical and clinical data on TCR gene transfer involving minor histocompatibility antigen, both of which have been suggested to provide additional clinical benefit. In this review, we examine the current status of anti-leukemia ACT with engineered T cells carrying the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene, and discuss the existing barriers to progress in this area.

  11. Hepatitis C Virus-Specific T Cell Receptor mRNA-Engineered Human T Cells: Impact of Antigen Specificity on Functional Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasiddaiah, Anangi; Davanian, Haleh; Aleman, Soo; Pasetto, Anna; Frelin, Lars; Sällberg, Matti; Lohmann, Volker; Koh, Sarene; Bertoletti, Antonio; Chen, Margaret

    2017-05-01

    Therapy with genetically modified autologous T cells has shown great promise in cancer therapy. For an efficient control of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, cytotoxic T cells (CTL) are pivotal, but persistence of activated T cells may lead to liver toxicity. Here, anti-HCV T cell receptors (TCRs) recognizing the HCV nonstructural (NS) NS3 or NS5 viral peptide target were examined by mRNA transfection of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) derived from healthy donors as well as chronically infected HCV patients. Immunological analysis shows that while the CTLs expressing the NS5-specific TCR reduced HCV RNA replication by a noncytotoxic mechanism, the NS3-specific TCR-redirected CTLs were polyfunctional and inhibited HCV RNA replication through antigen-specific cytotoxicity. Transcriptome signatures from these two types of CTL responses revealed uniquely expressed gene clusters upon encountering hepatoma target cells presenting endogenously expressed HCV proteins. The NS3 TCR induced a rapid expression of apoptotic signaling pathways and formation of embryonic gene clusters, whereas the NS5A TCR activation induced extended proliferative and metabolic pathways as the HCV target cells survived. Our results provide detailed insights into basic HCV T cell immunology and have clinical relevance for redirecting T cells to target virally infected hepatoma cells.IMPORTANCE Due to the protective ability of HCV-specific T cells and the hepatotoxic potential that they possess, there is a great need for the understanding of the functional aspects of HCV-specific T cells. To circumvent the low level of precursor frequency in patients, we engineered primary CD8(+) T cells by mRNA TCR vectors to confer HCV specificity to new T cells. HCV TCRs that differ in antigen specificity and polyfunctionality were examined. mRNA TCR engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors or chronically infected HCV patients resulted in strikingly high levels of HCV TCR

  12. Lipoproteins are Major Targets of the Polyclonal Human T-cell Response to M. tuberculosis1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Most vaccines and basic studies of T cell epitopes in M. tuberculosis emphasize water soluble proteins that are secreted into the extracellular space and presented in the context of MHC Class II. Much less is known about the role of antigens retained within the cell wall. We used polyclonal T cells from infected humans to probe for responses to immunodominant antigens in the M. tuberculosis cell wall. We found that the magnitude of response to secreted or cell wall intrinsic compounds was sim...

  13. Selective proliferation of human γδ T cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENSONGHUA; AKINORIOKI; 等

    1996-01-01

    The effect of monoethylphosphate (MEP,commercial available or synthesized) together with IL-2 on the selective proliferation of human γδT cells in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy donors and of cancer patients was investigated.The γδT cells were stimulated by MEP to proliferate in a dose-dependent manner.The effect of synthesized MEP was 10 times greater than that of commercial MEP.When the PBMCs of healthy donors were cultured for 25 d in the medium containing different concentrations of MEP,the total cell number increased about 1000-3000 fold;and the ratio of γδT cells reached to 70-80%.The selective expansion of γδT cells depended on the synergic action of MEP and IL-2.The bulk cultured γδT cells exhibited obvious cytotoxic activities against allogenic tumor cell lines (SQ-5,K562 and Daudi) and autologous tumor cells.The culture system described here not only offers a simple method for obtaining a large number of γδT cells which may become a new effector in the adoptive immunotherapy,but also provides a useful model for the further studies of the structure and function of γδT cells in vitro.

  14. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion-induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo.

  15. Double-Negative αβ T Cells Are Early Responders to AKI and Are Found in Human Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, Maria N; Noel, Sanjeev; Saxena, Ankit; Bandapalle, Samatha; Majithia, Richa; Jie, Chunfa; Arend, Lois J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Rabb, Hamid; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A

    2016-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of AKI, and previous studies established important roles for conventional CD4(+) T cells, natural killer T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in AKI pathogenesis. We recently identified CD4(-)CD8(-) (double-negative; DN) T cells as an important subset of αβ T cell receptor-positive cells residing in mouse kidney. However, little is known about the pathophysiologic functions of kidney DN T cells. In this study, we phenotypically and functionally characterized murine kidney DN T cells in the steady state and in response to IRI. Unlike CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, DN T cells in the steady state expressed high levels of CD69, CD28, and CD40L; differentially expressed IL-27 and IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokines; spontaneously proliferated at a very high rate; and suppressed in vitro proliferation of activated CD4(+) T cells. Within the first 3-24 hours after IRI, kidney DN T cells expanded significantly and upregulated expression of IL-10. In adoptive transfer experiments, DN T cells significantly protected recipients from AKI by an IL-10-dependent mechanism. DN T cells also made up a large fraction of the T cell compartment in human kidneys. Our results indicate that DN T cells are an important subset of the resident αβ(+) T cell population in the mammalian kidney and are early responders to AKI that have anti-inflammatory properties.

  16. Light-Induced Mutagenicity in Salmonella TA102 and Genotoxicity/Cytotoxicity in Human T-cells by 3,3’-Dichlorobenzidine: A Chemical Used in the Manufacture of Dyes and Pigments and in Tattoo Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yan, Jian; Hardy, William; Mosley, Charity; Wang, Shuguang; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    3,3’-Dichlorobenzidine (DCB) is used primarily as an intermediate in the manufacture of diarylide yellow or azo red pigments for printing inks, textiles, paints, and plastics. It is also used in tattoo inks. In this article, we investigate light-induced toxicity of DCB in both bacteria and human Jurkat T-cells. DCB itself is not toxic or mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium TA102, but is photomutagenic at concentrations as low as 2 µM and phototoxic at concentrations >100 µM when the bacteria is exposed to DCB and light at the same time (1.2 J/cm2 of UVA and 2.1 J/cm2 of visible light). Furthermore, DCB is both photocytotoxic and photogenotoxic to human Jurkat T-cells. Under a constant light irradiation dose of 2.3 J/cm2 of UVA and 4.2 J/cm2 of visible light, it causes the Jurkat T-cells to become non-viable in a DCB dose-dependent manner and only 40% viable cells remaining at DCB concentrations higher than 50 µM. At the same time, DNA fragmentation is observed for the cells exposed to both DCB and light, determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). As much as 8 % of the cellular DNA is fragmented when exposed to 200 µM DCB and light irradiation. This suggests that DCB can penetrate the cell membrane and enter the cell. Upon light activation, DCB in the cells can cause various cellular damages, including DNA fragmentation, leading to non-viable Jurkat T-cells. It appears, though, non-viable cells may not be caused solely by fragmentation of cellular DNA, but other damages such as to proteins and cell membranes, or other forms of DNA damage such as alkylation that does not cause DNA to fragment, may also be involved. Therefore, persons exposed to DCB through environmental contamination or through tattoo piercing using DCB-contaminated inks must not only concern about its toxicity without exposing to light, but also about its phototoxicity. PMID:15664269

  17. Antibody-Independent Function of Human B Cells Contributes to Antifungal T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Li, Hulun; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Bar-Or, Amit

    2017-03-08

    Fungal infections (e.g., Candida albicans) can manifest as serious medical illnesses, especially in the elderly and immune-compromised hosts. T cells are important for Candida control. Whether and how B cells are involved in antifungal immunity has been less clear. Although patients with agammaglobulinemia exhibit normal antifungal immunity, increased fungal infections are reported following B cell-depleting therapy, together pointing to Ab-independent roles of B cells in controlling such infections. To test how human B cells may contribute to fungal-associated human T cell responses, we developed a novel Ag-specific human T cell/B cell in vitro coculture system and found that human B cells could induce C. albicans-associated, MHC class II-restricted responses of naive T cells. Activated B cells significantly enhanced C. albicans-mediated Th1 and Th17 T cell responses, which were both strongly induced by CD80/CD86 costimulation. IL-6(+)GM-CSF(+) B cells were the major responding B cell subpopulation to C. albicans and provided efficient costimulatory signals to the T cells. In vivo B cell depletion in humans resulted in reduced C. albicans-associated T responses. Of note, the decreased Th17, but not Th1, responses could be reversed by soluble factors from B cells prior to depletion, in an IL-6-dependent manner. Taken together, our results implicate an Ab-independent cytokine-defined B cell role in human antifungal T cell responses. These findings may be particularly relevant given the prospects of chronic B cell depletion therapy use in lymphoma and autoimmune disease, as patients age and are exposed to serial combination therapies.

  18. Introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors into human hematopoietic progenitors results in exclusion of endogenous T-cell receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N; Arumugam, Balamurugan; Kim, Sohn G; Bristol, Gregory; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2013-05-01

    Current tumor immunotherapy approaches include the genetic modification of peripheral T cells to express tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs). The approach, tested in melanoma, has led to some limited success of tumor regression in patients. Yet, the introduction of exogenous TCRs into mature T cells entails an underlying risk; the generation of autoreactive clones due to potential TCR mispairing, and the lack of effective negative selection, as these peripheral cells do not undergo thymic selection following introduction of the exogenous TCR. We have successfully generated MART-1-specific CD8 T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) in a humanized mouse model. The advantages of this approach include a long-term source of antigen specific T cells and proper T-cell selection due to thymopoiesis following expression of the TCR. In this report, we examine the molecular processes occurring on endogenous TCR expression and demonstrate that this approach results in exclusive cell surface expression of the newly introduced TCR, and the exclusion of endogenous TCR cell surface expression. This suggests that this stem cell based approach can provide a potentially safer approach for anticancer immunotherapy due to the involvement of thymic selection.

  19. Effect of irradiation on human T-cell proliferation: low dose irradiation stimulates mitogen-induced proliferation and function of the suppressor/cytotoxic T-cell subset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualde, N.; Goodwin, J.S.

    1984-04-01

    Unfractionated human T cells exposed to 10-50 rad of X irradiation incorporated less (/sup 3/H)thymidine than nonirradiated T cells when subsequently cultured with PHA or Con A. The cytotoxic/suppressor T-cell subset, isolated as either OKT8(+) or OKT4(-) cells, demonstrated significantly enhanced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation in PHA- or Con A-stimulated cultures after exposure to 10-50 rad, compared to unirradiated cells, while the proliferation of the OKT4(+) helper/inducer subset was inhibited by low dose irradiation. It has been previously reported that approximately 30% of the cytotoxic/suppressor subset also stains with OKM1. When the cytotoxic/suppressor subset was further subdivided into OKT4(-), OKM1(+), and OKT4(-), OKM1(-) cells, proliferation of the OKT4(-), OKM1(+) population was inhibited by exposure to 25 rad while proliferation of the OKT4(-), OKM1(-) population was stimulated. The increase in proliferation of the cytotoxic/suppressor T-cell subset after low dose irradiation is paralleled by an increase in suppressor activity of these cells. T cells exposed to 25 rad and then cultured with Con A for 48 hr caused greater inhibition of IgG production when added to fresh autologous lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen than did unirradiated cells. Thus, low dose irradiation enhances both the proliferation and function of the human suppressor T-cell subset.

  20. Human Zika infection induces a reduction of IFN-γ producing CD4 T-cells and a parallel expansion of effector Vδ2 T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Eleonora; Castilletti, Concetta; Sacchi, Alessandra; Casetti, Rita; Bordoni, Veronica; Romanelli, Antonella; Turchi, Federica; Martini, Federico; Tumino, Nicola; Nicastri, Emanuele; Corpolongo, Angela; Di Caro, Antonino; Kobinger, Gary; Zumla, Alimuddin; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Agrati, Chiara

    2017-07-24

    The definition of the immunological response to Zika (ZIKV) infection in humans represents a key issue to identify protective profile useful for vaccine development and for pathogenesis studies. No data are available on the cellular immune response in the acute phase of human ZIKV infection, and its role in the protection and/or pathogenesis needs to be clarified. We studied and compared the phenotype and functionality of T-cells in patients with acute ZIKV and Dengue viral (DENV) infections. A significant activation of T-cells was observed during both ZIKV and DENV infections. ZIKV infection was characterized by a CD4 T cell differentiation toward effector cells and by a lower frequency of IFN-γ producing CD4 T cells. Moreover, a substantial expansion of CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cell subset expressing Vδ2 TCR was specifically observed in ZIKV patients. Vδ2 T cells presented a terminally differentiated profile, expressed granzyme B and maintained their ability to produce IFN-γ. These findings provide new knowledge on the immune response profile during self-limited infection that may help in vaccine efficacy definition, and in identifying possible immuno-pathogenetic mechanisms of severe infection.

  1. Cytotoxicity and Proliferation Studies with Arsenic in Established Human Cell Lines: Keratinocytes, Melanocytes, Dendritic Cells, Dermal Fibroblasts, Microvascular Endothelial Cells, Monocytes and T-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari H. P. Cohly

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Based on the hypothesis that arsenic exposure results in toxicity and mitogenecity, this study examined the dose-response of arsenic in established human cell lines of keratinocytes (HaCaT, melanocytes (1675, dendritic cells (THP-1/A23187, dermal fibroblasts (CRL1904, microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC, monocytes (THP-1, and T cells (Jurkat. Cytotoxicity was determined by incubating THP-1, THP-1+ A23187 and JKT cells in RPMI 1640, 1675 in Vitacell, HMEC in EBM, and dermal fibroblasts and HaCaT in DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% streptomycin and penicillin for 72 hrs in 96-well microtiter plates, at 37oC in a 5% CO2 incubator with different concentrations of arsenic using fluorescein diacetate (FDA. Cell proliferation in 96-well plates was determined in cultured cells starved by prior incubation for 24 hrs in 1% FBS and exposed for 72 hours, using the 96 cell titer proliferation solution (Promega assay. Cytotoxicity assays yielded LD50s of 9 μg/mL for HaCaT, 1.5 μg/mL for CRL 1675, 1.5 μg/mL for dendritic cells, 37 μg/mL for dermal fibroblasts, 0.48 μg/mL for HMEC, 50 μg/mL for THP-1 cells and 50 μg/mL for JKT-T cells. The peak proliferation was observed at 6 μg/mL for HaCaT and THP-1 cells, 0.19 μg/mL for CRL 1675, dendritic cells, and HMEC, and 1.5 μg/mL for dermal fibroblasts and Jurkat T cells. These results show that arsenic is toxic at high doses to keratinocytes, fibroblasts, monocytes and T cells, and toxic at lower doses to melanocytes, microvascular endothelial cells and dendritic cells. Proliferation studies showed sub-lethal doses of arsenic to be mitogenic.

  2. Staphylococcus enterotoxin A modulates interleukin 15-induced signaling and mitogenesis in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerwien, J; Kaltoft, K; Nielsen, M;

    1998-01-01

    T cells expressing the appropriate T-cell receptor Vbeta chain proliferate in response to Staphylococcus enterotoxin A (SEA) pulsed antigen-presenting cells (APC), whereas other T cells do not (SEA "non-responders"). Activated human T cells express MHC class II molecules that are high affinity......-mediated mitogenesis correlates with an inhibition of IL-2Rbeta expression and ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IL-2R. Cyclosporin A (CyA), an inhibitor of the protein phosphatase (PP2B) calcineurin, strongly inhibits the SEA-induced modulations of cytokine receptor expression. Moreover, CyA inhibits both...... the anti-mitogenic effect of SEA on cytokine-induced proliferation and the pro-mitogenic effect of PMA. In contrast, inhibitors of PP1, PP2A, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) are unable to inhibit the effects of SEA. In a SEA "non...

  3. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M;

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The immune privilege of the eye has been thought to be dependent on physical barriers and absence of lymphatic vessels. However, the immune privilege may also involve active immunologic processes, as recent studies have indicated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...

  4. Enumeration and Characterization of Human Memory T Cells by Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A. Calarota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT assay has advanced into a useful and widely applicable tool for the evaluation of T-cell responses in both humans and animal models of diseases and/or vaccine candidates. Using synthetic peptides (either individually or as overlapping peptide mixtures or whole antigens, total lymphocyte or isolated T-cell subset responses can be assessed either after short-term stimulation (standard ELISPOT or after their expansion during a 10-day culture (cultured ELISPOT. Both assays detect different antigen-specific immune responses allowing the analysis of effector memory T cells and central memory T cells. This paper describes the principle of ELISPOT assays and discusses their application in the evaluation of immune correlates of clinical interest with a focus on the vaccine field.

  5. Human CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells do not constitutively express IL-35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardel, Emilie; Larousserie, Frédérique; Charlot-Rabiega, Pascaline; Coulomb-L'Herminé, Aurore; Devergne, Odile

    2008-11-15

    EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3) can associate with p28 to form the heterodimeric cytokine IL-27, or with the p35 subunit of IL-12 to form the EBI3/p35 heterodimer, recently named IL-35. In mice, IL-35 has been shown to be constitutively expressed by CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and suggested to contribute to their suppressive activity. In this study, we investigated whether human Treg cells express IL-35. Double-staining analysis of human thymuses showed that neither Foxp3(+) nor CD25(+) cells coexpressed EBI3. Similarly, Foxp3(+) cells present in human lymph nodes, tonsils, spleens, and intestines did not express EBI3. Consistent with these in situ observations, Treg cells purified from blood or tonsils were negative for EBI3 by immunoblotting. Other human T cell subsets, including effector T cells, naive and memory CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells also did not constitutively express EBI3, which contrasts with IL-35 expression observed in murine CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells. Furthermore, although CD3/CD28 stimulation consistently induced low levels of EBI3 in various CD4(+) T cell subsets, no EBI3 could be detected in CD3/CD28-stimulated Treg cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that, whereas p35 transcripts were detected in both Teff and Treg cells, EBI3 transcripts were detected only in activated Teff cells, but not in resting or activated Treg cells. Thus, in contrast to their murine counterpart, human Treg cells do not express detectable amounts of IL-35.

  6. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damián ePérez-Mazliah

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  7. A sensitive method for detecting proliferation of rare autoantigen-specific human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannering, Stuart I; Morris, Jessica S; Jensen, Kent P; Purcell, Anthony W; Honeyman, Margo C; van Endert, Peter M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2003-12-01

    The ability to measure proliferation of rare antigen-specific T cells among many bystanders is critical for the evaluation of cellular immune function in health and disease. T-cell proliferation in response to antigen has been measured almost exclusively by 3H-thymidine incorporation. This method does not directly identify the phenotype of the proliferating cells and is frequently not sufficiently sensitive to detect rare autoantigen-specific T cells. To overcome these problems, we developed a novel assay for antigen-specific human T-cell proliferation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were labelled with the fluorescent dye 5,6-carboxylfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) and cells that proliferated in response to antigen, with resultant reduction in CFSE intensity, were measured directly by flow cytometry. This assay was more sensitive than 3H-thymidine incorporation and detected the proliferation of rare antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells at 10-fold lower antigen concentrations. It also allowed the phenotype of the proliferating cells to be directly determined. Using the CFSE assay we were able to measure directly the proliferation of human CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors in response to the type 1 diabetes autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and proinsulin (PI).

  8. Chloroquine inhibits human CD4+ T-cell activation by AP-1 signaling modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ralf L. J.; Jutz, Sabrina; Goldhahn, Katrin; Witzeneder, Nadine; Gerner, Marlene C.; Trapin, Doris; Greiner, Georg; Hoermann, Gregor; Steiner, Guenter; Pickl, Winfried F.; Burgmann, Heinz; Steinberger, Peter; Ratzinger, Franz; Schmetterer, Klaus G.

    2017-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic for rheumatic diseases. Although its modes of action on the innate immune system are well described, there is still insufficient knowledge about its direct effects on the adaptive immune system. Thus, we evaluated the influence of CQ on activation parameters of human CD4+ T-cells. CQ directly suppressed proliferation, metabolic activity and cytokine secretion of T-cells following anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activation. In contrast, CQ showed no effect on up-regulation of T-cell activation markers. CQ inhibited activation of all T helper cell subsets, although IL-4 and IL-13 secretion by Th2 cells were less influenced compared to other Th-specific cytokines. Up to 10 μM, CQ did not reduce cell viability, suggesting specific suppressive effects on T-cells. These properties of CQ were fully reversible in re-stimulation experiments. Analyses of intracellular signaling showed that CQ specifically inhibited autophagic flux and additionally activation of AP-1 by reducing phosphorylation of c-JUN. This effect was mediated by inhibition of JNK catalytic activity. In summary, we characterized selective and reversible immunomodulatory effects of CQ on human CD4+ T-cells. These findings provide new insights into the biological actions of JNK/AP-1 signaling in T-cells and may help to expand the therapeutic spectrum of CQ. PMID:28169350

  9. T Cell Coinhibition and Immunotherapy in Human Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Janakiram, Murali; Abadi, Yael M.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Zang, Xingxing

    2012-01-01

    Costimulation and coinhibition generated by the B7 family and their receptor CD28 family have key roles in regulating T lymphocyte activation and tolerance. These pathways are very attractive therapeutic targets for human cancers including breast cancer. Gene polymorphisms of B7x (B7-H4/B7S1), PD-1 (CD279), and CTLA-4 (CD152) are associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In human breast cancer microenvironment, up-regulation of ...

  10. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  11. Mouse T-cells restrict replication of human immunodeficiency virus at the level of integration

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    Goffinet Christine

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of an immunocompetent, genetically modified mouse model to study HIV-1 pathogenesis and to test antiviral strategies has been hampered by the fact that cells from native mice do not or only inefficiently support several steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Upon HIV-1 infection, mouse T-cell lines fail to express viral proteins, but the underlying replication barrier has thus far not been unambiguously identified. Here, we performed a kinetic and quantitative assessment of consecutive steps in the early phase of the HIV-1 replication cycle in T-cells from mice and humans. Results Both T-cell lines and primary T-cells from mice harbor a severe post-entry defect that is independent of potential species-specTR transactivation. Reverse transcription occurred efficiently following VSV-G-mediated entry of virions into mouse T-cells, and abundant levels of 2-LTR circles indicated successful nuclear import of the pre-integration complex. To probe the next step in the retroviral replication cycle, i.e. the integration of HIV-1 into the host cell genome, we established and validated a nested real-time PCR to specifically quantify HIV-1 integrants exploiting highly repetitive mouse B1 elements. Importantly, we demonstrate that the frequency of integrant formation is diminished 18- to > 305-fold in mouse T-cell lines compared to a human counterpart, resulting in a largely abortive infection. Moreover, differences in transgene expression from residual vector integrants, the transcription off which is cyclin T1-independent, provided evidence for an additional, peri-integrational deficit in certain mouse T-cell lines. Conclusion In contrast to earlier reports, we find that mouse T-cells efficiently support early replication steps up to and including nuclear import, but restrict HIV-1 at the level of chromosomal integration.

  12. Impact of Growth Factor Independence 1 in Human T-Cell Lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabrowska, Magdalena Julia; Dybkær, Karen; Johansen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    Impact of Growth Factor Independence 1 in Human T-Cell Lymphomas; Pathogenic Potential Identified by Insertional Mutagenesis in a Murine T-Cell Lymphoma Model. Magdalena Julia Dabrowska *,1, Karen Dybkaer *,1, Preben Johansen *,2, Hans Erik Johnsen1 and Finn Skou Pedersen *,3 1 Department...... role in the development of MLV induced lymphomas and strongly indicates that retroviral insertional mutagenesis in murine models of human NHLs can be used to identify new genes involved in lymphomagenesis and, by use of functional assays, their impact on human lymphomas can be evaluated. Disclosures...

  13. Metabolic engineering of Salmonella vaccine bacteria to boost human Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workalemahu, Grefachew; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Nada, Mohanad H; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Jones, Bradley D; Jin, Chenggang; Morita, Craig T

    2014-07-15

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing foreign (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a metabolite in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by most eubacteria and apicomplexan parasites, and self isopentenyl pyrophosphate, a metabolite in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Whereas microbial infections elicit prolonged expansion of memory Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, immunization with prenyl pyrophosphates or aminobisphosphonates elicit short-term Vγ2Vδ2 expansion with rapid anergy and deletion upon subsequent immunizations. We hypothesized that a live, attenuated bacterial vaccine that overproduces HMBPP would elicit long-lasting Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity by mimicking a natural infection. Therefore, we metabolically engineered the avirulent aroA(-) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 strain by deleting the gene for LytB (the downstream enzyme from HMBPP) and functionally complementing for this loss with genes encoding mevalonate pathway enzymes. LytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 had high HMBPP levels, infected human cells as efficiently as did the wild-type bacteria, and stimulated large ex vivo expansions of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells from human donors. Importantly, vaccination of a rhesus monkey with live lytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 stimulated a prolonged expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells without significant side effects or anergy induction. These studies provide proof-of-principle that metabolic engineering can be used to derive live bacterial vaccines that boost Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity. Similar engineering of metabolic pathways to produce lipid Ags or B vitamin metabolite Ags could be used to derive live bacterial vaccine for other unconventional T cells that recognize nonpeptide Ags.

  14. Engineering human peripheral blood stem cell grafts that are depleted of naïve T cells and retain functional pathogen-specific memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Marie; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jones, Lori A; Turtle, Cameron; Krause, Diane; Riddell, Stanley R; Shlomchik, Warren

    2014-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a frequent major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Approaches that selectively deplete T cells that cause GVHD from allogeneic stem cell grafts and preserve T cells specific for pathogens may improve HCT outcomes. It has been hypothesized that the majority of T cells that can cause GVHD reside within the naïve T cell (TN) subset, and previous studies performed in mouse models and with human cells in vitro support this hypothesis. As a prelude to translating these findings to the clinic, we developed and evaluated a novel 2-step clinically compliant procedure for manipulating peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) to remove TN, preserve CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, and provide for a fixed dose of memory T cells (TM) that includes T cells with specificity for common opportunistic pathogens encountered after HCT. Our studies demonstrate effective and reproducible performance of the immunomagnetic cell selection procedure for depleting TN. Moreover, after cell processing, the CD45RA-depleted PBSC products are enriched for CD4(+) and CD8(+) TM with a central memory phenotype and contain TM cells that are capable of proliferating and producing effector cytokines in response to opportunistic pathogens. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transition of late-stage effector T cells to CD27+ CD28+ tumor-reactive effector memory T cells in humans after adoptive cell transfer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Daniel J.; Dudley, Mark E.; Robbins, Paul F.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In humans, the pathways of memory T-cell differentiation remain poorly defined. Recently, adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of tumor-reactive T lymphocytes to metastatic melanoma patients after nonmyeloablative chemotherapy has resulted in persistence of functional, tumor-reactive lymphocytes, regression of disease, and induction of melanocyte-directed autoimmunity in some responding patients. In the current study, longitudinal phenotypic analysis was performed on melanoma antigen–specific CD8+ T cells during their transition from in vitro cultured effector cells to long-term persistent memory cells following ACT to 6 responding patients. Tumor-reactive T cells used for therapy were generally late-stage effector cells with a CD27Lo CD28Lo CD45RA− CD62 ligand− (CD62L−) CC chemokine receptor 7− (CCR7−) interleukin-7 receptor αLo (IL-7RαLo) phenotype. After transfer, rapid up-regulation and continued expression of IL-7Rα in vivo suggested an important role for IL-7R in immediate and long-term T-cell survival. Although the tumor antigen–specific T-cell population contracted between 1 and 4 weeks after transfer, stable numbers of CD27+ CD28+ tumor-reactive T cells were maintained, demonstrating their contribution to the development of long-term, melanoma-reactive memory CD8+ T cells in vivo. At 2 months after transfer, melanoma-reactive T cells persisted at high levels and displayed an effector memory phenotype, including a CD27+ CD28+ CD62L− CCR7− profile, which may explain in part their ability to mediate tumor destruction. PMID:15345595

  16. Intracellular processing and presentation of T cell epitopes, expressed by recombinant Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, to human T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); C.M. Janssen (Riny); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); C.E.M. van Doornik (C. E M); J. Tommassen (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractVaccines based on recombinant attenuated bacteria represent a potentially safe and effective immunization strategy. A carrier system was developed to analyze in vitro whether foreign T cell epitopes, inserted in the outer membrane protein PhoE of Escherichia coli and expressed by recombi

  17. Non-human primate regulatory T cells: Current biology and implications for transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Dons (Eefje); G. Raimondi (Giorgio); D.K.C. Cooper (David); A.W. Thomson (Angus)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractRegulatory T cells (Treg) offer potential for improving long-term outcomes in cell and organ transplantation. The non-human primate model is a valuable resource for addressing issues concerning the transfer of Treg therapy to the clinic. Herein, we discuss the properties of non-human pri

  18. Pneumococcal infections in humans are associated with increased apoptosis and trafficking of type 1 cytokine-producing T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Skinhøj, Peter

    2002-01-01

    , little is known regarding the T-cell response during in vivo infections in humans. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that activated T cells producing type 1 cytokines were engaged in the host response to pneumococcal infections. The phenotype and function of T cells were studied in 22...

  19. Impact of nicotine on the interplay between human periodontal ligament cells and CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xin; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wong, Yong; Wu, Li-Zheng; Tan, Ling; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Periodontitis is a common infectious disease associated with destruction of periodontal ligaments and alveolar bones. CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune response is involved in the progression of periodontitis. Tobacco consumption increases the risk of periodontal disease. However, the impact of nicotine on the interaction between human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and CD4(+) T cells remains unrevealed. Our study aims to investigate the effect of nicotine on PDL cells and the cocultured CD4(+) T cells. The PDL cell cultures were established by explants from healthy individuals, exposed to nicotine or α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), and incubated solely or in combination with CD4(+) T cells. Afterwards, cell viability, secreted cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were evaluated. In monoculture of PDL cells, nicotine dramatically repressed cell viability and increased apoptosis. Meanwhile, α-BTX largely reversed the nicotine-induced apoptosis and increased viability of PDL cells. Compared with the monoculture, MMP-1, MMP-3, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-21 in supernatant of cocultures were markedly elevated after treatment with nicotine. Moreover, α-BTX significantly attenuated nicotine-triggered production of these components either in mono- or co-cultures. In addition, PDL cell-derived CXCL12 following nicotine treatment recruited CD4(+) T cells. Above all, nicotine deteriorated periodontitis partially by promoting PDL cell-CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response and matrix degradation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Human CD4+ T cell epitopes from vaccinia virus induced by vaccination or infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mauricio Calvo-Calle

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of vaccinia virus in basic and applied immunology, our knowledge of the human immune response directed against this virus is very limited. CD4(+ T cell responses are an important component of immunity induced by current vaccinia-based vaccines, and likely will be required for new subunit vaccine approaches, but to date vaccinia-specific CD4(+ T cell responses have been poorly characterized, and CD4(+ T cell epitopes have been reported only recently. Classical approaches used to identify T cell epitopes are not practical for large genomes like vaccinia. We developed and validated a highly efficient computational approach that combines prediction of class II MHC-peptide binding activity with prediction of antigen processing and presentation. Using this approach and screening only 36 peptides, we identified 25 epitopes recognized by T cells from vaccinia-immune individuals. Although the predictions were made for HLA-DR1, eight of the peptides were recognized by donors of multiple haplotypes. T cell responses were observed in samples of peripheral blood obtained many years after primary vaccination, and were amplified after booster immunization. Peptides recognized by multiple donors are highly conserved across the poxvirus family, including variola, the causative agent of smallpox, and may be useful in development of a new generation of smallpox vaccines and in the analysis of the immune response elicited to vaccinia virus. Moreover, the epitope identification approach developed here should find application to other large-genome pathogens.

