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Sample records for human intracranial tumours

  1. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  2. MRI of intracranial germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, M.; Uozumi, T.; Kiya, K.; Mukada, K.; Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Onda, J.; Satoh, H.; Ikawa, F.; Migita, K.

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in proven intracranial germ cell tumours in 22 cases, 12 of whom received Gd-DTPA. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensity of the tumour parenchyma was moderately low in 19 cases and isointense in 3; on T2-weighted images, it was high in all cases. Regions of different intensity thought to be cysts were found in 17 (77 %): 7 of 12 patients with germinoma (58 %) and in all other cases. Of the 13 patients with pineal lesions T1-weighted sagittal images showed the aqueduct to be obstructed in 5, stenotic in 7 and normal in 1. Strong contrast enhancement was observed in all 12 cases. Of the 14 patients with suprasellar lesions, 5 were found to have an intrasellar extension, and in 3 of these, the normal pituitary gland, which could be distinguished from the tumour, was displaced anteriorly. Ten patients (45 %) had multiple lesions. (orig.)

  3. MRI of intracranial germ-cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, L.; Korogi, Y.; Sugahara, T.; Ikushima, I.; Shigematsu, Y.; Okuda, T.; Takahashi, M.; Kochi, M.; Ushio, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. Our aim was to review the MRI appearances of primary intracranial germ-cell tumours (GCT). We reviewed the MRI studies of 32 patients: 19 with germinomas, five with teratomas, one with an embryonal carcinoma, five with mixed and two with malignant nongerminomatous GCT. Eleven were in the pineal region, 12 suprasellar, five in the both sites, two in the basal ganglia and two in the corpus callosum. Contrast-enhanced images were available for 27 patients. The solid parts of GCT were nearly isointense with grey matter on both T1- and T2-weighted images. In seven patients with nongerminomatous GCT high-signal components were found on T1-weighted images, representing haemorrhage, high-protein fluid or fat. Cystic components were detected in 17 of 27 patients; eight germinomas and all nine nongerminomatous GCT had cysts. The solid components of germinomas enhanced homogeneously in eight cases and heterogeneously in 10, while all nongerminomatous GCT showed heterogeneous enhancement. MRI features tumours can facilitate correct diagnosis of GCT, including histological subtypes. (orig.)

  4. Chemical Meningitis with Intracranial Tumours | De Klerk | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with intracranial epidermoid tumours who had a chemical meningitis as part of their clinical course, are described. The importance of recognising this as a presenting complaint is stressed. The pathogenesis and treatment are discussed.

  5. Somatostatin receptor imaging in intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Scheidhauer, K.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.; Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Klug, N.

    1998-01-01

    The somatostatin analogue [ 111 In-DTPA-d-Phe 1 ]-octreotide ( 111 In-octreotide) allows scintigraphic visualization of somatostatin receptor-expressing tissue. While it is well known that a large variety of tissues express somatostatin receptors and 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy has a clearly defined role in various neuroendocrine diseases, the clinical value of 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy in brain tumours is still under clinical investigation. In 124 patients with 141 brain lesions (63 meningiomas, 24 pituitary adenomas, 10 gliomas WHO class I and II, 12 gliomas WHO class III and IV, 11 neurinomas and 2 neurofibromas, 7 metastases and 12 other varieties: three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, two epidermoids, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma, one haemangiopericytoma, one osteosarcoma, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst), 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 110-220 MBq 111 In-octreotide. Planar images of the head in four views with a 128 x 128 matrix and single-photon emission tomographic images (64 x 64 matrix) were acquired, and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Fifty-nine of the 63 meningiomas showed moderate to intense tracer uptake. Nine of 24 pituitary adenomas were visible; the remaining 15 did not show any tracer uptake. None of the class I and II gliomas with an intact blood-brain barrier were detected whereas 11/12 class III and IV gliomas showed 111 In-octreotide uptake. None of the neurinomas or neurofibromas were positive. Five of seven metastases were classified as positive, as were the osteosarcoma, two of three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma and one haemangiopericytoma. The other varieties (one non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, two epidermoids, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst) did not show 111 In-octreotide uptake. The results demonstrate that a large variety of intracranial lesions express somatostatin receptors and

  6. Somatostatin receptor imaging in intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M.; Scheidhauer, K.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Koeln (Germany); Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Klug, N. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kolen (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The somatostatin analogue [{sup 111}In-DTPA-d-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide ({sup 111}In-octreotide) allows scintigraphic visualization of somatostatin receptor-expressing tissue. While it is well known that a large variety of tissues express somatostatin receptors and {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy has a clearly defined role in various neuroendocrine diseases, the clinical value of {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy in brain tumours is still under clinical investigation. In 124 patients with 141 brain lesions (63 meningiomas, 24 pituitary adenomas, 10 gliomas WHO class I and II, 12 gliomas WHO class III and IV, 11 neurinomas and 2 neurofibromas, 7 metastases and 12 other varieties: three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, two epidermoids, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma, one haemangiopericytoma, one osteosarcoma, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst), {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 110-220 MBq {sup 111}In-octreotide. Planar images of the head in four views with a 128 x 128 matrix and single-photon emission tomographic images (64 x 64 matrix) were acquired, and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Fifty-nine of the 63 meningiomas showed moderate to intense tracer uptake. Nine of 24 pituitary adenomas were visible; the remaining 15 did not show any tracer uptake. None of the class I and II gliomas with an intact blood-brain barrier were detected whereas 11/12 class III and IV gliomas showed {sup 111}In-octreotide uptake. None of the neurinomas or neurofibromas were positive. Five of seven metastases were classified as positive, as were the osteosarcoma, two of three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma and one haemangiopericytoma. The other varieties (one non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, two epidermoids, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst) did not show {sup 111}In-octreotide uptake. The results demonstrate that a large variety of intracranial

  7. Computer tomography of intracranial tumours and hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tans, J.T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors and hematomas was investigated in a retrospective study comprising 220 patients. All C.T.scans are reviewed and described in detail. To assess the diagnostic accuracy, the original interpretation of the C.T.scans was compared with that of conventional neuroradiological and neurophysiological examinations. The aspect on C.T. of the various types of tumors and hematomas proved to vary widely and specific features were seldom seen. This holds particularly for the malignant tumors. Benign tumors such as meningeomas, adenomas and neurilemmomas showed a rather easily identifiable and almost identical picture of the C.T.scan, and diagnosis had to be based mainly on differences in localization. The hematomas, with the exception of the older intracerebral ones, showed the most characteristic C.T.abnormalities. (Auth.)

  8. Imaging of intracranial neuronal and mixed neuronal-glial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Shimin; Qin Jinxi; Zhang Leili; Liu Meili; Jin Song; Yan Shixin; Liu Li; Dai Weiying; Li Tao; Gao Man

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristic clinical, imaging , and pathologic findings of intracranial neuronal and mixed neuronal-glial tumours. Methods: The imaging findings of surgery and pathobiology proved intracranial neuronal and mixed neuronal-glial tumours in 14 cases (7 male and 7 female, ranging in age from 6-56 years; mean age 33.8 years) were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Eight gangliogliomas were located in the frontal lobe (4 cases), temporal lobe (1 case), front- temporal lobe (2 cases), and pons (1 case). They appeared as iso-or low density on CT, iso-or low signal intensity on T 1 WI, and high signal intensity on T 2 WI on MR imaging. Two central neurocytomas were located in the supratentorial ventricles. Four desmoplastic gangliogliomas were seen as cystic masses, appearing as low signal intensity on T 1 WI and high signal intensity on T 2 WI. Conclusion: Intracranial neuronal and mixed neuronal-glial tumours had imaging characteristics. Combined with clinical history, it was possible to make a tendency preoperative diagnosis using CT or MR

  9. The occurrence of intracranial rhabdoid tumours in mice depends on temporal control of Smarcb1 inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhi-Yan; Richer, Wilfrid; Fréneaux, Paul; Chauvin, Céline; Lucchesi, Carlo; Guillemot, Delphine; Grison, Camille; Lequin, Delphine; Pierron, Gaelle; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Nicolas, André; Ranchère-Vince, Dominique; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stéphanie; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Ayrault, Olivier; Surdez, Didier; Delattre, Olivier; Bourdeaut, Franck

    2016-01-28

    Rhabdoid tumours (RTs) are highly aggressive tumours of infancy, frequently localized in the central nervous system (CNS) where they are termed atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RTs) and characterized by bi-allelic inactivation of the SMARCB1 tumour suppressor gene. In this study, by temporal control of tamoxifen injection in Smarcb1(flox/flox);Rosa26-Cre(ERT2) mice, we explore the phenotypes associated with Smarcb1 inactivation at different developmental stages. Injection before E6, at birth or at 2 months of age recapitulates previously described phenotypes including embryonic lethality, hepatic toxicity or development of T-cell lymphomas, respectively. Injection between E6 and E10 leads to high penetrance tumours, mainly intra-cranial, with short delays (median: 3 months). These tumours demonstrate anatomical, morphological and gene expression profiles consistent with those of human AT/RTs. Moreover, intra- and inter-species comparisons of tumours reveal that human and mouse RTs can be split into different entities that may underline the variety of RT cells of origin.

  10. Novel somatic and germline mutations in intracranial germ cell tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linghua; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Burstein, Matthew D; Terashima, Keita; Chang, Kyle; Ng, Ho-Keung; Nakamura, Hideo; He, Zongxiao; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Lewis, Lora; Wang, Mark; Suzuki, Tomonari; Nishikawa, Ryo; Natsume, Atsushi; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William; Adekunle, Adesina; Sun, Jiayi; Qiao, Yi; Marth, Gábor; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Leal, Suzanne M; Wheeler, David A; Lau, Ching C

    2014-07-10

    Intracranial germ cell tumours (IGCTs) are a group of rare heterogeneous brain tumours that are clinically and histologically similar to the more common gonadal GCTs. IGCTs show great variation in their geographical and gender distribution, histological composition and treatment outcomes. The incidence of IGCTs is historically five- to eightfold greater in Japan and other East Asian countries than in Western countries, with peak incidence near the time of puberty. About half of the tumours are located in the pineal region. The male-to-female incidence ratio is approximately 3-4:1 overall, but is even higher for tumours located in the pineal region. Owing to the scarcity of tumour specimens available for research, little is currently known about this rare disease. Here we report the analysis of 62 cases by next-generation sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array and expression array. We find the KIT/RAS signalling pathway frequently mutated in more than 50% of IGCTs, including novel recurrent somatic mutations in KIT, its downstream mediators KRAS and NRAS, and its negative regulator CBL. Novel somatic alterations in the AKT/mTOR pathway included copy number gains of the AKT1 locus at 14q32.33 in 19% of patients, with corresponding upregulation of AKT1 expression. We identified loss-of-function mutations in BCORL1, a transcriptional co-repressor and tumour suppressor. We report significant enrichment of novel and rare germline variants in JMJD1C, which codes for a histone demethylase and is a coactivator of the androgen receptor, among Japanese IGCT patients. This study establishes a molecular foundation for understanding the biology of IGCTs and suggests potentially promising therapeutic strategies focusing on the inhibition of KIT/RAS activation and the AKT1/mTOR pathway.

  11. Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) in intracranial tumours: comparison with surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, M.; Uozumi, T.; Kiya, K.; Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Onda, J.; Satoh, H.; Ikawa, F.; Yukawa, O.; Migita, K.; Hada, H.; Katada, K.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of surface anatomy scanning (SAS) in intracranial tumours, comparing it with surgical findings. We examined 31 patients with brain tumours preoperatively. The tumours included 16 meningiomas, 8 gliomas, 4 metastases and 3 others. SAS clearly demonstrated the tumours, allowing them to be distinguished from the structures of the brain surface, including oedema, except in cases of metastasis. SAS clearly demonstrated large cortical veins. SAS is useful for three-dimensional delineation of the brain surface before surgery. (orig.)

  12. Aggressive solitary intracranial metastatic malignant melanoma from a primary mediastinal tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraju, Laxminadh; Aryan, Saritha; Hegde, Vinay S; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar S

    2016-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is the third most common tumour to cause cerebral metastases, following breast and lung cancer. Central nervous system metastases occur in 10-40% of patients with melanoma. Intracranial metastasis from a primary malignant melanoma of the anterior mediastinum is uncommon. We report a case of solitary intracranial metastatic melanoma arising from a primary mediastinal tumour. We then discuss the clinico-radiological features and treatment options. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. New evidence for the origin of intracranial germ cell tumours from primordial germ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Sehested, A; Juhler, M

    2006-01-01

    that it is not required for the initiation of malignant germ cell transformation. The expression of genes associated with embryonic stem cell pluripotency in CNS germ cell tumours strongly suggests that these tumours are derived from cells that retain, at least partially, an embryonic stem cell-like phenotype, which...... germ cell tumours and analysed expression of a wide panel of stem cell-related proteins (C-KIT, OCT-3/4 (POU5F1), AP-2gamma (TFAP2C), and NANOG) and developmentally regulated germ cell-specific proteins (including MAGE-A4, NY-ESO-1, and TSPY). Expression at the protein level was analysed in 21 children...... and young adults with intracranial germinomas and non-germinomas, contributing to a careful description of these unusual tumours and adding to the understanding of pathogenesis. Stem cell related proteins were highly expressed in intracranial germ cell tumours, and many similarities were detected...

  14. Radiotherapy applied to tumours of the intracranial central nervous systems in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortereau, Antonin

    2009-01-01

    As domestic animals such as dogs are living older because of a better life quality and better cares, they may more frequently develop tumours in their intracranial central nervous system. In this research thesis, the author addresses this specific topic. He first recalls fundamental physical and biological aspects for the understanding of radiotherapy action mechanisms, and the modalities of such a treatment. He addresses the general study of intracranial central nervous system tumours in dogs: brief recall on anatomic and histological aspects, presentation of their classification and their prevalence, and precise descriptions of their characteristics. In the third part, the author reports clinical and para-clinical data which allow the diagnosis of an intracranial nervous tissue tumour. The last part presents different available therapeutic modalities, more particularly addresses the interest of radiotherapy in neuro-oncology, and compares published results [fr

  15. Diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Scheidhauer, K.; Kirsch, B.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the SR binding sites in intracranial tumours and to evaluate the benefit of SRS in pre- and postoperative diagnostics. 86 patients with 94 intracranial tumours (39 meningiomas, 18 pituitary adenomas, 11 gliomas grade 3 or 4, 8 gliomas grade 2, 5 neurinomas, 5 intracranial metastases, 4 tumours of the orbit, 2 neurofibromas, 1 brain abscess and 1 cystic lesion) were examined. 111 In-octreotide was injected i.v. as 10 μg or 20 μg bolus, corresponding to 110 or 220 MBq (3 or 6 mCi). Gamma-camera images and SPECT were obtained 3-6 h and 24 h post injection. The scintigraphic evaluation was performed without knowledge of CT and MRI results. The histological classification corresponded to the WHO grading system. Somatostatin binding sites were detected in vito using somatostatin-gold conjugates. All patients with meningiomas showed a high focal tracer uptake corresponding to SR binding sites in vitro, whereas only in 50% of the pituitary adenomas SRS was positive. Neurinomas did not show any tracer uptake. In patients with gliomas with disturbed blood-brain-barrier positive tracer uptake was detected, while none of the gliomas with intact blood-brain-barrier could be visualized by SRS but showed somatostatin binding sites in vitro. In intracranial metastases a local tracer uptake was detected in vivo. In vitro 3 of 4 cases showed somatostatin binding sites. In 2 cases extracranial tracer uptake showed the primary tumour and metastases of the lymphnodes. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy can help to detect or to exclude meningiomas especially in the cerebellopontine angle or in the orbit. In intracranial metastases SRS may point to the primary tumour or other metastases. In all other intracranial tumours receptor scintigraphy provides no clinical relevant information. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Imaging oxygenation of human tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhani, Anwar R.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Lewis, Jason S.; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia represents a significant challenge to the curability of human tumours leading to treatment resistance and enhanced tumour progression. Tumour hypoxia can be detected by non-invasive and invasive techniques but the inter-relationships between these remains largely undefined. 18 F-MISO and Cu-ATSM-PET, and BOLD-MRI are the lead contenders for human application based on their non-invasive nature, ease of use and robustness, measurement of hypoxia status, validity, ability to demonstrate heterogeneity and general availability, these techniques are the primary focus of this review. We discuss where developments are required for hypoxia imaging to become clinically useful and explore potential new uses for hypoxia imaging techniques including biological conformal radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance tomography (MR) of intracranial tumours: Contrast versus T2-weighted tomograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Laniado, M.; Claussen, C.; Kazner, E.; Niendorf, H.P.; Felix, R.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography was performed on 38 patients with intracranial tumours, before and after the administration of contrast, using a 0.35 T Magnetom. The MR examinations included various plain spin-echo sequences (SE 400/35, 800/35, 1600/35, 1600/70, 1600/105, 1600/120) as well as examinations after the iv-administration of gadolinium-DTPA (SE 800/35). On all occasions, the abnormalities were visible without contrast. Differentiation of tumour and its surroundings was possible in 19 out of 38 cases without contrast. Delineation of expansively growing tumours (eg. meningiomas) was possible in twelve out of 14 cases, but in only seven out of 24 cases with infiltrating tumours (eg. glioblastomas). On the other hand, clear differentiation between tumour and adjacent edema and normal brain, respectively, was possible in 35 out of 38 cases after Gadolinium-DTPA. (orig.) [de

  18. Magnetic resonance tomography (MR) of intracranial tumours: Multi-echo technique versus gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindel, W.; Steinbrich, W.; Friedmann, G.

    1986-01-01

    In thirty-seven MR examinations of intracranial tumours equivalent sections were obtained in a multi-echo technique before and after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol gadolinium DTPA/kg body weight. From this comparison the following preliminary conclusions have been drawn concerning the demonstration of the tumour, its delineation and type: contrast administration does not unequivocally improve the sensitivity. In 55% of the cases, differentiation between tumour and oedema respectively normal brain tissue was easier after Gd-DTPA. Diffusely infiltrating gliomas remain a problem, since their extent is uncertain with or without contrast medium. The structure of the tumour can already be adequately characterized by the multi-echo technique. In order to diagnose the type of tumour, the criteria which apply to Gd-DTPA are similar to those used for iodine-containing contrast media in CT. (orig.) [de

  19. Spectrum of intracranial tumours in a tertiary health carefacility: Our ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meningioma.Medulloblastoma accounted for 18%.(10).Of the cases of Gliomas, majority(52%) fell under WHO grade II. (38%)of the Meningioma were of the mixed type while 25% had transitional type. Conclusion: astrocytomas was the commonest brain tumour.These patterns corroboratedmost studies that have been done.

  20. The potential of proton beam radiation therapy in intracranial and ocular tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomquist, Erik [Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology; Bjelkengren, Goeran [Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Glimelius, Bengt [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology and Pathology; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology

    2005-12-01

    A group of oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. In intracranial benign and malignant tumours, it is estimated that between 130 and 180 patients each year are candidates for proton beam therapy. Of these, between 50 and 75 patients have malignant glioma, 30-40 meningeoma, 20-25 arteriovenous malformations, 20-25 skull base tumours and 10-15 pituitary adenoma. In addition, 15 patients with ocular melanoma are candidates.

  1. Correlation of proton MR spectroscopy of primary intracranial tumours and histopathological findings: preliminarily findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, C.; Birchall, D.; Ellison, D.; Crawford, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Proton MR spectroscopy is becoming more widely available in the clinical setting, and is increasingly used for the analysis of focal intracranial mass lesions. Several papers have indicated that MR spectroscopy can be applied not only to the differentiation of tumour from non-neoplastic pathologies, but that it may also have a role in the grading of differing histological grades of tumour. MR spectroscopy has therefore been proposed as a means of non-invasive biopsy, but its validation in this context is a necessary prerequisite for its use in this manner. Currently at our centre, all patients undergoing surgical biopsy for intracranial tumour are being imaged preoperatively with proton MR spectroscopy, and comparison made with the histopathological findings. To date, 20 patients (12 male, 8 female, age range 24-72) with primary intracranial tumour have been included in the study. Patients were imaged with conventional MR scanning and proton MR spectroscopy on a Philips Intera 1.5T scanner. Chemical shift spectroscopy was performed in each case (TR 2000 msec, TE 272 msec, slice thickness 20mm, acquisition time 15:53) in an axial plane at the level of tumour. Voxels were chosen within the lesion and within remote normal appearing white matter, and the corresponding spectra were interrogated. The heights of the peaks corresponding to choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and lactate / lipid (Lip) were measured using a semi-quantitative scale. Cho:NAA, Cho:Cr, Cho: Chonormal, Cho:Crnormal, Lip:Crnormal, Chonormal:NAAnormal and Chonormal:Crnormal ratios were calculated. Biopsy was performed by the neurosurgical team, and histopathological analysis performed by a single consultant neuropathologist. Histological analysis demonstrated 10 glioblastomas, 4 anaplastic astrocytomas and 6 low grade gliomas. Spectral analysis demonstrated a mean Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr of 0.3 and 0.8 respectively for normal white matter. Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr were

  2. Differential diagnosis of extra-axial intracranial tumours by dynamic spin-echo MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Y.G.; Korogi, Y.; Hirai, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sumi, M.; Takahashi, M.; Ushio, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic MRI was performed on 22 patients with extra-axial intracranial tumours. Serial images were obtained every 30 s for 3 min using a spin-echo sequence (TR 200, TE 15 ms) after rapid injection of Gd-DTPA, 0.1 mmol/kg body weight. The contrast medium enhancement ratio (CER) was correlated with the histology of the tumours. Meningiomas and extra-axial metastases showed a sharp rise, then a gradual decline. Although both had a definite early peak of CER, metastases showed a more rapid decline. Neuromas and extra-axial lymphoma showed a slow, steady increase with no peak within 180 s. This study indicates that the CER is helpful in the differentiation of extra-axial tumours. (orig.)

  3. Variable methylation of the imprinted gene, SNRPN, supports a relationship between intracranial germ cell tumours and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shih-Han; Appleby, Vanessa; Jeyapalan, Jennie N; Palmer, Roger D; Nicholson, James C; Sottile, Virginie; Gao, Erning; Coleman, Nicholas; Scotting, Paul J

    2011-02-01

    Germ cell tumours (GCTs) are a diverse group of neoplasms all of which are generally believed to arise from germ cell progenitors (PGCs). Even those that form in the nervous system are likewise believed to be PGC-derived, despite being found a great distance from the normal location of germ cells. The primary evidence in favour of this model for the origins of intracranial GCTs is that they share molecular features with other GCTs. Those features include shared gene expression and a lack of methylation of imprinted genes, including SNRPN. Contrary to this model, we have proposed that endogenous neural stem cells of the brain are a more likely origin for these tumours. We show here that the lack of methylation of SNRPN that has previously been taken to indicate an origin for GCTs from PGCs is also seen in neural stem cells of mice and humans. We believe that, in the light of these and other recent observations, endogenous neural precursors of the brain are a more plausible origin for intracranial GCTs than are misplaced PGCs.

  4. Intracranial melanocytic meningeal tumours and melanosis oculi: case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doglietto, Francesco; Colosimo, Cesare; Lauriola, Libero; Balducci, Mario; De Bonis, Pasquale; Montano, Nicola; Zadeh, Gelareh; Maira, Giulio; Pallini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Melanocytic meningeal tumours are rare extra-axial neoplasms of the nervous system, with only three reported cases in the cavernous sinus. Herein we describe for the first time the association of ocular melanosis and multiple intracranial melanocytic meningeal tumours, with the presenting lesion being in the cavernous sinus. The importance of this association is discussed together with the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of the case. A 20-year-old man presented with a left sixth cranial nerve deficit; general examination documented only congenital melanosis of the homolateral eye. MRI examination showed a space occupying lesion in the left cavernous sinus, which was followed conservatively for 2 years, until a new space occupying lesion was evident at the level of the right frontal convexity: both lesions presented with neuroradiological characteristics suggestive of melanin content. The frontal convexity lesion was removed: intraoperatively the dura was markedly and diffusely melanotic. Histological examination documented a melanocytic meningeal tumour, with a proliferative index of 3 %. The patient underwent 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy on the lesion of the cavernous sinus (total dose 5040 cGy), with initial tumour reduction. Three years later, due to a symptomatic growth, he underwent partial removal of the lesion in the cavernous sinus. Histological examination was unchanged. He then received adjuvant Temozolomide with Low Dose Fractionated Radiation Therapy (LD-FRT). Due to further disease progression cisplatin plus fotemustine were administered, concomitant with LD-FRT: after two cycles MRI documented significant disease regression. After a period of apparent disease control, the patient presented with persistent cough and evidence of multiple thoracic metastases, which lead to his death, seven years after presentation. Intracranial melanocytic meningeal tumours are challenging lesions, both from a diagnostic and therapeutic point of view; though rare

  5. Dose optimization of gadolinium DTPA. An inter-individual study of patients with intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubeus, P.; Schoerner, W.; Haustein, J.; Hosten, N.; Niendorf, H.P.; Felix, R.; Schering AG, Berlin

    1990-01-01

    The diagnostic value of various doses of Gd-DTPA was compared intraindividually. Thirty-three patients with cerebral tumours were randomly allocated to three groups. Group 1 was given a dose of 0.025, group 2 a dose of 0.05 and group 3 a dose of 0.1 mmol GD-DTPA/kg body weight. Following administration of Gd-DTPA the average tumor/brain contrast in group 1 was -4.5%, in group 2 +8.4% and in group 3 +43.0%. Diagnostically useful tumour delineation was obtained in two out of 11 in group 1, in seven out of 11 in group 2 and in 10 out of 11 in group 3. A further increase in the dose to 0.2 mmol/kg body weight in group 3 resulted in a further increase in tumour/brain contrast of +62.5% and improved tumour deliniation in one case. As a result of these findings a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd-DTPA/kg body weight is reommended for the routine investigation of intracranial tumours. (orig.) [de

  6. INTRACRANIAL AND INTRASPINAL TUMOURS: REVIEW OF MRI FINDINGS IN A RARE NF - 2 CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome, characterized by multiple intracranial and intraspinal tumours associated with ocular abnormalities. The most common tumor associated with the disease is the vestibule cochlear schwannoma, and as many as 10% of patients with this tumor have neurofibromatosis type 2. Based on clinical and imaging findings the diagnostic of neurofibromatosis type 2 can be made. In this report we aim to report a 24 - year - old male who was evaluated for progressive h earing loss, vertigo, ataxic gait and right lower limb weakness. During the workup, cranial CT, Brain and whole s pine MRI was done which showed all the findings in one patient including bilateral vestibulocochlear schwannoma, multiple meningiomas, and intr amedullary and extramedullary tumours in spinal cord.

  7. Nervous System and Intracranial Tumour Incidence by Ethnicity in England, 2001–2007: A Descriptive Epidemiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maile, Edward J.; Barnes, Isobel; Finlayson, Alexander E.; Sayeed, Shameq; Ali, Raghib

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial variation in nervous system and intracranial tumour incidence worldwide. UK incidence data have limited utility because they group these diverse tumours together and do not provide data for individual ethnic groups within Blacks and South Asians. Our objective was to determine the incidence of individual tumour types for seven individual ethnic groups. Methods We used data from the National Cancer Intelligence Network on tumour site, age, sex and deprivation to identify 42,207 tumour cases. Self-reported ethnicity was obtained from the Hospital Episode Statistics database. We used mid-year population estimates from the Office for National Statistics. We analysed tumours by site using Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios comparing non-White ethnicities to Whites after adjustment for sex, age and deprivation. Results Our study showed differences in tumour incidence by ethnicity for gliomas, meningiomas, pituitary tumours and cranial and paraspinal nerve tumours. Relative to Whites; South Asians, Blacks and Chinese have a lower incidence of gliomas (pethnicities. Blacks have a higher incidence of pituitary tumours relative to Whites (pethnicities. Conclusions We present incidence data of individual tumour types for seven ethnic groups. Current understanding of the aetiology of these tumours cannot explain our results. These findings suggest avenues for further work. PMID:27135830

  8. Therapy strategy for intracranial germ-cell tumours and initial results of the GPO therapy study MAKEI 86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, U.; Calaminus, G.; Haasenritter, N.

    1988-01-01

    Pineal tumours are increasingly identified histologically since the introduction of the surgical microscope and microsurgical techniques. A major biological characteristic of germ-cell tumours is the fact that they produce tumour markers. Meaningful therapy planning is determined by the biological behaviour of the individual tumour entity which is strongly influenced by its intracranial localization. Important risk factors need to be identified and weighted according to previous treatment in order to arrive at an adequate therapy with improved curative prospects. Three risk areas can be defined for tumour extension. Therapy planning is also determined by the metastatic spread behaviour of germ-cell tumours. Within the two therapy studies for nontesticular germ-cell tumours MAKEI 83 and 86, a total of 180 germ-cell tumours, 24 of which were localized intercranially, were reported from 46 different clinics. All patients have a survival probability according to Kaplan and Meier of 67 ± 10% at an observation duration of 48 months. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Texture analysis in quantitative MR imaging. Tissue characterisation of normal brain and intracranial tumours at 1.5 T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Ring, P; Thomsen, C

    1995-01-01

    The diagnostic potential of texture analysis in quantitative tissue characterisation by MR imaging at 1.5 T was evaluated in the brain of 6 healthy volunteers and in 88 patients with intracranial tumours. Texture images were computed from calculated T1 and T2 parameter images by applying groups o...... to be successful in some cases of clinical importance. However, no discrimination between benign and malignant tumour growth was possible. Much texture information seems to be contained in MR images, which may prove useful for classification and image segmentation....

  10. Three dimensional dose verification for clinical treatments of small intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.L.; Dunn, L.; Kairn, L.; Jenny, J.; Knight, R.; Trapp, J.; Smith, R.; Ackerly, T.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Cancers of the brain and central nervous system account for 1.6% of new cancers and 1.8% of cancer deaths globally. The highest rates of all developed nations are observed in Australia and New Zealand. There are known complexities associated with dose measurement of very small radiation fields. Here, 3D dosimetric verification of treatments for small intracranial tumours using gel dosimetry was investigated. An anthropomorphic head phantom with a 43 mm diameter and 63 mm long gel container was filled with PAGAT normoxic radiosensitive gel. In this work, we show results for a 12-field stereotactic radiotherapy treatment delivered using a Varian 21EX with BrainLAB mini-multi leaf collimator. The gel was read out using an Octopus-1Q laser optical CT scanner. Generally good agreement was observed between the measured doses and those calculated with the iPlan treatment planning system (pencil beam convolution); see Fig. I. For gamma criteria of 5%/5 mm the percentage of gamma values less than unity was 95% above the 80% isodose line, indicating good PTV coverage. For lower isodose regions approaching the boundaries of the container poorer agreement was observed. The feasibility of three-dimensional measurement of small field dose distributions in clinical contexts has been demonstrated. Development of this methodology has the potential to overcome many shortcomings of other dosimetric methods, such as limitations of spatial information (typically one- and two-dimensions), volume-averaging effects and perturbation due to poor mediamatching. (author)

  11. Diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with intracranial tumours. Diagnostische Wertigkeit der Somatostatin-Rezeptor-Szintigraphie bei Patienten mit intrakraniellen Raumforderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luyken, C. (Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Koeln Univ. (Germany)); Hildebrandt, G. (Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Koeln Univ. (Germany)); Scheidhauer, K. (Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Koeln Univ. (Germany)); Kirsch, B. (Anatomisches Inst., Kiel Univ. (Germany))

    1993-12-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the SR binding sites in intracranial tumours and to evaluate the benefit of SRS in pre- and postoperative diagnostics. 86 patients with 94 intracranial tumours (39 meningiomas, 18 pituitary adenomas, 11 gliomas grade 3 or 4, 8 gliomas grade 2, 5 neurinomas, 5 intracranial metastases, 4 tumours of the orbit, 2 neurofibromas, 1 brain abscess and 1 cystic lesion) were examined. [sup 111]In-octreotide was injected i.v. as 10 [mu]g or 20 [mu]g bolus, corresponding to 110 or 220 MBq (3 or 6 mCi). Gamma-camera images and SPECT were obtained 3-6 h and 24 h post injection. The scintigraphic evaluation was performed without knowledge of CT and MRI results. The histological classification corresponded to the WHO grading system. Somatostatin binding sites were detected in vito using somatostatin-gold conjugates. All patients with meningiomas showed a high focal tracer uptake corresponding to SR binding sites in vitro, whereas only in 50% of the pituitary adenomas SRS was positive. Neurinomas did not show any tracer uptake. In patients with gliomas with disturbed blood-brain-barrier positive tracer uptake was detected, while none of the gliomas with intact blood-brain-barrier could be visualized by SRS but showed somatostatin binding sites in vitro. In intracranial metastases a local tracer uptake was detected in vivo. In vitro 3 of 4 cases showed somatostatin binding sites. In 2 cases extracranial tracer uptake showed the primary tumour and metastases of the lymphnodes. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy can help to detect or to exclude meningiomas especially in the cerebellopontine angle or in the orbit. In intracranial metastases SRS may point to the primary tumour or other metastases. In all other intracranial tumours receptor scintigraphy provides no clinical relevant information. (orig./MG)

  12. Expression of p16(INK4A) gene in human pituitary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Gloria; Cotignola, Javier; Danilowicz, Karina; Carbonara, Carolina; Paes de Lima, Andrea; Basso, Armando; Bruno, Oscar Domingo; Szijan, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise 10-15% of primary intracranial tumours but the mechanisms leading to tumour development are yet to be clearly established. The retinoblastoma pathway, which regulates the progression through the cell cycle, is often deregulated in different types of tumours. We studied the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4A) gene expression at mRNA level in human pituitary adenomas. Forty-six tumour specimens of different subtypes, 21 clinically non-functioning, 12 growth hormone-secreting, 6 prolactin-secreting, 6 adrenocorticotropin-secreting, and 1 thyrotropin-secreting tumours were studied. All clinically non-functioning and most of the hormone-secreting tumours were macroadenomas (38/46). The RT-PCR assay and electrophoresis of the PCR-products showed that p16(INK4A) mRNA was undetectable in: 62% of non-functioning, 8% of growth hormone-secreting, 17% of prolactin-secreting and 17% of adrenocorticotropin-secreting adenomas. Forty percent of all macroadenomas and 25% of microadenomas had negative p16(INK4A) mRNA, the latter results suggest that the absence of p16(INK4A) product might be an early event in tumours with no expression of this suppressor gene. Within the non-functioning adenomas 63% were "null cell" and 37% were positive for some hormone, both subgroups showed similar percentage of cases with absence of p16(INK4A) mRNA. Our results show that clinically non-functioning macroadenomas have impaired p16(INK4A) expression in a clearly higher proportion than any other pituitary tumour subtype investigated. Other regulatory pathways may be implicated in the development of tumours with positive p16(INK4A) expression.

  13. Central nervous system tumours and related intracranial pathologies in radium dial workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stebbings, J.H.; Semkiw, W.

    1989-01-01

    Among female radiation workers in the radium dial industry there is no overall excess of fatal brain or central nervous system tumours. A significant excess did appear, in one of three major cohorts; the excess was not due to an excess of gliomas and cannot be ascribed with certainty to radium or external radiation. A significant proportional excess of tumours outside of the brain was observed, consistent with irradiation of nervous system tissue from adjacent bone. Excess tumours of the eye, pituitary or pineal did not occur. Early deaths from brain abscess or mastoiditis, coded as diseases of the nervous system and sense organs, were observed. (author)

  14. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian; Chekenya, Martha; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Enger, Per Ø; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Ø; Huszthy, Peter C; Jacobsen, Hege; Brekkå, Narve; Li, Xingang; Zhao, Peng; Mørk, Sverre

    2009-01-01

    Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression

  15. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...

  16. A multi-slice gradient sequence for contrast enhanced MR diagnosis of intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Sander, B.; Kornmesser, W.; Laniado, M.; Nakamura, T.; Felix, R.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-slice gradient echo sequence (FLASH) was compared with a conventional spin-echo (SE) technique with regard to its value for contrast enhanced MR diagnosis. In 28 patients with cerebral tumours, SE images (SE 400/30; four images/3.4 minutes) and FLASH images (FLASH 315/14; 15 images/1.4 minutes) were obtained before and after gadolinium DTPA. After gadolinium-DTPA results were comparable for both techniques with respect to contrast enhancement, tumor contrast and delineation. Because of the higher efficiency of the FLASH 315/14 technique, this sequence is the method of choice for contrast enhanced cerebral MR imaging. (orig.) [de

  17. Pharmacological doses of daily ascorbate protect tumours from radiation damage after a single dose of radiation in an intracranial mouse glioma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole eGrasso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumour environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionising radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumour, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitising GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy of radiation combined with a one hour exposure to ascorbate (5 mM sensitised murine glioma GL261cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy of whole brain radiation combined with daily intra-peritoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg in an intra-cranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumour-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain eight days after tumour implantation, a second group received daily intra-peritoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8-45 after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumour progression, intra-peritoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumour progression. Tumour progression was faster in tumour-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumours treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumour micro-environment which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant.

  18. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  19. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Hieab HH; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Renter��a, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivi��res, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjus...

  20. NOISY INTRACRANIAL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDOOREN, BTH; VANBRUGGEN, AC; MOOIJ, JJA; HEW, JM; JOURNEE, HL

    1994-01-01

    Transorbital sound recordings were obtained from 21 patients with intracranial tumours, 28 patients with intracranial aneurysms and 20 control patients. The group of patients with tumours consisted of 12 patients with gliomas, of whom 6 had low-grade gliomas and 6 had high-grade gliomas, and 9

  1. Adaptation to statins restricts human tumour growth in Nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follet, Julie; Rémy, Lionel; Hesry, Vincent; Simon, Brigitte; Gillet, Danièle; Auvray, Pierrick; Corcos, Laurent; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Statins have long been used as anti-hypercholesterolemia drugs, but numerous lines of evidence suggest that they may also bear anti-tumour potential. We have recently demonstrated that it was possible to isolate cancer cells adapted to growth in the continuous presence of lovastatin. These cells grew more slowly than the statin-sensitive cells of origin. In the present study, we compared the ability of both statin-sensitive and statin-resistant cells to give rise to tumours in Nude mice. HGT-1 human gastric cancer cells and L50 statin-resistant derivatives were injected subcutaneously into Nude mice and tumour growth was recorded. At the end of the experiment, tumours were recovered and marker proteins were analyzed by western blotting, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. L50 tumours grew more slowly, showed a strong decrease in cyclin B1, over-expressed collagen IV, and had reduced laminin 332, VEGF and CD34 levels, which, collectively, may have restricted cell division, cell adhesion and neoangiogenesis. Taken together, these results showed that statin-resistant cells developed into smaller tumours than statin-sensitive cells. This may be reflective of the cancer restricting activity of statins in humans, as suggested from several retrospective studies with subjects undergoing statin therapy for several years

  2. Enhanced casein kinase II activity in human tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowald, K; Fischer, H; Issinger, O G

    1984-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity is enhanced as much as 2-3 fold in established and 4-5-fold in transformed human cell lines when compared to that of fibroblasts and primary human tumour cell cultures where CKII activity never exceeded a basic level. The high activity of CKII in transformed cells...

  3. Radiosensitivity of drug-resistant human tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattern, J.; Bak, M. Jr.; Volm, M.; Hoever, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of three drug-resistant sublines of a human epidermoid lung carcinoma growing as xenografts in nude mice was investigated. Drug resistance to vincristine, actinomycin D and cisplatin was developed in vivo by repeated drug treatment. It was found that all three drug-resistant tumour lines were not cross-resistant to irradiation. (orig.) [de

  4. Sperm protein 17 is expressed in human nervous system tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grizzi, Fabio; Baena, Riccardo Rodriguez y; Dioguardi, Nicola; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Gaetani, Paolo; Franceschini, Barbara; Di Ieva, Antonio; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Ceva-Grimaldi, Giorgia; Bollati, Angelo; Frezza, Eldo E; Cobos, E

    2006-01-01

    Human sperm protein 17 (Sp17) is a highly conserved protein that was originally isolated from a rabbit epididymal sperm membrane and testis membrane pellet. It has recently been included in the cancer/testis (CT) antigen family, and shown to be expressed in multiple myeloma and ovarian cancer. We investigated its immunolocalisation in specimens of nervous system (NS) malignancies, in order to establish its usefulness as a target for tumour-vaccine strategies. The expression of Sp17 was assessed by means of a standardised immunohistochemical procedure [(mAb/antigen) MF1/Sp17] in formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded surgical specimens of NS malignancies, including 28 neuroectodermal primary tumours (6 astrocytomas, 16 glioblastoma multiforme, 5 oligodendrogliomas, and 1 ependymoma), 25 meningeal tumours, and five peripheral nerve sheath tumours (4 schwannomas, and 1 neurofibroma),. A number of neuroectodermal (21%) and meningeal tumours (4%) were found heterogeneously immunopositive for Sp17. None of the peripheral nerve sheath tumours was immunopositive for Sp17. The expression pattern was heterogeneous in all of the positive samples, and did not correlate with the degree of malignancy. The frequency of expression and non-uniform cell distribution of Sp17 suggest that it cannot be used as a unique immunotherapeutic target in NS cancer. However, our results do show the immunolocalisation of Sp17 in a proportion of NS tumour cells, but not in their non-pathological counterparts. The emerging complex function of Sp17 makes further studies necessary to clarify the link between it and immunopositive cells

  5. Intracapillary HbO2 saturations in murine tumours and human tumour xenografts measured by cryospectrophotometry: relationship to tumour volume, tumour pH and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofstad, E K; Fenton, B M; Sutherland, R M

    1988-05-01

    Frequency distributions for intracapillary HbO2 saturation were determined for two murine tumour lines (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines (MLS, OWI) using a cryospectrophotometric method. The aim was to search for possible relationships between HbO2 saturation status and tumour volume, tumour pH and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Tumour pH was measured by 31P NMR spectroscopy. Hypoxic fractions were determined from cell survival curves for tumours irradiated in vivo and assayed in vitro. Tumours in the volume range 100-4000 mm3 were studied and the majority of the vessels were found to have HbO2 saturations below 10%. The volume-dependence of the HbO2 frequency distributions differed significantly among the four tumour lines; HbO2 saturation status decreased with increasing tumour volume for the KHT, RIF-1 and MLS lines and was independent of tumour volume for the OWI line. The data indicated that the rate of decrease in HbO2 saturation status during tumour growth was related to the rate of development of necrosis. The volume-dependence of tumour pH was very similar to that of the HbO2 saturation status for all tumour lines. Significant correlations were therefore found between HbO2 saturation status and tumour pH, both within tumour lines and across the four tumour lines, reflecting that the volume-dependence of both parameters probably was a compulsory consequence of reduced oxygen supply conditions during tumour growth. Hypoxic fraction increased during tumour growth for the KHT, RIF-1 and MLS lines and was volume-independent for the OWI line, suggesting a relationship between HbO2 saturation status and hypoxic fraction within tumour lines. However, there was no correlation between these two parameters across the four tumour lines, indicating that the hypoxic fraction of a tumour is not determined only by the oxygen supply conditions; other parameters may also be important, e.g. oxygen diffusivity, rate of oxygen

  6. Cytotoxic effects of radiation and docetaxel in human tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, A.L.

    2000-12-01

    Data from both single institutions and from randomised multicentre trials have demonstrated that the combination of chemotherapy with radiotherapy can increase the survival of cancer patients. Treatment regimens consisting of taxanes (paclitaxel and docetaxel), a potent class of new chemotherapeutic agents, combined with radiotherapy have recently undergone preclincal investigation. Overall, these studies show that taxanes can enhance the radiation sensitivity of tumour cells. However, data on docetaxel is very limited and the mechanism of radiosensitisation by docetaxel remains largely unknown. The chief purpose of this thesis was to investigate the ability of docetaxel to radiosensitise human tumour cells and investigate potential mechanisms for radiosensitisation. The results reported here for docetaxel indicate that for the cell fines examined this drug does have a synergistic effect and is thus a radiosensitising agent. The degree of radiosensitisation seen seems to be largely dependent on drug concentration. A mechanism involving docetaxel potentiation of radiation-induced apoptosis is also suggested. The second purpose of this thesis is to investigate the potential usefulness of an apoptosis assay and the comet assay as biological indicators for cellular radiosensitivity. Many scientists and clinicans have highlighted the need for development of new rapid, predictive assays of radiation responses. If the radiosensitivity of tumours could be predicted, it may eventually allow the individualisation of patient treatment by radiotherapy. In summary, initial DNA damage measured using the comet assay was successful in predicting the radiosensitivity of colorectal tumour cells. The results suggest that the comet assay appears more suitable than the detection of apoptosis for the prediction of radiosensitivity. We conclude that the results obtained from this thesis will contribute to the current attempts to improve the radiotherapeutic management of cancer. (author)

  7. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-05-12

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination.

  8. The mechanism of 67Ga uptake in animal and human tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammersley, P.A.G.; Cronshaw, S.; Taylor, D.M.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H.

    1980-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of 67 Ga has been studied by differential centrifugation in 3 transplantable mouse tumours, 3 transplantable rat tumours, 1 dog tumour, 3 human tumour xenografts and 2 human tumours in situ at various times after injection of the citrate complex. From 24 h post injection the nuclide was located predominantly in lysosomal structures in all the tumours studied. Studies in two murine tumours showed marked differences in the rate of lysosomal accumulation of 67 Ga. In the ADJ/PC6 plasmacytoma lysosomal uptake of 67 Ga had reached a plateau within 15 min while in the S180 tumour lysosomal accumulation of the nuclide occurred over the first 24 h. Normal mouse liver showed a similar pattern to this latter tumour. It is postulated that these variations in the rate of lysosomal accumulation of 67 Ga reflect differences in the permeability of the lysosomal membrane. While large amounts of 67 Ga were found in the crude nuclear fraction of some tumours this was attributed to unbroken cells as studies with purified nuclei from 7 different tumours indicated that between 2 and 14% of the total tumour 67 Ga was associated with the nuclei. (orig.)

  9. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Hieab HH; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura ME; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher RK; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David CM; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein MJ; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo GM; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco JC; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald HH; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, WT; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schofield, Peter R; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Srikanth, Velandai; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Tiemeier, Henning; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van der Brug, Marcel; Van der Lugt, Aad; Van der Wee, Nic JA; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Haren, Neeltje EM; Van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Veltman, Dick J; Vernooij, Meike W; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, H Ronald; Zonderman, Alan B; Deary, Ian J; DeCarli, Charles; Schmidt, Helena; Martin, Nicholas G; De Craen, Anton JM; Wright, Margaret J; Launer, Lenore J; Schumann, Gunter; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Barbara; Debette, Stéphanie; Medland, Sarah E; Ikram, M Arfan; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five novel loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci are also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (ρgenetic=0.748), which indicated a similar genetic background and allowed for the identification of four additional loci through meta-analysis (Ncombined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, Parkinson’s disease, and enriched near genes involved in growth pathways including PI3K–AKT signaling. These findings identify biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and provide genetic support for theories on brain reserve and brain overgrowth. PMID:27694991

  10. Time reversibility of intracranial human EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heyden, M. J.; Diks, C.; Pijn, J. P. M.; Velis, D. N.

    1996-02-01

    Intracranial electroencephalograms from patients suffering from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy were tested for time reversibility. If the recorded time series is irreversible, the input of the recording system cannot be a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. We confirmed experimentally that the measurement equipment did not introduce irreversibility in the recorded output when the input was a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. In general, the non-seizure recordings are reversible, whereas the seizure recordings are irreversible. These results suggest that time reversibility is a useful property for the characterisation of human intracranial EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  11. Metastatic behaviour of primary human tumours in a zebrafish xenotransplantation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Ines J; Bagowski, Christoph P; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Vlecken, Danielle H; Nitsche, Claudia; Bakkers, Jeroen; Lagendijk, Anne K; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Lerch, Markus M

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of cell migration drives progression of many diseases, including cancer cell invasion and metastasis formation. Analysis of tumour invasion and metastasis in living organisms to date is cumbersome and involves difficult and time consuming investigative techniques. For primary human tumours we establish here a simple, fast, sensitive and cost-effective in vivo model to analyse tumour invasion and metastatic behaviour. We fluorescently labelled small explants from gastrointestinal human tumours and investigated their metastatic behaviour after transplantation into zebrafish embryos and larvae. The transparency of the zebrafish embryos allows to follow invasion, migration and micrometastasis formation in real-time. High resolution imaging was achieved through laser scanning confocal microscopy of live zebrafish. In the transparent zebrafish embryos invasion, circulation of tumour cells in blood vessels, migration and micrometastasis formation can be followed in real-time. Xenografts of primary human tumours showed invasiveness and micrometastasis formation within 24 hours after transplantation, which was absent when non-tumour tissue was implanted. Furthermore, primary human tumour cells, when organotopically implanted in the zebrafish liver, demonstrated invasiveness and metastatic behaviour, whereas primary control cells remained in the liver. Pancreatic tumour cells showed no metastatic behaviour when injected into cloche mutant embryos, which lack a functional vasculature. Our results show that the zebrafish is a useful in vivo animal model for rapid analysis of invasion and metastatic behaviour of primary human tumour specimen

  12. A comparative study between mixed-type tumours from human salivary and canine mammary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genelhu, Marisa CLS; Cardoso, Sérgio V; Gobbi, Helenice; Cassali, Geovanni D

    2007-01-01

    In comparative pathology, canine mammary tumours have special interest because of their similarities with human breast cancer. Mixed tumours are uncommon lesions in the human breast, but they are found most frequently in the mammary gland of the female dogs and in the human salivary glands. The aim of the study was to compare clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical features of human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours, in order to evaluate the latter as an experimental model for salivary gland tumours. Ten examples of each mixed tumour type (human pleomorphic adenoma and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas and canine mixed tumour and metaplastic carcinoma) were evaluated. First, clinical and morphologic aspects of benign and malignant variants were compared between the species. Then, streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of cytokeratins, vimentin, p63 protein, estrogen receptor, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. After standardization, similar age and site distributions were observed in human and canine tumours. Histological similarities were identified in the comparison of the benign lesions as well. Metaplastic carcinomas also resembled general aspects of carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas in morphological evaluation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining further presented similar antigenic expression between lesions. There are many similar features between human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours. This observation is of great relevance for those interested in the study and management of salivary gland tumours, since canine lesions may constitute useful comparative models for their investigations

  13. Analysis of clonogenic human brain tumour cells: preliminary results of tumour sensitivity testing with BCNU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblum, M L; Dougherty, D A; Deen, D F; Hoshino, T; Wilson, C B [California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurology

    1980-04-01

    Biopsies from 6 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were disaggregated and single cells were treated in vitro with various concentrations of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitroso urea (BCNU) and plated for cell survival. One patient's cells were sensitive to BCNU in vitro; after a single dose of BCNU her brain scan reverted to normal and she was clinically well. Five tumours demonstrated resistance in vitro. Three of these tumours progressed during the first course of chemotherapy with a nitrosourea and the patients died at 21/2, 4 and 81/2 months after operation. Two patients who showed dramatic responses to radiation therapy were considered unchanged after the first course of nitrosourea therapy (although one demonstrated tumour enlargement on brain scan). The correlation of in vitro testing of tumour cell sensitivity with actual patient response is encouraging enough to warrant further work to determine whether such tests should weigh in decisions on patient therapy.

  14. The measurement of intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity in human tumours and normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Human tumour and normal cell radiosensitivity are thought to be important factors determining the response of tumour and normal tissues to radiotherapy, respectively. Clonogenic assays are the standard method for measuring radiosensitivity but they are of limited applicability for clinical use with fresh human tumours. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System (ATCCS), as a method for measuring the radiosensitivity of human tumours. A soft agar clonogenic assay, the modified Courtenay-Mills assay, was used as a standard to compare with the ATCCS. The demonstration that fibroblast contamination could occur with both assay methods led to the investigation of a new technique for removing unwanted fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions and to the use of a multiwell assay for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity. (author)

  15. The measurement of intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity in human tumours and normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    Human tumour and normal cell radiosensitivity are thought to be important factors determining the response of tumour and normal tissues to radiotherapy, respectively. Clonogenic assays are the standard method for measuring radiosensitivity but they are of limited applicability for clinical use with fresh human tumours. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System (ATCCS), as a method for measuring the radiosensitivity of human tumours. A soft agar clonogenic assay, the modified Courtenay-Mills assay, was used as a standard to compare with the ATCCS. The demonstration that fibroblast contamination could occur with both assay methods led to the investigation of a new technique for removing unwanted fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions and to the use of a multiwell assay for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity. (author).

  16. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of human radio-induced tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, S.

    2002-09-01

    After a brief recall of some fundamentals regarding radiobiology, this research thesis discusses some epidemiological aspects of radio carcinogenesis, based on epidemiological studies performed on people having survived to Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Chernobyl, but also performed on people submitted to domestic or professional exposures to radon, or to medicine-related exposures. The author highlights some predispositions to radio-induced cancers. Then, she discusses the genetic mechanisms of radio-induced carcinogenesis and the genetic alterations observed in human radio-induced tumours. She discusses and comments the genomic instability, its mechanisms and some models observed on mice, and describes the various forms of radio-induced genomic instability. After a discussion of all these aspects, the author draws some perspectives for future research works

  17. Somatostatin receptor subtype expression in human thyroid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klagge, A; Krause, K; Schierle, K; Steinert, F; Dralle, H; Fuhrer, D

    2010-04-01

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are expressed in various endocrine tumours. The expression of SSTR at the tumour cell surface confers the possibility for diagnostic imaging and therapy of tumours using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. The majority of currently available somatostatin analogues show a higher binding affinity for the SSTR2 subtype. To date, the precise expression pattern of the SSTR subtypes 1-5 in thyroid epithelial tumours remains to be determined. We investigated the mRNA expression of SSTR1-5 in benign and malignant epithelial thyroid tumours [20 cold thyroid nodules (CTNs), 20 toxic thyroid nodules (TTNs), 20 papillary, 20 follicular, and 5 anaplastic carcinomas (PTCs, FTCs, ATCs, respectively)] and compared them to normal surrounding thyroid tissues. Four out of five SSTR subtypes were detected in malignant thyroid tumours, benign neoplasia, and normal surrounding tissue with a predominant expression of SSTR2 and SSTR5, and a weak expression of SSTR1 and SSTR3. Weak SSTR4 mRNA expression was detected in some PTCs. Compared to normal thyroid tissue, SSTR2 was significantly upregulated in PTC and ATC. In addition significant upregulation of SSTR3 was found in PTC. SSTR5 mRNA expression was increased in PTC and FTC and significantly decreased in CTN and TTN compared to normal thyroid tissue. SSTR2 is the predominant subtype in thyroid epithelial tumours with a high expression pattern, in particular, in PTC . Perspectively, the expression of distinct SSTR in thyroid epithelial tumours might represent a promising avenue for diagnostics and therapy of advanced thyroid cancer with somatostatin analogues. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  18. Quantifying heterogeneity in human tumours using MRI and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Marie-Claude; O'Connor, James P B; Boellaard, Ronald; Thacker, Neil A; Jackson, Alan

    2012-03-01

    Most tumours, even those of the same histological type and grade, demonstrate considerable biological heterogeneity. Variations in genomic subtype, growth factor expression and local microenvironmental factors can result in regional variations within individual tumours. For example, localised variations in tumour cell proliferation, cell death, metabolic activity and vascular structure will be accompanied by variations in oxygenation status, pH and drug delivery that may directly affect therapeutic response. Documenting and quantifying regional heterogeneity within the tumour requires histological or imaging techniques. There is increasing evidence that quantitative imaging biomarkers can be used in vivo to provide important, reproducible and repeatable estimates of tumoural heterogeneity. In this article we review the imaging methods available to provide appropriate biomarkers of tumour structure and function. We also discuss the significant technical issues involved in the quantitative estimation of heterogeneity and the range of descriptive metrics that can be derived. Finally, we have reviewed the existing clinical evidence that heterogeneity metrics provide additional useful information in drug discovery and development and in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in the normal human eye and its expression pattern in selected eye tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinmei; Wu, Yazhen; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in neoplastic processes. The purpose of the present study is to investigate COX-2 expression in the normal human eye and the expression pattern in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining...... using antibodies against COX-2 was performed on paraffin sections of normal human eyes and selected eye tumours arising from cells expressing COX-2. Results: Cyclooxygenase-2 expression was found in various structures of the normal eye. Abundant expression was seen in the cornea, iris, ciliary body...... and retina. The COX-2 expression was less in tumours deriving from the ciliary epithelium and also in retinoblastoma. Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 is constitutively expressed in normal human eyes. The expression of COX-2 is much lower in selected eye tumours involving COX-2 expressing cells....

