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Sample records for human intracranial recordings

  1. Time reversibility of intracranial human EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heyden, M. J.; Diks, C.; Pijn, J. P. M.; Velis, D. N.

    1996-02-01

    Intracranial electroencephalograms from patients suffering from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy were tested for time reversibility. If the recorded time series is irreversible, the input of the recording system cannot be a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. We confirmed experimentally that the measurement equipment did not introduce irreversibility in the recorded output when the input was a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. In general, the non-seizure recordings are reversible, whereas the seizure recordings are irreversible. These results suggest that time reversibility is a useful property for the characterisation of human intracranial EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  2. Human occipital cortices differentially exert saccadic suppression: intracranial recording in children

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    Uematsu, Mitsugu; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Brown, Erik C.; Kojima, Katsuaki; Asano, Eishi

    2013-01-01

    By repeating saccades unconsciously, humans explore the surrounding world every day. Saccades inevitably move external visual images across the retina at high velocity; nonetheless, healthy humans don’t perceive transient blurring of the visual scene during saccades. This perceptual stability is referred to as saccadic suppression. Functional suppression is believed to take place transiently in the visual systems, but it remains unknown how commonly or differentially the human occipital lobe activities are suppressed at the large-scale cortical network level. We determined the spatial-temporal dynamics of intracranially-recorded gamma activity at 80–150 Hz around spontaneous saccades under no-task conditions during wakefulness and those in darkness during REM sleep. Regardless of wakefulness or REM sleep, a small degree of attenuation of gamma activity was noted in the occipital regions during saccades, most extensively in the polar and least in the medial portions. Longer saccades were associated with more intense gamma-attenuation. Gamma-attenuation was subsequently followed by gamma-augmentation most extensively involving the medial and least involving the polar occipital region. Such gamma-augmentation was more intense during wakefulness and temporally locked to the offset of saccades. The polarities of initial peaks of perisaccadic event-related potentials (ERPs) were frequently positive in the medial and negative in the polar occipital regions. The present study, for the first time, provided the electrophysiological evidence that human occipital cortices differentially exert peri-saccadic modulation. Transiently suppressed sensitivity of the primary visual cortex in the polar region may be an important neural basis for saccadic suppression. Presence of occipital gamma-attenuation even during REM sleep suggests that saccadic suppression might be exerted even without external visual inputs. The primary visual cortex in the medial region, compared to the

  3. Human intracranial recordings link suppressed transients rather than 'filling-in' to perceptual continuity across blinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Tal; Davidesco, Ido; Meshulam, Meir; Groppe, David M; Mégevand, Pierre; Yeagle, Erin M; Goldfinger, Matthew S; Harel, Michal; Melloni, Lucia; Schroeder, Charles E; Deouell, Leon Y; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2016-09-29

    We hardly notice our eye blinks, yet an externally generated retinal interruption of a similar duration is perceptually salient. We examined the neural correlates of this perceptual distinction using intracranially measured ECoG signals from the human visual cortex in 14 patients. In early visual areas (V1 and V2), the disappearance of the stimulus due to either invisible blinks or salient blank video frames ('gaps') led to a similar drop in activity level, followed by a positive overshoot beyond baseline, triggered by stimulus reappearance. Ascending the visual hierarchy, the reappearance-related overshoot gradually subsided for blinks but not for gaps. By contrast, the disappearance-related drop did not follow the perceptual distinction - it was actually slightly more pronounced for blinks than for gaps. These findings suggest that blinks' limited visibility compared with gaps is correlated with suppression of blink-related visual activity transients, rather than with "filling-in" of the occluded content during blinks.

  4. Mapping face categorization in the human ventral occipitotemporal cortex with direct neural intracranial recordings.

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    Rossion, Bruno; Jacques, Corentin; Jonas, Jacques

    2018-02-26

    The neural basis of face categorization has been widely investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), identifying a set of face-selective local regions in the ventral occipitotemporal cortex (VOTC). However, indirect recording of neural activity with fMRI is associated with large fluctuations of signal across regions, often underestimating face-selective responses in the anterior VOTC. While direct recording of neural activity with subdural grids of electrodes (electrocorticography, ECoG) or depth electrodes (stereotactic electroencephalography, SEEG) offers a unique opportunity to fill this gap in knowledge, these studies rather reveal widely distributed face-selective responses. Moreover, intracranial recordings are complicated by interindividual variability in neuroanatomy, ambiguity in definition, and quantification of responses of interest, as well as limited access to sulci with ECoG. Here, we propose to combine SEEG in large samples of individuals with fast periodic visual stimulation to objectively define, quantify, and characterize face categorization across the whole VOTC. This approach reconciles the wide distribution of neural face categorization responses with their (right) hemispheric and regional specialization, and reveals several face-selective regions in anterior VOTC sulci. We outline the challenges of this research program to understand the neural basis of face categorization and high-level visual recognition in general. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Temporal Dissociation of Neocortical and Hippocampal Contributions to Mental Time Travel Using Intracranial Recordings in Humans.

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    Schurr, Roey; Nitzan, Mor; Eliahou, Ruth; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Blanke, Olaf; Arzy, Shahar

    2018-01-01

    In mental time travel (MTT) one is "traveling" back-and-forth in time, remembering, and imagining events. Despite intensive research regarding memory processes in the hippocampus, it was only recently shown that the hippocampus plays an essential role in encoding the temporal order of events remembered, and therefore plays an important role in MTT. Does it also encode the temporal relations of these events to the remembering self? We asked patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation with depth electrodes penetrating the temporal lobes bilaterally toward the hippocampus to project themselves in time to a past, future, or present time-point, and then make judgments regarding various events. Classification analysis of intracranial evoked potentials revealed clear temporal dissociation in the left hemisphere between lateral-temporal electrodes, activated at ~100-300 ms, and hippocampal electrodes, activated at ~400-600 ms. This dissociation may suggest a division of labor in the temporal lobe during self-projection in time, hinting toward the different roles of the lateral-temporal cortex and the hippocampus in MTT and the temporal organization of the related events with respect to the experiencing self.

  6. Temporal Dissociation of Neocortical and Hippocampal Contributions to Mental Time Travel Using Intracranial Recordings in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roey Schurr

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In mental time travel (MTT one is “traveling” back-and-forth in time, remembering, and imagining events. Despite intensive research regarding memory processes in the hippocampus, it was only recently shown that the hippocampus plays an essential role in encoding the temporal order of events remembered, and therefore plays an important role in MTT. Does it also encode the temporal relations of these events to the remembering self? We asked patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation with depth electrodes penetrating the temporal lobes bilaterally toward the hippocampus to project themselves in time to a past, future, or present time-point, and then make judgments regarding various events. Classification analysis of intracranial evoked potentials revealed clear temporal dissociation in the left hemisphere between lateral-temporal electrodes, activated at ~100–300 ms, and hippocampal electrodes, activated at ~400–600 ms. This dissociation may suggest a division of labor in the temporal lobe during self-projection in time, hinting toward the different roles of the lateral-temporal cortex and the hippocampus in MTT and the temporal organization of the related events with respect to the experiencing self.

  7. Decoding face information in time, frequency and space from direct intracranial recordings of the human brain.

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    Naotsugu Tsuchiya

    Full Text Available Faces are processed by a neural system with distributed anatomical components, but the roles of these components remain unclear. A dominant theory of face perception postulates independent representations of invariant aspects of faces (e.g., identity in ventral temporal cortex including the fusiform gyrus, and changeable aspects of faces (e.g., emotion in lateral temporal cortex including the superior temporal sulcus. Here we recorded neuronal activity directly from the cortical surface in 9 neurosurgical subjects undergoing epilepsy monitoring while they viewed static and dynamic facial expressions. Applying novel decoding analyses to the power spectrogram of electrocorticograms (ECoG from over 100 contacts in ventral and lateral temporal cortex, we found better representation of both invariant and changeable aspects of faces in ventral than lateral temporal cortex. Critical information for discriminating faces from geometric patterns was carried by power modulations between 50 to 150 Hz. For both static and dynamic face stimuli, we obtained a higher decoding performance in ventral than lateral temporal cortex. For discriminating fearful from happy expressions, critical information was carried by power modulation between 60-150 Hz and below 30 Hz, and again better decoded in ventral than lateral temporal cortex. Task-relevant attention improved decoding accuracy more than 10% across a wide frequency range in ventral but not at all in lateral temporal cortex. Spatial searchlight decoding showed that decoding performance was highest around the middle fusiform gyrus. Finally, we found that the right hemisphere, in general, showed superior decoding to the left hemisphere. Taken together, our results challenge the dominant model for independent face representation of invariant and changeable aspects: information about both face attributes was better decoded from a single region in the middle fusiform gyrus.

  8. S6-5: Visual Consciousness Tracked with Direct Intracranial Recording from Early and High-Level Visual Cortices in Humans and Monkeys

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    Naotsugu Tsuchiya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Key insights about the neuronal correlates of consciousness have been gained by electrophysiological recording of single neurons from a particular area or by recording of indirect fMRI signals from the whole brain. However, if rapid interaction among neuronal populations in distant cortical areas is essential for consciousness, other methods such as intracranial electrocorticogram (ECoG that can attain both requirements are necessary. Here we report the results of ECoG experiments in three epilepsy patients and one monkey. We used Continuous Flash Suppression to investigate the neuronal activity when ‘invisible’ stimuli broke interocular suppression. We found that widespread activity in the visual cortex preceded up to 1–2 s before subjective reports of detection and that alpha-band activity in the visual cortex induced by the initial flashes predicted how long the suppression was going to last. We will discuss implication of these findings for the neuronal dynamics associated with consciousness.

  9. Extended seizure detection algorithm for intracranial EEG recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, T. W.; Remvig, L. S.; Henriksen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We implemented and tested an existing seizure detection algorithm for scalp EEG (sEEG) with the purpose of improving it to intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings. Method: iEEG was obtained from 16 patients with focal epilepsy undergoing work up for resective epilepsy surgery. Each patient...... had 4 or 5 recorded seizures and 24 hours of non-ictal data were used for evaluation. Data from three electrodes placed at the ictal focus were used for the analysis. A wavelet based feature extraction algorithm delivered input to a support vector machine (SVM) classifier for distinction between ictal...... and non-ictal iEEG. We compare our results to a method published by Shoeb in 2004. While the original method on sEEG was optimal with the use of only four subbands in the wavelet analysis, we found that better seizure detection could be made if all subbands were used for iEEG. Results: When using...

  10. Intra-cranial recordings of brain activity during language production

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    Anais eLlorens

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings in the neurophysiology of language production have provided a detailed description of the brain network underlying this behavior, as well as some indications about the timing of operations. Despite their invaluable utility, these data generally suffer from limitations either in terms of temporal resolution, or in terms of spatial localization. In addition, studying the neural basis of speech is complicated by the presence of articulation artifacts such as electro-myographic activity that interferes with the neural signal. These difficulties are virtually absent in a powerful albeit much less frequent methodology, namely the recording of intra-cranial brain activity (iEEG. Such recordings are only possible under very specific clinical circumstances requiring functional mapping before brain surgery, most notably patients that suffer for pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Here we review the research conducted with this methodology in the field of language production, with explicit consideration of its advantages and drawbacks. The available evidence is shown to be diverse, both in terms of the tasks and cognitive processes tested and in terms of the brain localizations being studied. Still, the review provides valuable information for characterizing the dynamics of the neural events occurring in the language production network. Following modality specific activities (in auditory or visual cortices, there is a convergence of activity in superior temporal sulcus, which is a plausible neural correlate of phonological encoding processes. Later, between 500 and 800 ms, inferior frontal gyrus (around Broca's area is involved. Peri-rolandic areas are recruited in the two modalities relatively early (200-500 ms window, suggesting a very early involvement of (pre- motor processes. We discuss how some of these findings may be at odds with conclusions drawn from available meta-analysis of language production.

  11. Feasibility of Seizure Prediction from intracranial EEG Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas; Kjær, Troels; Thomsen, Carsten E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The current project evaluated the feasibility of providing an algorithm that could warn a patient of a forthcoming seizure based on iEEG recordings. Method: The mean phase coherence (MPC) feature (Mormann F et al. Phys Nonlinear Phenom 2000;3-4:358-369.) was implemented and tested...... in a rigorously, out-of-sample manner. The MPC-feature is based on the synchronization measure, explained through the analytic signal approach where the Hilbert transform is used to find the instantaneous phase of an arbitrary signal. By a relative comparison between two different iEEG channels the phase...

  12. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Hieab HH; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Renter��a, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivi��res, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjus...

  13. Medial frontal cortex and response conflict: Evidence from human intracranial EEG and medial frontal cortex lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.X.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Haupt, S.; Elger, C.E.; Fell, J.

    2008-01-01

    The medial frontal cortex (MFC) has been implicated in the monitoring and selection of actions in the face of competing alternatives, but much remains unknown about its functional properties, including electrophysiological oscillations, during response conflict tasks. Here, we recorded intracranial

  14. Detection of High Frequency Oscillations by Hybrid Depth Electrodes in Standard Clinical Intracranial EEG Recordings

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    Efstathios D Kondylis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillations (HFOs have been proposed as a novel marker for epileptogenic tissue, spurring tremendous research interest into the characterization of these transient events. A wealth of continuously recorded intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG data is currently available from patients undergoing invasive monitoring for the surgical treatment of epilepsy. In contrast to data recorded on research-customized recording systems, data from clinical acquisition systems remain an underutilized resource for HFO detection in most centers. The effective and reliable use of this clinically obtained data would be an important advance in the ongoing study of HFOs and their relationship to ictogenesis. The diagnostic utility of HFOs ultimately will be limited by the ability of clinicians to detect these brief, sporadic, and low amplitude events in an electrically noisy clinical environment. Indeed, one of the most significant factors limiting the use of such clinical recordings for research purposes is their low signal to noise ratio, especially in the higher frequency bands. In order to investigate the presence of HFOs in clinical data, we first obtained continuous intracranial recordings in a typical clinical environment using a commercially available, commonly utilized data acquisition system and off the shelf hybrid macro/micro depth electrodes. This data was then inspected for the presence of HFOs using semi-automated methods and expert manual review. With targeted removal of noise frequency content, HFOs were detected on both macro- and micro-contacts, and preferentially localized to seizure onset zones. HFOs detected by the offline, semi-automated method were also validated in the clinical viewer, demonstrating that 1 this clinical system allows for the visualization of HFOs, and 2 with effective signal processing, clinical recordings can yield valuable information for offline analysis.

  15. iELVis: An open source MATLAB toolbox for localizing and visualizing human intracranial electrode data.

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    Groppe, David M; Bickel, Stephan; Dykstra, Andrew R; Wang, Xiuyuan; Mégevand, Pierre; Mercier, Manuel R; Lado, Fred A; Mehta, Ashesh D; Honey, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Intracranial electrical recordings (iEEG) and brain stimulation (iEBS) are invaluable human neuroscience methodologies. However, the value of such data is often unrealized as many laboratories lack tools for localizing electrodes relative to anatomy. To remedy this, we have developed a MATLAB toolbox for intracranial electrode localization and visualization, iELVis. NEW METHOD: iELVis uses existing tools (BioImage Suite, FSL, and FreeSurfer) for preimplant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) segmentation, neuroimaging coregistration, and manual identification of electrodes in postimplant neuroimaging. Subsequently, iELVis implements methods for correcting electrode locations for postimplant brain shift with millimeter-scale accuracy and provides interactive visualization on 3D surfaces or in 2D slices with optional functional neuroimaging overlays. iELVis also localizes electrodes relative to FreeSurfer-based atlases and can combine data across subjects via the FreeSurfer average brain. It takes 30-60min of user time and 12-24h of computer time to localize and visualize electrodes from one brain. We demonstrate iELVis's functionality by showing that three methods for mapping primary hand somatosensory cortex (iEEG, iEBS, and functional MRI) provide highly concordant results. COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHODS: iELVis is the first public software for electrode localization that corrects for brain shift, maps electrodes to an average brain, and supports neuroimaging overlays. Moreover, its interactive visualizations are powerful and its tutorial material is extensive. iELVis promises to speed the progress and enhance the robustness of intracranial electrode research. The software and extensive tutorial materials are freely available as part of the EpiSurg software project: https://github.com/episurg/episurg. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracranial EEG fluctuates over months after implanting electrodes in human brain

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    Ung, Hoameng; Baldassano, Steven N.; Bink, Hank; Krieger, Abba M.; Williams, Shawniqua; Vitale, Flavia; Wu, Chengyuan; Freestone, Dean; Nurse, Ewan; Leyde, Kent; Davis, Kathryn A.; Cook, Mark; Litt, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Implanting subdural and penetrating electrodes in the brain causes acute trauma and inflammation that affect intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) recordings. This behavior and its potential impact on clinical decision-making and algorithms for implanted devices have not been assessed in detail. In this study we aim to characterize the temporal and spatial variability of continuous, prolonged human iEEG recordings. Approach. Intracranial electroencephalography from 15 patients with drug-refractory epilepsy, each implanted with 16 subdural electrodes and continuously monitored for an average of 18 months, was included in this study. Time and spectral domain features were computed each day for each channel for the duration of each patient’s recording. Metrics to capture post-implantation feature changes and inflexion points were computed on group and individual levels. A linear mixed model was used to characterize transient group-level changes in feature values post-implantation and independent linear models were used to describe individual variability. Main results. A significant decline in features important to seizure detection and prediction algorithms (mean line length, energy, and half-wave), as well as mean power in the Berger and high gamma bands, was observed in many patients over 100 d following implantation. In addition, spatial variability across electrodes declines post-implantation following a similar timeframe. All selected features decreased by 14-50% in the initial 75 d of recording on the group level, and at least one feature demonstrated this pattern in 13 of the 15 patients. Our findings indicate that iEEG signal features demonstrate increased variability following implantation, most notably in the weeks immediately post-implant. Significance. These findings suggest that conclusions drawn from iEEG, both clinically and for research, should account for spatiotemporal signal variability and that properly assessing the iEEG in

  17. Detection of Interictal Epileptiform Discharges Using Signal Envelope Distribution Modelling: Application to Epileptic and Non-Epileptic Intracranial Recordings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janča, R.; Ježdík, P.; Čmejla, R.; Tomášek, M.; Worrell, G. A.; Stead, M.; Wagenaar, J.; Jefferys, J. G. R.; Kršek, P.; Komárek, V.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Marusič, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2015), s. 172-183 ISSN 0896-0267 Grant - others:GA Mzd(CZ) NT11460 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : spike detection * interictal epileptiform discharges * intracranial recording * automatic detection * Hilbert transform * principal component analysis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.727, year: 2015

  18. Utilization of independent component analysis for accurate pathological ripple detection in intracranial EEG recordings recorded extra- and intra-operatively.

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    Shimamoto, Shoichi; Waldman, Zachary J; Orosz, Iren; Song, Inkyung; Bragin, Anatol; Fried, Itzhak; Engel, Jerome; Staba, Richard; Sharan, Ashwini; Wu, Chengyuan; Sperling, Michael R; Weiss, Shennan A

    2018-01-01

    To develop and validate a detector that identifies ripple (80-200 Hz) events in intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings in a referential montage and utilizes independent component analysis (ICA) to eliminate or reduce high-frequency artifact contamination. Also, investigate the correspondence of detected ripples and the seizure onset zone (SOZ). iEEG recordings from 16 patients were first band-pass filtered (80-600 Hz) and Infomax ICA was next applied to derive the first independent component (IC1). IC1 was subsequently pruned, and an artifact index was derived to reduce the identification of high-frequency events introduced by the reference electrode signal. A Hilbert detector identified ripple events in the processed iEEG recordings using amplitude and duration criteria. The identified ripple events were further classified and characterized as true or false ripple on spikes, or ripples on oscillations by utilizing a topographical analysis to their time-frequency plot, and confirmed by visual inspection. The signal to noise ratio was improved by pruning IC1. The precision of the detector for ripple events was 91.27 ± 4.3%, and the sensitivity of the detector was 79.4 ± 3.0% (N = 16 patients, 5842 ripple events). The sensitivity and precision of the detector was equivalent in iEEG recordings obtained during sleep or intra-operatively. Across all the patients, true ripple on spike rates and also the rates of false ripple on spikes, that were generated due to filter ringing, classified the seizure onset zone (SOZ) with an area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC) of >76%. The magnitude and spectral content of true ripple on spikes generated in the SOZ was distinct as compared with the ripples generated in the NSOZ (p ripple rates and properties defined using this approach may accurately delineate the seizure onset zone. Strategies to improve the spatial resolution of intracranial EEG and reduce artifact can help improve the clinical utility of

  19. Automatic bad channel detection in intracranial electroencephalographic recordings using ensemble machine learning.

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    Tuyisenge, Viateur; Trebaul, Lena; Bhattacharjee, Manik; Chanteloup-Forêt, Blandine; Saubat-Guigui, Carole; Mîndruţă, Ioana; Rheims, Sylvain; Maillard, Louis; Kahane, Philippe; Taussig, Delphine; David, Olivier

    2018-03-01

    Intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) recordings contain "bad channels", which show non-neuronal signals. Here, we developed a new method that automatically detects iEEG bad channels using machine learning of seven signal features. The features quantified signals' variance, spatial-temporal correlation and nonlinear properties. Because the number of bad channels is usually much lower than the number of good channels, we implemented an ensemble bagging classifier known to be optimal in terms of stability and predictive accuracy for datasets with imbalanced class distributions. This method was applied on stereo-electroencephalographic (SEEG) signals recording during low frequency stimulations performed in 206 patients from 5 clinical centers. We found that the classification accuracy was extremely good: It increased with the number of subjects used to train the classifier and reached a plateau at 99.77% for 110 subjects. The classification performance was thus not impacted by the multicentric nature of data. The proposed method to automatically detect bad channels demonstrated convincing results and can be envisaged to be used on larger datasets for automatic quality control of iEEG data. This is the first method proposed to classify bad channels in iEEG and should allow to improve the data selection when reviewing iEEG signals. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Hieab HH; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura ME; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher RK; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David CM; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein MJ; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo GM; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco JC; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald HH; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, WT; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schofield, Peter R; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Srikanth, Velandai; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Tiemeier, Henning; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van der Brug, Marcel; Van der Lugt, Aad; Van der Wee, Nic JA; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Haren, Neeltje EM; Van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Veltman, Dick J; Vernooij, Meike W; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, H Ronald; Zonderman, Alan B; Deary, Ian J; DeCarli, Charles; Schmidt, Helena; Martin, Nicholas G; De Craen, Anton JM; Wright, Margaret J; Launer, Lenore J; Schumann, Gunter; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Barbara; Debette, Stéphanie; Medland, Sarah E; Ikram, M Arfan; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five novel loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci are also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (ρgenetic=0.748), which indicated a similar genetic background and allowed for the identification of four additional loci through meta-analysis (Ncombined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, Parkinson’s disease, and enriched near genes involved in growth pathways including PI3K–AKT signaling. These findings identify biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and provide genetic support for theories on brain reserve and brain overgrowth. PMID:27694991

  1. Preictal dynamics of EEG complexity in intracranially recorded epileptic seizure: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob, Petr; Roman, Robert; Svetlak, Miroslav; Kukleta, Miloslav; Chladek, Jan; Brazdil, Milan

    2014-11-01

    Recent findings suggest that neural complexity reflecting a number of independent processes in the brain may characterize typical changes during epileptic seizures and may enable to describe preictal dynamics. With respect to previously reported findings suggesting specific changes in neural complexity during preictal period, we have used measure of pointwise correlation dimension (PD2) as a sensitive indicator of nonstationary changes in complexity of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Although this measure of complexity in epileptic patients was previously reported by Feucht et al (Applications of correlation dimension and pointwise dimension for non-linear topographical analysis of focal onset seizures. Med Biol Comput. 1999;37:208-217), it was not used to study changes in preictal dynamics. With this aim to study preictal changes of EEG complexity, we have examined signals from 11 multicontact depth (intracerebral) EEG electrodes located in 108 cortical and subcortical brain sites, and from 3 scalp EEG electrodes in a patient with intractable epilepsy, who underwent preoperative evaluation before epilepsy surgery. From those 108 EEG contacts, records related to 44 electrode contacts implanted into lesional structures and white matter were not included into the experimental analysis.The results show that in comparison to interictal period (at about 8-6 minutes before seizure onset), there was a statistically significant decrease in PD2 complexity in the preictal period at about 2 minutes before seizure onset in all 64 intracranial channels localized in various brain sites that were included into the analysis and in 3 scalp EEG channels as well. Presented results suggest that using PD2 in EEG analysis may have significant implications for research of preictal dynamics and prediction of epileptic seizures.

  2. Outcome of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery evaluated with bitemporal intracranial electrode recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot-Tarrús, Andreu; Steven, David A; McLachlan, Richard S; Mirsattari, Seyed M; Diosy, David; Parrent, Andrew G; Blume, Warren T; Girvin, John P; Burneo, Jorge G

    2016-11-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with unclear lateralization may require intracranial implantation of electrodes (IIE). We retrospectively assessed the association between the use of IIE and long-term outcomes in patients undergoing anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1,032 patients undergoing epilepsy surgery at our center from 1977 to 2006. Patients who underwent ATL were included. Seizure outcome was assessed through final follow-up. Those who underwent scalp and IIE (mostly evaluated with temporal subdural strip electrodes) were compared. From 497 patients who underwent ATL, 139 did so after IIE placement in the temporal lobes. Mean age at surgery was 32.3±12.3years and median duration of follow-up 24 months (range: 6-36). Fifty-three percent of those evaluated with IIE were seizure-free at their last available visit (vs. 68% evaluated with only scalp EEG, p=0.002). Patients with lesional TLE generally had a better outcome (65.5% seizure free) than those without lesions (56.3%, p=0.093), especially for unilateral TLE diagnosed with IIE. In a multivariate Cox regression analyses adjusted for gender, neuropsychological concordance, pathological findings, and post-operative seizures, bilateral TLE predicted seizure recurrence in IIE patients (HR=2.08, 95% CI: 1.08-4.0, p=0.029). More than a half of those who undergo IIE in suspected TLE are seizure free after ATL. IIE allows for the identification of surgical candidates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Intracranial hemorrhage and other symptoms in infants associated with human parechovirus in Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Herbert; Prammer, Ruth; Bock, Wolfgang; Ollerieth, Robert; Bernert, Günther; Zwiauer, Karl; Aberle, Judith H; Aberle, Stephan W; Fazekas, Tamas; Holter, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The human parechovirus (HPeV), mainly genotype 3, may cause severe illness in young infants and neonates, including sepsis-like illness and central nervous system (CNS) infection. We lack data concerning the impact and symptoms of HPeV infection in infants in Austria. The aim of the study is to evaluate the spectrum of symptoms and findings in infants with the parechovirus in Vienna and its environs. Patients younger than 3 months of age, with clinically suspected sepsis-like illness or CNS infection and a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HPeV, were included in the study. Medical records were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty patients were included in the study from 2009 to 2013. The most frequent manifestations were fever and neurological symptoms (89 and 80 %, respectively). Fifty percent of the infants had white blood cell counts out of range. The most notable aspect was cerebral hemorrhage in three neonates, which has not been reported earlier in association with HPeV infection. In Austria, HPeV is a relevant pathogen in sepsis-like disease in infants. The clinical presentation is similar to that described in other studies; cerebral hemorrhage is a new aspect. • Parechovirus infection can cause severe illness in infants. • Symptoms have been described to involve all organs; sepsis-like signs, fever, and irritability are most frequent. • Also in Austria, HPeV plays an important role in severe illnesses in infants. • Severe intracranial hemorrhage is described as a new finding.

  4. A preliminary study for investigating idiopatic normal pressure hydrocephalus by means of statistical parameters classification of intracranial pressure recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisto, A; Bramanti, A; Galeano, M; Angileri, F; Campobello, G; Serrano, S; Azzerboni, B

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate Id-iopatic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (INPH) through a multidimensional and multiparameter analysis of statistical data obtained from accurate analysis of Intracranial Pressure (ICP) recordings. Such a study could permit to detect new factors, correlated with therapeutic response, which are able to validate a predicting significance for infusion test. The algorithm developed by the authors computes 13 ICP parameter trends on each of the recording, afterward 9 statistical information from each trend is determined. All data are transferred to the datamining software WEKA. According to the exploited feature-selection techniques, the WEKA has revealed that the most significant statistical parameter is the maximum of Single-Wave-Amplitude: setting a 27 mmHg threshold leads to over 90% of correct classification.

  5. Decoding sequence learning from single-trial intracranial EEG in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia De Lucia

    Full Text Available We propose and validate a multivariate classification algorithm for characterizing changes in human intracranial electroencephalographic data (iEEG after learning motor sequences. The algorithm is based on a Hidden Markov Model (HMM that captures spatio-temporal properties of the iEEG at the level of single trials. Continuous intracranial iEEG was acquired during two sessions (one before and one after a night of sleep in two patients with depth electrodes implanted in several brain areas. They performed a visuomotor sequence (serial reaction time task, SRTT using the fingers of their non-dominant hand. Our results show that the decoding algorithm correctly classified single iEEG trials from the trained sequence as belonging to either the initial training phase (day 1, before sleep or a later consolidated phase (day 2, after sleep, whereas it failed to do so for trials belonging to a control condition (pseudo-random sequence. Accurate single-trial classification was achieved by taking advantage of the distributed pattern of neural activity. However, across all the contacts the hippocampus contributed most significantly to the classification accuracy for both patients, and one fronto-striatal contact for one patient. Together, these human intracranial findings demonstrate that a multivariate decoding approach can detect learning-related changes at the level of single-trial iEEG. Because it allows an unbiased identification of brain sites contributing to a behavioral effect (or experimental condition at the level of single subject, this approach could be usefully applied to assess the neural correlates of other complex cognitive functions in patients implanted with multiple electrodes.

  6. Timing, timing, timing: Fast decoding of object information from intracranial field potentials in human visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hesheng; Agam, Yigal; Madsen, Joseph R.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Summary The difficulty of visual recognition stems from the need to achieve high selectivity while maintaining robustness to object transformations within hundreds of milliseconds. Theories of visual recognition differ in whether the neuronal circuits invoke recurrent feedback connections or not. The timing of neurophysiological responses in visual cortex plays a key role in distinguishing between bottom-up and top-down theories. Here we quantified at millisecond resolution the amount of visual information conveyed by intracranial field potentials from 912 electrodes in 11 human subjects. We could decode object category information from human visual cortex in single trials as early as 100 ms post-stimulus. Decoding performance was robust to depth rotation and scale changes. The results suggest that physiological activity in the temporal lobe can account for key properties of visual recognition. The fast decoding in single trials is compatible with feed-forward theories and provides strong constraints for computational models of human vision. PMID:19409272

  7. NOISY INTRACRANIAL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDOOREN, BTH; VANBRUGGEN, AC; MOOIJ, JJA; HEW, JM; JOURNEE, HL

    1994-01-01

    Transorbital sound recordings were obtained from 21 patients with intracranial tumours, 28 patients with intracranial aneurysms and 20 control patients. The group of patients with tumours consisted of 12 patients with gliomas, of whom 6 had low-grade gliomas and 6 had high-grade gliomas, and 9

  8. γ-oscillations modulated by picture naming and word reading: intracranial recording in epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Helen C; Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Brown, Erik C; Juhasz, Csaba; Rothermel, Robert; Hoechstetter, Karsten; Shah, Aashit; Mittal, Sandeep; Fuerst, Darren; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2011-10-01

    We measured cortical gamma-oscillations in response to visual-language tasks consisting of picture naming and word reading in an effort to better understand human visual-language pathways. We studied six patients with focal epilepsy who underwent extraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) recording. Patients were asked to overtly name images presented sequentially in the picture naming task and to overtly read written words in the reading task. Both tasks commonly elicited gamma-augmentation (maximally at 80-100 Hz) on ECoG in the occipital, inferior-occipital-temporal and inferior-Rolandic areas, bilaterally. Picture naming, compared to reading task, elicited greater gamma-augmentation in portions of pre-motor areas as well as occipital and inferior-occipital-temporal areas, bilaterally. In contrast, word reading elicited greater gamma-augmentation in portions of bilateral occipital, left occipital-temporal and left superior-posterior-parietal areas. Gamma-attenuation was elicited by both tasks in portions of posterior cingulate and ventral premotor-prefrontal areas bilaterally. The number of letters in a presented word was positively correlated to the degree of gamma-augmentation in the medial occipital areas. Gamma-augmentation measured on ECoG identified cortical areas commonly and differentially involved in picture naming and reading tasks. Longer words may activate the primary visual cortex for the more peripheral field. The present study increases our understanding of the visual-language pathways. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P; Senstad, Rudy E; Winkler, Anderson M; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Ørjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A; Cannon, Dara M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M; Hansell, Narelle K; Hwang, Kristy S; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; O’Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roddey, J Cooper; Rose, Emma J; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brohawn, David G; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T; Freimer, Nelson B; Gill, Michael; Göring, Harald H H; Hagler, Donald J; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liewald, David C; Mandl, René; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nauck, Matthias; Nöthen, Markus M; Olvera, Rene L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Rentería, Miguel E; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Joris A; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R; Foroud, Tatiana M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W; Veltman, Dick J; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Smith, Albert V; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W; Launer, Lenore J; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Bastin, Mark E; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J C; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Hardy, John; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, René S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W; Potkin, Steven G; Sämann, Philipp G; Saykin, Andrew J; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Martin, Nicholas G; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer’s disease1,2 and is reduced in schizophrenia3, major depression4 and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy5. Whereas many brain imaging phenotypes are highly heritable6,7, identifying and replicating genetic influences has been difficult, as small effects and the high costs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to underpowered studies. Here we report genome-wide association meta-analyses and replication for mean bilateral hippocampal, total brain and intracranial volumes from a large multinational consortium. The intergenic variant rs7294919 was associated with hippocampal volume (12q24.22; N = 21,151; P = 6.70 × 10−16) and the expression levels of the positional candidate gene TESC in brain tissue. Additionally, rs10784502, located within HMGA2, was associated with intracranial volume (12q14.3; N = 15,782; P = 1.12 × 10−12). We also identified a suggestive association with total brain volume at rs10494373 within DDR2 (1q23.3; N = 6,500; P = 5.81 × 10−7). PMID:22504417

  10. Errors Recruit both Cognitive and Emotional Monitoring Systems: Simultaneous Intracranial Recordings in the Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Gyrus and Amygdala Combined with fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtois, Gilles; Vocat, Roland; N'Diaye, Karim; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2010-01-01

    We studied error monitoring in a human patient with unique implantation of depth electrodes in both the left dorsal cingulate gyrus and medial temporal lobe prior to surgery. The patient performed a speeded go/nogo task and made a substantial number of commission errors (false alarms). As predicted, intracranial Local Field Potentials (iLFPs) in…

  11. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure During Intracranial Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracranial endoscopy is a minimum invasive procedure, which reduces trauma to the brain, is cost-effective, and carries a shortened hospital stay with an improved postoperative outcome. Objective: To monitor intracranial pressure changes during intracranial endoscopy among children and adults under general anesthesia/sedation, and to compare the intracranial pressure changes between children and adults receiving general anesthesia and among adults receiving general anesthesia and sedation. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the tertiary care hospitals of Lucknow. This was carried out in the department of neurosurgery from January 2008 to December 2008. Patients who were not fit for general anesthesia received local anesthesia under sedation. Patients participating in the study were divided into three groups. Intracranial pressure was recorded at specific intervals. Parametric data were subjected to statistical analysis using a student\\s t test. Result: A total of 70 patients were undergoing intracranial endoscopy under general anesthesia during the study period. In both groups A and B, intracranial pressure increases the maximum during inflation of the balloon. In group C, all the variations in ICP were found to be statistically significant. In the comparison of intracranial pressure changes between groups A and B, no significant difference was found. All correlations in the comparison of groups B and C were found to be statistically significant (p< 0.001. Conclusion: There is a need for continuous intraoperative monitoring of ICP intracranial endoscopy, because ICP increases in various stages of the procedure, which can be detrimental to the perfusion of the brain. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 240-245

  12. Spatiotemporal mapping of interictal spike propagation: a novel methodology applied to pediatric intracranial EEG recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Tomlinson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized cortical activity is implicated in both normative cognitive functioning andmany neurological disorders. For epilepsy patients with intractable seizures, irregular patterns ofsynchronization within the epileptogenic zone (EZ is believed to provide the network substratethrough which seizures initiate and propagate. Mapping the EZ prior to epilepsy surgery is critical fordetecting seizure networks in order to achieve post-surgical seizure control. However, automatedtechniques for characterizing epileptic networks have yet to gain traction in the clinical setting.Recent advances in signal processing and spike detection have made it possible to examine thespatiotemporal propagation of interictal spike discharges across the epileptic cortex. In this study, wepresent a novel methodology for detecting, extracting, and visualizing spike propagation anddemonstrate its potential utility as a biomarker for the epileptogenic zone. Eighteen pre-surgicalintracranial EEG recordings were obtained from pediatric patients ultimately experiencing favorable(i.e., seizure-free, n = 9 or unfavorable (i.e., seizure-persistent, n = 9 surgical outcomes. Novelalgorithms were applied to extract multi-channel spike discharges and visualize their spatiotemporalpropagation. Quantitative analysis of spike propagation was performed using trajectory clusteringand spatial autocorrelation techniques. Comparison of interictal propagation patterns revealed anincrease in trajectory organization (i.e., spatial autocorrelation among Sz-Free patients compared toSz-Persist patients. The pathophysiological basis and clinical implications of these findings areconsidered.

  13. Semi-automated Anatomical Labeling and Inter-subject Warping of High-Density Intracranial Recording Electrodes in Electrocorticography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberty S. Hamilton

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we introduce img_pipe, our open source python package for preprocessing of imaging data for use in intracranial electrocorticography (ECoG and intracranial stereo-EEG analyses. The process of electrode localization, labeling, and warping for use in ECoG currently varies widely across laboratories, and it is usually performed with custom, lab-specific code. This python package aims to provide a standardized interface for these procedures, as well as code to plot and display results on 3D cortical surface meshes. It gives the user an easy interface to create anatomically labeled electrodes that can also be warped to an atlas brain, starting with only a preoperative T1 MRI scan and a postoperative CT scan. We describe the full capabilities of our imaging pipeline and present a step-by-step protocol for users.

  14. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hieab H H; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura M E; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Braber, Anouk Den; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, W T; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schofield, Peter R; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Srikanth, Velandai; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Tiemeier, Henning; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; Van der Lugt, Aad; Van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Van T Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Veltman, Dick J; Vernooij, Meike W; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, H Ronald; Zonderman, Alan B; Deary, Ian J; DeCarli, Charles; Schmidt, Helena; Martin, Nicholas G; De Craen, Anton J M; Wright, Margaret J; Launer, Lenore J; Schumann, Gunter; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Barbara; Debette, Stéphanie; Medland, Sarah E; Ikram, M Arfan; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously

  15. Spatiotemporal structure of intracranial electric fields induced by transcranial electric stimulation in humans and nonhuman primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opitz, Alexander; Falchier, Arnaud; Yan, Chao-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) is an emerging technique, developed to non-invasively modulate brain function. However, the spatiotemporal distribution of the intracranial electric fields induced by TES remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how much current actually reac...

  16. Intracranial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvedstrup, Jeppe; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Moudrous, Walid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new method of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) measurement with conventional lumbar puncture (LP) opening pressure. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter study, patients undergoing LP for diagnostic purposes underwent intracranial pressure measurements with HeadSen...

  17. 78 FR 43258 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records, State-31

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8384] Privacy Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records... system of records, Human Resources Records, State- 31, pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of... State proposes that the current system will retain the name ``Human Resources Records'' (previously...

  18. Deep Neural Architectures for Mapping Scalp to Intracranial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Andreas; Spyrou, Loukianos; Martin-Lopez, David; Valentin, Antonio; Alarcon, Gonzalo; Sanei, Saeid; Took, Clive Cheong

    2018-03-19

    Data is often plagued by noise which encumbers machine learning of clinically useful biomarkers and electroencephalogram (EEG) data is no exemption. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) data enhances the training of deep learning models of the human brain, yet is often prohibitive due to the invasive recording process. A more convenient alternative is to record brain activity using scalp electrodes. However, the inherent noise associated with scalp EEG data often impedes the learning process of neural models, achieving substandard performance. Here, an ensemble deep learning architecture for nonlinearly mapping scalp to iEEG data is proposed. The proposed architecture exploits the information from a limited number of joint scalp-intracranial recording to establish a novel methodology for detecting the epileptic discharges from the sEEG of a general population of subjects. Statistical tests and qualitative analysis have revealed that the generated pseudo-intracranial data are highly correlated with the true intracranial data. This facilitated the detection of IEDs from the scalp recordings where such waveforms are not often visible. As a real-world clinical application, these pseudo-iEEGs are then used by a convolutional neural network for the automated classification of intracranial epileptic discharges (IEDs) and non-IED of trials in the context of epilepsy analysis. Although the aim of this work was to circumvent the unavailability of iEEG and the limitations of sEEG, we have achieved a classification accuracy of 68% an increase of 6% over the previously proposed linear regression mapping.