  1. Regulation and gene expression profiling of NKG2D positive human cytomegalovirus-primed CD4+ T-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Folkersen, Lasse; Skov, Søren

    2012-01-01

    NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T-cells, and ¿d T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4(+) T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D(+) CD4(+) T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This particular...... CD4(+) T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D(+) CD4(+) T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression.......NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T-cells, and ¿d T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4(+) T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D(+) CD4(+) T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This particular...... subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D(+) CD4(+) T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D(+) CD4(+) T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4(+) T-cells is currently not known. In this study...

  2. Notch signalling inhibits CD4 expression during initiation and differentiation of human T cell lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Carlin

    Full Text Available The Delta/Notch signal transduction pathway is central to T cell differentiation from haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Although T cell development is well characterized using expression of cell surface markers, the detailed mechanisms driving differentiation have not been established. This issue becomes central with observations that adult HSCs exhibit poor differentiation towards the T cell lineage relative to neonatal or embryonic precursors. This study investigates the contribution of Notch signalling and stromal support cells to differentiation of adult and Cord Blood (CB human HSCs, using the Notch signalling OP9Delta co-culture system. Co-cultured cells were assayed at weekly intervals during development for phenotype markers using flow cytometry. Cells were also assayed for mRNA expression at critical developmental stages. Expression of the central thymocyte marker CD4 was initiated independently of Notch signalling, while cells grown with Notch signalling had reduced expression of CD4 mRNA and protein. Interruption of Notch signalling in partially differentiated cells increased CD4 mRNA and protein expression, and promoted differentiation to CD4(+ CD8(+ T cells. We identified a set of genes related to T cell development that were initiated by Notch signalling, and also a set of genes subsequently altered by Notch signal interruption. These results demonstrate that while Notch signalling is essential for establishment of the T cell lineage, at later stages of differentiation, its removal late in differentiation promotes more efficient DP cell generation. Notch signalling adds to signals provided by stromal cells to allow HSCs to differentiate to T cells via initiation of transcription factors such as HES1, GATA3 and TCF7. We also identify gene expression profile differences that may account for low generation of T cells from adult HSCs.

  3. Functional Signatures of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezzemolo, Teresa; Guggino, Giuliana; La Manna, Marco Pio; Di Liberto, Diana; Dieli, Francesco; Caccamo, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms could contribute to control Mtb infection, as upon activation, CD8 T cells release cytokines or cytotoxic molecules, which cause apoptosis of target cells. Taken together, the balance of the immune response in the control of infection and possibly bacterial eradication is important in understanding whether the host immune response will be appropriate in contrasting the infection or not, and, consequently, the inability of the immune response, will determine the dissemination and the transmission of bacilli to new subjects. In conclusion, the recent highlights on the role of different functional signatures of T cell subsets in the immune response toward Mtb infection will be discerned in this review, in order to summarize what is known about the immune response in human TB. In particular, we will discuss the role of CD4 and CD8 T cells in contrasting the advance of the intracellular pathogen in already infected people or the progression to active disease in subjects with latent infection. All the information will be aimed at increasing the knowledge of this complex disease in order to improve diagnosis, prognosis, drug treatment, and vaccination.

  4. Low CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio associated with inflammatory arthropathy in human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax transgenic mice.

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    Takeo Ohsugi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1 can cause an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL as well as inflammatory diseases such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. A transgenic mouse that expresses HTLV-1 Tax also develops T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and an inflammatory arthropathy that resembles rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to identify the primary T-cell subsets involved in the development of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By 24 months of age, Tax transgenic mice developed severe arthropathy with a cumulative incidence of 22.8%. The pathological findings of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice were similar to those seen in human rheumatoid arthritis or mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis, with synovial proliferation and a positive rheumatoid factor. Before the onset of spontaneous arthropathy, young and old Tax transgenic mice were not sensitive to collagen and did not develop arthritis after immunization with type II collagen. The arthropathic Tax transgenic mice showed a significantly decreased proportion of splenic CD4(+ T cells, whereas the proportion of splenic CD8(+ T cells was increased. Regulatory T cells (CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ were significantly decreased and CD8(+ T cells that expressed the chemokine receptor CCR4 (CD8(+CCR4(+ were significantly increased in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice. The expression of tax mRNA was strong in the spleen and joints of arthropathic mice, with a 40-fold increase compared with healthy transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reveal that Tax transgenic mice develop rheumatoid-like arthritis with proliferating synovial cells in the joints; however, the proportion of different splenic T-cell subsets in these mice was completely different from other commonly used animal models of rheumatoid arthritis. The crucial T-cell subsets in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice appear to resemble

  5. Enforced IL-10 Expression Confers Type 1 Regulatory T Cell (Tr1) Phenotype and Function to Human CD4+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4+ Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10–producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4+ T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP+ LV-IL-10–transduced human CD4+ T (CD4LV-IL-10) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4LV-IL-10 T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4LV-IL-10 T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4+ T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells. PMID:22692497

  6. Enforced IL-10 Expression Confers Type 1 Regulatory T Cell (Tr1) Phenotype and Function to Human CD4(+) T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4(+) Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10-producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4(+) T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP(+) LV-IL-10-transduced human CD4(+) T (CD4(LV-IL-10)) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4(+) T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells.

  7. Lipoproteins are major targets of the polyclonal human T cell response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Chetan; Turner, Marie T; Lewinsohn, David M; Moody, D Branch; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2013-01-01

    Most vaccines and basic studies of T cell epitopes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis emphasize water-soluble proteins that are secreted into the extracellular space and presented in the context of MHC class II. Much less is known about the role of Ags retained within the cell wall. We used polyclonal T cells from infected humans to probe for responses to immunodominant Ags in the M. tuberculosis cell wall. We found that the magnitude of response to secreted or cell wall intrinsic compounds was similar among healthy controls, patients with latent tuberculosis, and patients with active tuberculosis. Individual responses to secreted Ags and cell wall extract were strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.495, p = 0.001), suggesting that T cells responding to cell wall and secreted Ags are present at similar frequency. Surprisingly, T cell stimulatory factors intrinsic to the cell wall partition into organic solvents; however, these responses are not explained by CD1-mediated presentation of lipids. Instead, we find that molecules soluble in organic solvents are dependent upon MHC class II and recognized by IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) T cells. We reasoned that MHC class II-dependent Ags extracting into lipid mixtures might be found among triacylated lipoproteins present in mycobacteria. We used M. tuberculosis lacking prolipoprotein signal peptidase A (lspA), an enzyme required for lipoprotein synthesis, to demonstrate loss of polyclonal T cell responses. Our results demonstrate the use of bacterial genetics to identify lipoproteins as an unexpected and immunodominant class of cell wall-associated Ags targeted by the polyclonal human T cell response to M. tuberculosis.

  8. Human B cell activating factor (BCAF): production by a human T cell tumor line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fevrier, M; Diu, A; Mollier, P; Abadie, A; Olive, D; Mawas, C; Theze, J

    1989-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that supernatants from human T cell clones stimulated by a pair of anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies cause resting human B cells to become activated and to proliferate in the absence of any other signals. The activity responsible for these effects was shown to be different from already characterized lymphokines and in particular from IL-2 and IL-4, and was named B Cell Activating Factor or BCAF. In this paper, we describe the production of BCAF by a human T cell tumor line T687 after phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation; this production can be potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). We further show that the stimulatory phase can be separated from the secretory phase thereby avoiding contamination of BCAF-containing supernatant by PMA and PHA. Supernatants produced under these conditions do not contain either IL-4 or IFN but contain traces of lymphotoxin and 2 to 10 ng/ml of IL-2. The T687 cell line will allow us to obtain a large volume of supernatant for biochemical study and purification of the molecule(s) responsible for BCAF activity.

  9. Regulatory T cells and human myeloid dendritic cells promote tolerance via programmed death ligand-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Amarnath

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg has been proposed, yet cellular and molecular mechanisms of human Tregs remain incompletely characterized. Here, we demonstrate that human Tregs promote the generation of myeloid dendritic cells (DC with reduced capacity to stimulate effector T cell responses. In a model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, allogeneic human DC conditioned with Tregs suppressed human T cell activation and completely abrogated posttransplant lethality. Tregs induced programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 expression on Treg-conditioned DC; subsequently, Treg-conditioned DC induced PD-L1 expression in vivo on effector T cells. PD-L1 blockade reversed Treg-conditioned DC function in vitro and in vivo, thereby demonstrating that human Tregs can promote immune suppression via DC modulation through PD-L1 up-regulation. This identification of a human Treg downstream cellular effector (DC and molecular mechanism (PD-L1 will facilitate the rational design of clinical trials to modulate alloreactivity.

  10. Interleukin 2 inhibits in vitro growth of human T cell lines carrying retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugamura, K; Nakai, S; Fujii, M; Hinuma, Y

    1985-05-01

    Four human T cell lines, TL-Mor, TL-Su, TL-TerI, and TL-OmI, carrying human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV), were established previously. TL-Mor, TL-Su, and TL-TerI were derived from interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent parental cell lines cloned from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of three healthy HTLV carriers, while TL-OmI was directly established from PBL of a patient with adult T cell leukemia. These four TL cell lines grow autonomously without IL-2. When they were cultured in the presence of IL-2, their growth was inhibited after a few days. This growth inhibition depended on the dose of IL-2, and the effective dose significantly promoted growth of their parental IL-2-dependent cell lines. The growth inhibition is demonstrated to be due to specific binding of IL-2 to receptors on the TL cells.

  11. Identification of putative human T cell receptor delta complementary DNA clones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, S.; Brenner, M.B.; Krangel, M.S.

    1987-10-30

    A novel T cell receptor (TCR) subunit termed TCR delta, associated with TCY ..gamma.. and CD3 polypeptides, were recently found on a subpopulation of human T lymphocytes. T cell-specific complementary DNA clones present in a human TCR..gamma..delta T cell complementary DNA library were obtained and characterized in order to identify candidate clones encoding TCR delta. One cross-hybridizing group of clones detected transcripts that are expressed in lymphocytes bearing TCR ..gamma..delta but not in other T lymphocytes and are encoded by genes that are rearranged in TCR ..gamma..delta lymphocytes but deleted in other T lymphocytes. Their sequences indicate homology to the variable, joining, and constant elements of other TCR and immunoglobulin genes. These characteristics are strong evidence that the complementary DNA clones encode TCR delta.

  12. Carica papaya increases regulatory T cells and reduces IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Maha; Chai, Pei-Shin; Loh, Chiew-Yee; Chong, Mun-Yee; Quay, Huai-Wei; Vidyadaran, Sharmili; Seman, Zainina; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Seow, Heng-Fong

    2011-05-01

    Fruit and vegetables have therapeutic potential as they dampen inflammation, have no known side-effects and as whole foods have prospective additive and synergistic benefits. Th1 (IFN-γ(+) CD4(+))/Th2 (IL-4(+)CD4(+)) T cells play a vital role in mediating inflammatory responses and may be regulated by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Effects of Carica papaya on cells of healthy individuals were determined using flow cytometry methods. Significant down-regulation of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) (p=0.03, n=13), up-regulation of IL-4(+) CD4(+) (p=0.04, n=13) T cells and up-regulation of CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(-) (p=0.001, n=15) Tregs were observed after papaya consumption. In vitro cultures showed up-regulation of Tregs in male subjects and was significantly associated with levels of IL-1β in culture supernatants (R(2) =0.608, p=0.04, n=12). Other inflammatory cytokines were significantly suppressed. Papaya consumption may exert an anti-inflammatory response mediated through Tregs and have potential in alleviating inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Concentrations of cyclosporin A and FK506 that inhibit IL-2 induction in human T cells do not affect TGF-beta1 biosynthesis, whereas higher doses of cyclosporin A trigger apoptosis and release of preformed TGF-beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguillón, Jordi; Morancho, Beatriz; Kim, Seong-Jin; López-Botet, Miguel; Aramburu, José

    2005-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 suppress T cell activation by inhibiting calcineurin and the calcineurin-dependent transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc), which are central regulators of T cell function. It was reported that CsA up-regulated the transcription of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) in lymphocytes and other cells and activated its promoter in A549 lung carcinoma cells, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood, and it is unclear whether calcineurin plays any role. We have studied the regulation of TGF-beta1 in normal human lymphocytes and cell lines. In Jurkat T cells, the TGF-beta1 promoter was activated by calcineurin and NFATc and inhibited by CsA and FK506. However, the promoter was insensitive to both drugs in A549 cells. In human T cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin, biosynthesis of TGF-beta1, induced by the T cell receptor (TCR) or the TGF-beta receptor, was not substantially affected by CsA and FK506 concentrations (< or = 1 microM) that effectively inhibited interleukin-2 production. However, pretreatment of fresh lymphocytes with CsA or FK506 during primary TCR stimulation reduced their production of TGF-beta1 during secondary TCR activation. Finally, high concentrations of CsA (10 microM), in the range attained in vivo in experiments in rodents, caused apoptosis in human T cells and the release of preformed, bioactive TGF-beta1. These effects are unlikely to owe to calcineurin inhibition, as they were not observed with FK506. Our results indicate that CsA and FK506 are not general inducers of TGF-beta1 biosynthesis but can cause different effects on TGF-beta1 depending on the cell type and concentrations used.

  14. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I infection and the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuoka Masao

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The clinical entity of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL was established around 1977, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I was subsequently identified in 1980. In the 25 years since the discovery of HTLV-I, HTLV-I infection and its associated diseases have been extensively studied, and many of their aspects have been clarified. However, the detailed mechanism of leukemogenesis remains unsolved yet, and the prognosis of ATL patients still poor because of its resistance to chemotherapy and immunodeficiency. In this review, I highlight the recent progress and remaining enigmas in HTLV-I infection and its associated diseases, especially ATL.

  15. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) Suppresses the Effects of Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) on Human T Cell Activation and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Michael S.; Houtman, Jon C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a monoglyceride with well characterized anti-microbial properties. Because of these properties, GML is widely used in food, cosmetics, and personal care products and currently being tested as a therapeutic for menstrual associated toxic shock syndrome, superficial wound infections, and HIV transmission. Recently, we have described that GML potently suppresses select T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling events, leading to reduced human T cell effector functions. However, how soluble host factors present in the blood and at sites of infection affect GML-mediated human T cell suppression is unknown. In this study, we have characterized how human serum albumin (HSA) affects GML-induced inhibition of human T cells. We found that HSA and other serum albumins bind to 12 carbon acyl side chain of GML at low micromolar affinities and restores the TCR-induced formation of LAT, PLC-γ1, and AKT microclusters at the plasma membrane. Additionally, HSA reverses GML mediated inhibition of AKT phosphorylation and partially restores cytokine production in GML treated cells. Our data reveal that HSA, one of the most abundant proteins in the human serum and at sites of infections, potently reverses the suppression of human T cells by GML. This suggests that GML-driven human T cell suppression depends upon the local tissue environment, with albumin concentration being a major determinant of GML function. PMID:27764189

  16. Profile of central and effector memory T cells in the progression of chronic human chagas disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Araújo Fiuza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic Chagas disease presents several different clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to severe cardiac and/or digestive clinical forms. Several studies have demonstrated that immunoregulatory mechanisms are important processes for the control of the intense immune activity observed in the chronic phase. T cells play a critical role in parasite specific and non-specific immune response elicited by the host against Trypanosoma cruzi. Specifically, memory T cells, which are basically classified as central and effector memory cells, might have a distinct migratory activity, role and function during the human Chagas disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on the hypothesis that the disease severity in humans is correlated to the quality of immune responses against T. cruzi, we evaluated the memory profile of peripheral CD4(+ and CD8(+ T lymphocytes as well as its cytokine secretion before and after in vitro antigenic stimulation. We evaluated cellular response from non-infected individuals (NI, patients with indeterminate (IND or cardiac (CARD clinical forms of Chagas disease. The expression of CD45RA, CD45RO and CCR7 surface molecules was determined on CD4(+ and CD8(+ T lymphocytes; the pattern of intracellular cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-10 synthesized by naive and memory cells was determined by flow cytometry. Our results revealed that IND and CARD patients have relatively lower percentages of naive (CD45RA(high CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. However, statistical analysis of ex-vivo profiles of CD4(+ T cells showed that IND have lower percentage of CD45RA(high in relation to non-infected individuals, but not in relation to CARD. Elevated percentages of memory (CD45RO(high CD4(+ T cells were also demonstrated in infected individuals, although statistically significant differences were only observed between IND and NI groups. Furthermore, when we analyzed the profile of secreted cytokines, we observed that CARD patients

  17. Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus in a Population of Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOMCS2

    African Health Sciences Vol 7 No 3 September 2007. 129. Human T-cell ... The results of this study thus show that HTLV infection is active in the population although higher in pregnant .... Software Version 2.0 running on a window NT platform.

  18. Human T cell responses to the ESAT-6 antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Demissie, A; Eguale, T;

    1999-01-01

    Human T cell responses to ESAT-6 and eight synthetic overlapping peptides were investigated in tuberculosis (TB) patients and control subjects from regions of high and low endemicity for TB. ESAT-6 was recognized by 65% of all tuberculin purified protein derivative-responsive TB patients, whereas...

  19. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-01-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its o...

  20. Priming of protective T cell responses against virus-induced tumors in mice with human immune system components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strowig, Till; Gurer, Cagan; Ploss, Alexander; Liu, Yi-Fang; Arrey, Frida; Sashihara, Junji; Koo, Gloria; Rice, Charles M; Young, James W; Chadburn, Amy; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Münz, Christian

    2009-06-08

    Many pathogens that cause human disease infect only humans. To identify the mechanisms of immune protection against these pathogens and also to evaluate promising vaccine candidates, a small animal model would be desirable. We demonstrate that primary T cell responses in mice with reconstituted human immune system components control infection with the oncogenic and persistent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). These cytotoxic and interferon-gamma-producing T cell responses were human leukocyte antigen (HLA) restricted and specific for EBV-derived peptides. In HLA-A2 transgenic animals and similar to human EBV carriers, T cell responses against lytic EBV antigens dominated over recognition of latent EBV antigens. T cell depletion resulted in elevated viral loads and emergence of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease. Both loss of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells abolished immune control. Therefore, this mouse model recapitulates features of symptomatic primary EBV infection and generates T cell-mediated immune control that resists oncogenic transformation.

  1. Identification of a human cyclin D1-derived peptide that induces human cytotoxic CD4 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Dao

    Full Text Available Cyclin D1 is over-expressed in various human tumors and therefore can be a potential oncogenic target antigen. However, only a limited number of T cell epitopes has been characterized. We aimed at identifying human cyclin D1-derived peptides that include both CD4 and CD8 T cell epitopes and to test if such multi-epitope peptides could yield improved cytotoxic CD8 T cell responses as well as cytotoxic CD4 T cells. Five HLA-DR.B1-binding peptides containing multiple overlapping CD4 epitopes and HLA-A0201-restricted CD8 T cell epitopes were predicted by computer algorithms. Immunogenicity of the synthetic peptides was assessed by stimulating T cells from healthy donors in vitro and the epitope recognition was measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT and (51Chromium release assays. A HLA-DR.B1 peptide, designed "DR-1", in which a HLA-A0201-binding epitopes (D1-1 was imbedded, induced CD3 T cell responses against both DR-1 and D1-1 peptides in IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. This suggested processing of the shorter D1-1 epitope from the DR-1 sequence. However, only DR-1-stimulated CD4 or CD3 T cells possessed cytotoxicity against peptide-pulsed autologous DCs and a cancer cell line, that expresses a high level of cyclin D1. Monoclonal antibody to HLA-DR abrogated the epitope-specific responses of both CD3 and CD4 T cells, demonstrating class II-mediated killing. Our studies suggest a possible role of CD4 T cells in anti-tumor immunity as cytotoxic effectors against HLA-DR expressing cancers and provide a rationale for designing peptide vaccines that include CD4 epitopes.

  2. Trehalose improves cell proliferation and dehydration tolerance of human HaCaT cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kyung Eun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a disaccharide molecule that serves as a natural osmotic regulator in halophilic microorganisms and plants but not in mammals. We observed that human HaCaT cells supplied with trehalose improved cell proliferation and extended viability under dehydration. In HaCaT cells, in response to increasing concentrations of exogenous trehalose, the levels of heat shock protein (HSP 70 increased and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 1 decreased. Proteome analysis of trehalose-treated HaCaT cells revealed remarkable increases in the levels of proteins involved in cell signaling and the cell cycle, including p21 activated kinase I, Sec I family domain protein and elongation factor G. Moreover, the proteins for cell stress resistance, tryptophan hydroxylase, serine/cysteine proteinase inhibitors and vitamin D receptors were also increased. In addition, the proteins responsible for the maintenance of the cytoskeleton and cellular structures including procollagen-lysine dioxygenase, vinculin and ezrin were increased. Proteomic data revealed that trehalose affected HaCaT cells by inducing the proteins involved in cell proliferation. These results suggest that trehalose improves the proliferation and dehydration tolerance of HaCaT cells by inducing proteins involved in cell growth and dehydration protection.

  3. Human T cell responses to Japanese encephalitis virus in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Lance; Bali, Tanushka; Buxton, Gemma; Chib, Savita; Chan, Sajesh; Soni, Mohammed; Hussain, Mohammed; Isenman, Heather; Fadnis, Prachi; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Satishkumar, Vishali; Lewthwaite, Penny; Kurioka, Ayako; Krishna, Srinivasa; Shankar, M Veera; Ahmed, Riyaz; Begum, Ashia; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Yoksan, Sutee; Fernandez, Stefan; Willberg, Christian B; Kloverpris, Henrik N; Conlon, Christopher; Klenerman, Paul; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2016-06-27

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in children of South and Southeast Asia. However, the majority of individuals exposed to JEV only develop mild symptoms associated with long-lasting adaptive immunity. The related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) cocirculates in many JEV-endemic areas, and clinical data suggest cross-protection between DENV and JEV. To address the role of T cell responses in protection against JEV, we conducted the first full-breadth analysis of the human memory T cell response using a synthetic peptide library. Ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to JEV in healthy JEV-exposed donors were mostly CD8(+) and targeted nonstructural (NS) proteins, whereas IFN-γ responses in recovered JE patients were mostly CD4(+) and targeted structural proteins and the secreted protein NS1. Among patients, a high quality, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cell response was associated with complete recovery from JE. T cell responses from healthy donors showed a high degree of cross-reactivity to DENV that was less apparent in recovered JE patients despite equal exposure. These data reveal divergent functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses linked to different clinical outcomes of JEV infection, associated with distinct targeting and broad flavivirus cross-reactivity including epitopes from DENV, West Nile, and Zika virus.

  4. Preferential Th1 cytokine profile of phosphoantigen-stimulated human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, Margaret R

    2010-01-01

    Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells recognise pyrophosphate-based antigens (phosphoantigens) and have multiple functions in innate and adaptive immunity, including a unique ability to activate other cells of the immune system. We used flow cytometry and ELISA to define the early cytokine profiles of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells stimulated in vitro with isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2 enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP) in the absence and presence of IL-2 and IL-15. We show that fresh Vγ9Vδ2 T cells produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) within 4 hours of stimulation with phosphoantigen, but neither IL-10, IL-13, nor IL-17 was detectable up to 72 hours under these conditions. Cytokine production was not influenced by expression or lack, thereof, of CD4 or CD8. Addition of IL-2 or IL-15 caused expansion of IFN-γ-producing Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, but did not enhance IFN-γ secretion after 24-72 hours. Thus, phosphoantigen-stimulated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells have potential as Th1-biasing adjuvants for immunotherapy.

  5. Human CD8(+) T Cells Target Multiple Epitopes in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbulla, Daniel; Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Jahn, Gerhard; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2016-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a serious health problem in young children, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The development of novel prevention strategies, such as a vaccine to RSV, is a high priority. One strategy is to design a peptide-based vaccine that activates appropriate CD8(+) T-cell responses. However, this approach is limited by the low number of RSV peptide epitopes defined to date that activate CD8(+) T cells. We aimed to identify peptide epitopes that are presented by common human leukocyte antigen types (HLA-A*01, -A*02, and -B*07). We identify one novel HLA-A*02-restricted and two novel HLA-A*01-restricted peptide epitopes from RSV polymerase. Peptide-HLA multimer staining of specific T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cell, the memory phenotype of such peptide-specific T cells ex vivo, and functional IFNγ responses in short-term stimulation assays suggest that these peptides are recognized during RSV infection. Such peptides are candidates for inclusion into a peptide-based RSV vaccine designed to stimulate defined CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  6. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies.

  7. Impact of alemtuzumab treatment on the survival and function of human regulatory T cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havari, Evis; Turner, Michael J; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Shankara, Srinivas; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Roberts, Bruce; Siders, William; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2014-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for the CD52 protein present at high levels on the surface of B and T lymphocytes. In clinical trials, alemtuzumab has shown a clinical benefit superior to that of interferon-β in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Treatment with alemtuzumab leads to the depletion of circulating lymphocytes followed by a repopulation process characterized by alterations in the number, proportions and properties of lymphocyte subsets. Of particular interest, an increase in the percentage of T cells with a regulatory phenotype (Treg cells) has been observed in multiple sclerosis patients after alemtuzumab. Since Treg cells play an important role in the control of autoimmune responses, the effect of alemtuzumab on Treg cells was further studied in vitro. Alemtuzumab effectively mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of human T lymphocytes and the remaining population was enriched in T cells with a regulatory phenotype. The alemtuzumab-exposed T cells displayed functional regulatory characteristics including anergy to stimulation with allogeneic dendritic cells and ability to suppress the allogeneic response of autologous T cells. Consistent with the observed increase in Treg cell frequency, the CD25(hi) T-cell population was necessary for the suppressive activity of alemtuzumab-exposed T cells. The mechanism of this suppression was found to be dependent on both cell-cell contact and interleukin-2 consumption. These findings suggest that an alemtuzumab-mediated increase in the proportion of Treg cells may play a role in promoting the long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  8. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-09-16

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component.

  9. Expression and function of TNF and IL-1 receptors on human regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Mercer

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress immune activation and are critical in preventing autoimmune diseases. While the ability of Tregs to inhibit proliferation of other T cells is well established, it is not yet clear whether Tregs also modulate inflammatory cytokines during an immune response. Here, we show that the expression of inflammatory cytokine receptors IL-1R1 and TNFR2 were higher on resting mature Tregs compared to naïve or memory T cells. While upon activation through the T cell receptor (TCR, expression of IL-1R1 and TNFR2 were upregulated on all T cell subsets, IL-1R1 maintained significantly higher expression on activated Tregs as compared to other T cell subsets. The decoy receptor for IL-1 (IL-1R2 was not expressed by any of the resting T cells but was rapidly upregulated and preferentially expressed upon TCR-stimulation on Tregs. In addition, we found that Tregs also expressed high levels of mRNA for IL-1 antagonist, IL-1RA. TCR-stimulation of naïve T cells in the presence of TGFbeta, which induces FOXP3 expression, however did not result in upregulation of IL-1R1 or IL-1R2. In addition, ectopic expression of FOXP3 in non-Tregs, while causing significant upregulation of IL-1R1 and IL-1R2, did not achieve the levels seen in bona fide Tregs. We also determined that resting human Tregs expressing IL-1R1 did not have higher suppressive capacity compared to IL-1R1- Tregs, suggesting that IL-1R1 does not discriminate suppressive resting Tregs in healthy individuals. Functionally, activated human Tregs displayed a capacity to neutralize IL-1beta, which suggests a physiological significance for the expression of IL-1 decoy receptor on Tregs. In conclusion, our findings that human Tregs preferentially express receptors for TNF and IL-1 suggest a potential function in sensing and dampening local inflammation.

  10. A CRISPR-Based Toolbox for Studying T Cell Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shen; Weiss, Arthur; Wang, Haopeng

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful technology to perform genome editing in a variety of cell types. To facilitate the application of Cas9 in mapping T cell signaling pathways, we generated a toolbox for large-scale genetic screens in human Jurkat T cells. The toolbox has three different Jurkat cell lines expressing distinct Cas9 variants, including wild-type Cas9, dCas9-KRAB, and sunCas9. We demonstrated that the toolbox allows us to rapidly disrupt endogenous gene expression at the DNA level and to efficiently repress or activate gene expression at the transcriptional level. The toolbox, in combination with multiple currently existing genome-wide sgRNA libraries, will be useful to systematically investigate T cell signal transduction using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic screens. PMID:27057542

  11. Characterization of Adapter Protein NRBP as a Negative Regulator of T Cell Activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui; LIN Zhi-xin; WU Jun

    2008-01-01

    Adapter proteins can regulate the gene transcriptions in disparate signaling pathway by interacting with multiple signaling molecules, including T cell activation signaling. Nuclear receptor binding protein (NRBP), a novel adapter protein, represents a small family of evolutionarily conserved proteins with homologs in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), Drosophila melanogaster (D.melanogaster), mouse and human. Here, we demonstrated that overexpression of NRBP in Jurkat TAg cells specifically impairs T cell receptor (TCR) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)/ionomycin-mediated signaling leading to nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) promoter activation. Furthermore, the N-terminal of NRBP is necessary for its regulation of NFAT activation. Finally, we showed that NRBP has minimal effect on both TCR- and PMA-induced CD69 up-regulation in Jurkat TAg cells, which suggests that NRBP may function downstream of protein kinase C (PKC)/Ras pathway.

  12. A CRISPR-Based Toolbox for Studying T Cell Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful technology to perform genome editing in a variety of cell types. To facilitate the application of Cas9 in mapping T cell signaling pathways, we generated a toolbox for large-scale genetic screens in human Jurkat T cells. The toolbox has three different Jurkat cell lines expressing distinct Cas9 variants, including wild-type Cas9, dCas9-KRAB, and sunCas9. We demonstrated that the toolbox allows us to rapidly disrupt endogenous gene expression at the DNA level and to efficiently repress or activate gene expression at the transcriptional level. The toolbox, in combination with multiple currently existing genome-wide sgRNA libraries, will be useful to systematically investigate T cell signal transduction using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic screens.

  13. Efforts of the human immune system to maintain the peripheral CD8+ T cell compartment after childhood thymectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlamy, Manuela; Almanzar, Giovanni; Parson, Walther; Schmidt, Christian; Leierer, Johannes; Weinberger, Birgit; Jeller, Verena; Unsinn, Karin; Eyrich, Matthias; Würzner, Reinhard; Prelog, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic mechanisms to maintain the T cell compartment diversity indicate an ongoing process of thymic activity and peripheral T cell renewal during human life. These processes are expected to be accelerated after childhood thymectomy and by the influence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) inducing a prematurely aged immune system. The study aimed to investigate proportional changes and replicative history of CD8+ T cells, of recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) and CD103+ T cells (mostly gut-experienced) and the role of Interleukin-(IL)-7 and IL-7 receptor (CD127)-expressing T cells in thymectomized patients compared to young and old healthy controls. Decreased proportions of naive and CD31 + CD8+ T cells were demonstrated after thymectomy, with higher proliferative activity of CD127-expressing T cells and significantly shorter relative telomere lengths (RTLs) and lower T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs). Increased circulating CD103+ T cells and a skewed T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire were found after thymectomy similar to elderly persons. Naive T cells were influenced by age at thymectomy and further decreased by CMV. After childhood thymectomy, the immune system demonstrated constant efforts of the peripheral CD8+ T cell compartment to maintain homeostasis. Supposedly it tries to fill the void of RTEs by peripheral T cell proliferation, by at least partly IL-7-mediated mechanisms and by proportional increase of circulating CD103+ T cells, reminiscent of immune aging in elderly. Although other findings were less significant compared to healthy elderly, early thymectomy demonstrated immunological alterations of CD8+ T cells which mimic features of premature immunosenescence in humans.