  20. Expression of Selected Markers in Immunohistochemical Diagnosis of Canine and Human Testicular Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaputa Rafał

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemical profiles of the most common canine testicular tumours, including the Leydig cell tumours, seminomas, and Sertoli cell tumours were analysed, and the results were compared with those obtained in the corresponding types of human testicular neoplasms. The expressions of vimentin, von Willebrand factor (FVIII, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and MCM3 were quantified. In the case of Sertoli cell tumours, only canine ones were analysed, since this type of tumour is very rarely diagnosed in men. The expression of the analysed proteins in the testicular tumours was similar. The von Willebrand factor exhibited the strongest expression in Leydig cell tumours in dogs and men, while vimentin was expressed more strongly in dogs (96.7% had an intensity at +++ than in men (62.5% had +++ in the Leydigioma. The immunoexpression of MCM3 in seminomas was high in both men and dogs – 90% +++ and 100% +++ respectively. The lack of chromogranin A and synaptophysin was observed in almost 100% of seminomas in men and dogs. This differed from the results obtained for Leydigioma, where chromogranin A was expressed in 70% of dogs at +++ and in 100% of men at ++++. The results may indicate that the antibodies were selected correctly. Their analysis and interpretation provides valuable information concerning the nature of the studied tumours.

  1. Decoding sequence learning from single-trial intracranial EEG in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia De Lucia

    Full Text Available We propose and validate a multivariate classification algorithm for characterizing changes in human intracranial electroencephalographic data (iEEG after learning motor sequences. The algorithm is based on a Hidden Markov Model (HMM that captures spatio-temporal properties of the iEEG at the level of single trials. Continuous intracranial iEEG was acquired during two sessions (one before and one after a night of sleep in two patients with depth electrodes implanted in several brain areas. They performed a visuomotor sequence (serial reaction time task, SRTT using the fingers of their non-dominant hand. Our results show that the decoding algorithm correctly classified single iEEG trials from the trained sequence as belonging to either the initial training phase (day 1, before sleep or a later consolidated phase (day 2, after sleep, whereas it failed to do so for trials belonging to a control condition (pseudo-random sequence. Accurate single-trial classification was achieved by taking advantage of the distributed pattern of neural activity. However, across all the contacts the hippocampus contributed most significantly to the classification accuracy for both patients, and one fronto-striatal contact for one patient. Together, these human intracranial findings demonstrate that a multivariate decoding approach can detect learning-related changes at the level of single-trial iEEG. Because it allows an unbiased identification of brain sites contributing to a behavioral effect (or experimental condition at the level of single subject, this approach could be usefully applied to assess the neural correlates of other complex cognitive functions in patients implanted with multiple electrodes.

  2. Alpha-amidated peptides derived from pro-opiomelanocortin in human pituitary tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Johnsen, A H

    1988-01-01

    Human pituitary tumours, obtained at surgery for Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome, were extracted and the content and molecular forms of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides determined by radioimmunoassay, gel chromatography, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography....... In conclusion, all the molecular forms of the amidated peptides detected in tumours from patients with Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome were similar to the molecular forms found in the normal human pituitary. The main difference between the tumours and the normal pituitary was the greater amount...... (HPLC) and sequence analysis. In the tumours from patients with Cushing's disease the mean concentrations of amidated peptides relative to the total amount of POMC were as follows: alpha-MSH, 1.7%; amidated gamma-MSH (gamma 1-MSH), 8.5% and the peptide linking gamma-MSH and ACTH in the precursor (hinge...

  3. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  4. Timing, timing, timing: Fast decoding of object information from intracranial field potentials in human visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hesheng; Agam, Yigal; Madsen, Joseph R.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Summary The difficulty of visual recognition stems from the need to achieve high selectivity while maintaining robustness to object transformations within hundreds of milliseconds. Theories of visual recognition differ in whether the neuronal circuits invoke recurrent feedback connections or not. The timing of neurophysiological responses in visual cortex plays a key role in distinguishing between bottom-up and top-down theories. Here we quantified at millisecond resolution the amount of visual information conveyed by intracranial field potentials from 912 electrodes in 11 human subjects. We could decode object category information from human visual cortex in single trials as early as 100 ms post-stimulus. Decoding performance was robust to depth rotation and scale changes. The results suggest that physiological activity in the temporal lobe can account for key properties of visual recognition. The fast decoding in single trials is compatible with feed-forward theories and provides strong constraints for computational models of human vision. PMID:19409272

  5. lmmunohistochemical study of effect of ionizing radiation on human malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adomaitiene, D. I.; Aleknavicius, E.; Valuckas, K. and others

    2000-01-01

    Cell proliferation-associated tumour markers are considered to have a valuable clinical significance. The current study was designed to investigate changes in immunohistochemical (IH) expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen PCNA in human malignant tumour tissue samples obtained before and after preoperative radiotherapy. Tumour tissue samples were obtained from 26 patients with rectal carcinoma, from 22 patients with carcinoma corporis uteri and from 82 patients with breast cancer. Tumour samples were processed for IH examination by using monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) PC10 against PCNA. IH analysis of histological specimens of carcinoma corporis uteri and rectal carcinoma obtained before and after preoperative radiotherapy has revealed heterogeneity of biological response to irradiation. The great majority of tumour specimens after irradiation showed a high PCNA expression level in cell population. Only minority of tumour specimens (15-20%) exhibited reduced immunoreactivity with MoAbs PC10. PCNA positivity rate in breast cancer specimens obtained during surgery from 55 patients after preoperative radiotherapy in comparison to biomarker expression pattern in tumour specimens from 27 unirradiated patients (control group) was found to be tended to decrease. These in vivo findings are discussed in terms of radiation-induced cell death, followed after proliferation, and PCNA role in DNA repair. (author)

  6. Neutron autoradiography imaging of selective boron uptake in human metastatic tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altieri, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy)], E-mail: saverio.altieri@pv.infn.it; Bortolussi, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); Bruschi, P.; Chiari, P.; Fossati, F.; Stella, S. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); Prati, U.; Roveda, L. [Unit of cancer surgery, Cancer Center of Excellence, Foundation T. Campanella, Catanzaro (Italy); Zonta, A.; Zonta, C.; Ferrari, C.; Clerici, A. [Department of Surgery, University of Pavia, Piazza Botta, Pavia (Italy); Nano, R. [Department of Animal Biology, University of Pavia, Piazza Botta, Pavia (Italy); Pinelli, T. [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Pavia (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    The ability to selectively hit the tumour cells is an essential characteristic of an anti-tumour therapy. In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) this characteristic is based on the selective uptake of {sup 10}B in the tumour cells with respect to normal tissues. An important step in the BNCT planning is the measurement of the boron concentration in the tissue samples, both tumour and healthy. When the tumour is spread through the healthy tissue, as in the case of metastases, the knowledge of the different kinds of tissues in the sample being analysed is crucial. If the percentage of tumour and normal tissues cannot be evaluated, the obtained concentration is a mean value depending on the composition of the different samples being measured. In this case an imaging method that could give information both on the morphology and on the spatial distribution of boron concentration in the sample would be a fundamental support. In this paper, the results of the boron uptake analysis in the tumour and in the healthy samples taken from human livers after boron phenylalanine (BPA) infusion are shown; boron imaging was performed using neutron autoradiography.

  7. Electrical conductivity measurement of excised human metastatic liver tumours before and after thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerich, Dieter; Schutt, David J; Wright, Andrew W; Webster, John G; Mahvi, David M

    2009-05-01

    We measured the ex vivo electrical conductivity of eight human metastatic liver tumours and six normal liver tissue samples from six patients using the four electrode method over the frequency range 10 Hz to 1 MHz. In addition, in a single patient we measured the electrical conductivity before and after the thermal ablation of normal and tumour tissue. The average conductivity of tumour tissue was significantly higher than normal tissue over the entire frequency range (from 4.11 versus 0.75 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, to 5.33 versus 2.88 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz). We found no significant correlation between tumour size and measured electrical conductivity. While before ablation tumour tissue had considerably higher conductivity than normal tissue, the two had similar conductivity throughout the frequency range after ablation. Tumour tissue conductivity changed by +25% and -7% at 10 Hz and 1 MHz after ablation (0.23-0.29 at 10 Hz, and 0.43-0.40 at 1 MHz), while normal tissue conductivity increased by +270% and +10% at 10 Hz and 1 MHz (0.09-0.32 at 10 Hz and 0.37-0.41 at 1 MHz). These data can potentially be used to differentiate tumour from normal tissue diagnostically.

  8. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV-associated tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 52, 1-2 (2006), s. 45-46 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR7807; GA MZd(CZ) NR8004; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/04/0492; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500520605 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HPV * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.387, year: 2006

  9. iELVis: An open source MATLAB toolbox for localizing and visualizing human intracranial electrode data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppe, David M; Bickel, Stephan; Dykstra, Andrew R; Wang, Xiuyuan; Mégevand, Pierre; Mercier, Manuel R; Lado, Fred A; Mehta, Ashesh D; Honey, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Intracranial electrical recordings (iEEG) and brain stimulation (iEBS) are invaluable human neuroscience methodologies. However, the value of such data is often unrealized as many laboratories lack tools for localizing electrodes relative to anatomy. To remedy this, we have developed a MATLAB toolbox for intracranial electrode localization and visualization, iELVis. NEW METHOD: iELVis uses existing tools (BioImage Suite, FSL, and FreeSurfer) for preimplant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) segmentation, neuroimaging coregistration, and manual identification of electrodes in postimplant neuroimaging. Subsequently, iELVis implements methods for correcting electrode locations for postimplant brain shift with millimeter-scale accuracy and provides interactive visualization on 3D surfaces or in 2D slices with optional functional neuroimaging overlays. iELVis also localizes electrodes relative to FreeSurfer-based atlases and can combine data across subjects via the FreeSurfer average brain. It takes 30-60min of user time and 12-24h of computer time to localize and visualize electrodes from one brain. We demonstrate iELVis's functionality by showing that three methods for mapping primary hand somatosensory cortex (iEEG, iEBS, and functional MRI) provide highly concordant results. COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHODS: iELVis is the first public software for electrode localization that corrects for brain shift, maps electrodes to an average brain, and supports neuroimaging overlays. Moreover, its interactive visualizations are powerful and its tutorial material is extensive. iELVis promises to speed the progress and enhance the robustness of intracranial electrode research. The software and extensive tutorial materials are freely available as part of the EpiSurg software project: https://github.com/episurg/episurg. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P; Senstad, Rudy E; Winkler, Anderson M; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Ørjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A; Cannon, Dara M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M; Hansell, Narelle K; Hwang, Kristy S; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; O’Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roddey, J Cooper; Rose, Emma J; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brohawn, David G; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T; Freimer, Nelson B; Gill, Michael; Göring, Harald H H; Hagler, Donald J; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liewald, David C; Mandl, René; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nauck, Matthias; Nöthen, Markus M; Olvera, Rene L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Rentería, Miguel E; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Joris A; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R; Foroud, Tatiana M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W; Veltman, Dick J; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Smith, Albert V; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W; Launer, Lenore J; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Bastin, Mark E; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J C; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Hardy, John; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, René S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W; Potkin, Steven G; Sämann, Philipp G; Saykin, Andrew J; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Martin, Nicholas G; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer’s disease1,2 and is reduced in schizophrenia3, major depression4 and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy5. Whereas many brain imaging phenotypes are highly heritable6,7, identifying and replicating genetic influences has been difficult, as small effects and the high costs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to underpowered studies. Here we report genome-wide association meta-analyses and replication for mean bilateral hippocampal, total brain and intracranial volumes from a large multinational consortium. The intergenic variant rs7294919 was associated with hippocampal volume (12q24.22; N = 21,151; P = 6.70 × 10−16) and the expression levels of the positional candidate gene TESC in brain tissue. Additionally, rs10784502, located within HMGA2, was associated with intracranial volume (12q14.3; N = 15,782; P = 1.12 × 10−12). We also identified a suggestive association with total brain volume at rs10494373 within DDR2 (1q23.3; N = 6,500; P = 5.81 × 10−7). PMID:22504417

  11. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. ..... rangement of the EGF receptor gene in primary human brain tumors ... the INK4A gene in superficial bladder tumors.

  12. Measurement of human normal tissue and tumour responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.; Yarnold, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The scarcity of quantitative measures of normal tissue damage and tumour response in patients undergoing radiotherapy is an obstacle to the clinical evaluation of new treatment strategies. Retrospective studies of complications in critical normal tissues taught important lessons in the past concerning the potential dangers of hypofractionation. However, it is unethical to use serious complications as planned end-points in prospective studies. This paper reviews the desirable characteristics of clinical end-points required to compare alternative treatments employing radiotherapy, with emphasis on simple scales applied by clinicians or even the patients themselves

  13. Oxygen tension in human tumours measured with polarographic needle electrodes and its relationship to vascular density, necrosis and hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyng, Heidi; Sundfoer, Kolbein; Rofstad, Einar K.

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The use of polarographic needle electrodes for measurement of oxygen tension (pO 2 ) in tumours requires documentation of the validity of the method. In the present work the pO 2 values measured polarographically with the Eppendorf pO 2 histograph in human tumours were compared with the histological appearance of the tumour tissue, i.e. vascular density, fraction of necrosis and fraction of hypoxic tissue, to investigate whether the measurements reflected the expected pO 2 . Materials and methods: The pO 2 was measured in cervix tumours in patients and in human melanoma xenografted tumours in athymic mice. Vascular density was determined in the cervix tumours by histological analysis of biopsies from the pO 2 measurement tracks. Fraction of necrosis and fraction of hypoxic tissue, i.e. tissue binding the hypoxia marker pimonidazole, were determined in the melanomas by analysis of histological sections from the tumour planes in which the pO 2 measurements were performed. Results: The pO 2 distributions showed large intratumour heterogeneity. In cervix tumours, tumour regions with vascular density (vascular length per unit tissue volume) in the range of 47-77 mm/mm 3 showed higher pO 2 than tumour regions with vascular density in the range of 20-47 mm/mm 3 , which in turn showed higher pO 2 than tumour regions with vascular density in the range of 0-20 mm/mm 3 . In melanomas, tumour regions in which necrosis and hypoxia constituted more than 50% of the tissue showed lower pO 2 than other tumour regions. Conclusions: The pO 2 measured in the tumours was consistent with the histological appearance of the tissue in which the measurements were performed, suggesting that reliable pO 2 distributions of tumours can be obtained with polarographic needle electrodes

  14. Human intracranial recordings link suppressed transients rather than 'filling-in' to perceptual continuity across blinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Tal; Davidesco, Ido; Meshulam, Meir; Groppe, David M; Mégevand, Pierre; Yeagle, Erin M; Goldfinger, Matthew S; Harel, Michal; Melloni, Lucia; Schroeder, Charles E; Deouell, Leon Y; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2016-09-29

    We hardly notice our eye blinks, yet an externally generated retinal interruption of a similar duration is perceptually salient. We examined the neural correlates of this perceptual distinction using intracranially measured ECoG signals from the human visual cortex in 14 patients. In early visual areas (V1 and V2), the disappearance of the stimulus due to either invisible blinks or salient blank video frames ('gaps') led to a similar drop in activity level, followed by a positive overshoot beyond baseline, triggered by stimulus reappearance. Ascending the visual hierarchy, the reappearance-related overshoot gradually subsided for blinks but not for gaps. By contrast, the disappearance-related drop did not follow the perceptual distinction - it was actually slightly more pronounced for blinks than for gaps. These findings suggest that blinks' limited visibility compared with gaps is correlated with suppression of blink-related visual activity transients, rather than with "filling-in" of the occluded content during blinks.

  15. [Intracranial remote epidural haematoma as a complication after resection of an occipital lobe metastatic tumour from a testicular embryonal carcinoma – a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrusewicz, Wojciech; Limanówka, Bartosz; Sagan, Leszek; Kojder, Ireneusz

    We present the case of a patient who suffered from intracranial epidural haematoma in the left fronto -temporo -parietal region as a complication after left parieto -occipital craniotomy and a resection of a metastatic lesion from a testicular embryonal carcinoma to the left occipital lobe. We also discuss possible causes of this complication.

  16. An enhanced heterologous virus-like particle for human papillomavirus type 16 tumour immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairunadwa Jemon

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is caused by high-risk, cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPV and is the second highest cause of cancer deaths in women globally. The majority of cervical cancers express well-characterized HPV oncogenes, which are potential targets for immunotherapeutic vaccination. Here we develop a rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV virus-like particle (VLP-based vaccine designed for immunotherapy against HPV16 positive tumours. An RHDV-VLP, modified to contain the universal helper T cell epitope PADRE and decorated with an MHC I-restricted peptide (aa 48-57 from the HPV16 E6, was tested for its immunotherapeutic efficacy against the TC-1 HPV16 E6 and E7-expressing tumour in mice. The E6-RHDV-VLP-PADRE was administered therapeutically for the treatment of a pre-existing TC-1 tumour and was delivered with antibodies either to deplete regulatory T cells (anti-CD25 or to block T cell suppression mediated through CTLA-4. As a result, the tumour burden was reduced by around 50% and the median survival time of mice to the humane endpoint was almost doubled the compared to controls. The incorporation of PADRE into the RHDV-VLP was necessary for an E6-specific enhancement of the anti-tumour response and the co-administration of the immune modifying antibodies contributed to the overall efficacy of the immunotherapy. The E6-RHDV-VLP-PADRE shows immunotherapeutic efficacy, prolonging survival for HPV tumour-bearing mice. This was enhanced by the systemic administration of immune-modifying antibodies that are commercially available for use in humans. There is potential to further modify these particles for even greater efficacy in the path to development of an immunotherapeutic treatment for HPV precancerous and cancer stages.

  17. Deregulation of the RB pathway in human testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Lukas, Claudia; Sørensen, Claus S

    2003-01-01

    Deregulation of the RB pathway is shared by most human malignancies. Components upstream of the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor (pRB), namely the INK4 family of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, the D-type cyclins, their partner kinases CDK4/CDK6, and pRB as their critical substrate...

  18. Casein kinase II is elevated in solid human tumours and rapidly proliferating non-neoplastic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münstermann, U; Fritz, G; Seitz, G

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase CKII (i.e. casein kinase II, CKII, NII) is expressed at a higher level in rapidly proliferating tissues and in solid human tumours (e.g. colorectal carcinomas) when compared to the corresponding non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa. This could be shown by (a) Western blotting of cellular...

  19. Intracranial EEG fluctuates over months after implanting electrodes in human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Hoameng; Baldassano, Steven N.; Bink, Hank; Krieger, Abba M.; Williams, Shawniqua; Vitale, Flavia; Wu, Chengyuan; Freestone, Dean; Nurse, Ewan; Leyde, Kent; Davis, Kathryn A.; Cook, Mark; Litt, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Implanting subdural and penetrating electrodes in the brain causes acute trauma and inflammation that affect intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) recordings. This behavior and its potential impact on clinical decision-making and algorithms for implanted devices have not been assessed in detail. In this study we aim to characterize the temporal and spatial variability of continuous, prolonged human iEEG recordings. Approach. Intracranial electroencephalography from 15 patients with drug-refractory epilepsy, each implanted with 16 subdural electrodes and continuously monitored for an average of 18 months, was included in this study. Time and spectral domain features were computed each day for each channel for the duration of each patient’s recording. Metrics to capture post-implantation feature changes and inflexion points were computed on group and individual levels. A linear mixed model was used to characterize transient group-level changes in feature values post-implantation and independent linear models were used to describe individual variability. Main results. A significant decline in features important to seizure detection and prediction algorithms (mean line length, energy, and half-wave), as well as mean power in the Berger and high gamma bands, was observed in many patients over 100 d following implantation. In addition, spatial variability across electrodes declines post-implantation following a similar timeframe. All selected features decreased by 14-50% in the initial 75 d of recording on the group level, and at least one feature demonstrated this pattern in 13 of the 15 patients. Our findings indicate that iEEG signal features demonstrate increased variability following implantation, most notably in the weeks immediately post-implant. Significance. These findings suggest that conclusions drawn from iEEG, both clinically and for research, should account for spatiotemporal signal variability and that properly assessing the iEEG in

  20. Human cytomegalovirus tegument protein pp65 is detected in all intra- and extra-axial brain tumours independent of the tumour type or grade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Libard

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV has been indicated being a significant oncomodulator. Recent reports have suggested that an antiviral treatment alters the outcome of a glioblastoma. We analysed the performance of commercial HCMV-antibodies applying the immunohistochemical (IHC methods on brain sample obtained from a subject with a verified HCMV infection, on samples obtained from 14 control subjects, and on a tissue microarray block containing cores of various brain tumours. Based on these trials, we selected the best performing antibody and analysed a cohort of 417 extra- and intra-axial brain tumours such as gliomas, medulloblastomas, primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and meningiomas. HCMV protein pp65 immunoreactivity was observed in all types of tumours analysed, and the IHC expression did not depend on the patient's age, gender, tumour type, or grade. The labelling pattern observed in the tumours differed from the labelling pattern observed in the tissue with an active HCMV infection. The HCMV protein was expressed in up to 90% of all the tumours investigated. Our results are in accordance with previous reports regarding the HCMV protein expression in glioblastomas and medulloblastomas. In addition, the HCMV protein expression was seen in primary brain lymphomas, low-grade gliomas, and in meningiomas. Our results indicate that the HCMV protein pp65 expression is common in intra- and extra-axial brain tumours. Thus, the assessment of the HCMV expression in tumours of various origins and pathologically altered tissue in conditions such as inflammation, infection, and even degeneration should certainly be facilitated.

  1. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  2. Specific Cytotoxicity Against Autologous Tumour and Proliferative Responses of Human Lymphocytes Grown in Interleukin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-11

    reactivity against tumour cells. These cellular reagents will be useful in defining the antigenicity of human neoplasms and possibly in therapy . S, N 0) 02...Stjernswird. of human neoplasms and possibly in therapy . 1979; Vose et al., 1978; Vinky et al., 1979). Purifica- The derivation of cultured T cells...mononuclear cells were sepa- had increased 100- to 200-fold. Cells were cultured in rated by floatation on Ficoll-Hypaque (LSM, Litton- medium without IL-2 for

  3. Chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity testing of freshly explanted human tumour cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.

    1977-10-01

    In this thesis, in vitro testing for the chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of freshly explanted human tumour cells is described. The cells were incubated with anti-tumour drugs and either a 6-day growth test performed or a clonal growth test as a measure of survival of cell reproductive capacity. It was shown that if one aims to develop a suitable in vitro method for predicting the subsequent response of human tumour cells in situ to cytotoxic chemotherapy, the test procedure must be initiated before the explanted cells have undergone significant growth in vitro. The survival of the reproductive capacity of tumour cell explants following X-radiation was also studied. Using a 'feeder' layer technique, values for the survival curve parameter Dsub(q) were in the range 400-610 rad and the values for D 0 were in the range 120-160 rad. The shape of the X-ray survival curves did not change when cells were retested after repeated subculturing in vitro. Therefore, unlike chemosensitivity measured by the same biological end-point, radiosensitivity apparently does not change once cells have reached their maximum growth potential. (UK)

  4. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  5. Computerized tomography of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungenberg, T.

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses the possibilities and limits of CT in the differential diagnosis of intracranial tumours. His discussion is based on a quantitative classification and a number of case studies selected under the following aspects: Misinterpretation of the CT image; specific diagnostic problems; uncommon CT image of the tumour; rare histological findings. 118 patients were examined between November 1976 and April 1979. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Human occipital cortices differentially exert saccadic suppression: intracranial recording in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Mitsugu; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Brown, Erik C.; Kojima, Katsuaki; Asano, Eishi

    2013-01-01

    By repeating saccades unconsciously, humans explore the surrounding world every day. Saccades inevitably move external visual images across the retina at high velocity; nonetheless, healthy humans don’t perceive transient blurring of the visual scene during saccades. This perceptual stability is referred to as saccadic suppression. Functional suppression is believed to take place transiently in the visual systems, but it remains unknown how commonly or differentially the human occipital lobe activities are suppressed at the large-scale cortical network level. We determined the spatial-temporal dynamics of intracranially-recorded gamma activity at 80–150 Hz around spontaneous saccades under no-task conditions during wakefulness and those in darkness during REM sleep. Regardless of wakefulness or REM sleep, a small degree of attenuation of gamma activity was noted in the occipital regions during saccades, most extensively in the polar and least in the medial portions. Longer saccades were associated with more intense gamma-attenuation. Gamma-attenuation was subsequently followed by gamma-augmentation most extensively involving the medial and least involving the polar occipital region. Such gamma-augmentation was more intense during wakefulness and temporally locked to the offset of saccades. The polarities of initial peaks of perisaccadic event-related potentials (ERPs) were frequently positive in the medial and negative in the polar occipital regions. The present study, for the first time, provided the electrophysiological evidence that human occipital cortices differentially exert peri-saccadic modulation. Transiently suppressed sensitivity of the primary visual cortex in the polar region may be an important neural basis for saccadic suppression. Presence of occipital gamma-attenuation even during REM sleep suggests that saccadic suppression might be exerted even without external visual inputs. The primary visual cortex in the medial region, compared to the

  7. Medial frontal cortex and response conflict: Evidence from human intracranial EEG and medial frontal cortex lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.X.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Haupt, S.; Elger, C.E.; Fell, J.

    2008-01-01

    The medial frontal cortex (MFC) has been implicated in the monitoring and selection of actions in the face of competing alternatives, but much remains unknown about its functional properties, including electrophysiological oscillations, during response conflict tasks. Here, we recorded intracranial

  8. Intracranial hemorrhage and other symptoms in infants associated with human parechovirus in Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Herbert; Prammer, Ruth; Bock, Wolfgang; Ollerieth, Robert; Bernert, Günther; Zwiauer, Karl; Aberle, Judith H; Aberle, Stephan W; Fazekas, Tamas; Holter, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The human parechovirus (HPeV), mainly genotype 3, may cause severe illness in young infants and neonates, including sepsis-like illness and central nervous system (CNS) infection. We lack data concerning the impact and symptoms of HPeV infection in infants in Austria. The aim of the study is to evaluate the spectrum of symptoms and findings in infants with the parechovirus in Vienna and its environs. Patients younger than 3 months of age, with clinically suspected sepsis-like illness or CNS infection and a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HPeV, were included in the study. Medical records were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty patients were included in the study from 2009 to 2013. The most frequent manifestations were fever and neurological symptoms (89 and 80 %, respectively). Fifty percent of the infants had white blood cell counts out of range. The most notable aspect was cerebral hemorrhage in three neonates, which has not been reported earlier in association with HPeV infection. In Austria, HPeV is a relevant pathogen in sepsis-like disease in infants. The clinical presentation is similar to that described in other studies; cerebral hemorrhage is a new aspect. • Parechovirus infection can cause severe illness in infants. • Symptoms have been described to involve all organs; sepsis-like signs, fever, and irritability are most frequent. • Also in Austria, HPeV plays an important role in severe illnesses in infants. • Severe intracranial hemorrhage is described as a new finding.

  9. The acute in vitro and in vivo radiosensitivity of human lung tumour lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, G.M.; Peacock, J.H.; Steel, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    Eleven human lung tumour lines have been established in xenograft or tissue culture, and the responses to acute irradiation of the 10 lines which cloned in soft agar were assayed. In vitro radiosensitivity was evaluated using the multitarget and linear quadratic models of cell survival and the surviving fraction at 2 Gy. Significant differences in the response of the different cell types were found, the large-cell phenotype exhibiting radioresistance, and small-cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas being radiosensitive. No differences in the capacity of the different tumour types to repair radiation damage were demonstrated. In vivo and spheroid response was modified by the effects of hypoxia and cell-contact phenomena. The results suggested that hyperfractionation would be useful in the clinical management of adenocarcinoma and small-cell carcinoma. (Auth.)

  10. Human α-defensin (DEFA) gene expression helps to characterise benign and malignant salivary gland tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Jochen; Wenghoefer, Matthias; Pantelis, Annette; Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Reich, Rudolf; Jepsen, Soeren; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija

    2012-01-01

    Because of the infrequence of salivary gland tumours and their complex histopathological diagnosis it is still difficult to exactly predict their clinical course by means of recurrence, malignant progression and metastasis. In order to define new proliferation associated genes, purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of human α-defensins (DEFA) 1/3 and 4 in different tumour entities of the salivary glands with respect to malignancy. Tissue of salivary glands (n=10), pleomorphic adenomas (n=10), cystadenolymphomas (n=10), adenocarcinomas (n=10), adenoidcystic carcinomas (n=10), and mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=10) was obtained during routine surgical procedures. RNA was extracted according to standard protocols. Transcript levels of DEFA 1/3 and 4 were analyzed by quantitative realtime PCR and compared with healthy salivary gland tissue. Additionally, the proteins encoded by DEFA 1/3 and DEFA 4 were visualized in paraffin-embedded tissue sections by immunohistochemical staining. Human α-defensins are traceable in healthy as well as in pathological altered salivary gland tissue. In comparison with healthy tissue, the gene expression of DEFA 1/3 and 4 was significantly (p<0.05) increased in all tumours – except for a significant decrease of DEFA 4 gene expression in pleomorphic adenomas and a similar transcript level for DEFA 1/3 compared to healthy salivary glands. A decreased gene expression of DEFA 1/3 and 4 might protect pleomorphic adenomas from malignant transformation into adenocarcinomas. A similar expression pattern of DEFA-1/3 and -4 in cystadenolymphomas and inflamed salivary glands underlines a potential importance of immunological reactions during the formation of Warthin’s tumour

  11. Detection of human cancer in an animal model using radio-labelled tumour-associated monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epenetos, A.A.; Arklie, J.; Knowles, R.W.; Bodmer, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to epithelial-cell antigenic determinants, labelled with 123 I and 125 I, were administered parenterally to immunodeficient mice bearing human tumours derived from a human cancer cell line. Anterior, posterior and lateral radioscans of the body were taken with a gamma scintillation camera at various times from immediately to 65 days after injection. Visual displays of the images were processed by standard computer techniques. The model used a human colon-cancer cell line, HT29, and the monoclonal antibody, AUAl, which is specific to an epithelial proliferating antigen. Tumour detection was achieved in all the mice. The smallest tumour detectable appeared to be about 1 mm in diameter. The degree of antibody uptake in a tumour depended on its size and the blood supply of its surrounding tissues. (author)

  12. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hieab H H; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura M E; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Braber, Anouk Den; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, W T; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schofield, Peter R; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Srikanth, Velandai; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Tiemeier, Henning; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; Van der Lugt, Aad; Van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Van T Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Veltman, Dick J; Vernooij, Meike W; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, H Ronald; Zonderman, Alan B; Deary, Ian J; DeCarli, Charles; Schmidt, Helena; Martin, Nicholas G; De Craen, Anton J M; Wright, Margaret J; Launer, Lenore J; Schumann, Gunter; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Barbara; Debette, Stéphanie; Medland, Sarah E; Ikram, M Arfan; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously

  13. Spatiotemporal structure of intracranial electric fields induced by transcranial electric stimulation in humans and nonhuman primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opitz, Alexander; Falchier, Arnaud; Yan, Chao-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) is an emerging technique, developed to non-invasively modulate brain function. However, the spatiotemporal distribution of the intracranial electric fields induced by TES remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how much current actually reac...

  14. Intracranial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvedstrup, Jeppe; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Moudrous, Walid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new method of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) measurement with conventional lumbar puncture (LP) opening pressure. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter study, patients undergoing LP for diagnostic purposes underwent intracranial pressure measurements with HeadSen...

  15. Human tumour xenografts established and serially transplanted in mice immunologically deprived by thymectomy, cytosine arabinoside and whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.J.; Thomas, J.M.; Peckham, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Mice immunologically deprived by thymectomy, cytosine arabinoside treatment and whole-body irradiation were used to study the growth of human tumours as xenografts. 10/16 melanoma biopsies, 4/13 ovarian carcinoma biopsies and 3/6 uterine cancer biopsies grew as serially transplantable xenograft lines. The tumour lines were studied through serial passages by histology, histo-chemistry, electron microscopy, chromosome analysis, immune fluorescence, growth rate measurement and mitotic counts. They retained the characteristics of the tumours of origin, with the exception of loss of pigmentation in two melanomas, histological dedifferentiation in the uterine carcinomas, and increased mitotic frequency and growth rate in some melanomas. It was concluded that this type of animal preparation is as useful as alternative methods of immunological deprivation, or as athymic nude mice, for the growth of human tumour xenografts, at least for some experimental purposes. (author)

  16. Scintigraphic assessment of vascularity and blood-tissue barrier of human brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Front, D.

    1978-01-01

    Assessment of vascularity and blood-tissue barrier was performed by sequential scintigraphy in 43 patients with brain tumours. The blood-tumour barrier was evaluated by use of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, and vascularity using sup(99m)Tc-labelled red blood cells. Three groups of tumours were found: tumours with low vascularity and permeable barrier, tumours with high vascularity and permeable barrier, and tumours with low vascularity and relatively impermeable barrier. The first group indicates that when vessels are permeable, there may be a rapid penetration of large amounts of pertechnetate into the tumour even when vascularity is not increased. In the other two groups penetration of pertechnetate into the tumour is affected by vascularity, as it determines the total area where passage of the radiopharmaceutical takes place. It is suggested that the permeability of the blood-tumour barrier and the amount of vascularity may have an effect on the success of chemotherapy in brain tumours. (author)

  17. Early death, late death and repair factor in three human tumour cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdi, A.; Gioanni, J.; Mari, D.; Chauvel, P.

    1997-01-01

    The in vivo colony method used to generate survival curves following exposure to ionizing irradiation allows to score large clones, representing surviving cells, and small colonies, representing late reproductive death. By subtraction, early-dying cells can be estimated. In the three human tumour cell lines examined, we have observed that early cell death is a major mode of action of irradiation. The contribution of early cell death to total mortality increases as the dose increases. Moreover, repair due to dose-splitting and delayed plating in densely-inhibited cells is not observed in early-dying cells. (authors)

  18. Inhibitory effects of CP on the growth of human gastric adenocarcinoma BGC-823 tumours in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Jun; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Bao-Jun; Zhang, Zhan-Xue; Li, Ai-Ying; An, Ran; Yue, Bin; Fan, Li-Qiao; Li, Yong

    2018-05-01

    Objective To investigate the potential antitumour effects of [2-(6-amino-purine-9-yl)-1-hydroxy-phosphine acyl ethyl] phosphonic acid (CP) against gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods Human BGC-823 xenotransplants were established in nude mice. Animals were randomly divided into control and CP groups, which were administered NaHCO 3 vehicle alone or CP dissolved in NaHCO 3 (200 µg/kg body weight) daily, respectively. Tumour volume was measured weekly for 6 weeks. Resected tumours were assayed for proliferative activity with anti-Ki-67 or anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) antibodies. Cell apoptosis was examined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assays and with caspase-3 immunostaining. Proteins were measured by Western blotting. Results There was a significant reduction in tumour volume and a reduced percentage of Ki-67-positive or PCNA-positive cells in the CP group compared with the control group. The percentage of TUNEL-positive or caspase 3-positive cells significantly increased following CP treatment compared with the control group. Tumours from the CP group had higher levels of phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated-AKT (p-AKT) compared with control tumours. Conclusion CP treatment inhibited tumour growth and induced tumour cell apoptosis in a nude mouse model of BGC-823 gastric adenocarcinoma. Activation of the AKT and ERK signalling pathways may mediate this antitumour activity.

  19. Ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation and morphological changes in response to the tumour promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate in primary human tumour cells, established and transformed cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rance, A J; Thönnes, M; Issinger, O G

    1985-01-01

    lifespan (fibroblasts, primary human tumour cells) can be mimicked by unknown steps also associated with immortalization (establishment function) and the transformed state of the tumour cells. Another interesting observation were morphological changes of the established and SV40-transformed cells which...

  20. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidants status in human malignant and non-malignant thyroid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J A; Neelamohan, R; Suthagar, E; Vengatesh, G; Jayakumar, J; Chandrasekaran, M; Banu, S K; Aruldhas, M M

    2016-06-01

    Thyroid epithelial cells produce moderate amounts of reactive oxygen species that are physiologically required for thyroid hormone synthesis. Nevertheless, when they are produced in excessive amounts, they may become toxic. The present study is aimed to compare the lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes - superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and non-protein thiols (reduced glutathione (GSH)) in human thyroid tissues with malignant and non-malignant disorders. The study used human thyroid tissues and blood samples from 157 women (147 diseased and 10 normal). Thyroid hormones, oxidative stress markers and antioxidants were estimated by standard methods. LPO significantly increased in most of the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC: 82.9%) and follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA: 72.9%) tissues, whilst in a majority of nodular goitre (69.2%) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT: 73.7%) thyroid tissues, it remained unaltered. GSH increased in PTC (55.3%), remained unaltered in FTA (97.3%) and all other goiter samples studied. SOD increased in PTC (51.1%) and all other malignant thyroid tissues studied. CAT remained unaltered in PTC (95.7%), FTA (97.3%) and all other non-malignant samples (HT, MNG, TMNG) studied. GPx increased in PTC (63.8%), all other malignant thyroid tissues and remained unaltered in many of the FTA (91.9%) tissues and all other non-malignant samples (HT, MNG, TMNG) studied. In the case of non-malignant thyroid tumours, the oxidant-antioxidant balance was undisturbed, whilst in malignant tumours the balance was altered, and the change in r value observed in the LPO and SOD pairs between normal and PTC tissues and also in many pairs with multi-nodular goitre (MNG)/toxic MNG tissues may be used as a marker to differentiate/detect different malignant/non-malignant thyroid tumours. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Induction of human airway hyperresponsiveness by tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevich, S Z; Hughes, J M; Black, J L; Armour, C L

    1995-09-15

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) is implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma; however, little is known of its direct effect on smooth muscle reactivity. We investigated the effect of TNF alpha on the responsiveness of human bronchial tissue to electrical field stimulation in vitro. Incubation of non-sensitized tissue with 1 nM, 3 nM and 10 nM TNF alpha significantly increased responsiveness to electrical field stimulation (113 +/- 8, 110 +/- 4 and 112 +/- 2% respectively) compared to control (99 +/- 2%) (P 0.05) nor were responses to exogenous acetylcholine (93 +/- 4% versus 73 +/- 7%, n = 3, P = 0.38). These results show that TNF alpha causes an increase in responsiveness of human bronchial tissue and that this occurs prejunctionally on the parasympathetic nerve pathway. This is the first report of a cytokine increasing human airway tissue responsiveness.

  2. Tumour localization and pharmacokinetics of iodine-125 human monoclonal IgM antibody (COU-1) and its monomeric and half-monomeric fragments analysed in nude mice grafted with human tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditzel, H.; Erb, K.; Rasmussen, J.W.; Jensenius, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Human monoclonal IgM antibodies reactive with cancer-associated antigens may not have the optimal imaging capability due to their large size. Fragmentation of human IgM is less than straight-forward due to the loss of immunoreactivity. From the human monoclonal IgM antibody COU-1 we have prepared monomeric and half-monomeric fragments, which retain the ability to bind to colon cancer cells in vitro. The pharmacokinetics and tumour localization were evaluated in nude mice bearing human colon adenocarcinoma and human melanoma grafts. Faster clearance from the circulation was seen for the smaller half-monomeric fragment with a half-life (rapid phase/slow phase) of 2 h/16 h compared with the intact antibody, 4 h/25 h, and the monomeric fragment, 3 h/27 h. Intact COU-1 as well as the fragments accumulated in the colon tumour graft. Higher amounts of radioactivity were found in the colon tumour as compared to normal organs for intact COU-1 at days 4 and 6, for the monomeric fragment at day 4, and for the half-monomeric fragment at day 2 after injection. This investigation demonstrates the favourable biodistribution of the half monomeric COU-1 fragment. The fast clearance of this fragment resulted in a tumour-to-muscle ratio as high as 22 on day 2 after injection. Also, only this fragment gave a positive tumour-to-blood ratio. Normal IgM and its fragments were used as controls. Radioimmunoscintigraphy demonstrated the colon tumour discriminatory properties of each of the three iodine-labelled antibody preparations. The results compare favourably with previously reported investigations of the localization of human monoclonal antibodies and suggest that fragments of human monoclonal IgM antibodies may be useful tools for the immunodetection of cancer in patients. (orig.)

  3. 31P NMR spectroscopy studies of phospholipid metabolism in human melanoma xenograft lines differing in rate of tumour cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyng, H; Olsen, D R; Petersen, S B; Rofstad, E K

    1995-04-01

    The concentration of phospholipid metabolites in tumours has been hypothesized to be related to rate of cell membrane turnover and may reflect rate of cell proliferation. The purpose of the study reported here was to investigate whether 31P NMR resonance ratios involving the phosphomonoester (PME) or phosphodiester (PDE) resonance are correlated to fraction of cells in S-phase or volume-doubling time in experimental tumours. Four human melanoma xenograft lines (BEX-t, HUX-t, SAX-t, WIX-t) were included in the study. The tumours were grown subcutaneously in male BALB/c-nu/nu mice. 31P NMR spectroscopy was performed at a magnetic field strength of 4.7 T. Fraction of cells in S-phase was measured by flow cytometry. Tumour volume-doubling time was determined by Gompertzian analysis of volumetric growth data. BEX-t and SAX-t tumours differed in fraction of cells in S-phase and volume-doubling time, but showed similar 31P NMR resonance ratios. BEX-t and WIX-t tumours showed significantly different 31P NMR resonance ratios but similar fractions of cells in S-phase. The 31P NMR resonance ratios were significantly different for small and large HUX-t tumours even though fraction of cells in S-phase and volume-doubling time did not differ with tumour volume. None of the 31P NMR resonance ratios showed significant increase with increasing fraction of cells in S-phase or significant decrease with increasing tumour volume-doubling time across the four xenograft lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Modification of nucleotide metabolism in relationship with differentiation and in response to irradiation in human tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Shuang

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the metabolism of nucleotides in human tumour cells. The first part addresses the modifications of nucleotide (more specifically purine) metabolism in relationship with human melanoma cell proliferation and differentiation. The second part addresses the modifications of this metabolism in response to an irradiation in human colon tumour cells. For each part, the author proposes a bibliographic synthesis, and a presentation of studied cells and of methods used to grow cells, and respectively to proliferate and differentiate them or to irradiate them, and then discusses the obtained results [fr

  5. Modelling cell population growth with applications to cancer therapy in human tumour cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Britta; Baguley, Bruce C; Marshall, Elaine S; Wake, Graeme C; Wall, David J N

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the work undertaken to model a population of cells and the effects of cancer therapy. We began with a theoretical one compartment size structured cell population model and investigated its asymptotic steady size distributions (SSDs) (On a cell growth model for plankton, MMB JIMA 21 (2004) 49). However these size distributions are not similar to the DNA (size) distributions obtained experimentally via the flow cytometric analysis of human tumour cell lines (data obtained from the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, New Zealand). In our one compartment model, size was a generic term, but in order to obtain realistic steady size distributions we chose size to be DNA content and devised a multi-compartment mathematical model for the cell division cycle where each compartment corresponds to a distinct phase of the cell cycle (J. Math. Biol. 47 (2003) 295). We then incorporated another compartment describing the possible induction of apoptosis (cell death) from mitosis phase (Modelling cell death in human tumour cell lines exposed to anticancer drug paclitaxel, J. Math. Biol. 2004, in press). This enabled us to compare our model to flow cytometric data of a melanoma cell line where the anticancer drug, paclitaxel, had been added. The model gives a dynamic picture of the effects of paclitaxel on the cell cycle. We hope to use the model to describe the effects of other cancer therapies on a number of different cell lines. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Human papilloma viruses and cervical tumours: mapping of integration sites and analysis of adjacent cellular sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, Eugene; Vinokourova, Svetlana; Moisjak, Elena; Rakhmanaliev, Elian; Kobseva, Vera; Laimins, Laimonis; Kisseljov, Fjodor; Sulimova, Galina

    2002-01-01

    In cervical tumours the integration of human papilloma viruses (HPV) transcripts often results in the generation of transcripts that consist of hybrids of viral and cellular sequences. Mapping data using a variety of techniques has demonstrated that HPV integration occurred without obvious specificity into human genome. However, these techniques could not demonstrate whether integration resulted in the generation of transcripts encoding viral or viral-cellular sequences. The aim of this work was to map the integration sites of HPV DNA and to analyse the adjacent cellular sequences. Amplification of the INTs was done by the APOT technique. The APOT products were sequenced according to standard protocols. The analysis of the sequences was performed using BLASTN program and public databases. To localise the INTs PCR-based screening of GeneBridge4-RH-panel was used. Twelve cellular sequences adjacent to integrated HPV16 (INT markers) expressed in squamous cell cervical carcinomas were isolated. For 11 INT markers homologous human genomic sequences were readily identified and 9 of these showed significant homologies to known genes/ESTs. Using the known locations of homologous cDNAs and the RH-mapping techniques, mapping studies showed that the INTs are distributed among different human chromosomes for each tumour sample and are located in regions with the high levels of expression. Integration of HPV genomes occurs into the different human chromosomes but into regions that contain highly transcribed genes. One interpretation of these studies is that integration of HPV occurs into decondensed regions, which are more accessible for integration of foreign DNA

  7. Mendelian analysis of a metastasis-prone substrain of BALB/c nude mice using a subcutaneously inoculated human tumour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, M; Brünner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M

    2006-01-01

    Most nude mice do not allow the formation of metastases after heterotransplantation of human malignant tumours. Here we describe a substrain of BALB/c nude mice (BALB/c/AnNCr) that reproducibly allows some human cancers to metastasize. By Mendelian analysis of hybrids between this substrain and C57...

  8. Prevention and treatment of colon cancer by peroral administration of HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthia, Manoj; Storm, Petter; Nadeem, Aftab; Hsiung, Sabrina; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Most colon cancers start with dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling and remain a major therapeutic challenge. Examining whether HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) may be used for colon cancer treatment is logical, based on the properties of the complex and its biological context. To investigate if HAMLET can be used for colon cancer treatment and prevention. Apc(Min)(/+) mice, which carry mutations relevant to hereditary and sporadic human colorectal tumours, were used as a model for human disease. HAMLET was given perorally in therapeutic and prophylactic regimens. Tumour burden and animal survival of HAMLET-treated and sham-fed mice were compared. Tissue analysis focused on Wnt/β-catenin signalling, proliferation markers and gene expression, using microarrays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Confocal microscopy, reporter assay, immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, ion flux assays and holographic imaging were used to determine effects on colon cancer cells. Peroral HAMLET administration reduced tumour progression and mortality in Apc(Min)(/+) mice. HAMLET accumulated specifically in tumour tissue, reduced β-catenin and related tumour markers. Gene expression analysis detected inhibition of Wnt signalling and a shift to a more differentiated phenotype. In colon cancer cells with APC mutations, HAMLET altered β-catenin integrity and localisation through an ion channel-dependent pathway, defining a new mechanism for controlling β-catenin signalling. Remarkably, supplying HAMLET to the drinking water from the time of weaning also significantly prevented tumour development. These data identify HAMLET as a new, peroral agent for colon cancer prevention and treatment, especially needed in people carrying APC mutations, where colon cancer remains a leading cause of death.

  9. Selective targeting of tumour neovasculature by a radiohalogenated human antibody fragment specific for the ED-B domain of fibronectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demartis, S.; Tarli, L.; Neri, D.; Borsi, L.; Zardi, L.

    2001-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a characteristic feature of many aggressive tumours and other disorders. Antibodies capable of binding to new blood vessels, but not to mature vessels, could be used as selective targeting agents for immunoscintigraphic and radioimmunotherapeutic applications. Here we show that scFv(L19), a recombinant human antibody fragment with sub-nanomolar affinity for the ED-B domain of fibronectin, a marker of angiogenesis, can be stably labelled with iodine-125 and astatine-211 with full retention of immunoreactivity, using a trimethyl-stannyl benzoate bifunctional derivative. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing two different types of tumour grafted subcutaneously, followed by ex vivo micro-autoradiographic analysis, revealed that scFv(L19) rapidly localises around tumour blood vessels, but not around normal vessels. Four hours after intravenous injection of the stably radioiodinated scFv(L19), tumour to blood ratios were 6:1 in mice bearing the F9 murine teratocarcinoma and 9:1 in mice bearing an FE8 rat sarcoma. As expected, all other organs (including kidney) contained significantly less radioactivity than the tumour. Since the ED-B domain of fibronectin has an identical sequence in mouse and man, scFv(L19) is a pan-species antibody and the results presented here suggest clinical utility of radiolabelled scFv(L19) for the scintigraphic detection of angiogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, it should now be possible to investigate scFv(L19) for the selective delivery of 211 At to the tumour neovasculature, causing the selective death of tumour endothelial cells and tumour collapse. (orig.)

  10. Potentially lethal damage repair in cell lines of radioresistant human tumours and normal skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchese, M.J.; Minarik, L.; Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation cell survival data were obtained in vitro for three cell lines isolated from human tumours traditionally considered to be radioresistant-two melanomas and one osteosarcoma-as well as from a diploid skin fibroblast cell line. One melanoma cell line was much more radioresistant than the other, while the osteosarcoma and fibroblast cell lines were more radiosensitive than either. For cells growing exponentially, little potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) could be demonstrated by comparing survival data for cells in which subculture was delayed by 6 h with those sub-cultured immediately after treatment. For the malignant cells in plateau phase, which in these cells might be better termed 'slowed growth phase', since an appreciable fraction of the cells are still cycling, a small amount of PLDR was observed, but not as much as reported by other investigators in the literature. The normal fibroblasts, which achieved a truer plateau phase in terms of noncycling cells, showed a significantly larger amount of PLDR than the tumour cells. (author)

  11. Lethality of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human tumour cell lines with different radiosensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco-Martin, J M; Ottenheim, C P; Bartelink, H; Begg, A C

    1996-03-01

    In order to find an explanation for the eventual disappearance of all chromosome aberrations in two radiosensitive human tumour cell lines, the type and stability of different aberration types was investigated in more detail. To classify the aberrations into unstable and stable types, three-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed, including a whole-chromosome probe, a pancentromere probe, and a stain for total DNA. This technique enables the appropriate classification of the aberrations principally by the presence (stable) or not (unstable) of a single centromere per chromosome. Unstable-type aberrations were found to disappear within 7 days (several divisions) in the two radiosensitive and the two radioresistant tumour lines investigated. Stable-type aberrations were found to remain at an approximately constant level over the duration of the experiment (14 days; 8-10 divisions) in the two radioresistant lines. In contrast, the majority of these stable-type aberrations had disappeared by 14 days in the two radiosensitive lines. The previous findings of disappearance of total aberrations in radiosensitive cells was therefore not due to a reduced induction of stable-type aberrations, but the complete disappearance of cells with this aberration type. These results could not be explained by differences in apoptosis or G1 blocks. Two possible explanations for these unexpected findings involve non-random induction of unstable-type aberrations, or lethality of stable-type aberrations. The results suggest caution in the use of stable-type aberration numbers as a predictor for radiosensitivity.

  12. Immunity to tumour antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Geng; Ali, Selman A; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Mian, Shahid; Ahmad, Murrium; Miles, Amanda; Rees, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, a large number of human tumour antigens have been identified. These antigens are classified as tumour-specific shared antigens, tissue-specific differentiation antigens, overexpressed antigens, tumour antigens resulting from mutations, viral antigens and fusion proteins. Antigens recognised by effectors of immune system are potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. However, most tumour antigens are self-proteins and are generally of low immunogenicity and the immune response elicited towards these tumour antigens is not always effective. Strategies to induce and enhance the tumour antigen-specific response are needed. This review will summarise the approaches to discovery of tumour antigens, the current status of tumour antigens, and their potential application to cancer treatment.

  13. Effect of tumour promoter iodoacetate on γ-radiation induced chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjaria, K.B.; Shirsath, K.B.; Bhat, N.N.; Sreedevi, B.

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that tumour-promoting agents potentiate a number of genetic events induced by initiating agents in vitro Iodoacetate (IA) is reported to be a tumour promoter of moderate potency and although to the best of our knowledge, tumour promoting ability of IA in animals has not been reported, a large number of studies have reported various types of effects of IA, which may result in tumour promotion. In this paper, the modifying effects of tumour promoter IA on radiation induced dicentrics in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been reported

  14. Human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in the etiology of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Hørding, U; Nielsen, H W

    1994-01-01

    sequences of two viruses with known transforming abilities, human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used. In none of the 19 successfully amplified samples were DNA sequences of HPV type 16 or type 18 detected. In six cases a faint trace......Epidemiological features suggest that the risk of testicular cancer may be related to exposure to unknown infectious agents, including viruses. Therefore a series of twenty specimens of testicular germ cell tumours, including preinvasive carcinoma in-situ, were tested for the presence of DNA...... of EBV DNA was revealed in one of two experiments. These samples were examined by immunohistochemical staining with specific antibodies raised against the EBV protein products and in-situ hybridization with specific molecular probes, and were confirmed to be negative. The study indicates...

  15. Dual prognostic significance of tumour-associated macrophages in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated or untreated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caro, Giuseppe; Cortese, Nina; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Grizzi, Fabio; Gavazzi, Francesca; Ridolfi, Cristina; Capretti, Giovanni; Mineri, Rossana; Todoric, Jelena; Zerbi, Alessandro; Allavena, Paola; Mantovani, Alberto; Marchesi, Federica

    2016-10-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) play key roles in tumour progression. Recent evidence suggests that TAMs critically modulate the efficacy of anticancer therapies, raising the prospect of their targeting in human cancer. In a large retrospective cohort study involving 110 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we assessed the density of CD68-TAM immune reactive area (%IRA) at the tumour-stroma interface and addressed their prognostic relevance in relation to postsurgical adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX). In vitro, we dissected the synergism of CTX and TAMs. In human PDAC, TAMs predominantly exhibited an immunoregulatory profile, characterised by expression of scavenger receptors (CD206, CD163) and production of interleukin 10 (IL-10). Surprisingly, while the density of TAMs associated to worse prognosis and distant metastasis, CTX restrained their protumour prognostic significance. High density of TAMs at the tumour-stroma interface positively dictated prognostic responsiveness to CTX independently of T-cell density. Accordingly, in vitro, gemcitabine-treated macrophages became tumoricidal, activating a cytotoxic gene expression programme, inhibiting their protumoural effect and switching to an antitumour phenotype. In patients with human PDAC, neoadjuvant CTX was associated to a decreased density of CD206(+) and IL-10(+) TAMs at the tumour-stroma interface. Overall, our data highlight TAMs as critical determinants of prognostic responsiveness to CTX and provide clinical and in vitro evidence that CTX overall directly re-educates TAMs to restrain tumour progression. These results suggest that the quantification of TAMs could be exploited to select patients more likely to respond to CTX and provide the basis for novel strategies aimed at re-educating macrophages in the context of CTX. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Intracranial sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seltzer, S.; Mark, A.S.; Atlas, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    The appearance of intracranial sarcoidosis on Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging has not been previously reported. The authors have studied five patients with T1-and T2-weighted pre-GD and T1-weighted post-GD sequences. Images showed diffuse meningeal involvement suspected on the unenhanced scans in only one patient, enhancing extraaxial masses mimicking meningiomas, and enhancing and nonenhancing intraaxial lesions. In four of five patients, the diagnosis of intracranial sarcoidosis was suggested only after Gd-DTPA administration. The addition of Gd-DTPA greatly enhanced the sensitivity of MR imaging to the extraaxial and meningeal manifestations of central nervous system sarcoidosis

  17. Histological characteristics of human papilloma-virus-positive and -negative invasive and in situ squamous cell tumours of the penis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Dorrit; Jensen, Helle Lone; van den Brule, Adriaan J C

    2009-01-01

    A high prevalence of cervical cancer associated high-risk types of human papillomavirus (hrHPV) has been demonstrated in premalignant and invasive squamous cell lesions of the penis, but large studies correlating histological characteristics with HPV status are few in number. Tumour tissues from...