  19. Intracranial sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seltzer, S.; Mark, A.S.; Atlas, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    The appearance of intracranial sarcoidosis on Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging has not been previously reported. The authors have studied five patients with T1-and T2-weighted pre-GD and T1-weighted post-GD sequences. Images showed diffuse meningeal involvement suspected on the unenhanced scans in only one patient, enhancing extraaxial masses mimicking meningiomas, and enhancing and nonenhancing intraaxial lesions. In four of five patients, the diagnosis of intracranial sarcoidosis was suggested only after Gd-DTPA administration. The addition of Gd-DTPA greatly enhanced the sensitivity of MR imaging to the extraaxial and meningeal manifestations of central nervous system sarcoidosis

  20. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  1. In vivo imaging of twist drill drainage for subdural hematoma: a clinical feasibility study on electrical impedance tomography for measuring intracranial bleeding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Meng; Li, Bing; Hu, Shijie; Xu, Canhua; Yang, Bin; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Feng; Fei, Zhou; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial bleeding is one of the most severe medical emergencies in neurosurgery. Early detection or diagnosis would largely reduce the rate of disability and mortality, and improve the prognosis of the patients. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) can non-invasively image the internal resistivity distribution within a human body using a ring of external electrodes, and is thus a promising technique to promptly detect the occurrence of intracranial bleedings because blood differs from other brain tissues in resistivity. However, so far there is no experimental study that has determined whether the intracranial resistivity changes in humans could be repeatedly detected and imaged by EIT. Hence, we for the first time attempt to clinically validate this by in vivo imaging the influx and efflux of irrigating fluid (5% dextrose in water, D5W) during the twist-drill drainage operation for the patients with subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, six patients (four male, two female) with subacute or chronic SDH received the surgical operation in order to evacuate the hematoma around subdural region, and EIT measurements were performed simultaneously on each patient's head. The results showed that the resistivity significantly increased on the corresponding position of EIT images during the influx of D5W and gradually decreased back to baseline during the efflux. In the quantitative analysis, the average resistivity values demonstrated the similar results and had highly linear correlation (R(2) = 0.93 ± 0.06) with the injected D5W volumes, as well as the area of the resistivity gain(R(2) = 0.94 ± 0.05). In conclusion, it was clinically validated that intracranial resistivity changes in humans were detectable and quantifiable by the EIT method. After further technical improvements, EIT has the great potential of being a routine neuroimaging tool for early detection of intracranial bleedings.

  2. In vivo imaging of twist drill drainage for subdural hematoma: a clinical feasibility study on electrical impedance tomography for measuring intracranial bleeding in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Dai

    Full Text Available Intracranial bleeding is one of the most severe medical emergencies in neurosurgery. Early detection or diagnosis would largely reduce the rate of disability and mortality, and improve the prognosis of the patients. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT can non-invasively image the internal resistivity distribution within a human body using a ring of external electrodes, and is thus a promising technique to promptly detect the occurrence of intracranial bleedings because blood differs from other brain tissues in resistivity. However, so far there is no experimental study that has determined whether the intracranial resistivity changes in humans could be repeatedly detected and imaged by EIT. Hence, we for the first time attempt to clinically validate this by in vivo imaging the influx and efflux of irrigating fluid (5% dextrose in water, D5W during the twist-drill drainage operation for the patients with subdural hematoma (SDH. In this study, six patients (four male, two female with subacute or chronic SDH received the surgical operation in order to evacuate the hematoma around subdural region, and EIT measurements were performed simultaneously on each patient's head. The results showed that the resistivity significantly increased on the corresponding position of EIT images during the influx of D5W and gradually decreased back to baseline during the efflux. In the quantitative analysis, the average resistivity values demonstrated the similar results and had highly linear correlation (R(2 = 0.93 ± 0.06 with the injected D5W volumes, as well as the area of the resistivity gain(R(2 = 0.94 ± 0.05. In conclusion, it was clinically validated that intracranial resistivity changes in humans were detectable and quantifiable by the EIT method. After further technical improvements, EIT has the great potential of being a routine neuroimaging tool for early detection of intracranial bleedings.

  3. Three-dimensional stereotactic atlas of the adult human skull correlated with the brain, cranial nerves, and intracranial vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Thaung, Thant Shoon Let; Chua, Beng Choon; Yi, Su Hnin Wut; Ngai, Vincent; Yang, Yili; Chrzan, Robert; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2015-05-15

    Although the adult human skull is a complex and multifunctional structure, its 3D, complete, realistic, and stereotactic atlas has not yet been created. This work addresses the construction of a 3D interactive atlas of the adult human skull spatially correlated with the brain, cranial nerves, and intracranial vasculature. The process of atlas construction included computed tomography (CT) high-resolution scan acquisition, skull extraction, skull parcellation, 3D disarticulated bone surface modeling, 3D model simplification, brain-skull registration, 3D surface editing, 3D surface naming and color-coding, integration of the CT-derived 3D bony models with the existing brain atlas, and validation. The virtual skull model created is complete with all 29 bones, including the auditory ossicles (being among the smallest bones). It contains all typical bony features and landmarks. The created skull model is superior to the existing skull models in terms of completeness, realism, and integration with the brain along with blood vessels and cranial nerves. This skull atlas is valuable for medical students and residents to easily get familiarized with the skull and surrounding anatomy with a few clicks. The atlas is also useful for educators to prepare teaching materials. It may potentially serve as a reference aid in the reading and operating rooms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PARTNERSHIPS Meet our Fundraising Partners Tweet Welcome Intracranial hypertension (IH) is the general term for the neurological ... high. (Old names for IH include Benign Intracranial Hypertension and Pseudotumor Cerebri). The Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation ...

  5. Crowdsourcing seizure detection: algorithm development and validation on human implanted device recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassano, Steven N; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Ung, Hoameng; Blevins, Tyler; Conrad, Erin C; Leyde, Kent; Cook, Mark J; Khambhati, Ankit N; Wagenaar, Joost B; Worrell, Gregory A; Litt, Brian

    2017-06-01

    There exist significant clinical and basic research needs for accurate, automated seizure detection algorithms. These algorithms have translational potential in responsive neurostimulation devices and in automatic parsing of continuous intracranial electroencephalography data. An important barrier to developing accurate, validated algorithms for seizure detection is limited access to high-quality, expertly annotated seizure data from prolonged recordings. To overcome this, we hosted a kaggle.com competition to crowdsource the development of seizure detection algorithms using intracranial electroencephalography from canines and humans with epilepsy. The top three performing algorithms from the contest were then validated on out-of-sample patient data including standard clinical data and continuous ambulatory human data obtained over several years using the implantable NeuroVista seizure advisory system. Two hundred teams of data scientists from all over the world participated in the kaggle.com competition. The top performing teams submitted highly accurate algorithms with consistent performance in the out-of-sample validation study. The performance of these seizure detection algorithms, achieved using freely available code and data, sets a new reproducible benchmark for personalized seizure detection. We have also shared a 'plug and play' pipeline to allow other researchers to easily use these algorithms on their own datasets. The success of this competition demonstrates how sharing code and high quality data results in the creation of powerful translational tools with significant potential to impact patient care. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Spontaneous and visually-driven high-frequency oscillations in the occipital cortex: Intracranial recording in epileptic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Juhász, Csaba; Rothermel, Robert; Hoechstetter, Karsten; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) at ≧80 Hz of nonepileptic nature spontaneously emerge from human cerebral cortex. In 10 patients with extra-occipital lobe epilepsy, we compared the spectral-spatial characteristics of HFOs spontaneously arising from the nonepileptic occipital cortex with those of HFOs driven by a visual task as well as epileptogenic HFOs arising from the extra-occipital seizure focus. We identified spontaneous HFOs at ≧80 Hz with a mean duration of 330 msec intermittently emerging from the occipital cortex during interictal slow-wave sleep. The spectral frequency band of spontaneous occipital HFOs was similar to that of visually-driven HFOs. Spontaneous occipital HFOs were spatially sparse and confined to smaller areas, whereas visually-driven HFOs involved the larger areas including the more rostral sites. Neither spectral frequency band nor amplitude of spontaneous occipital HFOs significantly differed from those of epileptogenic HFOs. Spontaneous occipital HFOs were strongly locked to the phase of delta activity, but the strength of delta-phase coupling decayed from 1 to 3 Hz. Conversely, epileptogenic extra-occipital HFOs were locked to the phase of delta activity about equally in the range from 1 to 3 Hz. The occipital cortex spontaneously generates physiological HFOs which may stand out on electrocorticography traces as prominently as pathological HFOs arising from elsewhere; this observation should be taken into consideration during presurgical evaluation. Coupling of spontaneous delta and HFOs may increase the understanding of significance of delta-oscillations during slow-wave sleep. Further studies are warranted to determine whether delta-phase coupling distinguishes physiological from pathological HFOs or simply differs across anatomical locations. PMID:21432945

  7. DESIGN AND APPLICATION OF SENSOR FOR RECORDING SOUNDS OVER HUMAN EYE AND NOSE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOURNEE, HL; VANBRUGGEN, AC; VANDERMEER, JJ; DEJONGE, AB; MOOIJ, JJA

    The recording of sounds over the oribt of the eye has been found to be useful in the detection of intracranial aneurysms. A hydrophone for auscultation over the eye has been developed and is tested under controlled conditions. The tests consist of measurement over the eyes in three healthy

  8. Study of intracranial pressure in human brain during transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honrath, Marc; Sabouni, Abas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of cranial force in human brain due to electromagnetic pulse during transcranial magnetic stimulation. To model the force in a realistic brain, we used three dimensional magnetic resonance image of the 26 years old female subject. Simulation results show that during TMS procedure, there is a small force generated within the cranial tissue layers along with a torque value in different layers of brain tissues. The force depends on the magnitude of the magnetic field generated by the TMS coil.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of aldoxorubicin in an intracranial xenograft mouse model of human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Luis; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Musto, Alberto E; Wilk, Anna; Vashistha, Himanshu; Zapata, Adriana; Walker, Chelsey; Velasco-Gonzalez, Cruz; Parsons, Christopher; Wieland, Scott; Levitt, Daniel; Reiss, Krzysztof; Prakash, Om

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12 to 15 months after diagnosis. Acquired chemoresistance, high systemic toxicity, and low penetration of the blood brain barrier by many anticancer drugs contribute to the failure of anti-GBM therapies. To circumvent some of these obstacles, we tested a novel prodrug approach to evaluate anti-GBM efficacy by utilizing serum albumin-binding doxorubicin (Doxo), aldoxorubicin (Aldoxo), which is less toxic, is released from albumin in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. A human GBM cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter (U87-luc) was stereotactically injected into the left striatum of the brain of immunodeficient mice. Following initial tumor growth for 12 days, mice were injected once a week in the tail-vein with Aldoxo [24 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg of doxorubicin equivalents-3/4 maximum tolerated dose (MTD)], Doxo [6 mg/kg (3/4 MTD)], or vehicle. Aldoxo-treated mice demonstrated significantly slower growth of the tumor when compared to vehicle-treated or Doxo-treated mice. Five out of eight Aldoxo-treated mice remained alive more than 60 days with a median survival of 62 days, while the median survival of vehicle- and Doxo-treated mice was only 26 days. Importantly, Aldoxo-treated mice exhibited high levels of Doxo within the tumor tissue, accompanied by low tumor cell proliferation (Ki67) and abundant intratumoral programmed cell death (cleaved caspase-3). Effective accumulation of Aldoxo in brain tumor tissues but not normal brain, its anti-tumor efficacy, and low toxicity, provide a strong rationale for evaluating this novel drug conjugate as a treatment for patients afflicted with GBM.

  10. Therapeutic Efficacy of Aldoxorubicin in an Intracranial Xenograft Mouse Model of Human Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Marrero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12 to 15 months after diagnosis. Acquired chemoresistance, high systemic toxicity, and low penetration of the blood brain barrier by many anticancer drugs contribute to the failure of anti-GBM therapies. To circumvent some of these obstacles, we tested a novel prodrug approach to evaluate anti-GBM efficacy by utilizing serum albumin-binding doxorubicin (Doxo, aldoxorubicin (Aldoxo, which is less toxic, is released from albumin in an acidic environment and accumulates in tumor tissues. A human GBM cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter (U87-luc was stereotactically injected into the left striatum of the brain of immunodeficient mice. Following initial tumor growth for 12 days, mice were injected once a week in the tail-vein with Aldoxo [24 mg/kg or 18 mg/kg of doxorubicin equivalents—3/4 maximum tolerated dose (MTD], Doxo [6 mg/kg (3/4 MTD], or vehicle. Aldoxo-treated mice demonstrated significantly slower growth of the tumor when compared to vehicle-treated or Doxo-treated mice. Five out of eight Aldoxo-treated mice remained alive more than 60 days with a median survival of 62 days, while the median survival of vehicle- and Doxo-treated mice was only 26 days. Importantly, Aldoxo-treated mice exhibited high levels of Doxo within the tumor tissue, accompanied by low tumor cell proliferation (Ki67 and abundant intratumoral programmed cell death (cleaved caspase-3. Effective accumulation of Aldoxo in brain tumor tissues but not normal brain, its anti-tumor efficacy, and low toxicity, provide a strong rationale for evaluating this novel drug conjugate as a treatment for patients afflicted with GBM.

  11. Decoding Speech With Integrated Hybrid Signals Recorded From the Human Ventral Motor Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Ibayashi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of speech communication for locked-in patients by means of brain computer interfaces (BCIs is currently an important area of active research. Among the neural signals obtained from intracranial recordings, single/multi-unit activity (SUA/MUA, local field potential (LFP, and electrocorticography (ECoG are good candidates for an input signal for BCIs. However, the question of which signal or which combination of the three signal modalities is best suited for decoding speech production remains unverified. In order to record SUA, LFP, and ECoG simultaneously from a highly localized area of human ventral sensorimotor cortex (vSMC, we fabricated an electrode the size of which was 7 by 13 mm containing sparsely arranged microneedle and conventional macro contacts. We determined which signal modality is the most capable of decoding speech production, and tested if the combination of these signals could improve the decoding accuracy of spoken phonemes. Feature vectors were constructed from spike frequency obtained from SUAs and event-related spectral perturbation derived from ECoG and LFP signals, then input to the decoder. The results showed that the decoding accuracy for five spoken vowels was highest when features from multiple signals were combined and optimized for each subject, and reached 59% when averaged across all six subjects. This result suggests that multi-scale signals convey complementary information for speech articulation. The current study demonstrated that simultaneous recording of multi-scale neuronal activities could raise decoding accuracy even though the recording area is limited to a small portion of cortex, which is advantageous for future implementation of speech-assisting BCIs.

  12. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus...

  13. Gadolinium Deposition in Human Brain Tissues after Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Adult Patients without Intracranial Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert J; McDonald, Jennifer S; Kallmes, David F; Jentoft, Mark E; Paolini, Michael A; Murray, David L; Williamson, Eric E; Eckel, Laurence J

    2017-11-01

    Purpose To determine whether gadolinium deposits in neural tissues of patients with intracranial abnormalities following intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) exposure might be related to blood-brain barrier integrity by studying adult patients with normal brain pathologic characteristics. Materials and Methods After obtaining antemortem consent and institutional review board approval, the authors compared postmortem neuronal tissue samples from five patients who had undergone four to 18 gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) examinations between 2005 and 2014 (contrast group) with samples from 10 gadolinium-naive patients who had undergone at least one MR examination during their lifetime (control group). All patients in the contrast group had received gadodiamide. Neuronal tissues from the dentate nuclei, pons, globus pallidus, and thalamus were harvested and analyzed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and light microscopy to quantify, localize, and assess the effects of gadolinium deposition. Results Tissues from the four neuroanatomic regions of gadodiamide-exposed patients contained 0.1-19.4 μg of gadolinium per gram of tissue in a statistically significant dose-dependent relationship (globus pallidus: ρ = 0.90, P = .04). In contradistinction, patients in the control group had undetectable levels of gadolinium with ICP-MS. All patients had normal brain pathologic characteristics at autopsy. Three patients in the contrast group had borderline renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate the contrast group was localized to the capillary endothelium and neuronal interstitium and, in two cases, within the nucleus of the cell. Conclusion Gadolinium deposition in neural tissues after GBCA administration occurs in the absence of intracranial abnormalities that might affect the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. These findings

  14. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  15. Intracranial atherosclerosis: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    The most relevant ideas discussed in this article are described here. Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) represents the most common cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Its importance in whites may have been underestimated. New technical developments, such as high-resolution MRI, allow direct assessment of the intracranial atherosclerotic plaque, which may have a profound impact on ICAD diagnosis and therapy in the near future. Early detection of ICAD may allow therapeutic intervention while the disease is still asymptomatic. The Barcelonès Nord and Maresme Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study is presented here. The main prognostic factors that characterize the patients who are at a higher risk for ICAD recurrence are classified and discussed. The best treatment for ICAD remains to be established. The Stenting Versus Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Study is currently ongoing to address this crucial issue. These and other topics will be discussed at the Fifth International Intracranial Atherosclerosis Conference (Valladolid, Spain, autumn 2011).

  16. Hippocampal Negative Event-Related Potential Recorded in Humans During a Simple Sensorimotor Task Occurs Independently of Motor Execution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roman, R.; Brázdil, M.; Chládek, Jan; Rektor, I.; Jurák, Pavel; Světlák, M.; Damborská, A.; Shaw, D. J.; Kukleta, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 12 (2013), s. 1337-1344 ISSN 1050-9631 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP103/11/0933 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : intracranial recordings * auditory task * hippocampus * ERP latency * motor response Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 4.302, year: 2013

  17. Movement-related changes in local and long-range synchronization in Parkinson’s disease revealed by simultaneous magnetoencephalography and intracranial recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, Vladimir; Eusebio, Alexandre; Jha, Ashwani; Oostenveld, Robert; Barnes, Gareth; Foltynie, Tom; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan I.; Friston, Karl; Brown, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Functional neurosurgery has afforded the opportunity to assess interactions between populations of neurons in the human cerebral cortex and basal ganglia in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Interactions occur over a wide range of frequencies, and the functional significance of those above 30 Hz is particularly unclear. Do they improve movement and, if so, in what way? We acquired simultaneously magnetoencephalography (MEG) and direct recordings from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in 17 PD patients. We examined the effect of synchronous and sequential finger movements and of the dopamine prodrug levodopa on induced power in the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1) and STN and on the coherence between the two structures. We observed discrete peaks in M1 and STN power over 60-90 Hz and 300-400 Hz. All these power peaks increased with movement and levodopa treatment. Only STN activity over 60-90 Hz was coherent with activity in M1. Directionality analysis showed that STN gamma activity at 60-90 Hz tended to drive gamma activity in M1. The effects of levodopa on both local and distant synchronisation over 60-90 Hz correlated with the degree of improvement in bradykinesia-rigidity, as did local STN activity at 300-400 Hz. Despite this, there were no effects of movement type, nor interactions between movement type and levodopa in the STN, nor in the coherence between STN and M1. We conclude that synchronisation over 60-90 Hz in the basal ganglia cortical network is prokinetic, but likely through a modulatory effect rather than any involvement in explicit motor processing. PMID:22855804

  18. Epilepsy in primary intracranial tumors in a neurosurgical hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Seizures may be manifestation of intracranial tumor (IT) and demand thorough neurological evaluation. This paper examines epidemiology, lesion characteristics and outcome of seizures associated with primary IT. Methods: Retrospective analysis of medical records, computed tomography and magnetic ...

  19. Increased intracranial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord) Subdural hematoma (bleeding between the covering of the brain and ... intracranial pressure Patient Instructions Ventriculoperitoneal shunt - discharge Images Subdural hematoma Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References ...

  20. Gene expression profile of blood cells for the prediction of delayed cerebral ischemia after intracranial aneurysm rupture: a pilot study in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Antoine; Devaux, Yvan; Audibert, Gérard; Zhang, Lu; Bracard, Serge; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Klein, Olivier; Zannad, Faiez; Charpentier, Claire; Longrois, Dan; Mertes, Paul-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a potentially devastating complication after intracranial aneurysm rupture and its mechanisms remain poorly elucidated. Early identification of the patients prone to developing DCI after rupture may represent a major breakthrough in its prevention and treatment. The single gene approach of DCI has demonstrated interest in humans. We hypothesized that whole genome expression profile of blood cells may be useful for better comprehension and prediction of aneurysmal DCI. Over a 35-month period, 218 patients with aneurysm rupture were included in this study. DCI was defined as the occurrence of a new delayed neurological deficit occurring within 2 weeks after aneurysm rupture with evidence of ischemia either on perfusion-diffusion MRI, CT angiography or CT perfusion imaging, or with cerebral angiography. DCI patients were matched against controls based on 4 out of 5 criteria (age, sex, Fisher grade, aneurysm location and smoking status). Genome-wide expression analysis of blood cells obtained at admission was performed by microarrays. Transcriptomic analysis was performed using long oligonucleotide microarrays representing 25,000 genes. Quantitative PCR: 1 µg of total RNA extracted was reverse-transcribed, and the resulting cDNA was diluted 10-fold before performing quantitative PCR. Microarray data were first analyzed by 'Significance Analysis of Microarrays' software which includes the Benjamini correction for multiple testing. In a second step, microarray data fold change was compared using a two-tailed, paired t test. Analysis of receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the area under the ROC curves were used for prediction analysis. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the additive value of multiple biomarkers. A total of 16 patients demonstrated DCI. Significance Analysis of Microarrays software failed to retrieve significant genes, most probably because of the heterogeneity of the patients included in

  1. Gelastic seizures and the anteromesial frontal lobe: a case report and review of intracranial EEG recording and electrocortical stimulation case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnwongse, Kanjana; Wehner, Tim; Bingaman, William; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2010-10-01

    Symptomatogenic areas for ictal laughter have been described in the frontal and temporal lobes. Within the frontal lobe, gelastic seizures have been recorded from the cingulate gyrus. Electrocortical stimulation of the cingulate gyrus as well as the superior frontal gyrus induced laughter. We describe a patient whose gelastic seizures were associated with electrographic ictal activity in the mesial aspect of the right anterior frontal gyrus. The symptomatogenic area for ictal laughter in the frontal lobe may reside in the superior frontal gyrus.

  2. Postoperative radiotherapy for intracranial meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of postoperative external radiotherapy for patients with intracranial meningiomas. The records of thirty three patients with intracranial meningiomas who were treated with postoperative external irradiation at our institution between Feb, 1988 and Nov, 1999 were retrospectively analyzed. Median age of patients at diagnosis was 53 years with range of 17 to 68 years. Sites of involvement were parasagital, cerebral convexity, sphenoid ridge, parasellar and tentorium cerebella. Of 33 evaluated patients, 15 transitional, 10 meningotheliomatous, 4 hemangiopericytic, 3 atypical and 1 malignant meningioma were identified. Four patients underwent biopsy alone and remaining 29 patients underwent total tumor resection. A dose of 50 to 60 Gy was delivered in 28-35 daily fractions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks. Follow-up period ranged from 12 months to 8 years. The actuarial survival rates at 5 and 7 years for entire group of patients were 78% and 67%, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival rates were 73% and 61 %, respectively. The overall local control rate at 5 years was 83%. One out of 25 patients in benign group developed local failure, while 4 out of 8 patients in malignant group did local failure (p <0.05), Of 4 patients who underwent biopsy alone, 2 developed local failure. There was no significant difference in 5 year actuarial survival between patients who underwent total tumor resection and those who did biopsy alone. Patients whose age is under 60 showed slightly better survival than those whose age is 60 or older, although this was not statistically significant. There was no documented late complications in any patients. Based on our study, we might conclude that postoperative external beam radiotherapy tends to improve survival of patients with intracranial meningiomas comparing with surgery alone

  3. Co-localization between the BOLD response and epileptiform discharges recorded by simultaneous intracranial EEG-fMRI at 3 T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Aghakhani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: iEEG-fMRI is a feasible and low-risk method for assessment of hemodynamic changes of very focal IEDs that may not be recorded by scalp EEG. A high concordance rate between the location of the BOLD response and IEDs was seen for mesial temporal (6/7 IEDs. Significant BOLD activation was also seen in areas distant from the active electrode and these sites exhibited maximal BOLD activation in the majority of cases. This implies that iEEG-fMRI may further describe the areas involved in the generation of IEDs beyond the vicinity of the electrode(s.

  4. Comparison of Automated and Manual Recording of Brief Episodes of Intracranial Hypertension and Cerebral Hypoperfusion and Their Association with Outcome After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    which could limit our ability to evaluate the difference between EVD ICP and IPM ICP. Second, due to the complexity of the human brain and our...quartile 24.8 years and third quartile 49.3 years. There were 68 males and 13 females in this study group. In terms of the severity, those patients...Hypoperfusion and Their Association with Outcome After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Peter Hu, PhD; Yao Li, MS; Shiming Yang, PhD; Catriona

  5. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause is determined and is referred to as “secondary” intracranial hypertension. What are the risk factors for idiopathic intracranial ... clotting disorders, anemia and malnutrition. Can idiopathic intracranial ... to be “secondary” which affects males and females equally. The second ...

  6. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected but u...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  7. Mapping effective connectivity in the human brain with concurrent intracranial electrical stimulation and BOLD-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew A; Magnotta, Vincent A; Kruger, Anton; Griffiths, Timothy D; Lemieux, Louis; Carmichael, David W; Petkov, Christopher I; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Kovach, Christopher K; Sutterer, Matthew J; Adolphs, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    Understanding brain function requires knowledge of how one brain region causally influences another. This information is difficult to obtain directly in the human brain, and is instead typically inferred from resting-state fMRI. Here, we demonstrate the safety and scientific promise of a novel and complementary approach: concurrent electrical stimulation and fMRI (es-fMRI) at 3T in awake neurosurgical patients with implanted depth electrodes. We document the results of safety testing, actual experimental setup, and stimulation parameters, that safely and reliably evoke activation in distal structures through stimulation of amygdala, cingulate, or prefrontal cortex. We compare connectivity inferred from the evoked patterns of activation with that estimated from standard resting-state fMRI in the same patients: while connectivity patterns obtained with each approach are correlated, each method produces unique results. Response patterns were stable over the course of 11min of es-fMRI runs. COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHOD: es-fMRI in awake humans yields unique information about effective connectivity, complementing resting-state fMRI. Although our stimulations were below the level of inducing any apparent behavioral or perceptual effects, a next step would be to use es-fMRI to modulate task performances. This would reveal the acute network-level changes induced by the stimulation that mediate the behavioral and cognitive effects seen with brain stimulation. es-fMRI provides a novel and safe approach for mapping effective connectivity in the human brain in a clinical setting, and will inform treatments for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders that use deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bicycle Design : A different approach to improving on the world human powered speed records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epema, H.K.; Van den Brand, S.; Gregoor, W.; Kooijman, J.D.G.; Pereboom, H.P.; Wielemaker, D.C.; Van der Zweep, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    The current International Human Powered Vehicle Association world records for faired bicycles stand at 133.284km/h for the 200m flying start speed record and 91.562 km for the hour record. Traditionally the recumbent bicycles that have been developed for breaking one of either of these records have

  9. Raised intracranial pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is article presents an approach to raised intracranial pressure (ICP) constructed in a question-answer fashion. ..... Given that raised ICP is a serious and potentially life-threatening emergency, fast and reliable referral and transfer mechanisms should be established to ensure patients with this condition are effectively treated.

  10. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raboel, P H; Bartek, J; Andresen, M

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods...

  11. Sinogenic intracranial complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Mikkel Seremet; Fisker, Niels; Christensen, Anne Estmann

    2018-01-01

    We present two 11-year-old girls with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, treated with adalimumab. Both developed severe intracranial complications to sinusitis. Patient 1 had been treated with adalimumab for 15 months when she developed acute sinusitis complicated by an orbital abscess, ...

  12. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, P; Zenteno, M A; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O

    1989-09-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.).

  13. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-01-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.)

  14. Can you hear me yet? An intracranial investigation of speech and non-speech audiovisual interactions in human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhone, Ariane E; Nourski, Kirill V; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; McMurray, Bob

    In everyday conversation, viewing a talker's face can provide information about the timing and content of an upcoming speech signal, resulting in improved intelligibility. Using electrocorticography, we tested whether human auditory cortex in Heschl's gyrus (HG) and on superior temporal gyrus (STG) and motor cortex on precentral gyrus (PreC) were responsive to visual/gestural information prior to the onset of sound and whether early stages of auditory processing were sensitive to the visual content (speech syllable versus non-speech motion). Event-related band power (ERBP) in the high gamma band was content-specific prior to acoustic onset on STG and PreC, and ERBP in the beta band differed in all three areas. Following sound onset, we found with no evidence for content-specificity in HG, evidence for visual specificity in PreC, and specificity for both modalities in STG. These results support models of audio-visual processing in which sensory information is integrated in non-primary cortical areas.

  15. In vivo 1H-spectroscopy of human intracranial tumors at 1.5 tesla. Preliminary experience at a clinical installation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Wieslander, S; Gjerris, F

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may contribute to the characterization of intracranial tumors in vivo. Volume selective water suppressed proton spectroscopy offers the possibility to study a number of metabolites in the brain including choline (CHO), creatinine/phosphocreatinine (CR/PCR), N...

  16. Human and animal anthrax in Ethiopia: A retrospective record ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    26,737 animal anthrax cases (human to animal ratio 1:5) were reported from 2009 to 2013 ... respectively) This data analysis revealed that less number of human anthrax cases ..... quality to reach to strong conclusions and recommendations.

  17. Headache following intracranial neuroendovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eric P; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Tepper, Stewart J; Gupta, Rishi; Novak, Eric; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Stillman, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Predicting who will develop post-procedure headache (PPH) following intracranial endovascular procedures (IEPs) would be clinically useful and potentially could assist in reducing the excessive diagnostic testing so often obtained in these patients. Although limited safety data exist, the use of triptans or dihydroergotamine (DHE) often raise concern when used with pre/post-coiled aneurysms. We sought to determine risk factors for PPH following IEP, to evaluate the utility of diagnostic testing in patients with post-coil acute headache (HA), and to record whether triptans and DHE have been used safely in this clinical setting. We conducted a retrospective chart review of adult patients undergoing IEPs. Bivariate analyses were conducted to compare patients who did and did not develop PPH. We reviewed records pertaining to 372 patients, of whom 263 underwent intracranial coil embolizations, 21 acrylic glue embolizations, and 88 stent placements. PPH occurred in 72% of coil patients, 33% of glue patients, and 14% of stent patients. Significant risk factors for post-coil HA were female gender, any pre-coil HA history, smoking, and anxiety/depression. A pre-stent history of HA exceeding 1 year's duration, and smoking were risk factors for post-stent HA. A pre-glue history of HA exceeding 1 year was the only risk factor for post-glue HA. In the small subgroup available for study, treatment with triptans or DHE was not associated with adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Diagnostic testing was low yield. Occurrence of PPH was common after IEPs and especially so with coiling and in women, smokers, and those with anxiety/depression, and was often of longer duration than allowed by current International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria. The yield of diagnostic testing was low, and in a small subgroup treatment with triptans or DHE did not cause adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  18. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  19. Intracranial cavernous angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuhi, Fumiaki; Gondou, Masazumi; Sasahira, Masahiro; Ichitsubo, Hidenori; Asakura, Tetsuhiko.

    1986-01-01

    The present authors have experienced 2 cases of intracranial cavernous angioma. Of these cases, one was admitted because of generalized convulsions, while the other was admitted because of headache. In both cases, neither plain X-ray films nor carotid angiography showed any abnormality, but computerized tomography (CT) revealed a slightly high-density area which was not enhanced with contrast media. Histologically, the tumors had many vascular cavities with walls lined with a single layer of endothelial cells and had no neural tissue between the vascular cavities; therefore, they were diagnosed as cases of cavernous angioma. The authors discussed the radiological findings of the intracranial cavernous angioma with a review of the literature and stressed the role of computerized tomography in the diagnosis of cavernous angioma. (author)

  20. In vivo sup 1 H-spectroscopy of human intracranial tumors at 1. 5 Tesla; Preliminary experience at a clinical installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, O.; Wieslander, S.; Gjerris, F.; Jensen, K.M. (Danish Research Center of Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen (Denmark) Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Clinic of Neurosurgery)

    1991-03-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may contribute to the characterization of intracranial tumors in vivo. Volume selective water suppressed proton spectroscopy offers the possibility to study a number of metabolities in the brain including choline (CHO), creatinine-phosphocreatinine (CR/PCR), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and lactate. Using the stimulated echo technique we have studied 17 patients with intracranial tumors. In all cases the tumors were classified based on histologic evaluation. The tumor spectra differed considerably from those obtained in healthy brain tissue. The results indicate a relative decrease in the NAA and CR/PCR content. In many cases a lactate peak could be seen especially in the tumors with malignant growth characteristics. Our preliminary results suggest that proton spectroscopy may contribute to the differentiation of brain tumors with respect to benign or malignant growth. However, further research is warranted before a definite conclusion can be drawn. (orig.).

  1. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  2. Intracranial MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.L.; Blatter, D.D.; Parker, D.L.; Robison, R.O.; Harnsberger, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper compares the more traditional three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight MR angiography with a novel new technique, MOTSA, in the evaluation of both normal and abnormal intracranial anatomy. The authors performed sequential, location-matched 3D TOF and MOTSA MR angiography in 10 subjects with normal and 25 with abnormal intracranial anatomy. Images were evaluated for visualization of specific vessels and depiction of pathologic anatomy. All images were subjected to an objective scoring system. Digital angiography was available in 15 of 25 abnormal cases. In the normal cases, large- and small-vessel visualization was improved. Significant improvement in visualization of venous anatomy was also observed. In the abnormal cases, pathologic anatomy was better visualized, providing important diagnostic information. Multiple overlapping thin-slab-acquisition MR angiography demonstrates vessel visualization that is increased over that of 3D TOF MR angiography in both normal and abnormal cases. Because of the decrease in saturation effects and phase dispersion, MOTSA is especially useful in the evaluation of complex intracranial vascular abnormalities

  3. THE ACOUSTIC DETECTION OF INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSMS - A CLINICAL-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBRUGGEN, AC; MOOIJ, JJA; JOURNEE, HL

    1991-01-01

    A new recording method for the acoustical detection of intracranial aneurysms is presented. A study examining the capability of the method to discriminate between patients with an aneurysm and control patients by a simple, objective parameter is reported. Sound signals were recorded over the eyes,

  4. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-05-12

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination.

  5. Three cases of intracranial lipoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Yanagida, Noritaka; Fujii, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Miyauchi, Takaharu

    1987-12-01

    Intracranial lipoma is an uncommon lesion that can be found in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Because of CT (computerized tomography), the tumors can now be easily diagnosed in asymptomatic individuals. Three cases of intracranial lipoma in asymptomatic patients are presented, along with a review of the literature, and the value of CT, especially coronal section, in the diagnosis of intracranial lipomas and associated anomalies, such as the agenesis of corpus callosum, is discussed.

  6. Prognostic factors in childhood intracranial neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampil, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of primary intracranial neoplasm in children (over 1 year but under 13 years of age) seen at the university medical center between 1951 and 1982 were reviewed because of concern as to the results and after-effects of applied therapy. The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 17 %. Several factors of possible prognostic relevance, such as patient's age, intracranial location of the tumor, application or nonapplication of therapy, single or multiple modes of therapy, and extent of surgery, were analyzed. Completeness of surgical removal of the tumor proved to be the only statistically significant factor that correlated with survival. There was only one recorded case of severe learning disability and abnormal neuropsychologic development among the 12 living patients. The influence of patient's age (and technical factors) at the time of irradiation in correlation with the child's subsequent posttreatment functional performance, as reported in the literature, is reviewed. (author)

  7. Deciphering long-term records of natural variability and human impact as recorded in lake sediments: a palaeolimnological puzzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Keely; Schillereff, Daniel; Saulnier-Talbot, Émilie

    2017-01-01

    that is particularly acute when considering management options for aquatic ecosystems. The duration and timing of human impacts on lake systems varies geographically, with some regions of the world (such as Africa and South America) having a longer legacy of human impact than others (e.g., New Zealand). A wide array...... of techniques (biological, chemical, physical and statistical) is available to palaeolimnologists to allow the deciphering of complex sedimentary records. Lake sediments are an important archive of how drivers have changed through time, and how these impacts manifest in lake systems. With a paucity of ‘real...

  8. Primary intracranial malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Mikiro; Ohtsuka, Takatsugu; Kuroki, Takao; Shibata, Iekado; Terao, Hideo; Kudo, Motoshige

    1988-01-01

    Nine cases of primary intracranial malignant lymphoma, which accounts for 3.3 % of all intracranial tumors seen in the authors' institution, were studied in terms of diagnostic computed tomographic (CT) features, the tumors' histologic appearance, treatment, post-treatment blood immunologic and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics, and outcome. The patients were seven males and two females aged 42 to 67 years. Their chief signs and symptoms on admission were intracranial hypertension, focal signs, and disturbance of consciousness. CT, which proved the most useful preoperative diagnostic technique, demonstrated multiple lesions in seven cases and, in all cases, regions of isodensity or slight high density that were enhanced by contrast medium. According to the patterns of enhancement, the tumors were classed as diffuse (three cases) or nodular (six cases). The former is considered typical of malignant lymphoma, whereas the latter type was sometimes indistinguishable from metastatic tumor and meningioma. At surgery, one patient underwent radical tumor excision, two partial removal, and six biopsy only. Histologic examination revealed one tumor to be of the diffuse small cell type, three of the medium cell type, and five of the large cell type (Lymphoma Study Group classification). Of seven tumors in which lymphocytes were examined by peroxidase-antiperoxidase staining, four were of the B cell type. Postoperatively, whole brain irradiation with 29 to 46 Gy was followed by local irradiation with 15 to 50 Gy. If the tumor persisted, one of three chemotherapies was administered. In one case, methotrexate was given intrathecally. Seven patients were divided into two groups: long remission (three) and recurrence (four). These two groups were compared in terms of serum immunoglobulin levels, T and B cell ratios, CSF characteristics, CT features, tumor cell type, and treatment. No clear differences were found. (author)

  9. Intracranial Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshan B. Hameed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant woman with a mechanical prosthetic mitral valve was anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin in the first trimester followed by warfarin until 36 weeks' gestation. She was then switched to intravenous unfractionated heparin infusion to allow for regional anesthesia in anticipation of vaginal delivery. She developed severe headache on hospital day 2 that was refractory to pain medications. Cranial imaging demonstrated a large subdural hematoma with midline shift. She delivered a healthy baby girl by cesarean section. Eventually, symptoms and intracranial abnormalities resolved over time. In conclusion, subdural hematoma is a relatively rare complication that requires multidisciplinary management plan.

  10. Experimental validation of the influence of white matter anisotropy on the intracranial EEG forward solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangera, Nitin B; Schomer, Donald L; Dehghani, Nima; Ulbert, Istvan; Cash, Sydney; Papavasiliou, Steve; Eisenberg, Solomon R; Dale, Anders M; Halgren, Eric

    2010-12-01

    Forward solutions with different levels of complexity are employed for localization of current generators, which are responsible for the electric and magnetic fields measured from the human brain. The influence of brain anisotropy on the forward solution is poorly understood. The goal of this study is to validate an anisotropic model for the intracranial electric forward solution by comparing with the directly measured 'gold standard'. Dipolar sources are created at known locations in the brain and intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) is recorded simultaneously. Isotropic models with increasing level of complexity are generated along with anisotropic models based on Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A Finite Element Method based forward solution is calculated and validated using the measured data. Major findings are (1) An anisotropic model with a linear scaling between the eigenvalues of the electrical conductivity tensor and water self-diffusion tensor in brain tissue is validated. The greatest improvement was obtained when the stimulation site is close to a region of high anisotropy. The model with a global anisotropic ratio of 10:1 between the eigenvalues (parallel: tangential to the fiber direction) has the worst performance of all the anisotropic models. (2) Inclusion of cerebrospinal fluid as well as brain anisotropy in the forward model is necessary for an accurate description of the electric field inside the skull. The results indicate that an anisotropic model based on the DTI can be constructed non-invasively and shows an improved performance when compared to the isotropic models for the calculation of the intracranial EEG forward solution.