  14. High-throughput gene expression profiling of memory differentiation in primary human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Kate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation of naive T and B cells into memory lymphocytes is essential for immunity to pathogens. Therapeutic manipulation of this cellular differentiation program could improve vaccine efficacy and the in vitro expansion of memory cells. However, chemical screens to identify compounds that induce memory differentiation have been limited by 1 the lack of reporter-gene or functional assays that can distinguish naive and memory-phenotype T cells at high throughput and 2 a suitable cell-line representative of naive T cells. Results Here, we describe a method for gene-expression based screening that allows primary naive and memory-phenotype lymphocytes to be discriminated based on complex genes signatures corresponding to these differentiation states. We used ligation-mediated amplification and a fluorescent, bead-based detection system to quantify simultaneously 55 transcripts representing naive and memory-phenotype signatures in purified populations of human T cells. The use of a multi-gene panel allowed better resolution than any constituent single gene. The method was precise, correlated well with Affymetrix microarray data, and could be easily scaled up for high-throughput. Conclusion This method provides a generic solution for high-throughput differentiation screens in primary human T cells where no single-gene or functional assay is available. This screening platform will allow the identification of small molecules, genes or soluble factors that direct memory differentiation in naive human lymphocytes.

  15. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Haarmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  16. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, Axel; Nehen, Mathias; Deiß, Annika; Buttmann, Mathias

    2015-08-13

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS) by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  17. Acacetin Blocks Kv1.3 Channels and Inhibits Human T Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds/Aims: Acacetin, a natural flavonoid compound, has been proven to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Kv1.3 channels, highly expressed in human T cells, are attractive therapeutic targets to treat inflammatory and immunological disorders. The present study was designed to characterize the inhibition of Kv1.3 channels by Acacetin in human T cells and examine its role in T cell activation. Methods: Whole-cell patch-clamp was applied to record the Kv1.3 and KCa currents in human T cells; Western blot was used to detect Kv1.3 expression as well as NFAT1 and NF-κB activity; Fluo-4, CCK-8 and an ELISA kit were used to measure Ca2+ influx, proliferation, and IL-2 secretion, respectively. Results: Acacetin decreased the Kv1.3 current, accelerated the decay rate and negatively shifted the steady-state inactivation curves in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 values at +40 mV for peak and the current at end of pulse were 21.09 ± 2.75 and 3.63 ± 0.25 µmol/L, respectively. Treatment with Acacetin for 24 h significantly inhibited Kv1.3 protein expression. Additionally, paralleling Kv1.3 inhibition, Acacetin also inhibited Ca2+ influx, the Ca2+-activated transcription factors NFAT1, NF-κB p65/p50 activity, and proliferation as well as IL-2 production. Small interfering RNA against Kv1.3 reduced the inhibitory effect of Acacetin on IL-2 secretion. Conclusions: Acacetin blocks the Kv1.3 channel and inhibits human T cell activation. This action most likely contributes to its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory actions.

  18. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  19. Inactivation of tumor suppressor Dlg1 augments transformation of a T-cell line induced by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Yuetsu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax1 protein with the tumor suppressor Dlg1 is correlated with cellular transformation. Results Here, we show that Dlg1 knockdown by RNA interference increases the ability of Tax1 to transform a mouse T-cell line (CTLL-2, as measured interleukin (IL-2-independent growth. A Tax1 mutant defective for the Dlg1 interaction showed reduced transformation of CTLL-2 compared to wild type Tax1, but the transformation was minimally affected by Dlg1 reduction. The few Tax1ΔC-transduced CTLL-2 cells that became transformed expressed less Dlg1 than parental cells, suggesting that Dlg1-low cells were selectively transformed by Tax1ΔC. Moreover, all human T-cell lines immortalized by HTLV-1, including the recombinant HTLV-1-containing Tax1ΔC, expressed less Dlg1 than control T-cell lines. Conclusion These results suggest that inactivation of Dlg1 augments Tax1-mediated transformation of CTLL-2, and PDZ protein(s other than Dlg1 are critically involved in the transformation.

  20. Studying the Role for CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Human Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    subsets in human lupus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Insoo Kang, M.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Studying the role for CD4+ T cell subsets in human lupus 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0150 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have investigated whether and how autoimmune complex (AIC) in SLE ( lupus ) can

  1. Resistance to asbestos-induced apoptosis with continuous exposure to crocidolite on a human T cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Megumi [Department of Biofunctional Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Chen, Ying [Division of Pneumoconiosis, School of Public Health, China Medical University, 92 North 2nd, Heping District, Shenyang 110001 (China); Kumagai-Takei, Naoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hayashi, Hiroaki [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hatayama, Tamayo; Miyahara, Naomi; Katoh, Minako [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hiratsuka, Juni-ichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumitsu [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Otsuki, Takemi, E-mail: takemi@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have been investigating the immunological effects of asbestos. The establishment of a low-dose and continuously exposed human T cell line, HTLV-1 immortalized MT-2, to chrysotile (CB) revealed reduction of CXCR3 chemokine receptor and production of IFN-{gamma} that caused a decline of tumor immunity. These effects were coupled with upregulation of IL-10, TGF-{beta}, and BCL-2 in asbestos-exposed patients. To observe the immunological effects of crocidolite (CR) on human T cells, a trial to establish a low-dose and continuously exposed model was conducted and compared with a previously reported CB-exposed model (MT-2CB). Transient exposure of MT-2 original cells to CB or CR induced a similar level of apoptosis and growth inhibition. The establishment of a continuously exposed subline to CR (MT-2CR) revealed resistance against CR-induced apoptosis and upregulation of the BCL-2/BAX ratio similar to that recorded for MT-2CB. Both sublines showed reduced production of IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha}, and IL-6 with increased IL-10. cDNA microarray with network/pathway analyses focusing on transcription factors revealed that many similar factors related to cell proliferation were involved following continuous exposure to asbestos in both MT-2CB and MT-2CR. These results indicate that both CB and CR fibers affect human T cells with similar degrees even though the carcinogenic activity of these substances differs due to their chemical and physical forms. Trials to identify early detection markers for asbestos exposure or the occurrence of asbestos-inducing malignancies using these findings may lead to the development of clinical tools for asbestos-related diseases and chemoprevention that modifies the reduced tumor immunity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of effects of chrysotile and crocidolite on human T cell was done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both fibers caused apoptosis of T cells by transient exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells

  2. Identification of human T cell antigens for the development of vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Ireton, Gregory C; Kahn, Maria; Guderian, Jeffrey; Mohamath, Raodoh; Stride, Nicole; Laughlin, Elsa M; Baldwin, Susan L; Vedvick, Thomas S; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2008-12-01

    Development of a subunit vaccine for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) depends on the identification of Ags that induce appropriate T cell responses. Using bioinformatics, we selected a panel of 94 Mtb genes based on criteria that included growth in macrophages, up- or down-regulation under hypoxic conditions, secretion, membrane association, or because they were members of the PE/PPE or EsX families. Recombinant proteins encoded by these genes were evaluated for IFN-gamma recall responses using PBMCs from healthy subjects previously exposed to Mtb. From this screen, dominant human T cell Ags were identified and 49 of these proteins, formulated in CpG, were evaluated as vaccine candidates in a mouse model of tuberculosis. Eighteen of the individual Ags conferred partial protection against challenge with virulent Mtb. A combination of three of these Ags further increased protection against Mtb to levels comparable to those achieved with bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination. Vaccine candidates that led to reduction in lung bacterial burden following challenge-induced pluripotent CD4 and CD8 T cells, including Th1 cell responses characterized by elevated levels of Ag-specific IgG2c, IFN-gamma, and TNF. Priority vaccine Ags elicited pluripotent CD4 and CD8 T responses in purified protein derivative-positive donor PBMCs. This study identified numerous novel human T cell Ags suitable to be included in subunit vaccines against tuberculosis.

  3. T cell subsets in human airways prior to and following endobronchial administration of endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Andreas; Plovsing, Ronni R; Gaardbo, Julie C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Bronchial instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provides a reversible model of lung inflammation that may resemble early stages of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We investigated the distributions of T-cell subsets in the human airways and sought to deter......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Bronchial instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provides a reversible model of lung inflammation that may resemble early stages of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We investigated the distributions of T-cell subsets in the human airways and sought...... to determine whether pro- and anti-inflammatory T cells are involved in the local immune response to lung inflammation. METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed in 15 healthy volunteers, after which Escherichia coli LPS (4 ng/kg) was administered. BAL was repeated at 2, 4, 6, 8 or 24 h after...... instillation of LPS. RESULTS: BALF CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were characterized by expression of activation markers (HLA-DR+CD38+), the proportion of cells expressing naïve markers (CD45RA+CD27+CCR7+) was lower, and that of cells expressing effector memory markers (CD45RA-CD27+CCR7-) was higher, compared...

  4. Pathogenic T-cell recruitment into the airway in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medoff, Benjamin D; Thomas, Seddon Y; Banerji, Aleena; Wain, John C; Zhang, Hui; Lilly, Craig M; Ginns, Leo C; Luster, Andrew D

    2005-12-01

    Effector T cells significantly contribute to inflammatory diseases. These cells are recruited into tissue, where they orchestrate an inflammatory response that can either protect against infection or sometimes stimulate human disease. The recruitment of T cells into tissue from the blood and lymphoid compartments is an active process controlled by chemokines and the chemokine receptors expressed on distinct effector T-cell subsets. Thus, the chemokines secreted in the tissue will determine the specific types of T lymphocyte recruited into that tissue based on the chemokine receptors expressed on these cells. It follows that the chemokine receptor profile on T cells isolated from the lungs of patients with inflammatory pulmonary disease will define the subtype of pathogenic T lymphocytes mediating the disease process and will identify the mechanisms that recruit these cells into the lung. This article reviews data from both human and animal studies that define the chemokine receptors involved in the recruitment of T lymphocytes into the lung in various inflammatory pulmonary diseases, including asthma, obliterative bronchiolitis, sarcoidosis, and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. We then speculate on the potential role of these chemokine receptors in the pathogenesis of these disorders and potential novel therapeutic approaches suggested by these data.

  5. GATA3 induces human T-cell commitment by restraining Notch activity and repressing NK-cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Walle, Inge; Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Durinck, Kaat; De Mulder, Katrien; Van Loocke, Wouter; Damle, Sagar; Waegemans, Els; De Medts, Jelle; Velghe, Imke; De Smedt, Magda; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Kerre, Tessa; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges; Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The gradual reprogramming of haematopoietic precursors into the T-cell fate is characterized by at least two sequential developmental stages. Following Notch1-dependent T-cell lineage specification during which the first T-cell lineage genes are expressed and myeloid and dendritic cell potential is lost, T-cell specific transcription factors subsequently induce T-cell commitment by repressing residual natural killer (NK)-cell potential. How these processes are regulated in human is poorly understood, especially since efficient T-cell lineage commitment requires a reduction in Notch signalling activity following T-cell specification. Here, we show that GATA3, in contrast to TCF1, controls human T-cell lineage commitment through direct regulation of three distinct processes: repression of NK-cell fate, upregulation of T-cell lineage genes to promote further differentiation and restraint of Notch activity. Repression of the Notch1 target gene DTX1 hereby is essential to prevent NK-cell differentiation. Thus, GATA3-mediated positive and negative feedback mechanisms control human T-cell lineage commitment. PMID:27048872

  6. Extensive junctional diversity of rearranged human T cell receptor delta genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, S; Satyanarayana, K; Devlin, P; Band, H; McLean, J; Strominger, J L; Brenner, M B; Krangel, M S

    1988-06-10

    The human T cell receptor delta (TCR delta) gene encodes one component of the TCR gamma delta-CD3 complex found on subsets of peripheral blood and thymic T cells. Human TCR delta diversity was estimated by characterizing rearrangements in TCR gamma delta cell lines and determining the structures of complementary DNA clones representing functional and nonfunctional transcripts in these cell lines. One V delta segment and one J delta segment were identified in all functional transcripts, although a distinct J delta segment was identified in a truncated transcript. Further, one D delta element was identified, and evidence for the use of an additional D delta element was obtained. Thus human TCR delta genes appear to use a limited number of germline elements. However, the apparent use of two D delta elements in tandem coupled with imprecise joining and extensive incorporation of N nucleotides generates unprecedented variability in the junctional region.

  7. Redox regulation of T-cell function: from molecular mechanisms to significance in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesarwani, Pravin; Murali, Anuradha K; Al-Khami, Amir A; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2013-04-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to have effects on T-cell function and proliferation. Low concentrations of ROS in T cells are a prerequisite for cell survival, and increased ROS accumulation can lead to apoptosis/necrosis. The cellular redox state of a T cell can also affect T-cell receptor signaling, skewing the immune response. Various T-cell subsets have different redox statuses, and this differential ROS susceptibility could modulate the outcome of an immune response in various disease states. Recent advances in T-cell redox signaling reveal that ROS modulate signaling cascades such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, and JAK/STAT pathways. Also, tumor microenvironments, chronic T-cell stimulation leading to replicative senescence, gender, and age affect T-cell susceptibility to ROS, thereby contributing to diverse immune outcomes. Antioxidants such as glutathione, thioredoxin, superoxide dismutase, and catalase balance cellular oxidative stress. T-cell redox states are also regulated by expression of various vitamins and dietary compounds. Changes in T-cell redox regulation may affect the pathogenesis of various human diseases. Many strategies to control oxidative stress have been employed for various diseases, including the use of active antioxidants from dietary products and pharmacologic or genetic engineering of antioxidant genes in T cells. Here, we discuss the existence of a complex web of molecules/factors that exogenously or endogenously affect oxidants, and we relate these molecules to potential therapeutics.

  8. Abortive HIV infection mediates CD4 T cell depletion and inflammation in human lymphoid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Cavrois, Marielle; Lassen, Kara G; Zepeda, Orlando; Yang, Zhiyuan; Santiago, Mario L; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Greene, Warner C

    2010-11-24

    The mechanism by which CD4 T cells are depleted in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood. In ex vivo cultures of human tonsil tissue, CD4 T cells undergo a pronounced cytopathic response following HIV infection. Strikingly, >95% of these dying cells are not productively infected but instead correspond to bystander cells. We now show that the death of these "bystander" cells involves abortive HIV infection. Inhibitors blocking HIV entry or early steps of reverse transcription prevent CD4 T cell death while inhibition of later events in the viral life cycle does not. We demonstrate that the nonpermissive state exhibited by the majority of resting CD4 tonsil T cells leads to accumulation of incomplete reverse transcripts. These cytoplasmic nucleic acids activate a host defense program that elicits a coordinated proapoptotic and proinflammatory response involving caspase-3 and caspase-1 activation. While this response likely evolved to protect the host, it centrally contributes to the immunopathogenic effects of HIV. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Abortive HIV Infection Mediates CD4 T-Cell Depletion and Inflammation in Human Lymphoid Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Cavrois, Marielle; Lassen, Kara G.; Zepeda, Orlando; Yang, Zhiyuan; Santiago, Mario L.; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Greene, Warner C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The mechanism by which CD4 T-cells are depleted in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood. In ex vivo cultures of human tonsil tissue, CD4 T cells undergo a pronounced cytopathic response following HIV infection. Strikingly, >95% of these dying cells are not productively infected but instead correspond to bystander cells. We now show that the death of these “bystander” cells involves abortive HIV infection. Inhibitors blocking HIV entry or early steps of reverse transcription prevent CD4 T-cell death while inhibition of later events in viral life cycle does not. We propose that the nonpermissive state exhibited by the majority of resting CD4 tonsil T-cells leads to accumulation of incomplete reverse transcripts. These cytoplasmic nucleic acids activate a host defense program that elicits a coordinated proapoptotic and proinflammatory response involving caspase-3 and caspase-1 activation. While this response likely evolved to protect the host, it centrally contributes to the immunopathogenic effects of HIV. PMID:21111238

  10. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M;

    1998-01-01

    induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  11. Holistic systems biology approaches to molecular mechanisms of human helper T cell differentiation to functionally distinct subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Lönnberg, T; Lahesmaa, R

    2013-08-01

    Current knowledge of helper T cell differentiation largely relies on data generated from mouse studies. To develop therapeutical strategies combating human diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms how human naïve T cells differentiate to functionally distinct T helper (Th) subsets as well as studies on human differentiated Th cell subsets is particularly valuable. Systems biology approaches provide a holistic view of the processes of T helper differentiation, enable discovery of new factors and pathways involved and generation of new hypotheses to be tested to improve our understanding of human Th cell differentiation and immune-mediated diseases. Here, we summarize studies where high-throughput systems biology approaches have been exploited to human primary T cells. These studies reveal new factors and signalling pathways influencing T cell differentiation towards distinct subsets, important for immune regulation. Such information provides new insights into T cell biology and into targeting immune system for therapeutic interventions.

  12. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. Results We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP.

  13. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Isabelle; Laverdure, Sylvain; Torresilla, Cynthia; Landry, Sébastien; Borel, Sophie; Vargas, Amandine; Arpin-André, Charlotte; Gay, Bernard; Briant, Laurence; Gross, Antoine; Barbeau, Benoît; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-19

    Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP.

  14. Novel, in-natural-infection subdominant HIV-1 CD8+ T-cell epitopes revealed in human recipients of conserved-region T-cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Nicola; Lin, Zhansong; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Llano, Anuska; Silva-Arrieta, Sandra; Ahmed, Tina; Dorrell, Lucy; Brander, Christian; Murakoshi, Hayato; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Hanke, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Fine definition of targeted CD8+ T-cell epitopes and their human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I restriction informs iterative improvements of HIV-1 T-cell vaccine designs and may predict early vaccine success or failure. Here, lymphocytes from volunteers, who had received candidate HIVconsv vaccines expressing conserved sub-protein regions of HIV-1, were used to define the optimum-length target epitopes and their HLA restriction. In HIV-1-positive patients, CD8+ T-cell responses predominantly recognize immunodominant, but hypervariable and therefore less protective epitopes. The less variable, more protective epitopes in conserved regions are typically subdominant. Therefore, induction of strong responses to conserved regions by vaccination provides an opportunity to discover novel important epitopes. Cryopreserved lymphocytes from vaccine recipients were expanded by stimulation with 15-mer responder peptides for 10 days to establish short term-cell-line (STCL) effector cells. These were subjected to intracellular cytokine staining using serially truncated peptides and peptide-pulsed 721.221 cells expressing individual HLA class I alleles to define minimal epitope length and HLA restriction by stimulation of IFN-γ and TNF-α production and surface expression of CD107a. Using lymphocyte samples of 12 vaccine recipients, we defined 14 previously unreported optimal CD8+ T-cell HIV-1 epitopes and their four-digit HLA allele restriction (6 HLA-A, 7 HLA-B and 1 HLA-C alleles). Further 13 novel targets with incomplete information were revealed. The high rate of discovery of novel CD8+ T-cell effector epitopes warrants further epitope mining in recipients of the conserved-region vaccines in other populations and informs development of HIV-1/AIDS vaccines. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01151319.

  15. Multiplex and genome-wide analyses reveal distinctive properties of KIR+ and CD56+ T cells in human blood

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Wing Keung; Rujkijyanont, Piya; Neale, Geoffrey; Jie YANG; Bari, Rafijul; Gupta, Neha Das; Holladay, Martha; Rooney, Barbara; Leung, Wing

    2013-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on natural killer (NK) cells have been linked to a wide spectrum of health conditions such as chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, pregnancy complications, cancers, and transplant failures. A small subset of effector memory T cells also expresses KIRs. Here, we use modern analytic tools including genome-wide and multiplex molecular, phenotypic, and functional assays to characterize the KIR+ T cells in human blood. We find that KIR+ T cells ...

  16. Human T cell aging and the impact of persistent viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas eFulop

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a dysregulation of the immune response, loosely termed immunosenescence. Each part of the immune system is influenced to some extent by the aging process. However, adaptive immunity seems more extensively affected and among all participating cells it is the T cells that are most altered. There is a large body of experimental work devoted to the investigation of age-associated differences in T cell phenotypes and functions in young and old individuals, but few longitudinal studies in humans actually delineating changes at the level of the individual. In most studies, the number and proportion of late-differentiated T cells, especially CD8+ T cells, is reported to be higher in the elderly than in the young. Limited longitudinal studies suggest that accumulation of these cells is a dynamic process and does indeed represent an age-associated change. Accumulations of such late-stage cells may contribute to the enhanced systemic pro-inflammatory milieu commonly seen in older people. We do not know exactly what causes these observed changes, but an understanding of the possible causes is now beginning to emerge. A favored hypothesis is that these events are at least partly due to the effects of the maintenance of essential immune surveillance against persistent viral infections, notably Cytomegalovirus (CMV, which may exhaust the immune system over time. It is still a matter of debate as to whether these changes are compensatory and beneficial or pathological and detrimental to the proper functioning of the immune system and whether they impact longevity. Here, we will review present knowledge of T cell changes with aging and their relation to chronic viral and possibly other persistent infections.

  17. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth;

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  18. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R; Verkman, A S; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2012-12-19

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica.

  19. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R.; Verkman, A. S.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin + cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin + cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica. PMID:23108041

  20. Early-life compartmentalization of human T cell differentiation and regulatory function in mucosal and lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Joseph J C; Bickham, Kara L; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaru; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Gordon, Claire; Granot, Tomer; Griesemer, Adam; Lerner, Harvey; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how the immune response in early life becomes appropriately stimulated to provide protection while also avoiding excessive activation as a result of diverse new antigens. T cells are integral to adaptive immunity; mouse studies indicate that tissue localization of T cell subsets is important for both protective immunity and immunoregulation. In humans, however, the early development and function of T cells in tissues remain unexplored. We present here an analysis of lymphoid and mucosal tissue T cells derived from pediatric organ donors in the first two years of life, as compared to adult organ donors, revealing early compartmentalization of T cell differentiation and regulation. Whereas adult tissues contain a predominance of memory T cells, in pediatric blood and tissues the main subset consists of naive recent thymic emigrants, with effector memory T cells (T(EM)) found only in the lungs and small intestine. Additionally, regulatory T (T(reg)) cells comprise a high proportion (30-40%) of CD4(+) T cells in pediatric tissues but are present at much lower frequencies (1-10%) in adult tissues. Pediatric tissue T(reg) cells suppress endogenous T cell activation, and early T cell functionality is confined to the mucosal sites that have the lowest T(reg):T(EM) cell ratios, which suggests control in situ of immune responses in early life.

  1. ChIP-on-chip analysis identifies IL-22 as direct target gene of ectopically expressed FOXP3 transcription factor in human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeron Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor (TF forkhead box P3 (FOXP3 is constitutively expressed at high levels in naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs. It is not only the most accepted marker for that cell population but is also considered lineage determinative. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP of TFs in combination with genomic tiling microarray analysis (ChIP-on-chip has been shown to be an appropriate tool for identifying FOXP3 transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on a genome-wide scale. In combination with microarray expression analysis, the ChIP-on-chip technique allows identification of direct FOXP3 target genes. Results ChIP-on-chip analysis of the human FOXP3 expressed in resting and PMA/ionomycin–stimulated Jurkat T cells revealed several thousand putative FOXP3 binding sites and demonstrated the importance of intronic regions for FOXP3 binding. The analysis of expression data showed that the stimulation-dependent down-regulation of IL-22 was correlated with direct FOXP3 binding in the IL-22 promoter region. This association was confirmed by real-time PCR analysis of ChIP-DNA. The corresponding ChIP-region also contained a matching FOXP3 consensus sequence. Conclusions Knowledge of the general distribution patterns of FOXP3 TFBSs in the human genome under resting and activated conditions will contribute to a better understanding of this TF and its influence on direct target genes, as well as its importance for the phenotype and function of Tregs. Moreover, FOXP3-dependent repression of Th17-related IL-22 may be relevant to an understanding of the phenomenon of Treg/Th17 cell plasticity.

  2. ChIP-on-chip analysis identifies IL-22 as direct target gene of ectopically expressed FOXP3 transcription factor in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeron, Andreas; Hansen, Wiebke; Ewert, Franziska; Buer, Jan; Geffers, Robert; Bruder, Dunja

    2012-12-17

    The transcription factor (TF) forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) is constitutively expressed at high levels in naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs). It is not only the most accepted marker for that cell population but is also considered lineage determinative. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) of TFs in combination with genomic tiling microarray analysis (ChIP-on-chip) has been shown to be an appropriate tool for identifying FOXP3 transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on a genome-wide scale. In combination with microarray expression analysis, the ChIP-on-chip technique allows identification of direct FOXP3 target genes. ChIP-on-chip analysis of the human FOXP3 expressed in resting and PMA/ionomycin-stimulated Jurkat T cells revealed several thousand putative FOXP3 binding sites and demonstrated the importance of intronic regions for FOXP3 binding. The analysis of expression data showed that the stimulation-dependent down-regulation of IL-22 was correlated with direct FOXP3 binding in the IL-22 promoter region. This association was confirmed by real-time PCR analysis of ChIP-DNA. The corresponding ChIP-region also contained a matching FOXP3 consensus sequence. Knowledge of the general distribution patterns of FOXP3 TFBSs in the human genome under resting and activated conditions will contribute to a better understanding of this TF and its influence on direct target genes, as well as its importance for the phenotype and function of Tregs. Moreover, FOXP3-dependent repression of Th17-related IL-22 may be relevant to an understanding of the phenomenon of Treg/Th17 cell plasticity.

  3. Tumor Antigen Specific Activation of Primary Human T-Cells Expressing a Virally Encoded Chimeric T-Cell Receptor Specific for p185HER2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建民; MichaelSFRIEDMAN; ChristopherMREYNOLDS; MarianneTHUBEN; LeeWILKE; JenniferFULLER; 李桥; ZeligESHHAR; JamesJMULE; KevimTMCDONAGH

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and tested chimeric T-cell receptors (TCR) specific for p185HER2. In these experiments,retroviral vectors expressing the N297 or N29ξ receptors were constructed in pRET6. Amphotropic viral producer cells were established in the GALV-based PG13 packaging cell line. Ficoll purified human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were vitally transduced using an optimized protocol incorporating activation with immobilized anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies, followed by viral infection in the presence of fibronectin fragment CH296. Transduced cells were co-cultured with human tumor cell lines that overexpress (SK-OV-3) or underexpress (MCF7) p185HER2 to assay for antigen specific immune responses. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells transduced with the N297 or N29ξ chTCR demonstrated HER2-specific antigen responses, as determined by release of Th1 like cytokines, and cellular cytotoxicity assays. Our results support the feasibility of adoptive immunothempy with genetically modified T-cells expressing a chTCR specific for p185HER2.

  4. Phenotype of NK-Like CD8(+) T Cells with Innate Features in Humans and Their Relevance in Cancer Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarin, Alice; Cayssials, Emilie; Jacomet, Florence; Nunez, Nicolas Gonzalo; Basbous, Sara; Lefèvre, Lucie; Abdallah, Myriam; Piccirilli, Nathalie; Morin, Benjamin; Lavoue, Vincent; Catros, Véronique; Piaggio, Eliane; Herbelin, André; Gombert, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Unconventional T cells are defined by their capacity to respond to signals other than the well-known complex of peptides and major histocompatibility complex proteins. Among the burgeoning family of unconventional T cells, innate-like CD8(+) T cells in the mouse were discovered in the early 2000s. This subset of CD8(+) T cells bears a memory phenotype without having encountered a foreign antigen and can respond to innate-like IL-12 + IL-18 stimulation. Although the concept of innate memory CD8(+) T cells is now well established in mice, whether an equivalent memory NK-like T-cell population exists in humans remains under debate. We recently reported that CD8(+) T cells responding to innate-like IL-12 + IL-18 stimulation and co-expressing the transcription factor Eomesodermin (Eomes) and KIR/NKG2A membrane receptors with a memory/EMRA phenotype may represent a new, functionally distinct innate T cell subset in humans. In this review, after a summary on the known innate CD8(+) T-cell features in the mouse, we propose Eomes together with KIR/NKG2A and CD49d as a signature to standardize the identification of this innate CD8(+) T-cell subset in humans. Next, we discuss IL-4 and IL-15 involvement in the generation of innate CD8(+) T cells and particularly its possible dependency on the promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger factor expressing iNKT cells, an innate T cell subset well documented for its susceptibility to tumor immune subversion. After that, focusing on cancer diseases, we provide new insights into the potential role of these innate CD8(+) T cells in a physiopathological context in humans. Based on empirical data obtained in cases of chronic myeloid leukemia, a myeloproliferative syndrome controlled by the immune system, and in solid tumors, we observe both the possible contribution of innate CD8(+) T cells to cancer disease control and their susceptibility to tumor immune subversion. Finally, we note that during tumor progression, innate CD8(+) T

  5. Molecular Imprint of Exposure to Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Cytomegalovirus on the T cell Repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey; Gras, Stephanie; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Bird, Nicola L.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Miles, John J.; Chambers, Daniel; Bell, Scott; Campbell, Scott; Kedzierska, Katherine; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring variants of herpesviruses in clinical settings can have a dramatic impact on anti-viral immunity. Here we have evaluated the molecular imprint of variant peptide-MHC complexes on the T-cell repertoire during human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and demonstrate that primary co-infection with genetic variants of CMV was coincident with development of strain-specific T-cell immunity followed by emergence of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cells. Cross-reactive CMV-specific T cells exhibited a highly conserved public T cell repertoire, while T cells directed towards specific genetic variants displayed oligoclonal repertoires, unique to each individual. T cell recognition foot-print and pMHC-I structural analyses revealed that the cross-reactive T cells accommodate alterations in the pMHC complex with a broader foot-print focussing on the core of the peptide epitope. These findings provide novel molecular insight into how infection with naturally occurring genetic variants of persistent human herpesviruses imprints on the evolution of the anti-viral T-cell repertoire.

  6. CD1d-restricted peripheral T cell lymphoma in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Urb, Mirjam; Chandra, Shilpi; Robinot, Rémy; Bricard, Gabriel; de Bernard, Simon; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gazzo, Sophie; Blond, Olivier; Khurana, Archana; Baseggio, Lucile; Heavican, Tayla; Ffrench, Martine; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Mondière, Paul; Schrader, Alexandra; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Martin, Nadine; Dalle, Stéphane; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Salles, Gilles; Lachuer, Joel; Hermine, Olivier; Asnafi, Vahid; Roussel, Mikael; Lamy, Thierry; Herling, Marco; Iqbal, Javeed; Buffat, Laurent; Marche, Patrice N.; Gaulard, Philippe; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Defrance, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous entity of neoplasms with poor prognosis, lack of effective therapies, and a largely unknown pathophysiology. Identifying the mechanism of lymphomagenesis and cell-of-origin from which PTCLs arise is crucial for the development of efficient treatment strategies. In addition to the well-described thymic lymphomas, we found that p53-deficient mice also developed mature PTCLs that did not originate from conventional T cells but from CD1d-restricted NKT cells. PTCLs showed phenotypic features of activated NKT cells, such as PD-1 up-regulation and loss of NK1.1 expression. Injections of heat-killed Streptococcus pneumonia, known to express glycolipid antigens activating NKT cells, increased the incidence of these PTCLs, whereas Escherichia coli injection did not. Gene expression profile analyses indicated a significant down-regulation of genes in the TCR signaling pathway in PTCL, a common feature of chronically activated T cells. Targeting TCR signaling pathway in lymphoma cells, either with cyclosporine A or anti-CD1d blocking antibody, prolonged mice survival. Importantly, we identified human CD1d-restricted lymphoma cells within Vδ1 TCR-expressing PTCL. These results define a new subtype of PTCL and pave the way for the development of blocking anti-CD1d antibody for therapeutic purposes in humans. PMID:27069116

  7. Human secondary lymphoid organs typically contain polyclonally-activated proliferating regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jorieke H; Koenen, Hans J P M; Fasse, Esther; Tijssen, Henk J; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Joosten, Irma

    2013-09-26

    Immunomodulating regulatory T-cell (Treg) therapy is a promising strategy in autoimmunity and transplantation. However, to achieve full clinical efficacy, better understanding of in vivo human Treg biology is warranted. Here, we demonstrate that in contrast to blood and bone marrow Tregs, which showed a resting phenotype, the majority of CD4(pos)CD25(pos)CD127(neg)FoxP3(pos) Tregs in secondary lymphoid organs were proliferating activated CD69(pos)CD45RA(neg) cells with a hyperdemethylated FOXP3 gene and a broad T-cell receptor-Vβ repertoire, implying polyclonal activation. Activated CD69(pos) Tregs were distributed over both T-cell and B-cell areas, distant from Aire(pos) and CD11c(pos) cells. In contrast to the anergic peripheral blood Tregs, lymphoid organ Tregs had significant ex vivo proliferative capacity and produced cytokines like interleukin-2, while revealing similar suppressive potential. Also, next to Treg-expressing chemokine receptors important for a prolonged stay in lymphoid organs, a significant part of the cells expressed peripheral tissue-associated, functional homing markers. In conclusion, our data suggest that human secondary lymphoid organs aid in the maintenance and regulation of Treg function and homeostasis. This knowledge may be exploited for further optimization of Treg immunotherapy, for example, by ex vivo selection of Tregs with capacity to migrate to lymphoid organs providing an in vivo platform for further Treg expansion.