  18. Stem cell pluripotency factor NANOG is expressed in human fetal gonocytes, testicular carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Almstrup, K; Nielsen, J E

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: NANOG is a key regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and pluripotency. Our recent genome-wide gene expression profiling study of the precursor of testicular germ cell tumours, carcinoma in situ testis (CIS), showed close similarity between ESC and CIS, including high NANOG...... earlier than for OCT-4. We detected no expression at the protein level in normal testis. CONCLUSIONS: NANOG is a new marker for testicular CIS and germ cell tumours and the high level of NANOG along with OCT-4 are determinants of the stem cell-like pluripotency of the preinvasive CIS cell. Timing of NANOG...... expression. In the present study we analysed the protein expression of NANOG during normal development of human testis and in a large series of neoplastic/dysgenetic specimens. METHODS AND RESULTS: We detected abundant expression of NANOG in CIS and in CIS-derived testicular tumours with marked differences...

  19. FA1 immunoreactivity in endocrine tumours and during development of the human fetal pancreas; negative correlation with glucagon expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornehave, D; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Teisner, B

    1996-01-01

    Fetal antigen 1 (FA1) is a glycoprotein containing six epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats. It is closely similar to the protein translated from the human delta-like (dlk) cDNA and probably constitutes a proteolytically processed form of dlk. dlk is homologous to the Drosophila homeotic...... proteins delta and notch and to the murine preadipocyte differentiation factor Pref-1. These proteins participate in determining cell fate choices during differentiation. We now report that FA1 immunoreactivity is present in a number of neuroectodermally derived tumours as well as in pancreatic endocrine...... tumours. A negative correlation between FA1 and glucagon immunoreactants in these tumours prompted a reexamination of FA1 immunoreactants during fetal pancreatic development. At the earliest stages of development, FA1 was expressed by most of the non-endocrine parenchymal cells and, with ensuing...

  20. Variation in sensitizing effect of caffeine in human tumour cell lines after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenzuela, M.T.; Almodovar, M.R. de; Mateos, S.; McMillan, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated whether the protective role of the G2 checkpoint has increasing importance when the p53-dependent G1 checkpoint is inactivated. We have studied the differential effect of caffeine by clonogenic assays and flow cytometry in three human tumour cell lines with different functionality of p53 protein. The radiosensitizing effect of caffeine (2 mM) expressed itself as a significant decrease in surviving fraction at 2 Gy and a significant increase in α-values in RT112 and TE671, both with non-functional p53. However, no radiosensitizing effect was seen in cells with a normal p53 function (MCF-7 BUS). Two millimoles of caffeine also caused important changes in the cell cycle progression after irradiation. MCF-7 BUS showed a G1 arrest after irradiation and an early G2 arrest but those cells that reached the second G2 did not arrest significantly. In contrast, TE671 exhibited radiosensitization by caffeine, no G1 arrest, a G2 arrest in those cells irradiated in G2, no significant accumulation in the second G2 but an overall delay in release from the first cell cycle, which could be abrogated by caffeine. RT112 was similar to TE671 except that the emphasis in a G2 arrest was shifted from the block in cells irradiated in G2 to those irradiated at other cell cycle phases. The data presented confirm that p53 status can be a significant determinant of the efficacy of caffeine as radiosensitizer in these tumour cell lines, and document the importance of the G2 checkpoint in this effect. (author)

  1. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  2. Tumour oxygenation assessed by 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET and polarographic needle electrodes in human soft tissue tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, L.; Keiding, S.; Nordsmark, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of the study was to identify hypoxia in human soft tissue sarcomas (STS) by PET scanning using the hypoxia marker [F-18]-fluoromisonidazole ([F-18]FMISO) and invasive oxygen sensitive probes (Eppendorf pO(2) Histograph, Germany). Materials and methods: Thirteen pat...

  3. Expression and enzymatic activity of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV in human astrocytic tumours are associated with tumour grade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stremeňová, J.; Křepela, E.; Mareš, Vladislav; Trim, J.; Dbalý, V.; Marek, J.; Vaníčková, Z.; Lisá, Věra; Yea, Ch.; Šedo, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2007), s. 785-792 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV * human brain tumors * DASH molecules Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 2.295, year: 2007

  4. Tumour microenvironment and radiation response in sarcomas originating from tumourigenic human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo Peder; Safwat, Akmal Ahmed; Burns, Jorge S.

    2012-01-01

    : Immune deficient female mice were implanted on the backs with cells from one of the clones. The subsequent tumours were subjected to either radiation treatment or had the tumour microenvironment assayed, when they reached 400mm3. Radiation was given as a single fraction of 0 to 15 Gy and the degree...

  5. In vivo imaging of twist drill drainage for subdural hematoma: a clinical feasibility study on electrical impedance tomography for measuring intracranial bleeding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Meng; Li, Bing; Hu, Shijie; Xu, Canhua; Yang, Bin; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Feng; Fei, Zhou; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial bleeding is one of the most severe medical emergencies in neurosurgery. Early detection or diagnosis would largely reduce the rate of disability and mortality, and improve the prognosis of the patients. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) can non-invasively image the internal resistivity distribution within a human body using a ring of external electrodes, and is thus a promising technique to promptly detect the occurrence of intracranial bleedings because blood differs from other brain tissues in resistivity. However, so far there is no experimental study that has determined whether the intracranial resistivity changes in humans could be repeatedly detected and imaged by EIT. Hence, we for the first time attempt to clinically validate this by in vivo imaging the influx and efflux of irrigating fluid (5% dextrose in water, D5W) during the twist-drill drainage operation for the patients with subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, six patients (four male, two female) with subacute or chronic SDH received the surgical operation in order to evacuate the hematoma around subdural region, and EIT measurements were performed simultaneously on each patient's head. The results showed that the resistivity significantly increased on the corresponding position of EIT images during the influx of D5W and gradually decreased back to baseline during the efflux. In the quantitative analysis, the average resistivity values demonstrated the similar results and had highly linear correlation (R(2) = 0.93 ± 0.06) with the injected D5W volumes, as well as the area of the resistivity gain(R(2) = 0.94 ± 0.05). In conclusion, it was clinically validated that intracranial resistivity changes in humans were detectable and quantifiable by the EIT method. After further technical improvements, EIT has the great potential of being a routine neuroimaging tool for early detection of intracranial bleedings.

  6. In vivo imaging of twist drill drainage for subdural hematoma: a clinical feasibility study on electrical impedance tomography for measuring intracranial bleeding in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Dai

    Full Text Available Intracranial bleeding is one of the most severe medical emergencies in neurosurgery. Early detection or diagnosis would largely reduce the rate of disability and mortality, and improve the prognosis of the patients. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT can non-invasively image the internal resistivity distribution within a human body using a ring of external electrodes, and is thus a promising technique to promptly detect the occurrence of intracranial bleedings because blood differs from other brain tissues in resistivity. However, so far there is no experimental study that has determined whether the intracranial resistivity changes in humans could be repeatedly detected and imaged by EIT. Hence, we for the first time attempt to clinically validate this by in vivo imaging the influx and efflux of irrigating fluid (5% dextrose in water, D5W during the twist-drill drainage operation for the patients with subdural hematoma (SDH. In this study, six patients (four male, two female with subacute or chronic SDH received the surgical operation in order to evacuate the hematoma around subdural region, and EIT measurements were performed simultaneously on each patient's head. The results showed that the resistivity significantly increased on the corresponding position of EIT images during the influx of D5W and gradually decreased back to baseline during the efflux. In the quantitative analysis, the average resistivity values demonstrated the similar results and had highly linear correlation (R(2 = 0.93 ± 0.06 with the injected D5W volumes, as well as the area of the resistivity gain(R(2 = 0.94 ± 0.05. In conclusion, it was clinically validated that intracranial resistivity changes in humans were detectable and quantifiable by the EIT method. After further technical improvements, EIT has the great potential of being a routine neuroimaging tool for early detection of intracranial bleedings.

  7. A Case Of Ollier′s Disease With Intracranial Enchondroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharthan Neeraj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of multiple enchondromas is known as Ollier′s disease. Enchondromas are benign tumours of hyaline cartilage arising within the medullary cavity of tubular bones. We are reporting the case of a 16 year old girl with Ollier′s disease who presented with seizures and brainstem compression. A MRI scan of brain showed an intracranial space-occupying lesion in the region of clivus. The intracranial tumour was surgically removed and the histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of enchondroma. Intracranial enchondroma is an extremely rare situation and reported for the first time from south India.

  8. Temporal Dissociation of Neocortical and Hippocampal Contributions to Mental Time Travel Using Intracranial Recordings in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Roey; Nitzan, Mor; Eliahou, Ruth; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Blanke, Olaf; Arzy, Shahar

    2018-01-01

    In mental time travel (MTT) one is "traveling" back-and-forth in time, remembering, and imagining events. Despite intensive research regarding memory processes in the hippocampus, it was only recently shown that the hippocampus plays an essential role in encoding the temporal order of events remembered, and therefore plays an important role in MTT. Does it also encode the temporal relations of these events to the remembering self? We asked patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation with depth electrodes penetrating the temporal lobes bilaterally toward the hippocampus to project themselves in time to a past, future, or present time-point, and then make judgments regarding various events. Classification analysis of intracranial evoked potentials revealed clear temporal dissociation in the left hemisphere between lateral-temporal electrodes, activated at ~100-300 ms, and hippocampal electrodes, activated at ~400-600 ms. This dissociation may suggest a division of labor in the temporal lobe during self-projection in time, hinting toward the different roles of the lateral-temporal cortex and the hippocampus in MTT and the temporal organization of the related events with respect to the experiencing self.

  9. Mapping face categorization in the human ventral occipitotemporal cortex with direct neural intracranial recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossion, Bruno; Jacques, Corentin; Jonas, Jacques

    2018-02-26

    The neural basis of face categorization has been widely investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), identifying a set of face-selective local regions in the ventral occipitotemporal cortex (VOTC). However, indirect recording of neural activity with fMRI is associated with large fluctuations of signal across regions, often underestimating face-selective responses in the anterior VOTC. While direct recording of neural activity with subdural grids of electrodes (electrocorticography, ECoG) or depth electrodes (stereotactic electroencephalography, SEEG) offers a unique opportunity to fill this gap in knowledge, these studies rather reveal widely distributed face-selective responses. Moreover, intracranial recordings are complicated by interindividual variability in neuroanatomy, ambiguity in definition, and quantification of responses of interest, as well as limited access to sulci with ECoG. Here, we propose to combine SEEG in large samples of individuals with fast periodic visual stimulation to objectively define, quantify, and characterize face categorization across the whole VOTC. This approach reconciles the wide distribution of neural face categorization responses with their (right) hemispheric and regional specialization, and reveals several face-selective regions in anterior VOTC sulci. We outline the challenges of this research program to understand the neural basis of face categorization and high-level visual recognition in general. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Temporal Dissociation of Neocortical and Hippocampal Contributions to Mental Time Travel Using Intracranial Recordings in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roey Schurr

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In mental time travel (MTT one is “traveling” back-and-forth in time, remembering, and imagining events. Despite intensive research regarding memory processes in the hippocampus, it was only recently shown that the hippocampus plays an essential role in encoding the temporal order of events remembered, and therefore plays an important role in MTT. Does it also encode the temporal relations of these events to the remembering self? We asked patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation with depth electrodes penetrating the temporal lobes bilaterally toward the hippocampus to project themselves in time to a past, future, or present time-point, and then make judgments regarding various events. Classification analysis of intracranial evoked potentials revealed clear temporal dissociation in the left hemisphere between lateral-temporal electrodes, activated at ~100–300 ms, and hippocampal electrodes, activated at ~400–600 ms. This dissociation may suggest a division of labor in the temporal lobe during self-projection in time, hinting toward the different roles of the lateral-temporal cortex and the hippocampus in MTT and the temporal organization of the related events with respect to the experiencing self.

  11. Dosimetric Comparison of Simulated Human Eye And Water Phantom in Investigation of Iodine Source Effects on Tumour And Healthy Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadi, A.S.; Masoudi, F.S. K.N.Toosi University of Technology

    2011-01-01

    For better clinical analysis in ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry, there is a need for the dose determination in different parts of the eye, so simulating the eye and defining the material of any parts of that, is helpful for better investigating dosimetry in human eye. However in brachytherapy dosimetry, it is common to consider the water phantom as human eye globe. In this work, a full human eye is simulated with MCNP-4C code by considering all parts of the eye like; lens, cornea, retina, choroid, sclera, anterior chamber, optic nerve, bulk of the eye comprising vitreous body and tumour. The average dose in different parts of this full model of human eye is determined and the results are compared with the dose calculated in water phantom. The central axes depth dose and the dose in whole of the tumour for these two simulated eye model are calculated too, and the results are compared. At long last, as the aim of this work is comparing the result of investigating dosimetry between two water phantom as human eye and simulated eye globe, the ratios of the absorbed dose by the healthy tissues to the absorbed dose by the tumour are calculated in these simulations and the comparison between results is done eventually.

  12. Embolisation of intracranial meningiomas without subsequent surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendszus, M.; Solymosi, L.; Martin-Schrader, I.; Schlake, H.P.

    2003-01-01

    In an open, prospective study, we embolised intracranial meningiomas in seven patients, without subsequent surgery. Follow-up over a mean of 20 months included serial neurological examination, MRI and MR spectroscopy. Clinically, embolisation had no adverse effects. Symptomatic patients showed clinical improvement. On MRI marked tumour shrinkage occurred after embolisation in six patients, and was most pronounced during the first 6 months. In a young boy the tumour was unchanged despite complete angiographic devascularisation. Embolisation without subsequent surgery may cause substantial tumour shrinkage and thus be used in selected in patients. However, thorough follow-up is mandatory to ascertain the effects of embolisation. (orig.)

  13. Ophthalmic manifestations in patients with intracranial tumours ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 28, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. Unravelling the biology of human papillomavirus (HPV) related tumours to enhance their radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vozenin, M.C.; Lord, H.K.; Deutsch, E.; Vozenin, M.C.; Hartl, D.

    2010-01-01

    HPV infection is associated with most squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix and many head and neck SCC. While recent understanding of the mechanisms of HPV-induced carcinogenesis has lead to the development of prophylactic vaccines, the principal modality of treatment is radiotherapy and despite concurrent chemotherapy, outcomes remain suboptimal. Improving the radiotherapeutic index thus remains an important challenge as well as defining predictive assays for treatment outcome of HPV-related tumours. Therefore elucidating the influence of the HPV virus on tumour radiosensitivity is of major interest due to the prevalence of HPV-related tumours worldwide and due to evidence that head and neck HPV-tumours have markedly different clinical outcomes compared to non-HPV-related tumours. This difference may allow for different treatment strategies to be developed. The present review aims to summarize the current understanding of radiosensitivity and HPV-related tumour biology in order to subsequently develop new approaches to enhance the therapeutic index. This review also emphasizes the relevance of E6 and E7 onco-proteins to tumour cell response to radiotherapy suggesting that specific targeted approaches such as concomitant modulation of additional pathways using targeted therapies should offer new therapeutic avenues. (authors)

  15. Three-dimensional stereotactic atlas of the adult human skull correlated with the brain, cranial nerves, and intracranial vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Thaung, Thant Shoon Let; Chua, Beng Choon; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Ngai, Vincent; Yang, Yili; Chrzan, Robert; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-05-15

    Although the adult human skull is a complex and multifunctional structure, its 3D, complete, realistic, and stereotactic atlas has not yet been created. This work addresses the construction of a 3D interactive atlas of the adult human skull spatially correlated with the brain, cranial nerves, and intracranial vasculature. The process of atlas construction included computed tomography (CT) high-resolution scan acquisition, skull extraction, skull parcellation, 3D disarticulated bone surface modeling, 3D model simplification, brain-skull registration, 3D surface editing, 3D surface naming and color-coding, integration of the CT-derived 3D bony models with the existing brain atlas, and validation. The virtual skull model created is complete with all 29 bones, including the auditory ossicles (being among the smallest bones). It contains all typical bony features and landmarks. The created skull model is superior to the existing skull models in terms of completeness, realism, and integration with the brain along with blood vessels and cranial nerves. This skull atlas is valuable for medical students and residents to easily get familiarized with the skull and surrounding anatomy with a few clicks. The atlas is also useful for educators to prepare teaching materials. It may potentially serve as a reference aid in the reading and operating rooms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus: Molecular Insights into the Most Recently Discovered Human Tumour Virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stakaitytė, Gabrielė; Wood, Jennifer J.; Knight, Laura M.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Adzahar, Noor Suhana; Nwogu, Nnenna; Macdonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A fifth of worldwide cancer cases have an infectious origin, with viral infection being the foremost. One such cancer is Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but aggressive skin malignancy. In 2008, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was discovered as the causative agent of MCC. It is found clonally integrated into the majority of MCC tumours, which require MCPyV oncoproteins to survive. Since its discovery, research has begun to reveal the molecular virology of MCPyV, as well as how it induces tumourigenesis. It is thought to be a common skin commensal, found at low levels in healthy individuals. Upon loss of immunosurveillance, MCPyV reactivates, and a heavy viral load is associated with MCC pathogenesis. Although MCPyV is in many ways similar to classical oncogenic polyomaviruses, such as SV40, subtle differences are beginning to emerge. These unique features highlight the singular position MCPyV has as the only human oncogenic polyomavirus, and open up new avenues for therapies against MCC

  17. The fate of hypoxic (pimonidazole-labelled) cells in human cervix tumours undergoing chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: A subset of patients in a clinical study where sequential biopsies were to be obtained during multifraction radiotherapy received pimonidazole prior to initiating treatment, allowing a unique opportunity of following hypoxic cells in situ during therapy. Material and methods: After institutional ethics review and with informed consent, women expecting to undergo radical treatment for cancer of the cervix received pimonidazole hydrochloride, with a biopsy approximately 24 h later. Therapy was then started, and weekly biopsies were obtained. In the laboratory, the biopsies were reduced to single cell suspensions for flow cytometry analysis of DNA content, pimonidazole, and proliferation markers. Results: Pre-treatment pimonidazole-positive cells were largely in G /G 1 . Pimonidazole-labelled cells, though expected to be radioresistant, were markedly decreased even early into treatment, and continued to disappear with a half-time of about 3 days. Concurrently, the cell cycle distribution of the previously hypoxic cells changed from predominantly quiescent to mostly proliferating. Conclusions: While a part of the rapid apparent loss of hypoxic cells was certainly due to loss of pimonidazole adducts through repair and dilution by cell division, the speed with which this occurred suggests that many labelled cells could rapidly re-enter the proliferative pool, a result consistent with many of those pimonidazole-labelled human cervix tumour cells being cyclically, rather than continuously, hypoxic

  18. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus: Molecular Insights into the Most Recently Discovered Human Tumour Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakaitytė, Gabrielė; Wood, Jennifer J.; Knight, Laura M.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Adzahar, Noor Suhana; Nwogu, Nnenna; Macdonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian, E-mail: A.Whitehouse@leeds.ac.uk [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Astbury Centre of Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-27

    A fifth of worldwide cancer cases have an infectious origin, with viral infection being the foremost. One such cancer is Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but aggressive skin malignancy. In 2008, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was discovered as the causative agent of MCC. It is found clonally integrated into the majority of MCC tumours, which require MCPyV oncoproteins to survive. Since its discovery, research has begun to reveal the molecular virology of MCPyV, as well as how it induces tumourigenesis. It is thought to be a common skin commensal, found at low levels in healthy individuals. Upon loss of immunosurveillance, MCPyV reactivates, and a heavy viral load is associated with MCC pathogenesis. Although MCPyV is in many ways similar to classical oncogenic polyomaviruses, such as SV40, subtle differences are beginning to emerge. These unique features highlight the singular position MCPyV has as the only human oncogenic polyomavirus, and open up new avenues for therapies against MCC.

  19. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PARTNERSHIPS Meet our Fundraising Partners Tweet Welcome Intracranial hypertension (IH) is the general term for the neurological ... high. (Old names for IH include Benign Intracranial Hypertension and Pseudotumor Cerebri). The Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation ...

  20. Expression of FGFR3 during human testis development and in germ cell-derived tumours of young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewen, Katherine A; Olesen, Inge A; Winge, Sofia B

    2013-01-01

    development and to ascertain whether FGFR3 signalling is linked to germ cell proliferation and the pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of young adult men. Using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we examined 58 specimens of human testes throughout development for FGFR3...... expression, and then compared expression of FGFR3 with proliferation markers (PCNA or Ki67). We also analysed for FGFR3 expression 30 TGCTs and 28 testes containing the tumour precursor cell, carcinoma in situ (CIS). Fetal and adult testes expressed exclusively the FGFR3IIIc isoform. FGFR3 protein expression...... was restricted to the cytoplasm/plasma membrane of spermatogonia and was most prevalent at mid-gestation, infancy and from puberty onwards. Phosphorylated (p)FGFR was detected in pre-spermatogonia at mid-gestation and in spermatogonia during puberty and in the adult testis. Throughout normal human testis...

  1. NMR metabolomics of human lung tumours reveals distinct metabolic signatures for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, CM; Barros, AS; Goodfellow, BJ; Carreira, IM; Gomes, AA; Sousa, V; Bernardo, J; Carvalho, L; Gil, AM; Duarte, IF

    2015-01-01

    Lung tumour subtyping, particularly the distinction between adenocarcinoma (AdC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), is a critical diagnostic requirement. In this work, the metabolic signatures of lung carcinomas were investigated through (1)H NMR metabolomics, with a view to provide additional criteria for improved diagnosis and treatment planning. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyse matched tumour and adjacent control tissue...

  2. Promoter methylation-associated loss of ID4 expression is a marker of tumour recurrence in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noetzel, Erik; Veeck, Jürgen; Niederacher, Dieter; Galm, Oliver; Horn, Felicitas; Hartmann, Arndt; Knüchel, Ruth; Dahl, Edgar

    2008-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding/Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4) is a critical factor for cell proliferation and differentiation in normal vertebrate development. ID4 has regulative functions for differentiation and growth of the developing brain. The role of ID1, ID2 and ID3 are expected to be oncogenic due to their overexpression in pancreatic cancer and colorectal adenocarcinomas, respectively. Aside from these findings, loss of ID3 expression was demonstrated in ovarian cancer. The aim of the present study was to reveal the factual role of ID4 in carcinogenesis in more detail, since its role for the pathogenesis of human breast cancer has been discussed controversially, assigning both oncogenic and tumour suppressive functions. ID4 promoter methylation, ID4 mRNA expression and ID4 protein expression were analysed in primary human breast cancer specimens using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) (n=170), semiquantitative realtime RT-PCR (n=46) and immunhistochemistry (n=3), respectively. In order to demonstrate a functional association of ID4 promoter methylation with its gene silencing, we performed DNA demethylation analysis with four human breast cell lines using MSP and semiquantitative realtime RT-PCR. In addition, we performed correlations of ID4 promoter methylation with ID4 mRNA and ID4 protein expression in matched samples of breast tumour and corresponding normal tissue. We carried out statistical analyses in order to find correlations between ID4 promoter methylation and clinicopathological parameters. Frequent ID4 promoter methylation was observed in primary breast cancer samples (69%, 117/170). We found a tight correlation (P<0.0001) between ID4 promoter methylation and loss of ID4 expression in primary breast cancer 3 specimens. Demethylating treatment with breast cancer cell lines was associated with clear ID4 mRNA re-expression. Tumours with ID4 promoter methylation showed distinct loss of ID4 expression on both transcription and protein level

  3. Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E7 protein bodies cause tumour regression in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, Mark; Öhlschläger, Peter; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Alloza, Leonor; Marzábal, Pablo; Meyers, Ann E; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents of cervical cancer in women, which results in over 250 000 deaths per year. Presently there are two prophylactic vaccines on the market, protecting against the two most common high-risk HPV types 16 and 18. These vaccines remain very expensive and are not generally affordable in developing countries where they are needed most. Additionally, there remains a need to treat women that are already infected with HPV, and who have high-grade lesions or cervical cancer. In this paper, we characterize the immunogenicity of a therapeutic vaccine that targets the E7 protein of the most prevalent high-risk HPV - type 16 – the gene which has previously been shown to be effective in DNA vaccine trials in mice. The synthetic shuffled HPV-16 E7 (16E7SH) has lost its transforming properties but retains all naturally-occurring CTL epitopes. This was genetically fused to Zera®, a self-assembly domain of the maize γ-zein able to induce the accumulation of recombinant proteins into protein bodies (PBs), within the endoplasmic reticulum in a number of expression systems. High-level expression of the HPV 16E7SH protein fused to Zera® in plants was achieved, and the protein bodies could be easily and cost-effectively purified. Immune responses comparable to the 16E7SH DNA vaccine were demonstrated in the murine model, with the protein vaccine successfully inducing a specific humoral as well as cell mediated immune response, and mediating tumour regression. The fusion of 16E7SH to the Zera® peptide was found to enhance the immune responses, presumably by means of a more efficient antigen presentation via the protein bodies. Interestingly, simply mixing the free PBs and 16E7SH also enhanced immune responses, indicating an adjuvant activity for the Zera® PBs

  4. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuner, Irene; Kaffanke, Joachim B.; Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans; Shah, N. Jon

    2012-01-01

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as 18 F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or 11 C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  5. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuner, Irene [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Kaffanke, Joachim B. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); MR-Transfer e.K., Wuppertal (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as {sup 18}F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or {sup 11}C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  6. 99mTechnetium labelled vasoactive intestinal peptide analogue for rapid localization of tumours in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.; Pallela, V.; Marcus, C.S.; Diggles, L.; Pham, H.L.; Ahdoot, R.; Kalinowski, E.A.; Saeed, S.; Minami, C.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, imaging tumours with receptor specific biomolecules has been the focus of increasing interest. VIP has a high affinity for specific receptors that are expressed in high density on a large number of malignant tumours. VIP was modified (TP 3654) without compromising its biological activity, and labelled with 99m Tc. Pharmacokinetics and feasibility studies were performed in three normal volunteers and 11 patients with a history of cancer. Imaging was performed for up to two h post-injection. Within 24 h after injection of 99m Tc-TP 3654 (10-15 mCi/5 μg), approximately 70% of the tracer cleared through the kidneys, and 20% through the liver. Blood clearance was rapid. No adverse reaction was noted in any subjects. All known tumours were clearly delineated within 20 min. Findings were compared with the results of 99m Tc-MIBI, CT, MRI, or histology. There was concordance in nine patients. In the other two, only the VIP scan was positive for tumours known to express VIP receptors. The early results of imaging tumours with 99m Tc-VIP are promising and warrant further studies. (author)

  7. Recombinant Kunjin virus replicon vaccines induce protective T-cell immunity against human papillomavirus 16 E7-expressing tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herd, Karen A.; Harvey, Tracey; Khromykh, Alexander A.; Tindle, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    The persistence of the E7 oncoprotein in transformed cells in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical cancer provides a tumour-specific antigen to which immunotherapeutic strategies may be directed. Self-replicating RNA (replicon) vaccine vectors derived from the flavivirus Kunjin (KUN) have recently been reported to induce T-cell immunity. Here, we report that inclusion of a CTL epitope of HPV16 E7 protein into a polyepitope encoded by a KUN vector induced E7-directed T-cell responses and protected mice against challenge with an E7-expressing epithelial tumour. We found replicon RNA packaged into virus-like particles to be more effective than naked replicon RNA or plasmid DNA constructed to allow replicon RNA transcription in vivo. Protective immunity was induced although the E7 CTL epitope was subdominant in the context of other CTL epitopes in the polyepitope. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the KUN replicon vector system for inducing protective immunity directed towards a virally encoded human tumour-specific antigen, and for inducing multi-epitopic CTL responses

  8. 1H MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours: a practical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callot, Virginie; Galanaud, Damien; Le Fur, Yann; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Cozzone, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is proposed in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help in the characterization of brain tumours by detecting metabolic alterations that may be indicative of the tumour class. MRS can be routinely performed on clinical magnets, within a reasonable acquisition time and if performed under adequate conditions, MRS is reproducible and thus can be used for longitudinal follow-up of treatment. MRS can also be performed in clinical practice to guide the neurosurgeon into the most aggressive part of the lesions or to avoid unnecessary surgery, which may furthermore decrease the risk of surgical morbidity

  9. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours: a practical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callot, Virginie [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: virginie.callot@univmed.fr; Galanaud, Damien [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France); Departement de Neuroradiologie, Hopital La Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Le Fur, Yann; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Cozzone, Patrick J. [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is proposed in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help in the characterization of brain tumours by detecting metabolic alterations that may be indicative of the tumour class. MRS can be routinely performed on clinical magnets, within a reasonable acquisition time and if performed under adequate conditions, MRS is reproducible and thus can be used for longitudinal follow-up of treatment. MRS can also be performed in clinical practice to guide the neurosurgeon into the most aggressive part of the lesions or to avoid unnecessary surgery, which may furthermore decrease the risk of surgical morbidity.

  10. TUMOUR VACCINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Ernst; Kircheis, Ralf; Crommelin, D.; Van Slooten, Maaike; Storm, Gert

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a tumour vaccine with a tumour antigen base. In addition to a source of tumour antigens, the vaccine contains a release system for the delayed release of the active agent IFN- gamma , the active dose of IFN- gamma being 50 ng to 5 mu g. The IFN- gamma is released over a

  11. Expression of receptors for gut peptides in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma and tumour-free pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, C.; Biemond, I.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Verspaget, W.; Lamers, C. B.

    1997-01-01

    Gut hormones that modulate the growth of normal pancreas may also modulate the growth of cancers originating from pancreas. This study visualized and compared the receptors for cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin (BBS), secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in tumour-free tissue sections of

  12. Localised in vivo 1H spectroscopy of human bone and soft tissue tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongers, H.; Schick, F.; Skalej, M.; Hess, C.F.; Jung, W.I.

    1992-01-01

    Localised 1 H in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to fibrous and bone tumours before and during cytostatic treatment and radiotherapy. The results of 24 studies in 18 patients with malignant tumours of the leg or pelvis are presented including cases of sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, multiple myeloma, malignant lymphoma and metastasis. A double spin echo localisation method with water suppression was implemented on a 1.5 Tesla whole body unit. Voxel size was (13 mm) 3 or (20 mm) 3 . The most common resonances besides lipids (16/18) were those of choline (10/18) and creatine (5/18). Creatine was always decreased in comparison to choline and often absent from tumour spectra. Additional resonances with phase distorsions from J-coupling (chemical shift region 1.8-2.5 and 2.2-4.0 ppm) were recorded. In the presence of lipids, lactate remained undetectable because special editing techniques were not available. Significant spectral differences between different tumour types were not evident. In about 30% of the investigations the spectra contained only water and lipid signals. Follow-up studies in three patients during radio- and chemotherapy showed a decrease in metabolites (choline, creatine, unassigned signals between 1.0 and 2.5 ppm) after weeks and months. The decrease in choline was most pronounced paralleled by an increase in lipid/choline ratios. (orig.)

  13. Acetyltransferases and tumour suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A C; Vousden, Karen H

    2000-01-01

    The acetyltransferase p300 was first identified associated with the adenoviral transforming protein E1A, suggesting a potential role for p300 in the regulation of cell proliferation. Direct evidence demonstrating a role for p300 in human tumours was lacking until the recentl publication by Gayther et al, which strongly supports a role for p300 as a tumour suppressor. The authors identify truncating mutations associated with the loss or mutation of the second allele in both tumour samples and cell lines, suggesting that loss of p300 may play a role in the development of a subset of human cancers

  14. Proline-hydroxylated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α upregulation in human tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron E Snell

    Full Text Available The stabilisation of HIF-α is central to the transcriptional response of animals to hypoxia, regulating the expression of hundreds of genes including those involved in angiogenesis, metabolism and metastasis. HIF-α is degraded under normoxic conditions by proline hydroxylation, which allows for recognition and ubiquitination by the von-Hippel-Lindau (VHL E3 ligase complex. The aim of our study was to investigate the posttranslational modification of HIF-1α in tumours, to assess whether there are additional mechanisms besides reduced hydroxylation leading to stability. To this end we optimised antibodies against the proline-hydroxylated forms of HIF-1α for use in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE immunohistochemistry to assess effects in tumour cells in vivo. We found that HIF-1α proline-hydroxylated at both VHL binding sites (Pro402 and Pro564, was present in hypoxic regions of a wide range of tumours, tumour xenografts and in moderately hypoxic cells in vitro. Staining for hydroxylated HIF-1α can identify a subset of breast cancer patients with poorer prognosis and may be a better marker than total HIF-1α levels. The expression of unhydroxylated HIF-1α positively correlates with VHL in breast cancer suggesting that VHL may be rate-limiting for HIF degradation. Our conclusions are that the degradation of proline-hydroxylated HIF-1α may be rate-limited in tumours and therefore provides new insights into mechanisms of HIF upregulation. Persistence of proline-hydroxylated HIF-1α in perinecrotic areas suggests there is adequate oxygen to support prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD activity and proline-hydroxylated HIF-1α may be the predominant form associated with the poorer prognosis that higher levels of HIF-1α confer.

  15. Spontaneous transformation of human granulosa cell tumours into an aggressive phenotype: a metastasis model cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Misa; Muraki, Miho; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Saito, Hidekazu; Seiki, Motoharu; Takahashi, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) are frequently seen in menopausal women and are relatively indolent. Although the physiological properties of normal granulosa cells have been studied extensively, little is known about the molecular mechanism of GCT progression. Here, we characterise the unique behavioural properties of a granulosa tumour cell line, KGN cells, for the molecular analysis of GCT progression. Population doubling was carried out to examine the proliferation capacity of KGN cells. Moreover, the invasive capacity of these cells was determined using the in vitro invasion assay. The expression level of tumour markers in KGN cells at different passages was then determined by Western blot analysis. Finally, the growth and metastasis of KGN cells injected subcutaneously (s.c.) into nude mice was observed 3 months after injection. During in vitro culture, the advanced passage KGN cells grew 2-fold faster than the early passage cells, as determined by the population doubling assay. Moreover, we found that the advanced passage cells were 2-fold more invasive than the early passage cells. The expression pattern of tumour markers, such as p53, osteopontin, BAX and BAG-1, supported the notion that with passage, KGN cells became more aggressive. Strikingly, KGN cells at both early and advanced passages metastasized to the bowel when injected s.c. into nude mice. In addition, more tumour nodules were formed when the advanced passage cells were implanted. KGN cells cultured in vitro acquire an aggressive phenotype, which was confirmed by the analysis of cellular activities and the expression of biomarkers. Interestingly, KGN cells injected s.c. are metastatic with nodule formation occurring mostly in the bowel. Thus, this cell line is a good model for analysing GCT progression and the mechanism of metastasis in vivo

  16. Study of intracranial pressure in human brain during transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honrath, Marc; Sabouni, Abas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of cranial force in human brain due to electromagnetic pulse during transcranial magnetic stimulation. To model the force in a realistic brain, we used three dimensional magnetic resonance image of the 26 years old female subject. Simulation results show that during TMS procedure, there is a small force generated within the cranial tissue layers along with a torque value in different layers of brain tissues. The force depends on the magnitude of the magnetic field generated by the TMS coil.

  17. The prognostic value of pimonidazole and tumour pO2 in human cervix carcinomas after radiation therapy: a prospective international multi-center study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Loncaster, Julie; Aquino-Parsons, Christina

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely affects treatment outcome in human uterine cervical cancer. Here, we present the results of a prospective international multi-centre study evaluating the prognostic value of pre-treatment tumour oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) and the hypoxia marker pimon...... pimonidazole (pimo). MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty-seven patients with primary cervix cancer were entered. Pre-treatment tumour pO(2) measurements were obtained, and reported by the median tumour pO(2), the fraction of pO(2) values......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely affects treatment outcome in human uterine cervical cancer. Here, we present the results of a prospective international multi-centre study evaluating the prognostic value of pre-treatment tumour oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) and the hypoxia marker...

  18. Differences in radiosensitivity among cells in culture and in experimental tumours: Significance for the effectiveness of human cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.; Amsterdam Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Problems in the application of radiobiological data on various types of models, cell in vitro, experimental tumours, and clinical models, to the prediction of tumour radiocurability are discussed. On the basis of observations on cells in culture and experimental tumours it is suggested that heterogeneity in responsiveness of tumours in patients is caused in a large part by differences in intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity. Methods and developments are reviewed, which may yield better assays for the prediction of tumour responsiveness to treatments. (Auth.)

  19. Incidence of Brain Tumours at an Academic Centre in Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the incidence of brain tumours at King AbdulAziz University Hospital (KAUH) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, over eight year period. Design: Retrospective study. Sitting: King Abdul Aziz University Hospital in Jeddah Saudi Arabia. Subjects: Patients with intracranial tumours. Results: The overall average ...

  20. Upregulated expression of human neutrophil peptides 1, 2 and 3 (HNP 1-3) in colon cancer serum and tumours: a biomarker study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Bøgebo, Rikke; Gammeltoft, Steen; Olsen, Jesper; Winther, Benny; Raskov, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Molecular markers for localized colon tumours and for prognosis following therapy are needed. Proteomics research is currently producing numerous biomarker studies with clinical potential. We investigate the protein composition of plasma and of tumour extracts with the aim of identifying biomarkers for colon cancer. By Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionisation – Time Of Flight / Mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS) we compare the protein profiles of colon cancer serum with serum from healthy individuals and the protein profiles of colon tumours with normal colon tissue. By size exclusion chromatography, we investigate the binding of HNP 1-3 to high mass plasma proteins. By microflow we investigate the effect of HNP 1-3 on mammalian cells. Human Neutrophil Peptides -1, -2 and -3 (HNP 1-3), also known as alfa-defensin-1, -2 and -3, are present in elevated concentrations in serum from colon cancer patients and in protein extracts from colon tumours. A fraction of HNP 1-3 in serum is bound to unidentified high mass plasma proteins. HNP 1-3 purified from colon tumours are lethal to mammalian cells. HNP 1-3 may serve as blood markers for colon cancer in combination with other diagnostic tools. We propose that HNP 1-3 are carried into the bloodstream by attaching to high mass plasma proteins in the tumour microenvironment. We discuss the effect of HNP 1-3 on tumour progression

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of aldoxorubicin in an intracranial xenograft mouse model of human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Luis; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Musto, Alberto E; Wilk, Anna; Vashistha, Himanshu; Zapata, Adriana; Walker, Chelsey; Velasco-Gonzalez, Cruz; Parsons, Christopher; Wieland, Scott; Levitt, Daniel; Reiss, Krzysztof; Prakash, Om

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12 to 15 months after diagnosis. Acquired chemoresistance, high systemic toxicity, and low penetration of the blood brain barrier by many anticancer drugs contribute to the failure of anti-GBM therapies. To circumvent some of these obstacles, we tested a novel prodrug approach to evaluate anti-GBM efficacy by utilizing serum albumin-binding doxorubicin (Doxo), aldoxorubicin (Aldoxo), which is less toxic, is released from albumin in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. A human GBM cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter (U87-luc) was stereotactically injected into the left striatum of the brain of immunodeficient mice. Following initial tumor growth for 12 days, mice were injected once a week in the tail-vein with Aldoxo [24 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg of doxorubicin equivalents-3/4 maximum tolerated dose (MTD)], Doxo [6 mg/kg (3/4 MTD)], or vehicle. Aldoxo-treated mice demonstrated significantly slower growth of the tumor when compared to vehicle-treated or Doxo-treated mice. Five out of eight Aldoxo-treated mice remained alive more than 60 days with a median survival of 62 days, while the median survival of vehicle- and Doxo-treated mice was only 26 days. Importantly, Aldoxo-treated mice exhibited high levels of Doxo within the tumor tissue, accompanied by low tumor cell proliferation (Ki67) and abundant intratumoral programmed cell death (cleaved caspase-3). Effective accumulation of Aldoxo in brain tumor tissues but not normal brain, its anti-tumor efficacy, and low toxicity, provide a strong rationale for evaluating this novel drug conjugate as a treatment for patients afflicted with GBM.

  2. Therapeutic Efficacy of Aldoxorubicin in an Intracranial Xenograft Mouse Model of Human Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Marrero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12 to 15 months after diagnosis. Acquired chemoresistance, high systemic toxicity, and low penetration of the blood brain barrier by many anticancer drugs contribute to the failure of anti-GBM therapies. To circumvent some of these obstacles, we tested a novel prodrug approach to evaluate anti-GBM efficacy by utilizing serum albumin-binding doxorubicin (Doxo, aldoxorubicin (Aldoxo, which is less toxic, is released from albumin in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. A human GBM cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter (U87-luc was stereotactically injected into the left striatum of the brain of immunodeficient mice. Following initial tumor growth for 12 days, mice were injected once a week in the tail-vein with Aldoxo [24 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg of doxorubicin equivalents—3/4 maximum tolerated dose (MTD], Doxo [6 mg/kg (3/4 MTD], or vehicle. Aldoxo-treated mice demonstrated significantly slower growth of the tumor when compared to vehicle-treated or Doxo-treated mice. Five out of eight Aldoxo-treated mice remained alive more than 60 days with a median survival of 62 days, while the median survival of vehicle- and Doxo-treated mice was only 26 days. Importantly, Aldoxo-treated mice exhibited high levels of Doxo within the tumor tissue, accompanied by low tumor cell proliferation (Ki67 and abundant intratumoral programmed cell death (cleaved caspase-3. Effective accumulation of Aldoxo in brain tumor tissues but not normal brain, its anti-tumor efficacy, and low toxicity, provide a strong rationale for evaluating this novel drug conjugate as a treatment for patients afflicted with GBM.

  3. TRAIL receptor upregulation and the implication of KRAS/BRAF mutations in human colon cancer tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oikonomou, E.; Kosmidou, V.; Katseli, A.; Kothonidis, K.; Mourtzoukou, D.; Kontogeorgos, G.; Anděra, Ladislav; Zografos, G.; Pintzas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 125, č. 9 (2009), s. 2127-2135 ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSHC-CT-2006-037278 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : colorectal tumours * TRAIL receptors expression * KRAS/ BRAF oncogenic mutations Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.722, year: 2009

  4. Hyaluronan and hyaluronectin in the extracellular matrix of human brain tumour stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, B; Maingonnat, C; Girard, N; Chauzy, C; Maunoury, R; Olivier, A; Tayot, J; Creissard, P

    1993-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and the hyaluronan-binding glycoprotein hyaluronectin (HN) were measured in 23 gliomas and 8 meningiomas and their location was revisited in 35 tumours. A clear-cut difference was found in the HN/HA ratio values of glioblastomas (below 0.5) and that of astrocytomas (above 0.5 P edification of the extracellular matrix. In meningiomas only the stroma would be responsible for HA and HN production.

  5. Changes of E-cadherin and á-catenin in human and mouse intestinal tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šloncová, Eva; Frič, P.; Kučerová, Dana; Lojda, Z.; Tuháčková, Zdena; Sovová, Vlasta

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2001), s. 13-17 ISSN 0018-2214 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/96/K205; GA ČR GA301/00/0269; GA MZd IZ4217 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : E-cadherin * beta-catenin * intestinal tumours Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.169, year: 2001

  6. Tumour dosimetry and response in patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer using recombinant human thyrotropin before radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keizer, Bart de; Hoekstra, Anne; Rijk, Peter P. van; Klerk, John M.H. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Room E02.222, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brans, Boudewijn; Dierckx, Rudi A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Zelissen, Pierre M.J.; Koppeschaar, Hans P.F.; Lips, Cees J.M. [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2003-03-01

    The development of recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) has given clinicians new options for diagnostic follow-up and treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). This paper evaluates the tumour dosimetry and response following -iodine-131 treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer patients after rhTSH stimulation instead of classical hormone withdrawal-induced hypothyroidism. Nineteen consecutive {sup 131}I treatments in 16 patients were performed after rhTSH stimulation. All patients had undergone a near-total thyroidectomy followed by an ablative dosage of {sup 131}I. They all suffered from metastatic or recurrent disease showing tumoral {sup 131}I uptake on previous post-treatment scintigraphy. Dosimetric calculations were performed using {sup 131}I tumour uptake measurements from post-treatment {sup 131}I scintigrams and tumour volume estimations from radiological images. Response was assessed by comparing pre-treatment serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level with the Tg level 3 months post treatment. In 18 out of 19 treatments, uptake of {sup 131}I in metastatic or recurrent lesions was seen. The median tumour radiation dose was 26.3 Gy (range 1.3-368 Gy), and the median effective half-life was 2.7 days (range 0.5-6.5 days). Eleven of 19 treatments (10/16 patients) were evaluable for response after 3 months. {sup 131}I therapy with rhTSH resulted in a biochemical partial response in 3/11 or 27% of treatments (two patients), biochemical stable disease in 2/11 or 18% of treatments and biochemical progressive disease in 6/11 or 55% of treatments. Our study showed that although tumour doses in DTC patients treated with {sup 131}I after rhTSH were highly variable, 45% of treatments led to disease stabilisation or partial remission when using rhTSH in conjunction with {sup 131}I therapy, without serious side-effects and with minimal impact on quality of life. RhTSH is therefore adequately satisfactory as an adjuvant tool in therapeutic settings and is

  7. Radiation-induced apoptosis and cell cycle checkpoints in human colorectal tumour cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Playle, L.C.

    2001-03-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor gene is mutated in 75% of colorectal carcinomas and is critical for DNA damage-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Data presented in this thesis demonstrate that after treatment with Ionizing Radiation (IR), colorectal tumour cell lines with mutant p53 are unable to arrest at G1 and undergo cell cycle arrest at G2. The staurosporine derivative, UCN-01, was shown to abrogate the IR-induced G2 checkpoint in colorectal tumour cell lines. Furthermore, in some cell lines, abrogation of the G2 checkpoint was associated with radiosensitisation. Data presented in this study demonstrate that 2 out of 5 cell lines with mutant p53 were sensitised to IR by UCN-01. In order to determine whether radiosensitisation correlated with lack of functional p53, transfected derivatives of an adenoma-derived cell line were studied, in which endogenous wild type p53 was disrupted by expression of a dominant negative p53 mutant protein (and with a vector control). In both these cell lines UCN-01 abrogated the G2 arrest however this was not associated with radiosensitisation, indicating that radiosensitisation is a cell type-specific phenomenon. Although 2 colorectal carcinoma cell lines, with mutant p53, were sensitised to IR by UCN-01, the mechanisms of p53-independent IR-induced apoptosis in the colon are essentially unknown. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (that is the JNK, p38 and ERK pathways) have been implicated in apoptosis in a range of cell systems and in IR-induced apoptosis in some cell types. Data presented in this study show that, although the MAPKs can be activated by the known activator anisomycin, there is no evidence of a role for MAPKs in IR-induced apoptosis in colorectal tumour cell lines, regardless of p53 status. In summary, some colorectal tumour cell lines with mutant p53 can be sensitised to IR-induced cell death by G2 checkpoint abrogation and this may be an important treatment strategy, however mechanisms of IR-induced p53

  8. The prognostic value of pimonidazole and tumour pO2 in human cervix carcinomas after radiation therapy: A prospective international multi-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Loncaster, Julie; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Chou, S.-C.; Gebski, Val; West, Catharine; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Havsteen, Hanne; Davidson, Susan E.; Hunter, Robin; Raleigh, James A.; Overgaard, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxia adversely affects treatment outcome in human uterine cervical cancer. Here, we present the results of a prospective international multi-centre study evaluating the prognostic value of pre-treatment tumour oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 ) and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole (pimo). Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty-seven patients with primary cervix cancer were entered. Pre-treatment tumour pO 2 measurements were obtained, and reported by the median tumour pO 2 , the fraction of pO 2 values ≤10 mmHg (HP 1 ), ≤5 mmHg (HP 5 ) and ≤2.5 mmHg (HP 2.5 ). Following intravenous pimonidazole administration, biopsies were taken, stained for pimonidazole adducts, and scored for the area of labelled tumour cells on a scale from 0 to 4. Treatment modalities were surgery (11%), radiotherapy (98%), chemotherapy (33%) and carbogen (14%). Results: None of the hypoxia descriptors were statistically significant prognostic factors for loco-regional tumour control or overall survival when analyzed as continuous variables or divided by the sample median. By univariate analysis only tumour size and nodal status were significant prognostic factors for local control. Tumour size and FIGO stage were significant for overall survival. In a multivariate analysis stratified by centre, only tumour size above 5 cm and lower pre-treatment haemoglobin predicted poorer overall survival among FIGO stage, nodal involvement, tumour size, pre-treatment haemoglobin dichotomized at 12 g/dl and pimo 1, pimo 4 and HP 5 as continuous variables. Conclusion: Neither Eppendorf nor pimonidazole should be dismissed based on the current results. However, further investigations are needed to readdress the hypotheses of the current study having optimized statistical designs, and a population of sufficient size treated more homogenously following rigorous protocols

  9. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus...

  10. Targeting mesothelin receptors with drug-loaded bacterial nanocells suppresses human mesothelioma tumour growth in mouse xenograft models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A Alfaleh

    Full Text Available Human malignant mesothelioma is a chemoresistant tumour that develops from mesothelial cells, commonly associated with asbestos exposure. Malignant mesothelioma incidence rates in European countries are still rising and Australia has one of the highest burdens of malignant mesothelioma on a population basis in the world. Therapy using systemic delivery of free cytotoxic agents is associated with many undesirable side effects due to non-selectivity, and is thus dose-limited which limits its therapeutic potential. Therefore, increasing the selectivity of anti-cancer agents has the potential to dramatically enhance drug efficacy and reduce toxicity. EnGeneIC Dream Vectors (EDV are antibody-targeted nanocells which can be loaded with cytotoxic drugs and delivered to specific cancer cells via bispecific antibodies (BsAbs which target the EDV and a cancer cell-specific receptor, simultaneously. BsAbs were designed to target doxorubicin-loaded EDVs to cancer cells via cell surface mesothelin (MSLN. Flow cytometry was used to investigate cell binding and induction of apoptosis, and confocal microscopy to visualize internalization. Mouse xenograft models were used to assess anti-tumour effects in vivo, followed by immunohistochemistry for ex vivo evaluation of proliferation and necrosis. BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs were able to bind to and internalize within mesothelioma cells in vitro via MSLN receptors and induce apoptosis. In mice xenografts, the BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs suppressed the tumour growth and also decreased cell proliferation. Thus, the use of MSLN-specific antibodies to deliver encapsulated doxorubicin can provide a novel and alternative modality for treatment of mesothelioma.

  11. Electrochemotherapy of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sersa, G.; Cemazar, M.; Rudolf, Z.; Miklavcic, D.

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy consists of chemotherapy followed by local application of electric pulses to the tumour to increase drug delivery into cells. Drug uptake can be increased by electroporation for only those drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, only bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical trials. In vitro studies demonstrated several fold increase of their cytotoxicity after electroporation of cells. In vivo, electroporation of tumours after local or systemic administration of either of the drugs, i.e. electrochemotherapy, proved to be an effective antitumour treatment. In preclinical studies on several tumour models, electrochemotherapy either with bleomycin or cisplatin was elaborated and parameters for effective local tumour control were determined. In veterinary medicine, electrochemotherapy also proved to be effective in the treatment of primary tumours in cats, dogs and horses. In human clinical studies, electrochemotherapy was performed on the patients with progressive disease and accessible tumour nodules of different malignancies. All clinical studies demonstrated that electrochemotherapy is an effective treatment for local tumour control in cancer patients. (author)

  12. Expression of FGFR3 during human testis development and in germ cell-derived tumours of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Katherine A; Olesen, Inge A; Winge, Sofia B; Nielsen, Ana R; Nielsen, John E; Graem, Niels; Juul, Anders; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Observations in patients with an activating mutation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) suggest a role for FGFR3 signalling in promoting proliferation or survival of germ cells. In this study, we aimed to identify the FGFR3 subtype and the ontogeny of expression during human testis development and to ascertain whether FGFR3 signalling is linked to germ cell proliferation and the pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of young adult men. Using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we examined 58 specimens of human testes throughout development for FGFR3 expression, and then compared expression of FGFR3 with proliferation markers (PCNA or Ki67). We also analysed for FGFR3 expression 30 TGCTs and 28 testes containing the tumour precursor cell, carcinoma in situ (CIS). Fetal and adult testes expressed exclusively the FGFR3IIIc isoform. FGFR3 protein expression was restricted to the cytoplasm/plasma membrane of spermatogonia and was most prevalent at mid-gestation, infancy and from puberty onwards. Phosphorylated (p)FGFR was detected in pre-spermatogonia at mid-gestation and in spermatogonia during puberty and in the adult testis. Throughout normal human testis development, expression of FGFR3 did not directly correlate with proliferation markers. In preinvasive CIS cells and in TGCTs, including classical seminoma and embryonal carcinoma, FGFR3IIIc was detected only in a small number of cells, with a heterogeneous expression pattern. FGFR3 is an excellent marker for human pre-/spermatogonia throughout development. Signalling through this receptor is likely associated with spermatogonial survival rather than proliferation. FGFR3 is not expressed in gonocytes and may not be essential to the aetiology of TGCTs stemming from CIS.

  13. Tumour sleuths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.; Springolo, E.; Conradie, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a common disease in South Africa and its identification difficult. Methods for the diagnosis of this disease includes the production of hybridoma cell lines by inoculating laboratory mice with a purified human tumour-associated antigen or the antigen-containing surface membranes or the intact cells. In the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, high concentrations of serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP) can be measured by means of radioimmunoassay techniques. The need for specific methods of diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma led to the investigation by the Isotope Production Centre at Pelindaba into the possibility of using radiolabelled monoclonal anti-AFP for diagnosis, and later, therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies can also be labelled with 131 I. Recently the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the University of the Witwatersrand is conducting diagnostic trials on patients who have given their informed consent, to assess the specificity of 131 I radiolabelled anti-AFP monoclonal antibodies to hepatocellular carcinoma cells in humans. Although the investigation is still in its infancy, monoclonal antibodies may prove to be successful non-invasive agents for detecting tumors in early stages

  14. Selective in vitro targeting of GRP and NMB receptors in human tumours with the new bombesin tracer 177Lu-AMBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waser, Beatrice; Eltschinger, Veronique; Reubi, Jean C.; Linder, Karen; Nunn, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro binding properties of a novel radiolabelled bombesin analogue, 177 Lu-AMBA, in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues selected for their expression of the bombesin receptor subtypes GRP-R, NMB-R and BRS-3. In vitro receptor autoradiography was performed in cancers expressing the various bombesin receptor subtypes. The novel radioligand 177 Lu-AMBA was used and compared with established bombesin radioligands such as 125 I-Tyr 4 -bombesin and 125 I-[D-Tyr 6 ,β-Ala 11 ,Phe 13 ,Nle 14 ]-bombesin(6-14). In vitro incidence of detection of each of the three bombesin receptor subtypes was evaluated in each tumour. 177 Lu-AMBA identified all GRP-R-expressing tumours, such as prostatic, mammary and renal cell carcinomas as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumours. 177 Lu-AMBA also identified all NMB-expressing tumours, but did not detect BRS-3-expressing tumours or BRS-3-expressing pancreatic islets. GRP-R-expressing peritumoural vessels were heavily labelled with 177 Lu-AMBA. In contrast to the strongly GRP-R-positive mouse pancreas, the human pancreas was not labelled with 177 Lu-AMBA unless chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed. In general, the sensitivity was slightly better with 177 Lu-AMBA than with the conventional bombesin radioligands. The present in vitro study suggests that 177 Lu-AMBA may be a very useful in vivo targeting agent for GRP-R-expressing tumours, NMB-R-expressing tumours and GRP-R-expressing neoangiogenic vessels. (orig.)