  11. Intracranial Infections: Clinical and Imaging Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, B.R.; Thurnher, M.M.; Malani, P.N.; Petrou, M.; Carets-Zumelzu, F.; Sundgren, P.C. [Dept. of Radiology, and Divisions of Infectious Diseases and G eriatric Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The radiologist plays a crucial role in identifying and narrowing the differential diagnosis of intracranial infections. A thorough understanding of the intracranial compartment anatomy and characteristic imaging findings of specific pathogens, as well incorporation of the clinical information, is essential to establish correct diagnosis. Specific types of infections have certain propensities for different anatomical regions within the brain. In addition, the imaging findings must be placed in the context of the clinical setting, particularly in immunocompromised and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. This paper describes and depicts infections within the different compartments of the brain. Pathology-proven infectious cases are presented in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, with a discussion of the characteristic findings of each pathogen. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) characteristics for several infections are also discussed.

  12. Human Spaceflight and American Society: The Record So Far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Charles

    2002-01-01

    These remarks give me an excuse to revisit a world that Catherine Cox and I had a chance to live in vicariously from 1986 to 1989 when we were researching and writing about Project Apollo. As I thought about it, I realized that actually very few people in this audience have had a chance to live in that world, either vicariously or for real. For most people today, NASA's human spaceflight program is the Shuttle. The NASA you know is an extremely large bureaucracy. The Apollo you know is a historical event. So to kick off today's presentations, I want to be the "Voice of Christmas Past." If we want to think about what is possible for human spaceflight as part of America's future, it is essential to understand how NASA people understood "possible" during the Apollo era. It is also important to understand that the way NASA functioned during the Apollo Program was wildly different from the way NASA functions now. In fact-and I say this with all due respect to the current NASA team members who are doing fine work-the race to the Moon was not really a race against the Russians; it was a race to see if we could get to the Moon before NASA became a bureaucracy, and we won. But the lessons of that experience should be ones that we still have at the front of our minds.

  13. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardwell, C.; Cox, I.; Baldey, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 49-year old female presented with severe postural headache with no history of trauma. A Computed Tomography (CT) study of the brain demonstrated abnormal meningeal enhancement raising the possibility of leptomeningeal metastases. The patient was then referred to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which demonstrated diffuse smooth dural enhancement with ancillary findings characteristic of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. The patient was then referred to Nuclear Medicine to confirm the diagnosis and localise the presumed leak 400MBq of 99mTc DTPA was injected via lumbar puncture into the L3-L4 subarachnoid space Posterior images of the spine were taken with a GE XRT single head gamma camera at 1 and 4 hours post administration of radionuclide. Images demonstrated abnormal early arrival of radionuclide in the kidneys and bladder at 1 hour and abnormal leak of tracer was demonstrate at the level of the first thoracic vertebra on the right side at 4 hours. This confirmed CSF leak at this level. Consequently the patient underwent a blood patch and her symptoms resolved. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension is a syndrome often unrecognised presenting with symptoms including severe postural headache neck stiffness nausea vomiting tinnitus and vertigo. The diagnosis is frequently suspected from findings on MRI, but Nuclear Medicine CSF imaging provides a readily available and cost effective method for confirming the diagnosis, and for making the diagnosis in patients who are unsuitable for or do not have access to MRI. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  14. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardwell, C; Cox, I; Baldey, A [St. F.X. Cabrini Hospital, VIC (Australia). Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    2002-07-01

    Full text: A 49-year old female presented with severe postural headache with no history of trauma. A Computed Tomography (CT) study of the brain demonstrated abnormal meningeal enhancement raising the possibility of leptomeningeal metastases. The patient was then referred to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which demonstrated diffuse smooth dural enhancement with ancillary findings characteristic of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. The patient was then referred to Nuclear Medicine to confirm the diagnosis and localise the presumed leak 400MBq of 99mTc DTPA was injected via lumbar puncture into the L3-L4 subarachnoid space Posterior images of the spine were taken with a GE XRT single head gamma camera at 1 and 4 hours post administration of radionuclide. Images demonstrated abnormal early arrival of radionuclide in the kidneys and bladder at 1 hour and abnormal leak of tracer was demonstrate at the level of the first thoracic vertebra on the right side at 4 hours. This confirmed CSF leak at this level. Consequently the patient underwent a blood patch and her symptoms resolved. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension is a syndrome often unrecognised presenting with symptoms including severe postural headache neck stiffness nausea vomiting tinnitus and vertigo. The diagnosis is frequently suspected from findings on MRI, but Nuclear Medicine CSF imaging provides a readily available and cost effective method for confirming the diagnosis, and for making the diagnosis in patients who are unsuitable for or do not have access to MRI. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc.

  15. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Medical and Research Study Records of Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Medical & Research Study Records of Human Volunteers System collects demographic and medical information on subjects who participate in research. Learn how this data is collected, used, access to the data, and the purpose of data collection.

  16. New micro waveforms firstly recorded on electrocardiogram in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renguang; Chang, Qinghua; Chen, Juan

    2015-10-01

    In our study, not only the P-QRS-T waves but also the micro-wavelets before QRS complex (in P wave and PR segment) and after QRS complex (ST segment and upstroke of T wave) were first to be identified on surface electrocardiogram in human by the "new electrocardiogram" machine (model PHS-A10) according to conventional 12-lead electrocardiogram connection methods. By comparison to the conventional electrocardiogram in 100 cases of healthy individuals and several patients with arrhythmias, we have found that the wavelets before P wave theoretically reflected electrical activity of sinus node and the micro-wavelets before QRS complex may be related to atrioventricular conduction system (atrioventricular node, His bundle and bundle branch) potentials. Noninvasive atrioventricular node and His bundle potential tracing will contribute to differentiation of the origin of wide QRS and the location of the atrioventricular block. We also have found that the wavelets after QRS complex may be associated with phase 2 and 3 repolarization of ventricular action potential, which will further reveal ventricular repolarization changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The risk of intravenous thrombolysis-induced intracranial hemorrhage in Taiwanese patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ting Chiu

    Full Text Available The presence of an intracranial aneurysm is contraindicated to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, it is difficult to exclude asymptomatic intracranial aneurysms by using conventional, noncontrast head computed tomography (CT, which is the only neuroimaging suggested before r-tPA. Recent case reports and series have shown that administering r-tPA to patients with a pre-existing aneurysm does not increase the bleeding risk. However, Asians are known to have a relatively higher bleeding risk, and little evidence is available regarding the risk of using r-tPA on Asian patients with intracranial aneurysms.Medical records from the Shuang Ho hospital stroke registration between July 2010 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed, and 144 patients received r-tPA. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms were detected using CT, or magnetic resonance or conventional angiography after r-tPA. The primary and secondary outcomes were the difference in overall intracranial hemorrhage (ICH and symptomatic ICH after r-tPA. The differences were analyzed using Fisher's exact or Mann-Whitney U tests, and p < 0.05 was defined as the statistical significance.A total of 144 patients were reviewed, and incidental unruptured intracranial aneurysms were found in 11 of them (7.6%. No significant difference was observed in baseline demographic data between the aneurysm and nonaneurysm groups. Among patients with an unruptured aneurysm, two had giant aneurysms (7.7 and 7.4 mm, respectively. The bleeding risk was not significant different between aneurysm group (2 out of 11, 18% with nonaneurysm group (7 out of 133, 5.3% (p = 0.14. None of the patients with an unruptured aneurysm had symptomatic ICH, whereas one patient without an aneurysm exhibited symptomatic ICH.The presence of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm did not significantly increase the risk of overall and symptomatic ICH in Taiwanese patients after they

  18. Is Marfan syndrome associated with symptomatic intracranial aneurysms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J. S.; Limburg, M.; Hennekam, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Marfan syndrome is a heritable disorder of connective tissue caused by a deficiency of the glycoprotein fibrillin. In several publications and neurological textbooks, a relationship between Marfan syndrome and intracranial aneurysms has been assumed. METHODS: The records of

  19. Acoustic detection of intracranial aneurysms : A decision analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanBruggen, AC; Dippel, DWJ; Habbema, JDF; Mooij, JJA

    1996-01-01

    We present a further evaluation of an improved recording method for the acoustic detection of intracranial aneurysms (ADA). A sensor was applied to the patient's eyes. Two measures were derived to summarize the power spectral density functions of the sound frequencies that were obtained from each

  20. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fallen out of favor, unless there is a secondary inflammatory process caused by an underlying disease like ... have little effect on headaches caused by intracranial hypertension, they may temporarily affect the intensity of a ...

  1. Visual findings as primary manifestations in patients with intracranial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazife Sefi-Yurdakul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the visual findings as primary manifestations in patients with intracranial tumors.METHODS:The medical charts of the patients with intracranial tumors who initially admitted to the Neuro-ophthalmology and Strabismus Department with ocular complaints between August 1999 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The detailed clinical history and the findings of neuro-ophthalmologic examination were recorded. Ocular symptoms and signs, the types and locations of intracranial tumors, and the duration of symptoms before the diagnosis were evaluated.RESULTS:The mean age of 11 women (61.1% and 7 men (38.9% was 42.2±11.0 (range 20-66y at the time of intracranial tumor diagnosis. Initial symptoms were transient visual obscurations, visual loss or visual field defect in 16 cases (88.9%, and diplopia in 2 cases (11.1%. Neuro-ophthalmologic examination revealed normal optic discs in both eyes of 6 patients (33.3%, paleness, atrophy or edema of optic disc in 12 patients (66.7%, and sixth cranial nerve palsy in 2 patients (11.1%. Visual acuity ranged between normal vision and loss of light perception. Cranial imaging demonstrated craniopharyngioma (n=1, plasmacytoma (n=1, meningioma (n=6; olfactory groove and tuberculum sellae, pontocerebellar angle, anterior cranial fossa, frontal vertex, suprasellar region, and pituitary macroadenoma (n=10. The mean duration between the onset of visual disturbances and the diagnosis of intracranial tumor was 9.8±18mo (range 3d-6y.CONCLUSION:The ophthalmologist is frequently the first physician to encounter a patient with clinical manifestations of intracranial tumors that may cause neurological and ocular complications. Neuro-ophthalmologic findings should be carefully evaluated to avoid a delay in the diagnosis of intracranial tumors.

  2. Visual findings as primary manifestations in patients with intracranial tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nazife; Sefi-Yurdakul

    2015-01-01

    · AIM: To evaluate the visual findings as primary manifestations in patients with intracranial tumors.·METHODS: The medical charts of the patients with intracranial tumors who initially admitted to the Neuro-ophthalmology and Strabismus Department with ocular complaints between August 1999 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The detailed clinical history and the findings of neuro-ophthalmologic examination were recorded. Ocular symptoms and signs,the types and locations of intracranial tumors, and the duration of symptoms before the diagnosis were evaluated.·RESULTS: The mean age of 11 women(61.1%) and 7men(38.9%) was 42.2±11.0(range 20-66y) at the time of intracranial tumor diagnosis. Initial symptoms were transient visual obscurations, visual loss or visual field defect in 16 cases(88.9%), and diplopia in 2 cases(11.1%). Neuro-ophthalmologic examination revealed normal optic discs in both eyes of 6 patients(33.3%),paleness, atrophy or edema of optic disc in 12 patients(66.7%), and sixth cranial nerve palsy in 2 patients(11.1%). Visual acuity ranged between normal vision and loss of light perception. Cranial imaging demonstrated craniopharyngioma(n =1), plasmacytoma(n =1),meningioma(n =6; olfactory groove and tuberculum sellae, pontocerebellar angle, anterior cranial fossa,frontal vertex, suprasellar region), and pituitary macroadenoma(n =10). The mean duration between the onset of visual disturbances and the diagnosis of intracranial tumor was 9.8±18mo(range 3d-6y).·CONCLUSION: The ophthalmologist is frequently the first physician to encounter a patient with clinical manifestations of intracranial tumors that may cause neurological and ocular complications. Neuro-ophthalmologic findings should be carefully evaluated to avoid a delay in the diagnosis of intracranial tumors.

  3. Regional environmental change and human activity over the past hundred years recorded in the sedimentary record of Lake Qinghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, ZhanJiang; Wang, Qiugui; Wang, Jinlong; Du, Jinzhou; Hu, Jufang; Ma, Yujun; Kong, Fancui; Wang, Zhuan

    2017-04-01

    Environmental change and human activity can be recorded in sediment cores in aquatic systems such as lakes. Information from such records may be useful for environmental governance in the future. Six sediment cores were collected from Lake Qinghai, China and its sublakes during 2012 and 2013. Measurements of sediment grain-size fractions indicate that sedimentation in the north and southwest of Lake Qinghai is dominated by river input, whereas that in Lake Gahai and Lake Erhai is dominated by dunes. The sedimentation rates in Lake Qinghai were calculated to be 0.101-0.159 cm/y, similar to the rates in other lakes on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Using these data and sedimentation rates from the literature, we compiled the spatial distribution of sedimentation rates. Higher values were obtained in the three main areas of Lake Qinghai: two in river estuaries and one close to sand dunes. Lower values were measured in the center and south of the lake. Measurements of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), phosphorus concentrations, and TOC/TN ratios in three cores (QH01, QH02, and Z04) revealed four horizons corresponding to times of increased human activity. These anthropogenic events were (1) the development of large areas of cropland in the Lake Qinghai watershed in 1960, (2) the beginning of nationwide fertilizer use and increases in cropland area in the lake watershed after 1970, (3) the implementation of the national program "Grain to Green," and (4) the rapid increase in the tourism industry from 2000. Profiles of Rb, Sr concentrations, the Rb/Sr ratio, and grain-size fraction in core Z04 indicate that the climate has become drier over the past 100 years. Therefore, we suggest that lake sediments such as those in Lake Qinghai are useful media for high-resolution studies of regional environmental change and human activity.

  4. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype or a...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  5. Simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and single neuron recording in alert non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Grigsby, Erinn M.; Prevosto, Vincent; Petraglia, Frank W.; Rao, Hrishikesh; Deng, Zhi-De; Peterchev, Angel V.; Sommer, Marc A.; Egner, Tobias; Platt, Michael L.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used, noninvasive method for stimulating nervous tissue, yet its mechanisms of effect are poorly understood. Here we report novel methods for studying the influence of TMS on single neurons in the brain of alert non-human primates. We designed a TMS coil that focuses its effect near the tip of a recording electrode and recording electronics that enable direct acquisition of neuronal signals at the site of peak stimulus strength minimally per...

  6. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  7. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Manjón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden.

  8. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  9. Dealing with noise and physiological artifacts in human EEG recordings: empirical mode methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Khramova, Marina V.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2017-04-01

    In the paper we propose the new method for removing noise and physiological artifacts in human EEG recordings based on empirical mode decomposition (Hilbert-Huang transform). As physiological artifacts we consider specific oscillatory patterns that cause problems during EEG analysis and can be detected with additional signals recorded simultaneously with EEG (ECG, EMG, EOG, etc.) We introduce the algorithm of the proposed method with steps including empirical mode decomposition of EEG signal, choosing of empirical modes with artifacts, removing these empirical modes and reconstructing of initial EEG signal. We show the efficiency of the method on the example of filtration of human EEG signal from eye-moving artifacts.

  10. Intracranial arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marta; Oliveira, Ana; Azevedo, Elsa; Bastos-Leite, António J

    2014-04-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS) is usually attributable to atherosclerosis and corresponds to the most common cause of stroke worldwide. It is very prevalent among African, Asian, and Hispanic populations. Advancing age, systolic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and metabolic syndrome are some of its major risk factors. IAS may be associated with transient or definite neurological symptoms or can be clinically asymptomatic. Transcranial Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography are the most frequently used ancillary examinations for screening and follow-up. Computed tomography angiography can either serve as a screening tool for the detection of IAS or increasingly as a confirmatory test approaching the diagnostic accuracy of catheter digital subtraction angiography, which is still considered the gold (confirmation) standard. The risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic IAS is low (up to 6% over a mean follow-up period of approximately 2 years), but the annual risk of stroke recurrence in the presence of a symptomatic stenosis may exceed 20% when the degree of luminal narrowing is 70% or more, recently after an ischemic event, and in women. It is a matter of controversy whether there is a specific type of treatment other than medical management (including aggressive control of vascular risk factors and antiplatelet therapy) that may alter the high risk of stroke recurrence among patients with symptomatic IAS. Endovascular treatment has been thought to be helpful in patients who fail to respond to medical treatment alone, but recent data contradict such expectation. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multiple intracranial hydatid cysts: MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumar, J.; Alvarez, M.; Leira, R.; Prieto, J.M.; Arrojo, L.; Pereira, J.; Vidal, J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple intracranial hydatid cysts are uncommon and usually localized in the supratentorial compartment. We report a case studied by CT and MR of multiple intracranial hydatid cysts scattered in various anatomic sites: supratentorial, infratentorial and also intraventricular. (orig.)

  12. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    . The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  13. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation. T....... The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  14. Human motor cortical activity recorded with Micro-ECoG electrodes, during individual finger movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Degenhart, A D; Collinger, J L; Vinjamuri, R; Sudre, G P; Adelson, P D; Holder, D L; Leuthardt, E C; Moran, D W; Boninger, M L; Schwartz, A B; Crammond, D J; Tyler-Kabara, E C; Weber, D J

    2009-01-01

    In this study human motor cortical activity was recorded with a customized micro-ECoG grid during individual finger movements. The quality of the recorded neural signals was characterized in the frequency domain from three different perspectives: (1) coherence between neural signals recorded from different electrodes, (2) modulation of neural signals by finger movement, and (3) accuracy of finger movement decoding. It was found that, for the high frequency band (60-120 Hz), coherence between neighboring micro-ECoG electrodes was 0.3. In addition, the high frequency band showed significant modulation by finger movement both temporally and spatially, and a classification accuracy of 73% (chance level: 20%) was achieved for individual finger movement using neural signals recorded from the micro-ECoG grid. These results suggest that the micro-ECoG grid presented here offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution for the development of minimally-invasive brain-computer interface applications.

  15. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R.; Pandey, Tarun; Badawi, Mona H.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  16. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  17. Intracranial Monitoring after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Intracranial monitoring after severe traumatic brain injury offers the possibility for early detection and amelioration of physiological insults. In this thesis, I explore cerebral insults due raised intracranial pressure, decreased cerebral perfusion pressure and impaired cerebral pressure reactivity after traumatic brain injury. In chapter 2, the importance of intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and pressure reactivity in regulating the cerebral circulation is elucidated ...

  18. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...

  19. Genome screen in familial intracranial aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langefeld Carl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with 1st degree relatives harboring an intracranial aneurysm (IA are at an increased risk of IA, suggesting genetic variation is an important risk factor. Methods Families with multiple members having ruptured or unruptured IA were recruited and all available medical records and imaging data were reviewed to classify possible IA subjects as definite, probable or possible IA or not a case. A 6 K SNP genome screen was performed in 333 families, representing the largest linkage study of IA reported to date. A 'narrow' (n = 705 definite IA cases and 'broad' (n = 866 definite or probable IA disease definition were used in multipoint model-free linkage analysis and parametric linkage analysis, maximizing disease parameters. Ordered subset analysis (OSA was used to detect gene × smoking interaction. Results Model-free linkage analyses detected modest evidence of possible linkage (all LOD Conclusion These data suggest it is unlikely that there is a single common variant with a strong effect in the majority of the IA families. Rather, it is likely that multiple genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the susceptibility for intracranial aneurysms.

  20. Intracranial lipoma in the sylvian fissure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kinjo, Toshihiko; Onuma, Takehide

    1988-01-01

    An experience with an operation on a case of intracranial lipoma in the sylvian fissure is reported. A 14-year-old man had complained of attacks of abnormal behavior for 2 years and was diagnosed by a psychiatrist as suffering from temporal epilepsy. A computed tomography (CT) scan indicated an abnormal shadow on the brain, and so he was admitted to our hospital. On admission, the results of physical and neurological examinations were normal. An electroencephalogram recorded irregular δ waves and sharp waves over the right frontotemporal region, however. A CT scan showed a round-shaped, extremely low-density area, with calcification of the wall and without contrast-enhancement, in the left sylvian fissure. No abnormal finding was seen in plain skull X-P or in left-carotid angiography. Left-frontotemporal craniotomy was performed to remove the tumor. A solid yellowish tumor was found in the sylvian fissure and totally removed. Histologically, it proved to be a lipoma. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficit. We discussed the neuroradiological findings of sylvian lipomas. As far as we have learned in an extensive review of the literature, there have been nine reports on intracranial lipomas in the sylvian fissure; as for sylvian lipomas which were detected on a CT scan during life, there have been only six cases other than the present one. (author)

  1. Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department's ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE's historical records to independent research and analysis

  2. Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department`s ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE`s historical records to independent research and analysis.

  3. The effect of 50/60 Hz notch filter application on human and rat ECG recordings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vale-Cardoso, A S; Guimarães, H N

    2010-01-01

    Power-line interference is always present in indoor biopotential measurements, even when its extremely low magnitude makes it imperceptible. In special situations, this kind of interference can be neglected, but this is not a general rule. In laboratory experiments and clinical analysis, it is hard (and expensive) to isolate the subject of measurement from electrical fields produced by a power line. In human biopotential recordings, it is common practice to apply a 50/60 Hz notch filter to reduce this kind of interference. In such cases, there is no considerable distortion observed on the recorded signal. However, experiments showed that it is not true for rat ECG recordings. Several kinds of notch filters (analog and digital) were implemented for evaluation of the distortion caused on ECG signals. These filters were applied to ECGs of humans and rats and then distortion estimates were computed from their resulting signals. The comparison of these estimates showed that, as experimentally observed, rat ECG signals are significantly distorted and deformed when a 50/60 Hz notch filter is applied to them, while human ECGs are not. The major goal of this paper is to show that the use of a notch filter for power-line interference rejection, when applied to rat ECG recordings, can severely deform the QRS complex of such signals, warning researchers against its non-deliberate usage

  4. Ticks infesting wild and domestic animals and humans of Sri Lanka with new host records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanaarachchi, D R; Rajakaruna, R S; Dikkumbura, A W; Rajapakse, R P V J

    2015-02-01

    An island-wide collection of tick species infesting humans, domesticated and wild animals and questing ticks in domestic and peridomestic environments was carried out during 2009-2011. A total of 30,461 ticks were collected from 30 different hosts and free living stages from the ground. The collection consisted of 22 tick species from 30 different hosts recording 12 tick species from humans, 19 from domesticated animals and 21 from wild animals, with a total of 97 new host records. The most common tick species on humans were Dermacentor auratus and Amblyomma testudinairum, while Haemaphysalis intermedia, Rhipicephalus microplus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus were common in domesticated and wild animals sharing 20 host species. Among the questing ticks, immature D. auratus was the most abundant. Humans and domesticated animals were mostly infested by the nymphal stages while adult ticks were found on wild animals. High number of new host records could be due to domestic animals picking tick species from wildlife and vise versa at the human/animal interface. Habitat destruction due to forest fragmentation has lead to wild animals roaming in urban and semi-urban neighbourhoods increasing the interactions of wild animals with domesticated animals. Wild animals play a significant role as a reservoir of many tick borne infections which can easily be spread to domesticated animals and then to humans via tick infestations. Data in this paper are useful for those interested in tick infesting wild and domestic animals and humans in describing the zoonotic potential of tick borne infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Primary intracranial leiomyoma: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, P.H.; Yang, C.F.; Yeh, L.R.; Pan, H.B. [Department of Radiology, Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung, National Yang Ming University, National Defence Medical Centre, 386 Ta-Chung First Rd., Kaohsiung 813, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China); Huang, C.H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Veterans General Hospital-Kashsiung, National Yang Ming University, National Defence Medical Centre, Kashsiung, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China); Lin, S.L. [Department of Pathology, Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung, National Yang Ming University, National Defence Medical Centre, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1998-04-01

    We present a case of intracranial parenchymal leiomyoma in a 20-year-old woman with a chief complaint of numbness and a painful sensation over the right limbs for several years. CT and MRI revealed an intensely enhancing calcified mass. The patient was well, without recurrence, 2 years after surgery. (orig.) With 2 figs., 13 refs.

  6. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alex P; Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2015-06-01

    Although once a widely speculated about and largely theoretical topic, spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension has gained acceptance as a distinct clinical phenomenon, yet the underlying physiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the past, many terms were used to describe the symptoms of malaise, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo, though longer duration spaceflights have increased the prevalence of overlapping symptoms of headache and visual disturbance. Spaceflight-induced visual pathology is thought to be a manifestation of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) because of its similar presentation to cases of known intracranial hypertension on Earth as well as the documentation of increased ICP by lumbar puncture in symptomatic astronauts upon return to gravity. The most likely mechanisms of spaceflight-induced increased ICP include a cephalad shift of body fluids, venous outflow obstruction, blood-brain barrier breakdown, and disruption to CSF flow. The relative contribution of increased ICP to the symptoms experienced during spaceflight is currently unknown, though other factors recently posited to contribute include local effects on ocular structures, individual differences in metabolism, and the vasodilator effects of carbon dioxide. This review article attempts to consolidate the literature regarding spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension and distinguish it from other pathologies with similar symptomatology. It discusses the proposed physiological causes and the pathological manifestations of increased ICP in the spaceflight environment and provides considerations for future long-term space travel. In the future, it will be critical to develop countermeasures so that astronauts can participate at their peak potential and return safely to Earth.

  7. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE REPORT. 16. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • July 2005. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis. M Modi. FCRad (SA), MMed. Department of Radiation Sciences ... wall where granulomatous inflamma- tion (Fig. 2, arrow) was present in the adventitia. A specific site of origin for the subarachnoid haemorrhage was.

  8. Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gomes de Carvalho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Carvalho J.R.G., Vasconcellos C.H.C., Bastos I. P.B., Trajano F.L.C., Costa T.S. & Fernandes J.I [Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report.] Meningioma intracraniano canino: Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:1- 7, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465 Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23.897-000, Brasil, E-mail: vetjulio@yahoo.com.br Intracranial neoplasms usually show their signals in a moderate way, revealing a long background of nonspecific signs, making the diagnosis more difficult. The meningioma is the most common intracranial neoplasm in dogs and cats. Along the years, the Veterinary Medicine has experienced important technological improvements, making it possible the diagnosis of a lot of diseases. Therefore, diseases considered not common in the past, started being diagnosed more frequently, for instance, brain lesions. The objective of this research is to report a case of intracranial meningioma in a Boxer dog that arrived at the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, highlighting its clinical improvement, diagnosis and treatment.

  9. What Is IH (Intracranial Hypertension)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store What is IH? What is IH? Intracranial hypertension literally means that the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid ( ... is too high. “Intracranial” means “within the skull.” “Hypertension” means “high fluid pressure.” To understand how this ...

  10. Simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and single-neuron recording in alert non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jerel K; Grigsby, Erinn M; Prevosto, Vincent; Petraglia, Frank W; Rao, Hrishikesh; Deng, Zhi-De; Peterchev, Angel V; Sommer, Marc A; Egner, Tobias; Platt, Michael L; Grill, Warren M

    2014-08-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used, noninvasive method for stimulating nervous tissue, yet its mechanisms of effect are poorly understood. Here we report new methods for studying the influence of TMS on single neurons in the brain of alert non-human primates. We designed a TMS coil that focuses its effect near the tip of a recording electrode and recording electronics that enable direct acquisition of neuronal signals at the site of peak stimulus strength minimally perturbed by stimulation artifact in awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We recorded action potentials within ∼1 ms after 0.4-ms TMS pulses and observed changes in activity that differed significantly for active stimulation as compared with sham stimulation. This methodology is compatible with standard equipment in primate laboratories, allowing easy implementation. Application of these tools will facilitate the refinement of next generation TMS devices, experiments and treatment protocols.

  11. Simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and single neuron recording in alert non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Grigsby, Erinn M.; Prevosto, Vincent; Petraglia, Frank W.; Rao, Hrishikesh; Deng, Zhi-De; Peterchev, Angel V.; Sommer, Marc A.; Egner, Tobias; Platt, Michael L.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used, noninvasive method for stimulating nervous tissue, yet its mechanisms of effect are poorly understood. Here we report novel methods for studying the influence of TMS on single neurons in the brain of alert non-human primates. We designed a TMS coil that focuses its effect near the tip of a recording electrode and recording electronics that enable direct acquisition of neuronal signals at the site of peak stimulus strength minimally perturbed by stimulation artifact in intact, awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We recorded action potentials within ~1 ms after 0.4 ms TMS pulses and observed changes in activity that differed significantly for active stimulation as compared to sham stimulation. The methodology is compatible with standard equipment in primate laboratories, allowing for easy implementation. Application of these new tools will facilitate the refinement of next generation TMS devices, experiments, and treatment protocols. PMID:24974797

  12. An Overview of Sediment Organic Matter Records of Human Eutrophication in the Laurentian Great Lakes Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Philip A. [University of Michigan, Department of Geological Sciences (United States)], E-mail: pameyers@umich.ed

    2006-12-15

    The isotopic and molecular compositions of organic matter buried in lake sediments provide information that helps to reconstruct past environmental conditions and to assess impacts of humans on local ecosystems. This overview of sedimentary records from the North American Great Lakes region describes examples of applications of organic geochemistry to paleolimnological reconstructions. These lakes experienced a succession of human-induced environmental changes that started after completion of the Erie Canal in 1825. Agricultural deforestation in the mid-nineteenth century released soil nutrients that increased algal productivity and caused an associated increase in algal biomarkers in sediment records. Eutrophication that accompanied magnified delivery of municipal nutrients to the lakes in the 1960s and 1970s created excursions to less negative {delta}{sup 13}C values in sediment organic matter. Increased organic carbon mass accumulation rates mirror the isotopic evidence of eutrophication in the Great Lakes.

  13. Filtration of human EEG recordings from physiological artifacts with empirical mode method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Khramova, Marina V.

    2017-03-01

    In the paper we propose the new method for dealing with noise and physiological artifacts in experimental human EEG recordings. The method is based on analysis of EEG signals with empirical mode decomposition (Hilbert-Huang transform). We consider noises and physiological artifacts on EEG as specific oscillatory patterns that cause problems during EEG analysis and can be detected with additional signals recorded simultaneously with EEG (ECG, EMG, EOG, etc.) We introduce the algorithm of the method with following steps: empirical mode decomposition of EEG signal, choosing of empirical modes with artifacts, removing empirical modes with artifacts, reconstruction of the initial EEG signal. We test the method on filtration of experimental human EEG signals from eye-moving artifacts and show high efficiency of the method.

  14. Converging intracranial markers of conscious access.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Gaillard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We compared conscious and nonconscious processing of briefly flashed words using a visual masking procedure while recording intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG in ten patients. Nonconscious processing of masked words was observed in multiple cortical areas, mostly within an early time window (<300 ms, accompanied by induced gamma-band activity, but without coherent long-distance neural activity, suggesting a quickly dissipating feedforward wave. In contrast, conscious processing of unmasked words was characterized by the convergence of four distinct neurophysiological markers: sustained voltage changes, particularly in prefrontal cortex, large increases in spectral power in the gamma band, increases in long-distance phase synchrony in the beta range, and increases in long-range Granger causality. We argue that all of those measures provide distinct windows into the same distributed state of conscious processing. These results have a direct impact on current theoretical discussions concerning the neural correlates of conscious access.

  15. Intracranial Pressure Is a Determinant of Sympathetic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Schmidt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial pressure (ICP is the pressure within the cranium. ICP rise compresses brain vessels and reduces cerebral blood delivery. Massive ICP rise leads to cerebral ischemia, but it is also known to produce hypertension, bradycardia and respiratory irregularities due to a sympatho-adrenal mechanism termed Cushing response. One still unresolved question is whether the Cushing response is a non-synaptic acute brainstem ischemic mechanism or part of a larger physiological reflex for arterial blood pressure control and homeostasis regulation. We hypothesize that changes in ICP modulates sympathetic activity. Thus, modest ICP increase and decrease were achieved in mice and patients with respectively intra-ventricular and lumbar fluid infusion. Sympathetic activity was gauged directly by microneurography, recording renal sympathetic nerve activity in mice and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients, and gauged indirectly in both species by heart-rate variability analysis. In mice (n = 15, renal sympathetic activity increased from 29.9 ± 4.0 bursts.s−1 (baseline ICP 6.6 ± 0.7 mmHg to 45.7 ± 6.4 bursts.s−1 (plateau ICP 38.6 ± 1.0 mmHg and decreased to 34.8 ± 5.6 bursts.s−1 (post-infusion ICP 9.1 ± 0.8 mmHg. In patients (n = 10, muscle sympathetic activity increased from 51.2 ± 2.5 bursts.min−1 (baseline ICP 8.3 ± 1.0 mmHg to 66.7 ± 2.9 bursts.min−1 (plateau ICP 25 ± 0.3 mmHg and decreased to 58.8 ± 2.6 bursts.min−1 (post-infusion ICP 14.8 ± 0.9 mmHg. In patients 7 mmHg ICP rise significantly increases sympathetic activity by 17%. Heart-rate variability analysis demonstrated a significant vagal withdrawal during the ICP rise, in accordance with the microneurography findings. Mice and human results are alike. We demonstrate in animal and human that ICP is a reversible determinant of efferent sympathetic outflow, even at relatively low ICP levels. ICP is a biophysical stress related to the forces within the brain. But ICP

  16. Demonstration of uneven distribution of intracranial pulsatility in hydrocephalus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per K

    2008-11-01

    Data from intracranial pressure (ICP) recordings in patients with hydrocephalus were reviewed to determine whether intracranial pulsatility within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cerebral ventricles (ICP(LV)) may differ from that within the brain parenchyma (ICP(PAR)), and whether pulsatility may differ between noncommunicating ventricles. The authors retrieved data from recordings previously obtained in 7 patients with hydrocephalus (noncommunicating in 4 and communicating in 3) and shunt failure who received both an external ventricular drainage (EVD) and an ICP sensor as part of surveillance during intensive care. Simultaneous ICP(LV) and ICP(PAR) signals were available in 6 cases, and simultaneous signals from the lateral and fourth ventricles (ICP(LV) and ICP4V, respectively) were recorded in 1 case. The recordings with both signals were parsed into 6-second time windows. Pulsatility was characterized by the wave amplitude and rise time coefficient, and differences in pulsatility between the ICP(LV) and ICP(PAR) signals (6 cases) or ICP(LV) and ICP4V signals (1 case) were determined. There was uneven distribution of intracranial pulsatility in all 7 patients, shown as significantly elevated pulsatility (that is, higher wave amplitudes and rise time coefficients) within the ventricles (ICP(LV)) than within brain parenchyma (ICP(PAR)) in 6 patients, and significantly higher pulsatility in the fourth (ICP4V) than in the lateral (ICP(LV)) ventricles in 1 patient. Differences > or = 1 mm Hg in ICP wave amplitude were found in 0.5-100% (median 9.4%) of observations in the 7 patients (total number of 6-second time windows, 68,242). The present observations demonstrate uneven distribution of intracranial pulsatility in patients with hydrocephalus, higher pulse pressure amplitudes within the ventricular CSF (ICP(LV)) than within the brain parenchyma (ICP(PAR)). This may be one mechanism behind ventricular enlargement in hydrocephalus.

  17. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  18. First forensic records of termite activity on non-fossilized human bones in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Queiroz

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the first records of termite activity on non-fossilized human bones in Brazil. The cases reported in this study resulted from forensic analysis of six human skeletons found in northeastern Brazil between 2012 and 2014. Traces of tunnels and nests commonly produced by termites were found on several human bone surfaces as well as the specimens and characteristic signs of osteophagic activity. In four cases, the species were identified: Amitermes amifer Silvestri, 1901, Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky, 1855 (on two skeletons, and Microcerotermes indistinctus Mathews, 1977. In two other cases, the activity of termites on bone surfaces was evidenced by remains of nests and tunnels produced by these insects. At least in the samples of human remains available for this report, the number of termites collected was greater on bones found during autumn, the rainy season in the Northeast of Brazil. The human bones examined showed termites like insects with lots of strength at bone degradation, capable of continuing the process of decomposition of human remains even in completely skeletonized bodies.

  19. Intracranial germinoma: a clinical analysis of 33 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiangfei; Kang Jingbo; Nie Qing; Zhang Jun; Jia Haiwei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of clinical symptoms, examinations, and treatments in patients with intracranial germinoma. Methods: Medical records of 33 cases with intracranial germinoma between January 2000 and January 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: The study population consisted of 26 males and 7 females. Eighteen patients had a single tumor and 15 patients had multiple tumor. Twelve (36.4% ) were in the sellar region, 13 (39.4% ) in the pineal region, 5 cases (15.2% ) in basal ganglia and 9 cases in the periventricular region. Clinical manifestations: 21 patients (63.7% ) had headache, nausea and vomiting; 10 (30.3% ) had blurred vision and visual field damage; 11 (33.3% ) patients had diabetes insipidus and 7 patients (21.2% ) had limb weakness. Image study: MRI examination showed long T1, T2 or abnormal T1, T2 in MRI, which were enhanced equally by contrast medium. Diagnostic methods: 17 cases were confirmed by pathological diagnosis and 16 cases by diagnostic radiotherapy. Treatment: 3 cases underwent resection; 4 cases with obstructive hydrocephalus underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and 10 patients underwent stereotactic surgery. All the patients underwent radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. Symptoms were relieved obviously, but 2 patients had spinal cord metastasis. Conclusion: The increased intracranial pressure, polyuria, diplopia are the most common clinical symptoms of intracranial germ cell tumors. Common locations of lesions are the saddle area and pineal region. The whole brain + local radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy treatment is a common and effective modality for intracranial germinoma. Most patients have clinical symptoms remission and long survival. (authors)

  20. Recording human cortical population spikes non-invasively--An EEG tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterstraat, Gunnar; Fedele, Tommaso; Burghoff, Martin; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Curio, Gabriel

    2015-07-30

    Non-invasively recorded somatosensory high-frequency oscillations (sHFOs) evoked by electric nerve stimulation are markers of human cortical population spikes. Previously, their analysis was based on massive averaging of EEG responses. Advanced neurotechnology and optimized off-line analysis can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of sHFOs, eventually enabling single-trial analysis. The rationale for developing dedicated low-noise EEG technology for sHFOs is unfolded. Detailed recording procedures and tailored analysis principles are explained step-by-step. Source codes in Matlab and Python are provided as supplementary material online. Combining synergistic hardware and analysis improvements, evoked sHFOs at around 600 Hz ('σ-bursts') can be studied in single-trials. Additionally, optimized spatial filters increase the signal-to-noise ratio of components at about 1 kHz ('κ-bursts') enabling their detection in non-invasive surface EEG. sHFOs offer a unique possibility to record evoked human cortical population spikes non-invasively. The experimental approaches and algorithms presented here enable also non-specialized EEG laboratories to combine measurements of conventional low-frequency EEG with the analysis of concomitant cortical population spike responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intracranial MR imaging of achondroplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Shinichi; Ootsuka, Ryouichi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nishitani, Hiromu; Shirakawa, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Toshiaki

    1992-01-01

    Intracranial MR imaging was performed in five patients with achondroplasia. All patients had narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the level of the formen magnum that was mainly due to protrusion of the posterior aspect. Three patients had compressive deformities of the brainstem and/or upper cervical spine. Among them, two patients had deformities of the pons. Relative upward displacement of the brainstem was seen in all patients. Hydrocephalus was seen in three patients. (author)

  2. Intracranial MR imaging of achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shinichi; Ootsuka, Ryouichi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nishitani, Hiromu; Shirakawa, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Toshiaki (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-10-01

    Intracranial MR imaging was performed in five patients with achondroplasia. All patients had narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the level of the formen magnum that was mainly due to protrusion of the posterior aspect. Three patients had compressive deformities of the brainstem and/or upper cervical spine. Among them, two patients had deformities of the pons. Relative upward displacement of the brainstem was seen in all patients. Hydrocephalus was seen in three patients. (author).

  3. Computerized tomography of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungenberg, T.

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses the possibilities and limits of CT in the differential diagnosis of intracranial tumours. His discussion is based on a quantitative classification and a number of case studies selected under the following aspects: Misinterpretation of the CT image; specific diagnostic problems; uncommon CT image of the tumour; rare histological findings. 118 patients were examined between November 1976 and April 1979. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  5. Intracranial epidural hemorrhage during lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imajo, Yasuaki; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nishida, Norihiro; Goto, Hisaharu; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a case of intracranial epidural hemorrhage (ICEH) during spinal surgery. We could not find ICEH, though we recorded transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs). A 35-year-old man was referred for left anterior thigh pain and low back pain that hindered sleep. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural tumor at L3-L4 vertebral level. We performed osteoplastic laminectomy and en bloc tumor resection. TcMEPs were intraoperatively recorded at the bilateral abductor digiti minimi (ADM), quadriceps, tibialis anterior and abductor hallucis. When we closed a surgical incision, we were able to record normal TcMEPs in all muscles. The patient did not fully wake up from the anesthesia. He had right-sided unilateral positive ankle clonus 15 min after surgery in spite of bilateral negative of ankle clonus preoperatively. Emergent brain computed tomography scans revealed left epidural hemorrhage. The hematoma was evacuated immediately via a partial craniotomy. There was no restriction of the patient's daily activities 22 months postoperatively. We should pay attention to clinical signs such as headache and neurological findgings such as DTR and ankle clonus for patients with durotomy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Spine surgeons should know that it was difficult to detect ICEH by monitoring with TcMEPs.