  8. Lack of evidence for superantigen activity of Toxoplasma gondii towards human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Vallochi

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligatory intracellular parasite whose life cycle may include man as an intermediate host. More than 500 million people are infected with this parasite worldwide. It has been previously reported that T. gondii contains a superantigen activity. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the putative superantigen activity of T. gondii would manifest towards human T cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from individuals with no previous contact with the parasite were evaluated for proliferation as well as specific Vß expansion after exposure to Toxoplasma antigens. Likewise, PBMC from individuals with the congenital infection were evaluated for putative Vß family deletions in their T cell repertoire. We also evaluated, over a period of one year, the PBMC proliferation pattern in response to Toxoplasma antigens in patients with recently acquired infection. Some degree of proliferation in response to T. gondii was observed in the PBMC from individuals never exposed to the parasite, accompanied by specific Vß expansion, suggesting a superantigen effect. However, we found no specific deletion of Vß (or Valpha families in the blood of congenitally infected individuals. Furthermore, PBMC from recently infected individuals followed up over a period of one year did not present a reduction of the Vß families that were originally expanded in response to the parasite antigens. Taken together, our data suggest that T. gondii does not have a strong superantigen activity on human T cells.

  9. Regulatory T cells in human lymphatic filariasis: stronger functional activity in microfilaremics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Wammes

    Full Text Available Infection with filarial parasites is associated with T cell hyporesponsiveness, which is thought to be partly mediated by their ability to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs during human infections. This study investigates the functional capacity of Tregs from different groups of filarial patients to suppress filaria-specific immune responses during human filariasis. Microfilaremic (MF, chronic pathology (CP and uninfected endemic normal (EN individuals were selected in an area endemic for Brugia timori in Flores island, Indonesia. PBMC were isolated, CD4CD25(hi cells were magnetically depleted and in vitro cytokine production and proliferation in response to B. malayi adult worm antigen (BmA were determined in total and Treg-depleted PBMC. In MF subjects BmA-specific T and B lymphocyte proliferation as well as IFN-gamma, IL-13 and IL-17 responses were lower compared to EN and CP groups. Depletion of Tregs restored T cell as well as B cell proliferation in MF-positives, while proliferative responses in the other groups were not enhanced. BmA-induced IL-13 production was increased after Treg removal in MF-positives only. Thus, filaria-associated Tregs were demonstrated to be functional in suppressing proliferation and possibly Th2 cytokine responses to BmA. These suppressive effects were only observed in the MF group and not in EN or CP. These findings may be important when considering strategies for filarial treatment and the targeted prevention of filaria-induced lymphedema.

  10. Fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells give rise to distinct T cell lineages in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Jeff E; Venkatasubrahmanyam, Shivkumar; Burt, Trevor D; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Rivera, Jose M; Galkina, Sofiya A; Weinberg, Kenneth; Stoddart, Cheryl A; McCune, Joseph M

    2010-12-17

    Although the mammalian immune system is generally thought to develop in a linear fashion, findings in avian and murine species argue instead for the developmentally ordered appearance (or "layering") of distinct hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that give rise to distinct lymphocyte lineages at different stages of development. Here we provide evidence of an analogous layered immune system in humans. Our results suggest that fetal and adult T cells are distinct populations that arise from different populations of HSCs that are present at different stages of development. We also provide evidence that the fetal T cell lineage is biased toward immune tolerance. These observations offer a mechanistic explanation for the tolerogenic properties of the developing fetus and for variable degrees of immune responsiveness at birth.

  11. Inflammation-Induced Changes in Circulating T-Cell Subsets and Cytokine Production During Human Endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Andreas; Plovsing, Ronni R; Gaardbo, Julie C

    2017-01-01

    administration. The frequency of anti-inflammatory Tregs increased (P = .033), whereas the frequency of proinflammatory CD4(+)CD161(+) cells decreased (P = .034). Endotoxemia was associated with impaired whole-blood production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10, IL-6, IL-17, IL-2, and interferon......-γ in response to phytohaemagglutinin but did not affect TLR4 expression on Tregs. No changes in the absolute count or frequency of BALF T cells were observed. Systemic inflammation is associated with lymphopenia, a relative increase in the frequency of anti-inflammatory Tregs, and a functional impairment of T....../kg) was administered intravenously in 15 healthy volunteers. Peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected at baseline and after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours for flow cytometry. CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127lowFoxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), CD4(+)CD161(+) cells, and activated Human leukocyte antigen...

  12. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells.

  13. A promising sword of tomorrow: Human γδ T cell strategies reconcile allo-HSCT complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxian; Cui, Qu; Luo, Chao; Luo, Yi; Shi, Jimin; Huang, He

    2016-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is potentially a curative therapeutic option for hematological malignancies. In clinical practice, transplantation associated complications greatly affected the final therapeutical outcomes. Currently, primary disease relapse, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and infections remain the three leading causes of a high morbidity and mortality in allo-HSCT patients. Various strategies have been investigated in the past several decades including human γδ T cell-based therapeutical regimens. In different microenvironments, human γδ T cells assume features reminiscent of classical Th1, Th2, Th17, NKT and regulatory T cells, showing diverse biological functions. The cytotoxic γδ T cells could be utilized to target relapsed malignancies, and recently regulatory γδ T cells are defined as a novel implement for GVHD management. In addition, human γδ Τ cells facilitate control of post-transplantation infections and participate in tissue regeneration and wound healing processes. These features potentiate γδ T cells a versatile therapeutical agent to target transplantation associated complications. This review focuses on insights of applicable potentials of human γδ T cells reconciling complications associated with allo-HSCT. We believe an improved understanding of pertinent γδ T cell functions would be further exploited in the design of innovative immunotherapeutic approaches in allo-HSCT, to reduce mortality and morbidity, as well as improve quality of life for patients after transplantation.

  14. Manufacture of gene-modified human T-cells with a memory stem/central memory phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Heemskerk, Bianca; van Rooij, Nienke; van den Berg, Joost H; Beijnen, Jos H; Uckert, Wolfgang; Kvistborg, Pia; Schumacher, Ton N; Haanen, John B A G; Jorritsma, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T-cell products that carry desired functionalities, such as the ability to recognize cancer cells. The currently used strategies for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products lead to highly differentiated cells within the

  15. Monitoring the initiation and kinetics of human dendritic cell-induced polarization of autologous naive CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Oth

    Full Text Available A crucial step in generating de novo immune responses is the polarization of naive cognate CD4+ T cells by pathogen-triggered dendritic cells (DC. In the human setting, standardized DC-dependent systems are lacking to study molecular events during the initiation of a naive CD4+ T cell response. We developed a TCR-restricted assay to compare different pathogen-triggered human DC for their capacities to instruct functional differentiation of autologous, naive CD4+ T cells. We demonstrated that this methodology can be applied to compare differently matured DC in terms of kinetics, direction, and magnitude of the naive CD4+ T cell response. Furthermore, we showed the applicability of this assay to study the T cell polarizing capacity of low-frequency blood-derived DC populations directly isolated ex vivo. This methodology for addressing APC-dependent instruction of naive CD4+ T cells in a human autologous setting will provide researchers with a valuable tool to gain more insight into molecular mechanisms occurring in the early phase of T cell polarization. In addition, it may also allow the study of pharmacological agents on DC-dependent T cell polarization in the human system.

  16. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human memory T cell responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Patcharaporn Tippayawat

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important cause of community-acquired lethal sepsis in endemic regions in southeast Asia and northern Australia and is increasingly reported in other tropical areas. In animal models, production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma is critical for resistance, but in humans the characteristics of IFN-gamma production and the bacterial antigens that are recognized by the cell-mediated immune response have not been defined.Peripheral blood from 133 healthy individuals who lived in the endemic area and had no history of melioidosis, 60 patients who had recovered from melioidosis, and 31 other patient control subjects were stimulated by whole bacteria or purified bacterial proteins in vitro, and IFN-gamma responses were analyzed by ELISPOT and flow cytometry.B. pseudomallei was a potent activator of human peripheral blood NK cells for innate production of IFN-gamma. In addition, healthy individuals with serological evidence of exposure to B. pseudomallei and patients recovered from active melioidosis developed CD4(+ (and CD8(+ T cells that recognized whole bacteria and purified proteins LolC, OppA, and PotF, members of the B. pseudomallei ABC transporter family. This response was primarily mediated by terminally differentiated T cells of the effector-memory (T(EMRA phenotype and correlated with the titer of anti-B. pseudomallei antibodies in the serum.Individuals living in a melioidosis-endemic region show clear evidence of T cell priming for the ability to make IFN-gamma that correlates with their serological status. The ability to detect T cell responses to defined B. pseudomallei proteins in large numbers of individuals now provides the opportunity to screen candidate antigens for inclusion in protein or polysaccharide-conjugate subunit vaccines against this important but neglected disease.

  17. CD8+ T cells as a source of IFN-γ production in human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

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    Mahmoud Nateghi Rostami

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In human leishmaniasis Th1/Th2 dichotomy similar to murine model is not clearly defined and surrogate marker(s of protection is not yet known. In this study, Th1/Th2 cytokines (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ profile induced by purified CD4(+/CD8(+ T cells in response to Leishmania antigens were assessed at transcript and protein levels in 14 volunteers with a history of self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis (HCL and compared with 18 healthy control volunteers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD4(+/CD8(+/CD14(+ cells were purified from peripheral blood using magnetic beads; CD4(+/CD8(+ T cells were co-cultured with autologous CD14(+ monocytes in the presence of soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA. Stimulation of either CD4(+ T cells or CD8(+ T cells of HCL volunteers with SLA induced a significantly (P<0.05 higher IFN-γ production compared with the cells of controls. Upregulation of IFN-γ gene expression in CD4(+ cells (P<0.001 and CD8(+ cells (P = 0.006 of HCL volunteers was significantly more than that of controls. Significantly (P<0.05 higher fold-expression of IFN-γ gene was seen in CD4(+ cells than in CD8(+ cells. In HCL volunteers a significantly (P = 0.014 higher number of CD4(+ cells were positive for intracellular IFN-γ production than CD8(+ cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, the volunteers have shown maintenance of specific long-term immune responses characterized by a strong reaction to leishmanin skin test and IFN-γ production. The dominant IFN-γ response was the result of expansion of both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. The results suggested that immune response in protected individuals with a history of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL due to L. major is mediated not only through the expansion of antigen-specific IFN-γ producing CD4(+ Th1 cells, but also through IFN-γ producing CD8(+ T cells.

  18. Interferon-beta induces distinct gene expression response patterns in human monocytes versus T cells.

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    Noa Henig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocytes, which are key players in innate immunity, are outnumbered by neutrophils and lymphocytes among peripheral white blood cells. The cytokine interferon-β (IFN-β is widely used as an immunomodulatory drug for multiple sclerosis and its functional pathways in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs have been previously described. The aim of the present study was to identify novel, cell-specific IFN-β functions and pathways in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-activated monocytes that may have been missed in studies using PBMCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole genome gene expression profiles of human monocytes and T cells were compared following in vitro priming to TNF-α and overnight exposure to IFN-β. Statistical analyses of the gene expression data revealed a cell-type-specific change of 699 transcripts, 667 monocyte-specific transcripts, 21 T cell-specific transcripts and 11 transcripts with either a difference in the response direction or a difference in the magnitude of response. RT-PCR revealed a set of differentially expressed genes (DEGs, exhibiting responses to IFN-β that are modulated by TNF-α in monocytes, such as RIPK2 and CD83, but not in T cells or PBMCs. Known IFN-β promoter response elements, such as ISRE, were enriched in T cell DEGs but not in monocyte DEGs. The overall directionality of the gene expression regulation by IFN-β was different in T cells and monocytes, with up-regulation more prevalent in T cells, and a similar extent of up and down-regulation recorded in monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: By focusing on the response of distinct cell types and by evaluating the combined effects of two cytokines with pro and anti-inflammatory activities, we were able to present two new findings First, new IFN-β response pathways and genes, some of which were monocytes specific; second, a cell-specific modulation of the IFN-β response transcriptome by TNF-α.

  19. Cutting edge: Human regulatory T cells require IL-35 to mediate suppression and infectious tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Vandana; Collison, Lauren W; Guy, Clifford S; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-06-15

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are essential for the maintenance of immune tolerance. However, the mechanisms they use to mediate suppression remain controversial. Although IL-35 has been shown to play an important role in T(reg)-mediated suppression in mice, recent studies have questioned its relevance in human T(reg). In this study, we show that human T(reg) express and require IL-35 for maximal suppressive capacity. Substantial upregulation of EBI3 and IL12A, but not IL10 and TGFB, was observed in activated human T(reg) compared with conventional T cells (T(conv)). Contact-independent T(reg)-mediated suppression was IL-35 dependent and did not require IL-10 or TGF-β. Lastly, human T(reg)-mediated suppression led to the conversion of the suppressed T(conv) into iTr35 cells, an IL-35-induced T(reg) population, in an IL-35-dependent manner. Thus, IL-35 contributes to human T(reg)-mediated suppression, and its conversion of suppressed target T(conv) into IL-35-induced T(reg) may contribute to infectious tolerance.

  20. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary.

  1. CD8+ T cells in human autoimmune arthritis : The unusual suspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrelli, Alessandra; Van Wijk, Femke

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells are key players in the body's defence against viral infections and cancer. To date, data on the role of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune diseases have been scarce, especially when compared with the wealth of research on CD4+ T cells. However, growing evidence suggests that CD8+ T-cell homeost

  2. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Rode, Anna Kathrine Obelitz

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immune responses require activation and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. Whereas early T cell activation is independent of exogenous cystine (Cys2), T cell proliferation is dependent of Cys2. However, the exact roles of Cys2 in T cell proliferation still need to be determined. The ...

  3. Rapid and strong human CD8+ T cell responses to vaccination with peptide, IFA, and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 7909.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, Daniel E; Liénard, Danielle; Rufer, Nathalie; Rubio-Godoy, Verena; Rimoldi, Donata; Lejeune, Ferdy; Krieg, Arthur M; Cerottini, Jean-Charles; Romero, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    The induction of potent CD8+ T cell responses by vaccines to fight microbes or tumors remains a major challenge, as many candidates for human vaccines have proved to be poorly immunogenic. Deoxycytidyl-deoxyguanosin oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) trigger Toll-like receptor 9, resulting in dendritic cell maturation that can enhance immunogenicity of peptide-based vaccines in mice. We tested whether a synthetic ODN, CpG 7909, could improve human tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Eight HLA-A2+ melanoma patients received 4 monthly vaccinations of low-dose CpG 7909 mixed with melanoma antigen A (Melan-A; identical to MART-1) analog peptide and incomplete Freund's adjuvant. All patients exhibited rapid and strong antigen-specific T cell responses: the frequency of Melan-A-specific T cells reached over 3% of circulating CD8+ T cells. This was one order of magnitude higher than the frequency seen in 8 control patients treated similarly but without CpG and 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than that seen in previous studies with synthetic vaccines. The enhanced T cell populations consisted primarily of effector memory cells, which in part secreted IFN- and expressed granzyme B and perforin ex vivo. In vitro, T cell clones recognized and killed melanoma cells in an antigen-specific manner. Thus, CpG 7909 is an efficient vaccine adjuvant that promotes strong antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in humans.

  4. Initial viral load determines the magnitude of the human CD8 T cell response to yellow fever vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akondy, Rama S; Johnson, Philip L F; Nakaya, Helder I; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Mulligan, Mark J; Lawson, Benton; Miller, Joseph D; Pulendran, Bali; Antia, Rustom; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-03-10

    CD8 T cells are a potent tool for eliminating intracellular pathogens and tumor cells. Thus, eliciting robust CD8 T-cell immunity is the basis for many vaccines under development. However, the relationship between antigen load and the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell response is not well-described in a human immune response. Here we address this issue by quantifying viral load and the CD8 T-cell response in a cohort of 80 individuals immunized with the live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YFV-17D) by sampling peripheral blood at days 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14, 30, and 90. When the virus load was below a threshold (peak virus load < 225 genomes per mL, or integrated virus load < 400 genome days per mL), the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell response correlated strongly with the virus load (R(2) ∼ 0.63). As the virus load increased above this threshold, the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell responses saturated. Recent advances in CD8 T-cell-based vaccines have focused on replication-incompetent or single-cycle vectors. However, these approaches deliver relatively limited amounts of antigen after immunization. Our results highlight the requirement that T-cell-based vaccines should deliver sufficient antigen during the initial period of the immune response to elicit a large number of CD8 T cells that may be needed for protection.

  5. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

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    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  6. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  7. Defining CD8+ T cell determinants during human viral infection in populations of Asian ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivino, Laura; Tan, Anthony T; Chia, Adeline; Kumaran, Emmanuelle A P; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; MacAry, Paul A; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2013-10-15

    The identification of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell determinants is a fundamental requirement for our understanding of viral disease pathogenesis. T cell epitope mapping strategies increasingly rely on algorithms that predict the binding of peptides to MHC molecules. There is, however, little information on the reliability of predictive algorithms in the context of human populations, in particular, for those expressing HLA class I molecules for which there are limited experimental data available. In this study, we evaluate the ability of NetMHCpan to predict antiviral CD8(+) T cell epitopes that we identified with a traditional approach in patients of Asian ethnicity infected with Dengue virus, hepatitis B virus, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. We experimentally demonstrate that the predictive power of algorithms defining peptide-MHC interaction directly correlates with the amount of training data on which the predictive algorithm has been constructed. These results highlight the limited applicability of the NetMHCpan algorithm for populations expressing HLA molecules for which there are little or no experimental binding data, such as those of Asian ethnicity.

  8. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  9. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4 sup + T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M. (National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (USA)); June, C.H. (Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4{sup +} T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date.

  10. Deletional rearrangement in the human T-cell receptor. cap alpha. -chain locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Villartay, J.P.; Lewis, D.; Hockett, R.; Waldmann, T.A.; Korsmeyer, S.J.; Cohen, D.I.

    1987-12-01

    The antigen-specific receptor on the surface of mature T lymphocytes is a heterodimer consisting of polypeptides termed ..cap alpha.. and ..beta... In the course of characterizing human T-cell tumors with an immature (CD4/sup -/, CD8/sup -/) surface phenotype, the authors detected a 2-kilobase ..cap alpha..-related transcript. Analysis of cDNA clones corresponding to this transcript established that a genetic element (which they call TEA, for T early ..cap alpha..) located between the ..cap alpha..-chain variable- and joining-region genes had been spliced to the ..cap alpha.. constant region. The TEA transcript is present early in thymocyte ontogeny, and its expression declines during T-cell maturation. More important, the TEA area functions as an active site for rearrangement within the ..cap alpha.. gene locus. Blot hybridization of restriction enzyme-digested DNA with a TEA probe revealed a narrowly limited pattern of rearrangement in polyclonal thymic DNA, surprisingly different from the pattern expected for the mature ..cap alpha.. gene with its complex diversity. These DNA blots also showed that TEA is generally present in the germ-line configuration in cells expressing the ..gamma..delta heterodimeric receptor and is deleted from mature (..cap alpha beta..-expressing) T-lymphocyte tumors and lines. Moreover, the TEA transcript lacked a long open reading frame for protein but instead possessed multiple copies of a repetitive element resembling those utilized in the heavy-chain class switch of the immunoglobulin genes. The temporal nature of the rearrangements and expression detected by TEA suggests that this recombination could mediate a transition between immature (..gamma..delta-expressing) T cells and mature (..cap alpha beta..-expressing) T cells.

  11. Human effector T cells derived from central memory cells rather than CD8(+)T cells modified by tumor-specific TCR gene transfer possess superior traits for adoptive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Shao, Hongwei; Bo, Huaben; Shen, Han; Li, Jiandong; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Teng; Ma, Wenli; Huang, Shulin

    2013-10-10

    Adoptive cell therapy provides an attractive treatment of cancer, and our expanding capacity to target tumor antigens is driven by genetically engineered human T lymphocytes that express genes encoding tumor-specific T cell receptors (TCRs). The intrinsic properties of cultured T cells used for therapy were reported to have tremendous influences on their persistence and antitumor efficacy in vivo. In this study, we isolated CD8(+) central memory T cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors, and then transferred with the gene encoding TCR specific for tumor antigen using recombinant adenovirus vector Ad5F35-TRAV-TRBV. We found effector T cells derived from central memory T cells improved cell viability, maintained certain level of CD62L expression, and reacquired the CD62L(+)CD44(high) phenotype of central memory T cells after effector T cells differentiation. We then compared the antitumor reactivity of central memory T cells and CD8(+)T cells after TCR gene transferred. The results indicated that tumor-specific TCR gene being transferred to central memory T cells effectively increased the specific killing of antigen positive tumor cells and the expression of cytolytic granule protein. Furthermore, TCR gene transferred central memory T cells were more effective than TCR gene transferred CD8(+)T cells in CTL activity and effector cytokine secretion. These results implicated that isolating central memory T cells rather than CD8(+)T cells for insertion of gene encoding tumor-specific TCR may provide a superior tumor-reactive T cell population for adoptive transfer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of STAT5A and STAT5B target genes in human T cells.

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    Takahiro Kanai

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT comprises a family of universal transcription factors that help cells sense and respond to environmental signals. STAT5 refers to two highly related proteins, STAT5A and STAT5B, with critical function: their complete deficiency is lethal in mice; in humans, STAT5B deficiency alone leads to endocrine and immunological problems, while STAT5A deficiency has not been reported. STAT5A and STAT5B show peptide sequence similarities greater than 90%, but subtle structural differences suggest possible non-redundant roles in gene regulation. However, these roles remain unclear in humans. We applied chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing using human CD4(+ T cells to detect candidate genes regulated by STAT5A and/or STAT5B, and quantitative-PCR in STAT5A or STAT5B knock-down (KD human CD4(+ T cells to validate the findings. Our data show STAT5A and STAT5B play redundant roles in cell proliferation and apoptosis via SGK1 interaction. Interestingly, we found a novel, unique role for STAT5A in binding to genes involved in neural development and function (NDRG1, DNAJC6, and SSH2, while STAT5B appears to play a distinct role in T cell development and function via DOCK8, SNX9, FOXP3 and IL2RA binding. Our results also suggest that one or more co-activators for STAT5A and/or STAT5B may play important roles in establishing different binding abilities and gene regulation behaviors. The new identification of these genes regulated by STAT5A and/or STAT5B has major implications for understanding the pathophysiology of cancer progression, neural disorders, and immune abnormalities.

  13. Human B cells produce chemokine CXCL10 in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Soren T; Salman, Ahmed M; Ruhwald, Morten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment....... A candidate for such regulation could be the chemokine CXCL10. CXCL10 is mainly produced by human monocytes, but a few reports have also found CXCL10 production by human B cells. The objective of this study was to investigate CXCL10 production by human B cells in response to in vitro stimulation with Mtb...... antigens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed human blood samples from 30 volunteer donors using multiparameter flow cytometry, and identified a subgroup of B cells producing CXCL10 in response to in vitro stimulation with antigens. T cells did not produce CXCL10, but CXCL10 production by B cells...

  14. HIV Replication Is Not Controlled by CD8+ T Cells during the Acute Phase of the Infection in Humanized Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Y Petit

    Full Text Available HIV replication follows a well-defined pattern during the acute phase of the infection in humans. After reaching a peak during the first few weeks after infection, viral replication resolves to a set-point thereafter. There are still uncertainties regarding the contribution of CD8(+ T cells in establishing this set-point. An alternative explanation, supported by in silico modeling, would imply that viral replication is limited by the number of available targets for infection, i.e. CD4(+CCR5(+ T cells. Here, we used NOD.SCID.gc(-/- mice bearing human CD4(+CCR5(+ and CD8(+ T cells derived from CD34(+ progenitors to investigate the relative contribution of both in viral control after the peak. Using low dose of a CCR5-tropic HIV virus, we observed an increase in viral replication followed by "spontaneous" resolution of the peak, similar to humans. To rule out any possible role for CD8(+ T cells in viral control, we infected mice in which CD8(+ T cells had been removed by a depleting antibody. Globally, viral replication was not affected by the absence of CD8(+ T cells. Strikingly, resolution of the viral peak was equally observed in mice with or without CD8(+ T cells, showing that CD8(+ T cells were not involved in viral control in the early phase of the infection. In contrast, a marked and specific loss of CCR5-expressing CD4(+ T cells was observed in the spleen and in the bone marrow, but not in the blood, of infected animals. Our results strongly suggest that viral replication during the acute phase of the infection in humanized mice is mainly constrained by the number of available targets in lymphoid tissues rather than by CD8(+ T cells.

  15. HIV Replication Is Not Controlled by CD8+ T Cells during the Acute Phase of the Infection in Humanized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Nicolas Y; Lambert-Niclot, Sidonie; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Garcia, Sylvie; Marodon, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    HIV replication follows a well-defined pattern during the acute phase of the infection in humans. After reaching a peak during the first few weeks after infection, viral replication resolves to a set-point thereafter. There are still uncertainties regarding the contribution of CD8(+) T cells in establishing this set-point. An alternative explanation, supported by in silico modeling, would imply that viral replication is limited by the number of available targets for infection, i.e. CD4(+)CCR5(+) T cells. Here, we used NOD.SCID.gc(-/-) mice bearing human CD4(+)CCR5(+) and CD8(+) T cells derived from CD34(+) progenitors to investigate the relative contribution of both in viral control after the peak. Using low dose of a CCR5-tropic HIV virus, we observed an increase in viral replication followed by "spontaneous" resolution of the peak, similar to humans. To rule out any possible role for CD8(+) T cells in viral control, we infected mice in which CD8(+) T cells had been removed by a depleting antibody. Globally, viral replication was not affected by the absence of CD8(+) T cells. Strikingly, resolution of the viral peak was equally observed in mice with or without CD8(+) T cells, showing that CD8(+) T cells were not involved in viral control in the early phase of the infection. In contrast, a marked and specific loss of CCR5-expressing CD4(+) T cells was observed in the spleen and in the bone marrow, but not in the blood, of infected animals. Our results strongly suggest that viral replication during the acute phase of the infection in humanized mice is mainly constrained by the number of available targets in lymphoid tissues rather than by CD8(+) T cells.

  16. GM-CSF production allows the identification of immunoprevalent antigens recognized by human CD4+ T cells following smallpox vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Judkowski

    Full Text Available The threat of bioterrorism with smallpox and the broad use of vaccinia vectors for other vaccines have led to the resurgence in the study of vaccinia immunological memory. The importance of the role of CD4+ T cells in the control of vaccinia infection is well known. However, more CD8+ than CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by human subjects immunized with vaccinia virus have been reported. This could be, in part, due to the fact that most of the studies that have identified human CD4+ specific protein-derived fragments or peptides have used IFN-γ production to evaluate vaccinia specific T cell responses. Based on these findings, we reasoned that analyzing a large panel of cytokines would permit us to generate a more complete analysis of the CD4 T cell responses. The results presented provide clear evidence that TNF-α is an excellent readout of vaccinia specificity and that other cytokines such as GM-CSF can be used to evaluate the reactivity of CD4+ T cells in response to vaccinia antigens. Furthermore, using these cytokines as readout of vaccinia specificity, we present the identification of novel peptides from immunoprevalent vaccinia proteins recognized by CD4+ T cells derived from smallpox vaccinated human subjects. In conclusion, we describe a "T cell-driven" methodology that can be implemented to determine the specificity of the T cell response upon vaccination or infection. Together, the single pathogen in vitro stimulation, the selection of CD4+ T cells specific to the pathogen by limiting dilution, the evaluation of pathogen specificity by detecting multiple cytokines, and the screening of the clones with synthetic combinatorial libraries, constitutes a novel and valuable approach for the elucidation of human CD4+ T cell specificity in response to large pathogens.

  17. Regulation and gene expression profiling of NKG2D positive human cytomegalovirus-primed CD4+ T-cells.

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    Helle Jensen

    Full Text Available NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK cells, CD8(+ T-cells, and γδ T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4(+ T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. This particular subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4(+ T-cells is currently not known. In this study we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4(+ T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype than the NKG2D(- CD4(+ T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4(+ T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation between CD94 and NKG2D expression in the CD4(+ T-cells following HCMV stimulation. However, knock-down of CD94 did not affect NKG2D cell surface expression or signaling. In addition, we show that NKG2D is recycled at the cell surface of activated CD4(+ T-cells, whereas it is produced de novo in resting CD4(+ T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression.

  18. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine on human T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Frederik C.; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D.; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P.; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J.; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P.; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  19. Semaphorin 3F and Neuropilin-2 Control the Migration of Human T-Cell Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnafi, Vahid; Baleydier, Frederic; Messias, Carolina Valença; Lepelletier, Yves; Bedjaoui, Nawel; Renand, Amedée; Smaniotto, Salete; Canioni, Danielle; Milpied, Pierre; Balabanian, Karl; Bousso, Philippe; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Bertrand, Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert; Dardenne, Mireille; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Savino, Wilson; Hermine, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Neuropilins and semaphorins are known as modulators of axon guidance, angiogenesis, and organogenesis in the developing nervous system, but have been recently evidenced as also playing a role in the immune system. Here we describe the expression and role of semaphorin 3F (SEMA3F) and its receptor neuropilin-2 (NRP2) in human T cell precursors. NRP2 and SEMA3F are expressed in the human thymus, in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid compartments. SEMA3F have a repulsive effect on thymocyte migration and inhibited CXCL12- and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced thymocyte migration by inhibiting cytoskeleton reorganization prior to stimuli. Moreover, NRP2 and SEMA3F are expressed in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma primary cells. In these tumor cells, SEMA3F also blocks their migration induced by CXCL12 and S1P. Our data show that SEMA3F and NRP2 are further regulators of human thymocyte migration in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25068647

  20. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, E.; Jong, de M.A.W.P.; Nabatov, A.; Kalay, H.; Kooijk, van Y.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  1. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, E.; Jong, de M.A.W.P.; Nabatov, A.; Kalay, H.; Kooijk, van Y.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  2. Innate Memory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  3. Interferon-alpha induces transient suppressors of cytokine signalling expression in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brender, C; Nielsen, M; Röpke, C;

    2001-01-01

    The suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins comprise a newly identified family of negative feedback regulators of cytokine signalling. SOCS expression is differentially induced upon cytokine stimulation in different cell types. Here we show that interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is a potent...... induction neither CIS, SOCS-1, nor SOCS-2 expression levels declined after 6 h. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that IFNalpha induces SOCS expression in human T cells. Moreover, we show that IFNalpha and IL-2 induce distinct patterns of expression kinetics, suggesting that dynamic changes...