  15. Selective in vitro targeting of GRP and NMB receptors in human tumours with the new bombesin tracer {sup 177}Lu-AMBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Eltschinger, Veronique; Reubi, Jean C. [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, P.O. Box 62, Bern (Switzerland); Linder, Karen; Nunn, Adrian [Bracco Research USA Inc, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2007-01-15

    To investigate the in vitro binding properties of a novel radiolabelled bombesin analogue, {sup 177}Lu-AMBA, in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues selected for their expression of the bombesin receptor subtypes GRP-R, NMB-R and BRS-3. In vitro receptor autoradiography was performed in cancers expressing the various bombesin receptor subtypes. The novel radioligand {sup 177}Lu-AMBA was used and compared with established bombesin radioligands such as {sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4}-bombesin and {sup 125}I-[D-Tyr{sup 6},{beta}-Ala{sup 11},Phe{sup 13},Nle{sup 14}]-bombesin(6-14). In vitro incidence of detection of each of the three bombesin receptor subtypes was evaluated in each tumour. {sup 177}Lu-AMBA identified all GRP-R-expressing tumours, such as prostatic, mammary and renal cell carcinomas as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumours. {sup 177}Lu-AMBA also identified all NMB-expressing tumours, but did not detect BRS-3-expressing tumours or BRS-3-expressing pancreatic islets. GRP-R-expressing peritumoural vessels were heavily labelled with {sup 177}Lu-AMBA. In contrast to the strongly GRP-R-positive mouse pancreas, the human pancreas was not labelled with {sup 177}Lu-AMBA unless chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed. In general, the sensitivity was slightly better with {sup 177}Lu-AMBA than with the conventional bombesin radioligands. The present in vitro study suggests that {sup 177}Lu-AMBA may be a very useful in vivo targeting agent for GRP-R-expressing tumours, NMB-R-expressing tumours and GRP-R-expressing neoangiogenic vessels. (orig.)

  16. Radiosensitivity of primary tumour cultures as a determinant of curability of human head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, L.J.; Tofilon, P.J.; Goepfert, H.; Brock, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    Between November 1985 and November 1987, 31 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck who were treated on protocol by surgery and post-operative radiotherapy at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center had radiosensitivity measurements made on primary cultures of the surgical specimens using the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System. The parameter of cell survival at 2 Gy (S 2 ) was correlated with the clinical outcome independently of pathological risk factors. All five recurrences have been in patients with S 2 values >0.3 (p = 0.08). Evidence of significant intratumoral heterogeneity of cellular radiosensitivity in vitro was demonstrated in one of four cultures tested. Mathematical modelling suggests that in the absence of marked heterogeneity, the S 2 parameter is likely to be more robust than other radiobiologically based assays in predicting clinical treatment outcome. (author)

  17. Monte Carlo dose calculations for BNCT treatment of diffuse human lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Bruschi, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to test the possibility to apply BNCT in the core of diffuse lung tumours, dose distribution calculations were made. The simulations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP.4c2, using the male computational phantom Adam, version 07/94. Volumes of interest were voxelized for the tally requests, and results were obtained for tissues with and without Boron. Different collimated neutron sources were tested in order to establish the proper energies, as well as single and multiple beams to maximize neutron flux uniformity inside the target organs. Flux and dose distributions are reported. The use of two opposite epithermal neutron collimated beams insures good levels of dose homogeneity inside the lungs, with a substantially lower radiation dose delivered to surrounding structures. (author)

  18. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin and decreased expression of epithelial cadherin in human papillomavirus-positive tonsillar cancer: an early event in human papillomavirus-related tumour progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Markus; Yosef, Basima; Huebbers, Christian U; Preuss, Simon F; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Odenthal, Margarete; Klussmann, Jens P

    2011-06-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) constitute an important risk factor for tonsillar cancer. This study describes changes in cell adhesion molecules during metastasis of HPV-related and HPV-unrelated tonsillar carcinomas. We examined 48 primary tonsillar carcinoma samples (25 HPV-16 DNA-positive, 23 HPV-16 DNA-negative) and their respective lymph node metastases for their HPV status and for the expression of p16, epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), β-catenin, and vimentin. A positive HPV-specific polymerase chain reaction finding correlated significantly with p16 overexpression in both primary tumours and their metastases (P<0.0001 for both). In HPV-unrelated carcinomas, the expression of E-cadherin was significantly lower in metastases than in primary tumours (P<0.001). In contrast, the expression of nuclear β-catenin was significantly higher in metastases than in primary tumours (P=0.016). In HPV-related carcinomas, nuclear localization of β-catenin expression was already apparent in primary tumours (P=0.030). The expression of vimentin significantly correlated with the grading of the primary tumour (P=0.021). Our data indicate that the down-regulation of E-cadherin and the up-regulation of nuclear β-catenin expression might be crucial steps during tumour progression of tonsillar carcinomas, being already present in primary tumours in HPV-driven carcinomas, but becoming apparent in HPV-unrelated tumours later in the process of metastasis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  19. Mitochondrial modulation of oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity in some human tumour cell lines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anoopkumar-Dukie, S

    2009-10-01

    Oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of tumour cells reflects direct oxidative damage to DNA, but non-nuclear mechanisms including signalling pathways may also contribute. Mitochondria are likely candidates because not only do they integrate signals from each of the main kinase pathways but mitochondrial kinases responsive to oxidative stress communicate to the rest of the cell. Using pharmacological and immunochemical methods, we tested the role of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and the Bcl-2 proteins in oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity. Drug-treated or untreated cervical cancer HeLa, breast cancer MCF-7 and melanoma MeWo cell lines were irradiated at 6.2 Gy under normoxic and hypoxic conditions then allowed to proliferate for 7 days. The MPT blocker cyclosporin A (2 microM) strongly protected HeLa but not the other two lines against oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity. By contrast, bongkrekic acid (50 microM), which blocks MPT by targeting the adenine nucleotide transporter, had only marginal effect and calcineurin inhibitor FK-506 (0.1 microM) had none. Nor was evidence found for the modulation of oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity by Bax\\/Bcl-2 signalling, mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium (mitoK(ATP)) channels or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. In conclusion, calcineurin-independent protection by cyclosporin A suggests that MPT but not mitoK(ATP) or the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway plays a causal role in oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of HeLa cells. Targeting MPT may therefore improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy in some solid tumours.

  20. Histone H1x is highly expressed in human neuroendocrine cells and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warneboldt, Julia; Haller, Florian; Horstmann, Olaf; Danner, Bernhard C; Füzesi, László; Doenecke, Detlef; Happel, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Histone H1x is a ubiquitously expressed member of the H1 histone family. H1 histones, also called linker histones, stabilize compact, higher order structures of chromatin. In addition to their role as structural proteins, they actively regulate gene expression and participate in chromatin-based processes like DNA replication and repair. The epigenetic contribution of H1 histones to these mechanisms makes it conceivable that they also take part in malignant transformation. Based on results of a Blast data base search which revealed an accumulation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of H1x in libraries from neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), we evaluated the expression of H1x in NETs from lung and the gastrointestinal tract using immunohistochemisty. Relative protein and mRNA levels of H1x were analysed by Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Since several reports describe a change of the expression level of the replacement subtype H1.0 during tumourigenesis, the analysis of this subtype was included in this study. We found an increased expression of H1x but not of H1.0 in NET tissues in comparison to corresponding normal tissues. Even though the analysed NETs were heterogenous regarding their grade of malignancy, all except one showed a considerably higher protein amount of H1x compared with corresponding non-neoplastic tissue. Furthermore, double-labelling of H1x and chromogranin A in sections of pancreas and small intestine revealed that H1x is highly expressed in neuroendocrine cells of these tissues. We conclude that the high expression of histone H1x in NETs is probably due to the abundance of this protein in the cells from which these tumours originate

  1. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure During Intracranial Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracranial endoscopy is a minimum invasive procedure, which reduces trauma to the brain, is cost-effective, and carries a shortened hospital stay with an improved postoperative outcome. Objective: To monitor intracranial pressure changes during intracranial endoscopy among children and adults under general anesthesia/sedation, and to compare the intracranial pressure changes between children and adults receiving general anesthesia and among adults receiving general anesthesia and sedation. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the tertiary care hospitals of Lucknow. This was carried out in the department of neurosurgery from January 2008 to December 2008. Patients who were not fit for general anesthesia received local anesthesia under sedation. Patients participating in the study were divided into three groups. Intracranial pressure was recorded at specific intervals. Parametric data were subjected to statistical analysis using a student\\s t test. Result: A total of 70 patients were undergoing intracranial endoscopy under general anesthesia during the study period. In both groups A and B, intracranial pressure increases the maximum during inflation of the balloon. In group C, all the variations in ICP were found to be statistically significant. In the comparison of intracranial pressure changes between groups A and B, no significant difference was found. All correlations in the comparison of groups B and C were found to be statistically significant (p< 0.001. Conclusion: There is a need for continuous intraoperative monitoring of ICP intracranial endoscopy, because ICP increases in various stages of the procedure, which can be detrimental to the perfusion of the brain. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 240-245

  2. Biochemical signatures of in vitro radiation response in human lung, breast and prostate tumour cells observed with Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Q; Jirasek, A; Lum, J J; Brolo, A G

    2011-01-01

    This work applies noninvasive single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS) and principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze and correlate radiation-induced biochemical changes in a panel of human tumour cell lines that vary by tissue of origin, p53 status and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Six human tumour cell lines, derived from prostate (DU145, PC3 and LNCaP), breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) and lung (H460), were irradiated in vitro with single fractions (15, 30 or 50 Gy) of 6 MV photons. Remaining live cells were harvested for RS analysis at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-irradiation, along with unirradiated controls. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 cells per sample utilizing a 785 nm excitation laser. All spectra (200 per cell line) were individually post-processed using established methods and the total data set for each cell line was analyzed with PCA using standard algorithms. One radiation-induced PCA component was detected for each cell line by identification of statistically significant changes in the PCA score distributions for irradiated samples, as compared to unirradiated samples, in the first 24-72 h post-irradiation. These RS response signatures arise from radiation-induced changes in cellular concentrations of aromatic amino acids, conformational protein structures and certain nucleic acid and lipid functional groups. Correlation analysis between the radiation-induced PCA components separates the cell lines into three distinct RS response categories: R1 (H460 and MCF7), R2 (MDA-MB-231 and PC3) and R3 (DU145 and LNCaP). These RS categories partially segregate according to radiosensitivity, as the R1 and R2 cell lines are radioresistant (SF 2 > 0.6) and the R3 cell lines are radiosensitive (SF 2 < 0.5). The R1 and R2 cell lines further segregate according to p53 gene status, corroborated by cell cycle analysis post-irradiation. Potential radiation-induced biochemical response mechanisms underlying our RS observations are proposed, such as (1) the

  3. A STUDY OF TUMOURS OF THE CRANIAL NERVE AND PARASPINAL NERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION One of the frequent sites of tumour formation is the cranial nerves and paraspinal nerves. The cranial nerves perform a plethora of functions and so the signs and symptoms caused may be different. They are mainly classified into four different types. The aim of the study is: 1. To study the tumours arising from the cranial nerves in an epidemiological point of view. 2. To study the tumours histopathologically. 3. To classify the tumours according to WHO classification. Thirty-eight brain tumor cases were studied in the Department of Medicine, A. J. Shetty Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore. Cranial nerve tumours accounts for 4(10% among the intracranial tumours. Schwannomas makes up 3(7.39% among the Intracranial tumours. and constituted 3(75% among cranial nerve tumours. All the 3 schwannomas were located in CP angle. The geographic distribution of cases was found to be 28 cases from Mangalore and 10 cases from Kerala.

  4. MicroRNAs as tumour suppressors in canine and human melanoma cells and as a prognostic factor in canine melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, S; Mori, T; Hoshino, Y; Yamada, N; Maruo, K; Akao, Y

    2013-06-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is one of the most aggressive cancers in dogs and in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of its development and progression remain unclear. Presently, we examined the expression profile of microRNAs (miRs) in canine oral MM tissues and paired normal oral mucosa tissues by using the microRNA-microarray assay and quantitative RT-PCR. Importantly, a decreased expression of miR-203 was significantly associated with a shorter survival time. Also, miR-203 and -205 were markedly down-regulated in canine and human MM cell lines tested. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of miR-205 had a significant inhibitory effect on the cell growth of canine and human melanoma cells tested by targeting erbb3. Our data suggest that miR-203 is a new prognostic factor in canine oral MMs and that miR-205 functions as a tumour suppressor by targeting erbb3 in both canine and human MM cells. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. HumanMethylation450K Array–Identified Biomarkers Predict Tumour Recurrence/Progression at Initial Diagnosis of High-risk Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark O Kitchen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (HR-NMIBC is a clinically unpredictable disease. Despite clinical risk estimation tools, many patients are undertreated with intra-vesical therapies alone, whereas others may be over-treated with early radical surgery. Molecular biomarkers, particularly DNA methylation, have been reported as predictive of tumour/patient outcomes in numerous solid organ and haematologic malignancies; however, there are few reports in HR-NMIBC and none using genome-wide array assessment. We therefore sought to identify novel DNA methylation markers of HR-NMIBC clinical outcomes that might predict tumour behaviour at initial diagnosis and help guide patient management. Patients and methods: A total of 21 primary initial diagnosis HR-NMIBC tumours were analysed by Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays and subsequently bisulphite Pyrosequencing. In all, 7 had not recurred at 1 year after resection and 14 had recurred and/or progressed despite intra-vesical BCG. A further independent cohort of 32 HR-NMIBC tumours (17 no recurrence and 15 recurrence and/or progression despite BCG were also assessed by bisulphite Pyrosequencing. Results: Array analyses identified 206 CpG loci that segregated non-recurrent HR-NMIBC tumours from clinically more aggressive recurrence/progression tumours. Hypermethylation of CpG cg11850659 and hypomethylation of CpG cg01149192 in combination predicted HR-NMIBC recurrence and/or progression within 1 year of diagnosis with 83% sensitivity, 79% specificity, and 83% positive and 79% negative predictive values. Conclusions: This is the first genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of a unique HR-NMIBC tumour cohort encompassing known 1-year clinical outcomes. Our analyses identified potential novel epigenetic markers that could help guide individual patient management in this clinically unpredictable disease.

  6. Sphenoid sinus carcinoid tumour causing ectopic ACTH syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Sanjaya; Taha, Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    A thirty-eight year old patient presented with a gradual increase in weight and Cushingoid facies of two years duration. He also had orbital congestion, with puffy eyelids and corkscrew conjunctival vessels, associated with painful eye movements. An endocrine evaluation revealed raised cortisol and ACTH. Head imaging was performed which showed an enhancing tumour arising from the sphenoid sinus, with osseous erosion of the sphenoid sinus, extending to the nasopharynx, sellar and a small amount extending intracranially. He underwent an endoscopic endonasal resection of the tumour and histology revealed a low-grade carcinoid tumour with ACTH staining. The patient also underwent radiotherapy for the intracranial extension. He is currently in his fourth year of follow-up and imaging has showed a small, stable intracranial remnant. His anterior pituitary hormonal profile remains normal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A monograph proposing the use of canine mammary tumours as a model for the study of hereditary breast cancer susceptibility genes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Katie; Merner, Nancy D

    2017-05-01

    Canines are excellent models for cancer studies due to their similar physiology and genomic sequence to humans, companion status and limited intra-breed heterogeneity. Due to their affliction to mammary cancers, canines can serve as powerful genetic models of hereditary breast cancers. Variants within known human breast cancer susceptibility genes only explain a fraction of familial cases. Thus, further discovery is necessary but such efforts have been thwarted by genetic heterogeneity. Reducing heterogeneity is key, and studying isolated human populations have helped in the endeavour. An alternative is to study dog pedigrees, since artificial selection has resulted in extreme homogeneity. Identifying the genetic predisposition to canine mammary tumours can translate to human discoveries - a strategy currently underutilized. To explore this potential, we reviewed published canine mammary tumour genetic studies and proposed benefits of next generation sequencing canine cohorts to facilitate moving beyond incremental advances.

  8. Erratum to: Psammoma bodies in two types of human ovarian tumours: a mineralogical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanlu; Wang, Changqiu; Li, Yan; Lu, Anhuai; Mei, Fang; Liu, Jianying; Du, Jingyun; Zhang, Yan

    2015-06-01

    Psammoma body (PB) is a common form of calcification in pathological diagnosis and closely relevant to tumours. This paper focuses on the mineralogical characteristics of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma by using polarization microscope (POM), environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), micro-area synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (μ-SRXRD) and fluorescence (μ-SRXRF). Both the PBs in tissues and separated from eight typical cases were investigated. POM and ESEM observation revealed the inside-out growth pattern of PBs. μ-SRXRD and micro-FT-IR results demonstrated the dominant mineral phase of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma was AB-type carbonate hydroxyapatite (Ca10[(PO4)6-x-y(CO3)x(HPO4)y][(OH)2-u(CO3)u] with 0 ≤ x,y,u ≤ 2). As observed by ESEM and TEM, the layer-rich PBs in teratoma were up to 70 μm and mainly consisted of 5 nm-wide, 5-12 nm-long columnar crystals; the PBs in ovarian serous cancer with a maximum diameter of 35 μm were composed of slightly longer columnar crystals and granulates with 20-100 nm in diameter. The selected area electron diffraction patterns showed dispersed polycrystalline diffraction rings with arching behavior of (002) diffraction, indicating the aggregated nanocrystals grew in the preferred orientation of (002) face. The EDX and μ-SRXRF results together indicated the existence of Na, Mg, Zn and Sr in PBs. These detailed mineralogical characteristics may help uncover the nature of the pathological PBs in ovary.

  9. Psammoma bodies in two types of human ovarian tumours: a mineralogical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanlu, Meng; Changqiu, Wang; Yan, Li; Anhuai, Lu; Fang, Mei; Jianying, Liu; Jingyun, Du; Yan, Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Psammoma body (PB) is a common form of calcification in pathological diagnosis and closely relevant to tumours. This paper focuses on the mineralogical characteristics of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma by using polarization microscope (POM), environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), micro-area synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (μ-SRXRD) and fluorescence (μ-SRXRF). Both the PBs in tissues and separated from eight typical cases were investigated. POM and ESEM observation revealed the inside-out growth pattern of PBs. μ-SRXRD and micro-FT-IR results demonstrated the dominant mineral phase of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma was AB-type carbonate hydroxyapatite (Ca10[(PO4)6-x-y(CO3)x(HPO4 2-)y][(OH)2-u(CO3)u] with 0 ≤ x,y,u ≤ 2). As observed by ESEM and TEM, the layer-rich PBs in teratoma were up to 70 μm and mainly consisted of 5 nm-wide, 5-12 nm-long columnar crystals; the PBs in ovarian serous cancer with a maximum diameter of 35 μm were composed of slightly longer columnar crystals and granulates with 20-100 nm in diameter. The selected area electron diffraction patterns showed dispersed polycrystalline diffraction rings with arching behavior of (002) diffraction, indicating the aggregated nanocrystals grew in the preferred orientation of (002) face. The EDX and μ-SRXRF results together indicated the existence of Na, Mg, Zn and Sr in PBs. These detailed mineralogical characteristics may help uncover the nature of the pathological PBs in ovary.

  10. Associations between the uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab, HER2 density and response to trastuzumab (Herceptin) in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous human tumour xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLarty, Kristin; Cornelissen, Bart; Scollard, Deborah A. [University of Toronto, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada); Done, Susan J. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Biophysics, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University of Toronto, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University Health Network, Department of Pathology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chun, Kathy [North York General Hospital, Genetics Program, Toronto, ON (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [University of Toronto, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University Health Network, Toronto General Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University of Toronto, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations between uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab, tumour HER2 density and response to trastuzumab (Herceptin) of human breast cancer (BC) xenografts in athymic mice. The tumour uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab in athymic mice bearing BC xenografts with increasing HER2 density (0 to 3+) was evaluated. Specific uptake ratios were established in biodistribution (SUR) and imaging studies (ROI-SUR) using {sup 111}In-labeled mouse IgG ({sup 111}In-DTPA-mIgG). Further corrections were made for circulating radioactivity using tumour-to-blood ratios defined as a localization index (LI) and region-of-interest localization index (ROI-LI), respectively. Mice were treated with trastuzumab (Herceptin). A tumour growth inhibition index (TGI) was calculated and relative TGIs calculated by dividing the TGI of control by that of trastuzumab-treated mice. Strong, nonlinear associations with HER2 density were obtained if the uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab was corrected for nonspecific IgG localization (i.e., SUR; r{sup 2}=0.99) and circulating radioactivity (i.e., LI; r{sup 2} =0.87), but without these corrections, the association between HER2 density and tumour uptake was poor (r{sup 2}=0.22). There was a strong association between ROI-SUR and ROI-LI values and HER2 expression (r{sup 2}=0.90 and r{sup 2}=0.95), respectively. All tumours were imaged. Relative TGI values were associated with increasing uncorrected tumour uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab but not always with HER2 density (i.e., MCF-HER2-18 cells with trastuzumab-resistance). HER2 expression (0 to 3+) can be differentiated using {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab, but requires correction of tumour uptake for nonspecific IgG localization and circulating radioactivity. The uncorrected uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab was associated with tumour response to trastuzumab. (orig.)

  11. Gadolinium Deposition in Human Brain Tissues after Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Adult Patients without Intracranial Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert J; McDonald, Jennifer S; Kallmes, David F; Jentoft, Mark E; Paolini, Michael A; Murray, David L; Williamson, Eric E; Eckel, Laurence J

    2017-11-01

    Purpose To determine whether gadolinium deposits in neural tissues of patients with intracranial abnormalities following intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) exposure might be related to blood-brain barrier integrity by studying adult patients with normal brain pathologic characteristics. Materials and Methods After obtaining antemortem consent and institutional review board approval, the authors compared postmortem neuronal tissue samples from five patients who had undergone four to 18 gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) examinations between 2005 and 2014 (contrast group) with samples from 10 gadolinium-naive patients who had undergone at least one MR examination during their lifetime (control group). All patients in the contrast group had received gadodiamide. Neuronal tissues from the dentate nuclei, pons, globus pallidus, and thalamus were harvested and analyzed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and light microscopy to quantify, localize, and assess the effects of gadolinium deposition. Results Tissues from the four neuroanatomic regions of gadodiamide-exposed patients contained 0.1-19.4 μg of gadolinium per gram of tissue in a statistically significant dose-dependent relationship (globus pallidus: ρ = 0.90, P = .04). In contradistinction, patients in the control group had undetectable levels of gadolinium with ICP-MS. All patients had normal brain pathologic characteristics at autopsy. Three patients in the contrast group had borderline renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate the contrast group was localized to the capillary endothelium and neuronal interstitium and, in two cases, within the nucleus of the cell. Conclusion Gadolinium deposition in neural tissues after GBCA administration occurs in the absence of intracranial abnormalities that might affect the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. These findings

  12. Studies on the role of RNA tumour viruses in human leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nooter, K.

    1979-01-01

    A search has been made for an etiological role of retroviruses in human leukemia and cocultivation studies have led to the isolation of a presumed human type C virus which appeared to be oncogenic for experimental animals. The experimental procedures and results are fully discussed. The parallels between irradiation induced lymphomas in mice and leukaemias in man are explored. (C.F.)

  13. [Hydrocephalus as initial presentation of a spinal cord tumour in a child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, L.M.; Nysom, K.; Lavard, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    We report a previously healthy two-year-old girl who initially presented with signs of increased intracranial pressure of vomiting, lethargy and unstable gait. She had communicating hydrocephalus and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed. Two years later the girl developed signs of myelopathy...... and was diagnosed with a spinal cord tumour between Th3 and Th9. We suggest that spinal cord tumour should be considered in patients with increased intracranial pressure or hydrocephalus of unknown origin Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/15...

  14. Specific receptors for epidermal growth factor in human bone tumour cells and its effect on synthesis of prostaglandin E2 by cultured osteosarcoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Y.; Uchihashi, M.; Nakashima, H.; Fujita, T.; Matsukura, S.; Matsui, K.

    1984-01-01

    Using tumour cell lines derived from human bone tumours, specific binding sites for epidermal growth factor (EGF), a potent growth stimulator in many tissues, and its effect on synthesis of prostaglandin (PG) E 2 , a potent bone-resorbing factor, by cultured osteosarcoma cell line were studied. Three tumour cell lines, one osteosarcoma (HOSO) and two giant cell tumours of the bone (G-1 and G-2), all possessed specific binding sites for 125 I-labelled EGF: the apparent dissociation constant was approximately 4-10 x 10 -10 M and the maximal binding capacity was 50 000-80 000 sites/cell. EGF had no mitogenic effect in these cell lines. However, these cell lines did not have specific binding sites for 125 I-labelled parathyroid hormone (PTH) or calcitonin. HOSO line produced and secreted PGE 2 into medium, while no significant amount of PGE 2 was demonstrated in G-1 or G-2 line. EGF significantly stimulated PGE 2 production in HOSO line in a dose-dependent manner (0.5-50 ng/ml); its stimulatory effect was completely abolished by indomethacin, an inhibitor of PG biosynthesis. Exogenous PGE 1 significantly stimulated cyclic AMP formation in HOSO line, whereas PGFsub(2α) PTH, calcitonin, or EGF had no effect. None of these calcium-regulating hormones affected cyclic AMP generation in either G-1 of G-2 line. These data indicate that human bone tumour cells have specific EGF receptors unrelated to cell growth, and suggest that EGF may be involved in bone resorption through a PGE 2 -mediated process in human osseous tissues. (author)

  15. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  16. Tumour-Derived Interleukin-1 Beta Induces Pro-inflammatory Response in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alajez, Nehad M; Al-toub, Mashael; Almusa, Abdulaziz

    ’ secreted factors as represented by a panel of human cancer cell lines (breast (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231); prostate (PC-3); lung (NCI-H522); colon (HT-29) and head & neck (FaDu)) on the biological characteristics of MSCs. Background Over the past several years, significant amount of research has emerged......, the goal of this study was to assess the cellular and molecular changes in MSCs in response to secreted factors present in conditioned media (CM) from a panel of human tumor cell lines covering a spectrum of human cancers (Breast, Prostate, Lung, colon, and head and neck). Research Morphological changes...... with bipolar processes. In association with phenotypic changes, genome-wide gene expression and bioinformatics analysis revealed an enhanced pro-inflammatory response of those MSCs. Pharmacological inhibitions of FAK and MAPKK severely impaired the pro-inflammatory response of MSCs to tumor CM (~80-99%, and 55...

  17. Intracranial atherosclerosis: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    The most relevant ideas discussed in this article are described here. Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) represents the most common cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Its importance in whites may have been underestimated. New technical developments, such as high-resolution MRI, allow direct assessment of the intracranial atherosclerotic plaque, which may have a profound impact on ICAD diagnosis and therapy in the near future. Early detection of ICAD may allow therapeutic intervention while the disease is still asymptomatic. The Barcelonès Nord and Maresme Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study is presented here. The main prognostic factors that characterize the patients who are at a higher risk for ICAD recurrence are classified and discussed. The best treatment for ICAD remains to be established. The Stenting Versus Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Study is currently ongoing to address this crucial issue. These and other topics will be discussed at the Fifth International Intracranial Atherosclerosis Conference (Valladolid, Spain, autumn 2011).

  18. Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and mouse mammary tumour virus as multiple viruses in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Wendy K; Heng, Benjamin; Delprado, Warick; Iacopetta, Barry; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV), high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV) co-exist in some breast cancers. All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis) and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc). EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk - EBV (35%), HPV, 20%) and MMTV (32%) of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. We conclude that (i) EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii) the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer.

  19. Tumour necrosis factor blockade increases lymphangiogenesis in murine and human arthritic joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polzer, K.; Baeten, D.; Soleiman, A.; Distler, J.; Gerlag, D. M.; Tak, P. P.; Schett, G.; Zwerina, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the presence and regulation of lymphatic vessels in inflamed joints of mice with experimental arthritis as well as patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA). METHODS: Lymphatic vessels and blood vessels were assessed in synovial tissue of human

  20. Correlation between human papillomavirus and p16 overexpression in oropharyngeal tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj Larsen, C; Gyldenløve, M; Jensen, D H

    2014-01-01

    A significant proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx (OP-SCC) are related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and p16 overexpression. This subgroup proves better prognosis and survival but no evidence exists on the correlation between HPV and p16 overexpression based on diag...

  1. Treatment with HPMA copolymer-based doxorubicin conjugate containing human immunoglobulin induces long-lasting systemic anti-tumour immunity in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šírová, Milada; Strohalm, Jiří; Šubr, Vladimír; Plocová, Daniela; Rossmann, Pavel; Mrkvan, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Říhová, Blanka

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, - (2007), s. 35-47 ISSN 0340-7004 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505; GA ČR GA305/05/2268 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : targered tumour therapy * hpma * human immunoglobulin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.728, year: 2007

  2. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater: expression differences in tumour histotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Perrone

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1 is the major means by which gemcitabine enters human cells; recent evidence exists that hENT1 is expressed in carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater and that it should be considered as a molecular prognostic marker for patients with resected ampullary cancer. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the variations of hENT1 expression in ampullary carcinomas and to correlate such variations with histological subtypes and clinicopathological parameters. Forty-one ampullary carcinomas were histologically classified into intestinal, pancreaticobiliary and unusual types. hENT1 and Ki67 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and apoptotic cells were identified by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL method. hENT1 overexpression was detected in 63.4% ampullary carcinomas. A significant difference in terms of hENT1 and Ki67 expression was found between intestinal vs. pancreaticobiliary types (P=0.03 and P=0.009 respectively. Moreover, a significant statistical positive correlation was found between apoptotic and proliferative Index (P=0.036, while no significant correlation was found between hENT1 and apoptosis. Our results on hENT1 expression suggest that classification of ampullary carcinoma by morphological subtypes may represent an additional tool in prospective clinical trials aimed at examining treatment efficacy; in addition, data obtained from Ki67 and TUNEL suggest a key role of hENT1 in tumour growth of ampullary carcinoma.

  3. Modification of the radiation sensitivity of human tumour cells by a bis-benzimidazole derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P J; Anderson, C O [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK)

    1984-10-01

    A comparison was made of the ability of either X-radiation or a DNA-specific ligand (the vital bis-benzimidazole dye; Hoechst 33342) to induce: cell killing, inhibition of de novo DNA synthesis, DNA strand breakage and the delay of cell division in human colon adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. Unlike radiation-induced cell killing, ligand-induced cytotoxicity appeared to be positively correlated with the extent of inhibition of de novo DNA synthesis-a feature consistent with the persistent binding of ligand molecules to nuclear DNA. Ligand-induced DNA strand-breaks disappeared slowly although ligand-treated cells retained apparently normal capacities to repair discrete radiogenic DNA strand-breaks. Pre-treatment of cells with Hoechst 33342 resulted in a dose-modifying enhancement of radiation resistance not associated with altered dosimetry for strand-break induction. However, radioresistance was accompanied by the protracted retention of cells in the G/sub 2/ phase of the cell cycle. We suggest that the results provide direct evidence that the retention of cells in G/sub 2/ phase is a sparing phenomenon and is triggered by the responses of chromatin domains to the presence of DNA damage.

  4. Increased intracranial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord) Subdural hematoma (bleeding between the covering of the brain and ... intracranial pressure Patient Instructions Ventriculoperitoneal shunt - discharge Images Subdural hematoma Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References ...

  5. The in vitro effect of gefitinib ('Iressa' alone and in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy on human solid tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Louise A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR triggers downstream signaling pathways that regulate many cellular processes involved in tumour survival and growth. Gefitinib ('Iressa' is an orally active tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI targeted to the ATP-binding domain of EGFR (HER1; erbB1. Methods In this study we have used a standardised ATP-based tumour chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA to measure the activity of gefitinib alone or in combination with different cytotoxic drugs (cisplatin, gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and treosulfan against a variety of solid tumours (n = 86, including breast, colorectal, oesophageal and ovarian cancer, carcinoma of unknown primary site, cutaneous and uveal melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and sarcoma. The IC50 and IC90 were calculated for each single agent or combination. To allow comparison between samples the IndexSUM was calculated based on the percentage tumour growth inhibition (TGI at each test drug concentration (TDC. Gefitinib was tested at concentrations ranging from 0.0625–2 microM (TDC = 0.446 microg/ml. This study represents the first use of a TKI in the assay. Results There was heterogeneity in the degree of TGI observed when tumours were tested against single agent gefitinib. 7% (6/86 of tumours exhibited considerable inhibition, but most showed a more modest response resulting in a low TGI. The median IC50 value for single agent gefitinib in all tumours tested was 3.98 microM. Interestingly, gefitinib had both positive and negative effects when used in combination with different cytotoxics. In 59% (45/76 of tumours tested, the addition of gefitinib appeared to potentiate the effect of the cytotoxic agent or combination (of these, 11% (5/45 had a >50% decrease in their IndexSUM. In 38% of tumours (29/76, the TGI was decreased when the combination of gefitinib + cytotoxic was used in comparison to the cytotoxic alone. In the remaining 3% (2/76 there was no

  6. The effect of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α muteins on human neutrophils in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tchorzewski

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α has been implicated as an important inflammatory mediator. In vitro, TNF-α is reported to activate human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN, inducing responses such as phagocytic activity, degranulation and oxidative metabolism. Biological responses to TNF-α are initiated by its binding to specific cell surface receptors, and various studies have shown that the major TNF receptor species on PMN is the 75 kDa receptor. To verify the suggestion that the receptor binding domain includes the region close to the N-terminus of the TNF-α molecule, four TNF-α derivatives termed muteins were constructed, using a synthetic cDNA fragment substituting the N-terminal 3–7 selected hydrophilic or hydrophobic amino acids in the original TNF-α genomic DNA. Binding of muteins to PMN was assessed using monoclonal antibodies recognizing either the 55 kDa (p55 or the 75 kDa (p75 TNF receptor subtypes. Blocking by muteins of anti-p75 antibody binding to PMN was as expected from their N-terminal amino acid composition and hydrophilic properties. Hydrophilic muteins competed well with anti-TNF receptor antibodies for binding to the p75 receptor. In contrast, hydrophobic muteins were unable to block anti-p75 binding. Similarly, degranulation, chemiluminescence or enhancement of the PMN response to specific stimuli by the muteins correlated with the hydrophilic properties of the muteins. The significance of these observations in relation to the molecular structure of TNF-α is discussed.

  7. Gene expression profile of blood cells for the prediction of delayed cerebral ischemia after intracranial aneurysm rupture: a pilot study in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Antoine; Devaux, Yvan; Audibert, Gérard; Zhang, Lu; Bracard, Serge; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Klein, Olivier; Zannad, Faiez; Charpentier, Claire; Longrois, Dan; Mertes, Paul-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a potentially devastating complication after intracranial aneurysm rupture and its mechanisms remain poorly elucidated. Early identification of the patients prone to developing DCI after rupture may represent a major breakthrough in its prevention and treatment. The single gene approach of DCI has demonstrated interest in humans. We hypothesized that whole genome expression profile of blood cells may be useful for better comprehension and prediction of aneurysmal DCI. Over a 35-month period, 218 patients with aneurysm rupture were included in this study. DCI was defined as the occurrence of a new delayed neurological deficit occurring within 2 weeks after aneurysm rupture with evidence of ischemia either on perfusion-diffusion MRI, CT angiography or CT perfusion imaging, or with cerebral angiography. DCI patients were matched against controls based on 4 out of 5 criteria (age, sex, Fisher grade, aneurysm location and smoking status). Genome-wide expression analysis of blood cells obtained at admission was performed by microarrays. Transcriptomic analysis was performed using long oligonucleotide microarrays representing 25,000 genes. Quantitative PCR: 1 µg of total RNA extracted was reverse-transcribed, and the resulting cDNA was diluted 10-fold before performing quantitative PCR. Microarray data were first analyzed by 'Significance Analysis of Microarrays' software which includes the Benjamini correction for multiple testing. In a second step, microarray data fold change was compared using a two-tailed, paired t test. Analysis of receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the area under the ROC curves were used for prediction analysis. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the additive value of multiple biomarkers. A total of 16 patients demonstrated DCI. Significance Analysis of Microarrays software failed to retrieve significant genes, most probably because of the heterogeneity of the patients included in

  8. Primary brain tumours, meningiomas and brain metastases in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verheecke, Magali; Halaska, Michael J; Lok, Christianne A

    2014-01-01

    to obtain better insight into outcome and possibilities of treatment in pregnancy. METHODS: We collected all intracranial tumours (primary brain tumour, cerebral metastasis, or meningioma) diagnosed during pregnancy, registered prospectively and retrospectively by international collaboration since 1973......, respectively. Eight patients (30%) underwent brain surgery, seven patients (26%) had radiotherapy and in three patients (11%) chemotherapy was administered during gestation. Two patients died during pregnancy and four pregnancies were terminated. In 16 (59%) patients elective caesarean section was performed...... were reassuring. CONCLUSION: Adherence to standard protocol for the treatment of brain tumours during pregnancy appears to allow a term delivery and a higher probability of a vaginal delivery....

  9. Gastric Calcifying Fibrous Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Attila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours; however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases.

  10. Tumour compartment transcriptomics demonstrates the activation of inflammatory and odontogenic programmes in human adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma and identifies the MAPK/ERK pathway as a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, John R; Carreno, Gabriela; Gonzalez-Meljem, Jose Mario; Haston, Scott; Guiho, Romain; Cooper, Julie E; Manshaei, Saba; Jani, Nital; Hölsken, Annett; Pettorini, Benedetta; Beynon, Robert J; Simpson, Deborah M; Fraser, Helen C; Hong, Ying; Hallang, Shirleen; Stone, Thomas J; Virasami, Alex; Donson, Andrew M; Jones, David; Aquilina, Kristian; Spoudeas, Helen; Joshi, Abhijit R; Grundy, Richard; Storer, Lisa C D; Korbonits, Márta; Hilton, David A; Tossell, Kyoko; Thavaraj, Selvam; Ungless, Mark A; Gil, Jesus; Buslei, Rolf; Hankinson, Todd; Hargrave, Darren; Goding, Colin; Andoniadou, Cynthia L; Brogan, Paul; Jacques, Thomas S; Williams, Hywel J; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2018-05-01

    Adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas (ACPs) are clinically challenging tumours, the majority of which have activating mutations in CTNNB1. They are histologically complex, showing cystic and solid components, the latter comprised of different morphological cell types (e.g. β-catenin-accumulating cluster cells and palisading epithelium), surrounded by a florid glial reaction with immune cells. Here, we have carried out RNA sequencing on 18 ACP samples and integrated these data with an existing ACP transcriptomic dataset. No studies so far have examined the patterns of gene expression within the different cellular compartments of the tumour. To achieve this goal, we have combined laser capture microdissection with computational analyses to reveal groups of genes that are associated with either epithelial tumour cells (clusters and palisading epithelium), glial tissue or immune infiltrate. We use these human ACP molecular signatures and RNA-Seq data from two ACP mouse models to reveal that cell clusters are molecularly analogous to the enamel knot, a critical signalling centre controlling normal tooth morphogenesis. Supporting this finding, we show that human cluster cells express high levels of several members of the FGF, TGFB and BMP families of secreted factors, which signal to neighbouring cells as evidenced by immunostaining against the phosphorylated proteins pERK1/2, pSMAD3 and pSMAD1/5/9 in both human and mouse ACP. We reveal that inhibiting the MAPK/ERK pathway with trametinib, a clinically approved MEK inhibitor, results in reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis in explant cultures of human and mouse ACP. Finally, we analyse a prominent molecular signature in the glial reactive tissue to characterise the inflammatory microenvironment and uncover the activation of inflammasomes in human ACP. We validate these results by immunostaining against immune cell markers, cytokine ELISA and proteome analysis in both solid tumour and cystic fluid from ACP

  11. Development of a sensitive ELISA for the quantification of human tumour necrosis factor-alpha using 4 polyclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grebenchtchikov, N.J.; Ven-Jongekrijg, J. van der; Pesman, G.J.; Geurts-Moespot, A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the availability of many assays to measure concentrations of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in body fluids, these assays often lack specificity or sensitivity and are often of questionable reliability, resulting in inconsistent results. Therefore, we have developed an ELISA that is

  12. Upregulated expression of human neutrophil peptides 1, 2 and 3 (HNP 1-3) in colon cancer serum and tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Bøgebo, Rikke; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2005-01-01

    of identifying biomarkers for colon cancer. METHODS: By Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionisation--Time Of Flight/Mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS) we compare the protein profiles of colon cancer serum with serum from healthy individuals and the protein profiles of colon tumours with normal colon tissue...

  13. Small regions of overlapping deletions on 6q26 in human astrocytic tumours identified using chromosome 6 tile path array CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Koichi; Mungall, Andrew J; Fiegler, Heike; Pearson, Danita M.; Dunham, Ian; Carter, Nigel P; Collins, V. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 6 are a common abnormality in diverse human malignancies including astrocytic tumours, suggesting the presence of tumour suppressor genes (TSG). In order to help identify candidate TSGs, we have constructed a chromosome 6 tile path microarray. The array contains 1780 clones (778 PACs and 1002 BACs) that cover 98.3% of the published chromosome 6 sequences. A total of 104 adult astrocytic tumours (10 diffuse astrocytomas, 30 anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), 64 glioblastomas (GB)) were analysed using this array. Single copy number change was successfully detected and the result was in general concordant with a microsatellite analysis. The pattern of copy number change was complex with multiple interstitial deletions/gains. However, a predominance of telomeric 6q deletions was seen. Two small common and overlapping regions of deletion at 6q26 were identified. One was 1002 kb in size and contained PACRG and QKI, while the second was 199 kb and harbours a single gene, ARID1B. The data show that the chromosome 6 tile path array is useful in mapping copy number changes with high resolution and accuracy. We confirmed the high frequency of chromosome 6 deletions in AA and GB, and identified two novel commonly deleted regions that may harbour TSGs. PMID:16205629

  14. MRI findings of intracranial cystic meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Hu, L.-B.; Zhen, J.W.; Zou, L.-G.; Feng, X.-Y.; Wang, W.-X.; Wen, L.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of intracranial cystic meningiomas and compare these features in intra- and peritumoural cyst groups. Materials and methods: Fourteen cases of peritumoural cystic meningiomas were compared with 18 cases of intratumoural cystic meningiomas. All patients were examined using non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI. Tumour location, tumour size, signal intensity, enhancement characteristics, and cystic changes were assessed. The MRI features were compared between the intra- and peritumoural cyst groups. Results: Most cystic meningiomas comprised two or more cysts. The solid parts of the tumours showed moderate or marked enhancement after the injection of contrast material. An enhanced cyst wall was found in six out of 14 cases in the peritumoural cyst group, but not in the intratumoural cyst group. Peritumoural cystic meningiomas were predominately located in the cerebral falx, whereas the intratumoural cystic meningiomas were predominantly found in frontal convexity (X 2 = 7.434, p = 0.024). The cysts were larger in the peritumoural cyst group than in the intratumoural cyst group (t = 5.274, p = 0.0258). Peritumoural oedema was more commonly found in the intratumoural cyst group (X 2 = 6.863, p = 0.008). Cystic meningiomas with solid parts located inside the cyst are reported for the first time. Conclusion: Cystic meningiomas, although uncommon, should be differentiated from other cystic intracranial lesions. Peri- and intratumoural cystic meningiomas have distinct MRI features. The present study provides the first report of two lesions with solid parts located inside the cyst, as well as one lesion with a calcified solid nodule and haemorrhage within the cyst.

  15. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  16. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause is determined and is referred to as “secondary” intracranial hypertension. What are the risk factors for idiopathic intracranial ... clotting disorders, anemia and malnutrition. Can idiopathic intracranial ... to be “secondary” which affects males and females equally. The second ...

  17. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected but u...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  18. Mapping effective connectivity in the human brain with concurrent intracranial electrical stimulation and BOLD-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew A; Magnotta, Vincent A; Kruger, Anton; Griffiths, Timothy D; Lemieux, Louis; Carmichael, David W; Petkov, Christopher I; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Kovach, Christopher K; Sutterer, Matthew J; Adolphs, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    Understanding brain function requires knowledge of how one brain region causally influences another. This information is difficult to obtain directly in the human brain, and is instead typically inferred from resting-state fMRI. Here, we demonstrate the safety and scientific promise of a novel and complementary approach: concurrent electrical stimulation and fMRI (es-fMRI) at 3T in awake neurosurgical patients with implanted depth electrodes. We document the results of safety testing, actual experimental setup, and stimulation parameters, that safely and reliably evoke activation in distal structures through stimulation of amygdala, cingulate, or prefrontal cortex. We compare connectivity inferred from the evoked patterns of activation with that estimated from standard resting-state fMRI in the same patients: while connectivity patterns obtained with each approach are correlated, each method produces unique results. Response patterns were stable over the course of 11min of es-fMRI runs. COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHOD: es-fMRI in awake humans yields unique information about effective connectivity, complementing resting-state fMRI. Although our stimulations were below the level of inducing any apparent behavioral or perceptual effects, a next step would be to use es-fMRI to modulate task performances. This would reveal the acute network-level changes induced by the stimulation that mediate the behavioral and cognitive effects seen with brain stimulation. es-fMRI provides a novel and safe approach for mapping effective connectivity in the human brain in a clinical setting, and will inform treatments for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders that use deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Raised intracranial pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is article presents an approach to raised intracranial pressure (ICP) constructed in a question-answer fashion. ..... Given that raised ICP is a serious and potentially life-threatening emergency, fast and reliable referral and transfer mechanisms should be established to ensure patients with this condition are effectively treated.

  20. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raboel, P H; Bartek, J; Andresen, M

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods...

  1. Sinogenic intracranial complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Mikkel Seremet; Fisker, Niels; Christensen, Anne Estmann

    2018-01-01

    We present two 11-year-old girls with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, treated with adalimumab. Both developed severe intracranial complications to sinusitis. Patient 1 had been treated with adalimumab for 15 months when she developed acute sinusitis complicated by an orbital abscess, ...

  2. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, P; Zenteno, M A; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O

    1989-09-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.).

  3. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-01-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.)

  4. A PROSPECTIVE HISTOPATHOLOGICAL-BASED STUDY OF BRAIN TUMOURS IN A REFERRAL CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathima Gujjaru

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Brain neoplasms occur at all ages and account for around 2-3 percent of all deaths in adults. In children, the frequency increases to more than twenty percent. In children, it forms the second most common type of malignancy. Most of the tumours encountered are not related to any identifiable risk factors except for irradiation and some hereditary syndromes like subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, cerebellar haemangioblastoma, meningioma, Schwannoma of 7 th cranial nerve. Gliomas constitute fifty percent of the brain tumours and sixty percent of all gliomas are glioblastoma multiforme. Meningiomas constitute twenty percent and cerebral metastasis is seen in fifteen percent of the cases. Seventy percent of supratentorial tumours are found in adults and seventy percent of brain tumours in children are infratentorial. The three common tumours of cerebellum are medulloblastoma, haemangioblastoma and juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma. Brain tumours are space occupying lesions and cause compression and destruction of adjacent structures, brain oedema (Peritumoural tissue, infarction and ischaemia of brain by compressing/infiltrating cerebral blood vessels, obstruction of CSF flow causing hydrocephalus, and rise in intracranial pressure with herniations. Tumours can undergo ischaemic necrosis and necrotic tumours tend to bleed. Brain tumours generally do not metastasise. Schwannoma and meningioma are benign tumours. Medulloblastoma of childhood may have drop metastasis via CSF. A sincere effort has been put in this study to identify the incidence of each variety of brain tumour among the fifty confirmed and identified cases of brain tumours. METHODS The age range of the cases in present study was 5-72 years with a mean age of occurrence of 44.11 years and the peak age group affected were in the 3 rd and 4 th decades. Cerebral hemisphere was the commonest site for intracranial tumours. RESULT In the present study, fifty

  5. Can you hear me yet? An intracranial investigation of speech and non-speech audiovisual interactions in human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhone, Ariane E; Nourski, Kirill V; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; McMurray, Bob

    In everyday conversation, viewing a talker's face can provide information about the timing and content of an upcoming speech signal, resulting in improved intelligibility. Using electrocorticography, we tested whether human auditory cortex in Heschl's gyrus (HG) and on superior temporal gyrus (STG) and motor cortex on precentral gyrus (PreC) were responsive to visual/gestural information prior to the onset of sound and whether early stages of auditory processing were sensitive to the visual content (speech syllable versus non-speech motion). Event-related band power (ERBP) in the high gamma band was content-specific prior to acoustic onset on STG and PreC, and ERBP in the beta band differed in all three areas. Following sound onset, we found with no evidence for content-specificity in HG, evidence for visual specificity in PreC, and specificity for both modalities in STG. These results support models of audio-visual processing in which sensory information is integrated in non-primary cortical areas.

  6. In vivo 1H-spectroscopy of human intracranial tumors at 1.5 tesla. Preliminary experience at a clinical installation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Wieslander, S; Gjerris, F

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may contribute to the characterization of intracranial tumors in vivo. Volume selective water suppressed proton spectroscopy offers the possibility to study a number of metabolites in the brain including choline (CHO), creatinine/phosphocreatinine (CR/PCR), N...

  7. Chemical Meningitis with Intracranial Tumours | De Klerk | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 48, No 1 (1974) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  8. Adnexal Tumours Of Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parate Sanjay N

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A total 120 cases of epidermal appendage tumours of skin were analysed and classified according to the classification provided by WHO’. Epidermal appendage tumours accounted for 12.87% of all skin tumours, of which 29.17% were benign and 70.83% were malignant. Most of the tumours (75.83% were in the head and face region. The most common tumour was basal cell epithelioma (55%.

  9. Chlamydia trachomatis induces an upregulation of molecular biomarkers podoplanin, Wilms' tumour gene 1, osteopontin and inflammatory cytokines in human mesothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Anna; Buommino, Elisabetta; Domenico, Marina Di; Feola, Antonia; Brunetti-Pierri, Raffaella; Rizzo, Antonietta

    2017-05-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most prevalent infection of the genital tract in women worldwide. C. trachomatis has a tendency to cause persistent infection and induce a state of chronic inflammation, which has been reported to play a role in carcinogenesis. We report that persistent C. trachomatis infection increases the expression of inflammatory tumour cytokines and upregulates molecular biomarkers such as podoplanin, Wilms' tumour gene 1 and osteopontin in primary cultures of mesothelial cells (Mes1) and human mesothelioma cells (NCI). Infection experiments showed that Mes1 and NCI supported the growth of C. trachomatisin vitro, and at an m.o.i. of 4, the inclusion-forming units/cell showed many intracellular inclusion bodies after 3 days of infection. However, after 7 days of incubation, increased proliferative and invasive activity was also observed in Mes1 cells, which was more evident after 14 days of incubation. ELISA analysis revealed an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α release in Mes1 cells infected for a longer period (14 days). Finally, real-time PCR analysis revealed a strong induction of podoplanin, Wilms' tumour gene 1 and osteopontin gene expression in infected Mes1 cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inflammatory response elicited by C. trachomatis persistent infection and the role played by inflammation in cell proliferation, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and molecular biomarkers of cancer. The results of this study suggest that increased molecular biomarkers of cancer by persistent inflammation from C. trachomatis infection might support cellular transformation, thus increasing the risk of cancer.

  10. The effects of indomethacin on intracranial pressure and cerebral haemodynamics in patients undergoing craniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mads; Tankisi, A; Cold, G E

    2004-01-01

    We compared the effects of indomethacin (bolus of 0.2 mg.kg-1 followed by an infusion of 0.2 mg.kg-1.h-1) and placebo on intracranial pressure and cerebral haemodynamics in 30 patients undergoing craniotomy for supratentorial brain tumours under propofol and fentanyl anaesthesia. Indomethacin...

  11. Anaesthetic management for caesarean section in a case of previously operated with residual pituitary tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerana N Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful anaesthetic management for caesarean section in a case with previous pituitary tumour resection, with residual tumour, is reported. The pituitary gland undergoes global hyperplasia during pregnancy. Functional pituitary tumours may exhibit symptomatic enlargement during pregnancy. Growth hormone secreting tumour is associated with acromegaly which has associated anaesthetic implications of difficult airway, systemic hypertension, and diabetes and electrolyte imbalance. Intracranial space occupying lesions can increase intra cranial pressure and compromise cerebral perfusion or cause herniation. We report management of this case.

  12. Expression of Monocarboxylate Transporters 1, 2, and 4 in Human Tumours and Their Association with CD147 and CD44

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs are important cellular pH regulators in cancer cells; however, the value of MCT expression in cancer is still poorly understood. In the present study, we analysed MCT1, MCT2, and MCT4 protein expression in breast, colon, lung, and ovary neoplasms, as well as CD147 and CD44. MCT expression frequency was high and heterogeneous among the different tumours. Comparing with normal tissues, there was an increase in MCT1 and MCT4 expressions in breast carcinoma and a decrease in MCT4 plasma membrane expression in lung cancer. There were associations between CD147 and MCT1 expressions in ovarian cancer as well as between CD147 and MCT4 in both breast and lung cancers. CD44 was only associated with MCT1 plasma membrane expression in lung cancer. An important number of MCT1 positive cases are negative for both chaperones, suggesting that MCT plasma membrane expression in tumours may depend on a yet nonidentified regulatory protein.

  13. {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boll, R.; Murphy, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  14. 213Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U.; Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A.; Boll, R.; Murphy, K.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as 90 Y/ 177 Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with 213 Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with 90 Y/ 177 Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of 213 Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of 213 Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of 213 Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  15. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  16. Intracranial cavernous angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuhi, Fumiaki; Gondou, Masazumi; Sasahira, Masahiro; Ichitsubo, Hidenori; Asakura, Tetsuhiko.