  6. An automated system for the objective evaluation of human gustatory sensitivity using tongue biopotential recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Pani

    Full Text Available The goal of this work is to develop an automatic system for the evaluation of the gustatory sensitivity of patients using an electrophysiological recording of the response of bud cells to taste stimuli. In particular, the study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and limitations of supervised classifiers in the discrimination between subjects belonging to the three 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP taster categories (supertasters, medium tasters, and non-tasters, exploiting features extracted from electrophysiological recordings of the tongue. Thirty-nine subjects (equally divided into the three PROP status classes by standard non-objective scaling methods underwent a non-invasive, differential, biopotential recording of their tongues during stimulation with PROP by using a custom-made, flexible, silver electrode. Two different classifiers were trained to recognize up to seven different features extracted from the recorded depolarization signal. The classification results indicate that the identified set of features allows to distinguish between PROP tasters and non-tasters (average accuracy of 80% ± 18% and up to 94% ± 15% when only supertasters and non-tasters are considered, but medium tasters were difficult to identify. However, these apparent classification errors are related to uncertainty in the labeling procedures, which are based on non-objective tests, in which the subjects provided borderline evaluations. Thus, using the proposed method, it is possible, for the first time, to automatically achieve objective PROP taster status identification with high accuracy. The simplicity of the recording technique allows for easy reproduction of the experimental setting; thus the technique can be used in future studies to evaluate other gustatory stimuli. The proposed approach represents the first objective and automatic method to directly measure human gustatory responses and a milestone for physiological taste studies, with applications ranging from

  7. Intracranial arterial aneurysm vasculopathies: targeting the outer vessel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krings, Timo; Piske, Ronie L.; Lasjaunias, Pierre L.

    2005-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intracranial arterial aneurysms (AA) remains unclear, despite their clinical importance. An improved understanding of this disease is important in choosing therapeutic options. In addition to the ''classical'' berry-type aneurysm, there are various other types of intracranial AA such as infectious, dissecting or giant, partially-thrombosed aneurysms. From the clinician's perspective, the hypothesis that some of these intracranial AA might be due to abluminal factors has been proposed for several years. Indeed, this hypothesis and the empirical use of anti-inflammatory drugs in giant intracranial aneurysms have been confirmed by recent studies reporting that an enzyme involved in the inflammatory cascade (5-lipoxygenase or 5-LO) promotes the pathogenesis of specific aneurysms in humans. 5-LO generates different forms of leukotrienes which are potent mediators of inflammation. Adventitial inflammation leads to a weakening of the media from the abluminal part of the vessel wall due to the release of proinflammatory factors that invade the media, thereby degrading the extracellular matrix, the elastic lamina of the vascular wall, and, finally, the integrity of the vessel lumen. This in turn results in a dilation of the vessel and aneurysm formation. Moreover, neoangiogenesis of vasa vasorum is found in close proximity to 5-LO activated macrophages. In addition to this biological cascade, we argue that repeated subadventitial haemorrhages from the new vasa vasorum play an important role in aneurysm pathogenesis, due to a progressive increase in size mediated by the apposition of new layers of intramural haematoma within the vessel wall. Intracranial giant AA can therefore be regarded as a proliferative disease of the vessel wall induced by extravascular activity. (orig.)

  8. Vasomotor origin of intracranial pressure waves in hydrocephalic infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barritault, L; Rimbert, J N; Hirsch, J F; Pierr-Kahn, A; Lacombe, J; Zouaoui, A; Mises, J; Gabersek, V

    1980-12-01

    By measuring cerebral blood volume (CBV) and intracranial pressure (ICP) variations at the same running time during sleep, it has been demonstrated that the ICP wave which appears during the REM sleep in hydrocephalic infants is produced by intracerebral vaso-dilatation. Nine infants with stabilized hydrocephalus were investigated by non-invasive means: REM phases were distinguished with the usual polysomnographic electrodes. Intracranial pressure was measured with a fontanel palpation transducer and CBV variations were obtained by recording /sup 99/sup(m)Tc activity at the head level after in vivo labelling of red cells with /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate. The time activity curves, obtained from regions of interest and selected on the sequential radioisotope images, show that an increased ICP wave, occurring during the REM period, is related to a simultaneous increase in the blood volume, limited to the cerebral sector and not to the area of the external carotid artery.

  9. Mid- and late Holocene human impact recorded by the Coltrondo peat bog (NE Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segnana, Michela; Poto, Luisa; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Martino, Matteo; Oeggl, Klaus; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Peat bogs are ideal archives for the study of environmental changes, whether these are natural or human induced. Indeed, receiving water and nutrients exclusively from dry and wet atmospheric depositions, they are among the most suitable matrices for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. The present study is focused on the Eastern sector of the Italian Alps, where we sampled the Coltrondo peat bog, in the Comelico area (ca. 1800 m a.s.l.) The knowledge of the human history in this area is rather scarce: the only pieces of archaeological evidence found in this area dates back to the Mesolithic and the absence of later archaeological finds makes it difficult to reconstruct the human settlement in the valley. With the main aim to obtain information about the human settlement in that area we selected a multi-proxy approach, combining the study of biotic and abiotic sedimentary components archived in the 7900 years-peat bog record. Pollen analysis is performed along the core registering human impacts on the area from ca. 2500 cal BP, when land-use changes are well evidenced by the presence of human-related pollen and non-pollen palynomorphs (NPPs), as well as by the increase in micro-charcoal particles. Periods of increased human impact are recorded at the end of the Middle Ages and later, at the end of the 19th century. The analysis of trace elements, such as lead, is performed by means of ICP-MS technique and its enrichment factor (EF) is calculated. A first slight increase of Pb EF during Roman Times is possibly related to mining activities carried out by the Romans. Mining activities carried out in the area are registered during the Middle Ages, while the advent of the industrialization in the 20th century is marked by the highest EF values registered on the top of the core. To help and support the interpretation of geochemical data, lead isotopes ratios are also measured using ICP-MS to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic sources of lead. The 206Pb/207Pb

  10. Multichannel micromanipulator and chamber system for recording multineuronal activity in alert, non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Charles M; Goodell, Baldwin; Lear, Alex

    2007-07-01

    We describe the design and performance of an electromechanical system for conducting multineuron recording experiments in alert non-human primates. The system is based on a simple design, consisting of a microdrive, control electronics, software, and a unique type of recording chamber. The microdrive consists of an aluminum frame, a set of eight linear actuators driven by computer-controlled miniature stepping motors, and two printed circuit boards (PCBs) that provide connectivity to the electrodes and the control electronics. The control circuitry is structured around an Atmel RISC-based microcontroller, which sends commands to as many as eight motor control cards, each capable of controlling eight motors. The microcontroller is programmed in C and uses serial communication to interface with a host computer. The graphical user interface for sending commands is written in C and runs on a conventional personal computer. The recording chamber is low in profile, mounts within a circular craniotomy, and incorporates a removable internal sleeve. A replaceable Sylastic membrane can be stretched across the bottom opening of the sleeve to provide a watertight seal between the cranial cavity and the external environment. This greatly reduces the susceptibility to infection, nearly eliminates the need for routine cleaning, and permits repeated introduction of electrodes into the brain at the same sites while maintaining the watertight seal. The system is reliable, easy to use, and has several advantages over other commercially available systems with similar capabilities.

  11. Documenting genomics: Applying archival theory to preserving the records of the Human Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The Human Genome Archive Project (HGAP) aimed to preserve the documentary heritage of the UK's contribution to the Human Genome Project (HGP) by using archival theory to develop a suitable methodology for capturing the results of modern, collaborative science. After assessing past projects and different archival theories, the HGAP used an approach based on the theory of documentation strategy to try to capture the records of a scientific project that had an influence beyond the purely scientific sphere. The HGAP was an archival survey that ran for two years. It led to ninety scientists being contacted and has, so far, led to six collections being deposited in the Wellcome Library, with additional collections being deposited in other UK repositories. In applying documentation strategy the HGAP was attempting to move away from traditional archival approaches to science, which have generally focused on retired Nobel Prize winners. It has been partially successful in this aim, having managed to secure collections from people who are not 'big names', but who made an important contribution to the HGP. However, the attempt to redress the gender imbalance in scientific collections and to improve record-keeping in scientific organisations has continued to be difficult to achieve. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. An investigation and comparison of speech recognition software for determining if bird song recordings contain legible human voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim D. Hunt

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to test the effectiveness of using readily available speech recognition API services to determine if recordings of bird song had inadvertently recorded human voices. A mobile phone was used to record a human speaking at increasing distances from the phone in an outside setting with bird song occurring in the background. One of the services was trained with sample recordings and each service was compared for their ability to return recognized words. The services from Google and IBM performed similarly and the Microsoft service, that allowed training, performed slightly better. However, all three services failed to perform at a level that would enable recordings with recognizable human speech to be deleted in order to maintain full privacy protection.

  13. A Knowledge Discovery Approach to Diagnosing Intracranial Hematomas on Brain CT: Recognition, Measurement and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chun-Chih; Xiao, Furen; Wong, Jau-Min; Chiang, I.-Jen

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain is preferred study on neurological emergencies. Physicians use CT to diagnose various types of intracranial hematomas, including epidural, subdural and intracerebral hematomas according to their locations and shapes. We propose a novel method that can automatically diagnose intracranial hematomas by combining machine vision and knowledge discovery techniques. The skull on the CT slice is located and the depth of each intracranial pixel is labeled. After normalization of the pixel intensities by their depth, the hyperdense area of intracranial hematoma is segmented with multi-resolution thresholding and region-growing. We then apply C4.5 algorithm to construct a decision tree using the features of the segmented hematoma and the diagnoses made by physicians. The algorithm was evaluated on 48 pathological images treated in a single institute. The two discovered rules closely resemble those used by human experts, and are able to make correct diagnoses in all cases.

  14. Intracranial auditory detection and discrimination potentials as substrates of echoic memory in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liasis, A; Towell, A; Boyd, S

    1999-03-01

    In children, intracranial responses to auditory detection and discrimination processes have not been reported. We, therefore, recorded intracranial event-related potentials (ERPs) to both standard and deviant tones and/or syllables in 4 children undergoing pre-surgical evaluation for epilepsy. ERPs to detection (mean latency = 63 ms) and discrimination (mean latency = 334 ms) were highly localized to areas surrounding the Sylvian fissure (SF). These potentials reflect activation of different neuronal populations and are suggested to contribute to the scalp recorded auditory N1 and mismatch negativity (MMN).

  15. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  16. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacob G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension - IIH (synonymous old terms: benign intracranial hypertension - BIH, pseudotumor-cerebri - PTC it’s a syndrome, related to elevated intracranial pressure, of unknown cause, sometimes cerebral emergency, occuring in all age groups, especially in children and young obese womans, in the absence of an underlying expansive intracranial lesion, despite extensive investigations. Although initial symptoms can resolve, IIH displays a high risk of recurrence several months or years later, even if initial symptoms resolved. Results: A 20-year-old male, obese since two years (body mass index 30, 9, was admitted for three months intense headache, vomiting, diplopia, progressive visual acuity loss. Neurologic examination confirmed diplopia by left abducens nerve palsy, papilledema right > left. At admission, cerebral CT scan and cerebral MRI with angio MRI 3DTOF and 2D venous TOF was normal. Despite treatment with acetazolamide (Diamox, corticosteroid, antidepressants (Amitriptyline, anticonvulsivants (Topiramate three weeks later headache, diplopia persist and vision become worse, confirmed by visual field assessment, visual evoked potential (VEP. A cerebral arteriography demonstrate filling defect of the superior sagittal sinus in the 1/3 proximal part and very week filling of the transverse right sinus on venous time. Trombophylic profile has revealed a heterozygote V factor Leyden mutation, a homozygote MTHFR and PAI mutation justifying an anticoagulant treatment initiated to the patient. The MRI showed a superior sagittal sinus, right transverse and sigmoid sinus thrombosis, dilatation and buckling of the optic nerve sheaths with increased perineural fluid especially retrobulbar, discrete flattening of the posterior segment of the eyeballs, spinal MRI showed posterior epidural space with dilated venous branches, with mass effect on the spinal cord, that occurs pushed anterior on sagittal T1/T2 sequences cervical and

  17. The Pb isotopic record of historical to modern human lead exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenov, George D.; Gulson, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Human teeth and bones incorporate trace amounts of lead (Pb) from the local environment during growth and remodeling. Anthropogenic activities have caused changes in the natural Pb isotopic background since historical times and this is reflected in the Pb isotopes of historical European teeth. Lead mining and use increased exponentially during the last century and the isotopic compositions of modern human teeth reflect the modern anthropogenic Pb. USA teeth show the most radiogenic Pb and Australian teeth show the least radiogenic Pb, a result of different Pb ores used in the two regions. During the last century the Australian Pb was exported to Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa, resulting in swamping of the local environmental Pb signal by the imported Pb. As a result, the modern human teeth in Europe show a significant drop to lower isotopic values compared with historical times. Similarly, modern human teeth in other regions of the world show similar Pb isotopic ratios to modern European teeth reflecting the Pb imports. The specific pattern of human Pb exposure allows us to use the Pb isotopic signal recorded in the skeleton as a geo-referencing tool. As historical European teeth show a distinct Pb signal, we can identify early European skeletal remains in the New World and likely elsewhere. In modern forensic investigations we can discriminate to some extent Eastern Europeans from Western and Northern Europeans. Australians can be identified to some extent in any region in the world, although there is some overlap with Western European individuals. Lead isotopes can be used to easily identify foreigners in the USA, as modern USA teeth are distinct from any other region of the world. By analogy, USA individuals can be identified virtually in any other region of the world. - Highlights: • We present high-precision Pb isotope data for historical and modern human teeth. • Human teeth reflect human Pb exposure since historical times. • Modern teeth show

  18. The Pb isotopic record of historical to modern human lead exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenov, George D., E-mail: kamenov@ufl.edu [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida, 241 Williamson Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Gulson, Brian L. [Graduate School of the Environment, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2014-08-15

    Human teeth and bones incorporate trace amounts of lead (Pb) from the local environment during growth and remodeling. Anthropogenic activities have caused changes in the natural Pb isotopic background since historical times and this is reflected in the Pb isotopes of historical European teeth. Lead mining and use increased exponentially during the last century and the isotopic compositions of modern human teeth reflect the modern anthropogenic Pb. USA teeth show the most radiogenic Pb and Australian teeth show the least radiogenic Pb, a result of different Pb ores used in the two regions. During the last century the Australian Pb was exported to Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa, resulting in swamping of the local environmental Pb signal by the imported Pb. As a result, the modern human teeth in Europe show a significant drop to lower isotopic values compared with historical times. Similarly, modern human teeth in other regions of the world show similar Pb isotopic ratios to modern European teeth reflecting the Pb imports. The specific pattern of human Pb exposure allows us to use the Pb isotopic signal recorded in the skeleton as a geo-referencing tool. As historical European teeth show a distinct Pb signal, we can identify early European skeletal remains in the New World and likely elsewhere. In modern forensic investigations we can discriminate to some extent Eastern Europeans from Western and Northern Europeans. Australians can be identified to some extent in any region in the world, although there is some overlap with Western European individuals. Lead isotopes can be used to easily identify foreigners in the USA, as modern USA teeth are distinct from any other region of the world. By analogy, USA individuals can be identified virtually in any other region of the world. - Highlights: • We present high-precision Pb isotope data for historical and modern human teeth. • Human teeth reflect human Pb exposure since historical times. • Modern teeth show

  19. Microoptomechanical sensor for intracranial pressure monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, A V; Luchinin, V V; Lutetskiy, N A; Sergushichev, A N

    2014-01-01

    The main idea of this research is the development of microoptomechanical sensor for intracranial pressure monitoring. Currently, the authors studied the scientific and technical knowledge in this field, as well as develop and test a prototype of microoptomechanical sensor for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring

  20. MRI of intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, A.; Ochi, M.; Hayashi, K.; Hirata, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yasunaga, A.; Shibata, S.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the CT and MRI findings in a patient with primary intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). CT delineated the anatomical relations and MRI aided in tissue characterisation. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings in primary intracranial meningeal MFH. (orig.). With 1 fig

  1. Ultrasonographic Findings of Fetal Congenital Intracranial Teratoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ho; Song, Mi Jin; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Min, Jee Yeon; Moon, Min Hwan; Kim, Jeong Ah [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    To evaluate the sonographic findings of fetal congenital intracranial teratoma. From 1994 to 2002, of the 11 fetuses which had been diagnosed with fetal intracranial tumors after second level fetal ultrasonography, the six that were confirmed after autopsy as congenital intracranial teratomas were included in our study. The sonographic findings, including size, homogeneity, echogenicity compared with surrounding normal brain tissues, cystic components, and tumor related calcification, were retrospectively evaluated. The incidence of fetal congenital intracranial teratoma out of all fetal intracranial tumors was 54.5% (6 of 11 cases) during the 8-year period. The mean mass size was 7.4 cm (3.0-15.0 cm). Two thirds of (4/6) of the teratoma cases showed high echogenicity compared with normal brain tissues, and two thirds (4/6) showed heterogeneous echogenicity. Four teratoma cases (67%) showed cysts in the mass with a mean size of 1.9cm. One third (2/6) showed calcifications within the tumor. Out of the six cases, two had oropharyngeal teratoma with extension into the intracranial portion (so called epignathus) and showed homogenous mass without any cysts or calcifications. The typical sonographic appearance of intracranial teratoma was a heterogeneous, hyperechoic mass with cysts. In the epignathus cases, the sonographic appearances differed somewhat from the others. An understanding of the sonographic findings of fetal intracranial teratoma will help in the timely counseling of the parents and in obstetric decision making

  2. Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis: CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaid, A.H. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Dietemann, J.L. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Klinkert, A. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Kastler, B. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Gangi, A. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Jacquet, G. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. Hospital, Besancon (France)); Cattin, F. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Besancon (France))

    1994-05-01

    Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis is uncommon. We report a patient with right frontal lobe and palpebral lesions secondary to a primary hepatic focus with secondary lesion in the lung. The intracranial and palpebral cystic masses were totally removed and both proved to be alveolar hydatid cysts. An unusual feature in this case is CT and MRI demonstration of dural and bony extension. (orig.)

  3. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation.

  4. Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensaid, A.H.; Dietemann, J.L.; Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M.; Klinkert, A.; Kastler, B.; Gangi, A.; Jacquet, G.; Cattin, F.

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis is uncommon. We report a patient with right frontal lobe and palpebral lesions secondary to a primary hepatic focus with secondary lesion in the lung. The intracranial and palpebral cystic masses were totally removed and both proved to be alveolar hydatid cysts. An unusual feature in this case is CT and MRI demonstration of dural and bony extension. (orig.)

  5. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma.

  6. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-01-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma. (orig.)

  7. The population-based Barcelona-Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study (ASIA: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pera Guillem

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-artery intracranial atherosclerosis may be the most frequent cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Traditional approaches have attempted to target the disease when it is already symptomatic. However, early detection of intracranial atherosclerosis may allow therapeutic intervention while the disease is still asymptomatic. The prevalence and natural history of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis in Caucasians remain unclear. The aims of the Barcelona-ASymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis (ASIA study are (1 to determine the prevalence of ASIA in a moderate-high vascular risk population, (2 to study its prognostic impact on the risk of suffering future major ischemic events, and (3 to identify predictors of the development, progression and clinical expression of this condition. Methods/Design Cross-over and cohort, population-based study. A randomly selected representative sample of 1,503 subjects with a mild-moderate-high vascular risk (as defined by a REGICOR score ≥ 5% and with neither a history of cerebrovascular nor ischemic heart disease will be studied. At baseline, all individuals will undergo extracranial and transcranial Color-Coded Duplex (TCCD ultrasound examinations to detect presence and severity of extra and intracranial atherosclerosis. Intracranial stenoses will be assessed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA. Clinical and demographic variables will be recorded and blood samples will be drawn to investigate clinical, biological and genetic factors associated with the presence of ASIA. A long-term clinical and sonographic follow-up will be conducted thereafter to identify predictors of disease progression and of incident vascular events. Discussion The Barcelona-ASIA is a population-based study aiming to evaluate the prevalence and clinical importance of asymptomatic intracranial large-artery atherosclerosis in Caucasians. The ASIA project may provide a unique scientific resource to better

  8. The population-based Barcelona-Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study (ASIA): rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cancio, Elena; Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mónica; Reverté, Silvia; Suñol, Anna; Massuet, Anna; Mataró, María; Galán, Amparo; Alzamora, Maite; Pera, Guillem; Torán, Pere; Dávalos, Antoni; Arenillas, Juan F

    2011-02-17

    Large-artery intracranial atherosclerosis may be the most frequent cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Traditional approaches have attempted to target the disease when it is already symptomatic. However, early detection of intracranial atherosclerosis may allow therapeutic intervention while the disease is still asymptomatic. The prevalence and natural history of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis in Caucasians remain unclear. The aims of the Barcelona-ASymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis (ASIA) study are (1) to determine the prevalence of ASIA in a moderate-high vascular risk population, (2) to study its prognostic impact on the risk of suffering future major ischemic events, and (3) to identify predictors of the development, progression and clinical expression of this condition. Cross-over and cohort, population-based study. A randomly selected representative sample of 1,503 subjects with a mild-moderate-high vascular risk (as defined by a REGICOR score ≥ 5%) and with neither a history of cerebrovascular nor ischemic heart disease will be studied. At baseline, all individuals will undergo extracranial and transcranial Color-Coded Duplex (TCCD) ultrasound examinations to detect presence and severity of extra and intracranial atherosclerosis. Intracranial stenoses will be assessed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Clinical and demographic variables will be recorded and blood samples will be drawn to investigate clinical, biological and genetic factors associated with the presence of ASIA. A long-term clinical and sonographic follow-up will be conducted thereafter to identify predictors of disease progression and of incident vascular events. The Barcelona-ASIA is a population-based study aiming to evaluate the prevalence and clinical importance of asymptomatic intracranial large-artery atherosclerosis in Caucasians. The ASIA project may provide a unique scientific resource to better understand the dynamics of intracranial atherosclerosis from

  9. Intracranial metastases: spectrum of MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ja; Lee, Yong Seok [Department of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang-shi (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ejl1048@hanmail.net; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, No Hyuck [Department of Radiology, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Myongji Hospital, Goyang-shi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee-Jin [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); II, Sung Park [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Intracranial metastatic lesions arise through a number of routes. Therefore, they can involve any part of the central nervous system and their imaging appearances vary. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in lesion detection, lesion delineation, and differentiation of metastases from other intracranial disease processes. This article is a reasoned pictorial review illustrating the many faces of intracranial metastatic lesions based on the location - intra-axial metastases, calvarial metastases, dural metastases, leptomeningeal metastases, secondary invasion of the meninges by metastatic disease involving the calvarium and skull base, direct or perineural intracranial extension of head and neck neoplasm, and other unusual manifestations of intracranial metastases. We also review the role of advanced MRI to distinguish metastases from high-grade gliomas, tumor-mimicking lesions such as brain abscesses, and delayed post-radiation changes in radiosurgically treated patients.

  10. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  11. Management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Jun C.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that can cause serious neurological deficits or even death. They can manifest as intracranial hemorrhage, epileptic seizure, or other symptoms such as headache or tinnitus. They are detected by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Recently there have been significant developments in the management of AVMs. In this paper, the authors represent an overview of the epidemiology of AVMs and the existing treatment strategies. AVMs are ideally excised by standard microsurgical techniques. The grading scale which was proposed by Spetzler and Martin is widely used to estimate the risk of direct surgery. Stereotactic radiosurgery such as that using a gamma knife is very useful for small lesions located in eloquent areas. Technological advances in endovascular surgery have provided new alternatives in the treatment of AVMs. Currently indications for embolization can be divided into presurgical embolization in large AVMs to occlude deep arterial feeding vessels and embolization before stereotactic radiosurgery to reduce the size of the nidus. Palliative embolization can be also applied for patients with large, inoperable AVMs who are suffering from progressive neurological deficits secondary to venous hypertension and/or arterial steal phenomenon. (author)

  12. Management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Jun C [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that can cause serious neurological deficits or even death. They can manifest as intracranial hemorrhage, epileptic seizure, or other symptoms such as headache or tinnitus. They are detected by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Recently there have been significant developments in the management of AVMs. In this paper, the authors represent an overview of the epidemiology of AVMs and the existing treatment strategies. AVMs are ideally excised by standard microsurgical techniques. The grading scale which was proposed by Spetzler and Martin is widely used to estimate the risk of direct surgery. Stereotactic radiosurgery such as that using a gamma knife is very useful for small lesions located in eloquent areas. Technological advances in endovascular surgery have provided new alternatives in the treatment of AVMs. Currently indications for embolization can be divided into presurgical embolization in large AVMs to occlude deep arterial feeding vessels and embolization before stereotactic radiosurgery to reduce the size of the nidus. Palliative embolization can be also applied for patients with large, inoperable AVMs who are suffering from progressive neurological deficits secondary to venous hypertension and/or arterial steal phenomenon. (author)

  13. A case of intracranial teratoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiota, Madoka; Ando, Yukinori; Takashima, Sachio; Hori, Tomokatsu; Hiramoto, Shinsuke.

    1985-01-01

    A case of neonatal intracranial teratoma was examined on ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and tumor markers in serum, CSF and tumor tissue. This 27-day-old male infant was pointed out a head enlargement by prenatal sonography at 39 weeks' gestation. He admitted to our hospital at the age of one day after cesarean section. His birth weight was 4430 g and head circumstance 47.5 cm. On admission, physical and neurological examinations reveled big head, weak crying, twiching and sun set phenomenon. The optic fundi were normal. The CT scan at 1 day demonstrated the marked enlargement of lateral ventricles and the supratentorial large polycystic mass with calcifications at midline area. Transfontanelle sonography also delineated the polycystic mass and enlarged ventricle. Ventricular tap showed bloody CSF. Alpha-Fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen level in CSF was higher than those in serum. Postmortam tumor necropsy revealed a teratoma including mature squamous epithelium, muscle, cartilage, bone, lymphoid and nervous tissue. There were immature mesenchymal cells in some parts. The immune histochemical method showed positive staining to AFP in intestinal and respiratory epithelium, and to CEA in intestinal epithelium and immature mesenchymal cells. In summary, these characteristic findings of US, CT and tumor marker in CSF have a diagnostic value of intracranial teratoma. (author)

  14. Human motor unit recordings: origins and insight into the integrated motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchateau, Jacques; Enoka, Roger M

    2011-08-29

    Soon after Edward Liddell [1895-1981] and Charles Sherrington [1857-1952] introduced the concept of a motor unit in 1925 and the necessary technology was developed, the recording of single motor unit activity became feasible in humans. It was quickly discovered by Edgar Adrian [1889-1977] and Detlev Bronk [1897-1975] that the force exerted by muscle during voluntary contractions was the result of the concurrent recruitment of motor units and modulation of the rate at which they discharged action potentials. Subsequent studies found that the relation between discharge frequency and motor unit force was characterized by a sigmoidal function. Based on observations on experimental animals, Elwood Henneman [1915-1996] proposed a "size principle" in 1957 and most studies in humans focussed on validating this concept during various types of muscle contractions. By the end of the 20th C, the experimental evidence indicated that the recruitment order of human motor units was determined primarily by motoneuron size and that the occasional changes in recruitment order were not an intended strategy of the central nervous system. Fundamental knowledge on the function of Sherrington's "common final pathway" was expanded with observations on motor unit rotation, minimal and maximal discharge rates, discharge variability, and self-sustained firing. Despite the great amount of work on characterizing motor unit activity during the first century of inquiry, however, many basic questions remain unanswered and these limit the extent to which findings on humans and experimental animals can be integrated and generalized to all movements. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. First record of Talaromyces udagawae in soil related to decomposing human remains in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchida, María C; Centeno, Néstor D; Stenglein, Sebastián A; Cabello, Marta N

    2016-01-01

    The morphologic features of Talaromyces udagawae Stolk and Samson are here described and illustrated. This teleomorphic Ascomycota fungus was isolated from soil obtained in Buenos Aires province (Argentina) from beneath a human cadaver in an advanced state of decomposition. After washing and serial dilution of the soil along with moist-chamber techniques for fungal cultivation, T. udagawae formed very restricted colonies of bright yellow color on different growth media with 8-ascospored asci. The ascospores were ellipsoidal and ornamented. The anamorphic state was not observed. Molecular-genetic techniques identified the species. The present record is the first of the species in Argentina, pointing it as a tool to identify soils where cadaver decomposition occurs. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiologic assessment of spinal CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chang Jin; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Jang Sung; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho

    1999-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of imaging modalities in the detection of spinal CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Fifteen patients who complained of postural headache without any preceding cause showed typical brain MR findings of intracranial hypotension, including radiologically confirmed CSF leakage. All fifteen underwent brain MRI and radionuclide cisternography. CT myelography was performed in eight patients and spinal MRI in six. Medical records, imaging findings and the incidence of spinal CSF leakage during each modality were retrospectively reviewed. CSF leakage was most common at the cervicothoracic junction, where in seven of 15 cases it was seen on radionuclide cisternography as increased focal paraspinal activity. Leakage was noted at the mid-tho-racic level in three patients, at the upper thoracic level in two, and at the cervical and lumbar levels in the remaining two. In two patients multiple CSF leaks were noted, and in all, early radioactive accumulation in the bladder was visualized. CT myelography revealed extrathecal and paraspinal contrast leakage in three of eight patients, and among those who underwent spinal MRI, dural enhancement was observed at the site of CSF leakage in all six, abnormal CSF signal in the neural foramen in one, and epidural CSF collection in one. Radionuclide cisternography is a useful method for the detection of CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. CT myelography and spinal MRI help determine the precise location of leakage

  17. Low-dose prophylactic craniospinal radiotherapy for intracranial germinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfeld, Gordon O.; Amdur, Robert J.; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Keole, Sameer R.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of patients with localized intracranial germinoma treated with low-dose craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by a boost to the ventricular system and primary site. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients had pathologically confirmed intracranial germinoma and no spine metastases. Low-dose CSI was administered in 29 patients: usually 21 Gy of CSI, 9.0 Gy of ventricular boost, and a 19.5-Gy tumor boost, all at 1.5 Gy per fraction. Our neuroradiologist recorded three-dimensional tumor size on magnetic resonance images before, during, and after radiotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 29 of 31 patients (94%) are disease free. One failure had nongerminomatous histology; the initial diagnosis was a sampling error. Of 3 patients who did not receive CSI, 1 died. No patient developed myelopathy, visual deficits, dementia, or skeletal growth problems. In locally controlled patients, tumor response according to magnetic resonance scan was nearly complete within 6 months after radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy alone with low-dose prophylactic CSI cures almost all patients with localized intracranial germinoma. Complications are rare when the daily dose of radiotherapy is limited to 1.5 Gy and the total CSI dose to 21 Gy. Patients without a near-complete response to radiotherapy should undergo resection to rule out a nongerminomatous element

  18. Lake sediment records on climate change and human activities in the Xingyun Lake catchment, SW China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxiang; Ming, Qingzhong; Shi, Zhengtao; Chen, Guangjie; Niu, Jie; Lei, Guoliang; Chang, Fengqin; Zhang, Hucai

    2014-01-01

    Sediments from Xinyun Lake in central Yunnan, southwest China, provide a record of environmental history since the Holocene. With the application of multi-proxy indicators (total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), δ13C and δ15N isotopes, C/N ratio, grain size, magnetic susceptibility (MS) and CaCO3 content), as well as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C datings, four major climatic stages during the Holocene have been identified in Xingyun's catchment. A marked increase in lacustrine palaeoproductivity occurred from 11.06 to 9.98 cal. ka BP, which likely resulted from an enhanced Asian southwest monsoon and warm-humid climate. Between 9.98 and 5.93 cal. ka BP, a gradually increased lake level might have reached the optimum water depth, causing a marked decline in coverage by aquatic plants and lake productivity of the lake. This was caused by strong Asian southwest monsoon, and coincided with the global Holocene Optimum. During the period of 5.60-1.35 cal. ka BP, it resulted in a warm and dry climate at this stage, which is comparable to the aridification of India during the mid- and late Holocene. The intensifying human activity and land-use in the lake catchment since the early Tang Dynasty (∼1.35 cal. ka BP) were associated with the ancient Dian culture within Xingyun's catchment. The extensive deforestation and development of agriculture in the lake catchment caused heavy soil loss. Our study clearly shows that long-term human activities and land-use change have strongly impacted the evolution of the lake environment and therefore modulated the sediment records of the regional climate in central Yunnan for more than one thousand years.

  19. Lake sediment records on climate change and human activities in the Xingyun Lake catchment, SW China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Sediments from Xinyun Lake in central Yunnan, southwest China, provide a record of environmental history since the Holocene. With the application of multi-proxy indicators (total organic carbon (TOC, total nitrogen (TN, δ13C and δ15N isotopes, C/N ratio, grain size, magnetic susceptibility (MS and CaCO3 content, as well as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS 14C datings, four major climatic stages during the Holocene have been identified in Xingyun's catchment. A marked increase in lacustrine palaeoproductivity occurred from 11.06 to 9.98 cal. ka BP, which likely resulted from an enhanced Asian southwest monsoon and warm-humid climate. Between 9.98 and 5.93 cal. ka BP, a gradually increased lake level might have reached the optimum water depth, causing a marked decline in coverage by aquatic plants and lake productivity of the lake. This was caused by strong Asian southwest monsoon, and coincided with the global Holocene Optimum. During the period of 5.60-1.35 cal. ka BP, it resulted in a warm and dry climate at this stage, which is comparable to the aridification of India during the mid- and late Holocene. The intensifying human activity and land-use in the lake catchment since the early Tang Dynasty (∼1.35 cal. ka BP were associated with the ancient Dian culture within Xingyun's catchment. The extensive deforestation and development of agriculture in the lake catchment caused heavy soil loss. Our study clearly shows that long-term human activities and land-use change have strongly impacted the evolution of the lake environment and therefore modulated the sediment records of the regional climate in central Yunnan for more than one thousand years.

  20. Image-guided intracranial cannula placement for awake in vivo microdialysis in nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antong; Bone, Ashleigh; Hines, Catherine D. G.; Dogdas, Belma; Montgomery, Tamara O.; Michener, Maria; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Ghafurian, Soheil; Lubbers, Laura S.; Renger, John; Bagchi, Ansuman; Uslaner, Jason M.; Johnson, Colena; Zariwala, Hatim A.

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial microdialysis is used for sampling neurochemicals and large peptides along with their metabolites from the interstitial fluid (ISF) of the brain. The ability to perform this in nonhuman primates (NHP) e.g., rhesus could improve the prediction of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) action of drugs in human. However, microdialysis in rhesus brains is not as routinely performed as in rodents. One challenge is that the precise intracranial probe placement in NHP brains is difficult due to the richness of the anatomical structure and the variability of the size and shape of brains across animals. Also, a repeatable and reproducible ISF sampling from the same animal is highly desirable when combined with cognitive behaviors or other longitudinal study end points. Toward that end, we have developed a semi-automatic flexible neurosurgical method employing MR and CT imaging to (a) derive coordinates for permanent guide cannula placement in mid-brain structures and (b) fabricate a customized recording chamber to implant above the skull for enclosing and safeguarding access to the cannula for repeated experiments. In order to place the intracranial guide cannula in each subject, the entry points in the skull and the depth in the brain were derived using co-registered images acquired from MR and CT scans. The anterior/posterior (A/P) and medial-lateral (M/L) rotation in the pose of the animal was corrected in the 3D image to appropriately represent the pose used in the stereotactic frame. An array of implanted fiducial markers was used to transform stereotactic coordinates to the images. The recording chamber was custom fabricated using computer-aided design (CAD), such that it would fit the contours of the individual skull with minimum error. The chamber also helped in guiding the cannula through the entry points down a trajectory into the depth of the brain. We have validated our method in four animals and our results indicate average placement error

  1. Predictors of acute symptomatic seizures after intracranial hemorrhage in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Seema; Kebede, Tewodros; Dean, Nathan P; Carpenter, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of acute symptomatic seizures in infants with supratentorial intracranial hemorrhage, to identify potential risk factors, and to determine the effect of acute seizures on long-term morbidity and mortality. Children less than 24 months with intracranial hemorrhage were identified from a neurocritical care database. All patients who received seizure prophylaxis beginning at admission were included in the study. Risk factors studied were gender, etiology, location of hemorrhage, seizure(s) on presentation, and the presence of parenchymal injury. Acute clinical and electrographic seizures were identified from hospital medical records. Subsequent development of late seizures was determined based on clinical information from patients' latest follow-up. Patients with idiopathic neonatal intracranial hemorrhage, premature infants, and those with prior history of seizures were excluded from analysis. Seventy-two infants met inclusion criteria. None. Forty percent of infants had acute symptomatic seizures. The prevalence was similar regardless of whether etiology of hemorrhage was traumatic or nontraumatic. Seizures on presentation and parenchymal injury were independent risk factors of acute seizures (p = 0.001 and p = 0.006, respectively). Younger children and women were also at higher risk (p Acute seizures were not predictive of mortality, but nearly twice as many patients with acute seizures developed late seizures when compared with those without. Electrographic seizures and parenchymal injury were also predictive of development of late seizures (p hemorrhage are at high risk for acute symptomatic seizures. This is regardless of the etiology of hemorrhage. Younger patients, women, patients with parenchymal injury, and patients presenting with seizure are most likely to develop acute seizures. Although the benefits of seizure prophylaxis have not been studied in this specific population, these results suggest that it is an important component

  2. Clinical Application of Insertion Force Sensor System for Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Noriaki; Miyachi, Shigeru; Izumi, Takashi; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Marui, Naoki; Ota, Keisuke; Tajima, Hayato; Shintai, Kazunori; Ito, Masashi; Imai, Tasuku; Nishihori, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2017-09-01

    In endovascular embolization for intracranial aneurysms, it is important to properly control the coil insertion force. However, the force can only be subjectively detected by the subtle feedback experienced by neurointerventionists at their fingertips. The authors envisioned a system that would objectively sense and quantify that force. In this article, coil insertion force was measured in cases of intracranial aneurysm using this sensor, and its actual clinical application was investigated. The sensor consists of a hemostatic valve (Y-connector). A little flexure was intentionally added in the device, and it creates a bend in the delivery wire. The sensor measures the change in the position of the bent wire depending on the insertion force and translates it into a force value. Using this, embolization was performed for 10 unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The sensor adequately recorded the force, and it reflected the operators' usual clinical experience. The presence of the sensor did not affect the procedures. The sensor enabled the operators to objectively note and evaluate the insertion force and better cooperative handling was possible. Additionally, other members of the intervention team shared the information. Force records demonstrated the characteristic patterns according to every stage of coiling (framing, filling, and finishing). The force sensor system adequately measured coil insertion force in intracranial aneurysm coil embolization procedures. The safety of this sensor was demonstrated in clinical application for the limited number of patients. This system is useful adjunct for assisting during coil embolization for an intracranial aneurysm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  4. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Hamasaki, Osamu; Sakoda, Katsuaki

    2002-01-01

    We report on two patients with intracranial atherosclerosis of the carotid artery or vertebral artery treated with stent-assisted angioplasty. Both patients have severe intracranial atherosclerosis (>70%) with refractory symptoms despite optimal medical treatment. In both patients, a coronary balloon-expandable stent was successfully placed using a protective balloon technique without procedural complications. The patients were asymptomatic and neurologically intact at a mean clinical follow-up of 13 months. Follow-up angiograms did not show restenosis 3 or 4 months after procedure, respectively. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis in the elective patient has proven effective, with an acceptable low rate of morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  5. Urinary urge seizure semiology localization by intracranial monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Ronak; Shamim, Sadat

    2018-01-01

    Seizures may present with many different symptom complexes. Seizure semiologies have localization value when contemplating surgical therapies. Epilepsy presenting as a desire to micturate is exceedingly rare, with only a handful of published cases. We present a patient who had initially unexplained childhood urinary urge that progressed into lapses of memory and confusion that was eventually diagnosed as epilepsy in adulthood. Due to refractoriness to medical management, our patient's epileptic focus was localized through both noninvasive and invasive subdural electrode arrays to the nondominant medial temporal lobe and successfully treated with an amygdalohippocampectomy. Only one other case of ictal urinary urgency seizures has been recorded with intracranial electroencephalogram monitoring in the literature.