  4. B- and T-cell epitope mapping of human sapovirus capsid protein: an immunomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M Ruhul; Siddiqui, Mohammad S; Ahmed, Dilruba; Ahmed, Firoz; Hossain, Anowar

    2011-01-01

    Human sapovirus is one of the major causes of viral gastroenteritis. Although the capsid protein (VP1) confers antigenic cross-reactivity, immunity against sapovirus is still unclear. Using immunoinformatics approach, we defined putative T- and B-cell epitopes of VP1 and mapped on to its predicted three-dimensional structure. Identified five putative T-cell epitopes also occupied the putative B-cell epitope region. These putative epitopes were conserved in all existing serotypes. Predicted epitopes can be generated through proteasome cleavage and may be useful in designing peptide-based subunit vaccine to confer both humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

  5. Failure to demonstrate human T cell lymphotropic virus type I in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P;

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was employed in searching for human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) gag, env and pol sequences in samples of DNA prepared from two HTLV-I seropositive patients with tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP), the Swedish multiple sclerosis (MS...... and detection probes. In MS patients and healthy individuals, no signals were obtained with gag and env. In occasional experiments, weak signals were seen for the pol segment for a single MS patient and/or healthy individuals, but these signals were not reproducible in subsequent experiments. Thus, the present...

  6. Induction of cytotoxic CD8+CD56+ T cells from human thymocytes by interleukin-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, S; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Ødum, N;

    2001-01-01

    CD8(+) CD56(+) cells isolated from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been shown recently to represent a population of cytotoxic active T cells. However, it is not known if these cells are intrathymically or extrathymically developed or how these cells are influenced by growth factors...... of thymocytes. The majority of the IL-15-grown CD8(+) CD56(+) cells were CD45R0(+), representing a memory phenotype, and showed high expression of the IL-15R-complex and high numbers of CD69(+) cells. Moreover, cytotoxic activity was confined to this cell population....

  7. Enrichment of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactive mucosal T cells in the human female genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posavad, C M; Zhao, L; Dong, L; Jin, L; Stevens, C E; Magaret, A S; Johnston, C; Wald, A; Zhu, J; Corey, L; Koelle, D M

    2017-01-04

    Local mucosal cellular immunity is critical in providing protection from HSV-2. To characterize and quantify HSV-2-reactive mucosal T cells, lymphocytes were isolated from endocervical cytobrush and biopsy specimens from 17 HSV-2-infected women and examined ex vivo for the expression of markers associated with maturation and tissue residency and for functional T-cell responses to HSV-2. Compared with their circulating counterparts, cervix-derived CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were predominantly effector memory T cells (CCR7-/CD45RA-) and the majority expressed CD69, a marker of tissue residency. Co-expression of CD103, another marker of tissue residency, was highest on cervix-derived CD8+ T cells. Functional HSV-2 reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in cervical samples and a median of 17% co-expressed CD103. HSV-2-reactive CD4+ T cells co-expressed IL-2 and were significantly enriched in the cervix compared with blood. This first direct ex vivo documentation of local enrichment of HSV-2-reactive T cells in the human female genital mucosa is consistent with the presence of antigen-specific tissue-resident memory T cells. Ex vivo analysis of these T cells may uncover tissue-specific mechanisms of local control of HSV-2 to assist the development of vaccine strategies that target protective T cells to sites of HSV-2 infection.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 4 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2016.118.

  8. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Heng Giap; Braun, Asolina; Li, Jane; Smith, Corey; Edwards, Jarem; Sierro, Frederic; Feng, Carl G; Khanna, Rajiv; Elliot, Michael; Bell, Andrew; Hislop, Andrew D; Tangye, Stuart G; Rickinson, Alan B; Gebhardt, Thomas; Britton, Warwick J; Palendira, Umaimainthan

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103-, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections.

  9. Multiplex and genome-wide analyses reveal distinctive properties of KIR+ and CD56+ T cells in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing Keung; Rujkijyanont, Piya; Neale, Geoffrey; Yang, Jie; Bari, Rafijul; Das Gupta, Neha; Holladay, Martha; Rooney, Barbara; Leung, Wing

    2013-08-15

    Killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells have been linked to a wide spectrum of health conditions such as chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, pregnancy complications, cancers, and transplant failures. A small subset of effector memory T cells also expresses KIRs. In this study, we use modern analytic tools including genome-wide and multiplex molecular, phenotypic, and functional assays to characterize the KIR(+) T cells in human blood. We find that KIR(+) T cells primarily reside in the CD56(+) T population that is distinctively DNAM-1(high) with a genome-wide quiescent transcriptome, short telomere, and limited TCR excision circles. During CMV reactivation in bone marrow transplant recipients, KIR(+)CD56(+) T cells rapidly expanded in real-time but not KIR(+)CD56(-) T cells or KIR(+) NK cells. In CMV(+) asymptomatic donors, as much as 50% of CD56(+) T cells are KIR(+), and most are distinguishably KIR2DL2/3(+)NKG2C(+)CD57(+). Functionally, the KIR(+)CD56(+) T cell subset lyses cancer cells and CMVpp65-pulsed target cells in a dual KIR-dependent and TCR-dependent manner. Analysis of metabolic transcriptome confirms the immunological memory status of KIR(+)CD56(+) T cells in contrast to KIR(-)CD56(+) T cells that are more active in energy metabolism and effector differentiation. KIR(-)CD56(+) T cells have >25-fold higher level of expression of RORC than the KIR(+) counterpart and are a previously unknown producer of IL-13 rather than IL-17 in multiplex cytokine arrays. Our data provide fundamental insights into KIR(+) T cells biologically and clinically.

  10. Stimulated human peripheral T cells produce high amounts of IL-35 protein in a proliferation-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttek, Karina; Reinhold, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    The p35 subunit of IL-12 and the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) have been shown to form a heterodimeric cytokine, named interleukin-35 (IL-35). Recently, mRNA expression of both IL-12p35 and EBI3 was clearly shown in stimulated human T effector cells. Here, we investigated the production of IL-35 protein in human anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated pan T cells as well as T cell subpopulations using a specific human IL-35 ELISA system. We measured high concentrations of IL-35 (up to 3 ng/ml) in cell culture supernatants of stimulated pan T cells as well as CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cell subpopulations at 72 h after stimulation. Very low amounts of IL-35, in the range of 100pg/ml, were detectable in supernatants of resting T cells. These observations could be confirmed using a dot-blot assay for IL-12p35 and EBI3. High concentrations of IL-35 could be also measured in cell culture supernatants of both, resting and stimulated CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. In order to learn more about the regulation of IL-35 production, we studied the effect of dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and rapamycin on IL-35 production of anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated human pan T cells as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subpopulations. All three drugs significantly suppressed IL-35 production of these cells in a proliferation-dependent manner. In summary, we could show that stimulated human peripheral blood T cells of healthy donors produce high amounts of IL-35 protein. However, the biological function of this cytokine remains to be elucidated.

  11. Epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Proietti, Fernando Augusto; Ribas, João Gabriel Ramos; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Pinheiro, Sônia Regina; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara F

    2010-07-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus to be discovered, is present in diverse regions of the world, where its infection is usually neglected in health care settings and by public health authorities. Since it is usually asymptomatic in the beginning of the infection and disease typically manifests later in life, silent transmission occurs, which is associated with sexual relations, breastfeeding, and blood transfusions. There are no prospects of vaccines, and screening of blood banks and in prenatal care settings is not universal. Therefore, its transmission is active in many areas such as parts of Africa, South and Central America, the Caribbean region, Asia, and Melanesia. It causes serious diseases in humans, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and an incapacitating neurological disease (HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis [HAM/TSP]) besides other afflictions such as uveitis, rheumatic syndromes, and predisposition to helminthic and bacterial infections, among others. These diseases are not curable as yet, and current treatments as well as new perspectives are discussed in the present review.

  12. The human application of gene therapy to re-program T-cell specificity using chimeric antigen receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan DGuerrero; Judy SMoyes; Laurence JN Cooper

    2014-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells is a promising approach to treat cancers. Primary human T cells can be modified using viral and non-viral vectors to promote the specific targeting of cancer cells via the introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). This gene transfer displays the potential to increase the specificity and potency of the anticancer response while decreasing the systemic adverse effects that arise from conventional treatments that target both cancerous and healthy cells. This review highlights the generation of clinical-grade T cells expressing CARs for immunotherapy, the use of these cels to target B-cellmalignancies and, particularly, the first clinical trials deploying the Sleeping Beauty gene transfer system, which engineers T cells to target CD19+ leukemia and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

  13. Heterogeneity of CD4-Positive Human T-Cell Clones Which Recognize the Surface Protein Antigen of Rickettsia typhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    5055 " - PROGRAM PROJECT 1TASK IWORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. / NO. IACC SSI II. TITLE (Incluae Security Clasification ) Heterogeneity o. CD4-Positive...Human T-Cell Clones Which Kecognize the Surface Protein Antigen of Rickettsia typhi 12. PERSONAL AOTU-OR(S) Carl M, Vaidya S, Robbins FM, Ching WM...Heterogeneity of CD4-Positive Human T-Cell Clones Which Recognize the Surface Protein Antigen of Rickettsia typhi MITCHELl CARL,* SUSMA VAIDYA,1 FU-MEEI

  14. Characterization of human platelet binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Romero Roberto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs are bio-engineered molecules that may serve as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS. RTLs contain membrane distal α1 plus β1 domains of class II major histocompatibility complex linked covalently to specific peptides that can be used to regulate T cell responses and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The mechanisms by which RTLs impede local recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells in the CNS, however, are not completely understood. Methods We have recently shown that RTLs bind strongly to B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, but not to T cells, in an antigenic-independent manner, raising the question whether peripheral blood cells express a distinct RTL-receptor. Our study was designed to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which RTLs bind human blood platelets, and the ability of RTL to modulate platelet function. Results Our data demonstrate that human blood platelets support binding of RTL. Immobilized RTL initiated platelet intracellular calcium mobilization and lamellipodia formation through a pathway dependent upon Src and PI3 kinases signaling. The presence of RTL in solution reduced platelet aggregation by collagen, while treatment of whole blood with RTL prolonged occlusive thrombus formation on collagen. Conclusions Platelets, well-known regulators of hemostasis and thrombosis, have been implicated in playing a major role in inflammation and immunity. This study provides the first evidence that blood platelets express a functional RTL-receptor with a putative role in modulating pathways of neuroinflammation.

  15. Obesity impairs γδ T cell homeostasis and antiviral function in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne E Costanzo

    Full Text Available Obese patients are susceptible to increased morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases such as influenza A virus. γδ T cells and memory αβ T cells play key roles in reducing viral load by rapidly producing IFN-γ and lysing infected cells. In this article we analyze the impact of obesity on T lymphocyte antiviral immunity. Obese donors exhibit a reduction in γδ T cells in the peripheral blood. The severity of obesity negatively correlates with the number of γδ T cells. The remaining γδ T cells have a skewed maturation similar to that observed in aged populations. This skewed γδ T cell population exhibits a blunted antiviral IFN-γ response. Full γδ T cell function can be restored by potent stimulation with 1-Hydroxy-2-methyl-buten-4yl 4-diphosphate (HDMAPP, suggesting that γδ T cells retain the ability to produce IFN-γ. Additionally, γδ T cells from obese donors have reduced levels of IL-2Rα. IL-2 is able to restore γδ T cell antiviral cytokine production, which suggests that γδ T cells lack key T cell specific growth factor signals. These studies make the novel finding that the γδ T cell antiviral immune response to influenza is compromised by obesity. This has important implications for the development of therapeutic strategies to improve vaccination and antiviral responses in obese patients.

  16. Ex vivo generation of human alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells from CD4(posCD25(high T cells for immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorieke H Peters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cell (Treg based immunotherapy is a potential treatment for several immune disorders. By now, this approach proved successful in preclinical animal transplantation and auto-immunity models. In these models the success of Treg based immunotherapy crucially depends on the antigen-specificity of the infused Treg population. For the human setting, information is lacking on how to generate Treg with direct antigen-specificity ex vivo to be used for immunotherapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that in as little as two stimulation cycles with HLA mismatched allogeneic stimulator cells and T cell growth factors a very high degree of alloantigen-specificity was reached in magnetic bead isolated human CD4(posCD25(high Treg. Efficient increases in cell numbers were obtained. Primary allogeneic stimulation appeared a prerequisite in the generation of alloantigen-specific Treg, while secondary allogeneic or polyclonal stimulation with anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies enriched alloantigen-specificity and cell yield to a similar extent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ex vivo expansion protocol that we describe will very likely increase the success of clinical Treg-based immunotherapy, and will help to induce tolerance to selected antigens, while minimizing general immune suppression. This approach is of particular interest for recipients of HLA mismatched transplants.

  17. T-cell receptor/CD28 engagement when combined with prostaglandin E2 treatment leads to potent activation of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J

    2003-10-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE(2) treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56(lck) and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus.

  18. Positive Regulation of Interleukin-2 Expression by a Pseudokinase, Tribbles 1, in Activated T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Chiharu; Itoh, Yuka; Inoue, Yasumichi; Hayashi, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Tribbles 1 (TRB1), a member of the Tribbles family, is a pseudokinase that is conserved among species and implicated in various human diseases including leukemia, cardiovascular diseases, and metabolic disorders. However, the role of TRB1 in the immune response is not understood. To evaluate this role, we examined regulation of TRB1 expression and the function of TRB1 in interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction in Jurkat cells, a human acute T cell leukemia cell line. We found that TRB1 was strongly induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin in these cells. IL-2 expression was induced in Jurkat cells activated by PMA and ionomycin; however, knockdown of TRB1 resulted in decreased induction of IL-2. TRB1 null Jurkat cells established using the CRISPR/Cas9 system also showed reduction of IL-2 expression on PMA/ionomycin stimulation. TRB1 knockdown also markedly inhibited IL-2 promoter activation. To determine the mechanism of the stimulatory effect on IL-2 induction, we focused on histone deacetylases (HDACs), and found that HDAC1 preferentially interacts with TRB1. TRB1 suppressed the interaction of HDAC1 with nuclear factor of activated T cells 2 (NFAT2), which is a crucial transcription factor for IL-2 induction. These results indicate that TRB1 is a positive regulator of IL-2 induction in activated T cells.

  19. Loss of CD44dim Expression from Early Progenitor Cells Marks T-Cell Lineage Commitment in the Human Thymus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Mendes, Rui D.; Li, Yunlei; Vroegindeweij, Eric; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Wabeke, Tamara; Langerak, Anton W.; Pieters, Rob; Staal, Frank J. T.; Meijerink, Jules P. P.

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell development is less well studied than its murine counterpart due to the lack of genetic tools and the difficulty of obtaining cells and tissues. Here, we report the transcriptional landscape of 11 immature, consecutive human T-cell developmental stages. The changes in gene expression of cultured stem cells on OP9-DL1 match those of ex vivo isolated murine and human thymocytes. These analyses led us to define evolutionary conserved gene signatures that represent pre- and post-αβ T-cell commitment stages. We found that loss of dim expression of CD44 marks human T-cell commitment in early CD7+CD5+CD45dim cells, before the acquisition of CD1a surface expression. The CD44−CD1a− post-committed thymocytes have initiated in frame T-cell receptor rearrangements that are accompanied by loss of capacity to differentiate toward myeloid, B- and NK-lineages, unlike uncommitted CD44dimCD1a− thymocytes. Therefore, loss of CD44 represents a previously unrecognized human thymocyte stage that defines the earliest committed T-cell population in the thymus. PMID:28163708

  20. miR-20a inhibits TCR-mediated signaling and cytokine production in human naive CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarendra V Reddycherla

    Full Text Available Upon TCR stimulation by peptide-MHC complexes, CD4+ T cells undergo activation and proliferation. This process will ultimately culminate in T-cell differentiation and the acquisition of effector functions. The production of specific cytokines by differentiated CD4+ T cells is crucial for the generation of the appropriate immune response. Altered CD4+ T-cell activation and cytokine production result in chronic inflammatory conditions and autoimmune disorders. miRNAs have been shown to be important regulators of T-cell biology. In this study, we have focused our investigation on miR-20a, a member of the miR-17-92 cluster, whose expression is decreased in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis. We have found that miR-20a is rapidly induced upon TCR-triggering in primary human naïve CD4+ T cells and that its transcription is regulated in a Erk-, NF-κB-, and Ca++-dependent manner. We have further shown that overexpression of miR-20a inhibits TCR-mediated signaling but not the proliferation of primary human naïve CD4+ T cells. However, miR-20a overexpression strongly suppresses IL-10 secretion and moderately decreases IL-2, IL-6 and IL8 production, which are crucial regulators of inflammatory responses. Our study suggests that miR-20a is a new player in the regulation of TCR signaling strength and cytokine production.

  1. Phosphorylation regulates human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a pathogenic complex deltaretrovirus, which is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In addition to the structural and enzymatic viral gene products, HTLV-1 encodes the positive regulatory proteins Tax and Rex along with viral accessory proteins. Tax and Rex proteins orchestrate the timely expression of viral genes important in viral replication and cellular transformation. Rex is a nucleolar-localizing shuttling protein that acts post-transcriptionally by binding and facilitating the export of the unspliced and incompletely spliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. HTLV-1 Rex (Rex-1 is a phosphoprotein and general protein kinase inhibition correlates with reduced function. Therefore, it has been proposed that Rex-1 function may be regulated through site-specific phosphorylation. Results We conducted a phosphoryl mapping of Rex-1 over-expressed in transfected 293 T cells using a combination of affinity purification and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We achieved 100% physical coverage of the Rex-1 polypeptide and identified five novel phosphorylation sites at Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-97, and Ser-106. We also confirmed evidence of two previously identified residues, Ser-70 and Thr-174, but found no evidence of phosphorylation at Ser-177. The functional significance of these phosphorylation events was evaluated using a Rex reporter assay and site-directed mutational analysis. Our results indicate that phosphorylation at Ser-97 and Thr-174 is critical for Rex-1 function. Conclusion We have mapped completely the site-specific phosphorylation of Rex-1 identifying a total of seven residues; Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-70, Ser-97, Ser-106, and Thr-174. Overall, this work is the first to completely map the phosphorylation sites in Rex-1 and provides important insight into

  2. Activated human CD4+ T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth; Kongsbak, Martin; von Essen, Marina Rode; Woetmann, Anders; Odum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell activation and proliferation independently of cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells.

  3. Accessory signals in T-T cell interactions between antigen- and alloantigen-specific, human memory T cells generated in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, N; Ryder, L P; Georgsen, J;

    1990-01-01

    The potential of activated HLA class II-positive T cells as antigen-/alloantigen-presenting cells remains controversial. In our model system we use in vitro-primed, HLA class II-specific T cells of the memory T-cell phenotype, CD4+, CD29+ (4B4+), and CD45RO+ (UCHL-1). We have previously shown...... that alloactivated, HLA class II-positive T cells (Ta) are unable to stimulate proliferative responses in naive and primed allospecific T cells when 'back-stimulation' is avoided. The explanation of this feature of Ta is unknown, but it is due neither to suppression nor to insufficient HLA class II expression...

  4. Propolis Inhibits UVA-Induced Apoptosis of Human Keratinocyte HaCaT Cells by Scavenging ROS

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Propolis is a resinous material collected by honeybees from several plant sources. This research aimed at showing its protective effect against UVA-induced apoptosis of human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Using Hoechst staining, it was demonstrated that propolis (5 and 10 μg/mL) significantly inhibited the apoptosis of HaCaT cells induced by UVA-irradiation. Propolis also showed the protective effect against loss of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by UVA-irradiaiton in HaCaT cells. Propo...

  5. Role of Tax protein in human T-cell leukemia virus type-I leukemogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboud Mordechai

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL, the neurological syndrome TSP/HAM and certain other clinical disorders. The viral Tax protein is considered to play a central role in the process leading to ATL. Tax modulates the expression of many viral and cellular genes through the CREB/ATF-, SRF- and NF-κB-associated pathways. In addition, Tax employs the CBP/p300 and p/CAF co-activators for implementing the full transcriptional activation competence of each of these pathways. Tax also affects the function of various other regulatory proteins by direct protein-protein interaction. Through these activities Tax sets the infected T-cells into continuous uncontrolled replication and destabilizes their genome by interfering with the function of telomerase and topoisomerase-I and by inhibiting DNA repair. Furthermore, Tax prevents cell cycle arrest and apoptosis that would otherwise be induced by the unrepaired DNA damage and enables, thereby, accumulation of mutations that can contribute to the leukemogenic process. Together, these capacities render Tax highly oncogenic as reflected by its ability to transform rodent fibroblasts and primary human T-cells and to induce tumors in transgenic mice. In this article we discuss these effects of Tax and their apparent contribution to the HTLV-1 associated leukemogenic process. Notably, however, shortly after infection the virus enters into a latent state, in which viral gene expression is low in most of the HTLV-1 carriers' infected T-cells and so is the level of Tax protein, although rare infected cells may still display high viral RNA. This low Tax level is evidently insufficient for exerting its multiple oncogenic effects. Therefore, we propose that the latent virus must be activated, at least temporarily, in order to elevate Tax to its effective level and that during this transient activation state the infected cells may acquire some oncogenic mutations which can enable them to

  6. A self-inactivating lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 gene therapy that does not activate LMO2 expression in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sheng; Mody, Disha; DeRavin, Suk See; Hauer, Julia; Lu, Taihe; Ma, Zhijun; Hacein-Bey Abina, Salima; Gray, John T; Greene, Michael R; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2010-08-12

    To develop safer and more effective vectors for gene therapy of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), we have evaluated new self-inactivating lentiviral vectors based on the HIV virus. The CL20i4-hgamma(c)-Revgen vector contains the entire human common gamma chain (gamma(c)) genomic sequence driven by the gamma(c) promoter. The CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector uses a promoter fragment from the eukaryotic elongation factor alpha (EF1alpha) gene to express a codon-optimized human gamma(c) cDNA. Both vectors contain a 400-bp insulator fragment from the chicken beta-globin locus within the self-inactivating long-terminal repeat. Transduction of bone marrow cells using either of these vectors restored T, B, and natural killer lymphocyte development and function in a mouse SCID-X1 transplantation model. Transduction of human CD34(+) bone marrow cells from SCID-X1 patients with either vector restored T-cell development in an in vitro assay. In safety studies using a Jurkat LMO2 activation assay, only the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector lacked the ability to transactivate LMO2 protein expression, whereas the CL20i4-hgamma(c)-Revgen vector significantly activated LMO2 protein expression. In addition, the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector has not caused any tumors in transplanted mice. We conclude that the CL20i4-EF1alpha-hgamma(c)OPT vector may be suitable for testing in a clinical trial based on these preclinical demonstrations of efficacy and safety.

  7. Derivation of transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral T cells in defined culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishino, Yoshikazu; Seki, Tomohisa; Fujita, Jun; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tohyama, Shugo; Kunitomi, Akira; Tabei, Ryota; Nakajima, Kazuaki; Okada, Marina; Hirano, Akinori; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established as promising cell sources for revolutionary regenerative therapies. The initial culture system used for iPSC generation needed fetal calf serum in the culture medium and mouse embryonic fibroblast as a feeder layer, both of which could possibly transfer unknown exogenous antigens and pathogens into the iPSC population. Therefore, the development of culture systems designed to minimize such potential risks has become increasingly vital for future applications of iPSCs for clinical use. On another front, although donor cell types for generating iPSCs are wide-ranging, T cells have attracted attention as unique cell sources for iPSCs generation because T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs) have a unique monoclonal T cell receptor genomic rearrangement that enables their differentiation into antigen-specific T cells, which can be applied to novel immunotherapies. In the present study, we generated transgene-free human TiPSCs using a combination of activated human T cells and Sendai virus under defined culture conditions. These TiPSCs expressed pluripotent markers by quantitative PCR and immunostaining, had a normal karyotype, and were capable of differentiating into cells from all three germ layers. This method of TiPSCs generation is more suitable for the therapeutic application of iPSC technology because it lowers the risks associated with the presence of undefined, animal-derived feeder cells and serum. Therefore this work will lead to establishment of safer iPSCs and extended clinical application.

  8. Demonstration of a novel HIV-1 restriction phenotype from a human T cell line.

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    Yanxing Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although retroviruses may invade host cells, a productive infection can be established only after the virus counteracts inhibition from different types of host restriction factors. Fv1, APOBEC3G/F, TRIM5alpha, ZAP, and CD317 inhibit the replication of different retroviruses by interfering with viral uncoating, reverse transcription, nuclear import, RNA stability, and release. In humans, although APOBEC3G/3F and CD317 block HIV-1 replication, their antiviral activities are neutralized by viral proteins Vif and Vpu. So far, no human gene has been found to effectively block wild type HIV-1 replication under natural condition. Thus, identification of such a gene product would be of great medical importance for the development of HIV therapies. METHOD AND FINDINGS: In this study, we discovered a new type of host restriction against the wild type HIV-1 from a CD4/CXCR4 double-positive human T cell line. We identified a CEM-derived cell line (CEM.NKR that is highly resistant to productive HIV-1 infection. Viral production was reduced by at least 1000-fold when compared to the other permissive human T cell lines such as H9, A3.01, and CEM-T4. Importantly, this resistance was evident at extremely high multiplicity of infection. Further analyses demonstrated that HIV-1 could finish the first round of replication in CEM.NKR cells, but the released virions were poorly infectious. These virions could enter the target cells, but failed to initiate reverse transcription. Notably, this restriction phenotype was also present in CEM.NKR and 293T heterokaryons. CONCLUSIONS: These results clearly indicate that CEM.NKR cells express a HIV inhibitory gene(s. Further characterization of this novel gene product(s will reveal a new antiretroviral mechanism that directly inactivates wild type HIV-1.

  9. A human T cell lymphoma secreting an immunoglobulin E specific helper factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M C; Harfi, H; Sabbah, R; Leung, D Y; Geha, R S

    1985-06-01

    An 8-yr-old nonallergic girl with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma had markedly elevated serum IgE at presentation (greater than 10,000 IU/ml), negative skin tests to a battery of 24 common allergens, and no evidence of parasitic infestation. Serum levels of IgG, IgA, and IgM were normal. Remission after cytotoxic chemotherapy was accompanied by a marked reduction in serum IgE levels (to less than 200 IU/ml) with no change in the level of serum IgG, IgM, or IgA. Recurrence of the lymphoma 7 mo after remission was accompanied by an isotype specific rise in serum IgE (to 3,850 IU/ml). Isoelectric focusing revealed that the IgE was polyclonal. Phenotypic analysis of the lymphoma obtained during relapse revealed all (greater than 98%) cells to be T3+, T4+, and T8+. Incubation of lymphoma cells with human myeloma IgE followed by immunosorbent purified fluorescein tagged goat anti-human IgE (anti-IgE PS-adsorbed over IgE ADZ) stained 25% of the cells. In contrast, less than 1% of the cells were stained after incubation with human IgG followed by fluorescein conjugated goat anti-human IgE. Supernatants from lymphoma cells (5 X 10(6)/ml, 48 h) enhanced IgE production in B cells derived from four patients with allergic rhinitis (mean +/- SD picograms per milliliter of net IgE 930 +/- 320 in unstimulated cultures versus 2,450 +/- 650 in cultures stimulated with lymphoma supernatants; P less than 0.01) but did not induce IgE synthesis in B cells from two normal subjects that synthesized no IgE spontaneously. Lymphoma supernatants failed to enhance IgG synthesis by B cells of both allergic and nonallergic subjects. These results indicate that a T cell lymphoma comprised of cells bearing Fc receptors for IgE with a phenotype characteristic of immature T cells (i.e., T3+, T4+, T8+) exhibited IgE specific helper function. This lymphoma may represent the monoclonal expansion of a subpopulation of IgE specific helper T cells.

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G and Regulatory T Cells during Specific Immunotherapy for Pollen Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Johnsen, Claus R; Dalgaard, Louise Torp;

    2013-01-01

    with pollen extract in vitro and immune factors were evaluated. Results: During SIT, the main changes in the peripheral blood were an increase in CXCR3+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs and a decrease in CCR4+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs, an increase in allergen-specific IgG4, and a decrease in sHLA-G during the first......Background: TH2-biased immune responses are important in allergy pathogenesis. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) might include the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 blocking antibodies, a reduction in the number of effector cells, and skewing...... of the cytokine profile towards a TH1-polarized immune response. We investigated the effects of SIT on T cells, on immunomodulation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, which has been associated with allergy, on regulatory cytokine expression, and on serum allergen-specific antibody subclasses (IgE and IgG4...

  11. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are inefficient in activation of human regulatory T cells.

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    Mario Hubo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DC play a key role in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Plasmacytoid DC (pDC, a small subset of DC, characterized as type-I interferon producing cells, are critically involved in anti-viral immune responses, but also mediate tolerance by induction of regulatory T cells (Treg. In this study, we compared the capacity of human pDC and conventional DC (cDC to modulate T cell activity in presence of Foxp3(+ Treg. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In coculture of T effector cells (Teff and Treg, activated cDC overcome Treg anergy, abrogate their suppressive function and induce Teff proliferation. In contrast, pDC do not break Treg anergy but induce Teff proliferation even in coculture with Treg. Lack of Treg-mediated suppression is independent of proinflammatory cytokines like IFN-α, IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α. Phenotyping of pDC-stimulated Treg reveals a reduced expression of Treg activation markers GARP and CTLA-4. Additional stimulation by anti-CD3 antibodies enhances surface expression of GARP and CTLA-4 on Treg and consequently reconstitutes their suppressive function, while increased costimulation with anti-CD28 antibodies is ineffective. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that activated pDC induce Teff proliferation, but are insufficient for functional Treg activation and, therefore, allow expansion of Teff also in presence of Treg.

  12. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-09-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its own, but upon being presented with PPD was able to instruct monocytes to increase their expression of PCA. Antigen presentation could be performed only by autologous monocytes; allogeneic monocytes from donors unrelated to the donor of the reactive clone could not present antigen to cells of the clone in a way that would initiate the procoagulant response. Cells of the reactive clone did not mediate increased monocyte PCA in response to Candida, even though peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the donor demonstrated increased PCA to both Candida and PPD. Thus, the PCA response to specific antigen can be mediated by a single clone of cells that shows specificity in the recognition of both antigen and antigen presenting cell.

  13. Evaluation of the impact of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the differentiation of human naive CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanxia; Bai, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Liping; Wang, Hai; Dong, Xia; Zhang, Hailing; Leng, Xigang

    2011-06-01

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most widely studied polymers in non-viral gene delivery since it is a cationic polysaccharide that forms nanoparticles with DNA and hence protects the DNA against digestion by DNase. However, the impact of CS/DNA nanoparticle on the immune system still remains poorly understood. Previous investigations did not found CS/DNA nanoparticles had any significant impact on the function of human and murine macrophages. To date, little is known about the interaction between CS/DNA nanoparticles and naive CD4+ T cells. This study was designed to investigate whether CS/DNA nanoparticles affect the initial differentiation direction of human naive CD4+ T cells. The indirect impact of CS/DNA nanoparticles on naive CD4+ T cell differentiation was investigated by incubating the nanoparticles with human macrophage THP-1 cells in one chamber of a transwell co-incubation system, with the enriched human naive CD4+ T cells being placed in the other chamber of the transwell. The nanoparticles were also co-incubated with the naive CD4+ T cells to explore their direct impact on naive CD4+ T cell differentiation by measuring the release of IL-4 and IFN-γ from the cells. It was demonstrated that CS/DNA nanoparticles induced slightly elevated production of IL-12 by THP-1 cells, possibly owing to the presence of CpG motifs in the plasmid. However, this macrophage stimulating activity was much less significant as compared with lipopolysaccharide and did not impact on the differentiation of the naive CD4+ T cells. It was also demonstrated that, when directly exposed to the naive CD4+ T cells, the nanoparticles induced neither the activation of the naive CD4+ T cells in the absence of recombinant cytokines (recombinant human IL-4 or IFN-γ) that induce naive CD4+ T cell polarization, nor any changes in the differentiation direction of naive CD4+ T cells in the presence of the corresponding cytokines.