    1986-01-01

    The present authors have experienced 2 cases of intracranial cavernous angioma. Of these cases, one was admitted because of generalized convulsions, while the other was admitted because of headache. In both cases, neither plain X-ray films nor carotid angiography showed any abnormality, but computerized tomography (CT) revealed a slightly high-density area which was not enhanced with contrast media. Histologically, the tumors had many vascular cavities with walls lined with a single layer of endothelial cells and had no neural tissue between the vascular cavities; therefore, they were diagnosed as cases of cavernous angioma. The authors discussed the radiological findings of the intracranial cavernous angioma with a review of the literature and stressed the role of computerized tomography in the diagnosis of cavernous angioma. (author)

  17. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Pathobiology Group standard operating procedure for the preparation of human tumour tissue extracts suited for the quantitative analysis of tissue-associated biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Manfred; Mengele, Karin; Schueren, Elisabeth; Sweep, Fred C G J; Foekens, John A; Brünner, Nils; Laabs, Juliane; Malik, Abha; Harbeck, Nadia

    2007-03-01

    With the new concept of 'individualized treatment and targeted therapies', tumour tissue-associated biomarkers have been given a new role in selection of cancer patients for treatment and in cancer patient management. Tumour biomarkers can give support to cancer patient stratification and risk assessment, treatment response identification, or to identifying those patients who are expected to respond to certain anticancer drugs. As the field of tumour-associated biomarkers has expanded rapidly over the last years, it has become increasingly apparent that a strong need exists to establish guidelines on how to easily disintegrate the tumour tissue for assessment of the presence of tumour tissue-associated biomarkers. Several mechanical tissue (cell) disruption techniques exist, ranging from bead mill homogenisation and freeze-fracturing through to blade or pestle-type homogenisation, to grinding and ultrasonics. Still, only a few directives have been given on how fresh-frozen tumour tissues should be processed for the extraction and determination of tumour biomarkers. The PathoBiology Group of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer therefore has devised a standard operating procedure for the standardised preparation of human tumour tissue extracts which is designed for the quantitative analysis of tumour tissue-associated biomarkers. The easy to follow technical steps involved require 50-300 mg of deep-frozen cancer tissue placed into small size (1.2 ml) cryogenic tubes. These are placed into the shaking flask of a Mikro-Dismembrator S machine (bead mill) to pulverise the tumour tissue in the capped tubes in the deep-frozen state by use of a stainless steel ball, all within 30 s of exposure. RNA is isolated from the pulverised tissue following standard procedures. Proteins are extracted from the still frozen pulverised tissue by addition of Tris-buffered saline to obtain the cytosol fraction of the tumour or by the Tris buffer supplemented with

  18. In vivo sup 1 H-spectroscopy of human intracranial tumors at 1. 5 Tesla; Preliminary experience at a clinical installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, O.; Wieslander, S.; Gjerris, F.; Jensen, K.M. (Danish Research Center of Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen (Denmark) Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Clinic of Neurosurgery)

    1991-03-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may contribute to the characterization of intracranial tumors in vivo. Volume selective water suppressed proton spectroscopy offers the possibility to study a number of metabolities in the brain including choline (CHO), creatinine-phosphocreatinine (CR/PCR), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and lactate. Using the stimulated echo technique we have studied 17 patients with intracranial tumors. In all cases the tumors were classified based on histologic evaluation. The tumor spectra differed considerably from those obtained in healthy brain tissue. The results indicate a relative decrease in the NAA and CR/PCR content. In many cases a lactate peak could be seen especially in the tumors with malignant growth characteristics. Our preliminary results suggest that proton spectroscopy may contribute to the differentiation of brain tumors with respect to benign or malignant growth. However, further research is warranted before a definite conclusion can be drawn. (orig.).

  19. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  20. Intracranial MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.L.; Blatter, D.D.; Parker, D.L.; Robison, R.O.; Harnsberger, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper compares the more traditional three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight MR angiography with a novel new technique, MOTSA, in the evaluation of both normal and abnormal intracranial anatomy. The authors performed sequential, location-matched 3D TOF and MOTSA MR angiography in 10 subjects with normal and 25 with abnormal intracranial anatomy. Images were evaluated for visualization of specific vessels and depiction of pathologic anatomy. All images were subjected to an objective scoring system. Digital angiography was available in 15 of 25 abnormal cases. In the normal cases, large- and small-vessel visualization was improved. Significant improvement in visualization of venous anatomy was also observed. In the abnormal cases, pathologic anatomy was better visualized, providing important diagnostic information. Multiple overlapping thin-slab-acquisition MR angiography demonstrates vessel visualization that is increased over that of 3D TOF MR angiography in both normal and abnormal cases. Because of the decrease in saturation effects and phase dispersion, MOTSA is especially useful in the evaluation of complex intracranial vascular abnormalities

  1. An in vitro model demonstrates the potential of neoplastic human germ cells to influence the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, B; Schuppe, H-C; Bergmann, M; Hedger, M P; Loveland, B E; Loveland, K L

    2017-07-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) typically contain high numbers of infiltrating immune cells, yet the functional nature and consequences of interactions between GCNIS (germ cell neoplasia in situ) or seminoma cells and immune cells remain unknown. A co-culture model using the seminoma-derived TCam-2 cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, n = 7 healthy donors) was established to investigate how tumour and immune cells each contribute to the cytokine microenvironment associated with TGCT. Three different co-culture approaches were employed: direct contact during culture to simulate in situ cellular interactions occurring within seminomas (n = 9); indirect contact using well inserts to mimic GCNIS, in which a basement membrane separates the neoplastic germ cells and immune cells (n = 3); and PBMC stimulation prior to direct contact during culture to overcome the potential lack of immune cell activation (n = 3). Transcript levels for key cytokines in PBMC and TCam-2 cell fractions were determined using RT-qPCR. TCam-2 cell fractions showed an immediate increase (within 24 h) in several cytokine mRNAs after direct contact with PBMC, whereas immune cell fractions did not. The high levels of interleukin-6 (IL6) mRNA and protein associated with TCam-2 cells implicate this cytokine as important to seminoma physiology. Use of PBMCs from different donors revealed a robust, repeatable pattern of changes in TCam-2 and PBMC cytokine mRNAs, independent of potential inter-donor variation in immune cell responsiveness. This in vitro model recapitulated previous data from clinical TGCT biopsies, revealing similar cytokine expression profiles and indicating its suitability for exploring the in vivo circumstances of TGCT. Despite the limitations of using a cell line to mimic in vivo events, these results indicate how neoplastic germ cells can directly shape the surrounding tumour microenvironment, including by influencing local immune responses. IL6

  2. Giant growth-hormone secreting pituitary tumour with etracranial extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip Taipang; Chan Fuluk; Kung Annie Waichee; Lam Karen Siuling [Univ. of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong). Depts. of Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology

    1996-02-01

    A 19 year old female patient with typical features of acromegaly was found to have an extensive pituitary tumour with suprasellar, lateral and inferior extensions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed a portion of the tumour extending from the right cavernous sinus through the foramen ovale to become extracranial. Serum growth hormone (GH) was 52.6 mU/L basally and remained elevated after oral glucose, confirming the diagnosis of acromegaly. Treatment with the long-acting somatostatin analogue, octreotide, for 6 months led to a 30% reduction in tumour volume of the intracranial portion but no effect on the extracranial and sphenoidal extensions. She was subsequently treated with trans-sphenoidal surgery followed by external irradiation. The possibility of perineural spread of the tumour was considered. 9 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  3. Giant growth-hormone secreting pituitary tumour with etracranial extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ip Taipang; Chan Fuluk; Kung Annie Waichee; Lam Karen Siuling

    1996-01-01

    A 19 year old female patient with typical features of acromegaly was found to have an extensive pituitary tumour with suprasellar, lateral and inferior extensions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed a portion of the tumour extending from the right cavernous sinus through the foramen ovale to become extracranial. Serum growth hormone (GH) was 52.6 mU/L basally and remained elevated after oral glucose, confirming the diagnosis of acromegaly. Treatment with the long-acting somatostatin analogue, octreotide, for 6 months led to a 30% reduction in tumour volume of the intracranial portion but no effect on the extracranial and sphenoidal extensions. She was subsequently treated with trans-sphenoidal surgery followed by external irradiation. The possibility of perineural spread of the tumour was considered. 9 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  4. Modelling glioblastoma tumour-host cell interactions using adult brain organotypic slice co-culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Marques-Torrejon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an aggressive incurable brain cancer. The cells that fuel the growth of tumours resemble neural stem cells found in the developing and adult mammalian forebrain. These are referred to as glioma stem cells (GSCs. Similar to neural stem cells, GSCs exhibit a variety of phenotypic states: dormant, quiescent, proliferative and differentiating. How environmental cues within the brain influence these distinct states is not well understood. Laboratory models of GBM can be generated using either genetically engineered mouse models, or via intracranial transplantation of cultured tumour initiating cells (mouse or human. Unfortunately, these approaches are expensive, time-consuming, low-throughput and ill-suited for monitoring live cell behaviours. Here, we explored whole adult brain coronal organotypic slices as an alternative model. Mouse adult brain slices remain viable in a serum-free basal medium for several weeks. GSCs can be easily microinjected into specific anatomical sites ex vivo, and we demonstrate distinct responses of engrafted GSCs to diverse microenvironments in the brain tissue. Within the subependymal zone – one of the adult neural stem cell niches – injected tumour cells could effectively engraft and respond to endothelial niche signals. Tumour-transplanted slices were treated with the antimitotic drug temozolomide as proof of principle of the utility in modelling responses to existing treatments. Engraftment of mouse or human GSCs onto whole brain coronal organotypic brain slices therefore provides a simplified, yet flexible, experimental model. This will help to increase the precision and throughput of modelling GSC-host brain interactions and complements ongoing in vivo studies. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  5. Three cases of intracranial lipoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Yanagida, Noritaka; Fujii, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Miyauchi, Takaharu

    1987-12-01

    Intracranial lipoma is an uncommon lesion that can be found in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Because of CT (computerized tomography), the tumors can now be easily diagnosed in asymptomatic individuals. Three cases of intracranial lipoma in asymptomatic patients are presented, along with a review of the literature, and the value of CT, especially coronal section, in the diagnosis of intracranial lipomas and associated anomalies, such as the agenesis of corpus callosum, is discussed.

  6. Alternative splicing of TIA-1 in human colon cancer regulates VEGF isoform expression, angiogenesis, tumour growth and bevacizumab resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdollah Zadeh, Maryam A; Amin, Elianna M; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Domingo, Enric; Symonds, Kirsty E; Ye, Xi; Heesom, Katherine J; Salmon, Andrew; D'Silva, Olivia; Betteridge, Kai B; Williams, Ann C; Kerr, David J; Salmon, Andrew H J; Oltean, Sebastian; Midgley, Rachel S; Ladomery, Michael R; Harper, Steven J; Varey, Alexander H R; Bates, David O

    2015-01-01

    The angiogenic capability of colorectal carcinomas (CRC), and their susceptibility to anti-angiogenic therapy, is determined by expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) isoforms. The intracellular protein T-cell Intracellular Antigen (TIA-1) alters post-transcriptional RNA processing and binds VEGF-A mRNA. We therefore tested the hypothesis that TIA-1 could regulate VEGF-A isoform expression in colorectal cancers. TIA-1 and VEGF-A isoform expression was measured in colorectal cancers and cell lines. We discovered that an endogenous splice variant of TIA-1 encoding a truncated protein, short TIA-1 (sTIA-1) was expressed in CRC tissues and invasive K-Ras mutant colon cancer cells and tissues but not in adenoma cell lines. sTIA-1 was more highly expressed in CRC than in normal tissues and increased with tumour stage. Knockdown of sTIA-1 or over-expression of full length TIA-1 (flTIA-1) induced expression of the anti-angiogenic VEGF isoform VEGF-A165b. Whereas flTIA-1 selectively bound VEGF-A165 mRNA and increased translation of VEGF-A165b, sTIA-1 prevented this binding. In nude mice, xenografted colon cancer cells over-expressing flTIA-1 formed smaller, less vascular tumours than those expressing sTIA-1, but flTIA-1 expression inhibited the effect of anti-VEGF antibodies. These results indicate that alternative splicing of an RNA binding protein can regulate isoform specific expression of VEGF providing an added layer of complexity to the angiogenic profile of colorectal cancer and their resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment and association of two useful tumour markers: alpha feto protein and human chornionic gonodotropin (beta hCG) hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhan, F.; Tahir, F.; Sultan, S.; Subhan, K.

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to determine serum Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and beta-h Chornionic Gonodotropin hormone (beta-hCG) levels among adult Pakistani population, and to observe their correlation. Serum AFP and beta-hCG levels were evaluated, using Micro-particle Enzyme Immuno Assay (MEIA) technology of M/s Abbott Laboratories. Data were compared using students t-test and correlation was computed. In the patients advised serum AFP assessment, 52% had normal AFP levels. comprising 37% male and 63% female subjects. For patients having a non-pathological picture, AFP levels varied non-significantly (p>0.05) between the Genders however, age varied highly significantly (p 0.05) and highly significant (p 0.05). Comparison of the population in the same age groups of both genders revealed significant (p 0.05), due to a large standard error. Although the differences in beta-hCG levels were highly significant (p 0.05). Among the studied cases, 67% patients had normal and 33% patients had raised beta-hCG levels. Beta-hCG levels show a decreasing trend with increasing age and beta-hCG levels were statistically significant (p<0.05) when patients under 50 years of age were compared with patients above 50 years. The coefficient of correlation between serum AFP and beta- hCG levels was 0.996454, which indicated a very strong. Significant positive correlation between the two tumour markers. The study showed that both serum AFP and beta-hCG are useful tumour markers and had a very strong positive correlation. (author)

  8. Germ cell tumours in neonates and infants: a distinct subgroup?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, I.M.; Schepens, M.T.M.; Looijenga, L.H.J.; Strong, L.C.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Human germ cell tumours (GCTs) constitute a heterogeneous group of tumours that can be classified into four major subgroups. One of these subgroups encompasses (immature) teratomas and yolk sac tumours of patients under the age of 5 years. In this paper we review the various clinical, histological

  9. A STUDY OF TUMOURS OF THE SELLER REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rame

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The tumours of the sellar region that are encountered according to literature are Craniopharyngioma [WHO grade I], Granular cell tumour of the neurohypophysis [WHO grade I], Pituicytoma [WHO grade I], Spindle cells oncocytoma of the adenohypophysis [WHO grade I]. The aim of the study is to study the tumours that are encountered in the Sellar Region. The incidence of the sellar region is very less in this region of Karnataka. METHOD The sample size included 100 cases of intra-cranial neoplasms that turned in the Department of Medicine in KVJ Medical College, Sullia and different local private hospitals of Sullia and Mangalore. RESULTS Only one case of craniopharyngioma was encountered in this study. It accounts for 1(1% of all intracranial tumours studied in this series. Tumour was located in the suprasellar region. This case was reported in a 52-year-old female patient. Presenting complaint was bilateral visual loss and loss of memory. Microscopically-Stratified squamous epithelium was seen lining a cyst and solid ameloblastomatous tissue, calcification ossification and inflammatory reaction were common features. CONCLUSION The incidence of the sellar region is very less in this region of Karnataka.

  10. of brain tumours

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outline of the important clinical issues related to brain tumours and psychiatry. ... Left-sided, frontal tumours also seem to be associated with higher rates of depression, while those in the frontal lobe of the right .... Oxford: Blackwell Science,.

  11. INTRACRANIAL PATHOLOGY AND DIPLOPIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-04-10

    Apr 10, 1971 ... bance. Muscle paretic diplopia is the clinical entity com- ... occurring with chiasmal involvement by pituitary tumours. In these cases a new central functioning area or pseudo- fovea may ... may be a cerebral dissociation allowing the independent ... Long-standing convergence paresis in ep~demic encepha-.

  12. Induction of the early response protein EGR-1 in human tumour cells after ionizing radiation is correlated with a reduction of repair of lethal lesions and an increase of repair of sublethal lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; ten Cate, Rosemarie; van Bree, Chris; Haveman, Jaap

    2004-01-01

    The role of EGR-1 in potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) was studied. Induction of the early response protein EGR-1 and survival after ionizing radiation of two human tumour cell lines after culturing for 48 h in serum-deprived medium was investigated. The glioblastoma cell line (Gli-6) and a

  13. Human murine mammary tumour virus-like agents are genetically distinct from endogenous retroviruses and are not detectable in breast cancer cell lines or biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mant, Christine; Gillett, Cheryl; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Cason, John

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that a human murine mammary tumour virus (MMTV)-like virus (HMLV), which may be an endogenous human retrovirus (HERV), occurs in the human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF-7 and, in 38% of human breast cancer biopsies. As the aetiology of most breast cancers remains unknown, it is important to verify these observations in differing breast cancer populations worldwide. Thus, we sought to determine the genetic relationships between HMLVs, MMTVs, and HERVs, and to investigate the association between HMLVs and breast cancer biopsies from South London, UK. Phylogenetic analyses of the env/pol region indicated that HMLVs are indistinct from MMTVs, and that MMTVS/HMLVs exhibit only low sequence homologies with HERVs. A search of the human genome confirmed that HMLVs are not endogenous. Using MMTV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers described previously, we amplified DNA from all cell lines except MCF-7 and from 7 of 44 (16%) breast cancer biopsies. A restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was designed to distinguish between HMLVs and MMTVs, and upon analyses, PCR amplicons appeared to be HMLVs. To confirm these findings, amplicons from the T47D cell line and from four randomly selected breast cancer patients were sequenced. Of 106 DNA sequences obtained, 103 were homologous with a short arm of human chromosome (Chr) 3 (3p13), two with Chr 4, and one with Chr 8. None of the sequences exhibited significant nucleotide homology with MMTVs, HMLVs, or with HERVs (all <50%). Thus, we conclude that (i) HMLVs are integral members of the MMTV family; (ii) MMTVs/HMLVs are genetically distinct from HERVs; (iii) MMTV/HMLV DNA is not present in human breast cancer cell lines or clinical biopsies in our locality

  14. Primary intracranial malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Mikiro; Ohtsuka, Takatsugu; Kuroki, Takao; Shibata, Iekado; Terao, Hideo; Kudo, Motoshige

    1988-01-01

    Nine cases of primary intracranial malignant lymphoma, which accounts for 3.3 % of all intracranial tumors seen in the authors' institution, were studied in terms of diagnostic computed tomographic (CT) features, the tumors' histologic appearance, treatment, post-treatment blood immunologic and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics, and outcome. The patients were seven males and two females aged 42 to 67 years. Their chief signs and symptoms on admission were intracranial hypertension, focal signs, and disturbance of consciousness. CT, which proved the most useful preoperative diagnostic technique, demonstrated multiple lesions in seven cases and, in all cases, regions of isodensity or slight high density that were enhanced by contrast medium. According to the patterns of enhancement, the tumors were classed as diffuse (three cases) or nodular (six cases). The former is considered typical of malignant lymphoma, whereas the latter type was sometimes indistinguishable from metastatic tumor and meningioma. At surgery, one patient underwent radical tumor excision, two partial removal, and six biopsy only. Histologic examination revealed one tumor to be of the diffuse small cell type, three of the medium cell type, and five of the large cell type (Lymphoma Study Group classification). Of seven tumors in which lymphocytes were examined by peroxidase-antiperoxidase staining, four were of the B cell type. Postoperatively, whole brain irradiation with 29 to 46 Gy was followed by local irradiation with 15 to 50 Gy. If the tumor persisted, one of three chemotherapies was administered. In one case, methotrexate was given intrathecally. Seven patients were divided into two groups: long remission (three) and recurrence (four). These two groups were compared in terms of serum immunoglobulin levels, T and B cell ratios, CSF characteristics, CT features, tumor cell type, and treatment. No clear differences were found. (author)

  15. Intracranial Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshan B. Hameed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant woman with a mechanical prosthetic mitral valve was anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin in the first trimester followed by warfarin until 36 weeks' gestation. She was then switched to intravenous unfractionated heparin infusion to allow for regional anesthesia in anticipation of vaginal delivery. She developed severe headache on hospital day 2 that was refractory to pain medications. Cranial imaging demonstrated a large subdural hematoma with midline shift. She delivered a healthy baby girl by cesarean section. Eventually, symptoms and intracranial abnormalities resolved over time. In conclusion, subdural hematoma is a relatively rare complication that requires multidisciplinary management plan.

  16. Noninvasive quantification of 18F-FLT human brain PET for the assessment of tumour proliferation in patients with high-grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backes, Heiko; Ullrich, Roland; Neumaier, Bernd; Kracht, Lutz; Wienhard, Klaus; Jacobs, Andreas H.

    2009-01-01

    Compartmental modelling of 3 ' -deoxy-3 ' -[ 18 F]-fluorothymidine ( 18 F-FLT) PET-derived kinetics provides a method for noninvasive assessment of the proliferation rate of gliomas. Such analyses, however, require an input function generally derived by serial blood sampling and counting. In the current study, 18 F-FLT kinetic parameters obtained from image-derived input functions were compared with those from input functions derived from arterialized blood samples. Based on the analysis of 11 patients with glioma (WHO grade II-IV) a procedure for the automated extraction of an input function from 18 F-FLT brain PET data was derived. The time-activity curve of the volume of interest with the maximum difference in 18 F-FLT uptake during the first 5 min after injection and the period from 60 to 90 min was corrected for partial-volume effects and in vivo metabolism of 18 F-FLT. For each patient a two-compartment kinetic model was applied to the tumour tissue using the image-derived input function. The resulting kinetic rate constants K 1 (transport across the blood-brain barrier) and K i (metabolic rate constant or net influx constant) were compared with those obtained from the same data using the input function derived from blood samples. Additionally, the metabolic rate constant was correlated with the frequency of tumour cells stained with Ki-67, a widely used immunohistochemical marker of cell proliferation. The rate constants from kinetic modelling were comparable when the blood sample-derived input functions were replaced by the image-derived functions (K 1,img and K 1,sample , r = 0.95, p -5 ; K i,img and K i,sample , r = 0.86, p 1,img and K 1,sample , p = 0.20; K i,img and K i,sample , p = 0.92). Furthermore, a significant correlation between K i,img and the percentage of Ki-67-positive cells was observed (r = 0.73, p = 0.01). Kinetic modelling of 18 F-FLT brain PET data using image-derived input functions extracted from human brain PET data with the practical

  17. A first-in-human phase I and pharmacokinetic study of CP-4126 (CO-101), a nucleoside analogue, in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, B; Awada, A; Evans, T R J; Dueland, S; Hendlisz, A; Rasch, W; Hernes, K; Hagen, S; Aamdal, S

    2015-10-01

    CP-4126 (gemcitabine elaidate, previously CO-101) is a lipid-drug conjugate of gemcitabine designed to circumvent human equilibrative nucleoside transporter1-related resistance to gemcitabine. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of CP-4126, and to describe its pharmacokinetic profile. Eligible patients with advanced refractory solid tumours, and adequate performance status, haematological, renal and hepatic function, were treated with one of escalating doses of CP-4126 administered by a 30-min intravenous infusion on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Blood and urine samples were collected to determine the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of CP-4126. Forty-three patients, median age 59 years (range 18-76; male = 27, female = 16), received one of ten dose levels (30-1600 mg/m(2)). Dose-limiting toxicities included grade 3 anaemia, grade 3 fatigue and grade 3 elevation of transaminases. The MTD and RP2D were 1250 mg/m(2) on basis of the toxicity and PK data. CP-4126 followed dose-dependent kinetics and maximum plasma concentrations occurred at the end of CP-4126 infusion. Seven patients achieved stable disease sustained for ≥3 months, including two patients with pancreatic cancer who had progressed on or after gemcitabine exposure. CP-4126 was well tolerated with comparable toxicity profile to gemcitabine. Future studies are required to determine its anti-tumour efficacy, either alone or in combination with other cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens.

  18. Intracranial Infections: Clinical and Imaging Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, B.R.; Thurnher, M.M.; Malani, P.N.; Petrou, M.; Carets-Zumelzu, F.; Sundgren, P.C. [Dept. of Radiology, and Divisions of Infectious Diseases and G eriatric Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The radiologist plays a crucial role in identifying and narrowing the differential diagnosis of intracranial infections. A thorough understanding of the intracranial compartment anatomy and characteristic imaging findings of specific pathogens, as well incorporation of the clinical information, is essential to establish correct diagnosis. Specific types of infections have certain propensities for different anatomical regions within the brain. In addition, the imaging findings must be placed in the context of the clinical setting, particularly in immunocompromised and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. This paper describes and depicts infections within the different compartments of the brain. Pathology-proven infectious cases are presented in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, with a discussion of the characteristic findings of each pathogen. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) characteristics for several infections are also discussed.

  19. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardwell, C.; Cox, I.; Baldey, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 49-year old female presented with severe postural headache with no history of trauma. A Computed Tomography (CT) study of the brain demonstrated abnormal meningeal enhancement raising the possibility of leptomeningeal metastases. The patient was then referred to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which demonstrated diffuse smooth dural enhancement with ancillary findings characteristic of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. The patient was then referred to Nuclear Medicine to confirm the diagnosis and localise the presumed leak 400MBq of 99mTc DTPA was injected via lumbar puncture into the L3-L4 subarachnoid space Posterior images of the spine were taken with a GE XRT single head gamma camera at 1 and 4 hours post administration of radionuclide. Images demonstrated abnormal early arrival of radionuclide in the kidneys and bladder at 1 hour and abnormal leak of tracer was demonstrate at the level of the first thoracic vertebra on the right side at 4 hours. This confirmed CSF leak at this level. Consequently the patient underwent a blood patch and her symptoms resolved. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension is a syndrome often unrecognised presenting with symptoms including severe postural headache neck stiffness nausea vomiting tinnitus and vertigo. The diagnosis is frequently suspected from findings on MRI, but Nuclear Medicine CSF imaging provides a readily available and cost effective method for confirming the diagnosis, and for making the diagnosis in patients who are unsuitable for or do not have access to MRI. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  20. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardwell, C; Cox, I; Baldey, A [St. F.X. Cabrini Hospital, VIC (Australia). Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    2002-07-01

    Full text: A 49-year old female presented with severe postural headache with no history of trauma. A Computed Tomography (CT) study of the brain demonstrated abnormal meningeal enhancement raising the possibility of leptomeningeal metastases. The patient was then referred to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which demonstrated diffuse smooth dural enhancement with ancillary findings characteristic of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. The patient was then referred to Nuclear Medicine to confirm the diagnosis and localise the presumed leak 400MBq of 99mTc DTPA was injected via lumbar puncture into the L3-L4 subarachnoid space Posterior images of the spine were taken with a GE XRT single head gamma camera at 1 and 4 hours post administration of radionuclide. Images demonstrated abnormal early arrival of radionuclide in the kidneys and bladder at 1 hour and abnormal leak of tracer was demonstrate at the level of the first thoracic vertebra on the right side at 4 hours. This confirmed CSF leak at this level. Consequently the patient underwent a blood patch and her symptoms resolved. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension is a syndrome often unrecognised presenting with symptoms including severe postural headache neck stiffness nausea vomiting tinnitus and vertigo. The diagnosis is frequently suspected from findings on MRI, but Nuclear Medicine CSF imaging provides a readily available and cost effective method for confirming the diagnosis, and for making the diagnosis in patients who are unsuitable for or do not have access to MRI. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc.

  1. EVALUATION OF BRAIN TUMOURS USING COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vinod Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The brain is basically formed by the neurons and the supporting cells. Tumours arising of neurons are almost impossible because the neurons never divide. Tumours arising from the supporting cells are almost frequently seen. The tumour characteristics depend upon the cell of origin. The brain is covered by meninges and the vascular tissue supplies the essential nutrients to all these components of the brain. Unfortunately, the brain is placed in a rigid box called as neurocranium. According to Monro–Kellie principle, if any of the one component increases in a rigid box, the other components will be compensated. So in a limited space if any of the catastrophes occur i.e. space occupying lesions, then the other components will be compensated and as a result the effects will be seen in a very small amount of time. A sincere effort has been put in this study to understand and evaluate the Brain Tumours using a CT scan. This study is intended to be useful to the diagnosing radiologists, internal medicine practitioners and general practitioners and surgeons. METHODS The aim of the study is to evaluate the brain tumours using CT and to confirm the diagnosis by sending to the Histopathology Department. The study is a cross-sectional study and is done in the Department of Radiology, Fathima Medical College, Kadapa, Andhra Pradesh. The study was done from December 2014 to May 2016. The study was done using thirty cases who were believed to have brain tumour and were studied in the Department of Radiology after initial clinical evaluation. First, the plain CT was done and was checked for the location, size, characteristics of the lesion and the surrounding characteristics were observed. RESULT In the present study, the most common of all tumours were those of the neuroepithelial groups. Next in frequency were the tumours of meninges of all intracranial tumours. This was followed by tumours of cranial nerves, metastatic tumour, one lymphoma case

  2. The current role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery in the management of intracranial haemangiopericytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Alfio; Boari, Nicola; Gagliardi, Filippo; Donofrio, Carmine A; Franzin, Alberto; Mortini, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Haemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are rare tumours characterised by aggressive behaviour with tendency to local recurrence and to metastasise. WHO grade II and grade III tumours show different progression-free survival and overall survival rates. Gross total tumour resection is still considered the treatment of choice. Adjuvant radiation therapies represent an option in the treatment strategy regardless the extent of resection. Based on this consideration, Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been introduced either as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant treatment for residual or recurrent tumours. A systematic search was performed on PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar for clinical series reporting Gamma Knife radiosurgery, Cyberknife and Linear Accelerator (LINAC) for the management of intracranial HPCs. Fourteen studies focusing on the effects of Gamma Knife radiosurgery for intracranial HPCs were included. Four studies reported data on Cyberknife radiosurgery and LINAC. A total of 208 patients harbouring 366 tumours have been reported. Patient's features, radiosurgical treatment characteristics and follow-up data of the pertinent literature have been critically revised. Gamma Knife radiosurgery and the other radiosurgical techniques represent a feasible and effective therapy in the management of HPCs. Tumour control and survival rate are comparable to those reported for radiotherapy. Further studies should be focused to define the exact role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery in the management of HPCs.

  3. Immunohistochemical localisation of keratin and luminal epithelial antigen in myoepithelial and luminal epithelial cells of human mammary and salivary gland tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathrath, W B; Wilson, P D; Trejdosiewicz, L K

    1982-01-01

    Rabbit antisera to human 40-63 000 MW epidermal keratin, one batch with restricted distribution of reactivity from an initial (aK1) and one with "broad spectrum" distribution of reactivity from a late bleeding (aK), and to "luminal epithelial antigen" (aLEA) were applied to formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections of human normal and neoplastic mammary and salivary glands using an indirect immunoperoxidase method. aK1 reacted with myoepithelial cells, aLEA with luminal epithelial cells and aK with both cell types in normal mammary and salivary gland. In breast carcinomas the majority of intraluminal and infiltrating carcinoma cells reacted with aLEA but not with aK1 which reacted only with surrounding myoepithelial cells. aK reacted with both myoepithelial cells and with intraluminal and infiltrating tumour cells. In the salivary gland adenomas the majority of cells reacted with aK, and those cells arranged in a tubular fashion reacted with aLEA.

  4. Auto-catalysed progression of aneuploidy explains the Hayflick limit of cultured cells, carcinogen-induced tumours in mice, and the age distribution of human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasnick, D

    2000-06-15

    Evidence continues to accumulate that aneuploidy, an imbalance in the number of chromosomes, is responsible for the characteristic phenotypes of cancer, including the abnormal cellular size and morphology of cancer cells, the appearance of tumour-associated antigens, as well as the high levels of membrane-bound and secreted proteins responsible for invasiveness and loss of contact inhibition. Aneuploidy has also been demonstrated to be the self-perpetuating source of the karyotypic instability of cancer cells. Here it is shown that the auto-catalysed progression of aneuploidy explains the kinetics of the finite lifetime of diploid cells in culture, the time course of the appearance of papillomas and carcinomas in benzo[a]pyrene-treated mice, and the age-dependence of human cancers. Modelling studies indicate that the ease of spontaneous transformation of mouse cells in culture may be due to a chaotic progression of aneuploidy. Conversely, the strong preference towards senescence and resistance to transformation of human cells in culture may be the result of a non-chaotic progression of aneuploidy. Finally, a method is proposed for quantifying the aneuploidogenic potencies of carcinogens.

  5. Imaging of sacral tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S.; Leclere, J.; Vanel, D.; Missenard, G.; Pinieux, G. de

    2008-01-01

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of sacral tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Leclere, J. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Vanel, D. [The Rizzoli Institute, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Missenard, G. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Comite de pathologie tumorale de l' appareil locomoteur, Villejuif (France); Pinieux, G. de [CHRU de Tours, Department of Pathology, Hopital Trousseau, Tours (France)

    2008-04-15

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  7. S6-5: Visual Consciousness Tracked with Direct Intracranial Recording from Early and High-Level Visual Cortices in Humans and Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naotsugu Tsuchiya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Key insights about the neuronal correlates of consciousness have been gained by electrophysiological recording of single neurons from a particular area or by recording of indirect fMRI signals from the whole brain. However, if rapid interaction among neuronal populations in distant cortical areas is essential for consciousness, other methods such as intracranial electrocorticogram (ECoG that can attain both requirements are necessary. Here we report the results of ECoG experiments in three epilepsy patients and one monkey. We used Continuous Flash Suppression to investigate the neuronal activity when ‘invisible’ stimuli broke interocular suppression. We found that widespread activity in the visual cortex preceded up to 1–2 s before subjective reports of detection and that alpha-band activity in the visual cortex induced by the initial flashes predicted how long the suppression was going to last. We will discuss implication of these findings for the neuronal dynamics associated with consciousness.

  8. Oxidative stress specifically downregulates survivin to promote breast tumour formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervin, S; Tran, L; Urman, R; Braga, M; Parveen, M; Li, S A; Chaudhuri, G; Singh, R

    2013-03-05

    Breast cancer, a heterogeneous disease has been broadly classified into oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) or oestrogen receptor negative (ER-) tumour types. Each of these tumours is dependent on specific signalling pathways for their progression. While high levels of survivin, an anti-apoptotic protein, increases aggressive behaviour in ER- breast tumours, oxidative stress (OS) promotes the progression of ER+ breast tumours. Mechanisms and molecular targets by which OS promotes tumourigenesis remain poorly understood. DETA-NONOate, a nitric oxide (NO)-donor induces OS in breast cancer cell lines by early re-localisation and downregulation of cellular survivin. Using in vivo models of HMLE(HRAS) xenografts and E2-induced breast tumours in ACI rats, we demonstrate that high OS downregulates survivin during initiation of tumourigenesis. Overexpression of survivin in HMLE(HRAS) cells led to a significant delay in tumour initiation and tumour volume in nude mice. This inverse relationship between survivin and OS was also observed in ER+ human breast tumours. We also demonstrate an upregulation of NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX1) and its activating protein p67, which are novel markers of OS in E2-induced tumours in ACI rats and as well as in ER+ human breast tumours. Our data, therefore, suggest that downregulation of survivin could be an important early event by which OS initiates breast tumour formation.

  9. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fallen out of favor, unless there is a secondary inflammatory process caused by an underlying disease like ... have little effect on headaches caused by intracranial hypertension, they may temporarily affect the intensity of a ...

  10. Alveolar soft part sarcoma: the new primary intracranial malignancy : A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aditaya; Alrohmain, B; Taylor, W; Bhattathiri, P

    2017-07-26

    The purpose of this paper is to serve as a reference to aid in the management of this poorly understood intracranial malignancy. The authors report their experience treating the eighth ostensible case of a primary intracranial alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS). A 21-year-old man presented to hospital after collapsing. He gave a 1-year history of headache, a 2-month history of reduced visual acuity and on examination had left facial paraesthesia with left-sided incoordination. MRI of the brain revealed a large left posterior fossa mass. The patient underwent resection of the tumour with good recovery in function. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tumour specimen confirmed an ASPS, and multimodal imaging in search of an extra-cranial disease primary was negative. A review of the literature yielded only seven other cases of primary intracranial ASPS. A variety of diagnostic imaging modalities were employed in search of a disease primary, as were various combinations of surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy as treatment. Half of the cases documented delayed disease recurrence. The authors discuss the following: the unique radiological and immunohistological characteristics of this disease including the potential for its misdiagnosis; the investigations required to diagnose a primary intracranial ASPS; the efficacy of current medical and surgical treatment options and the factors that will aid in prognostication. This is the first review of this new primary intracranial malignancy. From our analysis, we offer a joint radiological and immunohistochemical algorithm for the diagnosis of primary intracranial ASPS and specific operative considerations prior to resection.

  11. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype or a...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  12. Anti-proliferative activity of 2,6-dichloro-9- or 7-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-9H- or 7H-purines against several human solid tumour cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Fátima; Ramírez, Alberto; Conejo-García, Ana; Morata, Cynthia; Marchal, Juan A; Campos, Joaquín M

    2014-04-09

    As leads we took several benzo-fused seven- and six-membered scaffolds linked to the pyrimidine or purine moieties with notable anti-proliferative activity against human breast, colon and melanoma cancerous cell lines. We then decided to maintain the double-ringed nitrogenous bases and change the other components to the ethyl acetate moiety. This way six purine and two 5-fluorouracil derivatives were obtained and evaluated against the MCF-7, HCT-116, A-375 and G-361 cancer cell lines. Two QSARs are obtained between the anti-proliferative IC₅₀ values for compounds 26-33 and the clog P against the melanoma cell lines A-375 and G-361. Our results show that two of the analogues [ethyl 2-(2,6-dichloro-9H- or 7H-purine-9- or 7-yl)acetates (30 and 33, respectively)] are potent cytotoxic agents against all the tumour cell lines assayed, showing single-digit micromolar IC₅₀ values. This exemplifies the potential of our previously reported purine compounds to qualify as lead structures for medicinal chemistry campaigns, affording simplified analogues easy to synthesize and with a noteworthy bioactivity. The selective activity of 30 and 33 against the melanoma cell line A-375, via apoptosis, supposes a great advantage for a future therapeutic use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidative stress by ascorbate/menadione association kills K562 human chronic myelogenous leukaemia cells and inhibits its tumour growth in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrax, Julien; Stockis, Julie; Tison, Aurélie; Taper, Henryk S; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2006-09-14

    The effect of oxidative stress induced by the ascorbate/menadione-redox association was examined in K562 cells, a human erythromyeloid leukaemia cell line. Our results show that ascorbate enhances menadione redox cycling, leading to the formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (as shown by dihydrorhodamine 123 oxidation). The incubation of cells in the presence of both ascorbate/menadione and aminotriazole, a catalase inhibitor, resulted in a strong decrease of cell survival, reinforcing the role of H(2)O(2) as the main oxidizing agent killing K562 cells. This cell death was not caspase-3-dependent. Indeed, neither procaspase-3 and PARP were processed and only a weak cytochrome c release was observed. Moreover, we observed only 23% of cells with depolarized mitochondria. In ascorbate/menadione-treated cells, DNA fragmentation was observed without any sign of chromatin condensation (DAPI and TUNEL tests). The cell demise by ascorbate/menadione is consistent with a necrosis-like cell death confirmed by both cytometric profile of annexin-V/propidium iodide labeled cells and by light microscopy examination. Finally, we showed that a single i.p. administration of the association of ascorbate and menadione is able to inhibit the growth of K562 cells by about 60% (in both tumour size and volume) in an immune-deficient mice model. Taken together, these results reinforced our previous claims about a potential application of the ascorbate/menadione association in cancer therapy.

  14. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in radiosensitive and radioresistant human tumour cells measured by field inversion gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeets, M.F.M.A.; Mooren, E.H.M.; Begg, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage induction and repair was measured in two human squamous carcinoma cell lines with differing radiosensitivities. Experiments were carried out with field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE), adapted to measure DNA double strand break (DSB) induction and repair in unlabelled cells. The sensitivity of the method was increased by introducing a hybridization membrane into the agarose gel. Damaged DNA accumulated on one spot on the membrane resulting in high local concentrations. This DNA was quantified using radioactively-labelled total human DNA as a probe. Radiosensitivity differences at physiological temperatures could not be explained by differences in either induction or repair of DNA damage as measured by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. (author)

  15. Intracranial ganglioglioma: clinicopathological and MRI findings in 16 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D. [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China); Henning, T.D. [UCSF, Department of Radiology, Contrast Media Laboratory, San Francisco, CA, 94107 (United States); Zou, L.-G. [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China); Hu, L.-B. [Department of Radiology, The Second Hospital of ChongQing, ChongQing 400000 (China); Wen, L. [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China)], E-mail: cqzdwl@yahoo.com.cn; Feng, X.-Y. [Department of Radiology, HuaShan Hospital, Medical Center of FuDan University, ShangHai 200040 (China); Dai, S.-H.; Wang, W.-X.; Sun, Q.-R. [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China); Zhang, Z.-G. [Department of Pathology, XinQiao Hosptial, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China)

    2008-01-15

    Aim: To record the clinical findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of intracranial gangliogliomas in 16 patients. Materials and methods: Sixteen patients were imaged using unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI. Eight patients underwent unenhanced CT and of these, three underwent contrast-enhanced CT. Two radiologists read the images retrospectively. The images were studied with regard to location, size, margin, signal intensity, enhancement characteristics, cystic changes, and presence of calcifications. Clinical data, such as presenting signs and symptoms, physical findings, and medical histories, were collected. Histopathological and immunohistochemical studies were performed and analysed by two pathologists. Results: In 12 cases the tumours were located in one of the cerebral hemispheres; in the other cases they were located in the brainstem, cerebellum, suprasellar area or the thalamus. The tumour dimension varied from 1-7 cm, with a mean of 3.6 cm {+-} 1.8 cm. The MRI features of ganglioglioma in the present cohort can be divided into three patterns: cystic (n = 2), cystic-solid (n = 6), and solid (n = 8). Solid lesions had a predilection for the temporal lobe; cystic and cystic-solid tumours had a wide anatomical distribution. Cystic lesions were significantly smaller than both cystic-solid and solid lesions (F = 4.28, P < 0.05). Cystic changes in the cystic-solid tumours showed one of the following patterns: those with walls showing contrast enhancement, those containing an enhancing nodule, or cysts without an obvious wall. The solid portion of cystic-solid gangliogliomas and the entire tumour in solid tumours showed homogeneous enhancement of variable degrees on T1-weighted (T1W) spin-echo (SE) images. Five tumours had mild or moderate oedema. In one patient two separate gangliogliomas were found, each lesion exhibiting different MRI features: solid and cystic-solid. One case of cortical ganglioglioma was found, causing bone erosion

  16. Intracranial ganglioglioma: clinicopathological and MRI findings in 16 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Henning, T.D.; Zou, L.-G.; Hu, L.-B.; Wen, L.; Feng, X.-Y.; Dai, S.-H.; Wang, W.-X.; Sun, Q.-R.; Zhang, Z.-G.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To record the clinical findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of intracranial gangliogliomas in 16 patients. Materials and methods: Sixteen patients were imaged using unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI. Eight patients underwent unenhanced CT and of these, three underwent contrast-enhanced CT. Two radiologists read the images retrospectively. The images were studied with regard to location, size, margin, signal intensity, enhancement characteristics, cystic changes, and presence of calcifications. Clinical data, such as presenting signs and symptoms, physical findings, and medical histories, were collected. Histopathological and immunohistochemical studies were performed and analysed by two pathologists. Results: In 12 cases the tumours were located in one of the cerebral hemispheres; in the other cases they were located in the brainstem, cerebellum, suprasellar area or the thalamus. The tumour dimension varied from 1-7 cm, with a mean of 3.6 cm ± 1.8 cm. The MRI features of ganglioglioma in the present cohort can be divided into three patterns: cystic (n = 2), cystic-solid (n = 6), and solid (n = 8). Solid lesions had a predilection for the temporal lobe; cystic and cystic-solid tumours had a wide anatomical distribution. Cystic lesions were significantly smaller than both cystic-solid and solid lesions (F = 4.28, P < 0.05). Cystic changes in the cystic-solid tumours showed one of the following patterns: those with walls showing contrast enhancement, those containing an enhancing nodule, or cysts without an obvious wall. The solid portion of cystic-solid gangliogliomas and the entire tumour in solid tumours showed homogeneous enhancement of variable degrees on T1-weighted (T1W) spin-echo (SE) images. Five tumours had mild or moderate oedema. In one patient two separate gangliogliomas were found, each lesion exhibiting different MRI features: solid and cystic-solid. One case of cortical ganglioglioma was found, causing bone erosion due

  17. Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wilms' tumour or nephroblastoma is a cancer of the kidney that ... It may be noticed by parents or it may be an incidental finding ... patients. It may lead to iron deficiency anaemia. Rarely Wilms' tumour may present with acquired von Willebrand's ... the best treatment approach. ... with multimodality therapy in paediatric.

  18. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  19. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Manjón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden.

  20. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  1. Direct astatination of a tumour-binding protein, human epidermal growth factor, using nido-carborane as a prosthetic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestroem, A.; Carlsson, J.; Lundqvist, H.; Koziorowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    A method for direct astatine labeling of proteins has been investigated. Binding sites for astatine were created by coupling of a nido-carborane derivative to a protein, the human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), using two different conjugation methods - by glutaraldehyde cross-linking or by introduction of sulfohydryl groups by Traut's reagent with subsequent linking of ANC-1 with m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide ester. The conjugates were astatinated using the Chloramine-T method in high yield. The best labeling was obtained by the glutaraldehyde conjugate with an average yield of 68 ± 9%. In vitro stability tests indicated that the glutaraldehyde conjugated label was as stable as hEGF labeled with astatobenzoate. (author)

  2. Provision of a simplified methodology for determining estradiol and progesterone receptors in human breast tumours. Internal and external quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinate, Z.

    1990-10-01

    A simplified assay for the detection of progesterone receptors (PR) in human breast tissue is described. Tissue storage is at -20 deg. C rather than -70 deg. C and a centrifugation speed of 20,000 rpm avoids requirement of an ultracentrifuge. Cytosol preparations obtained from homogenized oestradiol benzoate primed wistar rat uteri performed satisfactorily as positive controls with stability of two months in liquid nitrogen. The use of iodinated tracer (progesterone 11 alpha glucuronide 125 I iodotyramine) proved disappointing in the progesterone receptor assay in contrast to 125 I oestradiol which worked well in a oestrogen receptor assay, previously developed. Hydroxyl-apatite was a better separating agent than dextran coated charcoal in both assays and yielded better sensitivity, particularly when protein concentrations were low. Five breast cancer specimens assayed yielded, by Scatchard analysis, Kd values between 12 to 22x10 -9 m|h, comparable to the positive controls. However, two of these had binding site capacity of less than 5 fmol/mg cytosol as compared to the three others and the positive controls where values ranged from 47-196 fmol/mg cytosol. 28 refs, 6 figs, 14 tabs

  3. Foxa2, a novel protein partner of the tumour suppressor menin, is deregulated in mouse and human MEN1 glucagonomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnavion, Rémy; Teinturier, Romain; Gherardi, Samuele; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Yu, Run; Cordier-Bussat, Martine; Du, Rui; Pattou, François; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Bertolino, Philippe; Lu, Jieli; Zhang, Chang Xian

    2017-05-01

    Foxa2, known as one of the pioneer factors, plays a crucial role in islet development and endocrine functions. Its expression and biological functions are regulated by various factors, including, in particular, insulin and glucagon. However, its expression and biological role in adult pancreatic α-cells remain elusive. In the current study, we showed that Foxa2 was overexpressed in islets from α-cell-specific Men1 mutant mice, at both the transcriptional level and the protein level. More importantly, immunostaining analyses showed its prominent nuclear accumulation, specifically in α-cells, at a very early stage after Men1 disruption. Similar nuclear FOXA2 expression was also detected in a substantial proportion (12/19) of human multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) glucagonomas. Interestingly, our data revealed an interaction between Foxa2 and menin encoded by the Men1 gene. Furthermore, using several approaches, we demonstrated the relevance of this interaction in the regulation of two tested Foxa2 target genes, including the autoregulation of the Foxa2 promoter by Foxa2 itself. The current study establishes menin, a novel protein partner of Foxa2, as a regulator of Foxa2, the biological functions of which extend beyond the pancreatic endocrine cells. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Deep Neural Architectures for Mapping Scalp to Intracranial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Andreas; Spyrou, Loukianos; Martin-Lopez, David; Valentin, Antonio; Alarcon, Gonzalo; Sanei, Saeid; Took, Clive Cheong

    2018-03-19

    Data is often plagued by noise which encumbers machine learning of clinically useful biomarkers and electroencephalogram (EEG) data is no exemption. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) data enhances the training of deep learning models of the human brain, yet is often prohibitive due to the invasive recording process. A more convenient alternative is to record brain activity using scalp electrodes. However, the inherent noise associated with scalp EEG data often impedes the learning process of neural models, achieving substandard performance. Here, an ensemble deep learning architecture for nonlinearly mapping scalp to iEEG data is proposed. The proposed architecture exploits the information from a limited number of joint scalp-intracranial recording to establish a novel methodology for detecting the epileptic discharges from the sEEG of a general population of subjects. Statistical tests and qualitative analysis have revealed that the generated pseudo-intracranial data are highly correlated with the true intracranial data. This facilitated the detection of IEDs from the scalp recordings where such waveforms are not often visible. As a real-world clinical application, these pseudo-iEEGs are then used by a convolutional neural network for the automated classification of intracranial epileptic discharges (IEDs) and non-IED of trials in the context of epilepsy analysis. Although the aim of this work was to circumvent the unavailability of iEEG and the limitations of sEEG, we have achieved a classification accuracy of 68% an increase of 6% over the previously proposed linear regression mapping.

  5. Tumour-induced osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minisola, Salvatore; Peacock, Munro; Fukumoto, Seijii; Cipriani, Cristiana; Pepe, Jessica; Tella, Sri Harsha; Collins, Michael T

    2017-07-13

    Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO), also known as oncogenic osteomalacia, is a rare paraneoplastic disorder caused by tumours that secrete fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Owing to the role of FGF23 in renal phosphate handling and vitamin D synthesis, TIO is characterized by decreased renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, by hypophosphataemia and by low levels of active vitamin D. Chronic hypophosphataemia ultimately results in osteomalacia (that is, inadequate bone mineralization). The diagnosis of TIO is usually suspected when serum phosphate levels are chronically low in the setting of bone pain, fragility fractures and muscle weakness. Locating the offending tumour can be very difficult, as the tumour is often very small and can be anywhere in the body. Surgical removal of the tumour is the only definitive treatment. When the tumour cannot be located or when complete resection is not possible, medical treatment with phosphate salts or active vitamin D is necessary. One of the most promising emerging treatments for unresectable tumours that cause TIO is the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23. The recent identification of a fusion of fibronectin and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) as a molecular driver in some tumours not only sheds light on the pathophysiology of TIO but also opens the door to a better understanding of the transcription, translocation, post-translational modification and secretion of FGF23, as well as suggesting approaches to targeted therapy. Further study will reveal if the FGFR1 pathway is also involved in tumours that do not harbour the translocation.

  6. Intracranial arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marta; Oliveira, Ana; Azevedo, Elsa; Bastos-Leite, António J

    2014-04-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS) is usually attributable to atherosclerosis and corresponds to the most common cause of stroke worldwide. It is very prevalent among African, Asian, and Hispanic populations. Advancing age, systolic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and metabolic syndrome are some of its major risk factors. IAS may be associated with transient or definite neurological symptoms or can be clinically asymptomatic. Transcranial Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography are the most frequently used ancillary examinations for screening and follow-up. Computed tomography angiography can either serve as a screening tool for the detection of IAS or increasingly as a confirmatory test approaching the diagnostic accuracy of catheter digital subtraction angiography, which is still considered the gold (confirmation) standard. The risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic IAS is low (up to 6% over a mean follow-up period of approximately 2 years), but the annual risk of stroke recurrence in the presence of a symptomatic stenosis may exceed 20% when the degree of luminal narrowing is 70% or more, recently after an ischemic event, and in women. It is a matter of controversy whether there is a specific type of treatment other than medical management (including aggressive control of vascular risk factors and antiplatelet therapy) that may alter the high risk of stroke recurrence among patients with symptomatic IAS. Endovascular treatment has been thought to be helpful in patients who fail to respond to medical treatment alone, but recent data contradict such expectation. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Malignant thyroid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, W.; Reiners, C.

    1987-01-01

    The subjects dealt with at the symposium cover all topical aspects of pathology, epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy, and aftercare of the malignant thyroid tumours. A survey of the histological classification of the thyroid tumours and a review of the latest findings concerning the radiocarcinogenesis are followed by a detailed discussion of the most significant tumours. There are also papers dealing with controversial aspects of the histological classification, the value of diagnostic methods, radicality of the therapy, or after care. For five conference papers, separate records are available in the database. (orig./ECB) With 59 figs.; 57 tabs [de

  8. Multiple intracranial hydatid cysts: MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumar, J.; Alvarez, M.; Leira, R.; Prieto, J.M.; Arrojo, L.; Pereira, J.; Vidal, J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple intracranial hydatid cysts are uncommon and usually localized in the supratentorial compartment. We report a case studied by CT and MR of multiple intracranial hydatid cysts scattered in various anatomic sites: supratentorial, infratentorial and also intraventricular. (orig.)

  9. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    . The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  10. Quantitative MR imaging and spectroscopy of brain tumours: a step forward?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagnerova, Dita; Herynek, Vit; Dezortova, Monika; Jiru, Filip; Skoch, Antonin; Hajek, Milan [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic); Malucelli, Alberto; Bartos, Robert; Sames, Martin [JE Purkyne University and Masaryk Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Vymazal, Josef [Na Homolce Hospital, Department of Radiology, Prague (Czech Republic); Urgosik, Dusan [Na Homolce Hospital, Stereotactic and Radiation Neurosurgery, Prague (Czech Republic); Syrucek, Martin [Na Homolce Hospital, Department of Pathology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-11-15

    A prospective quantitative MR study of brain tumours was performed to show the potential of combining different MR techniques to distinguish various disease processes in routine clinical practice. Twenty-three patients with various intracranial tumours before treatment (diagnosis confirmed by a biopsy) and 59 healthy subjects were examined on a 3-T system by conventional MR imaging, 1H spectroscopic imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and T2 relaxometry. Metabolic concentrations and their ratios, T2 relaxation times and mean diffusivities were calculated and correlated on a pixel-by-pixel basis and compared to control data. Different tumour types and different localisations revealed specific patterns of correlations between metabolic concentrations and mean diffusivity or T2 relaxation times. The patterns distinguish given tissue states in the examined area: healthy tissue, tissue infiltrated by tumour, active tumour, oedema infiltrated by tumour, oedema, etc. This method is able to describe the complexity of a highly heterogeneous tissue in the tumour and its vicinity, and determines crucial parameters for tissue differentiation. A combination of different MR parameters on a pixel-by-pixel basis in individual patients enables better identification of the tumour type, direction of proliferation and assessment of the tumour extension. (orig.)

  11. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation. T....... The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  12. Targeting radiation to tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheldon, T.E.; Greater Glasgow Health Board, Glasgow

    1994-01-01

    Biologically targeted radiotherapy entails the preferential delivery of radiation to solid tumours or individual tumour cells by means of tumour-seeking delivery vehicles to which radionuclides can be conjugated. Monoclonal antibodies have attracted attention for some years as potentially selective targeting agents, but advances in tumour and molecular biology are now providing a much wider choice of molecular species. General radiobiological principles may be derived which are applicable to most forms of targeted radiotherapy. These principles provide guidelines for the appropriate choice of radionuclide in specific treatment situations and its optimal combination with other treatment modalities. In future, the availability of gene targeting agents will focus attention on the use of Auger electron emitters whose high potency and short range selectivity makes them attractive choices for specific killing of cancer cells whose genetic peculiarities are known. (author)

  13. [Gastric mesenchymal tumours (GIST)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivach, Arrigo; Fezzi, Margherita; Sartori, Alberto; Belgrano, Manuel; Rimondini, Alessandra; Cuttin-Zernich, Roberto; Covab, Maria Assunta; Bonifacio, Daniela; Buri, Luigi; Pagani, Carlo; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) has increased in recent years. A number of authors have attempted to define the actual nature of these tumours. Immunohistochemistry highlighting the positivity of tyrosine-kinase (CD117/c-Kit) has revealed the difference between gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours and, therefore, the possibility of medical rather than surgical therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 19 patients affected by primary gastric GIST, who underwent surgery in recent years with subsequent follow-up. Gastroscopy and gastrointestinal tract radiography were used not only to obtain the diagnosis but also to establish the size, density, contours, ulceration, regional lymphadenopathy, mesenteric infiltration and the presence of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of endoscopy and radiology in this pathology and the advantages and limitations of each individual technique.