  6. Linear array of photodiodes to track a human speaker for video recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeTone, D; Neal, H; Lougheed, R

    2012-01-01

    Communication and collaboration using stored digital media has garnered more interest by many areas of business, government and education in recent years. This is due primarily to improvements in the quality of cameras and speed of computers. An advantage of digital media is that it can serve as an effective alternative when physical interaction is not possible. Video recordings that allow for viewers to discern a presenter's facial features, lips and hand motions are more effective than videos that do not. To attain this, one must maintain a video capture in which the speaker occupies a significant portion of the captured pixels. However, camera operators are costly, and often do an imperfect job of tracking presenters in unrehearsed situations. This creates motivation for a robust, automated system that directs a video camera to follow a presenter as he or she walks anywhere in the front of a lecture hall or large conference room. Such a system is presented. The system consists of a commercial, off-the-shelf pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) color video camera, a necklace of infrared LEDs and a linear photodiode array detector. Electronic output from the photodiode array is processed to generate the location of the LED necklace, which is worn by a human speaker. The computer controls the video camera movements to record video of the speaker. The speaker's vertical position and depth are assumed to remain relatively constant– the video camera is sent only panning (horizontal) movement commands. The LED necklace is flashed at 70Hz at a 50% duty cycle to provide noise-filtering capability. The benefit to using a photodiode array versus a standard video camera is its higher frame rate (4kHz vs. 60Hz). The higher frame rate allows for the filtering of infrared noise such as sunlight and indoor lighting–a capability absent from other tracking technologies. The system has been tested in a large lecture hall and is shown to be effective.

  7. Multivariate regression methods for estimating velocity of ictal discharges from human microelectrode recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jyun-you; Smith, Elliot H.; Bateman, Lisa M.; McKhann, Guy M., II; Goodman, Robert R.; Greger, Bradley; Davis, Tyler S.; Kellis, Spencer S.; House, Paul A.; Schevon, Catherine A.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Epileptiform discharges, an electrophysiological hallmark of seizures, can propagate across cortical tissue in a manner similar to traveling waves. Recent work has focused attention on the origination and propagation patterns of these discharges, yielding important clues to their source location and mechanism of travel. However, systematic studies of methods for measuring propagation are lacking. Approach. We analyzed epileptiform discharges in microelectrode array recordings of human seizures. The array records multiunit activity and local field potentials at 400 micron spatial resolution, from a small cortical site free of obstructions. We evaluated several computationally efficient statistical methods for calculating traveling wave velocity, benchmarking them to analyses of associated neuronal burst firing. Main results. Over 90% of discharges met statistical criteria for propagation across the sampled cortical territory. Detection rate, direction and speed estimates derived from a multiunit estimator were compared to four field potential-based estimators: negative peak, maximum descent, high gamma power, and cross-correlation. Interestingly, the methods that were computationally simplest and most efficient (negative peak and maximal descent) offer non-inferior results in predicting neuronal traveling wave velocities compared to the other two, more complex methods. Moreover, the negative peak and maximal descent methods proved to be more robust against reduced spatial sampling challenges. Using least absolute deviation in place of least squares error minimized the impact of outliers, and reduced the discrepancies between local field potential-based and multiunit estimators. Significance. Our findings suggest that ictal epileptiform discharges typically take the form of exceptionally strong, rapidly traveling waves, with propagation detectable across millimeter distances. The sequential activation of neurons in space can be inferred from clinically

  8. Linear array of photodiodes to track a human speaker for video recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeTone, D.; Neal, H.; Lougheed, R.

    2012-12-01

    Communication and collaboration using stored digital media has garnered more interest by many areas of business, government and education in recent years. This is due primarily to improvements in the quality of cameras and speed of computers. An advantage of digital media is that it can serve as an effective alternative when physical interaction is not possible. Video recordings that allow for viewers to discern a presenter's facial features, lips and hand motions are more effective than videos that do not. To attain this, one must maintain a video capture in which the speaker occupies a significant portion of the captured pixels. However, camera operators are costly, and often do an imperfect job of tracking presenters in unrehearsed situations. This creates motivation for a robust, automated system that directs a video camera to follow a presenter as he or she walks anywhere in the front of a lecture hall or large conference room. Such a system is presented. The system consists of a commercial, off-the-shelf pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) color video camera, a necklace of infrared LEDs and a linear photodiode array detector. Electronic output from the photodiode array is processed to generate the location of the LED necklace, which is worn by a human speaker. The computer controls the video camera movements to record video of the speaker. The speaker's vertical position and depth are assumed to remain relatively constant- the video camera is sent only panning (horizontal) movement commands. The LED necklace is flashed at 70Hz at a 50% duty cycle to provide noise-filtering capability. The benefit to using a photodiode array versus a standard video camera is its higher frame rate (4kHz vs. 60Hz). The higher frame rate allows for the filtering of infrared noise such as sunlight and indoor lighting-a capability absent from other tracking technologies. The system has been tested in a large lecture hall and is shown to be effective.

  9. Declarative memory formation in hippocampal sclerosis: an intracranial event-related potentials study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mormann, F.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Klaver, P.; Weber, B.; Elger, C.E.; Fell, J.

    2007-01-01

    The functional deficits associated with hippocampal sclerosis during declarative memory formation are largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed intracranial event-related potentials recorded from the medial temporal lobes of nine epilepsy patients performing a word memorization task. We used

  10. MR angiography after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular occlusion with detachable coils has become an alternative treatment to neurosurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms over the last two decades. Its minimal invasiveness is the most important advantage of this treatment compared to clipping. The disadvantage of occlusion

  11. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  12. the role of the south african human rights commission to records ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Walter

    transparency and good governance in the public sector through various forms such as ..... is the name of the public entity or private company having the record during a time of ..... Fostering a framework to embed the records management ...

  13. the role of the south african human rights commission to records ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Walter

    in the public sector is the responsibility of the National Archives and. Records Service of ..... diffusions of innovation theory and web trusted models to form a ..... social research projects. ... records management in corporate governance in South.

  14. An Update on Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Thurtell, Matthew J.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of unknown etiology often encountered in neurologic practice. It produces non-localizing symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure and, when left untreated, can result in severe irreversible visual loss. It most commonly occurs in obese women of childbearing age, but it can also occur in children, men, non-obese adults, and older adults. While it is frequently associated with obesity, it can be associated with other conditions...

  15. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension without Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kansu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that presented with unilateral abducens nerve palsy, without orthostatic headache. While sixth nerve palsies improved without any intervention, subdural hematoma was detected with magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude that headache may be absent in spontaneous intracranial hypotension and spontaneous improvement of sixth nerve palsy can occur, even after the development of a subdural hematoma

  16. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jeronimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva Junior, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo, E-mail: leonardoruschel@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba (INC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xarelto®. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban. (author)

  17. "Negative symptoms"secondary to intracranial tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Kate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors are increasingly common in the elderly population. They may present with varied symptoms, some of which may be psychiatric in nature. In patients with known psychiatric disorders, these symptoms may be misattributed resulting in a delay in diagnosis and management. We present a case of an elderly female with paranoid schizophrenia and new onset symptoms secondary to intracranial tumor, which were initially misdiagnosed.

  18. Graves' disease and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Manish Gutch; Annesh Bhattacharjee; Sukriti Kumar; Durgesh Pushkar

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a central nervous system disorder characterized by raised intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and absence of any structural anomaly on neuroimaging. Among all endocrine disorders associated with the development of IIH, the association of hyperthyroidism and IIH is very rare with few cases reported till date. Thyroid disturbances have a unique association with IIH. Hypo- and hyper-thyroidism have been reported in assoc...

  19. Increased intracranial pressure: evaluation by computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightfoote, W.E.; Pressman, B.D.

    1975-01-01

    Computerized tomography is clearly very useful in the evaluation of patients with increased intracranial pressure and suspected pseudotumor cerebri. It provides an index of ventricular size and configuration and has the capability of demonstrating intracranial lesions. Moreover, this new technique is rapid and non-invasive, and is without attendant risks. Examinations may be performed serially as the clinical process evolves, thereby giving roentgenographic correlation to the clinical features. (U.S.)

  20. Dynamical criticality during induction of anesthesia in human ECoG recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro M. Alonso

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyze electro-corticography (ECoG recordings in human sub- jects as they are anesthetized. We hypothesize that the decrease in responsiveness that defines anesthesia induction is concomitant with the stabilization of neuronal dynamics. To test this hypothesis, we performed a moving vector autoregressive analysis and quantified stability of neuronal dynamics using eigenmode decompo- sition of the autoregressive matrices, independently fitted to short sliding temporal windows. Consistent with the hypothesis we show that while the subject is awake, many modes of oscillations of neuronal activity are found at the edge of instabil- ity, but as the subject becomes anesthetized the fitted dynamics becomes more damped. Analysis of eigenmode distributions in the awake and anesthetized brain revealed statistically significant stabilization not present in surrogate data. Sta- bility analysis thus offer a novel way of quantifying changes in neuronal activity that characterize loss of consciousness induced by general anesthetics. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the effect of the anesthetic procedure is to damp out high frequency activity while still allowing for low frequency modes to perform a function.

  1. Preictal Dynamics of EEG Complexity in Intracranially Recorded Epileptic Seizure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bob, P.; Roman, R.; Světlák, M.; Kukleta, M.; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 23 (2014), el151:1-4 ISSN 0025-7974 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : EEG * epileptic Seizure Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 5.723, year: 2014

  2. New Standardised Visual Forms for Recording the Presence of Human Skeletal Elements in Archaeological and Forensic Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Roksandic

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Even though visual recording forms are commonly used among human osteologists, very few of them are published. Those that are lack either detail or manipulability. Most anthropologists have to adapt these or develop their own forms when they start working on skeletal material, or have to accompany the visual forms with detailed, often time consuming, textual inventories. Three recording forms are proposed here: for adult, subadult and newborn skeletons. While no two-dimensional form will fit the requirements of every human osteologist, these forms are sufficiently detailed and easy to use. Printed or downloaded, they are published here in the belief that, with feedback from the anthropological community at large, they have the potential to become standard tools in data recording.

  3. Cell culture chamber with gas supply for prolonged recording of human neuronal cells on microelectrode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Joose; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Mäki, Antti-Juhana; Ristola, Mervi; Narkilahti, Susanna; Kallio, Pasi

    2017-03-15

    Typically, live cell analyses are performed outside an incubator in an ambient air, where the lack of sufficient CO 2 supply results in a fast change of pH and the high evaporation causes concentration drifts in the culture medium. That limits the experiment time for tens of minutes. In many applications, e.g. in neurotoxicity studies, a prolonged measurement of extracellular activity is, however, essential. We demonstrate a simple cell culture chamber that enables stable culture conditions during prolonged extracellular recordings on a microelectrode array (MEA) outside an incubator. The proposed chamber consists of a gas permeable silicone structure that enables gas transfer into the chamber. We show that the culture chamber supports the growth of the human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neurons both inside and outside an incubator. The structure provides very low evaporation, stable pH and osmolarity, and maintains strong signaling of hESC-derived neuronal networks over three-day MEA experiments. Existing systems are typically complex including continuous perfusion of medium or relatively large amount of gas to supply. The proposed chamber requires only a supply of very low flow rate (1.5ml/min) of non-humidified 5% CO 2 gas. Utilizing dry gas supply makes the proposed chamber simple to use. Using the proposed culture structure on top of MEA, we can maintain hESC-derived neural networks over three days outside an incubator. Technically, the structure requires very low flow rate of dry gas supporting, however, low evaporation and maintaining the pH of the culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  5. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field Scoring Recording Number 231 (Human Factors Applications, Inc.)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbuy and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  6. Intracranial germinoma: the case for lower dose radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardenbergh, Patricia Harrigan; Golden, Jeffrey; Billet, Amy; Scott, R. Michael; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Silver, Barbara; Loeffler, Jay S.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal dose and treatment outcome of patients treated with radiation for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1975 and 1995, 40 patients with the diagnosis of intracranial germinoma were treated with radiation (RT) to the central nervous system. All patients received whole-brain (WB) RT (median dose: 32.4 Gy, range: 15-44.37 Gy) and a boost to the tumor volume (median total tumor volume dose: 52 Gy, range: 45-59.5 Gy). Thirty patients received RT to the spine (median dose: 26 Gy, range: 18.75-37.5 Gy). Four patients were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and WB RT with a boost to the tumor volume (dose range: 51-54 Gy). A low-dose RT only group was defined as ≤25.5 Gy to the WB (9 patients); <50 Gy to the primary site (14 patients); and <22 Gy to the spine (9 patients) Seventeen tumors were biopsy-proven germinoma, and 17 patients presented with multiple midline germinomas (MMG). Among 26 patients who had tumor markers measured, 27% had elevation of β-human chorionic gonadotropin and by definition, no patient had an elevation of AFP. Twenty-four percent of 26 patients who had spine imaging or cerebral spinal fluid cytology had evidence of tumor seeding at diagnosis. The male to female ratio was 1.9:1. Median age at diagnosis was 14 years for male patients and 9.5 years for female patients (p = 0.02), (overall age ranges: 0.5-31 years). Median follow-up was 62 months (range: 3-226 months). Late effects of 29 patients with follow-up of ≥20 months and adequate documentation in their medical records were analyzed. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for biopsy-proven germinomas and presumed germinomas was 97%. No patient died of germinoma. There were no local failures regardless of the dose of RT, elevation of HCG tumor marker, or CSF dissemination at presentation. At presentation 22 patients had evidence of at least one endocrine abnormality. At follow

  7. Intracranial nonvestibular neurinomas: Young neurosurgeons’ experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Forhad Hossain; Haque, Mohammod R.; Kawsar, Khandkar A.; Sarker, Mainul H.; Hasan, Mahmudul; Goel, Atul H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Neurinoma arising from other than nonvestibular cranial nerves is less prevalent. Here we present our experiences regarding the clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, and the outcome of nonvestibular cranial nerve neurinomas. Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to December 2011, the recorded documents of operated nonvestibular intracranial neurinomas were retrospectively studied for clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, complications, follow-up, and outcomes. Results: The average follow-up was 24.5 months. Total number of cases was 30, with age ranging from 9 to 60 years. Sixteen cases were males and 14 were females. Nonvestibular cranial nerve schwannomas most commonly originated from trigeminal nerve followed by glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve. There were three abducent nerve schwannomas that are very rare. There was no trochlear nerve schwannoma. Two glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve schwannomas extended into the neck through jugular foramen and one extended into the upper cervical spinal canal. Involved nerve dysfunction was a common clinical feature except in trigeminal neurinomas where facial pain was a common feature. Aiming for no new neurodeficit, total resection of the tumor was done in 24 cases, and near-total resection or gross total resection or subtotal resection was done in 6 cases. Preoperative symptoms improved or disappeared in 25 cases. New persistent deficit occurred in 3 cases. Two patients died postoperatively. There was no recurrence of tumor till the last follow-up. Conclusion: Nonvestibular schwannomas are far less common, but curable benign lesions. Surgical approach to the skull base and craniovertebral junction is a often complex and lengthy procedure associated with chances of significant morbidity. But early diagnosis, proper investigations, and evaluation, along with appropriate decision making and surgical planning with microsurgical techniques are the

  8. the role of the south african human rights commission to records ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Walter

    nine institutions, such as the Auditor-General of South Africa .... As studies have shown, the chaotic state of public records in many African countries, and the near collapse of record-keeping systems in some of the countries make it virtually impossible to .... Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), North American.

  9. Optimizing clinical performance and geometrical robustness of a new electrode device for intracranial tumor electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Gehl, Julie

    2011-01-01

    and genes to intracranial tumors in humans, and demonstrate a method to optimize the design (i.e. geometry) of the electrode device prototype to improve both clinical performance and geometrical tolerance (robustness). We have employed a semiempirical objective function based on constraints similar to those...... sensitive to random geometrical deviations. The method is readily applicable to other electrode configurations....

  10. The Relationship Between Intracranial Pressure and Age-Chasing Age-Related Reference Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sarah Hornshøj; Lilja-Cyron, Alexander; Andresen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Background: No true reference values for intracranial pressure (ICP) in humans exist; current values are estimated from measurements in adults who undergo treatment in order to correct ICP. We report ICP values in a "pseudonormal" group of children and adults to examine if age affects ICP. Method...

  11. Evaluation of Intracranial Pressure in Different Body Postures and Disease Entities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Morten; Hadi, Amer; Juhler, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    We currently do not have sufficient knowledge regarding appropriate boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal" intracranial pressure (ICP) in humans. Our objective in this study was to quantify the effects of postural changes on ICP in normal and ill subjects. As a model for normal patients, we i...

  12. An improved mounting device for attaching intracranial probes in large animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunster, Kimble R

    2015-12-01

    The rigid support of intracranial probes can be difficult when using animal models, as mounting devices suitable for the probes are either not available, or designed for human use and not suitable in animal skulls. A cheap and reliable mounting device for securing intracranial probes in large animal models is described. Using commonly available clinical consumables, a universal mounting device for securing intracranial probes to the skull of large animals was developed and tested. A simply made mounting device to hold a variety of probes from 500 μm to 1.3 mm in diameter to the skull was developed. The device was used to hold probes to the skulls of sheep for up to 18 h. No adhesives or cements were used. The described device provides a reliable method of securing probes to the skull of animals.

  13. Primary Intracranial Germinomas: Retrospective Analysis of Five Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Anas; Asilturk, Murad; Uysal, Mustafa Levent; Emel, Erhan; Abdallah, Betul Guler; Bilgic, Bilge; Gundogdu, Gokcen

    2018-01-01

    Primary intracranial germinomas (PIGs) are rare malignant brain tumors that represent approximately 0.2% to 1.7% of all primary intracranial tumors. PIGs have infrequent, but there is a possibility of spinal cord metastases. In this study, clinical outcomes of five consecutive PIGs have been presented. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed in 1,849 cases of intracranial tumors who underwent surgery between the years 2005 and 2015 and cases confirmed as germinoma histopathologically were included in this study. Five cases of PIGs were detected in two female (40%) and 3 male (60%) patients. The mean age was 15.2±5.6 (8-23) years. The mean follow-up period was 52.3±56.4 (9-135) months. The most common complaint was headache (60%), followed by nausea±vomiting (40%). Four cases (80%) affected the suprasellar region while the fifth patient"s tumor was localized in the pineal region. The duration between the initial symptom and time of surgical intervention ranged between 15 days and 2 months. Twelve months after the first operation, one patient presented with drop seeding metastasis. Four-year survival (with exception of the case that died as a early surgical complication) was 100%. Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in one patient. Surgical mortality rate was 20%. PIGs" morbidity rate was 60%. PIG is a mostly malignant tumor that generally affects the pediatric age group. They are radiosensitive tumors. Subtotal or near-total resection using stereotactic guide or direct surgery to confirm the histopathological diagnosis followed by chemotherapy and whole brain or in some cases craniospinal radiotherapy rather than GTR is therefore the treatment of choice.

  14. Local field potential recordings in a non-human primate model of Parkinsons disease using the Activa PC + S neurostimulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Allison T; Muralidharan, Abirami; Hendrix, Claudia; Johnson, Luke; Gupta, Rahul; Stanslaski, Scott; Denison, Tim; Baker, Kenneth B; Vitek, Jerrold L; Johnson, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Using the Medtronic Activa® PC + S system, this study investigated how passive joint manipulation, reaching behavior, and deep brain stimulation (DBS) modulate local field potential (LFP) activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus (GP). Approach Five non-human primates were implanted unilaterally with one or more DBS leads. LFPs were collected in montage recordings during resting state conditions and during motor tasks that facilitate the expression of parkinsonian motor signs. These recordings were made in the naïve state in one subject, in the parkinsonian state in two subjects, and in both naïve and parkinsonian states in two subjects. Main results LFPs measured at rest were consistent over time for a given recording location and parkinsonian state in a given subject; however, LFPs were highly variable between subjects, between and within recording locations, and across parkinsonian states. LFPs in both naïve and parkinsonian states across all recorded nuclei contained a spectral peak in the beta band (10–30 Hz). Moreover, the spectral content of recorded LFPs was modulated by passive and active movement of the subjects’ limbs. LFPs recorded during a cued-reaching task displayed task-related beta desynchronization in STN and GP. The bidirectional capabilities of the Activa® PC + S also allowed for recording LFPs while delivering DBS. The therapeutic effect of STN DBS on parkinsonian rigidity outlasted stimulation for 30–60 s, but there was no correlation with beta band power. Significance This study emphasizes (1) the variability in spontaneous LFPs amongst subjects and (2) the value of using the Activa® PC + S system to record neural data in the context of behavioral tasks that allow one to evaluate a subject’s symptomatology. PMID:26469737

  15. Local field potential recordings in a non-human primate model of Parkinsons disease using the Activa PC + S neurostimulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Allison T.; Muralidharan, Abirami; Hendrix, Claudia; Johnson, Luke; Gupta, Rahul; Stanslaski, Scott; Denison, Tim; Baker, Kenneth B.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Using the Medtronic Activa® PC + S system, this study investigated how passive joint manipulation, reaching behavior, and deep brain stimulation (DBS) modulate local field potential (LFP) activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus (GP). Approach. Five non-human primates were implanted unilaterally with one or more DBS leads. LFPs were collected in montage recordings during resting state conditions and during motor tasks that facilitate the expression of parkinsonian motor signs. These recordings were made in the naïve state in one subject, in the parkinsonian state in two subjects, and in both naïve and parkinsonian states in two subjects. Main results. LFPs measured at rest were consistent over time for a given recording location and parkinsonian state in a given subject; however, LFPs were highly variable between subjects, between and within recording locations, and across parkinsonian states. LFPs in both naïve and parkinsonian states across all recorded nuclei contained a spectral peak in the beta band (10-30 Hz). Moreover, the spectral content of recorded LFPs was modulated by passive and active movement of the subjects’ limbs. LFPs recorded during a cued-reaching task displayed task-related beta desynchronization in STN and GP. The bidirectional capabilities of the Activa® PC + S also allowed for recording LFPs while delivering DBS. The therapeutic effect of STN DBS on parkinsonian rigidity outlasted stimulation for 30-60 s, but there was no correlation with beta band power. Significance. This study emphasizes (1) the variability in spontaneous LFPs amongst subjects and (2) the value of using the Activa® PC + S system to record neural data in the context of behavioral tasks that allow one to evaluate a subject’s symptomatology.

  16. Genetic study of intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Junxia; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Takenaka, Katsunobu; Kato, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio

    2015-03-01

    Rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) causes subarachnoid hemorrhage, leading to immediate death or severe disability. Identification of the genetic factors involved is critical for disease prevention and treatment. We aimed to identify the susceptibility genes for IAs. Exome sequencing was performed in 12 families with histories of multiple cases of IA (number of cases per family ≥3), with a total of 42 cases. Various filtering strategies were used to select the candidate variants. Replicate association studies of several candidate variants were performed in probands of 24 additional IA families and 426 sporadic IA cases. Functional analysis for the mutations was conducted. After sequencing and filtering, 78 variants were selected for the following reasons: allele frequencies of variants in 42 patients was significantly (PIA within ≥1 family; variants predicted damage to the structure or function of the protein by PolyPhen-2 (Polymorphism Phenotyping V2) and SIFT (Sorting Intolerance From Tolerant). We selected 10 variants from 9 genes (GPR63, ADAMST15, MLL2, IL10RA, PAFAH2, THBD, IL11RA, FILIP1L, and ZNF222) to form 78 candidate variants by considering commonness in families, known disease genes, or ontology association with angiogenesis. Replicate association studies revealed that only p.E133Q in ADAMTS15 was aggregated in the familial IA cases (odds ratio, 5.96; 95% confidence interval, 2.40-14.82; P=0.0001; significant after the Bonferroni correction [P=0.05/78=0.0006]). Silencing ADAMTS15 and overexpression of ADAMTS15 p.E133Q accelerated endothelial cell migration, suggesting that ADAMTS15 may have antiangiogenic activity. ADAMTS15 is a candidate gene for IAs. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provi...

  18. Predictors of severe complications in intracranial meningioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Förander, Petter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate predictors of complications after intracranial meningioma resection using a standardized reporting system for adverse events. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian population-based cohort of 979 adult operations for intracranial meningioma perfo...

  19. Parapharyngeal meningioma extending from the intracranial space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchibori, M.; Odake, G.; Ueda, S.; Yasuda, N.; Hisa, I.

    1990-01-01

    A 50-year old woman with a giant parapharyngeal meningioma extending from the intracranial cavity was admitted to our hospital. The parapharyngeal tumor was biopsied using the transoral approach, and a histological section diagnosis suggested meningioma. Thereafter, further examination by magnetic resonance images (MRI) and contrast enhanced CT scans revealed a diffuse meningioma en plaque in the posterior fossa. Invasion extended from the clival dura to the right sigmoid sinus. The extracranial extension of a meningioma is very rare but a few cases have been reported. In almost all of the reported cases, a large intracranial meningioma was simultaneously or previously verified by CT scans. Our case was special in that the intracranial mass was not voluminous but showed en plaque extension, and also because the pathway of the extracranial extension through the jugular foramen was clearly visualized by CT and MRI. Obliteration and invasion of the right sigmoid sinus and the internal jugular vein by tumor were also demonstrated. (orig.)

  20. Fast FLAIR MR images of intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Hye Young; Cho, Young A; Kim, Wha Young

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the signal characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage, as seen on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging according to various stages, and to compare FLAIR imaging with spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging. We retrospectively evaluated fast FLAIR images along with spin-echo T1- and T2 weighted MR images of 32 lesions in 25 patients (12 males and 14 females, aged 3 - 84 yrs) with intracranial hemorrhagic lesions. For imaging, 1.5 T unit was used, and the nature of the lesions was found to be as follows : intracranial hemorrhage (n=15); tumor (n=9); infarction (n=4); arteriovenous malformation (n=3); and arachnoid cyst with hemorrhage (n=1). On the basis of spin-echo MR imaging, lesions were classified as acute, early subacute, late subacute, early chronic, or late chronic stage. The signal characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage were analysed in accordance with each staging, as seen on MR FLAIR imaging, and compared to the staging seen on spin-echo T1- and T-2 weighted MR imaging. The signal intensity of intracranial hemorrhage, as seen on FLAIR imaging, was not characteristic; it was similar to that of T2WI during the acute and subacute stages, and similiar to that of T1WI during the chronic stage. When used together with spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging, however, FLAIR imaging may be useful for the classification of chronic intracranial hemorrhage as either early or late stage. (author). 20 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  1. Revising the archaeological record of the Upper Pleistocene Arctic Siberia: Human dispersal and adaptations in MIS 3 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitulko, Vladimir; Pavlova, Elena; Nikolskiy, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    As the main external driver, environmental changes largely predetermine human population distribution, especially in the Arctic, where environmental conditions were often too extreme for human survival. Not that long ago the only evidence of human presence here was the Berelekh site in the lower reaches of the Indighirka River. This landmark dates to 13,000-12,000 years ago but it was widely accepted as documentation of the earliest stage of human dispersal in the Arctic. New research discussed here, shows that humans began colonizing the Siberian Arctic at least by the end of the early stage of MIS 3 at around 45,000 years ago. For now, this earliest known stage of human occupation in the arctic regions is documented by the evidence of human hunting. The archaeological record of continued human occupation is fragmentary; nevertheless, evidence exists for each significant phase including the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Siberian Arctic human populations were likely supported by the local mammoth population, which provided humans with food and raw material in the form of mammoth tusks. Processing of mammoth ivory is recognized widely as one of the most important peculiarities of the material culture of ancient humans. In fact, ivory tool manufacturing is one of the most important innovations of the Upper Palaeolithic in northern Eurasia. Technology that allowed manufacturing of long ivory shafts - long points and full-size spears - was critical in the tree-less open landscapes of Eurasian mammoth steppe belt. These technological skills reach their greatest extent and development shortly before the Last Glacial Maximum but are recognizable until the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary across Northern Eurasia in all areas populated by mammoths and humans. Loss of this stable source of raw material due to the late Pleistocene mammoth extinction may have provoked a shift in post-LGM Siberia to the Beringian microblade tradition. This paper reviews the most important

  2. Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms in a patient with Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anthony C; Gemmete, Joseph J; Keegan, Catherine E; Witt, Cordelie E; Muraszko, Karin M; Than, Khoi D; Maher, Cormac O

    2011-11-01

    Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome (RBS) is a rare but distinct genetic disorder with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. It has been associated with microcephaly, craniofacial malformation, cavernous hemangioma, encephalocele, and hydrocephalus. There are no previously reported cases of RBS with intracranial aneurysms. The authors report on a patient with a history of RBS who presented with a spontaneous posterior fossa hemorrhage. Multiple small intracranial aneurysms were noted on a preoperative CT angiogram. The patient underwent emergency craniotomy for evacuation of the hemorrhage. A postoperative angiogram confirmed the presence of multiple, distal small intracranial aneurysms.

  3. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have...... an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led...

  4. Diagnostic value of optical coherence tomography for intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, M; Yri, H; Sander, B

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of space-occupying lesions or other known etiology. It primarily affects young obese females, and potentially causes permanent visual loss due to papilledema and secondary...... optic atrophy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a marker for CSF opening pressure in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of 20 newly diagnosed, 21 long-term IIH patients...

  5. [Analysis on Clinical Characteristic and Risk Factors of Patients Coexistence of Cerebral Artery Stenosis with Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Yan; Han, Jin-Tao; Fan, Dong-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    To analyze the incidence of intracranial unruptured aneurysms in patients with intracranial artery stenosis,clinical features,and investigate the risk factors for unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Medical records from all patients performed with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) who had been treated at Peking University Third Hospital,China,from January 2012 to December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed to identify cases coexistence with cerebral artery stenosis and unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Of 273 patients with cerebral artery stenosis (≥50%),intracranial unruptured aneurysms was observed in 17 cases (6.23%) from age of 45 to 78,among them 8 (47.06%) were female and 9 (52.94%) were male. The incidence of unruptured intracranial aneurysm in male patients was 4.17% (9/216),and that of female was 14.4% (8/57). There was statistically significant difference between the male and female incidence of intracranial aneurysm ( P patients,16 (94.12%) aneurysms were located in the internal carotid artery (ICA) system,1 (5.88%) aneurysm was located at the tip of the basilar artery. In 11 cases (64.71%),aneurysms were located at the distal of the stenotic vessels,2 (11.76%) were located at the proximal of the stenotic vessels,and 4 cases (23.53%) of which the aneurysm and stenosis were not in the same artery. Logistic multivariate analysis showed that gender was an independent risk factor for aneurysms in patients with cerebral arterial stenosis. In the intracranial artery stenosis atients,the possibility of the occurrence of the aneurysm is much higher than the general population,and women were more prominent than man. Sex is an independent risk factor for aneurysms in patients with cerebral arterial stenosis.

  6. Development of intracranial hypertension after surgical management of intracranial arachnoid cyst: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2013-11-12

    To describe three cases of delayed development of intracranial hypertension (IH) after surgical treatment of intracranial arachnoid cyst, including the pathogenesis of IH and a review of the literature.

  7. Intracranial meningiomas in the present era of modern neuroimaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intracranial meningioma is the most common primary, intracranial, extra-axial neoplasm. It is mesenchymal in origin and arises from meningothelial cells of arachnoid villi of meninges. Objectives: To re-emphasize the regional anatomic localisation and diagnostic radiological features of intracranial ...

  8. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension – Pathophysiology Based on Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubisavljević Srdjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition, idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a pathological state characterized by an increase in intracranial pressure; however, there are no obvious intracranial pathological processes. The pathophysiology of this disorder is not clear, although there are many reports related to it.

  9. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  10. Primary intracranial leiomyoma in renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasana Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyoma, the benign tumor of smooth muscle cell origin, is commonly seen in genitourinary and gastrointestinal tracts. Primary intracranial leiomyoma, however, is extremely rare occurrence. We hereby report a case of Epstein-Barr negative primary intracranial leiomyoma in a middle-aged renal transplant recipient, which mimicked left frontal parasagittal meningioma on neuroimaging. The tumor was completely excised and diagnosis of leiomyoma was clinched on pathological analysis with immunohistochemistry. The patient improved after tumor removal, and no evidence of tumor recurrence was noted on follow-up study after 10 months postsurgically.

  11. Intracranial osteosarcoma after radiosurgery. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanno, Naoko; Hayashi, Shinkichi; Shimura, Toshiro; Maeda, Shotaro; Teramoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an intracranial osteosarcoma at the site of previous radiosurgery, manifesting as sudden onset of headache and left hemiparesis with aphasia. She had a previous history of stereotactic radiosurgery for an intracranial tumor under a diagnosis of falx meningioma. Computed tomography showed intratumoral and peritumoral hemorrhage at the right parietofrontal region. Gross total resection of the tumor with hematoma was performed. The histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma. Sarcomatous change is a rare complication of radiotherapy. This case illustrates that osteosarcoma may develop years after radiosurgery for benign brain neoplasm. (author)

  12. Increased intracranial volume in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Katja; Karlsborg, Merete; Hansen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    segmentation and outlining of regions in order to identify regional volume changes that might be useful in the diagnosis of the two diseases. RESULTS: Patients with PD had significantly larger intracranial volumes (ICVs) and significantly smaller putaminal and sustantia nigra volumes than controls. MSA...... patients had significantly smaller substantia nigra and caudate volumes than controls but normal intracranial volume. In both patient groups there was a further trend towards smaller amygdala volumes. DISCUSSION: Increased ICV in PD patients is a new finding that may be explained by genetic factors...

  13. Traumatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raksha Ramlakhan, BMedSc, MBBCh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial dermoid cysts are congenital tumors of ectodermal origin. Rupture of these cysts can occur spontaneously, but rupture in association with trauma is reported infrequently. The diagnosis of rupture is made by the presence of lipid (cholesterol droplets in the subarachnoid spaces and ventricles. Nonenhanced CT of the head demonstrates multiple foci of low attenuation that correspond with hyperintense signal on T1-weighted MRI. We present a case of an adult patient with rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst, precipitated by minor trauma.

  14. Graves' disease and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gutch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a central nervous system disorder characterized by raised intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and absence of any structural anomaly on neuroimaging. Among all endocrine disorders associated with the development of IIH, the association of hyperthyroidism and IIH is very rare with few cases reported till date. Thyroid disturbances have a unique association with IIH. Hypo- and hyper-thyroidism have been reported in association with this disorder. We present a rare case of a 25-year-old man with Graves' disease with intractable headache that was later investigated and attributed to development of IIH.

  15. Bereitschaftspotentials recorded from the lateral part of the superior frontal gyrus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Shinji; Ikeda, Akio; Matsuhashi, Masao; Satow, Takeshi; Kunieda, Takeharu; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Baba, Koichi; Mihara, Tadahiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2006-05-15

    To demonstrate the Bereitschaftspotentials (BPs) over the high lateral convexity in the superior frontal gyrus, movement-related cortical potentials with respect to the middle finger extension were recorded in seven patients with refractory epilepsy who underwent subdural implantation of platinum electrode grids and/or strips covering the high lateral frontal convexity. In two out of the seven patients, BPs were recorded from the electrodes placed on the superior frontal gyrus in the vicinity of the border between the medial and lateral frontal lobes, which were distinct from those recorded from the primary sensorimotor cortex. The results suggest the possible contribution of either the lateral dorsal non-primary motor area or the SMA to the generation of the BPs.

  16. "This Is a Public Record": Teaching Human Rights through the Performing Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spero, Andrea McEvoy

    2012-01-01

    Urban youth in the United States often experience daily human rights violations such as racism and violence. Therefore, Human Rights Education (HRE) can strengthen their understanding of these issues and unleash their power to act toward positive change. This qualitative study attempted to gain a deeper understanding of the use of performance arts…

  17. A description of externally recorded womb sounds in human subjects during gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parga, Joanna J; Daland, Robert; Kesavan, Kalpashri; Macey, Paul M; Zeltzer, Lonnie; Harper, Ronald M

    2018-01-01

    Reducing environmental noise benefits premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICU), but excessive reduction may lead to sensory deprivation, compromising development. Instead of minimal noise levels, environments that mimic intrauterine soundscapes may facilitate infant development by providing a sound environment reflecting fetal life. This soundscape may support autonomic and emotional development in preterm infants. We aimed to assess the efficacy and feasibility of external non-invasive recordings in pregnant women, endeavoring to capture intra-abdominal or womb sounds during pregnancy with electronic stethoscopes and build a womb sound library to assess sound trends with gestational development. We also compared these sounds to popular commercial womb sounds marketed to new parents. Intra-abdominal sounds from 50 mothers in their second and third trimester (13 to 40 weeks) of pregnancy were recorded for 6 minutes in a quiet clinic room with 4 electronic stethoscopes, placed in the right upper and lower quadrants, and left upper and lower quadrants of the abdomen. These recording were partitioned into 2-minute intervals in three different positions: standing, sitting and lying supine. Maternal and gestational age, Body Mass Index (BMI) and time since last meal were collected during recordings. Recordings were analyzed using long-term average spectral and waveform analysis, and compared to sounds from non-pregnant abdomens and commercially-marketed womb sounds selected for their availability, popularity, and claims they mimic the intrauterine environment. Maternal sounds shared certain common characteristics, but varied with gestational age. With fetal development, the maternal abdomen filtered high (500-5,000 Hz) and mid-frequency (100-500 Hz) energy bands, but no change appeared in contributions from low-frequency signals (10-100 Hz) with gestational age. Variation appeared between mothers, suggesting a resonant chamber role for intra

  18. Giant serpentine intracranial aneurysm: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Seong; Lee, Myeong Sub; Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Dong Jin; Park, Joong Wha; Whang, Kum

    2001-01-01

    The authors present a case of giant serpentine aneurysm (a partially thrombosed aneurysm containing tortuous vascular channels with a separate entrance and outflow pathway). Giant serpentine aneurysms form a subgroup of giant intracranial aneurysms, distinct from saccular and fusiform varieties, and in this case, too, the clinical presentation and radiographic features of CT, MR imaging and angiography were distinct

  19. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and transverse sinus stenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyrman, Simon; Fytagoridis, Anders; Andresen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old woman was diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and bilateral transverse sinus stenoses (TSS), after presenting with papilledema and decreased visual acuity. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of >60 cm H2O. MRI showed bilateral TSS believed to be asso...

  20. Endovascular treatment of intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shubin; Liang Zhihui; Cui Jinguo; Tian Huiqin; Li Liang; Chen Feng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis. Methods: Ten patients with intracranial venous sinus thrombosis, confirmed by CT, MRI, MRV and / or DSA and encountered during the period of Aug. 2005-Aug. 2007, were treated with endovascular management after they failed to respond to anticoagulant therapy. Of ten patients, intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombus maceration were carried out in 6, while intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical thrombus maceration together with intra-arterial thrombolysis were employed in 4. After the treatment, the anticoagulant therapy continued for 6 months. The patients were followed up for 12-29 months (mean 21 months). Results: After the treatment, the clinical symptoms and signs were completely or partially relieved in eight patients, including disappearance of headache (n=6) and relive of headache (n=2). No obvious improvement was found in one patient and linguistic function disturbance was seen in the remaining one. Lumbar puncture showed that the cerebrospinal fluid pressure returned to normal in all patients. Neither recurrence of thrombosis nor new symptom of neuralgic dysfunction was observed. No procedure-related intracranial or systemic hemorrhagic complications occurred both during and after the operation. Conclusion: Endovascular treatment is an effective and safe procedure for the potentially catastrophic intracranial venous thrombosis. (authors)

  1. [Intracranial plasmocytomas: biology, diagnosis, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A I; Gol'bin, D A

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial plasmocytomas are a rare abnormality in a neurosurgeon's practice. The plasmocytomas may originate from the skull bones or soft tissue intracranial structures; they may be solitary or occur as a manifestation of multiple myeloma, this type being typical of most intracranial plasmocytomas. Progression of solitary plasmocytoma to multiple myeloma is observed in a number of cases. Preoperative diagnosis involves computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging; angiography is desirable. The final diagnosis of plasmocytoma is chiefly based on a morphological study. Special immunohistochemical studies yield very promising results; these are likely to be of high prognostic value. Intracranial plasmocytomas require a differential approach and a meticulous examination since the presence or absence of multiple myeloma radically affects prognosis. There are well-defined predictors; however, it is appropriate that craniobasal plasmocytomas show a worse prognosis than plasmocytomas of the skull vault and more commonly progress to multiple myeloma. Plasmocytomas respond to radiotherapy very well. The gold standard of treatment for plasmocytoma is its total removal and adjuvant radiation therapy; however, there is evidence for good results when it is partially removed and undergoes radiotherapy or after radical surgery without subsequent radiation. The role of chemotherapy has not been defined today.