  14. Evaluation of the impact of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the differentiation of human naive CD4{sup +} T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lanxia; Bai Yuanyuan; Zhu Dunwan; Song Liping; Wang Hai; Dong Xia; Zhang Hailing; Leng Xigang, E-mail: lengxg@bme.org.cn [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Lab of Bioengineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China)

    2011-06-15

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most widely studied polymers in non-viral gene delivery since it is a cationic polysaccharide that forms nanoparticles with DNA and hence protects the DNA against digestion by DNase. However, the impact of CS/DNA nanoparticle on the immune system still remains poorly understood. Previous investigations did not found CS/DNA nanoparticles had any significant impact on the function of human and murine macrophages. To date, little is known about the interaction between CS/DNA nanoparticles and naive CD4{sup +} T cells. This study was designed to investigate whether CS/DNA nanoparticles affect the initial differentiation direction of human naive CD4{sup +} T cells. The indirect impact of CS/DNA nanoparticles on naive CD4{sup +} T cell differentiation was investigated by incubating the nanoparticles with human macrophage THP-1 cells in one chamber of a transwell co-incubation system, with the enriched human naive CD4{sup +} T cells being placed in the other chamber of the transwell. The nanoparticles were also co-incubated with the naive CD4{sup +} T cells to explore their direct impact on naive CD4{sup +} T cell differentiation by measuring the release of IL-4 and IFN-{gamma} from the cells. It was demonstrated that CS/DNA nanoparticles induced slightly elevated production of IL-12 by THP-1 cells, possibly owing to the presence of CpG motifs in the plasmid. However, this macrophage stimulating activity was much less significant as compared with lipopolysaccharide and did not impact on the differentiation of the naive CD4{sup +} T cells. It was also demonstrated that, when directly exposed to the naive CD4{sup +} T cells, the nanoparticles induced neither the activation of the naive CD4{sup +} T cells in the absence of recombinant cytokines (recombinant human IL-4 or IFN-{gamma}) that induce naive CD4{sup +} T cell polarization, nor any changes in the differentiation direction of naive CD4{sup +} T cells in the presence of the corresponding

  15. PD-1/PD-Ls pathways between CD4(+) T cells and pleural mesothelial cells in human tuberculous pleurisy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen; Tong, Zhao-Hui; Cui, Ai; Zhang, Jian-Chu; Ye, Zhi-Jian; Yuan, Ming-Li; Zhou, Qiong; Shi, Huan-Zhong

    2014-03-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1), PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and PD-L2 have been demonstrated to be involved in tuberculosis immunity, however, the expression and regulation of PD-1/PD-Ls pathways in pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) and CD4(+) T cells in tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) have not been investigated. Expression of PD-1 on CD4(+) T cells and expressions of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on PMCs in TPE were determined. The impacts of PD-1/PD-Ls pathways on proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration of CD4(+) T cells were explored. Concentrations of soluble PD-l, but not of soluble PD-Ls, were much higher in TPE than in serum. Expressions of PD-1 on CD4(+) T cells in TPE were significantly higher than those in blood. Expressions of PD-Ls were much higher on PMCs from TPE when compared with those from transudative effusion. Interferon-γ not only upregulated the expression of PD-1 on CD4(+) T cells, but also upregulated the expressions of PD-Ls on PMCs. Blockage PD-1/PD-Ls pathways abolished the inhibitory effects on proliferation and adhesion activity of CD4(+) T cells induced by PMCs. PD-1/PD-Ls pathways on PMCs inhibited proliferation and adhesion activity of CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that Mycobacterium tuberculosis might exploit PD-1/PD-Ls pathways to evade host cell immune response in human.

  16. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  17. GapmeR cellular internalization by macropinocytosis induces sequence-specific gene silencing in human primary T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazil, Mobashar Hussain Urf Turabe; Ong, Seow Theng; Chalasani, Madhavi Latha Somaraju; Low, Jian Hui; Kizhakeyil, Atish; Mamidi, Akshay; Lim, Carey Fang Hui; Wright, Graham D.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Kelleher, Dermot; Verma, Navin Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing holds great promise in discovery research for addressing intricate biological questions and as therapeutics. While various gene silencing approaches, such as siRNA and CRISPR-Cas9 techniques, are available, these cannot be effectively applied to “hard-to-transfect” primary T-lymphocytes. The locked nucleic acid-conjugated chimeric antisense oligonucleotide, called “GapmeR”, is an emerging new class of gene silencing molecule. Here, we show that GapmeR internalizes into human primary T-cells through macropinocytosis. Internalized GapmeR molecules can associate with SNX5-positive macropinosomes in T-cells, as detected by super-resolution microscopy. Utilizing the intrinsic self-internalizing capability of GapmeR, we demonstrate significant and specific depletion (>70%) of the expression of 5 different endogenous proteins with varying molecular weights (18 kDa Stathmin, 80 kDa PKCε, 180 kDa CD11a, 220 kDa Talin1 and 450 kDa CG-NAP/AKAP450) in human primary and cultured T-cells. Further functional analysis confirms CG-NAP and Stathmin as regulators of T-cell motility. Thus, in addition to screening, identifying or verifying critical roles of various proteins in T-cell functioning, this study provides novel opportunities to silence individual or multiple genes in a subset of purified human primary T-cells that would be exploited as future therapeutics. PMID:27883055

  18. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  19. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Ersching

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections.

  20. CROSSREACTIVE ANTIBODIES AND MEMORY T CELLS TO HUMAN AND ZOONOTIC INFLUENZA A VIRUSES IN VOLUNTEERS

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    I. V. Losev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists a real hazard of transferring zoonotic influenza A viruses, either swine, or avian, into human population. In such case, severity of such pandemics depends on the pathogen-specific immunity in the population. Virtual absence of such immunity in humans was declared in the literature. In this work, we assessed systemic, local, and T-cell immunity to potentially pandemic H3N2sw, H5N1, H5N2, H7N3, H7N9 and H2N2 influenza A viruses in a group of healthy adults of different age. Our results indicate that these subjects develop the following immune reactions: (i local (i.e., nasal IgA and cellular (CD4+ and CD8v memory T cells heterosubtypic immunity, in absence of detectable virus-specific serum antibodies to avian influenza A viruses; (ii Local immune responses (as nasal IgA to human A (H2N2 virus which circulated in 1957-1968 were detected both in subjects who could be primed at that time, but also in subjects born after 1968; (iii full-scale systemic and local immunity to potentially pandemic А (H3N2sw swine virus was found in the group. Conclusion. In order of proper epidemiological forecasts and planning appropriate preventive measures for potentially pandemic Influenza A viruses, a regular monitoring of collective immunity should be performed using different adaptive markers. In this respect, any conclusion based on molecular analysis only could lead to considerable mistakes, and should be accomplished by the mentioned immunological studies.

  1. Failure to demonstrate human T cell lymphotropic virus type I in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was employed in searching for human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) gag, env and pol sequences in samples of DNA prepared from two HTLV-I seropositive patients with tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP), the Swedish multiple sclerosis (MS......) patients who recently have been reported to be PCR-positive for HTLV-I gag and env sequences, and eight healthy individuals. Precautions were taken in order to reduce the risk of cross-contamination in the PCR. In the two TSP patients strong signals were obtained with gag, env and pol amplification primers...... data do not confirm the presence of HTLV-I sequences in MS patients....

  2. The role of CD4 and CD8 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

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    Claudia Ida Brodskyn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, caused by infection with parasites of the Leishmania genus, affects millions of individuals worldwide. This disease displays distinct clinical manifestations ranging from self-healing skin lesions to severe tissue damage. The control of Leishmania infection is dependent on cellular immune mechanisms, and evidence has shown that CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes play different roles in the outcome of leishmaniasis. Although the presence of CD4 T cells is important for controlling parasite growth, the results in the literature suggest that the inflammatory response elicited by these cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of lesions. However, recent studies on CD8 T lymphocytes show that these cells are mainly involved in tissue damage through cytotoxic mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the study of the human adaptive immunological response in the pathogenesis of tegumentary leishmaniasis.

  3. Systems biology approach to transplant tolerance: proof of concept experiments using RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down hub genes in Jurkat and HeLa cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, Wint Wah; Park, Ken; Wauson, Matthew; Gao, Qin; Finn, Patricia W; Perkins, David; Khanna, Ajai

    2012-07-01

    Systems biology is gaining importance in studying complex systems such as the functional interconnections of human genes [1]. To investigate the molecular interactions involved in T cell immune responses, we used databases of physical gene-gene interactions to constructed molecular interaction networks (interconnections) with R language algorithms. This helped to identify highly interconnected "hub" genes AT(1)P5C1, IL6ST, PRKCZ, MYC, FOS, JUN, and MAPK1. We hypothesized that suppression of these hub genes in the gene network would result in significant phenotypic effects on T cells and examined this in vitro. The molecular interaction networks were then analyzed and visualized with Cytoscape. Jurkat and HeLa cells were transfected with siRNA for the selected hub genes. Cell proliferation was measured using ATP luminescence and BrdU labeling, which were measured 36, 72, and 96 h after activation. Following T cell stimulation, we found a significant decrease in ATP production (P cells. However, HeLa cells showed a significant (P cell proliferation when the genes MAPK1, IL6ST, ATP5C1, JUN, and FOS were knocked down. In both Jurkat and HeLa cells, targeted gene knockdown using siRNA showed decreased cell proliferation and ATP production in both Jurkat and HeLa cells. However, Jurkat T cells and HELA cells use different hub genes to regulate activation responses. This experiment provides proof of principle of applying siRNA knockdown of T cell hub genes to evaluate their proliferative capacity and ATP production. This novel concept outlines a systems biology approach to identify hub genes for targeted therapeutics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  5. HER2 as a promising target for cytotoxicity T cells in human melanoma therapy.

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    Juan Ma

    Full Text Available Anti-HER2/neu antibody therapy has been reported to mediate tumor regression of HER2/ neu(+ tumors. Here we demonstrated the expression of HER2 in a wide range of human melanoma cells including a primary culture and seven cell lines, and we further investigated whether HER2 could be served as a target for T cell mediated immunotherapy of human melanoma. Specific cytolytic activity of activated T cells (ATC armed with anti-CD3 x anti-HER2 bispecific antibody (HER2Bi-Ab against Malme-3M-luc cells was evaluated by bioluminescent signal generated by luciferase reporter which did not alter HER2 expression or proliferation ability of Malme-3M cells. Contrast with unarmed ATC, increased cytotoxic activity of HER2Bi-armed ATC against Malme-3M-luc cells was observed at effector/target (E/T ratios of 1:1, 5:1, and 20:1. Moreover, HER2Bi-armed ATC expressed higher level of activation marker CD69 and secreted significantly higher level of IFN-γ than unarmed ATC counterpart at the E/T ratio of 20:1. In addition, compared with anti-HER2 mAb (Herceptin® or unarmed ATC, HER2Bi-armed ATC showed remarkable suppression effect on Malme-3M-luc tumor cells. Furthermore, in melanoma tumor cell xenograft mice, infusion of HER2Bi-armed ATC successfully inhibited the growth of melanoma tumors. The anti-tumor effect of HER2Bi-armed ATC may provide a promising immunotherapy for melanoma in the future.

  6. Analysis of close associations of uropod-associated proteins in human T-cells using the proximity ligation assay

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    Tommy Baumann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have shown previously that the raft-associated proteins flotillin-1 and -2 are rapidly recruited to the uropods of chemoattractant-stimulated human neutrophils and T-cells and are involved in cell polarization. Other proteins such as the adhesion receptor PSGL-1, the actin-membrane linker proteins ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM and the signaling enzyme phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ90 (PIPKIγ90 also accumulate in the T-cell uropod. Using the in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA we now have investigated putative close associations of these proteins in human freshly isolated T-cells before and after chemokine addition. The PLA allows in situ subcellular localization of close proximity of endogenous proteins at single-molecule resolution in fixed cells. It allows detection also of weaker and transient complexes that would not be revealed with co-immunoprecipitation approaches. We previously provided evidence for heterodimer formation of tagged flotillin-1 and -2 in T-cells before and after chemokine addition using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET. We now confirm these findings using PLA for the endogenous flotillins in fixed human T-cells. Moreover, in agreement with the literature, our PLA findings confirm a close association of endogenous PSGL-1 and ERM proteins both in resting and chemokine-activated human T-cells. In addition, we provide novel evidence using the PLA for close associations of endogenous activated ERM proteins with PIPKIγ90 and of endogenous flotillins with PSGL-1 in human T-cells, before and after chemokine addition. Our findings suggest that preformed clusters of these proteins coalesce in the uropod upon cell stimulation.

  7. Activated human neonatal CD8+ T cells are subject to immunomodulation by direct TLR2 or TLR5 stimulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarron, Mark

    2012-02-01

    In conditions of optimal priming, the neonate possesses competency to mount quantitatively adult-like responses. Vaccine formulations containing sufficiently potent adjuvants may overcome the neonate\\'s natural tendency for immunosuppression and provoke a similarly robust immune response. TLR expression on T cells represents the possibility of directly enhancing T cell immunity. We examined the ex vivo responsiveness of highly purified human cord blood-derived CD8(+) T cells to direct TLR ligation by a repertoire of TLR agonists. In concert with TCR stimulation, only Pam(3)Cys (palmitoyl-3-Cys-Ser-(Lys)(4)) and flagellin monomers significantly enhanced proliferation, CD25(+) expression, IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and intracellular granzyme B expression. TLR2 and TLR5 mRNA was detected in the CD8(+) T cells. Blocking studies confirmed that the increase in IFN-gamma production was by the direct triggering of surface TLR2 or TLR5. The simultaneous exposure of CD8(+) T cells to both TLR agonists had an additive effect on IFN-gamma production. These data suggest that a combination of the two TLR ligands would be a potent T cell adjuvant. This may represent a new approach to TLR agonist-based adjuvant design for future human neonatal vaccination strategies requiring a CD8(+) component.

  8. Human T cell recognition of the blood stage antigen Plasmodium hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGXPRT in acute malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodberry Tonia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Plasmodium purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGXPRT can protect mice against Plasmodium yoelii pRBC challenge in a T cell-dependent manner and has, therefore, been proposed as a novel vaccine candidate. It is not known whether natural exposure to Plasmodium falciparum stimulates HGXPRT T cell reactivity in humans. Methods PBMC and plasma collected from malaria-exposed Indonesians during infection and 7–28 days after anti-malarial therapy, were assessed for HGXPRT recognition using CFSE proliferation, IFNγ ELISPOT assay and ELISA. Results HGXPRT-specific T cell proliferation was found in 44% of patients during acute infection; in 80% of responders both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets proliferated. Antigen-specific T cell proliferation was largely lost within 28 days of parasite clearance. HGXPRT-specific IFN-γ production was more frequent 28 days after treatment than during acute infection. HGXPRT-specific plasma IgG was undetectable even in individuals exposed to malaria for at least two years. Conclusion The prevalence of acute proliferative and convalescent IFNγ responses to HGXPRT demonstrates cellular immunogenicity in humans. Further studies to determine minimal HGXPRT epitopes, the specificity of responses for Plasmodia and associations with protection are required. Frequent and robust T cell proliferation, high sequence conservation among Plasmodium species and absent IgG responses distinguish HGXPRT from other malaria antigens.

  9. SHP-1 and SHP-2 associate with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif of programmed death 1 upon primary human T cell stimulation, but only receptor ligation prevents T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemnitz, Jens M; Parry, Richard V; Nichols, Kim E; June, Carl H; Riley, James L

    2004-07-15

    To study the cis- and trans-acting factors that mediate programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling in primary human CD4 T cells, we constructed a chimeric molecule consisting of the murine CD28 extracellular domain and human PD-1 cytoplasmic tail. When introduced into CD4 T cells, this construct mimics the activity of endogenous PD-1 in terms of its ability to suppress T cell expansion and cytokine production. The cytoplasmic tail of PD-1 contains two structural motifs, an ITIM and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif (ITSM). Mutation of the ITIM had little effect on PD-1 signaling or functional activity. In contrast, mutation of the ITSM abrogated the ability of PD-1 to block cytokine synthesis and to limit T cell expansion. Further biochemical analyses revealed that the ability of PD-1 to block T cell activation correlated with recruitment of Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and SHP-2, and not the adaptor Src homology 2 domain-containing molecule 1A, to the ITSM domain. In TCR-stimulated T cells, SHP-2 associated with PD-1, even in the absence of PD-1 engagement. Despite this interaction, the ability of PD-1 to block T cell activation required receptor ligation, suggesting that colocalization of PD-1 with CD3 and/or CD28 may be necessary for inhibition of T cell activation.

  10. Vaccine-induced boosting of influenza virus-specific CD4 T cells in younger and aged humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas V Dolfi

    Full Text Available Current yearly influenza virus vaccines induce strain-specific neutralizing antibody (NAb responses providing protective immunity to closely matched viruses. However, these vaccines are often poorly effective in high-risk groups such as the elderly and challenges exist in predicting yearly or emerging pandemic influenza virus strains to include in the vaccines. Thus, there has been considerable emphasis on understanding broadly protective immunological mechanisms for influenza virus. Recent studies have implicated memory CD4 T cells in heterotypic immunity in animal models and in human challenge studies. Here we examined how influenza virus vaccination boosted CD4 T cell responses in younger versus aged humans. Our results demonstrate that while the magnitude of the vaccine-induced CD4 T cell response and number of subjects responding on day 7 did not differ between younger and aged subjects, fewer aged subjects had peak responses on day 14. While CD4 T cell responses were inefficiently boosted against NA, both HA and especially nucleocaspid protein- and matrix-(NP+M specific responses were robustly boosted. Pre-existing CD4 T cell responses were associated with more robust responses to influenza virus NP+M, but not H1 or H3. Finally pre-existing strain-specific NAb decreased the boosting of CD4 T cell responses. Thus, accumulation of pre-existing influenza virus-specific immunity in the form of NAb and cross-reactive T cells to conserved virus proteins (e.g. NP and M over a lifetime of exposure to infection and vaccination may influence vaccine-induced CD4 T cell responses in the aged.

  11. A murine herpesvirus closely related to ubiquitous human herpesviruses causes T-cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Swapneel J; Zhao, Guoyan; Penna, Vinay R; Park, Eugene; Lauron, Elvin J; Harvey, Ian B; Beatty, Wandy L; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Poursine-Laurent, Jennifer; Fremont, Daved H; Wang, David; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2017-02-08

    Mouse models of human herpesvirus infections The human roseoloviruses HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7 comprise the Roseolovirus genus of the human Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. Infections with these viruses have been implicated in many diseases; however, it has been challenging to establish infections with Roseoloviruses as direct drivers of pathology because they are nearly ubiquitous and display species-specific tropism. Furthermore, controlled study of infection has been hampered by the lack of experimental models, and until now, a mouse roseolovirus has not been identified. Herein we describe a virus that causes severe thymic necrosis in neonatal mice, characterized by a loss of CD4(+) T-cells. These phenotypes resemble those caused by the previously described mouse thymic virus (MTV), a putative herpesvirus that has not been molecularly characterized. By Next Generation sequencing of infected tissue homogenates, we assembled a contiguous 174Kb genome sequence encoding 128 unique predicted open reading frames (ORFs), many of which were most closely related to herpesvirus genes. Moreover, the structure of the virus genome and phylogenetic analysis of multiple genes strongly suggested that this virus is a betaherpesvirus more closely related to the roseoloviruses, HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7, than another murine betaherpesvirus, mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). As such, we have named this virus murine roseolovirus (MRV) because these data strongly suggest that MRV is a mouse homolog of HHV6A/HHV6B/HHV7.Importance: Herein we describe the complete genome sequence of a novel murine herpesvirus. By sequence and phylogenetic analyses, we show that it is a betaherpesvirus most closely related to the roseoloviruses, human herpesvirus 6A, 6B, and 7. These data combined with physiological similarities with human roseoloviruses collectively suggest that this virus is a murine roseolovirus (MRV), the first definitively described rodent roseolovirus, to our knowledge. Many biological and

  12. Messenger RNA encoding constitutively active Toll-like receptor 4 enhances effector functions of human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, A; Eisenberg, G; Machlenkin, A; Margalit, A; Cafri, G; Frankenburg, S; Merims, S; Peretz, T; Lotem, M; Gross, G

    2015-11-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy of cancer employs a large number of ex-vivo-propagated T cells which recognize their targets either by virtue of their endogenous T cell receptor (TCR) or via genetic reprogramming. However, both cell-extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms often diminish the in-vivo potency of these therapeutic T cells, limiting their clinical efficacy and broader use. Direct activation of human T cells by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands induces T cell survival and proliferation, boosts the production of proinflammatory cytokines and augments resistance to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression. Removal of the TLR ligand-binding region results in constitutive signalling triggered by the remaining cytosolic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The use of such TIR domains therefore offers an ideal means for equipping anti-tumour T cells with the arsenal of functional attributes required for improving current clinical protocols. Here we show that constitutively active (ca)TLR-4 can be expressed efficiently in human T cells using mRNA electroporation. The mere expression of caTLR-4 mRNA in polyclonal CD8 and CD4 T cells induced the production of interferon (IFN)-γ, triggered the surface expression of CD25, CD69 and 4-1BB and up-regulated a panel of cytokines and chemokines. In tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes prepared from melanoma patients, caTLR-4 induced robust IFN-γ secretion in all samples tested. Furthermore, caTLR-4 enhanced the anti-melanoma cytolytic activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and augmented the secretion of IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for at least 4 days post-transfection. Our results demonstrate that caTLR-4 is capable of exerting multiple T cell-enhancing effects and can potentially be used as a genetic adjuvant in adoptive cell therapy. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  13. Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. modulates antioxidant activity and human T-cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belarbi Meriem

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. also known as Jujube, is a deciduous shrub which belongs to Rhamnaceae family. This plant is used in Algerian traditional medicine for its anti-diabetic, sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic activities. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of different vitamins (vitamin A, C and E and fatty acids in root, stem, leaves, fruit pulp and seed of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. and assessed the effects of their aqueous extracts on antioxidant status and human T-cell proliferation. Methods Aqueous filtrates from different parts, i.e, root, leaf, stem, fruit pulp and seed, of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. were prepared. Vitamin C levels were determined by precipitating with 10% trichloroacetic acid and vitamin A and E were assessed by HPLC. Lipid composition of these extracts was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Anti-oxidant capacity was evaluated by using anti-radical resistance kit [Kit Radicaux Libres (KRL@; Kirial International SA, Couternon, France]. T-cell blastogenesis was assessed by the incorporation of 3H-thymidine. IL-2 gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Results Our results show that fruit pulp contained higher vitamin A and C contents than other parts of the plant. Furthermore, the fruit pulp was the richest source of linoleic acid (18:2n-6, a precursor of n-6 fatty acids. Fruit seeds possessed higher vitamin C levels than leaves, roots and stem. The leaves were the richest source of vitamin E and linolenic acid (18:3n-3, a precursor of n-3 fatty acids. The antioxidant capacity of the different extracts, measured by KRL@ test, was as follows: pulp Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf. exerted immunosuppressive effects. Conclusion Seed extracts exerted the most potent immunosuppressive effects on T cell proliferation and IL-2 mRNA expression. The results of the present study are discussed in the light of their use to modulate the immune-mediated diseases.

  14. Repression of interferon-γexpression in T cells by prosperorelated Homeobox protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linfang Wang; Jianmei Zhu; Shifang Shan; Yi Qin; Yuying Kong; Jing Liu; Yuan Wang; Youhua Xie

    2008-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a major proinflammatory effector and regulatory cytokine produced by activated T cells and NK cells. IFN-γ has been shown to play pivotal roles in fundamental immunological processes such as inflammatory reactions,cell-mediated immunity and autoimmunity. A variety of human disorders have now been linked to irregular IFN-γ expression. In order to achieve proper IFN-γ-mediated immunological effects,IFN-γ expression in T cells is subject to both positive and negative regulation. In this study,we report for the first time the negative regulation of IFN-γ expression by Prospero-related Homeobox (Prox1). In Jurkat T cells and primary human CD4+ T cells,Proxl expression decreases quickly upon T cell activation,concurrent with a dramatic increase in IFN-γ expression.Reporter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that Proxl associates with and inhibits the transcription activity of IFN-γ promoter in activated Jurkat T cells. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay demonstrated a direct binding between Proxl and the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ),which is also an IFN-γ repressor in T cells. By introducing deletions and mutations into Proxl,we show that the repression of IFN-γ promoter by Prox1 is largely dependent upon the physical interaction between Prox1 and PPARγ. Furthermore,PPARγ antagonist treatment removes Prox1 from IFN-γ promoter and attenuates repression of IFN-γ expression by Prox1. These findings establish Prox1 as a new negative regulator of IFN-γ expression in T cells and will aid in the understanding of IFN-γ transcription regulation mechanisms.

  15. Silencing of human T-cell leukemia virus type I gene transcription by epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Nancy

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL after a long latent period. Among accessory genes encoded by HTLV-I, the tax gene is thought to play a central role in oncogenesis. However, Tax expression is disrupted by several mechanims including genetic changes of the tax gene, deletion/hypermethylation of 5'-LTR. To clarify the role of epigenetic changes, we analyzed DNA methylation and histone modification in the whole HTLV-I provirus genome. Results The gag, pol and env genes of HTLV-I provirus were more methylated than pX region, whereas methylation of 5'-LTR was variable and 3'-LTR was not methylated at all. In ATL cell lines, complete DNA methylation of 5'-LTR was associated with transcriptional silencing of viral genes. HTLV-I provirus was more methylated in primary ATL cells than in carrier state, indicating the association with disease progression. In seroconvertors, DNA methylation was already observed in internal sequences of provirus just after seroconversion. Taken together, it is speculated that DNA methylation first occurs in the gag, pol and env regions and then extends in the 5' and 3' directions in vivo, and when 5'-LTR becomes methylated, viral transcription is silenced. Analysis of histone modification in the HTLV-I provirus showed that the methylated provirus was associated with hypoacetylation. However, the tax gene transcript could not be detected in fresh ATL cells regardless of hyperacetylated histone H3 in 5'-LTR. The transcription rapidly recovered after in vitro culture in such ATL cells. Conclusion These results showed that epigenetic changes of provirus facilitated ATL cells to evade host immune system by suppressing viral gene transcription. In addition, this study shows the presence of another reversible mechanism that suppresses the tax gene transcription without DNA methylation and hypoacetylated histone.

  16. T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Informed d Corporate Support Corporate Partners National Teams Partnership Opportunities d Personal Stories Ambassadors & Familiar Faces Life ... d Our Healthcare Voice Home What Is MS? Definition of MS T Cells Share this page Facebook ...

  17. Identification of a human CD8+ regulatory T cell subset that mediates suppression through the chemokine CC chemokine ligand 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, S.A.; Meijgaarden, K.E. van; Savage, N.D.; Boer, T. de; Triebel, F.; Wal, A. van der; Heer, E. de; Klein, M.R.; Geluk, A.; Ottenhoff, T.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) comprise multiple subsets and are important in controlling immunity and inflammation. However, the induction and mode of action of the various distinct Treg subsets remain ill defined, particularly in humans. Here, we describe a human CD8+ lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-

  18. Low-affinity TCR engagement drives IL-2-dependent post-thymic maintenance of naive CD4+T cells in aged humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, Kornelis S. M.; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Teteloshvili, Nato; Tete, Sarah M.; Peters, Jorieke H.; Horst, Gerda; Lorencetti, Pedro G.; Bos, Nicolaas A.; Lambeck, Annechien; Roozendaal, Caroline; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Koenen, Hans J. P. M.; Joosten, Irma; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Insight into the maintenance of naive T cells is essential to understand defective immune responses in the context of aging and other immune compromised states. In humans, naive CD4+ T cells, in contrast to CD8+ T cells, are remarkably well retained with aging. Here, we show that low-affinity TCR

  19. Thymopentin enhances the generation of T-cell lineage derived from human embryonic stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming-Xia; Wan, Wen-Li; Li, Hai-Shen; Wang, Jing; Chen, Gui-An; Ke, Xiao-Yan

    2015-02-15

    Thymopentin is a group of biologically active peptide secreted mainly by the epithelial cells of thymic cortex and medulla. Whether it promotes T cells production from human embryonic stem cells(hESCs) in vitro remains an elusive issue. In the present study, we develop a novel strategy that enhances T-cell lineage differentiation of hESCs in collagen matrix culture by sequential cytokine cocktails treatment combined with thymopentin stimulation. We observed that approximately 30.75% cells expressed CD34 on day 14 of the cultures and expressed the surface markers of erythroid, lymphoid and myeloid lineages. The results of colony assays and gene expressions by RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) derived from hESCs were capable of multi-lineage differentiation. Further study revealed that culturing with thymopentin treatment, the CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(+) cells sorted from HPCs expressed T-cell-related genes, IKAROS, DNTT, TCRγ and TCRβ, and T-cell surface markers, CD3, cytoplasmic CD3, CD5, CD27, TCRγδ, CD4 and CD8. The differentiated cells produced the cytokines including IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α in response to stimulation, providing the evidence for T-cell function of these cells. In conclusion, thymopentin enhances T-cell lineage differentiation from hESCs in vitro by mimicking thymus peptide environment in vivo.

  20. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane vesicles inhibit human T cell responses via induction of monocyte COX-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Barry D; McKenzie, Judith L; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2017-06-01

    The modulation of T cell responses by Helicobacter pylori is thought to potentiate both H. pylori persistence and development of gastric pathologies including cancer. Release of outer membrane vesicles (OMV) by H. pylori provides a potential vehicle for modulation of the immune system. Although OMV are thought to have T cell suppressive activity, this has not yet been demonstrated. Their suppressive activity was investigated in this study using the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to T cell stimuli as a readout. We demonstrate that addition of OMV to PBMC significantly inhibits subsequent T cell proliferation in a cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent manner. Addition of OMV did not significantly modulate PBMC apoptosis, but induced strong expression of COX-2 by the monocytes present and significantly increased levels of PGE2 and IL-10. These effects were independent of vacuolating cytotoxin expression. Together, these findings demonstrate that OMV can suppress human T cell responses and that the predominant mechanism is not through a direct effect on the T cells but results from the induction of COX-2 expression in monocytes. This increased COX-2 activity may modulate not only H. pylori-directed immune responses but also wider immune responses. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Characterisation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of Meningococcal Opa Proteins on Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells.

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    Claire Jones

    Full Text Available Opa proteins are major surface-expressed proteins located in the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane, and are potential meningococcal vaccine candidates. Although Opa proteins elicit high levels of bactericidal antibodies following immunisation in mice, progress towards human clinical trials has been delayed due to previous findings that Opa inhibits T cell proliferation in some in vitro assays. However, results from previous studies are conflicting, with different Opa preparations and culture conditions being used. We investigated the effects of various Opa+ and Opa- antigens from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 in a range of in vitro conditions using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and purified CD4+ T cells, measuring T cell proliferation by CFSE dilution using flow cytometry. Wild type recombinant and liposomal Opa proteins inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation after stimulation with IL-2, anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and these effects were reduced by mutation of the CEACAM1-binding region of Opa. These effects were not observed in culture with ex vivo PBMCs. Opa+ and Opa- OMVs did not consistently exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect across different culture conditions. These data do not support a hypothesis that Opa proteins would be inhibitory to T cells if given as a vaccine component, and T cell immune responses to OMV vaccines are unlikely to be significantly affected by the presence of Opa proteins.