  14. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R.; Pandey, Tarun; Badawi, Mona H.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  15. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  16. Intracranial Monitoring after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Intracranial monitoring after severe traumatic brain injury offers the possibility for early detection and amelioration of physiological insults. In this thesis, I explore cerebral insults due raised intracranial pressure, decreased cerebral perfusion pressure and impaired cerebral pressure reactivity after traumatic brain injury. In chapter 2, the importance of intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and pressure reactivity in regulating the cerebral circulation is elucidated ...

  17. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...

  18. Primary intracranial leiomyoma: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, P.H.; Yang, C.F.; Yeh, L.R.; Pan, H.B. [Department of Radiology, Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung, National Yang Ming University, National Defence Medical Centre, 386 Ta-Chung First Rd., Kaohsiung 813, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China); Huang, C.H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Veterans General Hospital-Kashsiung, National Yang Ming University, National Defence Medical Centre, Kashsiung, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China); Lin, S.L. [Department of Pathology, Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung, National Yang Ming University, National Defence Medical Centre, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1998-04-01

    We present a case of intracranial parenchymal leiomyoma in a 20-year-old woman with a chief complaint of numbness and a painful sensation over the right limbs for several years. CT and MRI revealed an intensely enhancing calcified mass. The patient was well, without recurrence, 2 years after surgery. (orig.) With 2 figs., 13 refs.

  19. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alex P; Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2015-06-01

    Although once a widely speculated about and largely theoretical topic, spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension has gained acceptance as a distinct clinical phenomenon, yet the underlying physiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the past, many terms were used to describe the symptoms of malaise, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo, though longer duration spaceflights have increased the prevalence of overlapping symptoms of headache and visual disturbance. Spaceflight-induced visual pathology is thought to be a manifestation of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) because of its similar presentation to cases of known intracranial hypertension on Earth as well as the documentation of increased ICP by lumbar puncture in symptomatic astronauts upon return to gravity. The most likely mechanisms of spaceflight-induced increased ICP include a cephalad shift of body fluids, venous outflow obstruction, blood-brain barrier breakdown, and disruption to CSF flow. The relative contribution of increased ICP to the symptoms experienced during spaceflight is currently unknown, though other factors recently posited to contribute include local effects on ocular structures, individual differences in metabolism, and the vasodilator effects of carbon dioxide. This review article attempts to consolidate the literature regarding spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension and distinguish it from other pathologies with similar symptomatology. It discusses the proposed physiological causes and the pathological manifestations of increased ICP in the spaceflight environment and provides considerations for future long-term space travel. In the future, it will be critical to develop countermeasures so that astronauts can participate at their peak potential and return safely to Earth.

  20. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE REPORT. 16. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • July 2005. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis. M Modi. FCRad (SA), MMed. Department of Radiation Sciences ... wall where granulomatous inflamma- tion (Fig. 2, arrow) was present in the adventitia. A specific site of origin for the subarachnoid haemorrhage was.

  1. Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gomes de Carvalho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Carvalho J.R.G., Vasconcellos C.H.C., Bastos I. P.B., Trajano F.L.C., Costa T.S. & Fernandes J.I [Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report.] Meningioma intracraniano canino: Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:1- 7, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465 Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23.897-000, Brasil, E-mail: vetjulio@yahoo.com.br Intracranial neoplasms usually show their signals in a moderate way, revealing a long background of nonspecific signs, making the diagnosis more difficult. The meningioma is the most common intracranial neoplasm in dogs and cats. Along the years, the Veterinary Medicine has experienced important technological improvements, making it possible the diagnosis of a lot of diseases. Therefore, diseases considered not common in the past, started being diagnosed more frequently, for instance, brain lesions. The objective of this research is to report a case of intracranial meningioma in a Boxer dog that arrived at the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, highlighting its clinical improvement, diagnosis and treatment.

  2. What Is IH (Intracranial Hypertension)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store What is IH? What is IH? Intracranial hypertension literally means that the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid ( ... is too high. “Intracranial” means “within the skull.” “Hypertension” means “high fluid pressure.” To understand how this ...

  3. Increased detectability of somatic changes in the DNA from human tumours after probing with "synthetic" and "genome-derived" hypervariable multilocus probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagoda, P J; Seitz, G; Epplen, J T

    1989-01-01

    intensities were observed. Together the probes 33.15 and (CAC)5/(GTG)5 detected deviating fingerprint patterns in 63% of the colorectal carcinomas investigated. In mammary and stomach carcinomas, only 1/11 and 2/11 tumours, respectively, showed differences with either of the three probes, 33.15, (GACA)4...

  4. Primary brain tumours, meningiomas and brain metastases in pregnancy: report on 27 cases and review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheecke, M.; Halaska, M.J.; Lok, C.A.; Ottevanger, P.B.; Fruscio, R.; Dahl-Steffensen, K.; Kolawa, W.; Gziri, M.M.; Han, S.N.; Calsteren, K. van; Heuvel, F. van den; Vleeschouwer, S. De; Clement, P.M.; Menten, J.; Amant, F.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concurrence of intracranial tumours with pregnancy is rare. The purpose of this study was to describe all reported patients registered in the international Cancer in Pregnancy registration study (CIP study; http://www.cancerinpregnancy.org), and to review the literature in order to

  5. In vitro differentiation of human monocytes to macrophages: change of PDE profile and its relationship to suppression of tumour necrosis factor-α release by PDE inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantner, Florian; Kupferschmidt, Rochus; Schudt, Christian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hatzelmann, Armin

    1997-01-01

    During in vitro culture in 10% human AB serum, human peripheral blood monocytes acquire a macrophage-like phenotype. The underlying differentiation was characterized by increased activities of the macrophage marker enzymes unspecific esterase (NaF-insensitive form) and acid phosphatase, as well as by a down-regulation in surface CD14 expression. In parallel, a dramatic change in the phosphodiesterase (PDE) profile became evident within a few days that strongly resembled that previously described for human alveolar macrophages. Whereas PDE1 and PDE3 activities were augmented, PDE4 activity, which represented the major cyclic AMP-hydrolysing activity of peripheral blood monocytes, rapidly declined. Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages responded to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with the release of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). In line with the change in CD14 expression, the EC50 value of LPS for induction of TNF release increased from approximately 0.1 ng ml−1 in peripheral blood monocytes to about 2 ng ml−1 in macrophages. Both populations of cells were equally susceptible towards inhibition of TNF release by cyclic AMP elevating agents such as dibutyryl cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or forskolin, which all led to a complete abrogation of TNF production in a concentration-dependent manner and which were more efficient than the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. In monocytes, PDE4 selective inhibitors (rolipram, RP73401) suppressed TNF formation by 80%, whereas motapizone, a PDE3 selective compound, exerted a comparatively weak effect (10–15% inhibition). Combined use of PDE3 plus PDE4 inhibitors resulted in an additive effect and fully abrogated LPS-induced TNF release as did the mixed PDE3/4 inhibitor tolafentrine. In monocyte-derived macrophages, neither PDE3- nor PDE4-selective drugs markedly affected TNF generation when used alone (<15% inhibition), whereas in combination, they led to a maximal inhibition of TNF formation by about 40–50

  6. Human leucocyte antigen class I-redirected anti-tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M P; Dolton, G M; Gerry, A B; Brewer, J E; Bennett, A D; Pumphrey, N J; Jakobsen, B K; Sewell, A K

    2017-01-01

    CD4 + T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour-specific CD4 + T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low-affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4 + T cells with tumour-specific HLA class I-restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co-receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4 + cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing wild-type and a range of affinity-enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1- and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4 + T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4 + T cells than CD8 + T cells. These results indicate that the CD4 + T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8 + T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Immunology.

  7. Modulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis by trimethyltin chloride in human tumour cells: Neuroblastoma SY5Y and cervix adenocarcinoma HeLa S3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Splettstoesser, Frank; Dopp, Elke; Rettenmeier, Albert W.; Buesselberg, Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    Physiological modifications of intracellular Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] i ) levels trigger and/or regulate a diversity of cellular activities (e.g. neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, muscular contraction, cell proliferation), while calcium overloads could result in cytotoxicity. Previously, we have shown that trimethyltin chloride (Me 3 SnCl; TMT) modulates calcium homeostasis in cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa S3) cells [Florea, A.-M., Dopp, E., Buesselberg, D., 2005. TMT induces elevated calcium transients in HeLa cells: types and levels of response. Cell Calcium 37, 252-258]. Here we compare [Ca 2+ ] i -changes induced by trimethyltin chloride in neuroblastoma SY5Y and HeLa S3 cells using calcium-sensitive dyes (fluo-4/AM (fluo-4) and rhod-2/AM (rhod-2)) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). TMT-induced calcium elevations in neuroblastoma SY5Y as well as in HeLa S3 cells. [Ca 2+ ] i rose to a sustained plateau or to transient spikes. Overall, the detected averaged increase of the maximum calcium elevation were: 0.5 μM ∼125.6%; 5 μM ∼130.1%; 500 μM ∼145% in HeLa S3 cells and 0.5 μM ∼133.3%; 5 μM ∼136.1%; 500 μM ∼147.1% in neuroblastoma SY5Y cells. The calcium rise derived from internal stores did not significantly depend on the presence of calcium in the external solution: ∼109% (no calcium added) versus ∼117% (2 mM calcium; 5 μM TMT) in HeLa cells. This difference was similar in neuroblastoma SY5Y cells, were ∼127% versus ∼136% increase (5 μM TMT) were measured. Staining of calcium stores with rhod-2 showed a TMT-induced [Ca 2+ ] i -decrease in the stores followed by an increase of the calcium concentration in the nuclei of the two cell lines tested. Our results suggest that toxic effects in human tumour cells after exposure to trimethyltin compounds might be due to an elevation of [Ca 2+ ] i

  8. Experimental tumour treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    This report of 1984 is the seventh in a series and presents that year's results of continuous studies in the domain of experimental tumour radiotherapy. In the year under review, more personnel has been available for the studies, and the scientific programmes for the assessment of acute and chronic side effects of radiotherapies have been extended. New models have been developed, among them a first system based on animal experiments, for quantifying the mucositis of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa, a limiting condition in the radiotherapy of head and throat tumours. Another significant advancement is a model for quantification of chronical damage to the ureter, which still is a serious problem in the radiotherapy of gynaecological tumours. The 1984 experimental tumour studies have been mainly devoted to the repopulation and split-dose recovery in various tumours, concentrating on dose fractionation as one of the major problems studies. Particular interest has been attached to the processes involved in treatments over several weeks with a daily effective dose of 2 Gy. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of CT in Paediatric Intracranial Neoplastic Lesions - Radiologic and Pathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The frequency of paediatric tumours in developing countries could be attributed to the increased percentage (39% of total population of children) in the overall population. Therefore, extensive researches should be under taken in the field of Paediatric Oncology in the third world. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT by comparing the pre-operative radiological findings of paediatric brain tumours with post-operative histopathological findings on the basis of characteristic radiological features of various tumours. Materials and Methods: This was a hospital based prospective, cross-sectional and descriptive study carried out in Radiology Dept, KEMU / Mayo Hospital, Lahore. Study was conducted over a period of 3 years from June 2005 till June 2008 and comprised of 100 cases of paediatric brain tumours up to 12 years of age. Cases were also collected from Mayo and Children Hospital, Lahore. Results: Topographically, supratentorial tumours were found more than infratentorial 55 : 45. Low grade were more common than high grade 73 : 27. The most common tumour was astrocytoma with 52 cases. Medulloblastoma ranked the second with 16 cases followed by craniopharyngioma with 12 cases. Conclusion: The diagnostic accuracy of CT scan was found to be 83% when correlated with histopathology. CT proved fairly accurate in detection of paediatric intracranial neoplastic lesions. As CT is relatively commonly available inexpensive modality than MRI so it can be used as non invasive imaging modality. (author)

  10. In vitro effects of substance P analogue [D-Arg1, D-Phe5, D-Trp7,9, Leu11] substance P on human tumour and normal cell growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Everard, M. J.; Macaulay, V. M.; Miller, J. L.; Smith, I. E.

    1992-01-01

    Analogues of the neurotransmitter substance P (SP) can interact with neuropeptide receptors, and are reported to inhibit growth of small cell lung cancer cell lines (SCLC CLs). We found [D-Arg1, D-Phe5, D-Trp7,9, Leu11] substance P (D-Phe5SP) significantly inhibited DNA synthesis by 10/10 human tumour CLs; six SCLC, one N-SCLC (squamous), two ovarian and one squamous cervical carcinoma, with inhibition to 50% control levels (IC50) of 20-50 microM. There was dose dependent inhibition of colony...

  11. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  12. The value of MRI in angiogram-negative intracranial haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renowden, S.A. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Molyneux, A.J. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Anslow, P. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Byrne, J.V. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    In one year, cerebral angiograms were performed for intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) on 334 patients. No cause for haemorrhage could be identified in 41 (12 %), 30 of whom had predominantly subarachnoid (SAH) and 11 predominantly parenchymal haemorrhage (PH). These patients were prospectively examined by cranial MRI 1-6 weeks after the ictus. The MRI studies were positive in 7 patients (17 %). In the 30 patients examined after SAH, 2 studies were positive, showing an aneurysm in one case and a brain stem lesion of uncertain aetiology in the other. In those examined after PH, cavernous angiomas were shown in 2, a tumour in 1 and a vascular malformation in another; useful diagnostic information was thus obtained in 36 % of this group. (orig.)

  13. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Saira; Sebire, Neil; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); McCarville, Mary Beth [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (MNTI) is a rare neoplasm of neural crest origin. To describe three further cases of MNTI, with emphasis on CT and MRI findings. Data for children with histologically confirmed MNTI following biopsy or surgery were retrieved. Three children with available imaging at the time of diagnosis were included in the study. All three children had primary tumour in the head and neck region: one in the maxilla, one in the occipital bone (extra-axial but with intracranial extension) and one with an unusual tumour growing exophytically from the subcutaneous tissues adjacent to the occipital bone. All tumours were iso/hypointense both on T1- and T2-weighted MRI, and showed marked contrast enhancement in their non-ossified components. CT allowed identification of bone destruction and remodelling. Our findings are consistent with previously reported cases of MNTI regarding age at presentation and location in the head and neck region. Our MR findings did not demonstrate the typical pattern of T1-shortening expected from melanin deposition. (orig.)

  14. Short term outcomes following surgery in brain tumours sans neuronavigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mamoon Ur; Junaid, Muhammad; Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Afsheen, Afeera

    2018-02-01

    To determine the presentation and frequency of various intracranial neoplasms and assess outcomes for patients who underwent surgery without neuronavigation. This retrospective study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital, Peshawar, Pakistan, and comprised medical records related to the period from August 2011 to July 2014. Patient histories, examination reports and preoperative and post-operative radiological scans were reviewed and extent of excision was determined based on these coupled with recurrence rates. Intraoperatively, tumour excision was determined largely by the experience of the surgeon and preoperative planning using bony landmarks and radiological scans as an objective guide to resection. SPSS 21 was used for data analysis. Of the 143 patients, 83(57.9%) were males and 60(42.1%)were females. Gliomas were the most common tumours, occurring in 20(33.3%) females and 35(42.2%) males. One-year survival rate for grade 4 astrocytomas was poor (39.4%) and was excellent for meningiomas (100%) and pituitary tumours (100%). Time-tested methods of careful neurological examination and knowledge of neuroanatomy can allow a surgeon with limited resources to plan and accommodate for accurate tumour resection with adequate margins.

  15. Nicotinamide and carbogen: relationship between pO2 and radiosensitivity in three tumour lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.M.; Thomas, C.D.; Guichard, M.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of carbogen breathing, nicotinamide injection and their combination on tumour radiosensitivity were correlated with changes in tumour O 2 tension to determine the relationship between radiosensitivity and measured pO 2 . The radiosensitivity (in vivo-in vitro colony assay) and O 2 tension (computerized pO 2 histograph KIMOC 6650) of two human xenografted tumours (HRT18 and NA11 +) and one murine tumour (EMT6) were measured under similar experimental conditions. (author)

  16. Intracranial MR imaging of achondroplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Shinichi; Ootsuka, Ryouichi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nishitani, Hiromu; Shirakawa, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Toshiaki

    1992-01-01

    Intracranial MR imaging was performed in five patients with achondroplasia. All patients had narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the level of the formen magnum that was mainly due to protrusion of the posterior aspect. Three patients had compressive deformities of the brainstem and/or upper cervical spine. Among them, two patients had deformities of the pons. Relative upward displacement of the brainstem was seen in all patients. Hydrocephalus was seen in three patients. (author)

  17. Intracranial MR imaging of achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shinichi; Ootsuka, Ryouichi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nishitani, Hiromu; Shirakawa, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Toshiaki (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-10-01

    Intracranial MR imaging was performed in five patients with achondroplasia. All patients had narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the level of the formen magnum that was mainly due to protrusion of the posterior aspect. Three patients had compressive deformities of the brainstem and/or upper cervical spine. Among them, two patients had deformities of the pons. Relative upward displacement of the brainstem was seen in all patients. Hydrocephalus was seen in three patients. (author).

  18. Screen for intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae with carotid duplex sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, L-K; Yeh, S-J; Chen, Y-C; Liu, H-M; Jeng, J-S

    2009-11-01

    Early diagnosis and management of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) may prevent the occurrence of stroke. This study aimed to identify the best carotid duplex sonography (CDS) parameters for screening DAVF. 63 DAVF patients and 170 non-DAVF patients received both CDS and conventional angiography. The use of seven CDS haemodynamic parameter sets related to the resistance index (RI) of the external carotid artery (ECA) for the diagnosis of DAVF was validated and the applicability of the best CDS parameter set in 20 400 patients was tested. The CDS parameter set (ECA RI (cut-off point = 0.7) and internal carotid artery (ICA) to ECA RI ratio (cut-off point = 0.9)) had the highest specificity (99%) for diagnosis of DAVF with moderate sensitivity (51%). Location of the DAVF was a significant determinant of sensitivity of detection, which was 70% for non-cavernous DAVF and 0% for cavernous sinus DAVF (pdetected abnormality in 92 of 20 400 patients. These abnormalities included DAVF (n = 25), carotid stenosis (n = 32), vertebral artery stenosis (n = 7), intracranial arterial stenosis (n = 6), head and neck tumour (n = 3) and unknown aetiology (n = 19). Combined CDS parameters of ECA RI and ICA to ECA RI ratio can be used as a screening tool for the diagnosis of DAVF.

  19. Bilateral disease and new trends in Wilms tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, Catherine M.; Olsen, Oeystein E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Brisse, Herve J. [Institut Curie, Service de Radiodiagnostic, Paris (France); Begent, Joanna [University College Hospital, Paediatric Oncology, London (United Kingdom); Smets, Anne M. [Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-01-15

    Wilms tumour is a great therapeutic success story within paediatric oncology; its prognosis is excellent. Although mainly sporadic, occurring in otherwise well children, it occurs in a small number of genetically predisposed children. Thus regular surveillance imaging is performed in predisposed children in parts of the USA and Europe. The risks and benefits of surveillance are unclear, as the existing ad-hoc surveillance protocols are lacking in consistency of practice and equity of provision. We present guidelines for Wilms tumour surveillance based on a review of current practice and available evidence, outlined by a multidisciplinary working group in the UK. Wilms tumours are bilateral in 4-13% of affected children. Bilateral synchronous nephroblastomas are observed in 5% of affected children and are usually associated with the presence of nephrogenic rests, congenital malformations and predisposing syndromes. The major challenge in bilateral disease is to achieve a cure and at the same time to preserve sufficient functional renal tissue for normal growth and development. The association among Wilms tumour, nephrogenic rests and nephroblastomatosis makes detection and characterization of renal lesions with imaging extremely important. We discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different modalities used for diagnosis and follow-up in bilateral renal disease. We also discuss newly emerging diagnostic imaging tests such as {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). This technique, when fused with CT (PET-CT), allows accelerated metabolic activity to be accurately anatomically localised and so is potentially useful for staging, assessment of treatment response, and for surgical and radiotherapy planning. In addition, quantitative MRI techniques have been proved to be valuable in intracranial tumours, but no such role has been validated in abdominal disease. Diffusion-weighted imaging with calculation of ADC maps is feasible in

  20. Bilateral disease and new trends in Wilms tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, Catherine M.; Olsen, Oeystein E.; Brisse, Herve J.; Begent, Joanna; Smets, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    Wilms tumour is a great therapeutic success story within paediatric oncology; its prognosis is excellent. Although mainly sporadic, occurring in otherwise well children, it occurs in a small number of genetically predisposed children. Thus regular surveillance imaging is performed in predisposed children in parts of the USA and Europe. The risks and benefits of surveillance are unclear, as the existing ad-hoc surveillance protocols are lacking in consistency of practice and equity of provision. We present guidelines for Wilms tumour surveillance based on a review of current practice and available evidence, outlined by a multidisciplinary working group in the UK. Wilms tumours are bilateral in 4-13% of affected children. Bilateral synchronous nephroblastomas are observed in 5% of affected children and are usually associated with the presence of nephrogenic rests, congenital malformations and predisposing syndromes. The major challenge in bilateral disease is to achieve a cure and at the same time to preserve sufficient functional renal tissue for normal growth and development. The association among Wilms tumour, nephrogenic rests and nephroblastomatosis makes detection and characterization of renal lesions with imaging extremely important. We discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different modalities used for diagnosis and follow-up in bilateral renal disease. We also discuss newly emerging diagnostic imaging tests such as 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). This technique, when fused with CT (PET-CT), allows accelerated metabolic activity to be accurately anatomically localised and so is potentially useful for staging, assessment of treatment response, and for surgical and radiotherapy planning. In addition, quantitative MRI techniques have been proved to be valuable in intracranial tumours, but no such role has been validated in abdominal disease. Diffusion-weighted imaging with calculation of ADC maps is feasible in

  1. Genetically modified tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, Suppl. 1 (2005), S7 ISSN 1214-021X. [Cells VI - Biological Days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumour vaccines * HPV16 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  2. Putting tumours in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, M J; Radisky, D

    2001-10-01

    The interactions between cancer cells and their micro- and macroenvironment create a context that promotes tumour growth and protects it from immune attack. The functional association of cancer cells with their surrounding tissues forms a new 'organ' that changes as malignancy progresses. Investigation of this process might provide new insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and could also lead to new therapeutic targets.

  3. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  4. Inhibition of platelet-tumour cell interaction with ibrutinib reduces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BTK) inhibitor, ibrutinib, in tumour cell-platelet crosstalk in lung cancer. Methods: Human lung cancer cells A549 were treated with ibrutinib or DMSO. mRNA expression was assessed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain ...

  5. Intracranial arterial aneurysm vasculopathies: targeting the outer vessel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krings, Timo; Piske, Ronie L.; Lasjaunias, Pierre L.

    2005-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intracranial arterial aneurysms (AA) remains unclear, despite their clinical importance. An improved understanding of this disease is important in choosing therapeutic options. In addition to the ''classical'' berry-type aneurysm, there are various other types of intracranial AA such as infectious, dissecting or giant, partially-thrombosed aneurysms. From the clinician's perspective, the hypothesis that some of these intracranial AA might be due to abluminal factors has been proposed for several years. Indeed, this hypothesis and the empirical use of anti-inflammatory drugs in giant intracranial aneurysms have been confirmed by recent studies reporting that an enzyme involved in the inflammatory cascade (5-lipoxygenase or 5-LO) promotes the pathogenesis of specific aneurysms in humans. 5-LO generates different forms of leukotrienes which are potent mediators of inflammation. Adventitial inflammation leads to a weakening of the media from the abluminal part of the vessel wall due to the release of proinflammatory factors that invade the media, thereby degrading the extracellular matrix, the elastic lamina of the vascular wall, and, finally, the integrity of the vessel lumen. This in turn results in a dilation of the vessel and aneurysm formation. Moreover, neoangiogenesis of vasa vasorum is found in close proximity to 5-LO activated macrophages. In addition to this biological cascade, we argue that repeated subadventitial haemorrhages from the new vasa vasorum play an important role in aneurysm pathogenesis, due to a progressive increase in size mediated by the apposition of new layers of intramural haematoma within the vessel wall. Intracranial giant AA can therefore be regarded as a proliferative disease of the vessel wall induced by extravascular activity. (orig.)

  6. A first-in-human phase I study of SAR125844, a selective MET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumours with MET amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevin, Eric; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Rodon, Jordi; Dotti, Katia; Isambert, Nicolas; Salvagni, Stefania; Moreno, Victor; Assadourian, Sylvie; Gomez, Corinne; Harnois, Marzia; Hollebecque, Antoine; Azaro, Analia; Hervieu, Alice; Rihawi, Karim; De Marinis, Filippo

    2017-12-01

    Dysregulated MET signalling is implicated in oncogenesis. The safety and preliminary efficacy of a highly selective MET kinase inhibitor (SAR125844) was investigated in patients with advanced solid tumours and MET dysregulation. This was a phase I dose-escalation (3 + 3 design [50-740 mg/m 2 ]) and dose-expansion study. In the dose escalation, patients had high total MET (t-MET) expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or MET amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. In the dose expansion, patients had MET amplification (including a subset of patients with non-small cell lung cancer [NSCLC]) or phosphorylated-MET (p-MET) expression (IHC). Objectives were determination of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of once-weekly intravenous SAR125844 based on dose-limiting toxicities; safety and pharmacokinetic profile; preliminary efficacy of SAR125844 MTD in the expansion cohort. In total, 72 patients were enrolled: dose escalation, N = 33; dose expansion, N = 39; 570 mg/m 2 was established as the MTD. Most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were asthenia/fatigue (58.3%), nausea (31.9%), and abdominal pain, constipation, and dyspnea (27.8% for each); 58.3% of patients reported grade 3 AEs (19.4% were treatment related). Of the 29 evaluable patients with MET amplification treated at 570 mg/m 2 , five achieved a partial response, including four of 22 with NSCLC; 17 patients had stable disease. No response was observed in patients with high p-MET solid tumours. There was no correlation between tumour response and t-MET status or MET gene copy number. The MTD of once-weekly SAR125844 was 570 mg/m 2 ; SAR125844 was well tolerated, with significant antitumour activity in patients with MET-amplified NSCLC. NCT01391533. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunodetection of tumours and for targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.W.; Embleton, M.J.; Pimm, M.V.

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody 791T/36 prepared against human osteogenic sarcoma has been used to detect primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas by external imaging of patients following injection of 131 I-labelled antibody. In 10 of 11 patients radiolabelled 791T/36 antibody localized in tumours, the tumour/non tumour ratio of radioactivity ranging from 1.5:1 to 8.1. 791T/36 antibody was also evaluated for its potential for targeting anti-tumour agents including cytotoxic drugs (Vindesine) and immunomodulating agents (interferon). Vindesine-791T/36 conjugates were preferentially cytotoxic in vitro for target cells expressing the 791T/36 anti-body defined antigen. Also interferon conjugated to 791T/36 antibody, like free interferon activated peripheral blood natural killer cell activity. These in vitro tests together with related studies on antibody localization in vivo indicate the potential of monoclonal antibody targeting of anti-tumour agents

  8. CT and MRI of haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asari, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Katayama, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Itoh, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Tsuchida, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Ohmoto, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan))

    1993-04-01

    Six patients with haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas were studied by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T with spin-echo pulse sequences. The nature of the tumour and the presence of a haematoma were confirmed by surgery and microscopic examination in all cases. Four neuromas arose from the acoustic nerves and two from the trigeminal. Four of the six patients suffered from sudden onset or rapid worsening of symptoms including headache, vertigo and/or hemifacial motor and sensory disturbances. CT in the acute stage revealed a hyperdense area or a fluid-fluid level (FFL). The hyperdense area disappeared on CT repeated in the chronic stage. On MRI in subacute and chronic stages the haemorrhage showed hyperintensity on both T1 and T2 weighting in five cases examined between 16 and 46 days after the onset, and isointensity on T1 weighting and an FFL on T2 weighting in one case examined 12 days after the onset of symptoms. A well-defined low intensity rim indicating prior haemorrhage was observed on T2-weighted images in three cases. MRI was more effectie than CT in detecting haemorrhage into the tumours and in staging it. (orig.)

  9. A Knowledge Discovery Approach to Diagnosing Intracranial Hematomas on Brain CT: Recognition, Measurement and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chun-Chih; Xiao, Furen; Wong, Jau-Min; Chiang, I.-Jen

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain is preferred study on neurological emergencies. Physicians use CT to diagnose various types of intracranial hematomas, including epidural, subdural and intracerebral hematomas according to their locations and shapes. We propose a novel method that can automatically diagnose intracranial hematomas by combining machine vision and knowledge discovery techniques. The skull on the CT slice is located and the depth of each intracranial pixel is labeled. After normalization of the pixel intensities by their depth, the hyperdense area of intracranial hematoma is segmented with multi-resolution thresholding and region-growing. We then apply C4.5 algorithm to construct a decision tree using the features of the segmented hematoma and the diagnoses made by physicians. The algorithm was evaluated on 48 pathological images treated in a single institute. The two discovered rules closely resemble those used by human experts, and are able to make correct diagnoses in all cases.

  10. Haemorrhagic pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, C.M.; Philippine General Hospital, Manila; Guo, W.Y.; Sami, M.; Hindmarsch, T.; Ericson, K.; Hulting, A.L.; Wersaell, J.

    1994-01-01

    In a group of 69 patients with pituitary tumours, 12 were found to have evidence of intratumoral haemorrhage on MRI, characterized by high signal intensity on short TR/TE sequences. This was verified in all but 1 patient. The majority of the bleedings occurred in macroadenomas. Five (42%) were prolactinomas and 4 (33%) were non-functioning adenomas. There were 2 GH- and 1 ACTH-secreting tumours. All 5 patients with prolactinomas were on bromocriptine medication. Two of the patients had a clinical picture of pituitary apoplexy. The haemorrhage was not large enough to prompt surgery in any of the patients. However, surgical verification of the diagnosis was obtained in 5 cases, while 6 patients were examined with follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  11. Tumours following retinoblastoma radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollot, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    Radioinduced tumours in young patients irradiated in childhood for retinoblastoma take on a particularly deadly aspect. The onset of this true clinical entity characterized by a long post-irradiation latency period induced by a dose above 6000 rads is a real tragedy. The vast majority of patients then enter into a long martyrdom ending in death. The only cure is surgical, but seldom possible. Treatment is limited to palliative radiotherapy, effective for a while, and chemiotherapy as a last resort but often difficult to prescribe. Prevention alone is the answer. The quality and reliability of the radiotherapeutic treatment depend not only on the personal talent of the radiotherapist but above all on the standard of the equipment. A strong reduction in the doses employed as well as recent technological progress improving the material, its precision and reproducibility appear already to have lowered the frequency curve of these fatal radioinduced tumours [fr

  12. Skull base tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  13. Skull base tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base

  14. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy

  15. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.H. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Oral Pathology)

    1982-08-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy.

  16. Relationship between tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and vascular endothelial growth factor in human multiple myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkun, Lukasz; Lemancewicz, Dorota; Piszcz, Jaroslaw; Moniuszko, Marcin; Bolkun-Skornicka, Urszula; Szkiladz, Malgorzata; Jablonska, Ewa; Kloczko, Janusz; Dzieciol, Janusz

    2015-12-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alfa (TNF-α) is an inflammatory cytokine with a wide spectrum of biological activity, including angiogenesis. Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), which belongs to the TNF family of proteins, plays a role in the regulation of vascular responses, but its effect on the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is unclear. We analysed TRAIL concentrations in parallel with pro-angiogenic cytokines in serum and their expression in trephine biopsy (TB) in 56 patients with newly diagnosed IgG MM and 24 healthy volunteers. The study showed statistically higher concentrations of TRAIL and TNF-α, as well as of VEGF and its receptor, in MM patients compared to healthy volunteers and patients in advanced stages of the disease. Furthermore, we observed a significant decrease in all studied pro-angiogenic cytokines and significant increase of TRAIL concentration after anti-angiogenic therapy, with meaningful differences between responders (at least partial remission) and patients with progression during the induction treatment. It was also established that TRAIL correlated statistically and negatively with pro-angiogenic cytokines such as VEGF with its receptor and expression of VEGF and syndecan-1 in TB. In summary, our data indicate that in MM patients, both clinical course and treatment responsiveness are associated with dynamic yet corresponding changes of levels of TRAIL parallel pro-angiogenic mediators such as VEGF with its receptor and expression of VEGF and syndecan-1 in TB. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Imaging brain tumour microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Markus; Englund, Elisabet; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C

    2018-05-08

    Imaging is an indispensable tool for brain tumour diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow-up. Definite diagnosis, however, often demands histopathological analysis of microscopic features of tissue samples, which have to be obtained by invasive means. A non-invasive alternative may be to probe corresponding microscopic tissue characteristics by MRI, or so called 'microstructure imaging'. The promise of microstructure imaging is one of 'virtual biopsy' with the goal to offset the need for invasive procedures in favour of imaging that can guide pre-surgical planning and can be repeated longitudinally to monitor and predict treatment response. The exploration of such methods is motivated by the striking link between parameters from MRI and tumour histology, for example the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient and cellularity. Recent microstructure imaging techniques probe even more subtle and specific features, providing parameters associated to cell shape, size, permeability, and volume distributions. However, the range of scenarios in which these techniques provide reliable imaging biomarkers that can be used to test medical hypotheses or support clinical decisions is yet unknown. Accurate microstructure imaging may moreover require acquisitions that go beyond conventional data acquisition strategies. This review covers a wide range of candidate microstructure imaging methods based on diffusion MRI and relaxometry, and explores advantages, challenges, and potential pitfalls in brain tumour microstructure imaging. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  20. Postoperative radiotherapy for intracranial meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of postoperative external radiotherapy for patients with intracranial meningiomas. The records of thirty three patients with intracranial meningiomas who were treated with postoperative external irradiation at our institution between Feb, 1988 and Nov, 1999 were retrospectively analyzed. Median age of patients at diagnosis was 53 years with range of 17 to 68 years. Sites of involvement were parasagital, cerebral convexity, sphenoid ridge, parasellar and tentorium cerebella. Of 33 evaluated patients, 15 transitional, 10 meningotheliomatous, 4 hemangiopericytic, 3 atypical and 1 malignant meningioma were identified. Four patients underwent biopsy alone and remaining 29 patients underwent total tumor resection. A dose of 50 to 60 Gy was delivered in 28-35 daily fractions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks. Follow-up period ranged from 12 months to 8 years. The actuarial survival rates at 5 and 7 years for entire group of patients were 78% and 67%, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival rates were 73% and 61 %, respectively. The overall local control rate at 5 years was 83%. One out of 25 patients in benign group developed local failure, while 4 out of 8 patients in malignant group did local failure (p <0.05), Of 4 patients who underwent biopsy alone, 2 developed local failure. There was no significant difference in 5 year actuarial survival between patients who underwent total tumor resection and those who did biopsy alone. Patients whose age is under 60 showed slightly better survival than those whose age is 60 or older, although this was not statistically significant. There was no documented late complications in any patients. Based on our study, we might conclude that postoperative external beam radiotherapy tends to improve survival of patients with intracranial meningiomas comparing with surgery alone

  1. Neutrophil-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium is facilitated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different cytokines that are present in tumour-conditioned medium on human neutrophil (PMN)-induced tumour cell transmigration. DESIGN: Laboratory study. SETTING: University hospital, Ireland. MATERIAL: Isolated human PMN and cultured human breast tumour cell line, MDA-MB-231. Interventions: Human PMN treated with either tumour-conditioned medium or different media neutralised with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), and MDA-MB-231 cells were plated on macrovascular and microvascular endothelial monolayers in collagen-coated transwells to assess migration of tumour cells. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cytokines present in tumour-conditioned medium, PMN cytocidal function and receptor expression, and tumour cell transmigration. RESULTS: tumour-conditioned medium contained high concentrations of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin 8 (IL-8), but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3). Anti-GM-CSF MoAb significantly reduced PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05), whereas anti-VEGF and anti-IL-8 MoAbs did not affect their migration. In addition, anti-GM-CSF MoAb, but not anti-VEGF or anti-IL-8 MoAb, reduced PMN CD11b and CD18 overexpression induced by tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the GM-CSF that is present in tumour-conditioned medium may be involved, at least in part, in alterations in PMN function mediated by the medium and subsequently PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells.

  2. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacob G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension - IIH (synonymous old terms: benign intracranial hypertension - BIH, pseudotumor-cerebri - PTC it’s a syndrome, related to elevated intracranial pressure, of unknown cause, sometimes cerebral emergency, occuring in all age groups, especially in children and young obese womans, in the absence of an underlying expansive intracranial lesion, despite extensive investigations. Although initial symptoms can resolve, IIH displays a high risk of recurrence several months or years later, even if initial symptoms resolved. Results: A 20-year-old male, obese since two years (body mass index 30, 9, was admitted for three months intense headache, vomiting, diplopia, progressive visual acuity loss. Neurologic examination confirmed diplopia by left abducens nerve palsy, papilledema right > left. At admission, cerebral CT scan and cerebral MRI with angio MRI 3DTOF and 2D venous TOF was normal. Despite treatment with acetazolamide (Diamox, corticosteroid, antidepressants (Amitriptyline, anticonvulsivants (Topiramate three weeks later headache, diplopia persist and vision become worse, confirmed by visual field assessment, visual evoked potential (VEP. A cerebral arteriography demonstrate filling defect of the superior sagittal sinus in the 1/3 proximal part and very week filling of the transverse right sinus on venous time. Trombophylic profile has revealed a heterozygote V factor Leyden mutation, a homozygote MTHFR and PAI mutation justifying an anticoagulant treatment initiated to the patient. The MRI showed a superior sagittal sinus, right transverse and sigmoid sinus thrombosis, dilatation and buckling of the optic nerve sheaths with increased perineural fluid especially retrobulbar, discrete flattening of the posterior segment of the eyeballs, spinal MRI showed posterior epidural space with dilated venous branches, with mass effect on the spinal cord, that occurs pushed anterior on sagittal T1/T2 sequences cervical and

  3. Microoptomechanical sensor for intracranial pressure monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, A V; Luchinin, V V; Lutetskiy, N A; Sergushichev, A N

    2014-01-01

    The main idea of this research is the development of microoptomechanical sensor for intracranial pressure monitoring. Currently, the authors studied the scientific and technical knowledge in this field, as well as develop and test a prototype of microoptomechanical sensor for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring

  4. MRI of intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, A.; Ochi, M.; Hayashi, K.; Hirata, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yasunaga, A.; Shibata, S.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the CT and MRI findings in a patient with primary intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). CT delineated the anatomical relations and MRI aided in tissue characterisation. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings in primary intracranial meningeal MFH. (orig.). With 1 fig

  5. Ultrasonographic Findings of Fetal Congenital Intracranial Teratoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ho; Song, Mi Jin; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Min, Jee Yeon; Moon, Min Hwan; Kim, Jeong Ah [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    To evaluate the sonographic findings of fetal congenital intracranial teratoma. From 1994 to 2002, of the 11 fetuses which had been diagnosed with fetal intracranial tumors after second level fetal ultrasonography, the six that were confirmed after autopsy as congenital intracranial teratomas were included in our study. The sonographic findings, including size, homogeneity, echogenicity compared with surrounding normal brain tissues, cystic components, and tumor related calcification, were retrospectively evaluated. The incidence of fetal congenital intracranial teratoma out of all fetal intracranial tumors was 54.5% (6 of 11 cases) during the 8-year period. The mean mass size was 7.4 cm (3.0-15.0 cm). Two thirds of (4/6) of the teratoma cases showed high echogenicity compared with normal brain tissues, and two thirds (4/6) showed heterogeneous echogenicity. Four teratoma cases (67%) showed cysts in the mass with a mean size of 1.9cm. One third (2/6) showed calcifications within the tumor. Out of the six cases, two had oropharyngeal teratoma with extension into the intracranial portion (so called epignathus) and showed homogenous mass without any cysts or calcifications. The typical sonographic appearance of intracranial teratoma was a heterogeneous, hyperechoic mass with cysts. In the epignathus cases, the sonographic appearances differed somewhat from the others. An understanding of the sonographic findings of fetal intracranial teratoma will help in the timely counseling of the parents and in obstetric decision making

  6. Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis: CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaid, A.H. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Dietemann, J.L. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Klinkert, A. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Kastler, B. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Gangi, A. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Jacquet, G. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. Hospital, Besancon (France)); Cattin, F. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Besancon (France))

    1994-05-01

    Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis is uncommon. We report a patient with right frontal lobe and palpebral lesions secondary to a primary hepatic focus with secondary lesion in the lung. The intracranial and palpebral cystic masses were totally removed and both proved to be alveolar hydatid cysts. An unusual feature in this case is CT and MRI demonstration of dural and bony extension. (orig.)

  7. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation.

  8. Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensaid, A.H.; Dietemann, J.L.; Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M.; Klinkert, A.; Kastler, B.; Gangi, A.; Jacquet, G.; Cattin, F.

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis is uncommon. We report a patient with right frontal lobe and palpebral lesions secondary to a primary hepatic focus with secondary lesion in the lung. The intracranial and palpebral cystic masses were totally removed and both proved to be alveolar hydatid cysts. An unusual feature in this case is CT and MRI demonstration of dural and bony extension. (orig.)

  9. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma.

  10. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-01-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma. (orig.)

  11. Cell death induced by ionizing radiations in human radio-resistant tumours: in-vitro and in-vivo study of mechanisms involved in its induction by different types of radiations and pharmacological modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmeyer, Anais

    2010-01-01

    Whereas chemo-radiotherapy protocols revealed to be very efficient when taking tumours into care, the treatment of some tumours remains very limited due to their critical location or to the weak radio-sensitivity to conventional radiations. One way to work around this problem is to use high linear energy transfer radiations or hadron therapy, in combination with radio-sensitizers. This research thesis reports the assessment of radio-sensitizer effects of different molecules on human radio-resistant cell lines and more particularly the SK-Hep1 line from a hepatocellular carcinoma. In vitro studies have been performed and then in vivo studies by using fast neutron irradiation on a mice liver sample. Observations made by optic fibre confocal microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy confirmed in vitro observations: the prevailing cell death after such an irradiation is the autophagic cell death. It shows the importance of the autophagic phenomenon induced by radiations with high linear transfer energy. This could lead to new therapeutic protocols for radio-resistant cancers [fr

  12. Lymphatic vessels assessment in feline mammary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarli, Giuseppe; Sassi, Francesco; Brunetti, Barbara; Rizzo, Antonio; Diracca, Laura; Benazzi, Cinzia

    2007-01-01

    The lymphatic vessels play a crucial role in a variety of human cancers since tumour cell lymphatic invasion significantly influences prognosis. It is not known if pre-existing lymphatics are enough for tumour dissemination or de novo development is necessary. VEGFR-3 is an angiogenetic mediator for both lymphatic and blood vessels during embryonic development, and only for lymphatics after birth. VEGF is a mediator of both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, regulates the growth of lymphatics in various experimental models, and is produced in many solid tumours. CD44 mediates hyaluronic acid (HA)-dependent cell adhesion: besides promoting invasion, this interaction also supports neoangiogenesis that indirectly stimulates tumour cell proliferation. The expression of VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor – C), its receptor VEGFR-3 and CD44, were studied on feline mammary samples to assess the importance of lymphangiogenesis and lymphangiotrophism in neoplasia. Samples were taken from six normal mammary glands (NMG), ten benign (BT) and 32 malignant (MT) tumours. Immunohistochemical laminin/VEGFR-3 double stain, VEGF-C and CD44 stains were applied to 4 μm-thick sections, and their expression evaluated in intratumoral/extratumoral and intramammary/extramammary fields. All groups revealed a higher number of lymphatics in the extratumoral/extramammary areas. VEGF-C expression in the epithelium paralleled the number of positive vessels in the NMG, BT and MT, whereas VEGF-C higher expression was noted in the intratumoral fields only in infiltrating MT. CD44 score was lower in extratumoral than intratumoral fields in tumours and showed a significant increase in extramammary/extratumoral fields from NMG to MT. Pearson test showed a significant and inversely proportional correlation between CD44 expression and the number of lymphatic vessels with VEGFR-3 in malignant infiltrating tumours. The number of both VEGFR-3 positive and negative lymphatics in the extratumoral

  13. Ultra-wideband sensors for improved magnetic resonance imaging, cardiovascular monitoring and tumour diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Florian; Kosch, Olaf; Seifert, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The specific advantages of ultra-wideband electromagnetic remote sensing (UWB radar) make it a particularly attractive technique for biomedical applications. We partially review our activities in utilizing this novel approach for the benefit of high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and other applications, e.g., for intensive care medicine and biomedical research. We could show that our approach is beneficial for applications like motion tracking for high resolution brain imaging due to the non-contact acquisition of involuntary head motions with high spatial resolution, navigation for cardiac MRI due to our interpretation of the detected physiological mechanical contraction of the heart muscle and for MR safety, since we have investigated the influence of high static magnetic fields on myocardial mechanics. From our findings we could conclude, that UWB radar can serve as a navigator technique for high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging and can be beneficial preserving the high resolution capability of this imaging modality. Furthermore it can potentially be used to support standard ECG analysis by complementary information where sole ECG analysis fails. Further analytical investigations have proven the feasibility of this method for intracranial displacements detection and the rendition of a tumour's contrast agent based perfusion dynamic. Beside these analytical approaches we have carried out FDTD simulations of a complex arrangement mimicking the illumination of a human torso model incorporating the geometry of the antennas applied.

  14. Intracranial metastases: spectrum of MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ja; Lee, Yong Seok [Department of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang-shi (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ejl1048@hanmail.net; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, No Hyuck [Department of Radiology, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Myongji Hospital, Goyang-shi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee-Jin [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); II, Sung Park [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Intracranial metastatic lesions arise through a number of routes. Therefore, they can involve any part of the central nervous system and their imaging appearances vary. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in lesion detection, lesion delineation, and differentiation of metastases from other intracranial disease processes. This article is a reasoned pictorial review illustrating the many faces of intracranial metastatic lesions based on the location - intra-axial metastases, calvarial metastases, dural metastases, leptomeningeal metastases, secondary invasion of the meninges by metastatic disease involving the calvarium and skull base, direct or perineural intracranial extension of head and neck neoplasm, and other unusual manifestations of intracranial metastases. We also review the role of advanced MRI to distinguish metastases from high-grade gliomas, tumor-mimicking lesions such as brain abscesses, and delayed post-radiation changes in radiosurgically treated patients.

  15. Tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages: a simple and efficient method for the generation and long-term cultivation as non-adherent cells in a serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, R J; Hurley, E L; Epstein, D A; Pauly, J L

    1992-01-01

    We report a simple and efficient culture procedure for the generation of tumour-cytolytic human monocyte-derived macrophages (MAC). In this method, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, isolated using a conventional Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient procedure, are cultured as a heterogenous leukocyte population in Teflon or other hydrophobic cultureware, in a commercially available serum-free culture medium (M-SFM) that has been formulated specifically for the cultivation and ex vivo stimulation of human monocytes and MAC, and in the absence of exogenous mitogens, antigens, cytokines or other stimulants. This procedure features a negative-selection technique that takes advantage of the differential survival of blood leukocytes. Using the prescribed in vitro conditions, lymphocytes survived relatively poorly, whereas monocytes differentiated in the absence of exogenous stimulants into mature tumour-cytolytic MAC. The MAC were present as non-adherent, single cells that expressed good viability (greater than 95%) for a prolonged period (greater than 60 days). When compared to conventional procedures for generating MAC, the prescribed technique is thought to offer several important advantages in that it: (a) eliminates the tedious and cumbersome monocyte isolation procedures, thus providing a significant savings not only in time and money but also in eliminating repetitive cell manipulations that have often been associated with damage to monocyte morphology and/or function; (b) reduces the loss of monocyte subsets that are not recovered during specific isolation procedures; (c) facilitates harvesting a single cell, non-adherent suspension of immunocompetent MAC suitable for various examinations including analyses defining MAC morphology, cytochemistry, phenotype and function; and (d) eliminates variability and artifacts associated with different sera that are utilised frequently as medium supplements. The utility of the prescribed method is illustrated by the

  16. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  17. Management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Jun C.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that can cause serious neurological deficits or even death. They can manifest as intracranial hemorrhage, epileptic seizure, or other symptoms such as headache or tinnitus. They are detected by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Recently there have been significant developments in the management of AVMs. In this paper, the authors represent an overview of the epidemiology of AVMs and the existing treatment strategies. AVMs are ideally excised by standard microsurgical techniques. The grading scale which was proposed by Spetzler and Martin is widely used to estimate the risk of direct surgery. Stereotactic radiosurgery such as that using a gamma knife is very useful for small lesions located in eloquent areas. Technological advances in endovascular surgery have provided new alternatives in the treatment of AVMs. Currently indications for embolization can be divided into presurgical embolization in large AVMs to occlude deep arterial feeding vessels and embolization before stereotactic radiosurgery to reduce the size of the nidus. Palliative embolization can be also applied for patients with large, inoperable AVMs who are suffering from progressive neurological deficits secondary to venous hypertension and/or arterial steal phenomenon. (author)

  18. Management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Jun C [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that can cause serious neurological deficits or even death. They can manifest as intracranial hemorrhage, epileptic seizure, or other symptoms such as headache or tinnitus. They are detected by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Recently there have been significant developments in the management of AVMs. In this paper, the authors represent an overview of the epidemiology of AVMs and the existing treatment strategies. AVMs are ideally excised by standard microsurgical techniques. The grading scale which was proposed by Spetzler and Martin is widely used to estimate the risk of direct surgery. Stereotactic radiosurgery such as that using a gamma knife is very useful for small lesions located in eloquent areas. Technological advances in endovascular surgery have provided new alternatives in the treatment of AVMs. Currently indications for embolization can be divided into presurgical embolization in large AVMs to occlude deep arterial feeding vessels and embolization before stereotactic radiosurgery to reduce the size of the nidus. Palliative embolization can be also applied for patients with large, inoperable AVMs who are suffering from progressive neurological deficits secondary to venous hypertension and/or arterial steal phenomenon. (author)

  19. A case of intracranial teratoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiota, Madoka; Ando, Yukinori; Takashima, Sachio; Hori, Tomokatsu; Hiramoto, Shinsuke.

    1985-01-01

    A case of neonatal intracranial teratoma was examined on ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and tumor markers in serum, CSF and tumor tissue. This 27-day-old male infant was pointed out a head enlargement by prenatal sonography at 39 weeks' gestation. He admitted to our hospital at the age of one day after cesarean section. His birth weight was 4430 g and head circumstance 47.5 cm. On admission, physical and neurological examinations reveled big head, weak crying, twiching and sun set phenomenon. The optic fundi were normal. The CT scan at 1 day demonstrated the marked enlargement of lateral ventricles and the supratentorial large polycystic mass with calcifications at midline area. Transfontanelle sonography also delineated the polycystic mass and enlarged ventricle. Ventricular tap showed bloody CSF. Alpha-Fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen level in CSF was higher than those in serum. Postmortam tumor necropsy revealed a teratoma including mature squamous epithelium, muscle, cartilage, bone, lymphoid and nervous tissue. There were immature mesenchymal cells in some parts. The immune histochemical method showed positive staining to AFP in intestinal and respiratory epithelium, and to CEA in intestinal epithelium and immature mesenchymal cells. In summary, these characteristic findings of US, CT and tumor marker in CSF have a diagnostic value of intracranial teratoma. (author)

  20. Unsuccessful mitosis in multicellular tumour spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Annie; Couvet, Morgane; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2017-04-25

    Multicellular spheroids are very attractive models in oncology because they mimic the 3D organization of the tumour cells with their microenvironment. We show here using 3 different cell types (mammary TSA/pc, embryonic kidney Hek293 and cervical cancer HeLa), that when the cells are growing as spheroids the frequency of binucleated cells is augmented as occurs in some human tumours.We therefore describe mitosis in multicellular spheroids by following mitotic markers and by time-lapse experiments. Chromosomes alignment appears to be correct on the metaphasic plate and the passenger complex is well localized on centromere. Moreover aurora kinases are fully active and histone H3 is phosphorylated on Ser 10. Consequently, the mitotic spindle checkpoint is satisfied and, anaphase proceeds as illustrated by the transfer of survivin on the spindle and by the segregation of the two lots of chromosomes. However, the segregation plane is not well defined and oscillations of the dividing cells are observed. Finally, cytokinesis fails and the absence of separation of the two daughter cells gives rise to binucleated cells.Division orientation is specified during interphase and persists throughout mitosis. Our data indicate that the cancer cells, in multicellular spheroids, lose their ability to regulate their orientation, a feature commonly encountered in tumours.Moreover, multicellular spheroid expansion is still sensitive to mitotic drugs as pactlitaxel and aurora kinase inhibitors. The spheroids thus represent a highly relevant model for studying drug efficiency in tumours.

  1. Oral Squamomelanocytic Tumour in a Dog: a Unique Biphasic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, L V; Avallone, G; Benazzi, C; Sarli, G; Porcellato, I; Brachelente, C; Brunetti, B

    2016-01-01

    In human medicine, squamomelanocytic tumour is a malignant cutaneous neoplasm composed of closely intermingled neoplastic squamous cells and melanocytes. A multinodular gingival tumour in a 16-year-old, mixed breed neutered female dog was examined microscopically. Two populations of neoplastic cells, melanocytic and squamous epithelial cells were intermingled. The melanocytic cells were melan-A positive and cytokeratin AE1-AE3 negative and the squamous component was cytokeratin AE1-AE3 positive and melan-A negative. Bovine papillomavirus was not identified by immunohistochemistry or polymerase chain reaction. A diagnosis of squamomelanocytic tumour was made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vaginal haemangioendothelioma: an unusual tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Vaginal tumours are uncommon and this is a particularly rare case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma in a 38-year-old woman. Initial presentation consisted of symptoms similar to uterovaginal prolapse with "something coming down". Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated a necrotic anterior vaginal wall tumour. Histology of the lesion revealed a haemangioendothelioma which had some features of haemangiopericytoma. While the natural history of vaginal haemangioendothelioma is uncertain, as a group, they have a propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma. Management of this tumour is challenging given the paucity of literature on this tumour. There is a need to add rare tumours to our "knowledge bank" to guide management of these unusual tumours.

  3. Adaptive Evolution Coupled with Retrotransposon Exaptation Allowed for the Generation of a Human-Protein-Specific Coding Gene That Promotes Cancer Cell Proliferation and Metastasis in Both Haematological Malignancies and Solid Tumours: The Extraordinary Case of MYEOV Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros I. Papamichos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of cancer in human is high as compared to chimpanzee. However previous analysis has documented that numerous human cancer-related genes are highly conserved in chimpanzee. Till date whether human genome includes species-specific cancer-related genes that could potentially contribute to a higher cancer susceptibility remains obscure. This study focuses on MYEOV, an oncogene encoding for two protein isoforms, reported as causally involved in promoting cancer cell proliferation and metastasis in both haematological malignancies and solid tumours. First we document, via stringent in silico analysis, that MYEOV arose de novo in Catarrhini. We show that MYEOV short-isoform start codon was evolutionarily acquired after Catarrhini/Platyrrhini divergence. Throughout the course of Catarrhini evolution MYEOV acquired a gradually elongated translatable open reading frame (ORF, a gradually shortened translation-regulatory upstream ORF, and alternatively spliced mRNA variants. A point mutation introduced in human allowed for the acquisition of MYEOV long-isoform start codon. Second, we demonstrate the precious impact of exonized transposable elements on the creation of MYEOV gene structure. Third, we highlight that the initial part of MYEOV long-isoform coding DNA sequence was under positive selection pressure during Catarrhini evolution. MYEOV represents a Primate Orphan Gene that acquired, via ORF expansion, a human-protein-specific coding potential.