  2. Genetics of intracranial aneurysms and related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, F.N.G.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IA) are dilatations of the vessel walls of cerebral arteries. Some can rupture and result in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a severe subtype of stroke. This thesis is set out to elucidate the pathophysiology of IA from a genetic perspective. The main conclusions are: 1.

  3. Computed tomography in intracranial malignant lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, S; Odake, G; Fujimoto, M; Yamaki, T; Mizukawa, N [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1978-09-01

    Malignant lymphoma of the central nervous system has been found more and more often in recent years, partly because of the increased use of radiation and such drugs as steroids and antibiotics. However, the definite diagnosis of this disease is difficult until histological verification has been done by operation or autopsy. Since the revolutionary development of computed tomography, however, several reports have been presented, on the computed tomography of malignant lymphoma of the thorax and abdomen. Nevertheless, only a few cases of intracranial malignant lymphoma have been reported. The purpose of this paper, using four patients, is to emphasize the value of computed tomography in the diagnosis of intracranial malignant lymphoma. The characteristic CT findings of intracranial malignant lymphoma may be summarized follows: (1) the tumors are demonstrated to be well-defined, nodular-shaped, and homogenous isodensity - or slightly high-density - lesions in plain scans, and the tumors homogenously increase in density upon contrast enhancement; (2) the disease always has multifocal intracranial lesions, which are shown simultaneously or one after another, and (3) perifocal edema is prominent around the tumors in the cerebral hemisphere.

  4. Novel Application of Postmortem CT Angiography for Evaluation of the Intracranial Vascular Anatomy in Cadaver Heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Ruben P A; van der Zwan, Albert; Bleys, Ronald L A W; Regli, Luca; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Postmortem CT angiography is a common procedure used to visualize the entire human vasculature. For visualization of a specific organ's vascular anatomy, casting is the preferred method. Because of the permanent and damaging nature of casting, the organ cannot be further used as an experimental model after angiography. Therefore, there is a need for a minimally traumatic method to visualize organ-specific vascular anatomy. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a contrast enhancement technique that is capable of visualizing the intracranial vascular anatomy while preserving the anatomic integrity in cadaver heads. Seven human heads were used in this study. Heads were prepared by cannulating the vertebral and internal carotid arteries. Contrast agent was injected as a mixture of tap water, polyethylene glycol 600, and an iodinated contrast agent. Postmortem imaging was executed on a 64-MDCT scanner. Primary image review and 3D reconstruction were performed on a CT workstation. Clear visualization of the major cerebral arteries and smaller intracranial branches was achieved. Adequate visualization was obtained for both the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation. The minimally traumatic angiography method preserved the vascular integrity of the cadaver heads. A novel application of postmortem CT angiography is presented here. The technique can be used for radiologic evaluation of the intracranial circulation in cadaver heads. After CT angiography, the specimen can be used for further experimental or laboratory testing and teaching purposes.

  5. Deep-sea coral record of human impact on watershed quality in the Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Nancy G.; Roark, E. Brendan; Koenig, Alan E.; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Batista, Fabian C.; Kocar, Benjamin D.; Selby, David; McCarthy, Matthew D.; Mienis, Furu

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest drivers of historical nutrient and sediment transport into the Gulf of Mexico is the unprecedented scale and intensity of land use change in the Mississippi River Basin. These landscape changes are linked to enhanced fluxes of carbon and nitrogen pollution from the Mississippi River, and persistent eutrophication and hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Increased terrestrial runoff is one hypothesis for recent enrichment in bulk nitrogen isotope (δ15N) values, a tracer for nutrient source, observed in a Gulf of Mexico deep-sea coral record. However, unambiguously linking anthropogenic land use change to whole scale shifts in downstream Gulf of Mexico biogeochemical cycles is difficult. Here we present a novel approach, coupling a new tracer of agro-industrialization to a multiproxy record of nutrient loading in long-lived deep-sea corals collected in the Gulf of Mexico. We found that coral bulk δ15N values are enriched over the last 150–200 years relative to the last millennia, and compound-specific amino acid δ15N data indicate a strong increase in baseline δ15N of nitrate as the primary cause. Coral rhenium (Re) values are also strongly elevated during this period, suggesting that 34% of Re is of anthropogenic origin, consistent with Re enrichment in major world rivers. However, there are no pre-anthropogenic measurements of Re to confirm this observation. For the first time, an unprecedented record of natural and anthropogenic Re variability is documented through coral Re records. Taken together, these novel proxies link upstream changes in water quality to impacts on the deep-sea coral ecosystem.

  6. Deep-sea coral record of human impact on watershed quality in the Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, N.; Roark, B.; Koenig, A.; Batista, F. C.; Kocar, B. D.; Selby, D. S.; Mccarthy, M. D.; Mienis, F.; Ross, S. W.; Demopoulos, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    One of the greatest drivers of historical nutrient and sediment transport into the Gulf of Mexico is the unprecedented scale and intensity of land use change in the Mississippi River Basin. These landscape changes are linked to enhanced fluxes of carbon and nitrogen pollution from the Mississippi River, and persistent eutrophication and hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Increased terrestrial runoff is one hypothesis for recent enrichment in bulk nitrogen isotope (δ15N) values, a tracer for nutrient source, observed in a Gulf of Mexico deep-sea coral record. However, unambiguously linking anthropogenic land use change to whole scale shifts in downstream Gulf of Mexico biogeochemical cycles is difficult. Here we present a novel approach, coupling a new tracer of agro-industrialization to a multiproxy record of nutrient loading in long-lived deep-sea corals collected in the Gulf of Mexico. We found that coral bulk δ15N values are enriched over the last 150-200 years relative to the last millennia, and compound-specific amino acid δ15N data indicate a strong increase in baseline δ15N of nitrate as the primary cause. Coral rhenium (Re) values are also strongly elevated during this period, suggesting that 34% of Re is of anthropogenic origin, consistent with Re enrichment in major world rivers. However, there are no pre-anthropogenic measurements of Re to confirm this observation. For the first time, an unprecedented record of natural and anthropogenic Re variability is documented through coral Re records. Taken together, these novel proxies link upstream changes in water quality to impacts on the deep-sea coral ecosystem.

  7. Nucleus accumbens is involved in human action monitoring: evidence from invasive electrophysiological recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Münte

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Nucleus accumbens (Nacc has been proposed to act as a limbic-motor interface. Here, using invasive intraoperative recordings in an awake patient suffering from obsessive-compulsive disease (OCD, we demonstrate that its activity is modulated by the quality of performance of the subject in a choice reaction time task designed to tap action monitoring processes. Action monitoring, that is, error detection and correction, is thought to be supported by a system involving the dopaminergic midbrain, the basal ganglia, and the medial prefrontal cortex. In surface electrophysiological recordings, action monitoring is indexed by an error-related negativity (ERN appearing time-locked to the erroneous responses and emanating from the medial frontal cortex. In preoperative scalp recordings the patient's ERN was found to be signifi cantly increased compared to a large (n= 83 normal sample, suggesting enhanced action monitoring processes. Intraoperatively, error-related modulations were obtained from the Nacc but not from a site 5 mm above. Importantly, crosscorrelation analysis showed that error-related activity in the Nacc preceded surface activity by 40 ms. We propose that the Nacc is involved in action monitoring, possibly by using error signals from the dopaminergic midbrain to adjust the relative impact of limbic and prefrontal inputs on frontal control systems in order to optimize goal-directed behavior.

  8. Urinary urge seizure semiology localization by intracranial monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Ronak; Shamim, Sadat

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Seizures may present with many different symptom complexes. Seizure semiologies have localization value when contemplating surgical therapies. Epilepsy presenting as a desire to micturate is exceedingly rare, with only a handful of published cases. We present a patient who had initially unexplained childhood urinary urge that progressed into lapses of memory and confusion that was eventually diagnosed as epilepsy in adulthood. Due to refractoriness to medical management, our patient's epileptic focus was localized through both noninvasive and invasive subdural electrode arrays to the nondominant medial temporal lobe and successfully treated with an amygdalohippocampectomy. Only one other case of ictal urinary urgency seizures has been recorded with intracranial electroencephalogram monitoring in the literature. PMID:29686574

  9. The role of sleep in declarative memory consolidation--direct evidence by intracranial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmacher, Nikolai; Haupt, Sven; Fernández, Guillén; Elger, Christian E; Fell, Juergen

    2008-03-01

    Two step theories of memory formation assume that an initial learning phase is followed by a consolidation stage. Memory consolidation has been suggested to occur predominantly during sleep. Very recent findings, however, suggest that important steps in memory consolidation occur also during waking state but may become saturated after some time awake. Sleep, in this model, specifically favors restoration of synaptic plasticity and accelerated memory consolidation while asleep and briefly afterwards. To distinguish between these different views, we recorded intracranial electroencephalograms from the hippocampus and rhinal cortex of human subjects while they retrieved information acquired either before or after a "nap" in the afternoon or on a control day without nap. Reaction times, hippocampal event-related potentials, and oscillatory gamma activity indicated a temporal gradient of hippocampal involvement in information retrieval on the control day, suggesting hippocampal-neocortical information transfer during waking state. On the day with nap, retrieval of recent items that were encoded briefly after the nap did not involve the hippocampus to a higher degree than retrieval of items encoded before the nap. These results suggest that sleep facilitates rapid processing through the hippocampus but is not necessary for information transfer into the neocortex per se.

  10. Miniature Coplanar Implantable Antenna on Thin and Flexible Platform for Fully Wireless Intracranial Pressure Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Waqas A. Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive approach to intracranial pressure monitoring is desired for long-term diagnostics. The monitored pressure is transmitted outside the skull through an implant antenna. We present a new miniature (6 mm × 5 mm coplanar implant antenna and its integration on a sensor platform to establish a far-field data link for the sensor readout at distances of 0.5 to 1 meter. The implant antenna was developed using full-wave electromagnetic simulator and measured in a liquid phantom mimicking the dielectric properties of the human head. It achieved impedance reflection coefficient better than −10 dB from 2.38 GHz to 2.54 GHz which covers the targeted industrial, scientific, and medical band. Experiments resulted in an acceptable peak gain of approximately −23 dBi. The implant antenna was submerged in the liquid phantom and interfaced to a 0.5 mW voltage controlled oscillator. To verify the implant antenna performance as a part of the ICP monitoring system, we recorded the radiated signal strength using a spectrum analyzer. Using a half-wavelength dipole as the receiving antenna, we captured approximately −58.7 dBm signal at a distance of 1 m from the implant antenna which is well above for the reader with sensitivity of −80 dBm.

  11. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caranci, F., E-mail: ferdinandocaranci@libero.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Briganti, F., E-mail: frabriga@unina.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M. [Neuroradiology service, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Service Cardarelli Hospital Naples (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  12. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caranci, F.; Briganti, F.; Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M.; Muto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  13. Sleep-monitoring, experiment M133. [electronic recording system for automatic analysis of human sleep patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Salamy, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    The Skylab sleep-monitoring experiment simulated the timelines and environment expected during a 56-day Skylab mission. Two crewmembers utilized the data acquisition and analysis hardware, and their sleep characteristics were studied in an online fashion during a number of all night recording sessions. Comparison of the results of online automatic analysis with those of postmission visual data analysis was favorable, confirming the feasibility of obtaining reliable objective information concerning sleep characteristics during the Skylab missions. One crewmember exhibited definite changes in certain sleep characteristics (e.g., increased sleep latency, increased time Awake during first third of night, and decreased total sleep time) during the mission.

  14. Demonstration of a setup for chronic optogenetic stimulation and recording across cortical areas in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdan-Shahmorad, Azadeh; Diaz-Botia, Camilo; Hanson, Tim; Ledochowitsch, Peter; Maharabiz, Michel M.; Sabes, Philip N.

    2015-03-01

    Although several studies have shown the feasibility of using optogenetics in non-human primates (NHP), reliable largescale chronic interfaces have not yet been reported for such studies in NHP. Here we introduce a chronic setup that permits repeated, daily optogenetic stimulation and large-scale recording from the same sites in NHP cortex. The setup combines optogenetics with a transparent artificial dura (AD) and high-density micro-electrocorticography (μECoG). To obtain expression across large areas of cortex, we infused AAV5-CamKIIa-C1V1-EYFP viral vector using an infusion technique based on convection-enhanced delivery (CED) in primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices. By epifluorescent imaging through AD we were able to confirm high levels of expression covering about 110 mm2 of S1 and M1. We then incorporated a 192-channel μECoG array spanning 192 mm2 into the AD for simultaneous electrophysiological recording during optical stimulation. The array consists of patterned Pt-Au-Pt metal traces embedded in ~10 μm Parylene-C insulator. The parylene is sufficiently transparent to allow minimally attenuated optical access for optogenetic stimulation. The array was chronically implanted over the opsin-expressing areas in M1 and S1 for over two weeks. Optical stimulation was delivered via a fiber optic placed on the surface of the AD. With this setup, we recorded reliable evoked activity following light stimulation at several locations. Similar responses were recorded across tens of days, however a decline in the light-evoked signal amplitude was observed during this period due to the growth of dural tissue over the array. These results show the feasibility of a chronic interface for combined largescale optogenetic stimulation and cortical recordings across days.

  15. Department of Defense Report on Search for Human Radiation Experiment Records, 1944 - 1994, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    subsequent survival of patients in stage IV hepatic coma Abstract: This study did not involve human exposure to ionizing radiation. Start Date...renal function; (2) euthyroid subjects with renal disease; (3) hyperthyroid patients; and (4) myxedema patients. Simultaneous determinations of the...30 October 1953 Number Title ACIR54000-B Renal function and 131-1 clearance in hyperthyroidism and myxedema From a presently undetermined date

  16. Non-Invasive Electromagnetic Skin Patch Sensor to Measure Intracranial Fluid–Volume Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Griffith

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Elevated intracranial fluid volume can drive intracranial pressure increases, which can potentially result in numerous neurological complications or death. This study’s focus was to develop a passive skin patch sensor for the head that would non-invasively measure cranial fluid volume shifts. The sensor consists of a single baseline component configured into a rectangular planar spiral with a self-resonant frequency response when impinged upon by external radio frequency sweeps. Fluid volume changes (10 mL increments were detected through cranial bone using the sensor on a dry human skull model. Preliminary human tests utilized two sensors to determine feasibility of detecting fluid volume shifts in the complex environment of the human body. The correlation between fluid volume changes and shifts in the first resonance frequency using the dry human skull was classified as a second order polynomial with R2 = 0.97. During preliminary and secondary human tests, a ≈24 MHz and an average of ≈45.07 MHz shifts in the principal resonant frequency were measured respectively, corresponding to the induced cephalad bio-fluid shifts. This electromagnetic resonant sensor may provide a non-invasive method to monitor shifts in fluid volume and assist with medical scenarios including stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, concussion, or monitoring intracranial pressure.

  17. Short-term memory functions of the human fetus recorded with magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huotilainen, Minna; Kujala, Anu; Hotakainen, Merja; Parkkonen, Lauri; Taulu, Samu; Simola, Juha; Nenonen, Jukka; Karjalainen, Matti; Näätänen, Risto

    2005-01-19

    Studies in fetuses and in prematurely born infants show that auditory discriminative skills are present prior to birth. The magnetic fields generated by the fetal brain activity pass the maternal tissues and, despite their weakness, can be detected externally using MEG. Recent studies on the auditory evoked magnetic responses show that the fetal brain responds to sound onset. In contrast, higher-level auditory skills, such as those involving discriminative and memory functions, were not so far studied in fetuses with MEG. Here we show that fetal responses related to discriminating sounds can be recorded, implicating that the auditory change-detection system is functional. These results open new views to developmental neuroscience by enabling one to determine the sensory capabilities as well as the extent and accuracy of the short-term memory system of the fetus, and, further, to follow the development of these crucial processes.

  18. A comparison of antemortem tooth loss in human hunter-gatherers and non-human catarrhines: implications for the identification of behavioral evolution in the human fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Cassandra C

    2013-06-01

    Middle and Late Pleistocene fossil hominin specimens with severe antemortem tooth loss are often regarded as evidence for the precocious evolution of human-like behaviors, such as conspecific care or cooking, in ancient hominin species. The goal of this project was to ask whether the theoretical association between antemortem tooth loss and uniquely human behaviors is supported empirically in a large skeletal sample of human hunter-gatherers, chimpanzees, orangutans, and baboons. Binomial regression modeling in a Bayesian framework allows for the investigation of the effects of tooth class, genus, age, and sex on the likelihood of tooth loss. The results strongly suggest that modern humans experience more antemortem tooth loss than non-human primates and identify age in years as an important predictor. Once age is accounted for, the difference between the humans and the closest non-human genus (chimpanzees) is less pronounced; humans are still more likely on average to experience antemortem tooth loss though 95% uncertainty envelopes around the average prediction for each genus show some overlap. These analyses support theoretical links between antemortem tooth loss and modern human characteristics; humans' significantly longer life history and a positive correlation between age and antemortem tooth loss explain, in part, the reason why humans are more likely to experience tooth loss than non-human primates, but the results do not exclude behavioral differences as a contributing factor. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Intracranial cerebral artery stenosis with associated coronary artery and extracranial carotid artery stenosis in Turkish patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Ozlem [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: yalinozlem@hotmail.com; Kizilkilic, Osman; Yildirim, Tulin [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Atalay, Hakan [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Although it has been demonstrated that there is a high prevalence of extracranial carotid artery stenosis (ECAS) in patients with severe coronary artery disease, intracranial cerebral artery stenosis (ICAS) is rarely mentioned. We evaluated the prevalence of ICAS in patients with ECAS having elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery to determine the relations between ICAS, ECAS and atherosclerotic risk factors. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the digital subtraction angiography findings of 183 patients with ECAS {>=} 50% preparing for CABG surgery. The analyses focused on the intracranial or extracranial location and degree of the stenosis. The degree of extracranial stenoses were categorized as normal, <50%, 50-69%, 70-89%, and 90-99% stenosis and occluded. The degree of intracranial stenosis was classified as normal or {<=}25%, 25-49%, and {>=}50% stenosis and occluded. Traditional atherosclerotic risk factors were recorded. Results: ECAS < 70% in 42 patients and ECAS {>=} 70% in 141 patients. ICAS was found in 51 patients and ICAS {>=} 50% in 30 patients. Regarding risk factors, we found hypertension in 135 patients, diabetes mellitus in 91 patients, hyperlipidemia in 84 patients, and smoking in 81 patients. No risk factor was significant predictors of intracranial atherosclerosis. The severity of ICAS was not significantly associated with that of the ECAS. Conclusions: We found ICAS in 27.8% of the patients with ECAS > 50% on digital subtraction angiography preparing for CABG. Therefore a complete evaluation of the neck vessels with magnetic resonance or catheter angiography seems to be indicated as well as intracranial circulation for the risk assessment of CABG.

  20. Computed tomographic findings of intracranial pyogenic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. J.; Suh, J. H.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, K. C.; Chung, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The early diagnosis and effective treatment of brain abscess pose a difficult clinical problem. With the advent of computed tomography, however, it appears that mortality due to intracranial abscess has significantly diminished. 54 cases of intracranial pyogenic abscess are presented. Etiologic factors and computed tomographic findings are analyzed and following result are obtained. 1. The common etiologic factors are otitis media, post operation, and head trauma, in order of frequency. 2. The most common initial computed tomographic findings of brain abscess is ring contrast enhancement with surrounding brain edema. 3. The most characteristic computed tomographic finding of ring contrast enhancement is smooth thin walled ring contrast enhancement. 4. Most of thick irregular ring contrast enhancement are abscess associated with cyanotic heart disease or poor operation. 5. The most common findings of epidural and subdural empyema is crescentic radiolucent area with thin wall contrast enhancement without surrounding brain edema in convexity of brain

  1. Intracranial neurenteric cyst traversing the brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurenteric cysts (NECs, also called enterogenous cysts, are rare benign endodermal lesions of the central nervous system that probably result from separation failure of the notochord and upper gastrointestinal tract. Most frequently they are found in the lower cervical spine or the upper thoracic spine. Intracranial occurrence is rare and mostly confined to infratentorial compartment, in prepontine region [51%]. Other common locations are fourth ventricle and cerebellopontine angle. There are few reports of NEC in medulla or the cerebellum. Because of the rarity of the disease and common radiological findings, they are misinterpreted as arachnoid or simple cysts until the histopathological confirmation, unless suspected preoperatively. We herein report a rare yet interesting case of intracranial NEC traversing across the brainstem.

  2. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies.

  3. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemine, Hisao

    1983-01-01

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  4. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor.

  5. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.

  7. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu

    1985-01-01

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor

  8. A Case of Rivaroxaban Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Chin-Yu Lo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rivaroxaban is a newer anticoagulant initially approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Rivaroxaban has several characteristics that are more favorable than warfarin. One of the characteristics is decreased risk of hemorrhage. We report one of the first case reports of severe intracranial hemorrhage associated with rivaroxaban in an elderly patient with decreased renal function. We aim to alert emergency medicine providers regarding the likelihood of encountering these patient as newer anticoagulants rise in popularity.

  9. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori.

    1984-01-01

    In tracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patinents; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  10. Simultaneous recordings of human microsaccades and drifts with a contemporary video eye tracker and the search coil technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B McCamy

    Full Text Available Human eyes move continuously, even during visual fixation. These "fixational eye movements" (FEMs include microsaccades, intersaccadic drift and oculomotor tremor. Research in human FEMs has grown considerably in the last decade, facilitated by the manufacture of noninvasive, high-resolution/speed video-oculography eye trackers. Due to the small magnitude of FEMs, obtaining reliable data can be challenging, however, and depends critically on the sensitivity and precision of the eye tracking system. Yet, no study has conducted an in-depth comparison of human FEM recordings obtained with the search coil (considered the gold standard for measuring microsaccades and drift and with contemporary, state-of-the art video trackers. Here we measured human microsaccades and drift simultaneously with the search coil and a popular state-of-the-art video tracker. We found that 95% of microsaccades detected with the search coil were also detected with the video tracker, and 95% of microsaccades detected with video tracking were also detected with the search coil, indicating substantial agreement between the two systems. Peak/mean velocities and main sequence slopes of microsaccades detected with video tracking were significantly higher than those of the same microsaccades detected with the search coil, however. Ocular drift was significantly correlated between the two systems, but drift speeds were higher with video tracking than with the search coil. Overall, our combined results suggest that contemporary video tracking now approaches the search coil for measuring FEMs.

  11. [Pregnancy aspects related to intracranial hemorrhage in newborns of very low weight in South Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Lisandra Radaelli; Iser, Betine Pinto Moehlecke; Tartare, Bianca; Bonetti, Heloise Serafin

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the relationship between route of delivery and other aspects of pregnancy and the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage in newborns of very low weight at a teaching hospital in South Brazil. A case-control study was conducted. Medical records of all patients who were born weighing ≤ 1,500 g and who were submitted to transfontanellar ultrasonography were analyzed from January 2011 to September 2014. The cases were newborns with diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage, while newborns with regular exams were used as controls. Differences between groups were analyzed by the Student t test and by χ2 or Fisher exact tests, and association was determined using the odds ratio with a 95% confidence interval and α = 5%. A total of 222 newborns with birth weight ≤ 1,500 g were recorded; of these, 113 were submitted to transfontanellar ultrasonography and were included in the study. Sixty-nine (61.1%) newborns were diagnosed with intracranial hemorrhage (cases) and 44 (38.9%) showed no abnormal results (controls). Most cases had grade I hemorrhage (96.8%) originating from the germinative matrix (95.7%). The predominant route of delivery was caesarean section (81.2% of the cases and 72.7% of the controls). Five deaths were recorded (3 cases and 2 controls). Gestational age ranged from 24 to 37 weeks. Median birth weight was 1,205 g (range: 675-1,500 g). The median time of hospitalization was 52 days, ranging from 5 to 163 days. Grade I intracranial hemorrhage from the germinative matrix was the most frequent. No differences were found between cases and controls for the variables studied. The small number of infants submitted to transfontanellar ultrasonography limited the sample size and the results of the study.

  12. IMASIS computer-based medical record project: dealing with the human factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Baranera, M; Planas, I; Palau, J; Sanz, F

    1995-01-01

    The Institut Municipal d'Assistència Sanitària (IMAS) is a health care organization in Barcelona, comprising two general hospitals, a psychiatric hospital, a surgical clinic, a geriatric center, some primary care clinics, and a research institute. Since 1984, IMAS has been engaged in creating a multicenter integrated hospital information system (IMASIS). Currently, IMASIS offers the possibility to manage administrative data, laboratory results, pathology and cytology reports, radiology reports, and pharmacy inpatient orders; it also shares this information on-line among IMAS centers. IMASIS users may also work with a word processor, a spreadsheet, a database, or a statistical package and have access to MEDLINE. A second phase of IMASIS development began in December 1993 focused on clinical information management. The goal was to move towards an integrated multimedia medical record [1]. As a first step, the implementation experiences of the most advanced hospital information systems around the world were studied. Some of these experiences detected behavioral, cultural, and organizational factors [2] as the main sources of delay, or even failure, in HIS projects. A preliminary analysis to define such factors, assess their potential impact, and introduce adequate measures to deal with them seemed unavoidable before structuring of the project. In our approach to physician attitudes analysis, two survey techniques were applied. First, every hospital service head was contacted to schedule an interview, with either a service representative or a group of staff physicians and residents. The aim was to provide detailed information about project objectives and collect personal opinions, problems encountered in the current HIS, and specific needs of every medical and surgical specialty (including imaging needs). Every service head was asked to distribute a questionnaire among all clinicians, which assessed frequency of use of IMASIS current applications, user's satisfaction

  13. Pulpal blood flow recorded from human premolar teeth with a laser Doppler flow meter using either red or infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsamanmith, Kanittha; Timpawat, Siriporn; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Matthews, Bruce

    2011-07-01

    To compare red (635 nm) and infrared (780 nm) light for recording pulpal blood flow from human premolar teeth. Recordings were made from 11 healthy teeth in 9 subjects (aged 16-30 years) using a laser Doppler flow meter (Periflux 4001) equipped with both red and infrared lasers. Average blood flow signals were obtained with both light sources alternately from each tooth under five conditions: intact tooth without opaque rubber dam, intact tooth with dam, after injecting local anaesthetic (3% Mepivacaine) (LA) over the apex of the tooth and cavity preparation to almost expose the pulp, after removal and replacement of the pulp, and with the root canal empty. With infrared light, the dam significantly decreased the mean blood flow by 80%. Injecting LA and cavity preparation had no significant effect. Removal and replacement of the pulp reduced the mean blood flow by 58%. There was no further change when the pulp was removed. With red light, the dam reduced the signal from intact teeth by 60%. Injecting LA and cavity preparation had no significant effect. The signal fell by 67% after pulp removal and replacement and did not change significantly when the pulp was removed. Opaque rubber dam minimises the contribution of non-pulpal tissues to the laser Doppler signal recorded from premolars. Using dam, the pulp contributed about 60% to the blood flow signal with both red and infrared light. The difference between them in this respect was not significant. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Endovascular treatment for pediatric intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Wu, Zhongxue [Capital Medical University, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, Hebei (China)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to report the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric patients with intracranial aneurysms. From 1998 to 2005, 25 pediatric patients (aged {<=}17 years) with intracranial aneurysm were treated at our institute. Eleven of 25 patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage. In ten patients, the aneurysm was an incidental finding. One patient presented with cranial nerves dysfunction and three with neurological deficits. The locations of the aneurysms were as follows: vertebral artery (VA; n = 9), middle cerebral artery (MCA; n = 5), posterior cerebral artery (PCA; n = 4), basilar artery (BA; n = 2), anterior communicating artery (n = 2), anterior cerebral artery (n = 2), and internal carotid artery (n = 1). Five patients were treated with selective embolization with coils. Sixteen patients were treated with parent vessel occlusion (PVO). Eight PVOs were performed with balloons and eight were performed with coils. One patient with a VA aneurysm was spontaneously thrombosed 4 days after the initial diagnostic angiogram. In three patients treated with stent alone or stent-assisted coiling, one with BA trunk aneurysm died. One aneurismal recurrence occurred and was retreated. At a mean follow-up duration of 23.5 months, 96% of patients had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms occur more commonly in male patients and have a predilection for the VA, PCA, and MCA. PVO is an effective and safe treatment for fusiform aneurysms. Basilar trunk fusiform aneurysms were difficult to treat and were associated with a high mortality rate. (orig.)

  15. The Technique of Endovascular Intracranial Revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Connors

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerosis was traditionally believed to carry a risk of stroke of 8% to 22% per annum. The annualized stroke rate in the recent Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis trial medical management arm was 12.2%. This trial was halted due to excessive periprocedural events in the stent arm. This stroke rate Is still Unacceptably high and a treatment strategy is still needed. SAMMPRIS has no bearing on angioplasty alone. Angioplasty alone has always been our primary intervention for intracranial atherosclerosis and remains so to this day due to its relative simplicity, low complication rate, and efficacy. We have, however, made adjustments to our patient management regimen based on the results of SAMMPRIS. This paper outlines our current patient selection, procedural technique, and post-procedure management. The complications we have encountered while developing our technique are described along with how to avoid them and how to manage them. Our most recent results (since previous publications are also discussed.

  16. Brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Kyu; Byun, Woo Mok; Cho, Jae Ho; Cho Kil Ho; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Yang Gu [Keimyoung Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jin [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. A retrospective review of MRI findings was conducted on six patients with clinically proven spontaneous intracranial hypotension; no patient had a history of previous spinal puncture. Follow-up MRI was available in two patients, and to detect CSF leakage, radio-nuclide cisternography(n=3D5), myelography(n=3D1), and MR myelography(n=3D1) were performed. On contrast-enhanced T1WI, diffuse dural enhancement was seen in all cases, subdural hematoma or hygroma was seen in four cases, pituitary gland prominence in four, dural sinus dilatation in four, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil in two, downward displacement of the iter in one, and suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement in two. In no patient was abnormal CSF leakage found. Although dural enhancement, as seen on MRI, is not specific, diffuse enhancement of the dura mater accompanied by subdural hematoma, hygroma, pituitary gland prominence, dural sinus dilatation, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil, or suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement can strongly suggest intracranial hypotension.=20.

  17. Abciximab for thrombolysis during intracranial aneurysm coiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralla, Jan; Rennie, Adam T.M.; Corkill, Rufus A.; Lalloo, Shivendra T.; Molyneux, Andrew; Byrne, James V.; Kuker, Wilhem

    2008-01-01

    Thrombotic events are a common and severe complication of endovascular aneurysm treatment with significant impact on patients' outcome. This study evaluates risk factors for thrombus formation and assesses the efficacy and safety of abciximab for clot dissolution. All patients treated with abciximab during (41 patients) or shortly after (22 patients) intracranial aneurysm coil embolisation were retrieved from the institutional database (2000 to 2007, 1,250 patients). Sixty-three patients (mean age, 55.3 years, ±12.8) had received either intra-arterial or intravenous abciximab. Risk factors for clot formation were assessed and the angiographic and clinical outcome evaluated. No aneurysm rupture occurred during or after abciximab application. The intra-procedural rate of total recanalisation was 68.3%. Thromboembolic complications were frequently found in aneurysms of the Acom complex and of the basilar artery, whilst internal carotid artery aneurysms were underrepresented. Two patients died of treatment-related intracranial haemorrhages into preexisting cerebral infarcts. Two patients developed a symptomatic groin haematoma. Abciximab is efficacious and safe for thrombolysis during and after endovascular intracranial aneurysm treatment in the absence of preexisting ischaemic stroke. (orig.)

  18. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  19. CT and MRI diagnosis of intracranial chondroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuejun; Sui Qinglan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and study the features of intracranial chondroma on CT and MRI imaging. Methods: CT and MRI findings of ten cases of intracranial chondroma proved by surgery and pathology from 1994. 1 to 2004.9 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Among 10 cases, 4 cases were located at the skull base, 4 cases at convexity, 1 case at the region of falx cerebri, and 1 case within the brain parenchyma. CT scans showed obvious calcification and clear border of the tumors in 10 cases, mixed attenuation in 9 eases, and adjacent bone invasion in 5 cases. 4 cases of MRI scans showed hypointense signal on T 1 and T 2 -weighted images in calcified element of the tumor, intermediate to hypointense signal intensity on T 1 -weighted image, and hyperintense signal intensity on T 2 -weighted image in parenchyma of the tumor. 4 cases of CT scans showed slightly enhancement. Conclusion: Intracranial chondroma are often originated from synchondrosis of the skull base, convexity of brain and region of falx cerebri. Obvious calcification may be seen in most cases. Slightly enhancement and marked delayed contrast enhancement were characteristic. The accurate diagnosis still depends on pathology. (authors)

  20. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Jirásková

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Nada Jirásková, Pavel RozsívalDepartment of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Hradec Králové, Czech RepublicPurpose: To evaluate retrospectively the features, treatment, and outcome of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH in children.Methods: Nine patients, 15 years and younger, diagnosed with IIH. Inclusion criteria were papilledema, normal brain computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid pressure greater than 250 mm H2O, normal cerebrospinal fluid content, and a nonfocal neurologic examination except for sixth nerve palsy.Results: Of the nine patients, eight were girls. Five girls were overweight and one boy was obese. The most common presenting symptom was headache (5 patients. Diplopia or strabismus did not occur in our group. Visual field abnormalities were present in all eyes, and severe visual loss resulting in light perception vision occurred in both eyes of one patient. Eight patients were treated medically with acetazolamide alone, and one girl needed a combination of acetazolamide and corticosteroids. This girl also required optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. Resolution of papilledema and recovery of visual function occurred in all patients.Conclusions: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in prepubertal children is rather uncommon. Prompt diagnosis and management are important to prevent permanent visual loss.Keywords: idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pediatric, treatment

  1. Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Asao, Toyohiko; Shibata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage were diagnosed and followed up by CT scanning. By CT, hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high density areas in an acute stage and imaged as low density areas after the hemorrhage was absorbed. The time of absorption varies depending upon the site and the severity of hemorrhage. Intraventricular hemorrhage, petechial hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were absorbed rapidly in more than 70% of the exanimed cases, CT scanning 1 - 2 weeks after the onset revealed absorption of hemorrhage. However, the absorption delayed in intracerebral hematoma; CT scan taken after one month showed hemorrhagic lesions remaining in 75% of the cases. In nine cases who survived, following the absorption of the hemorrhagic lesions, cerebral atrophy was observed in 4 cases (44%), ventricular enlargement in 3 cases (33%), and complete recovery in 2 cases (22%). From these results, CT scanning for diagnosis of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage should be done before the hemorrhagic lesion is absorbed (within 7 days of the onset). Follow-up study by CT is important for observing changes and predicting prognosis of intracranial hemorrhage. (Ueda, J.)

  2. Primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Shigeru; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Miyamoto, Seiji; Kyoi, Kikuo; Utsumi, Shozaburo; Kamada, Kitaro; Inui, Shoji; Masuda, Akio.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage were studied in terms of the radiological and histological findings. The cases having hemorrhage in the tumor, as established through CT or histologically, were excluded if their onsets were not sudden due to intracranial hemorrhages. The results obtained may be summarized as follows: 1) From an anatomical point of view, cerebral subcortical hemorrhages account for 80%; hemorrhages in the cerebellopontine angle, 10%, and hemorrhages in the basal ganglia, 10%. 2) Plain CT findings showed perifocal low-density areas within 24 hours after onset in all 10 cases. 3) Enhanced CT findings showed enhanced areas in 4 or 6 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 5) From a histological point of view, glioblastomas account for 30%; malignant astrocytomas, 20%; astrocytomas, 20%; malignant ependymomas, 10%; hemangioblastoma, 10%, and transitional meningiomas, 10%. In conclusion, a perifocal low-density area on CT within 24 hours after onset is the most meaningful indication of intracranial hemorrhage originating from a brain tumor. A histological 'perinuclear halo' in an astrocytoma as an artifact due to hemorrhage may often be misleading in diagnosing mixed oligo-astrocytomas. (author)

  3. Private traits and attributes are predictable from digital records of human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, Michal; Stillwell, David; Graepel, Thore

    2013-04-09

    We show that easily accessible digital records of behavior, Facebook Likes, can be used to automatically and accurately predict a range of highly sensitive personal attributes including: sexual orientation, ethnicity, religious and political views, personality traits, intelligence, happiness, use of addictive substances, parental separation, age, and gender. The analysis presented is based on a dataset of over 58,000 volunteers who provided their Facebook Likes, detailed demographic profiles, and the results of several psychometric tests. The proposed model uses dimensionality reduction for preprocessing the Likes data, which are then entered into logistic/linear regression to predict individual psychodemographic profiles from Likes. The model correctly discriminates between homosexual and heterosexual men in 88% of cases, African Americans and Caucasian Americans in 95% of cases, and between Democrat and Republican in 85% of cases. For the personality trait "Openness," prediction accuracy is close to the test-retest accuracy of a standard personality test. We give examples of associations between attributes and Likes and discuss implications for online personalization and privacy.

  4. Systematic review of reviews of risk factors for intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Systematic reviews of systematic reviews identify good quality reviews of earlier studies of medical conditions. This article describes a systematic review of systematic reviews performed to investigate factors that might influence the risk of rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. It exemplifies the technique of this type of research and reports the finding of a specific study. The annual incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage resulting from the rupture of intracranial aneurysms is estimated to be nine per 100,000. A large proportion of people who have this bleed, will die or remain dependent on the care of others for some time. Reliable knowledge about the risks of subarachnoid haemorrhage in different populations will help in planning, screening and prevention strategies and in predicting the prognosis of individual patients. If the necessary data were available in the identified reviews, an estimate for the numerical relationship between a particular characteristic and the risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage was included in this report. The identification of eligible systematic reviews relied mainly on the two major bibliographic databases of the biomedical literature: PubMed and EMBASE. These were searched in 2006, using specially designed search strategies. Approximately 2,000 records were retrieved and each of these was checked carefully against the eligibility criteria for this systematic review. These criteria required that the report be a systematic review of studies assessing the risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage in patients known to have an unruptured intracranial aneurysm or of studies that had investigated the characteristics of people who experienced a subarachnoid haemorrhage without previously being known to have an unruptured aneurysm. Reports which included more than one systematic review were eligible and each of these reviews was potentially eligible. The quality of each systematic review was assessed. In this review, 16 separate reports were

  5. An externally head-mounted wireless neural recording device for laboratory animal research and possible human clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Li, Hao; Bull, Christopher; Borton, David A; Aceros, Juan; Larson, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new type of head-mounted wireless neural recording device in a highly compact package, dedicated for untethered laboratory animal research and designed for future mobile human clinical use. The device, which takes its input from an array of intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEA) has ninety-seven broadband parallel neural recording channels and was integrated on to two custom designed printed circuit boards. These house several low power, custom integrated circuits, including a preamplifier ASIC, a controller ASIC, plus two SAR ADCs, a 3-axis accelerometer, a 48MHz clock source, and a Manchester encoder. Another ultralow power RF chip supports an OOK transmitter with the center frequency tunable from 3GHz to 4GHz, mounted on a separate low loss dielectric board together with a 3V LDO, with output fed to a UWB chip antenna. The IC boards were interconnected and packaged in a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) enclosure which is compatible with both animal and human use (e.g. sterilizable). The entire system consumes 17mA from a 1.2Ahr 3.6V Li-SOCl2 1/2AA battery, which operates the device for more than 2 days. The overall system includes a custom RF receiver electronics which are designed to directly interface with any number of commercial (or custom) neural signal processors for multi-channel broadband neural recording. Bench-top measurements and in vivo testing of the device in rhesus macaques are presented to demonstrate the performance of the wireless neural interface.