  2. Th22 cells represent a distinct human T cell subset involved in epidermal immunity and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian; Pennino, Davide; Carbone, Teresa; Nasorri, Francesca; Pallotta, Sabatino; Cianfarani, Francesca; Odorisio, Teresa; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Behrendt, Heidrun; Durham, Stephen R; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Cavani, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Th subsets are defined according to their production of lineage-indicating cytokines and functions. In this study, we have identified a subset of human Th cells that infiltrates the epidermis in individuals with inflammatory skin disorders and is characterized by the secretion of IL-22 and TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, IL-4, or IL-17. In analogy to the Th17 subset, cells with this cytokine profile have been named the Th22 subset. Th22 clones derived from patients with psoriasis were stable in culture and exhibited a transcriptome profile clearly separate from those of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells; it included genes encoding proteins involved in tissue remodeling, such as FGFs, and chemokines involved in angiogenesis and fibrosis. Primary human keratinocytes exposed to Th22 supernatants expressed a transcriptome response profile that included genes involved in innate immune pathways and the induction and modulation of adaptive immunity. These proinflammatory Th22 responses were synergistically dependent on IL-22 and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, Th22 supernatants enhanced wound healing in an in vitro injury model, which was exclusively dependent on IL-22. In conclusion, the human Th22 subset may represent a separate T cell subset with a distinct identity with respect to gene expression and function, present within the epidermal layer in inflammatory skin diseases. Future strategies directed against the Th22 subset may be of value in chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

  3. Subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes contribute to resistance against experimental infection with a human protozoan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana R Dominguez

    Full Text Available During adaptive immune response, pathogen-specific CD8(+ T cells recognize preferentially a small number of epitopes, a phenomenon known as immunodominance. Its biological implications during natural or vaccine-induced immune responses are still unclear. Earlier, we have shown that during experimental infection, the human intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi restricts the repertoire of CD8(+ T cells generating strong immunodominance. We hypothesized that this phenomenon could be a mechanism used by the parasite to reduce the breath and magnitude of the immune response, favoring parasitism, and thus that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire could favor the host. Here, we confirmed our previous observation by showing that CD8(+ T cells of H-2(a infected mice recognized a single epitope of an immunodominant antigen of the trans-sialidase super-family. In sharp contrast, CD8(+ T cells from mice immunized with recombinant genetic vaccines (plasmid DNA and adenovirus expressing this same T. cruzi antigen recognized, in addition to the immunodominant epitope, two other subdominant epitopes. This unexpected observation allowed us to test the protective role of the immune response to subdominant epitopes. This was accomplished by genetic vaccination of mice with mutated genes that did not express a functional immunodominant epitope. We found that these mice developed immune responses directed solely to the subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes and a significant degree of protective immunity against infection mediated by CD8(+ T cells. We concluded that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire contributes to host resistance against infection, a finding that has implications for the host-parasite relationship and vaccine development.

  4. Human brain endothelial cells endeavor to immunoregulate CD8 T cells via PD-1 ligand expression in multiple sclerosis

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    Pittet Camille L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS, an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS, is characterized by blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption and massive infiltration of activated immune cells. Engagement of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 expressed on activated T cells with its ligands (PD-L1 and PD-L2 suppresses T cell responses. We recently demonstrated in MS lesions elevated PD-L1 expression by glial cells and absence of PD-1 on many infiltrating CD8 T cells. We have now investigated whether human brain endothelial cells (HBECs, which maintain the BBB, can express PD-L1 or PD-L2 and thereby modulate T cells. Methods We used primary cultures of HBECs isolated from non-tumoral CNS tissue either under basal or inflamed conditions. We assessed the expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 using qPCR and flow cytometry. Human CD8 T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors and co-cultured with HBECs. Following co-culture with HBECs, proliferation and cytokine production by human CD8 T cells were measured by flow cytometry whereas transmigration was determined using a well established in vitro model of the BBB. The functional impact of PD-L1 and PD-L2 provided by HBECs was determined using blocking antibodies. We performed immunohistochemistry for the detection of PD-L1 or PD-L2 concurrently with caveolin-1 (a cell specific marker for endothelial cells on post-mortem human brain tissues obtained from MS patients and normal controls. Results Under basal culture conditions, PD-L2 is expressed on HBECs, whilst PD-L1 is not detected. Both ligands are up-regulated under inflammatory conditions. Blocking PD-L1 and PD-L2 leads to increased transmigration and enhanced responses by human CD8 T cells in co-culture assays. Similarly, PD-L1 and PD-L2 blockade significantly increases CD4 T cell transmigration. Brain endothelium in normal tissues and MS lesions does not express detectable PD-L1; in contrast, all blood vessels in normal

  5. STAT3 is a critical cell-intrinsic regulator of human unconventional T cell numbers and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert P; Ives, Megan L; Rao, Geetha; Lau, Anthony; Payne, Kathryn; Kobayashi, Masao; Arkwright, Peter D; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Smart, Joanne M; French, Martyn A; Fulcher, David A; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Gray, Paul; Stepensky, Polina; Warnatz, Klaus; Freeman, Alexandra F; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Holland, Steven M; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Uzel, Gulbu; Ma, Cindy S; Tangye, Stuart G; Deenick, Elissa K

    2015-06-01

    Unconventional T cells such as γδ T cells, natural killer T cells (NKT cells) and mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells) are a major component of the immune system; however, the cytokine signaling pathways that control their development and function in humans are unknown. Primary immunodeficiencies caused by single gene mutations provide a unique opportunity to investigate the role of specific molecules in regulating human lymphocyte development and function. We found that individuals with loss-of-function mutations in STAT3 had reduced numbers of peripheral blood MAIT and NKT but not γδ T cells. Analysis of STAT3 mosaic individuals revealed that this effect was cell intrinsic. Surprisingly, the residual STAT3-deficient MAIT cells expressed normal levels of the transcription factor RORγt. Despite this, they displayed a deficiency in secretion of IL-17A and IL-17F, but were able to secrete normal levels of cytokines such as IFNγ and TNF. The deficiency in MAIT and NKT cells in STAT3-deficient patients was mirrored by loss-of-function mutations in IL12RB1 and IL21R, respectively. Thus, these results reveal for the first time the essential role of STAT3 signaling downstream of IL-23R and IL-21R in controlling human MAIT and NKT cell numbers. © 2015 Wilson et al.

  6. STAT3 is a critical cell-intrinsic regulator of human unconventional T cell numbers and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert P.; Ives, Megan L.; Rao, Geetha; Lau, Anthony; Payne, Kathryn; Kobayashi, Masao; Arkwright, Peter D.; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Smart, Joanne M.; French, Martyn A.; Fulcher, David A.; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Gray, Paul; Stepensky, Polina; Warnatz, Klaus; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Holland, Steven M.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Uzel, Gulbu; Ma, Cindy S.

    2015-01-01

    Unconventional T cells such as γδ T cells, natural killer T cells (NKT cells) and mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells) are a major component of the immune system; however, the cytokine signaling pathways that control their development and function in humans are unknown. Primary immunodeficiencies caused by single gene mutations provide a unique opportunity to investigate the role of specific molecules in regulating human lymphocyte development and function. We found that individuals with loss-of-function mutations in STAT3 had reduced numbers of peripheral blood MAIT and NKT but not γδ T cells. Analysis of STAT3 mosaic individuals revealed that this effect was cell intrinsic. Surprisingly, the residual STAT3-deficient MAIT cells expressed normal levels of the transcription factor RORγt. Despite this, they displayed a deficiency in secretion of IL-17A and IL-17F, but were able to secrete normal levels of cytokines such as IFNγ and TNF. The deficiency in MAIT and NKT cells in STAT3-deficient patients was mirrored by loss-of-function mutations in IL12RB1 and IL21R, respectively. Thus, these results reveal for the first time the essential role of STAT3 signaling downstream of IL-23R and IL-21R in controlling human MAIT and NKT cell numbers. PMID:25941256

  7. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes are coexpr......In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...

  8. Interleukin 2 induces a transient downregulation of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockdorff, J; Nielsen, M; Dobson, P

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of human CD4+ T cell lines with interleukin 2 (IL-2) induces tyrosine, serine and threonine phosphorylation of a series of proteins involved in the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling pathway. Here, we examined whether IL-2 induces changes in the activity of protein serine/threonine phosp......Stimulation of human CD4+ T cell lines with interleukin 2 (IL-2) induces tyrosine, serine and threonine phosphorylation of a series of proteins involved in the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling pathway. Here, we examined whether IL-2 induces changes in the activity of protein serine...

  9. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S;

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes are coexpr......In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...

  10. Discovery of a new human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-3 in Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahieux Renaud

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human T-cell Leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 and type 2 (HTLV-2 are pathogenic retroviruses that infect humans and cause severe hematological and neurological diseases. Both viruses have simian counterparts (STLV-1 and STLV-2. STLV-3 belongs to a third group of lymphotropic viruses which infect numerous African monkeys species. Among 240 Cameroonian plasma tested for the presence of HTLV-1 and/or HTLV-2 antibodies, 48 scored positive by immunofluorescence. Among those, 27 had indeterminate western-blot pattern. PCR amplification of pol and tax regions, using HTLV-1, -2 and STLV-3 highly conserved primers, demonstrated the presence of a new human retrovirus in one DNA sample. tax (180 bp and pol (318 bp phylogenetic analyses demonstrated the strong relationships between the novel human strain (Pyl43 and STLV-3 isolates from Cameroon. The virus, that we tentatively named HTLV-3, originated from a 62 years old Bakola Pygmy living in a remote settlement in the rain forest of Southern Cameroon. The plasma was reactive on MT2 cells but was negative on C19 cells. The HTLV 2.4 western-blot exhibited a strong reactivity to p19 and a faint one to MTA-1. On the INNO-LIA strip, it reacted faintly with the generic p19 (I/II, but strongly to the generic gp46 (I/II and to the specific HTLV-2 gp46. The molecular relationships between Pyl43 and STLV-3 are thus not paralleled by the serological results, as most of the STLV-3 infected monkeys have an "HTLV-2 like" WB pattern. In the context of the multiple interspecies transmissions which occurred in the past, and led to the present-day distribution of the PTLV-1, it is thus very tempting to speculate that this newly discovered human retrovirus HTLV-3 might be widespread, at least in the African continent.

  11. Human Invariant Natural Killer T cells possess immune-modulating functions during Aspergillus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitzen-Heineke, Antonia; Bouzani, Maria; Schmitt, Anna-Lena; Kurzai, Oliver; Hünniger, Kerstin; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause for invasive fungal infections, a disease associated with high mortality in immune-compromised patients. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells compose a small subset of T cells known to impact the immune response toward various infectious pathogens. To investigate the role of human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection, we studied their activation as determined by CD69 expression and cytokine production in response to distinct fungal morphotypes in the presence of different CD1d(+) antigen presenting cells using flow cytometry and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among CD1d(+) subpopulations, CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs showed the highest potential to activate iNKT cells on a per cell basis. The presence of A. fumigatus decreased this effect of CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs on iNKT cells and led to reduced secretion of TNF-α, G-CSF and RANTES. Production of other Th1 and Th2 cytokines was not affected by the fungus, suggesting an immune-modulating function for human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection.

  12. Clonal CD8+ T Cell Persistence and Variable Gene Usage Bias in a Human Transplanted Hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Y Kim

    Full Text Available Immune prophylaxis and treatment of transplanted tissue rejection act indiscriminately, risking serious infections and malignancies. Although animal data suggest that cellular immune responses causing rejection may be rather narrow and predictable based on genetic background, there are only limited data regarding the clonal breadth of anti-donor responses in humans after allogeneic organ transplantation. We evaluated the graft-infiltrating CD8+ T lymphocytes in skin punch biopsies of a transplanted hand over 178 days. Profiling of T cell receptor (TCR variable gene usage and size distribution of the infiltrating cells revealed marked skewing of the TCR repertoire indicating oligoclonality, but relatively normal distributions in the blood. Although sampling limitation prevented complete assessment of the TCR repertoire, sequencing further identified 11 TCR clonal expansions that persisted through varying degrees of clinical rejection and immunosuppressive therapy. These 11 clones were limited to three TCR beta chain variable (BV gene families. Overall, these data indicate significant oligoclonality and likely restricted BV gene usage of alloreactive CD8+ T lymphocytes, and suggest that changes in rejection status are more due to varying regulation of their activity or number rather than shifts in the clonal populations in the transplanted organ. Given that controlled animal models produce predictable BV usage in T lymphocytes mediating rejection, understanding the determinants of TCR gene usage associated with rejection in humans may have application in specifically targeted immunotherapy.

  13. Activated T cells exhibit increased uptake of silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 and increased susceptibility to Pc 4-photodynamic therapy-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, David C; Ohtola, Jennifer; Sugiyama, Hideaki; Rodriguez, Myriam E; Han, Ling; Oleinick, Nancy L; Lam, Minh; Baron, Elma D; Cooper, Kevin D; McCormick, Thomas S

    2016-06-08

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment for malignant and inflammatory dermal disorders. Photoirradiation of the silicon phthalocyanine (Pc) 4 photosensitizer with red light generates singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species to induce cell death. We previously reported that Pc 4-PDT elicited cell death in lymphoid-derived (Jurkat) and epithelial-derived (A431) cell lines in vitro, and furthermore that Jurkat cells were more sensitive than A431 cells to treatment. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of Pc 4-PDT on primary human CD3(+) T cells in vitro. Fluorometric analyses of lysed T cells confirmed the dose-dependent uptake of Pc 4 in non-stimulated and stimulated T cells. Flow cytometric analyses measuring annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of T cell apoptosis (6.6-59.9%) at Pc 4 doses ranging from 0-300 nM. Following T cell stimulation through the T cell receptor using a combination of anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, activated T cells exhibited increased susceptibility to Pc 4-PDT-induced apoptosis (10.6-81.2%) as determined by Pc 4 fluorescence in each cell, in both non-stimulated and stimulated T cells, Pc 4 uptake increased with Pc 4 dose up to 300 nM as assessed by flow cytometry. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of Pc 4 uptake measured in stimulated T cells was significantly increased over the uptake of resting T cells at each dose of Pc 4 tested (50, 100, 150 and 300 nM, p PDT exerts an enhanced apoptotic effect on activated CD3(+) T cells that may be exploited in targeting T cell-mediated skin diseases, such as cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) or psoriasis.

  14. Development of a diverse human T-cell repertoire despite stringent restriction of hematopoietic clonality in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugman, Martijn H; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; van Eggermond, Marja; Wolvers-Tettero, Ingrid; Langerak, Anton W; de Haas, Edwin F E; Bystrykh, Leonid V; van Rood, Jon J; de Haan, Gerald; Fibbe, Willem E; Staal, Frank J T

    2015-11-03

    The fate and numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny that seed the thymus constitute a fundamental question with important clinical implications. HSC transplantation is often complicated by limited T-cell reconstitution, especially when HSC from umbilical cord blood are used. Attempts to improve immune reconstitution have until now been unsuccessful, underscoring the need for better insight into thymic reconstitution. Here we made use of the NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ(-/-) xenograft model and lentiviral cellular barcoding of human HSCs to study T-cell development in the thymus at a clonal level. Barcoded HSCs showed robust (>80% human chimerism) and reproducible myeloid and lymphoid engraftment, with T cells arising 12 wk after transplantation. A very limited number of HSC clones (thymus, with further restriction of the number of clones during subsequent development. Nevertheless, T-cell receptor rearrangements were polyclonal and showed a diverse repertoire, demonstrating that a multitude of T-lymphocyte clones can develop from a single HSC clone. Our data imply that intrathymic clonal fitness is important during T-cell development. As a consequence, immune incompetence after HSC transplantation is not related to the transplantation of limited numbers of HSC but to intrathymic events.

  15. Repertoire Development and the Control of Cytotoxic/Effector Function in Human γδ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Urban

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available T cells develop into two major populations distinguished by their T cell receptor (TCR chains. Cells with the αβ TCR generally express CD4 or CD8 lineage markers and mostly fall into helper or cytotoxic/effector subsets. Cells expressing the alternate γδ TCR in humans generally do not express lineage markers, do not require MHC for antigen presentation, and recognize nonpeptidic antigens. We are interested in the dominant Vγ2Vδ2+ T cell subset in human peripheral blood and the control of effector function in this population. We review the literature on γδ T cell generation and repertoire selection, along with recent work on CD56 expression and defining a cytotoxic/effector lineage within the phosphoantigen-reactive Vγ2Vδ2 cells. A unique mechanism for MHC-independent repertoire selection is linked to the control of effector function that is vital to the role for γδ T cells in tumor surveillance. Better understanding of these mechanisms will improve our ability to exploit this population for tumor immunotherapy.

  16. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  17. Responses to recipient and donor B cells by genetically donor T cells from human haploidentical chimeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, S.; Sampson, H.; Buckley, R.

    1986-03-01

    Following administration of haploidentical stem cells to infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), mature T cells of donor karyotype appear later in the recipient without causing graft-versus-host disease. To investigate the effect of the host environment on the responsiveness of these genetically donor T cells, blood B and T lymphocytes from 6 SCID recipients, their parental donors and unrelated controls were purified by double SRBC rosetting. T cells were stimulated by irradiated B cells at a 1:1 ratio in 6 day cultures. Engrafted T cells of donor karyotype gave much smaller responses to irradiated genetically recipient B cells than did fresh donor T cells. Moreover, engrafted T cells of donor karyotype from two of the three SCIDs who are longest post-transplantation responded more vigorously (14,685 and 31,623 cpm) than fresh donor T cells (5141 and 22,709 cpm) to donor B cells. These data indicate that T lymphocytes which have matured from donor stem cells in the recipient microenvironment behave differently from those that have matured in the donor.

  18. Characterization of Human CD8 T Cell Responses in Dengue Virus-Infected Patients from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandele, Anmol; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Singla, Mohit; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Akondy, Rama S; Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Nayak, Kaustuv; Reddy, Elluri Seetharami; Kalam, Haroon; Kumar, Dhiraj; Verma, Anil; Panda, HareKrushna; Wang, Siyu; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, Sushil; Ahmed, Rafi; Murali-Krishna, Kaja

    2016-12-15

    Epidemiological studies suggest that India has the largest number of dengue virus infection cases worldwide. However, there is minimal information about the immunological responses in these patients. CD8 T cells are important in dengue, because they have been implicated in both protection and immunopathology. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of HLA-DR(+) CD38(+) and HLA-DR(-) CD38(+) effector CD8 T cell subsets in dengue patients from India and Thailand. Both CD8 T cell subsets expanded and expressed markers indicative of antigen-driven proliferation, tissue homing, and cytotoxic effector functions, with the HLA-DR(+) CD38(+) subset being the most striking in these effector qualities. The breadth of the dengue-specific CD8 T cell response was diverse, with NS3-specific cells being the most dominant. Interestingly, only a small fraction of these activated effector CD8 T cells produced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) when stimulated with dengue virus peptide pools. Transcriptomics revealed downregulation of key molecules involved in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Consistent with this, the majority of these CD8 T cells remained IFN-γ unresponsive even after TCR-dependent polyclonal stimulation (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28) but produced IFN-γ by TCR-independent polyclonal stimulation (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA] plus ionomycin). Thus, the vast majority of these proliferating, highly differentiated effector CD8 T cells probably acquire TCR refractoriness at the time the patient is experiencing febrile illness that leads to IFN-γ unresponsiveness. Our studies open novel avenues for understanding the mechanisms that fine-tune the balance between CD8 T cell-mediated protective versus pathological effects in dengue.

  19. Novel SLA-DQ alleles and their recombinant molecules in xenogeneic stimulation of human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuxiang; Xie, Jin; Li, Ningli; Zhou, Yun; Xin, Lijun; Chou, Kuang-Yen

    2005-06-01

    MHC class II antigens DR and DQ are essential for graft rejection both in allo- and xeno-transplantation. The antigens, especially the DQA and DQB gene-coencoded DQ molecules, are also involved in transplantation tolerance induced by activation of regulatory T cells. Here we report six novel DQ alleles from three properly inbred Chinese pig strains Gz, Bm and Yn. In our study, cDNA of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA)-DQA and -DQB were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced for each strain. The ORF-containing SLA-DQA and -DQB genes are composed of 768 (or 765) and 786 nucleotides, encoding antigen molecules of 255 (or 254) and 261 amino acid residues, respectively. Sequences of both SLA-DQA and -DQB alleles showed disparities when compared either among the three pig strains or with available SLA data, which allows our novel alleles receiving their accession numbers from GenBank. The sequence analysis further revealed a phylogenic connection of our SLA-DQ alleles with SLA-DQ(c) haplotype. In addition, the homologies of MHC DQ or DQ-like molecules between Chinese pigs (SLA) and human (HLA) are higher than those between pigs and mice (H-2). By co-transfection of Bm pig DQA and DQB genes into L929 cells, the Bm-DQ heterodimer-expressed cells could effectively stimulate the human lymphoproliferation in presence of human APCs with a mean stimulation index (SI) 9.9+/-1.4. This functional assay indicated that our recombinant DQ antigens are capable of initiating human lymphoproliferation in a xeno-MLR.

  20. Characterization of Human CD8 T Cell Responses in Dengue Virus-Infected Patients from India

    OpenAIRE

    Chandele, Anmol; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Singla, Mohit; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Akondy, Rama S.; Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Nayak, Kaustuv; Reddy, Elluri Seetharami; Kalam, Haroon; Kumar, Dhiraj; Verma, Anil; Panda, Harekrushna; Wang, Siyu; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidemiological studies suggest that India has the largest number of dengue virus infection cases worldwide. However, there is minimal information about the immunological responses in these patients. CD8 T cells are important in dengue, because they have been implicated in both protection and immunopathology. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of HLA-DR+ CD38+ and HLA-DR− CD38+ effector CD8 T cell subsets in dengue patients from India and Thailand. Both CD8 T cell subsets expanded ...

  1. IL-2 and IL-15 Each Mediate De Novo Induction of FOXP3 Expression in Human Tumor Antigen-specific CD8 T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, Mojgan; Antony, Paul A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Although FOXP3 is primarily expressed by regulatory CD4 T cells (Treg) in vivo, polyclonal activation of human CD8 T cells can result in the expression of FOXP3 in a fraction of CD8 T cells. However, the cellular lineage and mechanism of FOXP3 induction in CD8 T cells remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that interleukin-2 (IL-2) induces FOXP3 expression in OKT3-stimulated or antigen-stimulated CD8 T cells, indicating that FOXP3 expression is neither limited to a unique subset of CD8 T cells nor dependent on the mode of T-cell receptor stimulation. In the absence of IL-2, antigen stimulation resulted in T-cell activation and acquisition of effector function without induction of FOXP3, indicating that acquisition of effector function is independent of induction of FOXP3 expression in CD8 T cells. Interestingly, IL-15, but not IL-7 or IL-21, also led to de novo induction of FOXP3 in antigen-specific CD8 T cells, suggesting that signaling by IL-2/IL-15Rβ chain is pivotal for induction of FOXP3 in human CD8 T cells. These findings indicate that induction of FOXP3 is intrinsic to CD8 T cells that are activated in the presence of IL-2 or IL-15, and in vitro-induced expression of FOXP3 cannot be simply interpreted as an indicator of Treg activity or activation marker. PMID:17414320

  2. Inhibitory receptor expression depends more dominantly on differentiation and activation than exhaustion of human CD8 T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine eLegat

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Under conditions of chronic antigen stimulation, such as persistent viral infection and cancer, CD8 T cells may diminish effector function, which has been termed exhaustion. Expression of inhibitory Receptors (iRs is often regarded as a hallmark of exhaustion. Here we studied the expression of eight different iRs by CD8 T cells of healthy humans, including CTLA-4, PD1, TIM3, LAG3, 2B4, BTLA, CD160 and KLRG-1. We show that many iRs are expressed upon activation, and with progressive differentiation to effector cells, even in absence of long-term (chronic antigenic stimulation. In particular, we evaluated the direct relationship between iR expression and functionality in CD8 T cells by using anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 stimulation to stimulate all cells and differentiation subsets. We observed a striking upregulation of certain iRs following the cytokine production wave, in agreement with the notion that iRs function as a negative feedback mechanism. Intriguingly, we found no major impairment of cytokine production in cells positive for a broad array of iRs, as previously shown for PD1 in healthy donors. Rather, the expression of the various iRs strongly correlated with T cell differentiation or activation states, or both. Furthermore, we analyzed CD8 T cells from lymph nodes (LNs of melanoma patients. Interestingly, we found altered iR expression and lower cytokine production by T cells from metastatic LNs, but also from non-metastatic LNs, likely due to mechanisms which are not related to exhaustion. Together, our data shows that expression of iRs per se does not mark dysfunctional cells, but is rather tightly linked to activation and differentiation. This study highlights the importance of considering the status of activation and differentiation for the study and the clinical monitoring of CD8 T cells.

  3. Gene discovery at the human T-cell receptor alpha/delta locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Marsha R; Wu, Gillian E

    2007-02-01

    The human T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha/delta variable loci are interspersed on the chromosome 14q11 and consist of 57 intergenic spaces ranging from 4 to 100 kb in length. To elucidate the evolutionary history of this locus, we searched the intergenic spaces of all TCR alpha/delta variable (TRAV/DV) genes for pseudogenes and potential protein-coding genes. We applied direct open reading frame (ORF) searches, an exon-finding algorithm and comparative genomics. Two TRAV/DV pseudogenes were discovered bearing 80 and 65% sequence similarity to TRAV14DV4 and TRAV9-1/9-2 genes, respectively. A gene bearing 85% sequence identity to B lymphocyte activation-related protein, BC-1514, upstream of TRAV26-2 was also discovered. This ORF (BC-1514tcra) is a member of a gene family whose evolutionary history and function are not known. In total, 36 analogs of this gene exist in the human, the chimpanzee, the Rhesus monkey, the frog and the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analyses show convergent evolution of these genes. Assays for the expression of BC-1514tcra revealed transcripts in the bone marrow, thymus, spleen, and small intestine. These assays also showed the expression of another analog to BC-1514, found on chromosome 5 in the bone marrow and thymus RNA. The existence of at least 17 analogs at various locations in the human genome and in nonsyntenic chromosomes of the chimpanzee suggest that BC-1514tcra, along with its analogs may be transposable elements with evolved function(s). The identification of conserved putative serine phosphorylation sites provide evidence of their possible role(s) in signal transduction events involved in B cell development and differentiation.

  4. CD11a and CD49d enhance the detection of antigen-specific T cells following human vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiaansen, Allison F; Dixit, Upasna Gaur; Coler, Rhea N; Marie Beckmann, Anna; Reed, Steven G; Winokur, Patricia L; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Varga, Steven M; Wilson, Mary E

    2017-07-24

    Determining the efficacy of human vaccines that induce antigen-specific protective CD4 T cell responses against pathogens can be particularly challenging to evaluate. Surface expression of CD11a and CD49d has been shown to identify antigen-specific CD4 T cells against viral pathogens in mice. We hypothesized that CD11a and CD49d would also serve as markers of human antigen-specific T cells responding to vaccination. A phase I vaccine trial enabled us to evaluate a novel gating strategy based on surface expression of CD11a and CD49d as a means of detecting antigen-specific, cytokine producing CD4 and CD8 T cells induced after vaccination of naïve individuals against leishmaniasis. Three study groups received LEISH-F3 recombinant protein combined with either squalene oil-in-water emulsion (SE) alone, SE with the synthetic TLR-4 ligand glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA-SE), or SE with Salmonella minnesota-derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL-SE). Individuals were given 3 vaccine doses, on days 0, 28 and 168. Starting after the first vaccine dose, the frequency of both CD11a(hi)CD49d(+) CD4 and CD11a(hi)CD49d(+) CD8 T cells significantly increased over time throughout the 24-week trial. To confirm the role of CD11a(hi)CD49d(+) expression in the identification of the antigen-specific T cells, cytokine production was measured following LEISH-F3 stimulation. All of the IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 producing cells were found within the CD11a(hi)CD49d(+) population. Our results suggest that the change in the frequency of CD11a(hi)CD49d(+) T cells can be used to track antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses following T cell-targeted vaccination. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Genomic organization of the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, K; Hata, S; Devlin, P; Roncarolo, M G; De Vries, J E; Spits, H; Strominger, J L; Krangel, M S

    1988-11-01

    Two clusters of overlapping cosmid clones comprising about 100 kilobases (kb) at the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus were isolated from a genomic library. The structure of the germ-line V delta 1 variable gene segment was determined. V delta 1 is located 8.5 kb downstream of the V alpha 13.1 gene segment, and both V segments are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. The V alpha 17.1 segment is located between V delta 1 and the D delta, J delta, C delta region (containing the diversity, joining, and constant gene segments). Thus, V delta and V alpha segments are interspersed along the chromosome. The germ-line organization of the D delta 2, J delta 1, and J delta 2 segments was determined. Linkage of C delta to the J alpha region was established by identification of J alpha segments within 20 kb downstream of C delta. The organization of the locus was also analyzed by field-inversion gel electrophoresis. The unrearranged V delta 1 and D delta, J delta, C delta regions are quite distant from each other, apparently separated by a minimum of 175-180 kb.

  6. Sexual transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Paiva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is endemic in many parts of the world and is primarily transmitted through sexual intercourse or from mother to child. Sexual transmission occurs more efficiently from men to women than women to men and might be enhanced by sexually transmitted diseases that cause ulcers and result in mucosal ruptures, such as syphilis, herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2, and chancroid. Other sexually transmitted diseases might result in the recruitment of inflammatory cells and could increase the risk of HTLV-1 acquisition and transmission. Additionally, factors that are associated with higher transmission risks include the presence of antibodies against the viral oncoprotein Tax (anti-Tax, a higher proviral load in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and increased cervicovaginal or seminal secretions. Seminal fluid has been reported to increase HTLV replication and transmission, whereas male circumcision and neutralizing antibodies might have a protective effect. Recently, free virions were discovered in plasma, which reveals a possible new mode of HTLV replication. It is unclear how this discovery might affect the routes of HTLV transmission, particularly sexual transmission, because HTLV transmission rates are significantly higher from men to women than women to men.

  7. Genetic recombination within the human T-cell receptor. cap alpha. -chain gene complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, M.A.; Kindt, T.J.

    1987-12-01

    Genetic analyses of the human T-cell receptor (TCR) ..cap alpha..-chain genes indicate that recombination events may occur frequently within this gene complex. Examination of the inheritance of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) detected by using probes for constant or variable region gene segments made it possible to assign TCR..cap alpha.. haplotypes to the 16 parents and 43 offspring of eight families studied. A total of six RFLP, three for the constant region and three for variable region segments, were examined in the present studies. Most enzyme and probe combinations tested revealed no polymorphism and those finally selected for the study showed limited polymorphism in that only two or, in one case, three allelic forms of the gene were seen. In spite of limited variability at this level, extensive heterogeneity was observed for the combinations of markers present in haplotypes, suggesting that frequent recombination events have occurred. Most strikingly, multiple combinations of RFLP occurring in close proximity of the TCR..cap alpha.. constant region gene were observed in this study. A high recombination frequency for the TCR..cap alpha.. gene complex is further supported by the observation that two children, one in each of two families, inherited recombinant TCR..cap alpha.. haplotypes.