  4. Primary bone tumours in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Cohen, D.H.; Padovani, J.; Tamaela, L.; Azouz, M.; Bale, P.; Martin, H.C.; Nayanar, V.V.; Arico, M.

    1985-09-01

    Ten cases of primary bone tumours in infants (1 osteosarcoma, 3 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 chondroblastoma and 5 angiomastosis) are reported. All cases of angiomatosis showed characteristic radiographic findings. In all the other tumours the X-ray appearances were different from those usually seen in older children and adolescents. In the auhtors' opinion the precise diagnosis of malignant bone tumours in infancy is very difficult as no characteristic X-ray features are present in this age period.

  5. Radiological diagnosis of liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstedt, C.

    1987-01-01

    Sixty patients treated with an intra-arterial cytostatic drug for metastases from colo-rectal carcinoma were evaluated with angiography to determine prognostic parameters. The extent of tumour in the liver and an unchanged or diminished tumour volume following treatment, as demonstrated with angiography, were associated with significant prolongation of survival. Patients who developed occlusion of the hepatic artery or of branches of the portal vein, also survived longer. 189 patients examined with angiography, 161 with computed tomography (CT), 95 with computed tomographic arteriography (CTA) and 71 with ultrasound (US) were subjected to liver evaluation at laparotomy consisting of inspection and palpation. The result of this surgical liver evaluation was for the purpose of the study regarded as completely accurate and was used to assess the accuracy of the different radiological methods. The location of tumour in the liver lobes or segments was analysed, with a separate evaluation of the right and left liver lobes. The rate of detection of individual tumour nodules was also determined. Angiography detected 55% of liver areas affected by tumour and 47% of individual tumour nodules. CT detected 83% of liver lobes or segments containing tumour, and 70% of the tumour nodules. US detected 69% of the portions of liver holding tumour, and also 69% of the tumour nodules. CTA detected 85% of tumours areas and 74% of separate tumour nodules. Some lesions detected with CT were not seen with CTA and vice versa. More false-positive results were recorded with CTA than with CT using intravenous contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  6. Neurohypophysis granular cell tumours. Upon neurohypophysis rare tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrande, G.; Kujas, M.; Gancel, A.; Turpin, G.; Bruckert, E.; Kuhn, J.M.; Luton, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Granular cell tumours of neurohypophysis are rare. These tumours are more often encountered as incidental autopsy findings seen in up to 17 % of unselected adult autopsy cases. There are few reports of para-sellar granular cell tumours large enough to cause symptoms. We present three cases of neurohypophysis granular cell tumour and a review of the literature. In one patient, the asymptomatic granular cell tumour was incidentally discovered at surgical removal of a corticotrophic micro-adenoma. The remaining 2 patients had a symptomatic tumour which caused neurological symptoms such as visual disturbance and headaches and endocrine disorders such as hypopituitarism or hyper-prolactinaemia. In these 2 cases, computerized tomography showed a well-circumscribed, contrast-enhanced, intra-sellar and supra-sellar mass. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an isointense gadolinium-enhanced mass in T1-weighted-images. Trans-sphenoidal partial resection was performed and histology was interpreted as a granular cell tumour. The immunohistochemical study was positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GEAP) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 1 of the 2 tumours and positive for S100 protein and vimentin in both tumours but negative for CD68. The histogenesis of neurohypophysis granular cell tumours is still controversial but ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies support the theory that may arise from pituicytes, the glial cells of neurohypophysis. Management of these benign, slow growing, tumours is based mainly on neurosurgical resection. Data from the literature do not support a beneficial effect of post operative radiation therapy on postoperative recurrences. (authors). 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Management of parapharyngeal space tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.; Waqar-Uddin; Khan, M.S.; Khawar, A.; Bangush, W.; Aslam, J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the role of clinical features, fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and computed tomography (CT) scan in diagnosing Para pharyngeal space (PPS) tumours and treatment options. Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: From July 2000 to July 2002 at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. Patients and Methods: Patients diagnosed as having PPS tumours were studied. The medical record of patients was reviewed for their age, gender, clinical features, investigations (FNAC and CT scan) and treatment. The mean age, percentage of different clinical features and the sensitivity and specificity of FNAC was determined. Results: The mean age of patients presenting with PPS tumours was 33.6 years. The most common clinical features were neck mass (93%) and bulge in lateral pharyngeal wall (80%). The CT scan showed exact location and extent of tumour in 11 out of 15 cases. The sensitivity and specificity of FNAC was 70% and 85% respectively. The most common tumours were neurogenic tumours and salivary gland tumours. Surgery was performed in all except 2 patients with lymphoma in whom radiation and chemotherapy was recommended. Conclusion: This study indicates that PPS tumours are usually benign neurosurgeon and salivary gland tumours presenting with neck mass and bulge in or oropharynx. FNAC and CT scan are important in diagnostic work up and treatment planning. Surgery has the best results in most cases. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Fluorine-18 as a Scanning Agent for Intracranial Tumours; Emploi du Fluor-18 en Scintigraphy des Tumeurs Intracraniennes; Otsenka Ftora-18 kak skenniruyushchego agenta dlya vnutricherepnykh opukholej; Examen de las Caracteristicas del Fluor-18 como Agente de Exploracion de los Tumores Intracraneales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entzian, W.; Aronow, S.; Soloway, A. H.; Sweet, W. H. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1964-10-15

    F{sup 18}, a 110-min half-life, positron emitter was studied as a possible agent for brain-tumour localization. It was prepared in a nuclear reactor by thermal neutron irradiation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (Li{sup 6} (n, {alpha}) H{sup 3}, O{sup 16}(H{sup 3}, n) F{sup 18}). Tissue studies in mice bearing subcutaneously-transplanted ependymomas indicated that labelled sodium fluoride (NaF{sup 18}) gave excessive concentrations in bone and was therefore unsuitable as a brain-scanning agent. However, labelled potassium fluoborate (KBF{sup 18}{sub 4}) showed good preferential uptake in tumour compared with brain, uptake ratios ranging from 8 to 11. No excessive concentrations were found in other organs in either mice or cats. Toxicity studies were carried out in mice and rabbits at levels of 300 mg/kg and 120 mgAg respectively. No adverse effects were observed provided the solution was neutralized to a physiological pH. The chemical amounts needed for patient scanning were less than 0.5 mgAg of body weight. A comparative clinical study of 10 patients, each scanned with KBF{sup 18}{sub 4} and other isotopic agents, corroborated the findings of Askenasy et al. that this is a useful compound for brain-tumour localization. Intravenous injection was optimally performed 30 min before scanning at a dosage of 15 {mu}c/kg of body weight. Tissue samples of tumour and normal brain were obtained from one patient at operation. The uptake ratio was 3.5. While this is lower than that found in the mouse, it is still in a useful range. Blood samples obtained from patients at varying time intervals after injection yielded a blood clearance curve which had two time constants. The first was very rapid and the second slower. This sequence is typical of useful scanning agents. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont etudie la possibilite d'employer {sup 18}F, emetteur de positons ayant une periode de 110 min, pour localiser lcs tumeurs du cerveau. Cette substance a ete preparee dans un reacteur par

  9. Askin Tumour: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Carolina; Ramirez, Sandra Milena; Quesada, Diana Constanza; Unigarro Luz Adriana

    2011-01-01

    In this article we report a case of a 19 year-old woman with a final diagnosis of an extra skeletal Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor/Ewing sarcoma of the chest, also known as Askin tumour. The histologic features and the immunohistochemical profile were consistent with this aggressive malignancy of the chest wall that affects young people. Because the low incidence of this entity, as well as the clear radiological findings, we considered it interesting to describe this documented case and undertake a review of the literature.

  10. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  11. Solitary intracranial plasmacytoma located in the spheno-clival region mimicking chordoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z Y; Qi, X Q; Wu, X J; Luo, C; Lu, Y C

    2010-01-01

    Solitary intracranial plasmacytoma (SIP) is very rare. This case report presents serial findings of SIP located in the spheno-clival region in a 54-year old female who presented with an inferior hemianopia in the right eye and an enlarged physiological blind spot in both eyes. Based on the initial diagnosis of a spheno-clival region chordoma, the tumour was partially resected by the nasal-sphenoidal sinus approach. Subsequently, the correct diagnosis of SIP was made based on the pathology and immunohistochemical staining of the tumour. The patient was treated using a whole skull-base radiation therapy protocol with 45 Gy and she was in good physical condition during the subsequent 22 months. The findings of a series of similar case reports documenting SIP in 20 cases published from 1976 to 2008 are also reviewed. Based on these case reports, the key features of SIP, including their clinical manifestations, clinical imaging characteristics, treatment and prognosis, are described.

  12. Usefulness of low-field FlAIR sequence in MR imaging of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolowska, D.; Sasiadek, M.; Zimny, A.

    2004-01-01

    Plain MR study is often insufficient for visualization of all important details of intracranial tumors, hence there are attempts to use supplementary MR techniques. One of them is FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) sequence which previously was available only in high-field MR units, but recently has been introduced also in less expensive low-field units. FLAIR is already widely used in the diagnostics of ischemic and demyelinating lesions, while there are few papers concerning its application in intracranial tumors, none of them regarding low-field MR units.The aim of our study was detailed evaluation of low-field FLAIR in the diagnostics of intracranial tumors. The material consisted of 76 patients with intracranial tumors, who were examined with low-field open MR unit (0.23 Tesla). In all patients, standard T2-weighted and T1-weighted (before and after contrast enhancement) sequences, as well as FLAIR sequence, were performed. The following symptoms were compared in the aforementioned sequences: tumor-edema, edema-brain and tumor-brain borders, visualization of tumour structure, vessels in the tumor area and precise tumor localization. A superiority of FLAIR in assessment of all symptoms has been confirmed, at least in part of the patient group. It concerned particularly the evaluation of brain-edema and edema-brain borders which were better visible with FLAIR than with all other sequences in 29 and 30 patients, respectively. In the assessment of the remaining symptoms (tumor-brain border, tumor structure, visualization of vessels, tumor localization) FLAIR was superior to other sequences in smaller number of patients (13,11,11 and 12, respectively). Totally, in 48 out of 76 patients (63.2%) FLAIR allowed better assessment of at least one of the analyzed symptoms. Low-field MR FLAIR enriches diagnostic information in majority of patients with intracranial tumors, therefore it should be included routinely in the diagnostic algorithm in this group of

  13. Gastric neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, David A; Donohoe, Claire L; Fitzgerald, Louise; Muldoon, Cian; Hayes, Brian; O'Toole, Dermot; Reynolds, John V

    2012-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are increasingly recognised, and management decisions may be difficult due to an incomplete understanding of aetiology, natural history and optimum therapy. This article presents a current understanding based on recent advances in epidemiology, classification, molecular profiling, and treatment. Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles identified. Selection of articles was based on peer review, journal and relevance. Gastric NETs may be divided into three clinical prognostic groups: type I is associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis and hypergastrinaemia, type II is associated with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and type III lesions are gastrin-independent, have the greatest metastatic potential and poorest prognosis. There has been an increased frequency of gastric NETs reported. Management approaches have evolved in parallel with advances in endoscopic staging and surgery, as well as improved understanding of the biology and natural history of NETs. Gastric NETs present a spectrum of activity from indolent tumours to metastatic malignancy. Treatment decisions for patients must be individualised and are best managed by a multidisciplinary team approach. The current evidence base is limited to small series and efforts to treat patients within clinical networks of expertise are warranted. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Radiotherapy in ocular tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Ocular tumours at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay, form about 0.14% of all the proved cancer cases. In case of unilateral retinoblastoma with the other eye being not non-seeing for any reason, enucleation is advised, as the diagnosis may sometimes be in doubt. If after enucleation, optic nerve and/or peribulbar tissues are found to be involved, post-operative irradiation is given to the whole orbit. In bilateral retinoblastoma the more affected eye is enucleated and an attempt is made to preserve vision in the other eye. A tumour dose of 3500 to 4000 rad in about 4 weeks is given with a cobalt beam using a direct anterior field. A cataract that may develop has to be taken care of. Lateral and/or medial fields are used with deep X-rays. In certain cases, an implant of cobalt-60 or gold-198 grain is done. For carcinoma of conjuctiva, small lesions or early lesions are excised and a beta radiation dose of 2000 rad weekly for about 4 to 5 weeks is given; larger lesions require enucleation or exenteration followed by irradiation with super-voltage radiation. Post-irradiation sarcomas may develop many years later. Irradiation is repeated for recurrences. (M.G.B.)

  15. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Hamasaki, Osamu; Sakoda, Katsuaki

    2002-01-01

    We report on two patients with intracranial atherosclerosis of the carotid artery or vertebral artery treated with stent-assisted angioplasty. Both patients have severe intracranial atherosclerosis (>70%) with refractory symptoms despite optimal medical treatment. In both patients, a coronary balloon-expandable stent was successfully placed using a protective balloon technique without procedural complications. The patients were asymptomatic and neurologically intact at a mean clinical follow-up of 13 months. Follow-up angiograms did not show restenosis 3 or 4 months after procedure, respectively. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis in the elective patient has proven effective, with an acceptable low rate of morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  16. SPECTRUM OF NEUROENDOCRINE TUMOURS- A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupuleti Prathima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Neuroendocrine tumours occur at various sites in the human body. They are considered as one of the close differentials for many tumours. Various benign and malignant tumours undergo neuroendocrine differentiation. Its incidence is slightly increasing due to advanced imaging modalities. Although rare, they can be seen in breast, gallbladder and skin. The aim of the study is to study the spectrum of neuroendocrine tumours from various sites, their clinical presentation, histomorphological features with immunohistochemistry and review of literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study for a period of 3 years (June 2013-June 2016. Surgical resection specimens were included in the study. Out of the total specimens received, 24 cases were of neuroendocrine tumours. Differential diagnosis of small round cell tumours also was considered and a panel of immunohistochemical markers were included to rule out them. Biopsy specimens were excluded from the study. RESULTS Out of the 24 cases, 18 cases were benign lesions. 6 cases were malignant lesions. Female preponderance was noted. Peak incidence was seen in 20-30 years of age group. CONCLUSION Neuroendocrine tumours can occur anywhere in the body and it should be considered in one of the differential diagnosis. Diagnosis must be accurately made.

  17. Review article: Pathogenesis and management of gastric carcinoid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkitt, M D; Pritchard, D M

    2006-11-01

    Gastric carcinoid tumours are rare, but are increasing in incidence. To discuss tumour pathogenesis and outline current approaches to patient management. Review of published articles following a Pubmed search. Although interest in gastric carcinoids has increased since it was recognized that they are associated with achlorhydria, to date there is no definite evidence that humans taking long-term acid suppressing medication are at increased risk. Type I tumours are associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis and hypergastrinaemia, type II are associated with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 and hypergastrinaemia and sporadic type III carcinoids are gastrin-independent and carry the worst prognosis. Careful investigation of these patients is required, particularly to identify the tumour type, the source of hypergastrinaemia and the presence of metastases. Treatment can be directed at the source of hypergastrinaemia if type I or II tumours are still gastrin responsive and not growing autonomously. Type III tumours should be treated surgically. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoids have led to recent improvements in investigation and management. Challenges remain in identifying the genetic and environmental factors, in addition to hypergastrinaemia, that are responsible for tumour development in susceptible patients.

  18. Headache following intracranial neuroendovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eric P; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Tepper, Stewart J; Gupta, Rishi; Novak, Eric; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Stillman, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Predicting who will develop post-procedure headache (PPH) following intracranial endovascular procedures (IEPs) would be clinically useful and potentially could assist in reducing the excessive diagnostic testing so often obtained in these patients. Although limited safety data exist, the use of triptans or dihydroergotamine (DHE) often raise concern when used with pre/post-coiled aneurysms. We sought to determine risk factors for PPH following IEP, to evaluate the utility of diagnostic testing in patients with post-coil acute headache (HA), and to record whether triptans and DHE have been used safely in this clinical setting. We conducted a retrospective chart review of adult patients undergoing IEPs. Bivariate analyses were conducted to compare patients who did and did not develop PPH. We reviewed records pertaining to 372 patients, of whom 263 underwent intracranial coil embolizations, 21 acrylic glue embolizations, and 88 stent placements. PPH occurred in 72% of coil patients, 33% of glue patients, and 14% of stent patients. Significant risk factors for post-coil HA were female gender, any pre-coil HA history, smoking, and anxiety/depression. A pre-stent history of HA exceeding 1 year's duration, and smoking were risk factors for post-stent HA. A pre-glue history of HA exceeding 1 year was the only risk factor for post-glue HA. In the small subgroup available for study, treatment with triptans or DHE was not associated with adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Diagnostic testing was low yield. Occurrence of PPH was common after IEPs and especially so with coiling and in women, smokers, and those with anxiety/depression, and was often of longer duration than allowed by current International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria. The yield of diagnostic testing was low, and in a small subgroup treatment with triptans or DHE did not cause adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  19. Carcinoid Tumour of the Ovary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A case of bilateral carcinoid tumour of the ovary, with benign cystic teratoma in one ovary, in a 38 year old woman is presented. She had total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophorectomy, infracolic omentectomy and appendectomy. There was no macroscopic tumour in the vermiform appendix and the ...

  20. Intracranial dermoid cysts: variations of radiological and clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orakcioglu, B.; Halatsch, M.-E.; Unterberg, A.; Fortunati, M.; Yonekawa, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid cysts are uncommon, and their clinical features as well as surgical management differ from patient to patient. Dermoids are generally benign lesions, but may cause spontaneous complications such as meningitis and/or hydrocephalus due to rupture and epileptic seizures depending on their location. Little has been reported about characteristic imaging findings with resulting therapeutic considerations, and only a few reports exist about associated hydrocephalus. Imaging modalities have changed and can facilitate differential diagnosis and follow-up if applied correctly. In this paper, we attempt to contribute our clinical experience with the management of dermoid cysts. The charts of five men and two women with intracranial dermoid cysts were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were treated between September 1993 and September 2006. Selected patients are presented in detail. Tumour location, size and radiographic characteristics varied in each patient. Clinical presentations comprised focal neurological deficits as well as epileptic seizures, persistent headache, mental changes and psycho-organic syndromes. One patient underwent delayed ventriculo-peritoneal shunting after ruptured fatty particles caused obstructive hydrocephalus. Despite dermoid rupture into the subarachnoid space, three patients never developed hydrocephalus. Diffuse vascular supra-tentorial lesions were seen in one patient as a result of aseptic meningitis. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity in dermoids is related to decrease of water proton diffusion and should be used for both the diagnosis and follow-up of this lesion. Although dermoid cysts are known to be benign entities per se, their rupture can cause a wide range of symptoms including aseptic meningitis and/or hydrocephalus. This may be due to intraventricular obstruction and/or paraventricular compression. While rupture does not necessarily bring about hydrocephalus, radical removal of the tumor and

  1. [Neonatal tumours and congenital malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbel Tornero, O; Ortega García, J A; Ferrís i Tortajada, J; García Castell, J; Donat i Colomer, J; Soldin, O P; Fuster Soler, J L

    2008-06-01

    The association between pediatric cancer and congenital abnormalities is well known but, there is no exclusive data on the neonatal period and the underlying etiopathogenic mechanisms are unknown. First, to analyze the frequency of neonatal tumours associated with congenital abnormalities; and second, to comment on the likely etiopathogenic hypotheses of a relationship between neonatal tumours and congenital abnormalities. Historical series of neonatal tumours from La Fe University Children's Hospital in Valencia (Spain), from January 1990 to December 1999. Histological varieties of neonatal tumours and associated congenital abnormalities were described. A systematic review of the last 25 years was carried out using Medline, Cancerlit, Index Citation Science and Embase. The search profile used was the combination of "neonatal/congenital-tumors/cancer/neoplasms" and "congenital malformations/birth defects". 72 neonatal tumours were identified (2.8% of all pediatric cancers diagnosed in our hospital) and in 15 cases (20.8%) there was some associated malformation, disease or syndrome. The association between congenital abnormalities and neonatal tumours were: a) angiomas in three patients: two patients with congenital heart disease with a choanal stenosis, laryngomalacia; b) neuroblastomas in two patients: horseshoe kidney with vertebral anomalies and other with congenital heart disease; c) teratomas in two patients: one with cleft palate with vertebral anomalies and other with metatarsal varus; d) one tumour of the central nervous system with Bochdaleck hernia; e) heart tumours in four patients with tuberous sclerosis; f) acute leukaemia in one patient with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease; g) kidney tumour in one case with triventricular hydrocephaly, and h) adrenocortical tumour: hemihypertrophy. The publications included the tumours diagnosed in different pediatric periods and without unified criteria to classify the congenital abnormalities. Little data

  2. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  3. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Soevik, Aste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Oeyvind S; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO 2 -related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO 2 -related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO 2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO 2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure

  4. Improving tumour response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation oncology is in the middle of the most exciting developments in its 100-year history. Progress in treatment planning and delivery, in medical imaging and in basic cancer and normal tissue biology is likely to change the indication for radiotherapy as well as the way it is prescribed and delivered. Technological and conceptual advances, in particular the development of the multi-leaf collimator and the concept of inverse treatment planning, have led to the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with its capability to plan and deliver non-uniform dose distributions in the clinic. This has forced us to re-think radiation oncology: refining the indication for radiotherapy, optimizing the prescription of dose distributions and considering how, based on clinical evidence, radiation can best be combined with other treatment modalities, surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy and biologically targeted therapies. The attraction of radiation therapy as an element of multi-modality cancer therapy is that it induces DNA damage that can be modulated in space and time. Progress in basic cancer biology, genomics and proteomics, as well as biological imaging provides novel avenues for individualization of cancer therapy and for biological optimization of radiotherapy. In improving cancer care, it is the therapeutic ratio, rather than tumour control per se, that must be optimised. Interestingly, the two main avenues for improving the effectiveness of radiotherapy currently being actively pursued in the clinic generally aim at different sides of the therapeutic ratio: 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT predominantly aim to reduce normal-tissue side effects - and by doing this, open the way for dose escalation that may lead to increased tumour control rates - whereas combined radio-chemotherapy aims to improve tumour response - while keeping the fingers crossed that this will not increase normal-tissue complications to the same extent. In parallel with these

  5. MR angiography after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular occlusion with detachable coils has become an alternative treatment to neurosurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms over the last two decades. Its minimal invasiveness is the most important advantage of this treatment compared to clipping. The disadvantage of occlusion

  6. An Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Thurtell, Matthew J.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of unknown etiology often encountered in neurologic practice. It produces non-localizing symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure and, when left untreated, can result in severe irreversible visual loss. It most commonly occurs in obese women of childbearing age, but it can also occur in children, men, non-obese adults, and older adults. While it is frequently associated with obesity, it can be associated with other conditions...

  7. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension without Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kansu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that presented with unilateral abducens nerve palsy, without orthostatic headache. While sixth nerve palsies improved without any intervention, subdural hematoma was detected with magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude that headache may be absent in spontaneous intracranial hypotension and spontaneous improvement of sixth nerve palsy can occur, even after the development of a subdural hematoma

  8. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jeronimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva Junior, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo, E-mail: leonardoruschel@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba (INC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xarelto®. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban. (author)

  9. "Negative symptoms"secondary to intracranial tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Kate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors are increasingly common in the elderly population. They may present with varied symptoms, some of which may be psychiatric in nature. In patients with known psychiatric disorders, these symptoms may be misattributed resulting in a delay in diagnosis and management. We present a case of an elderly female with paranoid schizophrenia and new onset symptoms secondary to intracranial tumor, which were initially misdiagnosed.

  10. Graves' disease and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Manish Gutch; Annesh Bhattacharjee; Sukriti Kumar; Durgesh Pushkar

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a central nervous system disorder characterized by raised intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and absence of any structural anomaly on neuroimaging. Among all endocrine disorders associated with the development of IIH, the association of hyperthyroidism and IIH is very rare with few cases reported till date. Thyroid disturbances have a unique association with IIH. Hypo- and hyper-thyroidism have been reported in assoc...

  11. Increased intracranial pressure: evaluation by computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightfoote, W.E.; Pressman, B.D.

    1975-01-01

    Computerized tomography is clearly very useful in the evaluation of patients with increased intracranial pressure and suspected pseudotumor cerebri. It provides an index of ventricular size and configuration and has the capability of demonstrating intracranial lesions. Moreover, this new technique is rapid and non-invasive, and is without attendant risks. Examinations may be performed serially as the clinical process evolves, thereby giving roentgenographic correlation to the clinical features. (U.S.)

  12. Cancer and tumour markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osifo, B.

    1999-02-01

    Cancer has been a major cause of death world wide and in Nigeria there are six commonest forms of manifestation of cancer known. Of these prostrate cancer is the highest with 16% occurrence of all known cancers according to a study by the Histopathology Department of the UCH. Many factors, amongst them dietary, environmental, lifestyle, age and sedentary work are possible causes. With the global rise in incidents, the IAEA initiated the Tumour Marker Project as a means of screening cancers in 15 African countries including Nigeria. In Nigeria, 4 groups of the commonest cancers have been chosen for screening. These are prostrate cancer, primary liver cancer, cancer of the GI tract and trophoblastic cancer

  13. Reproductive tract tumours: the scourge of woman reproduction ails Indian rhinoceroses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hermes

    Full Text Available In Indian rhinoceros, extensive leiomyoma, a benign smooth muscle tumour, was sporadically diagnosed post mortem and commonly thought of as contributing factor for reduced fecundity of this species in captivity. However, to date, the prevalence of reproductive tract tumours and their relevance for fecundity are unknown. Our analysis of the international studbook now reveals that females cease reproducing at the age of 18.1±1.2 years; equivalent to a reproductive lifespan of just 9.5±1.3 years. This short reproductive life is in sharp contrast to their longevity in captivity of over 40 years. Here we show, after examining 42% of the captive female population, that age-related genital tract tumours are highly prevalent in this endangered species. Growth and development of these tumours was found to be age-related, starting from the age of 10 years. All females older than 12 years had developed genital tumours, just 7-9 years past maturity. Tumour sizes ranged from 1.5-10 cm. With age, tumours became more numerous, sometimes merging into one large diffuse tumour mass. These tumours, primarily vaginal and cervical, presumably cause widespread young-age infertility by the age of 18 years. In few cases, tumour necrosis suggested possible malignancy of tumours. Possible consequences of such genital tract tumour infestation are hindered intromission, pain during mating, hampered sperm passage, risk of ascending infection during pregnancy, dystocia, or chronic vaginal bleeding. In humans, leiomyoma affect up to 80% of pre-menopause women. While a leading cause for infertility, pregnancy is known to reduce the risk of tumour development. However, different from human, surgical intervention is not a viable treatment option in rhinoceroses. Thus, in analogy to humans, we suggest early onset and seamless consecutive pregnancies to help reduce prevalence of this disease, better maintain a self-sustained captive population and improve animal welfare.

  14. Testicular germ cell tumours in dogs are predominantly of spermatocytic seminoma type and are frequently associated with somatic cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bush, J M; Gardiner, D W; Palmer, J S

    2011-01-01

    Unlike seminomas in humans, seminomas in animals are not typically sub-classified as classical or spermatocytic types. To compare testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) in dogs with those of men, archived tissues from 347 cases of canine testicular tumours were morphologically evaluated...... in canine TGCT. None of the canine TGCT evaluated demonstrated the presence of carcinoma in situ cells, a standard feature of human classical seminomas, suggesting that classical seminomas either do not occur in dogs or are rare in occurrence. Canine spermatocytic seminomas may provide a useful model...... and characterized using human classification criteria. Histopathological and immunohistological analysis of PLAP, KIT, DAZ and DMRT1 expression revealed that canine seminomas closely resemble human spermatocytic seminomas. In addition, a relatively frequent concomitant presence of somatic cell tumours was noted...

  15. The INTERPRET Decision-Support System version 3.0 for evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy data from human brain tumours and other abnormal brain masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercadal Guillem

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proton Magnetic Resonance (MR Spectroscopy (MRS is a widely available technique for those clinical centres equipped with MR scanners. Unlike the rest of MR-based techniques, MRS yields not images but spectra of metabolites in the tissues. In pathological situations, the MRS profile changes and this has been particularly described for brain tumours. However, radiologists are frequently not familiar to the interpretation of MRS data and for this reason, the usefulness of decision-support systems (DSS in MRS data analysis has been explored. Results This work presents the INTERPRET DSS version 3.0, analysing the improvements made from its first release in 2002. Version 3.0 is aimed to be a program that 1st, can be easily used with any new case from any MR scanner manufacturer and 2nd, improves the initial analysis capabilities of the first version. The main improvements are an embedded database, user accounts, more diagnostic discrimination capabilities and the possibility to analyse data acquired under additional data acquisition conditions. Other improvements include a customisable graphical user interface (GUI. Most diagnostic problems included have been addressed through a pattern-recognition based approach, in which classifiers based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA were trained and tested. Conclusions The INTERPRET DSS 3.0 allows radiologists, medical physicists, biochemists or, generally speaking, any person with a minimum knowledge of what an MR spectrum is, to enter their own SV raw data, acquired at 1.5 T, and to analyse them. The system is expected to help in the categorisation of MR Spectra from abnormal brain masses.

  16. A generalised age- and phase-structured model of human tumour cell populations both unperturbed and exposed to a range of cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Britta; Ubezio, Paolo

    2007-07-01

    We develop a general mathematical model for a population of cells differentiated by their position within the cell division cycle. A system of partial differential equations governs the kinetics of cell densities in certain phases of the cell division cycle dependent on time t (hours) and an age-like variable tau (hours) describing the time since arrival in a particular phase of the cell division cycle. Transition rate functions control the transfer of cells between phases. We first obtain a theoretical solution on the infinite domain -infinity infinity. We then assume that age distributions at time t=0 are known and write our solution in terms of these age distributions on t=0. In practice, of course, these age distributions are unknown. All is not lost, however, because a cell line before treatment usually lies in a state of asynchronous balanced growth where the proportion of cells in each phase of the cell cycle remain constant. We assume that an unperturbed cell line has four distinct phases and that the rate of transition between phases is constant within a short period of observation ('short' relative to the whole history of the tumour growth) and we show that under certain conditions, this is equivalent to exponential growth or decline. We can then gain expressions for the age distributions. So, in short, our approach is to assume that we have an unperturbed cell line on t

  17. Interstitial fluid pressure, vascularity and metastasis in ectopic, orthotopic and spontaneous tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunt, Sarah Jane; Kalliomaki, Tuula MK; Brown, Allison; Yang, Victor X; Milosevic, Michael; Hill, Richard P

    2008-01-01

    High tumour interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) has been adversely linked to poor drug uptake in patients, and to treatment response following radiotherapy in cervix cancer patients. In this study we measured IFP values in a selection of murine and xenograft models, spontaneously arising or transplanted either intramuscularly (i/m) or orthotopically and analysed their relationship to tumour vascularity and metastatic spread. KHT-C murine fibrosarcoma, ME180 and SiHa human cervix carcinoma were grown either intramuscularly (i/m), sub-cutaneously (s/c) or orthotopically. Polyoma middle-T (MMTV-PyMT) transgenic spontaneous mammary tumours were studied either as spontaneous tumours or following orthotopic or i/m transplantation. IFP was measured in all tumours using the wick-in-needle method. Spontaneous metastasis formation in the lungs or lymph nodes was assessed in all models. An immunohistochemical analysis of tumour hypoxia, vascular density, lymphatic vascular density and proliferation was carried out in ME180 tumours grown both i/m and orthotopically. Blood flow was also assessed in the ME180 model using high-frequency micro-ultrasound functional imaging. Tumour IFP was heterogeneous in all the models irrespective of growth site: KHT-C i/m: 2–42 mmHg, s/c: 1–14 mmHg, ME180: i/m 5–68 mmHg, cervix 4–21 mmHg, SiHa: i/m 20–56 mmHg, cervix 2–26 mmHg, MMTV-PyMT: i/m: 13–45 mmHg, spontaneous 2–20 mmHg and transplanted 2–22 mmHg. Additionally, there was significant variation between individual tumours growing in the same mouse, and there was no correlation between donor and recipient tumour IFP values. Metastatic dissemination to the lungs or lymph nodes demonstrated no correlation with tumour IFP. Tumour hypoxia, proliferation, and lymphatic or blood vessel density also showed no relationship with tumour IFP. Speckle variance analysis of ultrasound images showed no differences in vascular perfusion between ME180 tumours grown i/m versus orthotopically

  18. STUDY OF INTRAOPERATIVE SQUASH CYTOLOGY OF INTRACRANIAL AND SPINAL CORD LESIONS WITH HISTOPATHOLOGICAL AND IHC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naval Kishore Bajaj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The causes of discordant diagnoses achieved at squash cytology of intracranial and spinal cord tumours were ascertained. Lesions having the advantage of diagnostic accuracy by squash cytology of intracranial and spinal cord lesions was also determined. METHODS Squash preparations of 72 patients suspected to have neoplasia were made and stained with rapid haematoxylin and eosin stain and toluidine blue stain. The smears were classified according to the cytomorphological criteria and the squash cytodiagnoses were compared. RESULTS Total 72 cases were studied, 93.9% were neoplastic and 6.1% non-neoplastic on histopathology. Amongst neoplasms, Astrocytic tumours constituted 26.3% of cases followed by Meningiomas comprising 20.8%. Amongst the benign lesions, Tuberculoma was seen most frequently (6.95%. Overall diagnostic accuracy of squash was 98.65%. On statistical analysis, Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive value (PPV and Negative Predictive Value (NPV of squash cytology were 98.6%, 100%, 100% and 80% respectively. CONCLUSION Intraoperative Squash is reliable, accurate, cost effective diagnostic modality when combined with histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques.

  19. Comparative oncology: what dogs and other species can teach us about humans with cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Joshua D.; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Over 1.66 million humans (approx. 500/100 000 population rate) and over 4.2 million dogs (approx. 5300/100 000 population rate) are diagnosed with cancer annually in the USA. The interdisciplinary field of comparative oncology offers a unique and strong opportunity to learn more about universal cancer risk and development through epidemiology, genetic and genomic investigations. Working across species, researchers from human and veterinary medicine can combine scientific findings to understand more quickly the origins of cancer and translate these findings to novel therapies to benefit both human and animals. This review begins with the genetic origins of canines and their advantage in cancer research. We next focus on recent findings in comparative oncology related to inherited, or genetic, risk for tumour development. We then detail the somatic, or genomic, changes within tumours and the similarities between species. The shared cancers between humans and dogs that we discuss include sarcoma (osteosarcoma, soft tissue sarcoma, histiocytic sarcoma, hemangiosarcoma), haematological malignancies (lymphoma, leukaemia), bladder cancer, intracranial neoplasms (meningioma, glioma) and melanoma. Tumour risk in other animal species is also briefly discussed. As the field of genomics advances, we predict that comparative oncology will continue to benefit both humans and the animals that live among us. PMID:26056372

  20. VIP secreting tumours in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.P.; Slavotinek, J.P.; Dorney, S.F.A.

    1990-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) secreting neural crest tumours are an uncommon but important treatable cause of intractable childhood diarrhoea. The radiological appearances of two cases are presented with a review of radiological findings in childhood VIP secreting neural crest tumours. Twenty eight cases of childhood VIP secreting neural crest tumours were reviewed. Nineteen (68%) were ganglioneuroblastomas and nine (32%) were ganglioneuromas. The majority of tumours (66%) were in a paravertebral location in the abdomen indicating that a search for such a tumour should be initiated at this site. Eighteen of the twenty eight cases reviewed discussed relevant radiological investigations. Calcification was detected in 50% of abdominal radiographs. Gut dilatation was often a prominent feature. A mass was detected in 5 of 5 cases where ultrasound findings were reported, and seven of seven cases with CT findings reported. Prior to the availability of CT and ultrasound the most useful investigation was IVU which demonstrated evidence of a mass in 5 of 9 cases. The presence of paravertebral calcification and gut dilatation on the plain radiograph of a child with intractable diarrhoea suggests the presence of a VIP secreting neural crest tumour. If an abdominal tumour is not found in the appropriate clinical setting and VIP levels are elevated, a widespread search of the paravertebral region is indicated. (orig.)

  1. Structure-cytotoxicity relationships of a series of natural and semi-synthetic simple coumarins as assessed in two human tumour cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodziej, H; Kayser, O; Woerdenbag, HJ; vanUden, W; Pras, N

    1997-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 22 natural and semi-synthetic simple coumarins was evaluated in GLC(4), a human small cell lung carcinoma cell line, and in COLO 320, a human colorectal cancer cell line, using the microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. With IC50 values > 100 mu M, following a continuous (96h)

  2. Carcino-embryonic antigen in monitoring the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma tumour cells SK-CO-1 and HT-29 in vitro and in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Fogh, J M; Sehested-Hansen, B

    1997-01-01

    A set of experimental model systems were designed to investigate (a) the inter-relationship between growth of two human cancer cell lines (SK-CO-1, HT-29) and carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) kinetics; and (b) whether neoplastic growth or CEA concentration is modulated by human growth hormone (hGH...

  3. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Pathobiology Group standard operating procedure for the preparation of human tumour tissue extracts suited for the quantitative analysis of tissue-associated biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Mengele, K.; Schueren, E. van der; Sweep, C.G.J.; Foekens, J.A.; Brunner, N.; Laabs, J.; Malik, A.; Harbeck, N.

    2007-01-01

    With the new concept of 'individualized treatment and targeted therapies', tumour tissue-associated biomarkers have been given a new role in selection of cancer patients for treatment and in cancer patient management. Tumour biomarkers can give support to cancer patient stratification and risk

  4. Primary vertebral tumours in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Masel, J.; Diard, F.; Ferrari-Ciboldi, F.; Le Dosseur, P.; Labatut, J.

    1984-03-01

    20 cases of primary benign and malignant bone tumours in children were reported. The most common tumours were Ewing's sarcoma, aneurismal bone cyst, benign osteoblastoma and osteoid osteoma. Some rare primary bone tumours in children (osteochondroma, chondroblastoma 6F, primary lymphoma of bone and neurofibromatosis with unusual cervical spinal changes) were also reported. The authors believe that radiographic findings together with clinical history and clinical examination may yield a high percentage of accurate diagnoses. Although microscopy is essential in the final diagnosis, the microscopic report should be also accepted with caution.

  5. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for radiation therapy of benign skull base tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.P.; Liguoro, D.; San Galli, F.

    2001-01-01

    Skull base tumours represent a out 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate: it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimensional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. (authors)

  6. Negative effects of a high tumour necrosis factor-α concentration on human gingival mesenchymal stem cell trophism: the use of natural compounds as modulatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Chiara; Natali, Letizia; Nisi, Marco; De Leo, Marinella; Daniele, Simona; Costa, Barbara; Graziani, Filippo; Gabriele, Mario; Braca, Alessandra; Trincavelli, M Letizia; Martini, Claudia

    2018-05-11

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a crucial role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and in regenerative processes. Among the different MSC types, the gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) have arisen as a promising tool to promote the repair of damaged tissues secreting trophic mediators that affect different types of cells involved in regenerative processes. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α is one of the key mediators of inflammation that could affect tissue regenerative processes and modify the MSC properties in in-vitro applications. To date, no data have been reported on the effects of TNF-α on GMSC trophic activities and how its modulation with anti-inflammatory agents from natural sources could modulate the GMSC properties. GMSCs were isolated and characterized from healthy subjects. The effects of TNF-α were evaluated on GMSCs and on the well-being of endothelial cells. The secretion of cytokines was measured and related to the modification of GMSC-endothelial cell communication using a conditioned-medium method. The ability to modify the inflammatory response was evaluated in the presence of Ribes nigrum bud extract (RBE). TNF-α differently affected GMSC proliferation and the expression of inflammatory-related proteins (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2) dependent on its concentration. A high TNF-α concentration decreased the GMSC viability and impaired the positive cross-talk between GMSCs and endothelial cells, probably by enhancing the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the GMSC secretome. RBE restored the beneficial effects of GMSCs on endothelial viability and motility under inflammatory conditions. A high TNF-α concentration decreased the well-being of GMSCs, modifying their trophic activities and decreasing endothelial cell healing. These data highlight the importance of controlling TNF-α concentrations to maintain the trophic activity of GMSCs. Furthermore, the

  7. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  8. World Health Organisation Classification of Lymphoid Tumours in Veterinary and Human Medicine: a Comparative Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Lymphomas in 61 Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfesberger, B; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, A; Greß, V; Hammer, S E; Gradner, G; Knödl, K; Tichy, A; Rütgen, B C; Beham-Schmid, C

    2018-02-01

    To diagnose and classify the various entities of lymphomas, the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification is applied in human as well as in veterinary medicine. We validated the concordance of these classification systems by having a veterinary and human pathologist evaluate gastrointestinal lymphoma tissue from 61 cats. In 59% of all cases, there was a match between their respective diagnoses of the lymphoma subtype. A complete consensus between the two evaluators was obtained for all samples with a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. A corresponding diagnosis was also made in the majority of samples with enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) type II, although this subtype in cats has similarities to the 'indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder of the gastrointestinal tract', a provisional entity newly added to the revised human WHO classification in 2016. Very little consensus has been found with cases of EATL type I due to the fact that most did not meet all of the criteria of human EATL I. Hence, the human pathologist assigned them to the heterogeneous group of peripheral T-cell lymphomas (not otherwise specified). Consequently, concrete guidelines and advanced immunophenotyping based on the model of human medicine are essential to differentiate these challenging entities in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cystic tumours of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Univ. (Japan); Ohtomo, K. [Univ. of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    In this pictorial essay we present the typical appearances of cystic pancreatic tumours, the wide spectrum of their features, and differential features among cystic pancreatic masses with an emphasis on CT. Pseudocysts are the most common cystic lesion in the pancreas and can be induced by pancreatitis, trauma or surgery. Pseudocysts appear as a round cystic mass with a definite wall. However, they can mimic cystic tumours associated with internal septation and/or necrotic mass of various shapes. Conversely, cystic tumours can appear as a simple cyst lacking any thickening of wall, septation or mural nodule. Pancreatic carcinoma not infrequently induces secondary cysts upstream of the obstructed pancreatic duct. The cysts are pseudocysts or retention cysts in nature. When cysts are formed in the pancreatic parenchyma or adjacent to pancreatic carcinoma they may mimic cystic tumour. (orig./VHE)

  10. Cystic tumours of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itai, Y.; Ohtomo, K.

    1996-01-01

    In this pictorial essay we present the typical appearances of cystic pancreatic tumours, the wide spectrum of their features, and differential features among cystic pancreatic masses with an emphasis on CT. Pseudocysts are the most common cystic lesion in the pancreas and can be induced by pancreatitis, trauma or surgery. Pseudocysts appear as a round cystic mass with a definite wall. However, they can mimic cystic tumours associated with internal septation and/or necrotic mass of various shapes. Conversely, cystic tumours can appear as a simple cyst lacking any thickening of wall, septation or mural nodule. Pancreatic carcinoma not infrequently induces secondary cysts upstream of the obstructed pancreatic duct. The cysts are pseudocysts or retention cysts in nature. When cysts are formed in the pancreatic parenchyma or adjacent to pancreatic carcinoma they may mimic cystic tumour. (orig./VHE)

  11. Tumour markers in urology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, L.; Fornara, P.; Fabricius, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The same applies essentially also for the bladder carcinomas: There is no reliable marker for these cancers which would be useful for clinical purposes. TPA has proven to be too non-specific in malignoma-detection and therefore hardly facilitates clinical decision-making in individual cases. The CEA is not sensitive enough to be recommendable for routine application. However, in advanced stages a CEA examination may be useful if applied within the scope of therapeutic efforts made to evaluate efficacy. In cases of carcinomas of the prostate the sour prostate-specific phosphatase (SPP) and, more recently, especially the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have proven in follow-up and therapy monitoring, whereby the PSA is superior to the SPP. Nevertheless, both these markers should be employed in therapy monitoring because differences in behaviour will be observed when the desired treatment effect is only achieved in one of the two markers producing tumour cell clonuses. Both markers, but especially the PSA, are quite reliably in agreement with the result of the introduced chemo-/hormone therapy, whereby an increase may be a sure indicator of relapse several months previous to clinical symptoms, imaging procedures, so-called routine laboratory results and subjective complaints. However, none of the 2 markers is appropriate for the purposes of screening or early diagnosis of carcinomas of the prostate. (orig.) [de

  12. Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour: Imaging features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, V. Anik; Hirsch, Michelle S.; Silverman, Stuart G.

    2012-01-01

    Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour is a rare, recently described neoplasm with a distinctive histological appearance. Although reported in the pathology literature, to our knowledge, no prior reports have described its imaging appearance. We describe the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features of an incidentally detected renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour that appeared as a well-marginated, solid T2-hypointense enhancing mass, in a 50-year-old woman. It is indistinguishable from a variety of benign and malignant renal neoplasms. PMID:23093565

  13. Paediatric laryngeal granular cell tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauda Ayuba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumour (GCT affecting the larynx is not common, especially in children. Most cases are apt to be confused with respiratory papilloma and may even be mistaken for a malignant neoplasia. We present a case of laryngeal GCT in a 12-year-old child to emphasize that the tumour should be regarded in the differential of growths affecting the larynx in children.

  14. Surgical approach to pineal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluchino, F; Broggi, G; Fornari, M; Franzini, A; Solero, C L; Allegranza, A

    1989-01-01

    During a period of 10 years (1977-1986) 40 cases of tumour of the pineal region have been treated at the Istituto Neurologico "C. Besta"-of Milan. Out of these 40 cases, 27 (67.5%) were in the paediatric (10-15 years) or juvenile (15-20 years) age at the time of operation. Since 1983 a specific diagnostic and therapeutic protocol has been adopted and thereafter direct surgical removal of the tumour was performed only when the neuroradiological investigations were highly suggestive of a benign extrinsic lesion. Sixteen cases in this series underwent direct surgical removal; in the remaining 24 cases stereotactic biopsy of the tumour was performed in the first instance. On the basis of the histological diagnosis obtained by this procedure surgical excision of the tumour (9 cases) or radiotherapy (15 cases) was then performed. 25 cases underwent surgical removal of the lesion. In all the cases the infratentorial supracerebellar approach as introduced by Krause and then modified by Stein was adopted. On analysis of the data of this series it was observed that in 25% of the cases completely benign resectable tumours were found; in 25% of the cases astrocytoma (grade I-II) which could be treated at least by partial removal were present; in 30% of the cases radiosensitive lesions were encountered. In the remaining 20% of the cases highly malignant tumours were found which should be treated only by radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.

  15. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Wang, C.C.; Wang, J.

    1999-01-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary midbrain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases. (orig.) (orig.)

  16. Optimizing clinical performance and geometrical robustness of a new electrode device for intracranial tumor electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Gehl, Julie

    2011-01-01

    and genes to intracranial tumors in humans, and demonstrate a method to optimize the design (i.e. geometry) of the electrode device prototype to improve both clinical performance and geometrical tolerance (robustness). We have employed a semiempirical objective function based on constraints similar to those...... sensitive to random geometrical deviations. The method is readily applicable to other electrode configurations....

  17. The Relationship Between Intracranial Pressure and Age-Chasing Age-Related Reference Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sarah Hornshøj; Lilja-Cyron, Alexander; Andresen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Background: No true reference values for intracranial pressure (ICP) in humans exist; current values are estimated from measurements in adults who undergo treatment in order to correct ICP. We report ICP values in a "pseudonormal" group of children and adults to examine if age affects ICP. Method...

  18. Evaluation of Intracranial Pressure in Different Body Postures and Disease Entities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Morten; Hadi, Amer; Juhler, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    We currently do not have sufficient knowledge regarding appropriate boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal" intracranial pressure (ICP) in humans. Our objective in this study was to quantify the effects of postural changes on ICP in normal and ill subjects. As a model for normal patients, we i...

  19. An improved mounting device for attaching intracranial probes in large animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunster, Kimble R

    2015-12-01

    The rigid support of intracranial probes can be difficult when using animal models, as mounting devices suitable for the probes are either not available, or designed for human use and not suitable in animal skulls. A cheap and reliable mounting device for securing intracranial probes in large animal models is described. Using commonly available clinical consumables, a universal mounting device for securing intracranial probes to the skull of large animals was developed and tested. A simply made mounting device to hold a variety of probes from 500 μm to 1.3 mm in diameter to the skull was developed. The device was used to hold probes to the skulls of sheep for up to 18 h. No adhesives or cements were used. The described device provides a reliable method of securing probes to the skull of animals.

  20. Targeted radiotherapy with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M. A de; Pedraza L, M.; Rodriguez C, J.; Ferro F, G.; Murphy S, E.

    2006-01-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses and to evaluate 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells, which over-express somatostatin receptors, were injected in athymic mice and 20 days later the mean tumour size was 3.08 square cm (n=3). A mean of 86.3 MBq 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE, was injected in a tail vein and 19 days after therapy the size of the tumours was 0.81 square cm. There was a partial relapse and after 16 days, when sacrificed, the mean tumour size was 8.28 cubic cm. An epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidney of one treated mouse was found. The tumour of the control mouse was 8.61 cubic cm when sacrificed 14 days after tumour induction. Radiotherapy estimates to the tumours was 35.9-39.7 Gy and the tumours might have been completely reduced with a second therapy dose. These preliminary studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that Lu- 177 -DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man, considering kidney radiation. (Author)

  1. Monocytic and granulocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells differentially regulate spatiotemporal tumour plasticity during metastatic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounova, Maria; Lee, Eunmi; Piranlioglu, Raziye; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Demirci, Mehmet F; Marasco, Daniela; Asm, Iskander; Chadli, Ahmed; Hassan, Khaled A; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Zhou, Gang; Arbab, Ali S; Cowell, John K; Korkaya, Hasan

    2017-04-06

    It is widely accepted that dynamic and reversible tumour cell plasticity is required for metastasis, however, in vivo steps and molecular mechanisms are poorly elucidated. We demonstrate here that monocytic (mMDSC) and granulocytic (gMDSC) subsets of myeloid-derived suppressor cells infiltrate in the primary tumour and distant organs with different time kinetics and regulate spatiotemporal tumour plasticity. Using co-culture experiments and mouse transcriptome analyses in syngeneic mouse models, we provide evidence that tumour-infiltrated mMDSCs facilitate tumour cell dissemination from the primary site by inducing EMT/CSC phenotype. In contrast, pulmonary gMDSC infiltrates support the metastatic growth by reverting EMT/CSC phenotype and promoting tumour cell proliferation. Furthermore, lung-derived gMDSCs isolated from tumour-bearing animals enhance metastatic growth of already disseminated tumour cells. MDSC-induced 'metastatic gene signature' derived from murine syngeneic model predicts poor patient survival in the majority of human solid tumours. Thus spatiotemporal MDSC infiltration may have clinical implications in tumour progression.

  2. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-04-26

    Abstract Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression.

  3. Genetic study of intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Junxia; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Takenaka, Katsunobu; Kato, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio

    2015-03-01

    Rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) causes subarachnoid hemorrhage, leading to immediate death or severe disability. Identification of the genetic factors involved is critical for disease prevention and treatment. We aimed to identify the susceptibility genes for IAs. Exome sequencing was performed in 12 families with histories of multiple cases of IA (number of cases per family ≥3), with a total of 42 cases. Various filtering strategies were used to select the candidate variants. Replicate association studies of several candidate variants were performed in probands of 24 additional IA families and 426 sporadic IA cases. Functional analysis for the mutations was conducted. After sequencing and filtering, 78 variants were selected for the following reasons: allele frequencies of variants in 42 patients was significantly (PIA within ≥1 family; variants predicted damage to the structure or function of the protein by PolyPhen-2 (Polymorphism Phenotyping V2) and SIFT (Sorting Intolerance From Tolerant). We selected 10 variants from 9 genes (GPR63, ADAMST15, MLL2, IL10RA, PAFAH2, THBD, IL11RA, FILIP1L, and ZNF222) to form 78 candidate variants by considering commonness in families, known disease genes, or ontology association with angiogenesis. Replicate association studies revealed that only p.E133Q in ADAMTS15 was aggregated in the familial IA cases (odds ratio, 5.96; 95% confidence interval, 2.40-14.82; P=0.0001; significant after the Bonferroni correction [P=0.05/78=0.0006]). Silencing ADAMTS15 and overexpression of ADAMTS15 p.E133Q accelerated endothelial cell migration, suggesting that ADAMTS15 may have antiangiogenic activity. ADAMTS15 is a candidate gene for IAs. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provi...

  5. Predictors of severe complications in intracranial meningioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Förander, Petter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate predictors of complications after intracranial meningioma resection using a standardized reporting system for adverse events. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian population-based cohort of 979 adult operations for intracranial meningioma perfo...

  6. Augmentation of alphavirus vector-induced human papilloma virus-specific immune and anti-tumour responses by co-expression of interleukin-12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Regts, Joke; Chen, Margaret; Wilschut, Jan; Daemen, Toos

    2009-01-01

    To enhance the efficacy of a therapeutic immunisition strategy against human papillomavirus-induced cervical cancer we evaluated the adjuvant effect of interleukin-12 (IL12) expressed by a Semliki Forest virus vector (SFV) in mice. Depending on the dose and schedule. SFV-IL12 Stimulated

  7. Superior therapeutic efficacy of alphavirus-mediated immunization against human papilloma virus type 16 antigens in a murine tumour model : effects of the route of immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; Riezebos-Brilman, A; Regts, J; Dontje, B; van der Zee, A; Wilschut, J

    2004-01-01

    In our efforts to develop a strong, effective immune response against cervical carcinoma and premalignant disease, we study the use of recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) encoding the oncoproteins E6 and E7 from high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs). Optimal immunization conditions are

  8. Medulloblastomas - primitive neuroectodermal tumours in the adult population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, R.I.; Williams, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Medulloblastomas - primitive neuroectodermal tumours are rare in adults. This review will evaluate a single centre's experience with this malignancy. The medulloblastoma - primitive neuroectodermal tumour database was evaluated for all patients aged more than 18 years who were referred for management. Relevant information from the database was abstracted to provide a descriptive record of this malignancy. Between 1977-2004 there were 11 patients referred, 1 with persistent disease and 10 were eligible, presenting with initial diagnosis. There was increased intracranial pressure in 50% of patients. Most patients had symptoms >3 months, with three having symptoms 1-3 months before diagnosis and one patient having thoracic dural metastases at presentation. Complete resection was recorded in four patients and six had 50-90% resection. All patients completed craniospinal radiotherapy (35-36 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy fractions) barring one patient, who died of surgical complications during his radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was given in five of the nine patients postradiotherapy. There were two posterior fossa recurrences, with associated supratentorial and extra central nervous system disease. Of the 10 primary patients 7 are alive with no evidence of diease, 2 died because of disease, with 1 intercurrent death. One patient developed a second malignancy. The outcome for adults matches that of the more common paediatric patients. Radiotherapy could control local disease even where complete resection was not achieved.

  9. New technologies to combat malignant tumours of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, F

    1982-01-01

    1. The primary problem in an effective treatment of a glioblastoma is the prevention of a recurrence. 2. For that purpose were the following therapeutical procedures undertaken: (a) Temporary implantation of radio cobalt in the brain itself (1957): (b) Clostridium butyricum M 55 was used to render the centre of the tumour fluid (1967): (c) Podophyllin was used to destroy the border of the tumour (1980); (d) The CO2 Laser beam (1975); (e) The electromagnetic heat induction deep in the brain (1973-1978). 3. In order to make the operation and postoperative phase safer for the patient, the following precautions were drawn upon or employed: (a) Hyperbaric oxygenisation in the pressure chamber (1971); (b) The anti-G-suit (1974); (c) the computer controlled automatic infusion pump (1980), and (d) the telemetric measurement of intra-cranial pressure (1975). 4. Apart from the pressure chamber, the mentioned devices were all supervised and developed in the department of the author. 5. The first successful means in the prevention of the recurrence of a glioblastoma multiform seems to be the telethermic method mentioned in 2 (e) above.