  6. Two Extreme Climate Events of the Last 1000 Years Recorded in Himalayan and Andean Ice Cores: Impacts on Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L. G.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Davis, M. E.; Kenny, D. V.; Lin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In the last few decades numerous studies have linked pandemic influenza, cholera, malaria, and viral pneumonia, as well as droughts, famines and global crises, to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Two annually resolved ice core records, one from Dasuopu Glacier in the Himalaya and one from the Quelccaya Ice Cap in the tropical Peruvian Andes provide an opportunity to investigate these relationships on opposite sides of the Pacific Basin for the last 1000 years. The Dasuopu record provides an annual history from 1440 to 1997 CE and a decadally resolved record from 1000 to 1440 CE while the Quelccaya ice core provides annual resolution over the last 1000 years. Major ENSO events are often recorded in the oxygen isotope, insoluble dust, and chemical records from these cores. Here we investigate outbreaks of diseases, famines and global crises during two of the largest events recorded in the chemistry of these cores, particularly large peaks in the concentrations of chloride (Cl-) and fluoride (Fl-). One event is centered on 1789 to 1800 CE and the second begins abruptly in 1345 and tapers off after 1360 CE. These Cl- and F- peaks represent major droughts and reflect the abundance of continental atmospheric dust, derived in part from dried lake beds in drought stricken regions upwind of the core sites. For Dasuopu the likely sources are in India while for Quelccaya the sources would be the Andean Altiplano. Both regions are subject to drought conditions during the El Niño phase of the ENSO cycle. These two events persist longer (10 to 15 years) than today's typical ENSO events in the Pacific Ocean Basin. The 1789 to 1800 CE event was associated with a very strong El Niño event and was coincidental with the Boji Bara famine resulting from extended droughts that led to over 600,000 deaths in central India by 1792. Similarly extensive droughts are documented in Central and South America. Likewise, the 1345 to 1360 CE event, although poorly documented

  7. Semi-supervised detection of intracranial pressure alarms using waveform dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalzo, Fabien; Hu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Patient monitoring systems in intensive care units (ICU) are usually set to trigger alarms when abnormal values are detected. Alarms are generated by threshold-crossing rules that lead to high false alarm rates. This is a recognized issue that causes alarm fatigue, waste of human resources, and increased patient risks. Recently developed smart alarm models require alarms to be validated by experts during the training phase. The manual annotation process involved is time-consuming and virtually impossible to achieve for the thousands of alarms recorded in the ICU every week. To tackle this problem, we investigate in this study if the use of semi-supervised learning methods, that can naturally integrate unlabeled data samples in the model, can be used to improve the accuracy of the alarm detection. As a proof of concept, the detection system is evaluated on intracranial pressure (ICP) signal alarms. Specific morphological and trending features are extracted from the ICP signal waveform to capture the dynamic of the signal prior to alarms. This study is based on a comprehensive dataset of 4791 manually labeled alarms recorded from 108 neurosurgical patients. A comparative analysis is provided between kernel spectral regression (SR-KDA) and support vector machine (SVM) both modified for the semi-supervised setting. Results obtained during the experimental evaluations indicate that the two models can significantly reduce false alarms using unlabeled samples; especially in the presence of a restrained number of labeled examples. At a true alarm recognition rate of 99%, the false alarm reduction rates improved from 9% (supervised) to 27% (semi-supervised) for SR-KDA, and from 3% (supervised) to 16% (semi-supervised) for SVM. (paper)

  8. Non-Invasive Measurement of Pulsatile Intracranial Pressures Using Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, Richard E.; Shuer, Lawrence M.; Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, John H.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1997-01-01

    Early detection of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) will aid clinical decision-making for head trauma, brain tumor and other cerebrovascular diseases. Conventional methods, however, require surgical procedures which take time and are accompanied by increased risk of infection. Accordingly we have developed and refined a new ultrasound device to measure skull movements which are known to occur in conjunction with altered ICP. The principle of this device is based upon pulse phase locked loop (PPLL), which enables us to detect changes in distance on the order of microns between an ultrasound transducer on one side of the skull and the opposite inner surface of the cranium. The present study was designed to verify this measurement technique in cadavera. Transcranial distance was increased in steps of 10 mmHg from zero to 50 mmHg by saline infusion into the lateral ventricle of two cadavera. In separate experiments, pulsations of ICP with the amplitudes of zero to 2 mmHg were generated by rhythmic injections of saline using a syringe. When the ICP was stepwise increased from zero to 50 mmHg, transcranial distance increased in proportion with the ICP increase (y=12 x - 76, r=0.938), where y is changes in transcranial distance in microns and x is ICP in mmHg. In the data recorded while ICP pulsations were generated, fast Fourier transform analysis demonstrated that cranial pulsations were clearly associated with ICP pulsations. The results indicate that changes in transcranial distance is linearly correlated with those in ICP, and also that the PPLL device has sufficient sensitivity to detect transcranial pulsations which occur in association with the cardiac cycle. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsations, we may be able to estimate the pressure-volume index in the cranium. As a result, estimates of intracranial compliance may be possible by using the PPLL device. Further studies are necessary in normal subjects and patients.

  9. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  10. CMS Records Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Records Schedule provides disposition authorizations approved by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for CMS program-related records...

  11. Human striatal recordings reveal abnormal discharge of projection neurons in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun; Mewes, Klaus; Gross, Robert E; DeLong, Mahlon R; Obeso, José A; Papa, Stella M

    2016-08-23

    Circuitry models of Parkinson's disease (PD) are based on striatal dopamine loss and aberrant striatal inputs into the basal ganglia network. However, extrastriatal mechanisms have increasingly been the focus of attention, whereas the status of striatal discharges in the parkinsonian human brain remains conjectural. We now report the activity pattern of striatal projection neurons (SPNs) in patients with PD undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery, compared with patients with essential tremor (ET) and isolated dystonia (ID). The SPN activity in ET was very low (2.1 ± 0.1 Hz) and reminiscent of that found in normal animals. In contrast, SPNs in PD fired at much higher frequency (30.2 ± 1.2 Hz) and with abundant spike bursts. The difference between PD and ET was reproduced between 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated and normal nonhuman primates. The SPN activity was also increased in ID, but to a lower level compared with the hyperactivity observed in PD. These results provide direct evidence that the striatum contributes significantly altered signals to the network in patients with PD.

  12. Millennial-scale faunal record reveals differential resilience of European large mammals to human impacts across the Holocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crees, Jennifer J; Carbone, Chris; Sommer, Robert S; Benecke, Norbert; Turvey, Samuel T

    2016-03-30

    The use of short-term indicators for understanding patterns and processes of biodiversity loss can mask longer-term faunal responses to human pressures. We use an extensive database of approximately 18,700 mammalian zooarchaeological records for the last 11,700 years across Europe to reconstruct spatio-temporal dynamics of Holocene range change for 15 large-bodied mammal species. European mammals experienced protracted, non-congruent range losses, with significant declines starting in some species approximately 3000 years ago and continuing to the present, and with the timing, duration and magnitude of declines varying individually between species. Some European mammals became globally extinct during the Holocene, whereas others experienced limited or no significant range change. These findings demonstrate the relatively early onset of prehistoric human impacts on postglacial biodiversity, and mirror species-specific patterns of mammalian extinction during the Late Pleistocene. Herbivores experienced significantly greater declines than carnivores, revealing an important historical extinction filter that informs our understanding of relative resilience and vulnerability to human pressures for different taxa. We highlight the importance of large-scale, long-term datasets for understanding complex protracted extinction processes, although the dynamic pattern of progressive faunal depletion of European mammal assemblages across the Holocene challenges easy identification of 'static' past baselines to inform current-day environmental management and restoration. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, Alan; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Future human space travel will primarily consist of long duration missions onboard the International Space Station or exploration class missions to Mars, its moons, or nearby asteroids. Current evidence suggests that long duration missions might increase risk of permanent ocular structural and functional changes, possibly due to increased intracranial pressure resulting from a spaceflight-induced cephalad (headward) fluid shift.

  14. Millennial-scale isotope records from a wide-ranging predator show evidence of recent human impact to oceanic food webs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiley, A.E.; Ostrom, P.H.; Welch, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Human exploitation of marine ecosystems is more recent in oceanic than near shore regions, yet our understanding of human impacts on oceanic food webs is comparatively poor. Few records of species that live beyond the continental shelves date back more than 60 y, and the sheer size of oceanic reg...

  15. A Late Holocene Record of Human Impact in the Tropical Lowlands of the Mexican Gulf Coast: Lago Verde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, L.; Sosa, S.; Caballero, M.; Rodriguez, A.; Ortega, B.

    2005-05-01

    Lago Verde is a maar lake (18 36 43 N; 95 20 52 W) located on the Gulf Coast of Mexico in "Los Tuxtlas" region. The area was cover by tropical rain forest and is part of the core area of the earliest Mesoamerican cultures. A 6 m sediment core was obtained in order to document vegetation and lake level history of this area. Lago Verde is a shallow, eutrophic lake (max. 4 m), the natural vegetation has been removed and grasslands with some tropical trees such Bursera grows around the lake. According with the radiocarbon chronology the sequence covers the last 2500 yr BP. At the base of the sequence low abundance of tropical trees is record, with intermediate lake levels. A sudden change in the pollen stratigraphy occurs at ca. 2000 yr BP, with important presence of Poaceae, Ambrosia and Cheno.-Am. along with Zea mays indicating human activity in the area. This is associated with a change in limnological conditions, recording turbid, shallow environments. This pollen signals correlates with dry phases in Yucatan, suggesting that this dry climatic signal probably had effect on an ample area of Mexico. However, at 1200 yr BP, no more Zea mays pollen is recovered suggesting the abandonment of the area. Lake levels recover as well as the tropical forest. The last 150 yr BP is characterized by the reduction in the pollen of tropical forest trees, presence of Zea mays, increased erosion rates, turbidity and eutrophication in the lake, all related to deforestation.

  16. Evidence of Influence of Human Activities and Volcanic Eruptions on Environmental Perchlorate from a 300-Year Greenland Ice Core Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole-Dai, Jihong; Peterson, Kari Marie; Kennedy, Joshua Andrew; Cox, Thomas S; Ferris, David G

    2018-06-26

    A 300-year (1700-2007) chronological record of environmental perchlorate, reconstructed from high-resolution analysis of a central Greenland ice core, shows that perchlorate levels in the post-1980 atmosphere were two-to-three times those of the pre-1980 environment. While this confirms recent reports of increased perchlorate in Arctic snow since 1980 compared with the levels for the prior decades (1930-1980), the longer Greenland record demonstrates that the Industrial Revolution and other human activities, which emitted large quantities of pollutants and contaminants, did not significantly impact environmental perchlorate, as perchlorate levels remained stable throughout the eighteenth, nineteenth, and much of the twentieth centuries. The increased levels since 1980 likely result from enhanced atmospheric perchlorate production, rather than from direct release from perchlorate manufacturing and applications. The enhancement is probably influenced by the emission of organic chlorine compounds in the last several decades. Prior to 1980, no significant long-term temporal trends in perchlorate concentration are observed. Brief (a few years) high concentration episodes appear frequently over an apparently stable and low background (~1 ng kg‒1). Several such episodes coincide in time with large explosive volcanic eruptions including the 1912 Novarupta/Katmai eruption in Alaska. It appears that atmospheric perchlorate production is impacted by large eruptions in both high and low latitudes, but not by small eruptions and non-explosive degassing.

  17. A retrospective survey of human hydatidosis based on hospital records during the period 1990-2003 in Ngorongoro, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, E; Nonga, H E; Kynsieri, N; Cleaveland, S

    2010-12-01

    A 13-year (1990-2003) retrospective study was carried out to investigate the occurrence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in patients at Wasso hospital in Ngorongoro district, Tanzania. Hospitalization records were reviewed and confirmed cases of CE were classified according to ward of residence, age, sex, cyst location and type. A total of 171 hydatidosis patients were diagnosed and operated giving an average of 13 cases per year, equivalent to approximately 10 cases per 100,000 people per year. Cystic echinococcosis affected more females (59.1%) than males (40.9%). A significantly higher number of CE cases were recorded in individuals 30 years of age (2.3-9.4%) (P Ngorongoro district and female and youths are those most affected. These findings merit for more extensive epidemiological investigations of CE in human to better determine the prevalence, economic impact and risk factors for the disease in this district and other areas of Tanzania. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of intracranial chordomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Teruo; Inoue, Yuichi; Shakudo, Miyuki and others

    1988-03-01

    MR images of 5 patients with intracranial chordoma were evaluated and compared with those of other clival lesions (1 clival osteomyelitis, 1 metastatic clival tumor, 3 clival meningiomas). The MR examination was performed using a 0.5 T superconductive magnet, with approximately 10 mm section thickness, one average and a 256 x 256 matrix. T1 weighted images were obtainned by inversion recovery (IR) with TR 2100 - 2500 msec, TI 600 msec and TE 40 msec. T2 weighted images were obtained by spin echo pulse sequence with TR 1800 - 2500 msec and TE 120 msec (long SE). In several cases, the spin echo pulse sequences with TR 1000 msec and TE 40 msec (short SE) were also done. Multiplaned images were obtained. Four of 5 intracranial chordomas were low in intensity compared to cerebral gray matter on T1 weighted images, and all of 5 chordomas were as high in intensity as cerebrospinal fluid or higher than that of cerebrospinal fluid on T2 weighted images. Clival fatty marrow is high intensity on T1 weighted images. Clival involvement by a tumor was a clearly demonstrated as disappearance of this high intensity in all cases. In two cases, the tumor extended to the retropharyngeal space and this was detected clearly on short SE image. Although clival fatty marrow was disappeared, osteomyelitis and metastatic tumor in clivus were iso-intense to cerebral gray matter on both T1 and T2 weighted images. All of 3 clival meningiomas showed iso-intensity to cerebral gray matter on T1 weighted images and slightly high intensity to brain on T2 weighted images, and clival fatty marrow was normal in all 3 cases. Although our experiences are limited in number, intracranial chordoma appeared to be differentiated from other clival lesions.

  19. Intracranial Aneurysms of Neuro-Ophthalmologic Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Jonathan A; Newman, Nancy J; Barrow, Daniel L; Biousse, Valérie

    2017-12-01

    Intracranial saccular aneurysms are acquired lesions that often present with neuro-ophthalmologic symptoms and signs. Recent advances in neurosurgical techniques, endovascular treatments, and neurocritical care have improved the optimal management of symptomatic unruptured aneurysms, but whether the chosen treatment has an impact on neuro-ophthalmologic outcomes remains debated. A review of the literature focused on neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and treatment of intracranial aneurysms with specific relevance to neuro-ophthalmologic outcomes was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. Cavernous sinus aneurysms were not included in this review. Surgical clipping vs endovascular coiling for aneurysms causing third nerve palsies was compared in 13 retrospective studies representing 447 patients. Complete recovery was achieved in 78% of surgical patients compared with 44% of patients treated with endovascular coiling. However, the complication rate, hospital costs, and days spent in intensive care were reported as higher in surgically treated patients. Retrospective reviews of surgical clipping and endovascular coiling for all ocular motor nerve palsies (third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerves) revealed similar results of complete resolution in 76% and 49%, respectively. Improvement in visual deficits related to aneurysmal compression of the anterior visual pathways was also better among patients treated with clipping than with coiling. The time to treatment from onset of visual symptoms was a predictive factor of visual recovery in several studies. Few reports have specifically assessed the improvement of visual deficits after treatment with flow diverters. Decisions regarding the choice of therapy for intracranial aneurysms causing neuro-ophthalmologic signs ideally should be made at high-volume centers with access to both surgical and endovascular treatments. The status of the patient, location of the aneurysm, and experience of the treating physicians

  20. Chemotherapy for intracranial ependymoma in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramatzki, Dorothee; Roth, Patrick; Felsberg, Jörg; Hofer, Silvia; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Hentschel, Bettina; Westphal, Manfred; Krex, Dietmar; Simon, Matthias; Schnell, Oliver; Wick, Wolfgang; Reifenberger, Guido; Weller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ependymal tumors in adults are rare, accounting for less than 4 % of primary tumors of the central nervous system in this age group. The low prevalence of intracranial ependymoma in adults limits the ability to perform clinical trials. Therefore, treatment decisions are based on small, mostly retrospective studies and the role of chemotherapy has remained unclear. We performed a retrospective study on 17 adult patients diagnosed with intracranial World Health Organisation grade II or III ependymoma, who were treated with chemotherapy at any time during the disease course. Benefit from chemotherapy was estimated by applying Macdonald criteria. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated from start of chemotherapy, using the Kaplan-Meier method. Eleven patients had supratentorial and 6 infratentorial tumors. Ten patients were treated with temozolomide (TMZ), 3 with procarbazine/lomustine/vincristine (PCV), 3 with platinum-based chemotherapy and 1 patient received epirubicin/ifosfamide. Response rates were as follows: TMZ 8/10 stable disease; PCV 3/3 stable disease; platinum-based chemotherapy 1/3 partial response; epirubicin/ifosfamide 1/1 complete response. PFS rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 52.9, 35.3 and 23.5 %. OS rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 82.4, 82.4 and 70.1 %. There was no indication for a favourable prognostic role of O 6 -methylguanyl-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation which was detected in 3/12 investigated tumors. Survival outcomes in response to chemotherapy in adult intracranial ependymoma patients vary substantially, but individual patients may respond to any kind of chemotherapy. There were too few patients to compare survival data between chemotherapeutic subgroups. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2323-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  1. Stent-assisted coiling of intracranial aneurysms using LEO stents: long-term follow-up in 153 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedat, Jacques; Chau, Yves; Gaudart, Jean; Sachet, Marina; Beuil, Stephanie; Lonjon, Michel

    2018-02-01

    Coiling associated with placement of a self-expandable intracranial stent has improved the treatment of intracranial wide-necked aneurysms. Little is known, however, about the durability of this treatment. The purpose of this report is to present our experience with the LEO stent and to evaluate the complications, effectiveness, and long-term results of this technique. We analyzed the records of 155 intracranial unruptured aneurysms that were treated by stent-assisted coiling with a LEO stent between 2008 and 2012. Procedural, early post-procedural, and delayed complications were recorded. Clinical and angiographic follow-up of patients was conducted over a period of at least 36 months. No procedural mortality was observed. One-month morbidity was observed in 14 out of 153 patients (9,15%). One hundred thirty-eight patients (with 140 aneurysms) had clinical and angiographic follow-up for more than 36 months. No aneurysm rupture was observed during follow-up. Four patients presented an intra-stent stenosis at 8 months, and 6 patients who had an early recurrence were retreated. Final results showed 85% complete occlusion, 13% neck remnants, and 2% stable incomplete occlusion. Stent-assisted coiling with the LEO stent is a safe and effective treatment for unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The long-term clinical outcomes with the LEO stent are excellent with a high rate of complete occlusion that is stable over time.

  2. A case of intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Sarrami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma which had infiltrated pons, cerebellum and basal surface of left temporal lobe without any visible mass. The patient presented with a sudden loss of consciousness and vomiting. Clinical findings, laboratory tests, imaging and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid tended to establish the diagnosis of an infectious condition than a malignancy. Without any response to the antibiotics and with a progressive deterioration of neurologic and mental condition, the patient died after 20 days. In the autopsy, histological and immunohistochemical study of the brain revealed the diagnosis of malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH.

  3. CT-assisted localisation of intracranial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luft, C.; Trenkler, J.; Hammer, B.; Valencak, E.

    1986-01-01

    With the software developed for the SOMATOM DRH computerized tomograph it is possible to mix a ROI into the digital radiogram (topogram) for projection of a lesion, such as a tumor, onto the topogram plane; the software also allows an image reconstruction taking the topogram as a reference image (topogram-initiated reconstruction). Combining these two relatively simple methods, and adding distance measurements in two planes, the neurosurgeon has at his disposal an objective CT-assisted means of precisely localising intracranial processes before surgery.

  4. CT-assisted localisation of intracranial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luft, C.; Trenkler, J.; Hammer, B.; Valencak, E.

    1986-01-01

    With the software developed for the SOMATOM DRH computerized tomograph it is possible to mix a ROI into the digital radiogram (topogram) for projection of a lesion, such as a tumor, onto the topogram plane; the software also allows an image reconstruction taking the topogram as a reference image (topogram-initiated reconstruction). Combining these two relatively simple methods, and adding distance measurements in two planes, the neurosurgeon has at his disposal an objective CT-assisted means of precisely localising intracranial processes before surgery. (orig.) [de

  5. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi Kai; Wu, Yuan Kui; Tamrakar, Karuna

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  6. Intracranial extramedullary hematopoiesis in beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi-Kai; Tamrakar, Karuna; Wu, Yuan-Kui

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  7. Embolisation of intracranial meningiomas without subsequent surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendszus, M.; Solymosi, L.; Martin-Schrader, I.; Schlake, H.P.

    2003-01-01

    In an open, prospective study, we embolised intracranial meningiomas in seven patients, without subsequent surgery. Follow-up over a mean of 20 months included serial neurological examination, MRI and MR spectroscopy. Clinically, embolisation had no adverse effects. Symptomatic patients showed clinical improvement. On MRI marked tumour shrinkage occurred after embolisation in six patients, and was most pronounced during the first 6 months. In a young boy the tumour was unchanged despite complete angiographic devascularisation. Embolisation without subsequent surgery may cause substantial tumour shrinkage and thus be used in selected in patients. However, thorough follow-up is mandatory to ascertain the effects of embolisation. (orig.)

  8. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi Kai; Wu, Yuan Kui [Nan fang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tamrakar, Karuna [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-15

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  9. Secondary Intracranial Hypotension: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Gundogan Bozdag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypotension is a clinical condition that characterized by postural (orthostatic headache and low pressure. It apperas with cerebrospinal fluid leak which occurs spontaneous or depending on the secondary attempts. 31 years old female patient which has diagnosis of acute appendicitis and underwent appendectomy under spinal anesthesia. postoperative 5.day she admitted with a postural headache, diplopia. Patient was treated with conservative methods after diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. We aim to asses an encountered complication after spinal anesthesia which widely applied for surgical procedures with imaging findings and literature.

  10. Disappearance of Intracranial Extradural Hematomas: Role of Diastatic Cranial Fracture and Intracranial Pressure - An Institutional Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Abdul Rashid; Kirmani, Altaf Rehman; Wani, Mohammed Afzal

    2018-01-01

    Context: The intracranial extradural hematoma (EDH) occupies space and creates a mass effect on the brain but the tenacious-adhesions of dura to the inner table of skull counters this effect. The intracranial pressure also pushes the hematoma back while it is held by dural tensile-force. Aims: The exploitation of a diastatic fracture, overlying an EDH, by the intracranial pressures to decompress a hematoma out of extradural space into subgaleal/subperiosteal space without surgical intervention. Settings and Design: In a period of 15 years, a group of 11 patients among 729 EDHs were managed conservatively. Materials and Methods: The retrospective study of 11 EDH patients was conducted in the Department of Neurosurgery from January 2000 to December 2014 in 15 years. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical law of variance was used as applicable. Results: Analysis of spontaneous disappearance of intracranial EDH among 11 patients revealed that only 1.5% (11/729) EDHs resolved conservatively. The most cases (63.6%) were children and the youngest being 9 months old. All the patients had a diastatic fracture overlying-EDH and were fully conscious. The cause of head injury in most was the fall from height. The hospital stay ranged from 2 to 4 days. All the patients had a good recovery at the time of discharging. Conclusion: The trial of the conservative or spontaneous disappearance of an EDH through a diastatic fracture into the subgaleal space is similar to burr-hole drainage without surgical intervention but depends upon the neurological status, the intracranial pressure of the patient, and the availability of all the modern neurosurgical gadgets. PMID:29682037

  11. Genus Zero Graph Segmentation: Estimation of Intracranial Volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Thorup, Signe Strann; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    The intracranial volume (ICV) in children with premature fusion of one or more sutures in the calvaria is of interest due to the risk of increased intracranial pressure. Challenges for automatic estimation of ICV include holes in the skull e.g. the foramen magnum and fontanelles. In this paper, we...

  12. THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INTRACRANIAL ARACHNOID CYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts have been found in 0.3% of computed tomography (CT) scans and in 0.1% of brain autopsy specimens, more often in children than in adults. Intracranial arachnoid cysts occur prevalently in males, on the left side, and in the temporal fossa. Their occasional association

  13. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension with altered consciousness in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a clinical condition of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) without an obvious underlying pathological brain lesion. It is usually characterized by headache, neck pain, vomiting, visual disturbances, papilledema, cranial nerve palsy or a combination of these signs and symptoms.

  14. Genus zero graph segmentation: Estimation of intracranial volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Thorup, Signe Strann; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    The intracranial volume (ICV) in children with premature fusion of one or more sutures in the calvaria is of interest due to the risk of increased intracranial pressure. Challenges for automatic estimation of ICV include holes in the skull e.g. the foramen magnum and fontanelles. In this paper, w...

  15. Mannitol-induced rebleeding from intracranial aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenørn, J; Westergaard, L; Hansen, P H

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented in which rebleeding from an intracranial saccular aneurysm occurred a few minutes after intravenous administration of mannitol during surgery. The relationship between the reducing effect of mannitol on elevated intracranial pressure and the increased pressure gradient across...

  16. Intracranial Convexity Lipoma with Massive Calcification: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Tae; Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Seung Ro [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Intracranial lipoma is a rare entity, accounting for less than 0.5% of intracranial tumors, which usually develops in the callosal cisterns. We report a case of lipoma with an unusual location; in the high parietal convexity combined with massive calcification, and no underlying vascular malformation or congenital anomaly.

  17. Mannitol-induced rebleeding from intracranial aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenørn, J; Westergaard, L; Hansen, P H

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented in which rebleeding from an intracranial saccular aneurysm occurred a few minutes after intravenous administration of mannitol during surgery. The relationship between the reducing effect of mannitol on elevated intracranial pressure and the increased pressure gradient across ...

  18. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  19. High-resolution records detect human-caused changes to the boreal forest wildfire regime in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, Benjamin V.; Mann, Daniel H.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Wooller, Matthew J.; Finney, Bruce P.

    2016-01-01

    Stand-replacing wildfires are a keystone disturbance in the boreal forest, and they are becoming more common as the climate warms. Paleo-fire archives from the wildland–urban interface can quantify the prehistoric fire regime and assess how both human land-use and climate change impact ecosystem dynamics. Here, we use a combination of a sedimentary charcoal record preserved in varved lake sediments (annually layered) and fire scars in living trees to document changes in local fire return intervals (FRIs) and regional fire activity over the last 500 years. Ace Lake is within the boreal forest, located near the town of Fairbanks in interior Alaska, which was settled by gold miners in AD 1902. In the 400 years before settlement, fires occurred near the lake on average every 58 years. After settlement, fires became much more frequent (average every 18  years), and background charcoal flux rates rose to four times their preindustrial levels, indicating a region-wide increase in burning. Despite this surge in burning, the preindustrial boreal forest ecosystem and permafrost in the watershed have remained intact. Although fire suppression has reduced charcoal influx since the 1950s, an aging fuel load experiencing increasingly warm summers may pose management problems for this and other boreal sites that have similar land-use and fire histories. The large human-caused fire events that we identify can be used to test how increasingly common megafires may alter ecosystem dynamics in the future.

  20. MRI diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis (73 cases report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Qingyong; Li Xin; He Zhihui; Cheng Chuanhu; Deng Kaijun; Deng Ming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the MRI features, classification and diagnostic value for intracranial tuberculosis. Methods MRI findings of 73 patients suffering from intracranial tuberculosis proved by pathology or clinic were analyzed respectively. Among the total 73 patients, 39 cases were tuberculosis meningitis, 12 cases simple intracranial tuberculoma, while 22 cases were tuberculoma combining with meningitis. Results: The MRI features of tuberculous meningitis are cerebral infarction, hydrocephalus, abnormal meningeal and cerebral cistern enhancement. 12 cases mature tuberculoma demon- strated typical features with high or low density on T 2 WI images and ring contrast enhancement; 22 cases non-mature tuberculoma showed focal nodular contrast enhancement with evident cerebral edema. FLAIR is more sensitive to find out focus than T 2 WI. Small lesions could be showed definitively by contrast-enhanced scan. Conclusion: MRI possess typical features in the diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis. It plays an important role in evaluating location, range, classification of intracranial tuberculosis, and is helpful to clinical treatment. (authors)

  1. Intracranial hypotension and hypertension in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur; Bolay, Hayrunnisa

    2014-07-01

    The specific aim of this review is to report the features of intracranial pressure changes [spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH)] in children and adolescents, with emphasis on the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment modalities. Headache associated with intracranial pressure changes are relatively rare and less known in children and adolescents. SIH is a specific syndrome involving reduced intracranial pressure with orthostatic headache, frequently encountered connective tissue disorders, and a good prognosis with medical management, initial epidural blood patching, and sometimes further interventions may be required. IIH is an uncommon condition in children and different from the disease in adults, not only with respect to clinical features (likely to present with strabismus and stiff neck rather than headache or pulsatile tinnitus) but also different in outcome. Consequently, specific ICP changes of pediatric ages required specific attention both of exact diagnosis and entire management.

  2. Diagnosis of ruptured intracranial aneurysm in acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Masataka; Nakagawa, Toshifumi

    1980-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage at an acute stage within one day from the onset to the first CT scan was classified into subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm, subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin and subarachnoid hemorrhage of which angiography could not be carried out, and the first CT findings, the severity, and the prognosis of these subarachnoid hemorrhage were compared and discussed. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm showed various changes according to progress in the severity with time, and intracranial hematoma, intraventricular clots and ventricular dilatation increased according to progress in the severity. Ruptured intracranial aneurysm in middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery could be found easily by CT, but that in internal carotid artery and vertabral basilar artery was difficult to be detected by CT. When cerebral angiography was carried out repeatedly for ruptured intracranial aneurysm of unknown origin, the time of performance must be consifered with attention to angiospasms or hematoma. (Tsunoda, M.)

  3. Imaging mass spectrometry identifies prognostic ganglioside species in rodent intracranial transplants of glioma and medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ermini

    Full Text Available Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-MSI allows us to investigate the distribution of lipid molecules within tissues. We used MALDI-MSI to identify prognostic gangliosides in tissue sections of rat intracranial allografts of rat glioma and mouse intracranial xenografts of human medulloblastoma. In the healthy adult rodent brain, GM1 and GD1 were the main types of glycolipids. Both gangliosides were absent in both intracranial transplants. The ganglioside GM3 was not present in the healthy adult brain but was highly expressed in rat glioma allografts. In combination with tandem mass spectrometry GM3 (d18:1/C24:0 was identified as the most abundant ganglioside species in the glioma allotransplant. By contrast, mouse xenografts of human medulloblastoma were characterized by prominent expression of the ganglioside GM2 (d18:0/C18:0. Together, these data demonstrate that tissue-based MALDI-MSI of gangliosides is able to discriminate between different brain tumors and may be a useful clinical tool for their classification and grading.

  4. CT findings of solitary intracranial metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chang, Kee Hyun

    1987-01-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed and analyzed CT scans of fifty patients with solitary intracranial lesion selected from 118 patients who had been confirmed to have intracranial metastasis from 1979 to 1985. The results were as follows: 1. The most common primary tumors with solitary metastasis, in order of frequency, were lung cancer, breast cancer, choriocarcinoma, colon cancer, lymphoma and others. 2. Precontrast scans obtained in 35 cases showed cystic very low density in 20%, slightly low density in 9%, isodensity in 20%, high density in 51% when he densities of the lesions were compared with that of the normal brain tissue. 3. After contrast enhancement 43 out of 50 showed one of 4 patterns of enhancement. Homogeneous enhancement without necrosis were found in 26%, homogeneous enhancement with necrosis in 18%, ring-enhancement in 26% and irregular enhancement in 16%. No enhancement was found in 14%. 4. The locations of the metastatic lesions were intra axial in 45 and extra axial in 5. Among the intra axial lesions, the parietal lobe was the most common location. Extra axial metastases were epidural, calvarial and leptomeningeal. 5. Degrees of surrounding edema were mild in 32%, moderate in 19% and severe in 49%

  5. Robust Peak Recognition in Intracranial Pressure Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergsneider Marvin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The waveform morphology of intracranial pressure pulses (ICP is an essential indicator for monitoring, and forecasting critical intracranial and cerebrovascular pathophysiological variations. While current ICP pulse analysis frameworks offer satisfying results on most of the pulses, we observed that the performance of several of them deteriorates significantly on abnormal, or simply more challenging pulses. Methods This paper provides two contributions to this problem. First, it introduces MOCAIP++, a generic ICP pulse processing framework that generalizes MOCAIP (Morphological Clustering and Analysis of ICP Pulse. Its strength is to integrate several peak recognition methods to describe ICP morphology, and to exploit different ICP features to improve peak recognition. Second, it investigates the effect of incorporating, automatically identified, challenging pulses into the training set of peak recognition models. Results Experiments on a large dataset of ICP signals, as well as on a representative collection of sampled challenging ICP pulses, demonstrate that both contributions are complementary and significantly improve peak recognition performance in clinical conditions. Conclusion The proposed framework allows to extract more reliable statistics about the ICP waveform morphology on challenging pulses to investigate the predictive power of these pulses on the condition of the patient.

  6. Longterm surgery of posttraumatic intracranial hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babochkin D.S.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Research objective — studying of consequences of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas in the remote period. Material. The nearest and remote results of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas at 105 patients in terms from 6 months till 3 years are analyzed. During research the anamnesis was studied, neurologic investigation, and also research cognitive functions by means of scale MMSE, the test of drawing of hours, a scale of studying of alarm/depression HADS, learning of 5 words, scale quality of life SF-36. Results. It is established, that in the remote period the condition of the majority of patients gradually improves, at the same time, frequent enough and expressed consequences which are necessary for analyzing with the purpose of optimization of outcomes and the forecast at the given disease are observed. The special attention should be given again developing complications to which it is possible to carry epileptic seizures and behavioral-memorable infringements. Conclusion. Studying of the remote consequences of this heavy kind of craniocereberal trauma allows to optimize results of treatment and to provide complex medical, labor, social and family adaptation

  7. MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Hong Kil; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyuong; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won; Cho, Hyeun Cha

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of neurosyphilis. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging findings in five patients with intracranial neurosyphilis confirmed by CSF, VDRL, TPHA, and clinical follow-up. MR imaging was performed in all five cases, and CT in two. The MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis included infarction (n=3), focal inflammation (n=1) and encephalopathy (n=1). There was a total of ten infaretions : three of the basal ganglia, two each of the frontal lobe, watershed zone, and cerebellum, and one of the occipital lobe. Intaretion was most common in MCA territory (n=9; 50%), followed by the watershed zone (16.6%), posterior cerebral artery territory (16.6%), and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (11.1%). The size of the lesion varied from 1cm to larger than one lobe. One patient showed diffuse high signal intensity in the left temporal lobe, but on follow-up MRI, this had resolved. The most common finding of neurosyphilis, as seen on MRI and CT, was infarction in middle cerebral arterial territory

  8. MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hong Kil; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyuong; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeun Cha [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of neurosyphilis. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging findings in five patients with intracranial neurosyphilis confirmed by CSF, VDRL, TPHA, and clinical follow-up. MR imaging was performed in all five cases, and CT in two. The MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis included infarction (n=3), focal inflammation (n=1) and encephalopathy (n=1). There was a total of ten infaretions : three of the basal ganglia, two each of the frontal lobe, watershed zone, and cerebellum, and one of the occipital lobe. Intaretion was most common in MCA territory (n=9; 50%), followed by the watershed zone (16.6%), posterior cerebral artery territory (16.6%), and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (11.1%). The size of the lesion varied from 1cm to larger than one lobe. One patient showed diffuse high signal intensity in the left temporal lobe, but on follow-up MRI, this had resolved. The most common finding of neurosyphilis, as seen on MRI and CT, was infarction in middle cerebral arterial territory.

  9. Intracranial solitary fibrous tumor: Imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarencon, Frederic, E-mail: fredclare5@msn.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France); Bonneville, Fabrice [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Rangueil, Toulouse University Hospital, 31000 Toulouse (France); Rousseau, Audrey [Department of Neuropathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Galanaud, Damien [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France); Kujas, Michele [Department of Neuropathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Naggara, Olivier [Department of Neuroradiology, St Anne Hospital, 75014 Paris (France); Cornu, Philippe [Department of Neurosurgery, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Chiras, Jacques [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To study the neuroimaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (ISFTs). Materials and methods: Retrospective study of neuroimaging features of 9 consecutive histopathologically proven ISFT cases. Location, size, shape, density, signal intensity and gadolinium uptake were studied at CT and MRI. Data collected from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (3 patients), perfusion imaging and MR spectroscopy (2 patients), and DSA (4 patients) were also analyzed. Results: The tumors most frequently arose from the intracranial meninges (7/9), while the other lesions were intraventricular. Tumor size ranged from 2.5 to 10 cm (mean = 6.6 cm). They presented multilobular shape in 6/9 patients. Most ISFTs were heterogeneous (7/9) with areas of low T2 signal intensity that strongly enhanced after gadolinium administration (6/8). Erosion of the skull was present in about half of the cases (4/9). Components with decreased apparent diffusion coefficient were seen in 2/3 ISFTs on DWI. Spectroscopy revealed elevated peaks of choline and myo-inositol. MR perfusion showed features of hyperperfusion. Conclusion: ISFT should be considered in cases of extra-axial, supratentorial, heterogeneous, hypervascular tumor. Areas of low T2 signal intensity that strongly enhance after gadolinium injection are suggestive of this diagnosis. Restricted diffusion and elevated peak of myo-inositol may be additional valuable features.

  10. Post-treatment intracranial hemorrhage of brain metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Kim, Kyu Bo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Yoon Jun; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Lee, Hyo Suk; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of post-treatment intracranial hemorrhage of brain metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Medical records of 81 patients who have been diagnosed of brain metastases from HCC and underwent surgery, radiosurgery and/or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) between January 2000 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Intracranial hemorrhage was present in 64 patients (79%) at the time of diagnosis. Median value of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was 1,700 ng/mL. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status for 20 patients was greater than 2. Fifty-seven patients underwent WBRT and the others were treated with surgery and/or radiosurgery without WBRT. During follow-up, 12 events of intracranial hemorrhage after treatment were identified. Three-month post-treatment hemorrhage rate was 16.1%. Multivariate analyses revealed that ECOG performance status, AFP, and WBRT were associated with post-treatment hemorrhage (p = 0.013, 0.013, and 0.003, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that 3-month post-treatment hemorrhage rate of new lesion was higher in patients treated without WBRT, although statistical significance was not reached. (18.6% vs. 4.6%; p = 0.104). Ten of 12 patients with post-treatment hemorrhage died with neurologic cause. WBRT should be considered to prevent post-treatment hemorrhage in the treatment of brain metastases from HCC.

  11. Communicating Hydrocephalus Associated with Intracranial Schwannoma Treated by Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sung Ho; Choi, Man Kyu; Choi, Seok Keun; Park, Bong Jin; Lim, Young Jin

    2016-05-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been established as an effective and safe treatment for intracranial schwannoma. However, serious complications can occur after GKRS, including hydrocephalus. The pathophysiology and risk factors of this disorder are not yet fully understood. The objective of the study was to assess potential risk factors for hydrocephalus after GKRS. We retrospectively reviewed the medical radiosurgical records of 244 patients who underwent GKRS to treat intracranial schwannoma. The following parameters were analyzed as potential risk factors for hydrocephalus after GKRS: age, sex, target volume, irradiation dose, prior tumor resection, treatment technique, and tumor enhancement pattern. The tumor enhancement pattern was divided into 2 groups: group A (homogeneous enhancement) and group B (heterogeneous or rim enhancement). Of the 244 patients, 14 of them (5.7%) developed communicating hydrocephalus. Communicating hydrocephalus occurred within 2 years after GKRS in most patients (92.8%). No significant association was observed between any of the parameters investigated and the development of hydrocephalus, with the exception of tumor enhancement pattern. Group B exhibited a statistically significant difference by univariate analysis (P = 0.002); this difference was also significant by multivariate analysis (P = 0.006). Because hydrocephalus is curable, patients should be closely monitored for the development of this disorder after GKRS. In particular, patients with intracranial schwannomas with irregular enhancement patterns or cysts should be meticulously observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A clinical study on perforator stroke resulting from Wingspan stent angioplasty for symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ziliang; Xu Haowen; Li Tianxiao; Zhu Liangfu; Li Zhaoshuo; Xue Jiangyu; Bai Weixing; Li Li; Guan Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence, potential hazards and effective countermeasure for perforator stroke (PS) resulting from stent angioplasty of symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis. Methods: Peri-operation PS complications of 258 patients receiving Gateway balloon-Wingspan stenting for severe symptomatic intracranial stenosis were analyzed. The incidence, clinical course, and prognosis of PS resulting from stenting were recorded. Special attention was given to the anatomical features, clinical manifestation and video materials of patients with PS. χ 2 test was used for statistics. Results: Two hundred and fifty-five patients received stent angioplasty successfully and 7 patients had PS (incidence rate 2.7%). The patients with basilar artery stenosis had a higher incidence of PS resulting from intracranial stenting (6.1%, 4/66) than patients with middle cerebral artery stenosis (2.5%, 3/118) (χ 2 =2.320, P= 0.025). The potential hazards for PS included preoperative perforator stroke adjacent to the stenotic segment and prominent dissection during operation. Six patients presented symptoms after awake from general anaesthesia and one had symptoms 3 hours after stenting. One deteriorated gradually and the others reached the maximum deficit almost at once. At the follow-up of 3 months, 3 patients were disabled and scored one, two, two by mRS respectively. Conclusion: The incidence of PS resulting from intracranial stenting was low and the prognosis was not disastrous. Stenosis at basilar artery and preoperative perforator stroke adjacent to the stenotic segment were potential risk factors for PS complication. Proper maneuver of angioplasty may decrease the incidence of PS and improve the prognosis. (authors)

  13. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany); Ernemann, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University of Tübingen (Germany); Bischof, Felix, E-mail: felix.bischof@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology.