  8. Allorestricted cytotoxic T cells specific for human CD45 show potent antileukemic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrolia, Persis J; Reid, Steven D; Gao, Liquan; Schultheis, Beate; Dotti, Gianpietro; Brenner, Malcolm K; Melo, Junia V; Goldman, John M; Stauss, Hans J

    2003-02-01

    Recent advances have made haploidentical transplantation for leukemia feasible, but the rigorous T-cell depletion used contributes to the high relapse rates observed. We have attempted to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect by generating allorestricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directed against human CD45. Such CTLs should recognize patient hematopoietic cells including leukemia, enhancing donor cell engraftment and improving the GVL effect, but they should not recognize host nonhematopoietic tissues or donor cells from the graft. Using the T2 binding assay, 4 CD45-derived peptides were found to bind HLA-A2 molecules. These peptides were used to generate cytotoxic T-cell lines from HLA-A2(-) donors by sequential stimulation with peptide-pulsed HLA-A2(+) stimulators, and the lines obtained were screened for peptide-specific cytotoxicity. Using one of these peptides (P1218), it was possible to generate peptide-specific, allorestricted CTLs in 3 of 7 responders. P1218-specific CTL lines show potent cytotoxicity against hematopoietic cell lines coexpressing HLA-A2 and CD45 but not CD45 loss variants. Studies with stable transfectants of 293 cells demonstrated recognition by P1218-specific CTLs of endogenously expressed CD45. Likewise P1218-specific CTLs recognized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HLA-A2(+) patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and leukemic blasts in HLA-A2(+) patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but they were unable to lyse HLA-A2(+) fibroblasts or HLA-A2(-) normal PBMCs. Coculture of CD34(+) PBMCs and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) with P1218-specific CTL significantly inhibited colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM) formation in HLA-A2(+) healthy controls and CML patients but resulted in no significant inhibition in HLA-A2(-) healthy controls. These studies demonstrate that P1218-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) have potent activity against leukemic progenitors and suggest that

  9. Regulatory T cell memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  10. Specific recruitment of γδ regulatory T cells in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Jian; MA, CHUNLING; Wang, Fang; Hsueh, Eddy C; Toth, Karoly; Huang, Yi; Mo, Wei; Liu, Shuai; Han, Bing; Varvares, Mark A.; Hoft,Daniel F; Peng, Guangyong

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the role of different subtypes of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is essential to improving cancer treatment. Enriched γδ1 T cell populations in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) suppress T cell responses and dendritic cell maturation in breast cancer, where their presence is correlated negatively with clinical outcomes. However, mechanism(s) that explain the increase in this class of T regulatory cells (γδ Treg) in breas...

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta inhibits human antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell proliferation without modulating the cytokine response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemessen, MM; Kunzmann, S; Schmidt-Weber, CB; Garssen, J; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, CAFM; Knol, EF; Van Hoffen, E

    2003-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been demonstrated to play a key role in the regulation of the immune response, mainly by its suppressive function towards cells of the immune system. In humans, the effect of TGF-beta on antigen-specific established memory T cells has not been investigated y

  12. Opa+ and Opa- isolates of Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae induce sustained proliferative responses in human CD4+ T cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, A.R.; Flier, M. van der; Estevao, S.; Hartwig, N.G.; Ley, P. van der; Virji, M.

    2009-01-01

    T cells may interact with a number of bacterial surface antigens, an encounter which has the potential to downmodulate host immune responses. Neisseria meningitidis, a human colonizer and an agent of septicemia and meningitis, expresses Opa proteins which interact with the CEACAM1 receptor expressed

  13. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: Unique properties of decidual T cells and their role in immune regulation during human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilburgs, T; Claas, F H J; Scherjon, S A

    2010-03-01

    Maternal lymphocytes at the fetal-maternal interface play a key role in the immune acceptance of the allogeneic fetus. Most studies focus on decidual NK cells and their interaction with fetal trophoblasts, whereas limited data are available on the mechanisms of fetus specific immune recognition and immune regulation by decidual T cells at the fetal-maternal interface. The aim of this review is to describe the phenotypic characteristics of decidual T cell subsets present at the fetal-maternal interface, their interaction with HLA-C expressed by fetal trophoblasts and their role in immune recognition and regulation at the fetal-maternal interface during human pregnancy.

  14. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells

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    Alexander Puck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence.

  15. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates using human CD4+ T-cells expression cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coler, Rhea N; Dillon, Davin C; Skeiky, Yasir A W; Kahn, Maria; Orme, Ian M; Lobet, Yves; Reed, Steven G; Alderson, Mark R

    2009-01-07

    To identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens as candidates for a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), we have employed a CD4+ T-cell expression screening method. Mtb-specific CD4+ T-cell lines from nine healthy PPD positive donors were stimulated with different antigenic substrates including autologous dendritic cells (DC) infected with Mtb, or cultured with culture filtrate proteins (CFP), and purified protein derivative of Mtb (PPD). These lines were used to screen a genomic Mtb library expressed in Escherichia coli and processed and presented by autologous DC. This screening led to the recovery of numerous T-cell antigens, including both novel and previously described antigens. One of these novel antigens, referred to as Mtb9.8 (Rv0287), was recognized by multiple T-cell lines, stimulated with either Mtb-infected DC or CFP. Using the mouse and guinea pig models of TB, high levels of IFN-gamma were produced, and solid protection from Mtb challenge was observed following immunization with Mtb9.8 formulated in either AS02A or AS01B Adjuvant Systems. These results demonstrate that T-cell screening of the Mtb genome can be used to identify CD4+ T-cell antigens that are candidates for vaccine development.

  16. A dominant EV71-specific CD4+ T cell epitope is highly conserved among human enteroviruses.

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    Ruicheng Wei

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity plays a central role in determining the immunopathogenesis of viral infections. However, the role of CD4+ T cells in EV71 infection, which causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD, has yet to be elucidated. We applied a sophisticated method to identify promiscuous CD4+ T cell epitopes contained within the sequence of the EV71 polyprotein. Fifteen epitopes were identified, and three of them are dominant ones. The most dominant epitope is highly conserved among enterovirus species, including HFMD-related coxsackieviruses, HFMD-unrelated echoviruses and polioviruses. Furthermore, the CD4+ T cells specific to the epitope indeed cross-reacted with the homolog of poliovirus 3 Sabin. Our findings imply that CD4+ T cell responses to poliovirus following vaccination, or to other enteroviruses to which individuals may be exposed in early childhood, may have a modulating effect on subsequent CD4+ T cell response to EV71 infection or vaccine.

  17. High efficiency ex vivo cloning of antigen-specific human effector T cells.

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    Michelle A Neller

    Full Text Available While cloned T cells are valuable tools for the exploration of immune responses against viruses and tumours, current cloning methods do not allow inferences to be made about the function and phenotype of a clone's in vivo precursor, nor can precise cloning efficiencies be calculated. Additionally, there is currently no general method for cloning antigen-specific effector T cells directly from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, without the need for prior expansion in vitro. Here we describe an efficient method for cloning effector T cells ex vivo. Functional T cells are detected using optimised interferon gamma capture following stimulation with viral or tumour cell-derived antigen. In combination with multiple phenotypic markers, single effector T cells are sorted using a flow cytometer directly into multi-well plates, and cloned using standard, non antigen-specific expansion methods. We provide examples of this novel technology to generate antigen-reactive clones from healthy donors using Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus as representative viral antigen sources, and from two melanoma patients using autologous melanoma cells. Cloning efficiency, clonality, and retention/loss of function are described. Ex vivo effector cell cloning provides a rapid and effective method of deriving antigen-specific T cells clones with traceable in vivo precursor function and phenotype.

  18. Noncytotoxic suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription by exosomes secreted from CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumne, Ashwin; Prasad, Varsha Shridhar; Chen, Yue; Stolz, Donna B; Saha, Kunal; Ratner, Deena M; Ding, Ming; Watkins, Simon C; Gupta, Phalguni

    2009-05-01

    CD8(+) T cells display a noncytotoxic activity that suppresses transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in an antigen-independent and major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted manner. To date, the precise cellular and molecular factors mediating this CD8(+) T-cell effector function remain unsolved. Despite evidence indicating the dependence of the activity on cell-cell contact, the possibility of a membrane-mediated activity that represses transcription from the viral promoter remains unexplored. We therefore investigated whether this inhibition of HIV-1 transcription might be elicited by a membrane-bound determinant. Using a CD8(+) T-cell line displaying potent noncytotoxic HIV-1 suppression activity, we have identified a membrane-localized HIV-1-suppressing activity that is concomitantly secreted as 30- to 100-nm endosome-derived tetraspanin-rich vesicles known as exosomes. Purified exosomes from CD8(+) T-cell culture supernatant noncytotoxically suppressed CCR5-tropic (R5) and CXCR4-tropic (X4) replication of HIV-1 in vitro through a protein moiety. Similar antiviral activity was also found in exosomes isolated from two HIV-1-infected subjects. The antiviral exosomes specifically inhibited HIV-1 transcription in both acute and chronic models of infection. Our results, for the first time, indicate the existence of an antiviral membrane-bound factor consistent with the hallmarks defining noncytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell suppression of HIV-1.

  19. Broad T-cell receptor repertoire in T-lymphocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Chia-Wei Chang

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have enormous potential for the treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. Recently, antigen-specific T lymphocytes derived from hiPSCs have been reported. However, T lymphocyte populations with broad T cell receptor (TCR diversity have not been generated. We report that hiPSCs derived from skin biopsy are capable of producing T lymphocyte populations with a broad TCR repertoire. In vitro T cell differentiation follows a similar developmental program as observed in vivo, indicated by sequential expression of CD7, intracellular CD3 and surface CD3. The γδ TCR locus is rearranged first and is followed by rearrangement of the αβ locus. Both γδ and αβ T cells display a diverse TCR repertoire. Upon activation, the cells express CD25, CD69, cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2 and cytolytic proteins (Perforin and Granzyme-B. These results suggest that most, if not all, mechanisms required to generate functional T cells with a broad TCR repertoire are intact in our in vitro differentiation protocol. These data provide a foundation for production of patient-specific T cells for the treatment of acquired or inherited immune disorders and for cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Fever-range whole-body heat treatment stimulates antigen-specific T-cell responses in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasunobu; Ito, Yusuke; Ostapenko, Valentina V; Sakai, Mayuko; Matsushita, Norimasa; Imai, Kenichiro; Shimizu, Koichi; Aruga, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Keishi

    2014-11-01

    Increase in body temperature has been thought to play an important role in the regulation of immune responses, although its precise mechanisms are still under investigation. Here, we examined the effects of physiologically relevant thermal stress on the cytokine production from human peripheral T cells. Volunteers were heated using a whole-body hyperthermia device, the rectal temperature was maintained above 38.5 °C for more than 60 min, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained before and after the treatment. When T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies, marked increases in the production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 were observed in PBMCs prepared immediately after and 24h after the treatment. Similarly, enhanced production of IFN-γ in response to the tuberculin purified protein derivative or antigenic viral peptides was also observed immediately after and 24h after the treatment. Fluorescence photo-bleaching analyses showed heat-induced increase of membrane fluidity in T cells, which probably enables them to induce rapid and efficient cluster formation of molecules involved in antigen recognition and signal transduction for T-cell stimulation. We concluded that physiologically relevant thermal stress could efficiently modify T-cell responsiveness to various stimuli, including enhanced responses to specific antigens.

  1. Invariant chain as a vehicle to load antigenic peptides on human MHC class I for cytotoxic T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälchli, Sébastien; Kumari, Shraddha; Fallang, Lars-Egil; Sand, Kine M K; Yang, Weiwen; Landsverk, Ole J B; Bakke, Oddmund; Olweus, Johanna; Gregers, Tone F

    2014-03-01

    Protective T-cell responses depend on efficient presentation of antigen (Ag) in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) and class II (MHCII) molecules. Invariant chain (Ii) serves as a chaperone for MHCII molecules and mediates trafficking to the endosomal pathway. The genetic exchange of the class II-associated Ii peptide (CLIP) with antigenic peptides has proven efficient for loading of MHCII and activation of specific CD4(+) T cells. Here, we investigated if Ii could similarly activate human CD8(+) T cells when used as a vehicle for cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) epitopes. The results show that wild type Ii, and Ii in which CLIP was replaced by known CTL epitopes from the cancer targets MART-1 or CD20, coprecipitated with HLA-A*02:01 and mediated colocalization in the endosomal pathway. Furthermore, HLA-A*02:01-positive cells expressing CLIP-replaced Ii efficiently activated Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells in a TAP- and proteasome-independent manner. Finally, dendritic cells transfected with mRNA encoding IiMART-1 or IiCD20 primed naïve CD8(+) T cells. The results show that Ii carrying antigenic peptides in the CLIP region can promote efficient presentation of the epitopes to CTLs independently of the classical MHCI peptide loading machinery, facilitating novel vaccination strategies against cancer.

  2. Crystal structure of a Gammadelta T-cell Receptor Specific for the Human MHC class I Homolog MICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Xu; J Pizarro; M Holmes; C McBeth; V Groh; T Spies; R Strong

    2011-12-31

    {gamma}{delta} T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human {gamma}{delta} T cells of the V{sub {delta}}1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive V{sub {delta}}1 {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, {alpha}{beta}, and other {gamma}{delta} TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of V{sub {delta}}1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on {gamma}{delta} T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of {gamma}{delta} T-cell/target cell interfaces.

  3. IL-15 induces unspecific effector functions in human peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrand, S T; Würtzen, P A; Ødum, N

    2002-01-01

    . Secondary IMP-specific CD8+ T cells were generated by the addition of IL-2 during two cycles of restimulation. From the third restimulation, identical CTL cultures were expanded with either IL-2 or IL-15 in parallel. Cell expansion as well as Ag specificity was considerably reduced after a 5 day culture......Antigen (Ag)-specific CD8+ T cells are a major host defence against viral infections. In the present study, we generated human CD8+ T-cell lines specific towards influenza matrix peptide (IMP)-pulsed Ag-presenting cells. We compared the effect of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-15 on the proliferation...... and cytotoxic activity of primary and secondary IMP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) culture. In primary CTL cultures, IL-15-induced cell expansion was considerably reduced as compared with IL-2-induced cell expansion, and IL-15 favoured the outgrowth of CTLs without peptide specificity in these cultures...

  4. PD-L1 expression induced by the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus impairs the human T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Mora-Velandia, Luz María; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1)pdm09 by promoting CD8⁺ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8⁺ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1)pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus.

  5. PD-L1 Expression Induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1 Virus Impairs the Human T Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriban Valero-Pacheco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1pdm09, and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1pdm09 by promoting CD8+ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1pdm09 virus.

  6. PD-L1 Expression Induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Virus Impairs the Human T Cell Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Mora-Velandia, Luz María; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia Enid; Isibasi, Armando; Bonifaz, Laura; López-Macías, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09), and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1)pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1)pdm09 by promoting CD8+ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1)pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. PMID:24187568

  7. A rapid crosstalk of human gammadelta T cells and monocytes drives the acute inflammation in bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Eberl

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells are a minor subset of T cells in human blood and differ from other T cells by their immediate responsiveness to microbes. We previously demonstrated that the primary target for Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells is (E-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP, an essential metabolite produced by a large range of pathogens. Here we wished to study the consequence of this unique responsiveness in microbial infection. The majority of peripheral Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells shares migration properties with circulating monocytes, which explains the presence of these two distinct blood cell types in the inflammatory infiltrate at sites of infection and suggests that they synergize in anti-microbial immune responses. Our present findings demonstrate a rapid and HMB-PP-dependent crosstalk between Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells and autologous monocytes that results in the immediate production of inflammatory mediators including the cytokines interleukin (IL-6, interferon (IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, and oncostatin M (OSM; the chemokines CCL2, CXCL8, and CXCL10; and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Moreover, under these co-culture conditions monocytes differentiate within 18 hours into inflammatory dendritic cells (DCs with antigen-presenting functions. Addition of further microbial stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan induces CCR7 and enables these inflammatory DCs to trigger the generation of CD4(+ effector alphabeta T cells expressing IFN-gamma and/or IL-17. Importantly, our in vitro model replicates the responsiveness to microbes of effluent cells from peritoneal dialysis (PD patients and translates directly to episodes of acute PD-associated bacterial peritonitis, where Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cell numbers and soluble inflammatory mediators are elevated in patients infected with HMB-PP-producing pathogens. Collectively, these findings suggest a direct link between invading pathogens, microbe

  8. IL-2 production by virus- and tumor-specific human CD8 T cells is determined by their fine specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallard, Eric; Vernel-Pauillac, Frédérique; Velu, Thierry; Lehmann, Frédéric; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Salcedo, Margarita; Bercovici, Nadège

    2004-03-15

    Memory CD8 T cells mediate rapid and effective immune responses against previously encountered Ags. However, these cells display considerable phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. In an effort to identify parameters that correlate with immune protection, we compared cell surface markers, proliferation, and cytokine production of distinct virus- and tumor-specific human CD8 populations. Phenotypic analysis of epitope-specific CD8 T cells showed that Ag specificity is associated with distinct CCR7/CD45RA expression profiles, suggesting that Ag recognition drives the expression of these molecules on effector/memory T cells. Moreover, the majority of central memory T cells (CD45RAlowCCR7dull) secreting cytokines in response to an EBV epitope produces both IL-2 and IFN-gamma, whereas effector memory CD8 cells (CD45RAdullCCR7-) found in EBV, CMV, or Melan-A memory pools are mostly composed of cells secreting exclusively IFN-gamma. However, these various subsets, including Melan-A-specific effector memory cells differentiated in cancer patients, display similar Ag-driven proliferation in vitro. Our findings show for the first time that human epitope-specific CD8 memory pools differ in IL-2 production after antigenic stimulation, although they display similar intrinsic proliferation capacity. These results provide new insights in the characterization of human virus- and tumor-specific CD8 lymphocytes.

  9. Unique and shared signaling pathways cooperate to regulate the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into distinct effector subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Nguyen, Akira; Avery, Danielle T; Payne, Kathryn; Torpy, James; O'Young, Patrick; Deenick, Elissa; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Elliott, Michael; Sebnem Kilic, Sara; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Bousfiha, Aziz; Robertson, Nic; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; French, Martyn; Blincoe, Annaliesse K; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E; Stormon, Michael O; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Fulcher, David A; Cook, Matthew C; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Beier, Rita; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Ziegler, John B; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Phan, Tri Giang; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-07-25

    Naive CD4(+) T cells differentiate into specific effector subsets-Th1, Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper (Tfh)-that provide immunity against pathogen infection. The signaling pathways involved in generating these effector cells are partially known. However, the effects of mutations underlying human primary immunodeficiencies on these processes, and how they compromise specific immune responses, remain unresolved. By studying individuals with mutations in key signaling pathways, we identified nonredundant pathways regulating human CD4(+) T cell differentiation in vitro. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and IFN-γR/STAT1 function in a feed-forward loop to induce Th1 cells, whereas IL-21/IL-21R/STAT3 signaling is required for Th17, Tfh, and IL-10-secreting cells. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and NEMO are also required for Th17 induction. Strikingly, gain-of-function STAT1 mutations recapitulated the impact of dominant-negative STAT3 mutations on Tfh and Th17 cells, revealing a putative inhibitory effect of hypermorphic STAT1 over STAT3. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the requirements for human T cell effector function, and explain clinical manifestations of these immunodeficient conditions. Furthermore, they identify molecules that could be targeted to modulate CD4(+) T cell effector function in the settings of infection, vaccination, or immune dysregulation. © 2016 Ma et al.

  10. T cells fail to develop in the human skin-cell explants system; an inconvenient truth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlocht Joris

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haplo-identical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation is very successful in eradicating haematological tumours, but the long post-transplant T-lymphopenic phase is responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates. Clark et al. have described a skin-explant system capable of producing host-tolerant donor-HSC derived T-cells. Because this T-cell production platform has the potential to replenish the T-cell levels following transplantation, we set out to validate the skin-explant system. Results Following the published procedures, while using the same commercial components, it was impossible to reproduce the skin-explant conditions required for HSC differentiation towards mature T-cells. The keratinocyte maturation procedure resulted in fragile cells with minimum expression of delta-like ligand (DLL. In most experiments the generated cells failed to adhere to carriers or were quickly outcompeted by fibroblasts. Consequently it was not possible to reproduce cell-culture conditions required for HSC differentiation into functional T-cells. Using cell-lines over-expressing DLL, we showed that the antibodies used by Clark et al. were unable to detect native DLL, but instead stained 7AAD+ cells. Therefore, it is unlikely that the observed T-lineage commitment from HSC is mediated by DLL expressed on keratinocytes. In addition, we did confirm expression of the Notch-ligand Jagged-1 by keratinocytes. Conclusions Currently, and unfortunately, it remains difficult to explain the development or growth of T-cells described by Clark et al., but for the fate of patients suffering from lymphopenia it is essential to both reproduce and understand how these co-cultures really "work". Fortunately, alternative procedures to speed-up T-cell reconstitution are being established and validated and may become available for patients in the near future.

  11. Gamma Interferon Secretion by Human Vγ2Vδ2 T Cells after Stimulation with Antibody against the T-Cell Receptor plus the Toll-Like Receptor 2 Agonist Pam3Cys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, Carl O.; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia A.; Cairo, Cristiana; Tikhonov, Illia; Pauza, C. David

    2006-01-01

    Circulating Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell populations in healthy human beings are poised for rapid responses to bacterial or viral pathogens. We asked whether Vγ2Vδ2 T cells use the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family to recognize pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules and to regulate cell functions. Analysis of expanded Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell lines showed the abundant presence of TLR2 mRNA, implying that these receptors are important for cell differentiation or function. However, multiple efforts to detect TLR2 protein on the cell surface or in cytoplasmic compartments gave inconsistent results. Functional assays confirmed that human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells could respond to the TLR2 agonist (S)-(2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl)-N-palmitoyl-(R)-Cys-(S)-Ser(S)-Lys4-OH trihydrochloride (Pam3Cys), but the response required coincident stimulation through the γδ T-cell receptor (TCR). Dually stimulated cells produced higher levels of cytoplasmic or cell-free gamma interferon and showed increased expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein CD107a on the cell surface. A functional TLR2 that requires coincident TCR stimulation may increase the initial potency of Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell responses at the site of infection and promote the rapid development of subsequent acquired antipathogen immunity. PMID:16861636

  12. Gamma interferon secretion by human Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells after stimulation with antibody against the T-cell receptor plus the Toll-Like receptor 2 agonist Pam3Cys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, Carl O; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Propp, Nadia A; Cairo, Cristiana; Tikhonov, Illia; Pauza, C David

    2006-08-01

    Circulating Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell populations in healthy human beings are poised for rapid responses to bacterial or viral pathogens. We asked whether Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells use the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family to recognize pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules and to regulate cell functions. Analysis of expanded Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell lines showed the abundant presence of TLR2 mRNA, implying that these receptors are important for cell differentiation or function. However, multiple efforts to detect TLR2 protein on the cell surface or in cytoplasmic compartments gave inconsistent results. Functional assays confirmed that human Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells could respond to the TLR2 agonist (S)-(2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl)-N-palmitoyl-(R)-Cys-(S)-Ser(S)-Lys4-OH trihydrochloride (Pam3Cys), but the response required coincident stimulation through the gammadelta T-cell receptor (TCR). Dually stimulated cells produced higher levels of cytoplasmic or cell-free gamma interferon and showed increased expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein CD107a on the cell surface. A functional TLR2 that requires coincident TCR stimulation may increase the initial potency of Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell responses at the site of infection and promote the rapid development of subsequent acquired antipathogen immunity.

  13. Analysis of relationships between peptide/MHC structural features and naive T cell frequency in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Legoux, François; Gras, Stéphanie; Trudel, Eric; Chouquet, Anne; Léger, Alexandra; Le Gorrec, Madalen; Machillot, Paul; Bonneville, Marc; Saulquin, Xavier; Housset, Dominique

    2014-12-15

    The structural rules governing peptide/MHC (pMHC) recognition by T cells remain unclear. To address this question, we performed a structural characterization of several HLA-A2/peptide complexes and assessed in parallel their antigenicity, by analyzing the frequency of the corresponding Ag-specific naive T cells in A2(+) and A2(-) individuals, as well as within CD4(+) and CD8(+) subsets. We were able to find a correlation between specific naive T cell frequency and peptide solvent accessibility and/or mobility for a subset of moderately prominent peptides. However, one single structural parameter of the pMHC complexes could not be identified to explain each peptide antigenicity. Enhanced pMHC antigenicity was associated with both highly biased TRAV usage, possibly reflecting favored interaction between particular pMHC complexes and germline TRAV loops, and peptide structural features allowing interactions with a broad range of permissive CDR3 loops. In this context of constrained TCR docking mode, an optimal peptide solvent exposed surface leading to an optimal complementarity with TCR interface may constitute one of the key features leading to high frequency of specific T cells. Altogether our results suggest that frequency of specific T cells depends on the fine-tuning of several parameters, the structural determinants governing TCR-pMHC interaction being just one of them. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Relationship between regulatory T cells and immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients interrupting antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Weiss

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Persistent immune activation plays a central role in driving Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV disease progression. Whether CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are harmful by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses and/or beneficial through a decrease in immune activation remains debatable. We analysed the relationship between proportion and number of regulatory T cells (Tregs and immune activation in HIV-infected patients interrupting an effective antiretroviral therapy (ART. Twenty-five patients were included in a substudy of a prospective multicenter trial of treatment interruption (TI (ANRS 116. Proportions and numbers of Tregs and the proportion of activated CD4 and CD8 T cells were assessed at baseline and month 12 (M12 of TI. Specific anti-HIV CD4 and CD8 responses were investigated at baseline and M12. Non parametric univariate analyses and multivariate linear regression models were conducted. At baseline, the proportion of Tregs negatively correlated with the proportion of HLA-DR+CD8+T cells (r=-0.519. Following TI, the proportion of Tregs increased from 6.3% to 7.2% (p=0.029; absolute numbers of Tregs decreased. The increase in the proportion of HLA-DR+CD38+CD8+T cells was significantly related to the increase in proportion of Tregs (p=0.031. At M12, the proportion of Tregs did not negatively correlate with CD8 T-cell activation. Nevertheless, Tregs retain a suppressive function since depletion of Treg-containing CD4+CD25+ cells led to an increase in lymphoproliferative responses in most patients studied. Our data suggest that Tregs are efficient in controlling residual immune activation in patients with ART-mediated viral suppression. However, the insufficient increase in the proportion and/or the decrease in the absolute number of Tregs result in a failure to control immune activation following TI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00118677.

  15. Specificity and dynamics of effector and memory CD8 T cell responses in human tick-borne encephalitis virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Blom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV is transferred to humans by ticks. The virus causes tick-borne encephalitis (TBE with symptoms such as meningitis and meningoencephalitis. About one third of the patients suffer from long-lasting sequelae after clearance of the infection. Studies of the immune response during TBEV-infection are essential to the understanding of host responses to TBEV-infection and for the development of therapeutics. Here, we studied in detail the primary CD8 T cell response to TBEV in patients with acute TBE. Peripheral blood CD8 T cells mounted a considerable response to TBEV-infection as assessed by Ki67 and CD38 co-expression. These activated cells showed a CD45RA-CCR7-CD127- phenotype at day 7 after hospitalization, phenotypically defining them as effector cells. An immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted TBEV epitope was identified and utilized to study the characteristics and temporal dynamics of the antigen-specific response. The functional profile of TBEV-specific CD8 T cells was dominated by variants of mono-functional cells as the effector response matured. Antigen-specific CD8 T cells predominantly displayed a distinct Eomes+Ki67+T-bet+ effector phenotype at the peak of the response, which transitioned to an Eomes-Ki67-T-bet+ phenotype as the infection resolved and memory was established. These transcription factors thus characterize and discriminate stages of the antigen-specific T cell response during acute TBEV-infection. Altogether, CD8 T cells responded strongly to acute TBEV infection and passed through an effector phase, prior to gradual differentiation into memory cells with distinct transcription factor expression-patterns throughout the different phases.

  16. Reexamination of human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I/II) prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker-Franklin, Dorothea; Pancake, Bette A.; Marmor, Michael; Legler, Patricia M.

    1997-01-01

    In the United States, blood donors are being screened for infection with human T cell lymphotropic viruses I and II (HTLV-I/II) by serologic means, which detect antibodies to the structural proteins of these viruses. Because patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) usually do not have such antibodies even though their cells harbor HTLV-I Tax and/or pol proviral sequences, it was questioned whether the prevalence of HTLV infection among healthy blood donors may also be underestimated by current means of testing. To examine this possibility, a study on specimens of relatives of mycosis fungoides patients (MFR) was begun. In addition, to collect data more expeditiously, a cohort of former injection drug users (IDUs) was tested by routine serologic methods, as well as by PCR/Southern blot analysis for Tax, pol, and gag proviral sequences and Western blot analysis for antibodies to the Tax gene product. To date, 6/8 MFRs and 42/81 (51.8%) of HIV-negative IDUs proved to be positive for HTLV, whereas routine serology identified none of the MFR and only 18/81 (22.2%) of the IDUs. Among the latter test subjects, the incidence of HTLV-I also proved to be 10 times higher than expected. Therefore, it is likely that among healthy blood donors infection with HTLV-I/II is more prevalent than is currently assumed. Since Tax is the transforming sequence of HTLV-I/II, testing for Tax sequences and antibodies to its gene product may be desirable in blood transfusion and tissue donor facilities. PMID:9177230

  17. Reexamination of human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I/II) prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker-Franklin, D; Pancake, B A; Marmor, M; Legler, P M

    1997-06-10

    In the United States, blood donors are being screened for infection with human T cell lymphotropic viruses I and II (HTLV-I/II) by serologic means, which detect antibodies to the structural proteins of these viruses. Because patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) usually do not have such antibodies even though their cells harbor HTLV-I Tax and/or pol proviral sequences, it was questioned whether the prevalence of HTLV infection among healthy blood donors may also be underestimated by current means of testing. To examine this possibility, a study on specimens of relatives of mycosis fungoides patients (MFR) was begun. In addition, to collect data more expeditiously, a cohort of former injection drug users (IDUs) was tested by routine serologic methods, as well as by PCR/Southern blot analysis for Tax, pol, and gag proviral sequences and Western blot analysis for antibodies to the Tax gene product. To date, 6/8 MFRs and 42/81 (51.8%) of HIV-negative IDUs proved to be positive for HTLV, whereas routine serology identified none of the MFR and only 18/81 (22.2%) of the IDUs. Among the latter test subjects, the incidence of HTLV-I also proved to be 10 times higher than expected. Therefore, it is likely that among healthy blood donors infection with HTLV-I/II is more prevalent than is currently assumed. Since Tax is the transforming sequence of HTLV-I/II, testing for Tax sequences and antibodies to its gene product may be desirable in blood transfusion and tissue donor facilities.

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies hypomethylated genes regulated by FOXP3 in human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Maksimovic, Jovana; Naselli, Gaetano; Qian, Junyan; Chopin, Michael; Blewitt, Marnie E; Oshlack, Alicia; Harrison, Leonard C

    2013-10-17

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) prevent the emergence of autoimmune disease. Prototypic natural Treg (nTreg) can be reliably identified by demethylation at the Forkhead-box P3 (FOXP3) locus. To explore the methylation landscape of nTreg, we analyzed genome-wide methylation in human naive nTreg (rTreg) and conventional naive CD4(+) T cells (Naive). We detected 2315 differentially methylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides (CpGs) between these 2 cell types, many of which clustered into 127 regions of differential methylation (RDMs). Activation changed the methylation status of 466 CpGs and 18 RDMs in Naive but did not alter DNA methylation in rTreg. Gene-set testing of the 127 RDMs showed that promoter methylation and gene expression were reciprocally related. RDMs were enriched for putative FOXP3-binding motifs. Moreover, CpGs within known FOXP3-binding regions in the genome were hypomethylated. In support of the view that methylation limits access of FOXP3 to its DNA targets, we showed that increased expression of the immune suppressive receptor T-cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domain (TIGIT), which delineated Treg from activated effector T cells, was associated with hypomethylation and FOXP3 binding at the TIGIT locus. Differential methylation analysis provides insight into previously undefined human Treg signature genes and their mode of regulation.

  19. The Retinoic Acid Receptor-α mediates human T-cell activation and Th2 cytokine and chemokine production

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    Key Michael

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently demonstrated that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis RA promote IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis, while decreasing IFN-γ and TNF-α expression by activated human T cells and reduces the synthesis of IL-12p70 from accessory cells. Here, we have demonstrated that the observed effects using ATRA and 9-cis RA are shared with the clinically useful RAR ligand, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA, and the retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α-selective agonist, AM580 but not with the RAR-β/γ ligand, 4-hydroxyphenylretinamide (4-HPR. Results The increase in type 2 cytokine production by these retinoids correlated with the expression of the T cell activation markers, CD69 and CD38. The RAR-α-selective agonist, AM580 recapitulated all of the T cell activation and type 2 cytokine-inducing ef