  10. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  11. Parapharyngeal meningioma extending from the intracranial space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchibori, M.; Odake, G.; Ueda, S.; Yasuda, N.; Hisa, I.

    1990-01-01

    A 50-year old woman with a giant parapharyngeal meningioma extending from the intracranial cavity was admitted to our hospital. The parapharyngeal tumor was biopsied using the transoral approach, and a histological section diagnosis suggested meningioma. Thereafter, further examination by magnetic resonance images (MRI) and contrast enhanced CT scans revealed a diffuse meningioma en plaque in the posterior fossa. Invasion extended from the clival dura to the right sigmoid sinus. The extracranial extension of a meningioma is very rare but a few cases have been reported. In almost all of the reported cases, a large intracranial meningioma was simultaneously or previously verified by CT scans. Our case was special in that the intracranial mass was not voluminous but showed en plaque extension, and also because the pathway of the extracranial extension through the jugular foramen was clearly visualized by CT and MRI. Obliteration and invasion of the right sigmoid sinus and the internal jugular vein by tumor were also demonstrated. (orig.)

  12. The Askin tumour. Neuroactodermic tumour of the thoracic wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez, P.; Nicolas, A. I.; Vivas, I.; Damaso Aquerreta, J.; Martinez-Cuesta, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Askin tumours is an extremely rare and malignant process in the thoracic pulmonary region during infancy and youth. The differential diagnosis has to be considered with other thoracic wall tumours that are more common in pediatrics like the undifferentiated neuroblastoma, the embionic rabdomiosarcoma, the Ewing sarcoma and the linfoma. A retrospective examination was carried out on 473 thoracic wall tumours from 1994 to 1997 at our centre, resulting in 4 patients with an anatomopathologically tested Askin tumour (ages from 13-21). All the cases were studied using simple radiography and CT. In two cases MRI was also used. The most common clinical manifestation was a palpable painful mass in the thoracic wall. In the simple radiograph the main finding was a large mass of extrapleural soft material, with costal destruction ( n=3) and a pleural effusion (n=2). In the CT study the mass was heterogeneous, with internal calcifications in one case. CT and MRI showed invasion in the mediastinum (n=1), medular channel (n=1) and phrenic and sulphrenic extension (n=1). The Askin tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic wall masses in infant-youth ages. There are no specific morphological characteristics. Both CT and MRI are useful for the diagnosis, staging and follow up. (Author) 11 refs

  13. Proton pump inhibitor-induced tumour cell death by inhibition of a detoxification mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, S

    2010-05-01

    This review presents a possible new approach against cancer, as represented by inhibition of proton pumps, a mechanism used by tumour cells to avoid intracellular accumulation of toxic substances. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) belong to a family of pro-drugs that are currently used in the treatment of peptic diseases needing acidity to be activated. PPIs target the acidic tumour mass, where they are metabolized, thus blocking proton traffic. Proton pump inhibition triggers a rapid cell death as a result of intracellular acidification, caspase activation and early accumulation of reactive oxygen species into tumour cells. As a whole, the devastating effect of PPIs on tumour cells suggest the triggering of a fatal cell toxification. Many human tumours, including melanoma, osteosarcoma, lymphomas and various adenocarcinomas are responsive to PPIs. This appears highly conceivable, in as much as almost all human tumours are acidic and express high levels of proton pumps. Paradoxically, metastatic tumours appear to be more responsive to PPIs being more acidic than the majority of primary tumours. However, two clinical trials test the effectiveness of PPIs in chemosensitizing melanoma and osteosarcoma patients. Indeed, tumour acidity represents a very potent mechanism of chemoresistance. A majority of cytotoxic agents, being weak bases, are quickly protonated outside and do not enter the cells, thus preventing drugs to reach specific cellular targets. Clinical data will provide the proof of concept on the use of PPIs as a new class of antitumour agent with a very low level of systemic toxicity as compared with standard chemotherapeutic agents.

  14. Fast FLAIR MR images of intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Hye Young; Cho, Young A; Kim, Wha Young

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the signal characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage, as seen on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging according to various stages, and to compare FLAIR imaging with spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging. We retrospectively evaluated fast FLAIR images along with spin-echo T1- and T2 weighted MR images of 32 lesions in 25 patients (12 males and 14 females, aged 3 - 84 yrs) with intracranial hemorrhagic lesions. For imaging, 1.5 T unit was used, and the nature of the lesions was found to be as follows : intracranial hemorrhage (n=15); tumor (n=9); infarction (n=4); arteriovenous malformation (n=3); and arachnoid cyst with hemorrhage (n=1). On the basis of spin-echo MR imaging, lesions were classified as acute, early subacute, late subacute, early chronic, or late chronic stage. The signal characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage were analysed in accordance with each staging, as seen on MR FLAIR imaging, and compared to the staging seen on spin-echo T1- and T-2 weighted MR imaging. The signal intensity of intracranial hemorrhage, as seen on FLAIR imaging, was not characteristic; it was similar to that of T2WI during the acute and subacute stages, and similiar to that of T1WI during the chronic stage. When used together with spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging, however, FLAIR imaging may be useful for the classification of chronic intracranial hemorrhage as either early or late stage. (author). 20 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  15. Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms in a patient with Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anthony C; Gemmete, Joseph J; Keegan, Catherine E; Witt, Cordelie E; Muraszko, Karin M; Than, Khoi D; Maher, Cormac O

    2011-11-01

    Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome (RBS) is a rare but distinct genetic disorder with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. It has been associated with microcephaly, craniofacial malformation, cavernous hemangioma, encephalocele, and hydrocephalus. There are no previously reported cases of RBS with intracranial aneurysms. The authors report on a patient with a history of RBS who presented with a spontaneous posterior fossa hemorrhage. Multiple small intracranial aneurysms were noted on a preoperative CT angiogram. The patient underwent emergency craniotomy for evacuation of the hemorrhage. A postoperative angiogram confirmed the presence of multiple, distal small intracranial aneurysms.

  16. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have...... an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led...

  17. Diagnostic value of optical coherence tomography for intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, M; Yri, H; Sander, B

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of space-occupying lesions or other known etiology. It primarily affects young obese females, and potentially causes permanent visual loss due to papilledema and secondary...... optic atrophy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a marker for CSF opening pressure in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of 20 newly diagnosed, 21 long-term IIH patients...

  18. Childhood Adrenocortical Tumours: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques-Pereira Rosana

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Childhood adrenocortical tumour (ACT is not a common disease, but in southern Brazil the prevalence is 15 times higher than in other parts of the world. One hundred and thirty-seven patients have been identified and followed by our group over the past four decades. Affected children are predominantly girls, with a female-to-male ratio of 3.5:1 in patients below 4 years of age. Virilization alone (51.6% or mixed with Cushing's syndrome (42.0% was the predominant clinical picture observed in these patients. Tumours are unilateral, affecting both glands equally. TP53 R337H germline mutations underlie most childhood ACTs in southern Brazil. Epidemiological data from our casuistic studies revealed that this mutation has ~10% penetrance for ACT. Surgery is the definitive treatment, and a complete resection should always be attempted. Although adjuvant chemotherapy has shown some encouraging results, its influence on overall outcome is small. The survival rate is directly correlated to tumour size; patients with small, completely excised tumours have survival rates close to 90%, whereas in those patients with inoperable tumours and/or metastatic disease it is less than 10%. In the group of patients with large, excisable tumours, half of them have an intermediate outcome. Recent molecular biology techniques and genomic approaches may help us to better understand the pathogenesis of ACT, the risk of developing a tumour when TP53 R337H is present, and to predict its outcome. An ongoing pilot study consisting of close monitoring of healthy carriers of the TP53 R337H mutation - siblings and first-degree relatives of known affected cases - aims at the early detection of ACTs and an improvement of the cure rate.

  19. Development of intracranial hypertension after surgical management of intracranial arachnoid cyst: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2013-11-12

    To describe three cases of delayed development of intracranial hypertension (IH) after surgical treatment of intracranial arachnoid cyst, including the pathogenesis of IH and a review of the literature.

  20. Intracranial meningiomas in the present era of modern neuroimaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intracranial meningioma is the most common primary, intracranial, extra-axial neoplasm. It is mesenchymal in origin and arises from meningothelial cells of arachnoid villi of meninges. Objectives: To re-emphasize the regional anatomic localisation and diagnostic radiological features of intracranial ...

  1. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension – Pathophysiology Based on Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubisavljević Srdjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition, idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a pathological state characterized by an increase in intracranial pressure; however, there are no obvious intracranial pathological processes. The pathophysiology of this disorder is not clear, although there are many reports related to it.

  2. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  3. Primary intracranial leiomyoma in renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasana Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyoma, the benign tumor of smooth muscle cell origin, is commonly seen in genitourinary and gastrointestinal tracts. Primary intracranial leiomyoma, however, is extremely rare occurrence. We hereby report a case of Epstein-Barr negative primary intracranial leiomyoma in a middle-aged renal transplant recipient, which mimicked left frontal parasagittal meningioma on neuroimaging. The tumor was completely excised and diagnosis of leiomyoma was clinched on pathological analysis with immunohistochemistry. The patient improved after tumor removal, and no evidence of tumor recurrence was noted on follow-up study after 10 months postsurgically.

  4. Intracranial osteosarcoma after radiosurgery. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanno, Naoko; Hayashi, Shinkichi; Shimura, Toshiro; Maeda, Shotaro; Teramoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an intracranial osteosarcoma at the site of previous radiosurgery, manifesting as sudden onset of headache and left hemiparesis with aphasia. She had a previous history of stereotactic radiosurgery for an intracranial tumor under a diagnosis of falx meningioma. Computed tomography showed intratumoral and peritumoral hemorrhage at the right parietofrontal region. Gross total resection of the tumor with hematoma was performed. The histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma. Sarcomatous change is a rare complication of radiotherapy. This case illustrates that osteosarcoma may develop years after radiosurgery for benign brain neoplasm. (author)

  5. Increased intracranial volume in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Katja; Karlsborg, Merete; Hansen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    segmentation and outlining of regions in order to identify regional volume changes that might be useful in the diagnosis of the two diseases. RESULTS: Patients with PD had significantly larger intracranial volumes (ICVs) and significantly smaller putaminal and sustantia nigra volumes than controls. MSA...... patients had significantly smaller substantia nigra and caudate volumes than controls but normal intracranial volume. In both patient groups there was a further trend towards smaller amygdala volumes. DISCUSSION: Increased ICV in PD patients is a new finding that may be explained by genetic factors...

  6. Traumatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raksha Ramlakhan, BMedSc, MBBCh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial dermoid cysts are congenital tumors of ectodermal origin. Rupture of these cysts can occur spontaneously, but rupture in association with trauma is reported infrequently. The diagnosis of rupture is made by the presence of lipid (cholesterol droplets in the subarachnoid spaces and ventricles. Nonenhanced CT of the head demonstrates multiple foci of low attenuation that correspond with hyperintense signal on T1-weighted MRI. We present a case of an adult patient with rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst, precipitated by minor trauma.

  7. Graves' disease and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gutch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a central nervous system disorder characterized by raised intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and absence of any structural anomaly on neuroimaging. Among all endocrine disorders associated with the development of IIH, the association of hyperthyroidism and IIH is very rare with few cases reported till date. Thyroid disturbances have a unique association with IIH. Hypo- and hyper-thyroidism have been reported in association with this disorder. We present a rare case of a 25-year-old man with Graves' disease with intractable headache that was later investigated and attributed to development of IIH.

  8. Anti-tumour activity in RAS-driven tumours by blocking AKT and MEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolcher, Anthony W.; Khan, Khurum; Ong, Michael; Banerji, Udai; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Gandara, David R.; Patnaik, Amita; Baird, Richard D.; Olmos, David; Garrett, Christopher R.; Skolnik, Jeffrey M.; Rubin, Eric H.; Smith, Paul D.; Huang, Pearl; Learoyd, Maria; Shannon, Keith A.; Morosky, Anne; Tetteh, Ernestina; Jou, Ying-Ming; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P.; Moreno, Victor; Kaiser, Brianne; Yap, Timothy A.; Yan, Li; de Bono, Johann S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose KRAS is the most commonly mutated oncogene in human tumours. KRAS-mutant cells may exhibit resistance to the allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244; ARRY-142886) and allosteric AKT inhibitors (such as MK-2206), the combination of which may overcome resistance to both monotherapies. Experimental Design We conducted a dose/schedule-finding study evaluating MK-2206 and selumetinib in patients with advanced treatment-refractory solid tumours. Recommended dosing schedules were defined as MK-2206 135 mg weekly and selumetinib 100 mg once-daily. Results Grade 3 rash was the most common dose-limiting toxicity (DLT); other DLTs included grade 4 lipase increase, grade 3 stomatitis, diarrhoea, and fatigue, and grade 3 and grade 2 retinal pigment epithelium detachment. There were no meaningful pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Clinical anti-tumour activity included RECIST 1.0-confirmed partial responses in non-small cell lung cancer and low-grade ovarian carcinoma. Conclusion Responses in KRAS-mutant cancers were generally durable. Clinical co-targeting of MEK and AKT signalling may be an important therapeutic strategy in KRAS-driven human malignancies (Trial NCT number NCT01021748). PMID:25516890

  9. Maturation of human dendritic cells by monocyte-conditioned medium is dependent upon trace amounts of lipopolysaccharide inducing tumour necrosis factor alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nersting, Jacob; Svenson, Morten; Andersen, Vagn

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the ability of monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM), generated by monocytes cultured on plastic-immobilised immunoglobulin, to stimulate maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). Earlier reports suggest that MCM is a strong inducer of irreversible DC maturation......, whereas we find, that adding a small amount of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the MCM-generating cultures is required for the production of a DC-stimulatory MCM. Moreover, compared with addition of LPS directly to the DC cultures, stimulation via MCM cultures increases by several fold the DC...

  10. A STUDY ON OPHTHALMIC MANIFESTATIONS IN PITUITARY GLAND TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Munusamy Rajendran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pituitary adenoma is a benign tumour that originates from the adenohypophyseal cells of the anterior lobe of pituitary gland. It accounts for 12% to 15% of all intracranial tumours. A spectrum of ocular manifestations are seen with these tumours ranging from the absence of any visual symptoms to severe visual field defects and loss of vision. The aim of the study is to study the various ocular features and its effect on vision, visual fields and ocular motility in cases of pituitary adenoma diagnosed on CT or MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study for a period of 1 year and 8 months conducted in Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Madras Medical College. 25 patients aged between 25 to 65 years diagnosed as pituitary adenomas on radiological imaging who presented to squint clinic were evaluated after detailed history with visual acuity, pupillary reaction, colour vision, extraocular movements, slit lamp and fundus examination. Visual field examination was done with Octopus field analyser. RESULTS In our study, 25 patients of pituitary adenoma diagnosed on radio imaging were enrolled and evaluated. Most patients were above 50 years, 15 patients of the 25 were above 50 yrs. (60%. Females were predominantly affected (76%. Visual acquity of the patient was between 6/12-6/6 (62% on presentation. Headache was the commonest mode of presentation (80%. 76% showed field defects of which bitemporal hemianopia was the commonest in 52.9%. Pituitary macroadenoma 96% was the commonest type. Optic atrophy was seen only in 4 cases. Others had normal fundus. CONCLUSION Neuro-ophthalmic evaluation plays a major role not only in early detection, planning of treatment and further follow up, but also prevents visual loss if intervened early.

  11. CT differential diagnosis of tumour of the cranium with intracranial spread - a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trittmacher, S; Purmann, H; Schmid, A

    1988-01-01

    A report on patient presenting in the cranial computer tomogram with changes in the cranium in the left temporal region typical of a meningioma, as well as with changes in the floor of the middle cranial fossa. Correct diagnosis was obtained only by the overall assessment comprising anamnesis, laboratory findings and state of the skeletal structure: namely, a plasmacytoma involving the calotte of the cranium.

  12. CT differential diagnosis of tumour of the cranium with intracranial spread - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trittmacher, S.; Purmann, H.

    1988-01-01

    A report on patient presenting in the cranial computer tomogram with changes in the cranium in the left temporal region typical of a meningioma, as well as with changes in the floor of the middle cranial fossa. Correct diagnosis was obtained only by the overall assessment comprising anamnesis, laboratory findings and state of the skeletal structure: namely, a plasmacytoma involving the calotte of the cranium. (orig.) [de

  13. Imaging in unilateral Wilms tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisse, Herve J.; Smets, Anne M.; Kaste, Sue C.; Owens, Catherine M.

    2008-01-01

    Wilms tumour is one of the most common malignancies in children, with an excellent prognosis after therapy. There is a very diverse approach to treatment according to geographical location. This variation in therapeutic attitude toward Wilms tumour, particularly between the United States and Europe, has consequences for the choice of imaging modality at diagnosis. In Europe, the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) treatment protocol is based on chemotherapy followed by surgery. Imaging (US, CT and MRI), clinical history and examination will help predict whether the findings are consistent with Wilms tumour. Furthermore, in the UK preoperative image-guided biopsy is advised to help identify the small group of patients who, despite typical imaging features of Wilms tumour, have other types of neoplasia that require alternative management. In the United States, the National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS) advises surgery prior to chemo- and radiotherapy. Hence imaging must provide detailed anatomical information for surgical planning. This article discusses the role of imaging at diagnosis and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the available radiological techniques. We also focus on imaging the lung for metastatic disease and the consequences (to the patient's ultimate outcome) of CT-diagnosed small pulmonary nodules and discuss the radiological diagnosis and consequences of tumour rupture present at diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. The independent action of radiation and cisplatin on the survival or recovery of human normal or tumour cells in vitro or in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basham, C.; Mills, J.; Roberts, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recovery from γ-radiation- or cisplatin-induced lethal damage was studied in euoxic normal human foetal lung fibroblasts (HFL cells). After 1 hour treatment with cisplatin the half-time of recovery was about 2 days. Recovery after radiation presented half-times of approximately 10 h, with further measurable recovery after 2 days. With either agent recovery ratios (RR) were dose-dependent but recovery (following treatment with equitoxic doses of both agents) was appreciably greater after cisplatin (RR ''approx.'' 123 after 40μm for 1 h) than after radiation (RR ''approx.'' 15 after 900 cGy). When radiation (900 cGy) was combined with cisplatin (40 μm for 1 h) the cell survival (measured at 5 days post-treatment or later) was not significantly less than that predicted by the additive, independent effects of both agents irrespective of whether cisplatin was given 1 h before, during or for 1 h after radiation. In euoxic, exponentially growing HFL or HeLa cells there was no evidence that combinations of cisplatin and radiation gave more than additive toxic effects. The combined effects of cisplatin or carboplatin and whole-body irradiation given 45 min later, on human melanoma cells were essentially the same as that predicted by the additive, independent effects of both agents. (author)

  15. Pasteurization of bone for tumour eradication prior to reimplantation – An in vitro & pre-clinical efficacy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kode, Jyoti; Taur, Prasad; Gulia, Ashish; Jambhekar, Nirmala; Agarwal, Manish; Puri, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: In current era of limb-salvage therapy, pasteurization of bone sarcomas is receiving growing attention as a potential extracorporeal treatment and cost-effective alternative to allografts and radiation before surgical reimplantation. Detailed in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical study to evaluate efficacy of pasteurization to eradicate malignant cells has not been reported yet. The present study was carried out to assess the efficacy of pasteurization to kill tumour cells both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Surgically resected specimens of osteosarcomas (n=4) were cut into equal halves and one section was pasteurized by heating at 60°C to 65°C for 40 min. Paired samples before and after pasteurization were studied in vitro for DNA ploidy, evaluation of histological change and elimination of mitotic activity. These tissues were transplanted in immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice to evaluate effect on tumour-generating ability, presence of human nuclei, osteopontin and cytokine/chemokines released in tumour-transplanted mice. Results: Non-pasteurized tumour samples had viable tumour cells which exhibited significant growth in culture, increased proliferative ability and clonogenic potential while respective pasteurized tumour tissues did not grow in culture and did not exhibit clonogenicity. Flow cytometry revealed that propidium iodide positive dead cells increased significantly (Ppasteurization. Seven of 12 non-pasteurized tumour transplanted mice demonstrated tumour-forming ability as against 0 of 12 in pasteurized tumour transplanted mice. Solid tumour xenografts exhibited strong expression of anti-human nuclei and osteopontin by immunohistochemistry as well as secretary human interluekin-6 (IL-6) while pasteurized mice failed to express these markers. Interpretation & conclusions: This study has provided a basis to establish pasteurization as being efficacious in ensuring tumour eradication from resected bone tumour specimens. Pasteurized

  16. Tocopherol in irradiation of temporary hypoxic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaagerud, A.; Lund, N.; Peterson, H.I.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of tocopherol on the effect of local irradiation under induced ischaemia by temporary tourniquet of two rat tumours transplanted intramuscularly into one hindleg was evaluated. An impaired retardation of growth rate occurred in tumours irradiated under ischaemia. This effect was eliminated by pretreatment of animals with tocopherol. In separate experiments the method of inducing ischaemia was investigated by MDO-electrode measurements of tumour tissue oxygen pressure. A significant tumour hypoxia was found under tourniquet of the tumour-bearing leg of the animals. Pretreatment with tocopherol did not influence the tumour pO 2 . (Auth.)

  17. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  18. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  19. Override of the radiation-induced mitotic block in human tumour cells by methylxanthines and its relationship to the potentiation of cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musk, S.R.R.; Steel, G.G.

    1990-01-01

    Caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine, were tested for ability to override mitotic block induced by ionizing radiation in the human bladder carcinoma cell line RT112. All were found to partially override the block, at a concentration of 1mM in the order caffeine > theophylline > theobromine = paraxanthine. At a concentration of 1 mM only caffeine was found to potentiate cell killing as well as causing block override; at higher concentrations all had a significant effect on survival but little or no further influence on the degree of block override. It is concluded that override of a mitotic block is not in itself sufficient to cause increased killing when irradiated cells are incubated in the presence of caffeine, and that caffeine exerts its potentiating effect by directly inhibiting repair of damage in DNA or by causing override of radiation-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis. (author)

  20. Override of the radiation-induced mitotic block in human tumour cells by methylxanthines and its relationship to the potentiation of cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musk, S.R.R.; Steel, G.G. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (UK). Surrey Branch)

    1990-06-01

    Caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine, were tested for ability to override mitotic block induced by ionizing radiation in the human bladder carcinoma cell line RT112. All were found to partially override the block, at a concentration of 1mM in the order caffeine > theophylline > theobromine = paraxanthine. At a concentration of 1 mM only caffeine was found to potentiate cell killing as well as causing block override; at higher concentrations all had a significant effect on survival but little or no further influence on the degree of block override. It is concluded that override of a mitotic block is not in itself sufficient to cause increased killing when irradiated cells are incubated in the presence of caffeine, and that caffeine exerts its potentiating effect by directly inhibiting repair of damage in DNA or by causing override of radiation-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis. (author).

  1. Genetic and molecular analysis of radon-induced rat lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilly, M.N.; Joubert, Ch.; Levalois, C.; Dano, L.; Chevillard, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have a model of radon-induced rat lung tumours, which allow us to analyse the cytogenetic and molecular alterations of the tumours. The aim is to better understand the mechanisms of radio-induced carcinogenesis and to define if it exists a specificity of radio-induced genetic alterations as compared to the genetic alterations found in the sporadic tumours. We have started our analysis by developing global cytogenetic and molecular approaches. We have shown that some alterations are recurrent. The genes that are potentially involved are the oncogene MET and the tumour suppressor Bene p16, which are also frequently altered in human lung tumours. Simultaneously, we have focussed our analysis by targeting the search of mutation in the tumour suppressor gene TP3. We have found that 8 of 39 tumours were mutated by deletion in the coding sequence of TP53. This high frequency of deletion, which is not observed in the human p53 mutation database could constitute a signature of radio-induced alterations. On this assumption, this type of alteration should not be only found on TP53 Bene but also in other suppressor genes which are inactivated by a mutation such as p16 for example. The work we are carrying out on radio-induced tumours among humans and animals is directed to this end. (author)

  2. Genetic analysis of neonatal and infantile germ cell tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    Human germ cell tumours (GCTs) can be classified into five distinct types, based on differences in anatomical location, histology, clinical outcome, age and genotype. The first type, the type I GCTs primarily occur in neonates and infants under the age of five years and include teratomas and yolk

  3. Glioblastoma stem-like cells give rise to tumour endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Rong; Chadalavada, Kalyani; Wilshire, Jennifer; Kowalik, Urszula; Hovinga, Koos E.; Geber, Adam; Fligelman, Boris; Leversha, Margaret; Brennan, Cameron; Tabar, Viviane

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is among the most aggressive of human cancers. A key feature of GBMs is the extensive network of abnormal vasculature characterized by glomeruloid structures and endothelial hyperplasia. Yet the mechanisms of angiogenesis and the origin of tumour endothelial cells remain poorly

  4. Alpha particles induce expression of immunogenic markers on tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorin, J.B.; Gouard, S.; Cherel, M.; Davodeau, F.; Gaschet, J.; Morgenstern, A.; Bruchertseifer, F.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of the publication follows. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is an approach aiming at targeting the radioelements to tumours, usually through the use of antibodies specific for tumour antigens. The radiations emitted by the radioelements then induce direct killing of the targeted cells as well as indirect killing through bystander effect. Interestingly, it has been shown that ionizing radiations, in some settings of external radiotherapy, can foster an immune response directed against tumour cells. Our research team is dedicated to the development of alpha RIT, i.e RIT using alpha particle emitters, we therefore decided to study the effects of such particles on tumour cells in regards to their immunogenicity. First, we studied the effects of bismuth 213, an alpha emitter, on cellular death and autophagy in six different tumour cell lines. Then, we measured the expression of 'danger' signals and MHC molecules at the cell surface to determine whether irradiation with 213 Bi could cause the tumour cells to be recognized by the immune system. Finally a co-culture of dendritic cells with irradiated tumour cells was performed to test whether it would induce dendritic cells to mature. No apoptosis was detected within 48 hours after irradiation in any cell line, however half of them exhibited signs of autophagy. No increase in membrane expression of 'danger' signals was observed after treatment with 213 Bi, but we showed an increase in expression of MHC class I and II for some cell lines. Moreover, the co-culture experiment indicated that the immunogenicity of a human adenocarcinoma cell line (LS 174T) was enhanced in vitro after irradiation with alpha rays. These preliminary data suggest that alpha particles could be of interest in raising an immune response associated to RIT. (authors)

  5. Giant serpentine intracranial aneurysm: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Seong; Lee, Myeong Sub; Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Dong Jin; Park, Joong Wha; Whang, Kum

    2001-01-01

    The authors present a case of giant serpentine aneurysm (a partially thrombosed aneurysm containing tortuous vascular channels with a separate entrance and outflow pathway). Giant serpentine aneurysms form a subgroup of giant intracranial aneurysms, distinct from saccular and fusiform varieties, and in this case, too, the clinical presentation and radiographic features of CT, MR imaging and angiography were distinct

  6. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and transverse sinus stenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyrman, Simon; Fytagoridis, Anders; Andresen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old woman was diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and bilateral transverse sinus stenoses (TSS), after presenting with papilledema and decreased visual acuity. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of >60 cm H2O. MRI showed bilateral TSS believed to be asso...

  7. Endovascular treatment of intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shubin; Liang Zhihui; Cui Jinguo; Tian Huiqin; Li Liang; Chen Feng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis. Methods: Ten patients with intracranial venous sinus thrombosis, confirmed by CT, MRI, MRV and / or DSA and encountered during the period of Aug. 2005-Aug. 2007, were treated with endovascular management after they failed to respond to anticoagulant therapy. Of ten patients, intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombus maceration were carried out in 6, while intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical thrombus maceration together with intra-arterial thrombolysis were employed in 4. After the treatment, the anticoagulant therapy continued for 6 months. The patients were followed up for 12-29 months (mean 21 months). Results: After the treatment, the clinical symptoms and signs were completely or partially relieved in eight patients, including disappearance of headache (n=6) and relive of headache (n=2). No obvious improvement was found in one patient and linguistic function disturbance was seen in the remaining one. Lumbar puncture showed that the cerebrospinal fluid pressure returned to normal in all patients. Neither recurrence of thrombosis nor new symptom of neuralgic dysfunction was observed. No procedure-related intracranial or systemic hemorrhagic complications occurred both during and after the operation. Conclusion: Endovascular treatment is an effective and safe procedure for the potentially catastrophic intracranial venous thrombosis. (authors)

  8. [Intracranial plasmocytomas: biology, diagnosis, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A I; Gol'bin, D A

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial plasmocytomas are a rare abnormality in a neurosurgeon's practice. The plasmocytomas may originate from the skull bones or soft tissue intracranial structures; they may be solitary or occur as a manifestation of multiple myeloma, this type being typical of most intracranial plasmocytomas. Progression of solitary plasmocytoma to multiple myeloma is observed in a number of cases. Preoperative diagnosis involves computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging; angiography is desirable. The final diagnosis of plasmocytoma is chiefly based on a morphological study. Special immunohistochemical studies yield very promising results; these are likely to be of high prognostic value. Intracranial plasmocytomas require a differential approach and a meticulous examination since the presence or absence of multiple myeloma radically affects prognosis. There are well-defined predictors; however, it is appropriate that craniobasal plasmocytomas show a worse prognosis than plasmocytomas of the skull vault and more commonly progress to multiple myeloma. Plasmocytomas respond to radiotherapy very well. The gold standard of treatment for plasmocytoma is its total removal and adjuvant radiation therapy; however, there is evidence for good results when it is partially removed and undergoes radiotherapy or after radical surgery without subsequent radiation. The role of chemotherapy has not been defined today.

  9. Genetics of intracranial aneurysms and related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, F.N.G.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IA) are dilatations of the vessel walls of cerebral arteries. Some can rupture and result in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a severe subtype of stroke. This thesis is set out to elucidate the pathophysiology of IA from a genetic perspective. The main conclusions are: 1.

  10. Computed tomography in intracranial malignant lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, S; Odake, G; Fujimoto, M; Yamaki, T; Mizukawa, N [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1978-09-01

    Malignant lymphoma of the central nervous system has been found more and more often in recent years, partly because of the increased use of radiation and such drugs as steroids and antibiotics. However, the definite diagnosis of this disease is difficult until histological verification has been done by operation or autopsy. Since the revolutionary development of computed tomography, however, several reports have been presented, on the computed tomography of malignant lymphoma of the thorax and abdomen. Nevertheless, only a few cases of intracranial malignant lymphoma have been reported. The purpose of this paper, using four patients, is to emphasize the value of computed tomography in the diagnosis of intracranial malignant lymphoma. The characteristic CT findings of intracranial malignant lymphoma may be summarized follows: (1) the tumors are demonstrated to be well-defined, nodular-shaped, and homogenous isodensity - or slightly high-density - lesions in plain scans, and the tumors homogenously increase in density upon contrast enhancement; (2) the disease always has multifocal intracranial lesions, which are shown simultaneously or one after another, and (3) perifocal edema is prominent around the tumors in the cerebral hemisphere.

  11. The 2016 WHO Classification of Tumours of the Urinary System and Male Genital Organs-Part A: Renal, Penile, and Testicular Tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Holger; Cubilla, Antonio L; Humphrey, Peter A; Reuter, Victor E; Ulbright, Thomas M

    2016-07-01

    The fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of urogenital tumours (WHO "blue book"), published in 2016, contains significant revisions. These revisions were performed after consideration by a large international group of pathologists with special expertise in this area. A subgroup of these persons met at the WHO Consensus Conference in Zurich, Switzerland, in 2015 to finalize the revisions. This review summarizes the most significant differences between the newly published classification and the prior version for renal, penile, and testicular tumours. Newly recognized epithelial renal tumours are hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) syndrome-associated RCC, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, tubulocystic RCC, acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, and clear cell papillary RCC. The WHO/International Society of Urological Pathology renal tumour grading system was recommended, and the definition of renal papillary adenoma was modified. The new WHO classification of penile squamous cell carcinomas is based on the presence of human papillomavirus and defines histologic subtypes accordingly. Germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) of the testis is the WHO-recommended term for precursor lesions of invasive germ cell tumours, and testicular germ cell tumours are now separated into two fundamentally different groups: those derived from GCNIS and those unrelated to GCNIS. Spermatocytic seminoma has been designated as a spermatocytic tumour and placed within the group of non-GCNIS-related tumours in the 2016 WHO classification. The 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification contains new renal tumour entities. The classification of penile squamous cell carcinomas is based on the presence of human papillomavirus. Germ cell neoplasia in situ of the testis is the WHO-recommended term for precursor lesions of invasive germ cell tumours. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  12. Image-based computational quantification and visualization of genetic alterations and tumour heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qing; Rüschoff, Jan H; Guo, Tiannan; Gabrani, Maria; Schüffler, Peter J; Rechsteiner, Markus; Liu, Yansheng; Fuchs, Thomas J; Rupp, Niels J; Fankhauser, Christian; Buhmann, Joachim M; Perner, Sven; Poyet, Cédric; Blattner, Miriam; Soldini, Davide; Moch, Holger; Rubin, Mark A; Noske, Aurelia; Rüschoff, Josef; Haffner, Michael C; Jochum, Wolfram; Wild, Peter J

    2016-04-07

    Recent large-scale genome analyses of human tissue samples have uncovered a high degree of genetic alterations and tumour heterogeneity in most tumour entities, independent of morphological phenotypes and histopathological characteristics. Assessment of genetic copy-number variation (CNV) and tumour heterogeneity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (ISH) provides additional tissue morphology at single-cell resolution, but it is labour intensive with limited throughput and high inter-observer variability. We present an integrative method combining bright-field dual-colour chromogenic and silver ISH assays with an image-based computational workflow (ISHProfiler), for accurate detection of molecular signals, high-throughput evaluation of CNV, expressive visualization of multi-level heterogeneity (cellular, inter- and intra-tumour heterogeneity), and objective quantification of heterogeneous genetic deletions (PTEN) and amplifications (19q12, HER2) in diverse human tumours (prostate, endometrial, ovarian and gastric), using various tissue sizes and different scanners, with unprecedented throughput and reproducibility.

  13. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severin, E S

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references

  14. Novel Application of Postmortem CT Angiography for Evaluation of the Intracranial Vascular Anatomy in Cadaver Heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Ruben P A; van der Zwan, Albert; Bleys, Ronald L A W; Regli, Luca; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Postmortem CT angiography is a common procedure used to visualize the entire human vasculature. For visualization of a specific organ's vascular anatomy, casting is the preferred method. Because of the permanent and damaging nature of casting, the organ cannot be further used as an experimental model after angiography. Therefore, there is a need for a minimally traumatic method to visualize organ-specific vascular anatomy. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a contrast enhancement technique that is capable of visualizing the intracranial vascular anatomy while preserving the anatomic integrity in cadaver heads. Seven human heads were used in this study. Heads were prepared by cannulating the vertebral and internal carotid arteries. Contrast agent was injected as a mixture of tap water, polyethylene glycol 600, and an iodinated contrast agent. Postmortem imaging was executed on a 64-MDCT scanner. Primary image review and 3D reconstruction were performed on a CT workstation. Clear visualization of the major cerebral arteries and smaller intracranial branches was achieved. Adequate visualization was obtained for both the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation. The minimally traumatic angiography method preserved the vascular integrity of the cadaver heads. A novel application of postmortem CT angiography is presented here. The technique can be used for radiologic evaluation of the intracranial circulation in cadaver heads. After CT angiography, the specimen can be used for further experimental or laboratory testing and teaching purposes.

  15. Adenoviral gene transfer of angiostatic ATF-BPTI inhibits tumour growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefesvre, Pierre; Attema, Joline; Bekkum, Dirk van

    2002-01-01

    The outgrowth of new vessels – angiogenesis – in the tumour mass is considered to be a limiting factor of tumour growth. To inhibit the matrix lysis that is part of the tumour angiogenesis, we employed the chimeric protein mhATF-BPTI, composed of the receptor binding part of the urokinase (ATF) linked to an inhibitor of plasmin (BPTI). For delivery, recombinant adenovirus encoding the transgene of interest was injected intravenously or locally into the tumour. The anti tumour effect of this compound was compared to that of human endostatin and of mhATF alone in two different rat bronchial carcinomas growing either as subcutaneous implants or as metastases. Significant inhibition of the tumour growth and decrease of the number of lung metastasis was achieved when the concentration of mhATF-BPTI at the tumour site was above 400 of ng / g tissue. This concentration could be achieved via production by the liver, only if permissive to the recombinant adenovirus. When the tumour cells could be transduced, local delivery of the vector was enough to obtain a response. In the case of metastasis, the capacity of the lung tissue to concentrate the encoded protein was essential to reach the required therapeutic levels. Further, endostatin or mhATF could not reproduce the effects of mhATF-BPTI, at similar concentrations (mhATF) and even at 10-fold higher concentration (endostatin). The ATF-BPTI was shown to inhibit tumour growth of different rat lung tumours when critical concentration was reached. In these tumour models, endostatin or ATF induce almost no tumour response

  16. Sodium hyaluronate enhances colorectal tumour cell metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Sodium hyaluronate has been used intraperitoneally to prevent postoperative adhesions. However, the effect of sodium hyaluronate on tumour growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. METHODS: Human colorectal tumour cell lines SW480, SW620 and SW707 were treated with sodium hyaluronate (10-500 microg\\/ml) and carboxymethylcellulose (0.125-1 per cent), and tumour cell proliferation and motility were determined in vitro. For the in vivo experiments male BD IX rats were randomized to a sodium hyaluronate group (n = 11; intraperitoneal administration of 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml 0.4 per cent sodium hyaluronate) or a phosphate-buffered saline group (n = 11; 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally). Four weeks later the intraperitoneal tumour load was visualized directly. RESULTS: In vitro sodium hyaluronate increased tumour cell proliferation and motility significantly. Sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell motility appeared to be CD44 receptor dependent, whereas sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell proliferation was CD44 receptor independent. In vivo there was a significantly higher total tumour nodule count in the peritoneal cavity of the sodium hyaluronate-treated group compared with the control (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Sodium hyaluronate enhances tumour metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that use of sodium hyaluronate to prevent adhesions in colorectal cancer surgery may also potentiate intraperitoneal tumour growth. Presented to the Patey Prize Session of the Surgical Research Society and the annual scientific meeting of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, Brighton, UK, 4-7 May 1999

  17. Human rheumatoid arthritis tissue production of IL-17A drives matrix and cartilage degradation: synergy with tumour necrosis factor-alpha, Oncostatin M and response to biologic therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Ellen M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to examine IL-17A in patients, following anti-TNF-alpha therapy and the effect of IL-17A on matrix turnover and cartilage degradation. METHODS: IL-17A expression was examined by ELISA and immunohistology in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints. RA whole synovial tissue explant (RA ST), primary synovial fibroblasts (RASFC), human cartilage and chondrocyte cultures were stimulated with IL-17A +\\/- TNF-alpha and Oncostatin M (OSM). Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitor (TIMP-1) were assessed by ELISA and zymography. Cartilage proteoglycan release was assessed histologically by Safranin-O staining. Clinical parameters, IL-17A, MMP\\/TIMP were assessed in patients pre\\/post biologic therapy. RESULTS: IL-17A levels were higher in RA vs osteoarthritis (OA)\\/normal joints (P < 0.05). IL-17A up-regulated MMP-1, -2, -9, and -13 in RA ST, RASFC, cartilage and chondrocyte cultures (P < 0.05). In combination with TNF-alpha and OSM, IL-17A shifted the MMP:TIMP-1 ratio in favor of matrix degradation (all P < 0.05). Cartilage proteoglycan depletion in response to IL-17A was mild; however, in combination with TNF-alpha or OSM showed almost complete proteoglycan depletion. Serum IL-17A was detected in 28% of patients commencing biologic therapy. IL-17A negative patients demonstrated reductions post therapy in serum MMP1\\/TIMP4, MMP3\\/TIMP1 and MMP3\\/TIMP4 ratios and an increase in CS846 (all P < 0.05). No significant changes were observed in IL-17A positive patients. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17A is produced locally in the inflamed RA joint. IL-17A promotes matrix turnover and cartilage destruction, especially in the presence of other cytokines, mimicking the joint environment. IL-17A levels are modulated in vivo, following anti-TNF therapy, and may reflect changes in matrix turnover.

  18. Monte Carlo dosimetry for synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudou, Caroline; Balosso, Jacques; Esteve, Francois; Elleaume, Helene

    2005-01-01

    A radiation dose enhancement can be obtained in brain tumours after infusion of an iodinated contrast agent and irradiation with kilovoltage x-rays in tomography mode. The aim of this study was to assess dosimetric properties of the synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy technique applied to humans (SSR) for preparing clinical trials. We designed an interface for dose computation based on a Monte Carlo code (MCNPX). A patient head was constructed from computed tomography (CT) data and a tumour volume was modelled. Dose distributions were calculated in SSR configuration for various energy beam and iodine content in the target volume. From the calculations, it appears that the iodine-filled target (10 mg ml -1 ) can be efficiently irradiated by a monochromatic beam of energy ranging from 50 to 85 keV. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of stereotactic radiotherapy for treating deep-seated brain tumours with monoenergetic x-rays from a synchrotron

  19. Molecular mimics of the tumour antigen MUC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharappel C James

    Full Text Available A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as "self", and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as 'proof of principle' we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1 from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides.

  20. Intra-operative 3-T MRI for paediatric brain tumours: challenges and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abernethy, L.J.; Avula, S.; Hughes, G.M.; Wright, E.J.; Mallucci, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    MRI is the ideal modality for imaging intracranial tumours. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) makes it possible to obtain scans during a neurosurgical operation that can aid complete macroscopic tumour resection - a major prognostic factor in the majority of brain tumours in children. Intra-operative MRI can also help limit damage to normal brain tissue. It therefore has the potential to improve the survival of children with brain tumours and to minimise morbidity, including neurological deficits. The use of ioMRI is also likely to reduce the need for second look surgery, and may reduce the need for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. High-field MRI systems provide better anatomical information and also enable effective utilisation of advanced MRI techniques such as perfusion imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. However, high-field ioMRI facilities require substantial capital investment, and careful planning is required for optimal benefit. Safe ioMRI requires meticulous attention to detail and rigorous application of magnetic field safety precautions. Interpretation of ioMRI can be challenging and requires experience and understanding of artefacts that are common in the intra-operative setting. (orig.)

  1. Tumour markers in gynaecological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adewole, I.F.

    1999-02-01

    Gynaecological cancers are fairly common in developing countries and represent about 26 % f all cancers. Application of cervical cytology screening nationally has made cervical cancer one of the most preventable malignant diseases thus eliminating the challenges of advanced cancer management. Tumour markers has played a most crucial role in this respect

  2. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caranci, F., E-mail: ferdinandocaranci@libero.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Briganti, F., E-mail: frabriga@unina.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M. [Neuroradiology service, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Service Cardarelli Hospital Naples (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  3. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caranci, F.; Briganti, F.; Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M.; Muto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  4. Tumour cell–derived extracellular vesicles interact with mesenchymal stem cells to modulate the microenvironment and enhance cholangiocarcinoma growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Haga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contributions of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to tumour growth and stroma formation are poorly understood. Tumour cells can transfer genetic information and modulate cell signalling in other cells through the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs. We examined the contribution of EV-mediated inter-cellular signalling between bone marrow MSCs and tumour cells in human cholangiocarcinoma, highly desmoplastic cancers that are characterized by tumour cells closely intertwined within a dense fibrous stroma. Exposure of MSCs to tumour cell–derived EVs enhanced MSC migratory capability and expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin mRNA, in addition to mRNA expression and release of CXCL-1, CCL2 and IL-6. Conditioned media from MSCs exposed to tumour cell–derived EVs increased STAT-3 phosphorylation and proliferation in tumour cells. These effects were completely blocked by anti-IL-6R antibody. In conclusion, tumour cell–derived EVs can contribute to the generation of tumour stroma through fibroblastic differentiation of MSCs, and can also selectively modulate the cellular release of soluble factors such as IL-6 by MSCs that can, in turn, alter tumour cell proliferation. Thus, malignant cells can “educate” MSCs to induce local microenvironmental changes that enhance tumour cell growth.

  5. Mohs micrographic surgery of rare cutaneous tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohil, S.C.; Lee, C.B. van; Beisenherz, J.; Mureau, M.A.M.; Overbeek, L.I.H.; Nijsten, T.; Bos, R.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrence rates after Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for rare cutaneous tumours are poorly defined. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the recurrence rate after MMS for rare cutaneous tumours at a university centre. METHODS & MATERIALS: Retrospective review of all rare cutaneous tumours treated

  6. Tumour gastrin expression and serum gastrin concentrations in dogs with gastric carcinoma are poor diagnostic indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seim-Wikse, T.; Kolbjørnsen, Ø.; Jörundsson, E.

    2014-01-01

    Hypergastrinaemia is observed commonly in human patients with gastric carcinoma and is associated with atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection, both of which predispose to development of gastric tumours. Increased expression of gastrin is also described as a prognostic indicator...

  7. Metastatic disease of the brain: extra-axial metastases (skull, dura, leptomeningeal) and tumour spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroldi, Roberto; Ambrosi, Claudia; Farina, Davide [University of Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia, BS (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    Extra-axial intracranial metastases may arise through several situations. Hematogenous spread to the meninges is the most frequent cause. Direct extension from contiguous extra-cranial neoplasms, secondary invasion of the meninges by calvarium and skull base metastases, and migration along perineural or perivascular structures are less common. Leptomeningeal invasion gives rise to tumour cell dissemination by the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), eventually leading to neoplastic coating of brain surfaces. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complementary to CSF examinations and can be invaluable, detecting up to 50% of false-negative lumbar punctures. MR findings range from diffuse linear leptomeningeal enhancement to multiple enhancing extra-axial nodules, obstructive communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus. Both calvarial and epidural metastases infrequently transgress the dura, which acts as a barrier against tumour spread. Radionuclide bone studies are still a valuable screening test to detect bone metastases. With computed tomography (CT) and MR, bone metastases extending intracranially and primary dural metastases show the characteristic biconvex shape, usually associated with brain displacement away from the inner table. Although CT is better in detecting skull base erosion, MR is more sensitive and provides more detailed information about dural involvement. Perineural and perivascular spread from head and neck neoplasms require thin-section contrast-enhanced MR. (orig.)

  8. Non-Invasive Electromagnetic Skin Patch Sensor to Measure Intracranial Fluid–Volume Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Griffith

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Elevated intracranial fluid volume can drive intracranial pressure increases, which can potentially result in numerous neurological complications or death. This study’s focus was to develop a passive skin patch sensor for the head that would non-invasively measure cranial fluid volume shifts. The sensor consists of a single baseline component configured into a rectangular planar spiral with a self-resonant frequency response when impinged upon by external radio frequency sweeps. Fluid volume changes (10 mL increments were detected through cranial bone using the sensor on a dry human skull model. Preliminary human tests utilized two sensors to determine feasibility of detecting fluid volume shifts in the complex environment of the human body. The correlation between fluid volume changes and shifts in the first resonance frequency using the dry human skull was classified as a second order polynomial with R2 = 0.97. During preliminary and secondary human tests, a ≈24 MHz and an average of ≈45.07 MHz shifts in the principal resonant frequency were measured respectively, corresponding to the induced cephalad bio-fluid shifts. This electromagnetic resonant sensor may provide a non-invasive method to monitor shifts in fluid volume and assist with medical scenarios including stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, concussion, or monitoring intracranial pressure.

  9. Total {sup 18}F-dopa PET tumour uptake reflects metabolic endocrine tumour activity in patients with a carcinoid tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiebrich, Helle-Brit; Walenkamp, Annemiek M.; Vries, Elisabeth G.E. de [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Medical Oncology, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Johan R. de; Koopmans, Klaas Pieter; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Brouwers, Adrienne H. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Kema, Ido P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Sluiter, Wim; Links, Thera P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Endocrinology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine ({sup 18}F-dopa) has an excellent sensitivity to detect carcinoid tumour lesions. {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake and the levels of biochemical tumour markers are mediated by tumour endocrine metabolic activity. We evaluated whether total {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake on PET, defined as whole-body metabolic tumour burden (WBMTB), reflects tumour load per patient, as measured with tumour markers. Seventy-seven consecutive carcinoid patients who underwent an {sup 18}F-dopa PET scan in two previously published studies were analysed. For all tumour lesions mean standardised uptake values (SUVs) at 40% of the maximal SUV and tumour volume on {sup 18}F-dopa PET were determined and multiplied to calculate a metabolic burden per lesion. WBMTB was the sum of the metabolic burden of all individual lesions per patient. The 24-h urinary serotonin, urine and plasma 5-hydroxindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), catecholamines (nor)epinephrine, dopamine and their metabolites, measured in urine and plasma, and serum chromogranin A served as tumour markers. All but 1 were evaluable for WBMTB; 74 patients had metastatic disease. {sup 18}F-dopa PET detected 979 lesions. SUV{sub max} on {sup 18}F-dopa PET varied up to 29-fold between individual lesions within the same patients. WBMTB correlated with urinary serotonin (r = 0.51) and urinary and plasma 5-HIAA (r = 0.78 and 0.66). WBMTB also correlated with urinary norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and plasma dopamine, but not with serum chromogranin A. Tumour load per patient measured with {sup 18}F-dopa PET correlates with tumour markers of the serotonin and catecholamine pathway in urine and plasma in carcinoid patients, reflecting metabolic tumour activity. (orig.)

  10. Tumours of the fetal body: a review

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    Avni, Fred E.; Massez, Anne; Cassart, Marie [University Clinics of Brussels - Erasme Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-11-15

    Tumours of the fetal body are rare, but lesions have been reported in all spaces, especially in the mediastinum, the pericardial space, the adrenals, the kidney, and the liver. Lymphangioma and teratoma are the commonest histological types encountered, followed by cardiac rhabdomyoma. Adrenal neuroblastoma is the commonest malignant tumour. Imaging plays an essential role in the detection and work-up of these tumours. In addition to assisting clinicians it also helps in counselling parents. Most tumours are detected by antenatal US, but fetal MRI is increasingly used as it brings significant additional information in terms of tumour extent, composition and complications. (orig.)

  11. ROLE OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY IN INTRACRANIAL LESIONS- A STUDY OF 75 CASES

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    Rajendra N. Solank

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Our study have shown the role of MR spectroscopy in lesions whenever results are equivocal or non-conclusive even on MRI. MR spectroscopy can differentiate the lesions, particularly intracranial lesions on the basis of various metabolites. The aims of this study is to diagnose the intracranial lesions and to show the advantage of MR spectroscopy over the conventional MRI, to differentiate the neoplastic from non-neoplastic lesion, to prove the reliability of MR spectroscopy in identifying the different grades of glioma with histopathological correlation as well as to differentiate recurrent tumour from post-operative changes or radiation necrosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS During the period of August 2009 to July 2011, a prospective study of 75 patients was carried out at Department of Radiodiagnosis, Civil Hospital and BJ Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat. MRI was performed on 1.5 Tesla MR scanner (GE HDXT using dedicated head coil. Conventional MR imaging was performed followed by MR spectroscopy using point resolved spectroscopy. After deciding the region of interest voxel was kept and 2D multivoxel proton spectroscopy (TR- 1000 msec, TE- 144 msec, voxel size 20 x 20 mm or single voxel proton spectroscopy (TR- 1500 msec, TE- 35 msec, voxel size 20 x 20 mm was performed and spectra obtained. RESULTS In the present study of 75 patients, the maximum number of patients were between 31 to 50 years of age. The approximate ratio of male: female was 2: 1. In our study sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value of MRI are 89%, 87%, 87% and 89% respectively and of MRI + MRS are 100%, 97%, 97% and 100% respectively in tumours. CONCLUSION MRS (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is a non-invasive imaging technique that studies the chemical activity in the brain and detects the presence of certain chemical substances. Through this imaging technique, images and graphs of the brain can be obtained.

  12. Computed tomographic findings of intracranial pyogenic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. J.; Suh, J. H.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, K. C.; Chung, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The early diagnosis and effective treatment of brain abscess pose a difficult clinical problem. With the advent of computed tomography, however, it appears that mortality due to intracranial abscess has significantly diminished. 54 cases of intracranial pyogenic abscess are presented. Etiologic factors and computed tomographic findings are analyzed and following result are obtained. 1. The common etiologic factors are otitis media, post operation, and head trauma, in order of frequency. 2. The most common initial computed tomographic findings of brain abscess is ring contrast enhancement with surrounding brain edema. 3. The most characteristic computed tomographic finding of ring contrast enhancement is smooth thin walled ring contrast enhancement. 4. Most of thick irregular ring contrast enhancement are abscess associated with cyanotic heart disease or poor operation. 5. The most common findings of epidural and subdural empyema is crescentic radiolucent area with thin wall contrast enhancement without surrounding brain edema in convexity of brain

  13. Intracranial neurenteric cyst traversing the brainstem

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    Jasmit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurenteric cysts (NECs, also called enterogenous cysts, are rare benign endodermal lesions of the central nervous system that probably result from separation failure of the notochord and upper gastrointestinal tract. Most frequently they are found in the lower cervical spine or the upper thoracic spine. Intracranial occurrence is rare and mostly confined to infratentorial compartment, in prepontine region [51%]. Other common locations are fourth ventricle and cerebellopontine angle. There are few reports of NEC in medulla or the cerebellum. Because of the rarity of the disease and common radiological findings, they are misinterpreted as arachnoid or simple cysts until the histopathological confirmation, unless suspected preoperatively. We herein report a rare yet interesting case of intracranial NEC traversing across the brainstem.

  14. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies.

  15. Prognostic factors in childhood intracranial neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampil, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of primary intracranial neoplasm in children (over 1 year but under 13 years of age) seen at the university medical center between 1951 and 1982 were reviewed because of concern as to the results and after-effects of applied therapy. The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 17 %. Several factors of possible prognostic relevance, such as patient's age, intracranial location of the tumor, application or nonapplication of therapy, single or multiple modes of therapy, and extent of surgery, were analyzed. Completeness of surgical removal of the tumor proved to be the only statistically significant factor that correlated with survival. There was only one recorded case of severe learning disability and abnormal neuropsychologic development among the 12 living patients. The influence of patient's age (and technical factors) at the time of irradiation in correlation with the child's subsequent posttreatment functional performance, as reported in the literature, is reviewed. (author)

  16. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemine, Hisao

    1983-01-01

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  17. A case series discussing the anaesthetic management of pregnant patients with brain tumours [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2hn

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    Alaa A Abd-Elsayed

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy may aggravate the natural history of an intracranial tumour, and may even unmask a previously unknown diagnosis. Here we present a series of seven patients who had brain tumours during pregnancy. The aim of this case series is to characterize the current perioperative management and to suggest evidence based guidelines for the anaesthetic management of pregnant females with brain tumours. This is a retrospective study. Information on pregnant patients diagnosed with brain tumours that underwent caesarean section (CS and/or brain tumour resection from May 2003 through June 2008 was obtained from the Department of General Anaesthesia and the Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumour & Neuro-Oncology Centre (BBTC at the Cleveland Clinic, OH, USA. The mean age was 34.5 years (range 29-40 years old. Six patients had glioma, two of whom had concomitant craniotomy and CS. Six cases had the tumour in the frontal lobe. Four cases were operated on under general anaesthesia and three underwent awake craniotomy. The neonatal outcomes of the six patients with elective or emergent delivery were six viable infants with normal Apgar scores. Pregnancy was terminated in the 7th patient. In conclusion, good knowledge of the variable anesthetic agents and their effects on the fetus is very important in managing those patients.

  18. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

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    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor.

  19. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  20. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

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    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.