  14. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bischof, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology

  15. Monteris AXiiiS Stereotactic Miniframe for Intracranial Biopsy: Precision, Feasibility, and Ease of Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Knudson, Kathleen E; Johnson, Carleton; Sloan, Andrew E

    2016-06-01

    Stereotactic biopsy is an important and minimally invasive technique used for a variety of indications in neurosurgery. Initially, this technique required a frame, but recently there have been a number of newer, less cumbersome approaches to biopsy including robotic arms, fixed arms, and, more recently, skull-mounted miniframes. Miniframes are attractive because they are disposable and low profile. However, the relatively limited degree of freedom offered by currently available devices necessitates a preplanned burr hole, which in turn limits flexibility and multiple trajectories. The AXiiiS device is a skull-mounted, magnetic resonance imaging-compatible miniframe that provides a similar degree of freedom with a frame while maintaining a low-profile, disposable platform. To assess the image-guided trajectory alignment accuracy using AXiiiS stereotactic miniframe biopsy of intracranial lesions. The accuracy of the AXiiiS device is compared with the Navigus Trajectory Guide as platforms. After approval by our institutional review board, medical records of 10 neurosurgical patients with intracranial pathologies were chosen for AXiiiS stereotactic miniframe biopsy, and histological correlation was obtained. Ten reported cases demonstrate the precision and ease of using the AXiiiS stereotactic miniframe for biopsy of intracranial lesions in conjunction with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Multiple trajectories and angles have been used with precision and safety. The AXiiiS stereotactic miniframe is a feasible, safe, and disposable platform for multitrajectory intracranial biopsies. Compared with existing platforms, this novel device provides a more stable base and wider limits of trajectory angles with comparable accuracy and precision.

  16. Clinical predictive score of intracranial hemorrhage in mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuksen C

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chaiyaporn Yuksen,1 Yuwares Sittichanbuncha,1 Jayanton Patumanond,2 Sombat Muengtaweepongsa,3 Kittisak Sawanyawisuth4,5 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, 2Clinical Epidemiology Unit and Clinical Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, 3Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, 4Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 5Sleep Apnea Research Group, Research Center in Back, Neck, Other Joint Pain and Human Performance (BNOJPH, and Research and Training Center for Enhancing Quality of Life of Working Age People, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Background: Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI is a common condition at the Emergency Medicine Department. Head computer tomography (CT scans in mild TBI patients must be properly justified in order to avoid unnecessary exposure to X-rays and to reduce the hospital/transfer costs. This study aimed to evaluate which clinical factors are associated with intracranial hemorrhage in Asian population and to develop a user-friendly predictive model.Methods: The study was conducted retrospectively at the Emergency Medicine Department in Ramathibodi Hospital, a university-affiliated super tertiary care hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. The study period was between September 2013 and August 2016. The inclusion criteria were age >15 years and having received a head CT scan after presenting with mild TBI. Those patients with mild TBI and no symptoms/deterioration after 24 h of clinical observation were excluded. The predictive model and prediction score for intracranial hemorrhage was developed by multivariate logistic regression analysis.Results: During the study period, there were 708 patients who met the study criteria. Of those, 100 patients (14.12% had positive head CT scan results. There were seven independent factors that were

  17. Stent-assisted recanalization of atherosclerotic intracranial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo Mee Lim; Dae Chul Suh

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke, and depending on the studied population, it accounts for 8%-15% of all strokes that are due to cerebral atherosclerosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic intracranial stenoses seems to depend on the location and extent of intracranial atherosclerosis. Currently, the primary treatment in intracranial atherosclerosis is the control of vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking. Secondary prevention with antiplatelet therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of subsequent vascular events in patients who have suffered a recent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Unfortunately, a significant number of patients with intracranial atherosclerosis continue to suffer from repeated strokes or TIA despite maximal medical treatment. Although endovascular revascularization for symptomatic intracranial stenoses remains at the investigational stage and much of the pertinent information is anecdotal, intracranial angioplasty and stenting are being increasingly performed to treat stenotic lesions. This article reviews basic principles involved in the patient selection, premedication, angio-interventional procedures, angiographic and clinical results, periprocedural complication, patients aftercare. (authors)

  18. A whole-body mathematical model for intracranial pressure dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, William D; Stevens, Scott A; Tranmer, Bruce I; Penar, Paul L

    2003-04-01

    Most attempts to study intracranial pressure using lumped-parameter models have adopted the classical "Kellie-Monro Doctrine," which considers the intracranial space to be a closed system that is confined within the nearly-rigid skull, conserves mass, and has equal inflow and outflow. The present work revokes this Doctrine and develops a mathematical model for the dynamics of intracranial pressures, volumes, and flows that embeds the intracranial system in extensive whole-body physiology. The new model consistently introduces compartments representing the tissues and vasculature of the extradural portions of the body, including both the thoracic region and the lower extremities. In addition to vascular connections, a spinal-subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartment bridges intracranial and extracranial physiology allowing explict buffering of intracranial pressure fluctuations by the spinal theca. The model contains cerebrovascular autoregulation, regulation of systemic vascular pressures by the sympathetic nervous system, regulation of CSF production in the choroid plexus, a lymphatic system, colloid osmotic pressure effects, and realistic descriptions of cardiac output. To validate the model in situations involving normal physiology, the model's response to a realistic pulsatile cardiac output is examined. A well-known experimentally-derived intracranial pressure-volume relationship is recovered by using the model to simulate CSF infusion tests, and the effect on cerebral blood flow of a change in body position is also examined. Cardiac arrest and hemorrhagic shock are simulated to demonstrate the predictive capabilities of the model in pathological conditions.

  19. Intracranial hypertension prediction using extremely randomized decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, Fabien; Hamilton, Robert; Asgari, Shadnaz; Kim, Sunghan; Hu, Xiao

    2012-10-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation (intracranial hypertension, IH) in neurocritical care is typically treated in a reactive fashion; it is only delivered after bedside clinicians notice prolonged ICP elevation. A proactive solution is desirable to improve the treatment of intracranial hypertension. Several studies have shown that the waveform morphology of the intracranial pressure pulse holds predictors about future intracranial hypertension and could therefore be used to alert the bedside clinician of a likely occurrence of the elevation in the immediate future. In this paper, a computational framework is proposed to predict prolonged intracranial hypertension based on morphological waveform features computed from the ICP. A key contribution of this work is to exploit an ensemble classifier method based on extremely randomized decision trees (Extra-Trees). Experiments on a representative set of 30 patients admitted for various intracranial pressure related conditions demonstrate the effectiveness of the predicting framework on ICP pulses acquired under clinical conditions and the superior results of the proposed approach in comparison to linear and AdaBoost classifiers. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Estimation of Human Workload from the Auditory Steady-State Response Recorded via a Wearable Electroencephalography System during Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yokota

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Workload in the human brain can be a useful marker of internal brain state. However, due to technical limitations, previous workload studies have been unable to record brain activity via conventional electroencephalography (EEG and magnetoencephalography (MEG devices in mobile participants. In this study, we used a wearable EEG system to estimate workload while participants walked in a naturalistic environment. Specifically, we used the auditory steady-state response (ASSR which is an oscillatory brain activity evoked by repetitive auditory stimuli, as an estimation index of workload. Participants performed three types of N-back tasks, which were expected to command different workloads, while walking at a constant speed. We used a binaural 500 Hz pure tone with amplitude modulation at 40 Hz to evoke the ASSR. We found that the phase-locking index (PLI of ASSR activity was significantly correlated with the degree of task difficulty, even for EEG data from few electrodes. Thus, ASSR appears to be an effective indicator of workload during walking in an ecologically valid environment.

  1. Intracranial structural alteration predicts treatment outcome in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hanna; Lee, Mi Ji; Choi, Hyun Ah; Cha, Jihoon; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2018-02-01

    Background Intracranial structural dislocation in spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) can be measured by various intracranial angles and distances. We aimed to identify the clinical significance of structural dislocation in relation to treatment outcome in patients with SIH. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we identified patients with SIH who received an epidural blood patch (EBP) at Samsung Medical Center from January 2005 to March 2015. Structural dislocation in pretreatment MRIs of SIH patients was assessed by measuring tonsillar herniation, mamillopontine distance, the angle between the vein of Galen and straight sinus (vG/SS angle), the pontomesencephalic angle, and the lateral ventricular angle. After the first EBP, poor response was defined as the persistence of symptoms that prompted a repeat EBP. Results Out of the 95 patients included, 31 (32.6%) showed poor response. Among the radiological markers of structural dislocation, the vG/SS angle was associated with poor response (49.82 ± 16.40° vs 66.58 ± 26.08°, p = 0.002). Among clinical variables, premorbid migraine ( p = 0.036) was related to poor response. In multivariate analysis, reduced vG/SS angle was independently associated with poor response (OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.01 - 1.07] per 1° decrease, p = 0.006). In 23 patients who underwent MRI after successful treatment, the vG/SS angle significantly increased after the EBP ( p < 0.001, by paired t-test), while two patients with aggravation or recurrence showed a further reduction of their vG/SS angles. Conclusions Intracranial structural dislocation, measured by the vG/SS angle, is associated with poor response to the first EBP in patients with SIH. Successful treatment can reverse the structural dislocation.

  2. Chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Different manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J Nicholas P; Pickard, John D; Lever, Andrew M L

    2017-08-01

    Though not discussed in the medical literature or considered in clinical practice, there are similarities between chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) which ought to encourage exploration of a link between them. The cardinal symptoms of each - fatigue and headache - are common in the other and their multiple other symptoms are frequently seen in both. The single discriminating factor is raised intracranial pressure, evidenced in IIH usually by the sign of papilloedema, regarded as responsible for the visual symptoms which can lead to blindness. Some patients with IIH, however, do not have papilloedema and these patients may be clinically indistinguishable from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Yet IIH is rare, IIH without papilloedema (IIHWOP) seems rarer still, while chronic fatigue syndrome is common. So are the clinical parallels spurious or is there a way to reconcile these conflicting observations? We suggest that it is a quirk of clinical measurement that has created this discrepancy. Specifically, that the criteria put in place to define IIH have led to a failure to appreciate the existence, clinical significance or numerical importance of patients with lower level disturbances of intracranial pressure. We argue that this has led to a grossly implausible distortion of the epidemiology of IIH such that the milder form of the illness (IIHWOP) is seen as less common than the more severe and that this would be resolved by recognising a connection with chronic fatigue syndrome. We hypothesise, therefore, that IIH, IIHWOP, lesser forms of IIH and an undetermined proportion of chronic fatigue cases are all manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure across a spectrum of disease severity, in which this subset of chronic fatigue syndrome would represent the most common and least severe and IIH the least common and most extreme. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The 7 ka pollen record of Akovitika: Key evidence for environmental change and human impact in the SW Peloponnese, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, M.; Knipping, M.; Brückner, H.; Kraft, J. C.; Kiderlen, M.

    2009-04-01

    Detailed investigations on the Holocene stratigraphy of the lower Messenian plain (SW Peloponnese, Greece) carried out within the framework of a geoarchaeological study on the Protogeometric Poseidon Sanctuary of Akovitika indicate significant shoreline fluctuations during Holocene times. Sedimentary, geochemical, mineralogical, and microfossil analyses of 18 vibracores document a maximum landward shoreline displacement around 3000 BC. Subsequently, increased sediment loads entering the gulf predominantly at the eastern head overcompensated the decelerating eustatic sea level rise and triggered beach ridge progradation. Synopses of adjacent sediment cores reveal extended wetland formation in the swales between the sand ridges throughout the Holocene. The swamp areas enlarged continuously during the late Holocene marine regression and persisted until the large-scaled implementation of drainage measures in the 20th century. However, the strata representing former wetland environments provide excellently preserved pollen assemblages and enable detailed vegetation reconstruction of certain time windows within the past 7000 years. During early Neolithic times the lower Messenian plain was covered with open vegetation adapted to the seasonal standing water bodies. Deciduous oak forests were abundant but restricted to the surrounding marl terraces while no signs of human impact appear in the pollen record so far. In mid- to late Neolithic times initial modification of the local vegetation composition is evident. The Neogene terraces nearby were still covered with forest, albeit Pinus and evergreen oak gradually started replacing deciduous oak. Anthropogenic influence on the vegetation was moderate although the upper part of the sequence (approx. 3500 BC) contains increasing amounts of settlement indicators. Exceptionally high percentages of Erica and Cistus as well as of charcoal fragments point to extensive burning of woodland and subsequent sustained establishment of a

  4. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsi Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH. Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient’s headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage. Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation.

  5. 3D printing of intracranial aneurysm based on intracranial digital subtraction angiography and its clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Li; Yuan, Zi-Gang; Qian, Guo-Liang; Bao, Wu-Qiao; Jin, Guo-Liang

    2018-06-01

    The study aimed to develop simulation models including intracranial aneurysmal and parent vessel geometries, as well as vascular branches, through 3D printing technology. The simulation models focused on the benefits of aneurysmal treatments and clinical education. This prospective study included 13 consecutive patients who suffered from intracranial aneurysms confirmed by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in the Neurosurgery Department of Shaoxing People's Hospital. The original 3D-DSA image data were extracted through the picture archiving and communication system and imported into Mimics. After reconstructing and transforming to Binary STL format, the simulation models of the hollow vascular tree were printed using 3D devices. The intracranial aneurysm 3D printing simulation model was developed based on DSA to assist neurosurgeons in aneurysmal treatments and residency training. Seven neurosurgical residents and 15 standardization training residents received their simulation model training and gave high assessments for the educational course with the follow-up qualitative questionnaire. 3D printed simulation models based on DSA can perfectly reveal target aneurysms and help neurosurgeons select therapeutic strategies precisely. As an educational tool, the 3D aneurysm vascular simulation model is useful for training residents.

  6. Clinical features and outcome analysis of intracranial hydatid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.M.; Shah, M.; Ayub, S.; Ahmad, A.; Aman, A.; Shah, M.A.; Rehman, R.U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hydatid cyst of the brain is a serious zoonotic parasitic infection which have profound health consequences if left untreated. The surgical excision of the cysts are rewarding for both the patient the neurosurgeon. Methods: The study was conducted prospectively at Department of Neurosurgery Hayatabad Medical Complex Peshawar from January 2013 to December 2014. Patients with a diagnosis of intracranial hydatid cysts were included, clinical and radiological features recorded, intervention and postoperative outcome were analysed. Results: Eleven patients with a male to female ratio of 1.7:1. Mean age was 12.4 (SD±6.5) years with median GCS on arrival of 10 (SD±2.5). Clinical features were headache (81.8 percentage), vomiting (90.9 percentage), seizures (36.4 percentage), focal deficits (54.5 percentage) and papilloedema (72.7 percentage). The median GCS on discharge was 13 (SD±1.1) while GOS at 1 month follow up was 4 (SD±0.7). The bivariate analysis showed inverse correlation (R2=-0.68; p=0.02) between duration of symptoms and outcome while GCS on admission was positively correlated (rs=0.75; p=0.007) with the outcome. There was no mortality. Conclusion: Despite its rarity the clinical features are non-specific while radiological features help in establishing diagnosis. Earlier diagnosis and prompt intervention is the key to favourable outcome. (author)

  7. ICP curve morphology and intracranial flow-volume changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unnerbäck, Mårten; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Reinstrup, Peter

    2018-01-01

    proposed to shape the ICP curve. This study tested the hypothesis that the ICP curve correlates to intracranial volume changes. METHODS: Cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were performed in neuro-intensive care patients with simultaneous ICP monitoring. The MRI was set......BACKGROUND: The intracranial pressure (ICP) curve with its different peaks has been extensively studied, but the exact physiological mechanisms behind its morphology are still not fully understood. Both intracranial volume change (ΔICV) and transmission of the arterial blood pressure have been...

  8. A Case Of Ollier′s Disease With Intracranial Enchondroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharthan Neeraj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of multiple enchondromas is known as Ollier′s disease. Enchondromas are benign tumours of hyaline cartilage arising within the medullary cavity of tubular bones. We are reporting the case of a 16 year old girl with Ollier′s disease who presented with seizures and brainstem compression. A MRI scan of brain showed an intracranial space-occupying lesion in the region of clivus. The intracranial tumour was surgically removed and the histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of enchondroma. Intracranial enchondroma is an extremely rare situation and reported for the first time from south India.

  9. Intracranial developmental venous anomaly: is it asymptomatic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, A Bolívar; de Asís Bravo Rodríguez, F; Bravo Rey, I; Romero, E Roldán

    2018-03-16

    Intracranial developmental venous anomalies are the most common vascular malformation. In the immense majority of cases, these anomalies are asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, and they are considered benign. Very exceptionally, however, they can cause neurological symptoms. In this article, we present three cases of patients with developmental venous anomalies that presented with different symptoms owing to complications derived from altered venous drainage. These anomalies were located in the left insula, right temporal lobe, and cerebellum. The exceptionality of the cases presented as well as of the images associated, which show the mechanism through which the symptoms developed, lies in the low incidence of symptomatic developmental venous anomalies reported in the literature. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Cognitive function in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne Maria; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Forchhammer, Hysse Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    -up. At the time of testing, none of the patients took medication potentially affecting cognitive function. Controls were 31 healthy age-matched and sex-matched volunteers from the local community. OUTCOME MEASURES: Executive function, working memory, visuospatial memory, processing speed, attention and reaction......OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent and nature of cognitive deficits in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at the time of diagnosis and after 3 months of treatment. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SETTING: Neurological department, ophthalmological department...... time assessed by a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery consisting of validated computerised (Cambridge neuropsychological test automated battery) and paper-and-pencil tests. RESULTS: Patients with IIH performed significantly worse than controls in four of six cognitive domains (p≤0...

  11. Brain edema associated with intracranial meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahi, Minoru; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Hirai, Osamu

    1992-01-01

    Brain edema associated with intracranial meningiomas was investigated on 80 patients, excluding recurrent cases. Statistically significant positive correlations with the degree of edema were found with large tumors, the convexity or parasagittal locations, the venous outflow disturbance, and the evidence of cortical disruption or peritumoral enhancement visualized on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imagings. Patients with a short clinical history and with angiographic evidence of hypervascularity tended to have edema, but there was no statistical significance. It is concluded that various factors are responsible for the edema associated with meningiomas and that it would be hard to determine the most important cause, since each factor plays a part edema production, spread, and resolution. (author)

  12. Endovascular treatment of very small intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskandar, A; Nepper-Rasmussen, J

    2011-01-01

    to large aneurysms (> 3 mm). However the data also suggest that endovascular treatment of very small aneurysms might be associated with an increased risk of procedural ruptures and mortality. At nine-month follow-up results indicate significantly less compaction in the very small aneurysms....... endovascular treatment was attempted in 956 consecutive intracranial aneurysms. Of 956 aneurysms, 111 aneurysms were very small aneurysms with a maximal diameter of 3 mm or less. We conducted a retrospective analysis of angiographic and clinical outcome following coiling of very small aneurysms...... aneurysms and less than 90% aneurysm occlusion in six aneurysms. Complications occurred in the treatment of 15 aneurysms, including eight procedural ruptures, six thromboembolic events and one case of early hemorrhage. Compared with larger aneurysms, treatment of very small aneurysms was associated...

  13. Intracranial drug delivery for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Robert Loch; Leung, Ming; Tice, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Tice and colleagues pioneered site-specific, sustained-release drug delivery to the brain almost 30 years ago. Currently there is one drug approved for use in this manner. Clinical trials in subarachnoid hemorrhage have led to approval of nimodipine for oral and intravenous use, but other drugs, such as clazosentan, hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and magnesium, have not shown consistent clinical efficacy. We propose that intracranial delivery of drugs such as nimodipine, formulated in sustained-release preparations, are good candidates for improving outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage because they can be administered to patients that are already undergoing surgery and who have a self-limited condition from which full recovery is possible.

  14. Intracranial arteriovenous malformation. Contralateral steal phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batjer, H H; Devous, M D; Seibert, G B; Purdy, P D; Ajmani, A K; Delarosa, M; Bonte, F J [Texas Univ., Dallas, TX (USA). Southwestern Medical Center

    1989-05-01

    Sixty-two patients with radiographically proven intracranial arteriovenous malformations underwent preoperative regional cerebral blood flow measurement with {sup 133}Xe signal-photon emission computed tomography. Contralateral regions of hypoperfusion were deteceted in all cases. Steal severity was assessed according to the contralateral steal index (ISteal(c)). ISteal(c) was < 0.7 (severe) in 22 (35%), 0.7-0.8 (intermediate) in 18 (29%), and > 0.8 (mild) in 22 (35%). ISteal(c) was more frequently severe or mild in females and more often intermediate in males in males (p < 0.05). Hyperemic complications were encountered more frequently in patients with intermediate ISteal(c) (p = 0.086). An unfavorable outcome was associated with less severe contralateral steal (p = 0.12). A detailed clinical, radiographic, and hemodynamic profile may help to preperatively identify patients at high risk for a poor surgical outcome. (author).

  15. Effect of radiation therapy against intracranial hemangiopericytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, Shozaburo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Nakahara, Tadashi; Kishida, Katsuaki

    1992-06-01

    Seven cases of intracranial hemangiopericytoma were studied retrospectively to investigate the efficacy of radiation therapy. Tumor response evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was obvious after 20-30 Gy irradiation. The total reduction rate was 80-90% and continued as long as 5-7 months after treatment. In five patients receiving radiation therapy before radical removal, the tumors were easily removed without massive hemorrhage. Histological inspection of specimens after irradiation showed a significant disappearance of tumor cells. Pyknosis frequently occurred in endothelial cells, and proliferating vessels with hyalinoid degeneration were also seen. Reticulin fibers between tumor cells were fewer, split, or absent. Preoperative radiation therapy is useful in the treatment of hemangiopericytoma involving considerable surgical risk. Postoperative radiation therapy should be given even if removal is complete. (author).

  16. Traumatic intracranial aneurysm: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Si Won; Chun, Kyung Ah; Baik, Joon Hyun; Shin, Kyung Sub

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence of traumatic aneurysm is rare in head injury, but this complication is important as it is a potentially treatable cause delayed onset of intracranial hemorrhage. Authors report one case of traumatic aneurysm involving A1 and A2 junction of anterior cerebral artery. A-28-year-old man with traffic accident was examined with brain CT and cerebral angiography. 1) Brain CT: Initial scan shows multiple skull fractures involving right frontal bones with subarachnoid hemorrhage and pneumocephalus. Follow-up scan shows intracerebral hemorrhage at bilateral frontal lobes. 2) Cerebral angiography: A traumatic aneurysm which is slowly filling and delayed emptying is noted at the junctional portion of A1 and A2 segment of the anterior cerebral artery. This report demonstrates radiologic findings of traumatic aneurysm at anterior cerebral artery with the brief review of the literatures

  17. Wavelet entropy characterization of elevated intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Scalzo, Fabien; Bergsneider, Marvin; Vespa, Paul; Chad, Miller; Hu, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial Hypertension (ICH) often occurs for those patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, tumor, etc. Pathology of ICH is still controversial. In this work, we used wavelet entropy and relative wavelet entropy to study the difference existed between normal and hypertension states of ICP for the first time. The wavelet entropy revealed the similar findings as the approximation entropy that entropy during ICH state is smaller than that in normal state. Moreover, with wavelet entropy, we can see that ICH state has the more focused energy in the low wavelet frequency band (0-3.1 Hz) than the normal state. The relative wavelet entropy shows that the energy distribution in the wavelet bands between these two states is actually different. Based on these results, we suggest that ICH may be formed by the re-allocation of oscillation energy within brain.

  18. Computer tomography of intracranial tumours and hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tans, J.T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors and hematomas was investigated in a retrospective study comprising 220 patients. All C.T.scans are reviewed and described in detail. To assess the diagnostic accuracy, the original interpretation of the C.T.scans was compared with that of conventional neuroradiological and neurophysiological examinations. The aspect on C.T. of the various types of tumors and hematomas proved to vary widely and specific features were seldom seen. This holds particularly for the malignant tumors. Benign tumors such as meningeomas, adenomas and neurilemmomas showed a rather easily identifiable and almost identical picture of the C.T.scan, and diagnosis had to be based mainly on differences in localization. The hematomas, with the exception of the older intracerebral ones, showed the most characteristic C.T.abnormalities. (Auth.)

  19. MRI of intracranial germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, M.; Uozumi, T.; Kiya, K.; Mukada, K.; Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Onda, J.; Satoh, H.; Ikawa, F.; Migita, K.

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in proven intracranial germ cell tumours in 22 cases, 12 of whom received Gd-DTPA. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensity of the tumour parenchyma was moderately low in 19 cases and isointense in 3; on T2-weighted images, it was high in all cases. Regions of different intensity thought to be cysts were found in 17 (77 %): 7 of 12 patients with germinoma (58 %) and in all other cases. Of the 13 patients with pineal lesions T1-weighted sagittal images showed the aqueduct to be obstructed in 5, stenotic in 7 and normal in 1. Strong contrast enhancement was observed in all 12 cases. Of the 14 patients with suprasellar lesions, 5 were found to have an intrasellar extension, and in 3 of these, the normal pituitary gland, which could be distinguished from the tumour, was displaced anteriorly. Ten patients (45 %) had multiple lesions. (orig.)

  20. Current management of symptomatic intracranial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert A; Weigele, John B; Kasner, Scott E

    2011-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS) is the cause of about 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States, but may account for about 40% of strokes in some populations. After a stroke or transient ischemic attack due to IAS, patients face a 12% annual risk of recurrent stroke on medical therapy, with most strokes occurring in the first year. Warfarin is no better than aspirin in preventing recurrent strokes but poses a higher risk of serious bleeding and death. Groups with the highest risk of recurrent stroke are those with high-grade (≥ 70%) stenosis, those with recent symptom onset, those with symptoms precipitated by hemodynamic maneuvers, and women. Endovascular treatment of IAS is a rapidly evolving therapeutic option. Antiplatelet agents are currently recommended as the primary treatment for symptomatic IAS, with endovascular therapy reserved for appropriate high-risk cases refractory to medical therapy.

  1. Effect of radiation therapy against intracranial hemangiopericytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Shozaburo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka; Nakahara, Tadashi; Kishida, Katsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Seven cases of intracranial hemangiopericytoma were studied retrospectively to investigate the efficacy of radiation therapy. Tumor response evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was obvious after 20-30 Gy irradiation. The total reduction rate was 80-90% and continued as long as 5-7 months after treatment. In five patients receiving radiation therapy before radical removal, the tumors were easily removed without massive hemorrhage. Histological inspection of specimens after irradiation showed a significant disappearance of tumor cells. Pyknosis frequently occurred in endothelial cells, and proliferating vessels with hyalinoid degeneration were also seen. Reticulin fibers between tumor cells were fewer, split, or absent. Preoperative radiation therapy is useful in the treatment of hemangiopericytoma involving considerable surgical risk. Postoperative radiation therapy should be given even if removal is complete. (author)

  2. Intracranial calcification on paediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.; Cavanagh, N.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the computed tomograms of 18000 children examined consecutively form the basis of an assessment of the diagnostic significance of intracranial calcification. The low incidence of physiological calcification in the pineal and choroid of about 2% up to the age of 8 years, but increasing 5-fold by the age of 15 years, is confirmed. Pathological calcification occurred in 1.6%, the commonest causes being neoplasms (43%), neuroectodermal syndromes (20%) and infections (12%). Diffuse basal ganglia calcification (15%) bore little relation to the diverse clinical symptomatology, and routine bio-chemical studies showed a disorder of metabolism to be present in only 6 cases. Calcification has not been previously noted in acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, Pertussis or Cocksackie encephalitis, infantile neuraxonal dystrophy, Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome or in the basal ganglia in neurofibromatosis. (orig.)

  3. The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure Syndrome in Long Duration NASA Astronauts: An Integrated Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, C. A.; Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M. J.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is currently NASA's number one human space flight risk. The syndrome, which is related to microgravity exposure, manifests with changes in visual acuity (hyperopic shifts, scotomas), changes in eye structure (optic disc edema, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, globe flattening, and distended optic nerve sheaths). In some cases, elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure has been documented postflight reflecting increased intracranial pressure (ICP). While the eye appears to be the main affected end organ of this syndrome, the ocular affects are thought to be related to the effect of cephalad fluid shift on the vascular system and the central nervous system. The leading hypotheses for the development of VIIP involve microgravity induced head-ward fluid shifts along with a loss of gravity-assisted drainage of venous blood from the brain, both leading to cephalic congestion and increased ICP. Although not all crewmembers have manifested clinical signs or symptoms of the VIIP syndrome, it is assumed that all astronauts exposed to microgravity have some degree of ICP elevation in-flight. Prolonged elevations of ICP can cause long-term reduced visual acuity and loss of peripheral visual fields, and has been reported to cause mild cognitive impairment in the analog terrestrial population of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH). These potentially irreversible health consequences underscore the importance of identifying the factors that lead to this syndrome and mitigating them.

  4. Clinical evaluation of a new intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stendel, R; Heidenreich, J; Schilling, A; Akhavan-Sigari, R; Kurth, R; Picht, T; Pietilä, T; Suess, O; Kern, C; Meisel, J; Brock, M

    2003-03-01

    Continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) still plays a key role in the management of patients at risk from intracranial hypertension. Numerous ICP-measuring devices are available. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility of the recently developed Neurovent-P(REHAU AG+CO, REHAU, Germany) ICP monitoring device. In a prospective two-center study, a total of 98 patients with severe head injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage, intracerebral haemorrhage, and non-traumatic brain edema underwent intraparenchymal monitoring of ICP using the Neurovent-P. A control group comprising 50 patients underwent implantation of the Camino-OLM-110-4B ICP monitor. The zero drift of the probes was determined before and after the ICP recording period. Technical and medical complications were documented. The MRI compatibility of the Neurovent-P ICP probe was investigated by evaluating artifacts caused by the probe, probe function and temperature changes during MRI, and probe movement caused by the magnetic field. The mean zero drift was 0.2+/-0.41 mmHg (maximum 3 mmHg) for the Neurovent-P ICP probes and 0.4+/-0.57 mmHg (maximum 12 mmHg) for the Camino-OLM-110-4B ICP probes. No significant correlation was identified between the extent of zero drift following the removal of the probes and the length of monitoring. Intraparenchymal haemorrhage spatially related to the probe occurred in 1 out of 50 (2%) patients with a Camino-OLM-110-4B probe and in 1 out of 98 (1%) with a Neurovent-P. Damage of the probe due to kinking or overextension of the cable or glass fiber occurred in 4 of the 50 (8%) Camino-OLM-110-4B ICP probes and in 5 of the 98 (5%) Neurovent-P probes. On T2-weighted MR images, the Neurovent-P ICP probe induced only small artifacts with very good discrimination of the surrounding tissue. On T1-weighted MR images, there was a good imaging quality but artifact-related local disturbances

  5. Vascular Variations Associated with Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orakdogen, Metin; Emon, Selin Tural; Somay, Hakan; Engin, Taner; Is, Merih; Hakan, Tayfun

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the vascular variations in patients with intracranial aneurysm in circle of Willis. We used the data on 128 consecutive intracranial aneurysm cases. Cerebral angiography images were analyzed retrospectively. Arteries were grouped as anterior cerebral arterial system (ACS), posterior cerebral arterial system (PCS) and middle cerebral arterial system (MCS) for grouping vascular variations. Lateralization, being single/multiple, gender; and also any connection with accompanying aneurysms" number, localization, dimension, whether bleeding/incidental aneurysm has been inspected. Variations were demonstrated in 57.8% of the cases. The most common variation was A1 variation (34.4%). The rate of variations was 36.7%, 24.2% and 10.2% respectively in ACS, PCS and MCS. MCS variations were significantly higher in males. Anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm observance rates were significantly higher and posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysm and middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm observance rates were significantly lower when compared to "no ACS variation detected" cases. In "PCS variation detected" cases, PCoA aneurysm observance rates and coexistence of multiple variations were significantly higher. The rate of vascular variations in patients with aneurysms was 57.8%. Arterial hypoplasia and aplasia were the most common variations. ACS was the most common region that variations were located in; they were mostly detected on the right side. Coexistence of ACoA aneurysm was higher than PCoA and MCA aneurysms. In the PCS variations group, PCoA aneurysms were the most common aneurysms that accompanying the variation and multiple variations were more common than in the other two groups. The variations in MCS were most common in males.

  6. MRI findings of intracranial cystic meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Hu, L.-B.; Zhen, J.W.; Zou, L.-G.; Feng, X.-Y.; Wang, W.-X.; Wen, L.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of intracranial cystic meningiomas and compare these features in intra- and peritumoural cyst groups. Materials and methods: Fourteen cases of peritumoural cystic meningiomas were compared with 18 cases of intratumoural cystic meningiomas. All patients were examined using non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI. Tumour location, tumour size, signal intensity, enhancement characteristics, and cystic changes were assessed. The MRI features were compared between the intra- and peritumoural cyst groups. Results: Most cystic meningiomas comprised two or more cysts. The solid parts of the tumours showed moderate or marked enhancement after the injection of contrast material. An enhanced cyst wall was found in six out of 14 cases in the peritumoural cyst group, but not in the intratumoural cyst group. Peritumoural cystic meningiomas were predominately located in the cerebral falx, whereas the intratumoural cystic meningiomas were predominantly found in frontal convexity (X 2 = 7.434, p = 0.024). The cysts were larger in the peritumoural cyst group than in the intratumoural cyst group (t = 5.274, p = 0.0258). Peritumoural oedema was more commonly found in the intratumoural cyst group (X 2 = 6.863, p = 0.008). Cystic meningiomas with solid parts located inside the cyst are reported for the first time. Conclusion: Cystic meningiomas, although uncommon, should be differentiated from other cystic intracranial lesions. Peri- and intratumoural cystic meningiomas have distinct MRI features. The present study provides the first report of two lesions with solid parts located inside the cyst, as well as one lesion with a calcified solid nodule and haemorrhage within the cyst.

  7. Imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shuilian; Man Yuping; Ma Longbai; Liu Ying; Wei Qiang; Zhu Youkai

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (ISFT). Methods: Ten patients with ISFT proven histopathologically were collected. Four cases had CT data and all cases had MR data. The imaging features and pathological results were retrospectively analyzed. Results: All cases were misdiagnosed as meningioma at pre-operation. All lesions arose from intracranial meninges including 5 lesions above the tentorium, 4 lesions beneath the tentorium and 1 lesion growing around the tentorium. The margins of all the masses were well defined, and 8 lesions presented multilobular shape. CT demonstrated hyerattenuated masses in all 4 lesions, smooth erosion of the basicranial skull in 1 lesion, and punctiform calcification of the capsule in 1 lesion. T 1 WI showed most lesions with isointense or slight hyperintense signals including homogeneous in 4 lesions and heterogeneous in 6 lesions. T 2 WI demonstrated isointense or slight hyperintense in 2 lesions, mixed hypointense and hyperintense signals in 4, cystic portion in 2, and two distinct portion of hyperintense and hypointense signal, so called 'yin-yang' pattern, in 2. Strong enhanced was found in all lesions, especially in 8 lesion with heterogeneous with the low T 2 signal. 'Dural tail' was found in 4 lesions. Conclusions: ISFI has some specific CT and MR features including heterogeneous signal intensity on T 2 WI, strong enhancement of areas with low T 2 signal intensity, slight or no 'dural tail', without skull thickening, and the typical 'yin-yang' pattern. (authors)

  8. Intracranial investigation of a patient with nodular heterotopia and hippocampal sclerosis: dealing with a dual pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Dash, Chelsea; Wu, Adam; Tellez-Zenteno, Jose Francisco

    2017-06-01

    The pre-operative assessment and surgical management of patients with dual pathology is challenging. We describe a patient with drug-resistant focal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and extensive periventricular nodular heterotopia in the same hemisphere. The semiology, scalp EEG, and imaging were divergent, but the presence of focal interictal and ictal epileptic discharges of the putative ictal onset zone resulted in successful localization of the epileptogenic zone. A less aggressive resection was performed based on intracranial EEG recording. The patient has been seizure-free for three years since resection. Electroclinical hypotheses and challenges in defining the epileptogenic network are discussed.

  9. Adipsic diabetes insipidus revealing a bifocal intracranial germinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, Julie; Potorac, Iulia; Lutteri, Laurence; Gennigens, Christine; Martin, Didier; Daly, Adrian F; Bonneville, Jean-Francois; Tshibanda, Luaba; Beckers, Albert

    2017-07-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of intracranial tumors in which impaired antidiuretic hormone secretion is associated with the loss of thirst sensation. Here, we present the case of a patient with bifocal intracranial germinoma, diagnosed due to symptoms mainly caused by adipsic diabetes insipidus. This is, to our knowledge, the first case of adipsic diabetes insipidus revealing an intracranial germinoma reported in the literature. We describe the diagnostic procedures and the three-year follow-up of this patient. Management of intracranial germ-cell tumors is made complex by the wide range of histological features. Although germinomas have a generally better prognosis than most nongerminomatous tumors, they can have severe or even life-threatening presentations. Adipsic diabetes insipidus is one such severe presentation and its rarity can make it difficult to recognize and manage. Awareness of this potential entity is therefore important for clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Intracranial hypertension in 2 children with marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Kroft, Lucia J. M.; Pals, Gerard; van Vugt, Jeroen P. P.; Overweg-Plandsoen, Wouterina C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Two unrelated children with Marfan syndrome presented with recurrent intracranial hypertension. Both children complained of headache, nausea, and vomiting and one of them had papilledema. Both had increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure, and their complaints disappeared after lumbar puncture.

  11. Chemical Meningitis with Intracranial Tumours | De Klerk | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with intracranial epidermoid tumours who had a chemical meningitis as part of their clinical course, are described. The importance of recognising this as a presenting complaint is stressed. The pathogenesis and treatment are discussed.

  12. Minimally invasive trans-portal resection of deep intracranial lesions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raza, S.M.; Recinos, P.F.; Avendano, J.; Adams, H.; Jallo, G.I.; Quinones-Hinojosa, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical management of deep intra-axial lesions still requires microsurgical approaches that utilize retraction of deep white matter to obtain adequate visualization. We report our experience with a new tubular retractor system, designed specifically for intracranial applications,

  13. Intracranial cavernous hemangiomas: a case report and bibliographic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiguihara, L.C.M.; Granero, P.C.; Gianotti, I.A.; Lederman, H.M.; Seixas, M.T.

    1992-01-01

    This is a case report of intracranial cavernous hemangioma that presented with macrocrania. A large, spontaneously hyperdense area with mass effect on CT was seen. This is a rare vascular malformation evolving the CNS in pediatrics. (author)

  14. [Congenital anomalies of cerebral artery and intracranial aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, K; Ito, Z; Hen, R; Uemura, K; Matsuoka, S

    1976-02-01

    It is well known that congenital anomalies such as polycystic kidney, aortic coarctation, Marfan syndrome, Ehler-Danlos syndrome are apt to be complicated by intracranial aneurysms. In this report we attempt to reveal the relation and incidence between cerebrovascular anomalies and intracranial aneurysms. The etiology of aneurysms has been discussed, too. 12 cases of persistent trigeminl artery, 2 cases of persistent hypoglossal artery and 11 cases of fenestration were obtained from 3841 patients who were angiographically examined in our clinic for 5 years. The incidence is 0.31%, 0.05% and 0.29%, respectively. Persistent trigeminal arteries were complicated by 2 cases of intracranial aneurysms and one case of arterivenous malformations (AVM), persistent hypoglossal arteries were complicated by one case of aneurysm, and fenestrations were complicated by 2 cases of aneurysms and one case of AVM. One case of congenital agenesis of right internal carotid artery was obtained which was complicated by aneurysm of anterior communicating artery. Totally, 8 cases of aneurysms and AVM were obtained from 26 cases of cerebrovascular anomalies (incidence 30.8%). On the other hand, thalamic or caudate hemorrhage revealed the highest incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms among intracerebral hematomas (10.7%). Compared with the incidence of aneurysms between cerebro vascular anomalies (30.8%) and thalamic or caudate hemorrhage (10.7%), the difference is statistically signigicant (P less than 0.05). The cause of intracranial aneurysm has not yet been clarified. But it is well accepted that the defect of tunica media vasorum is most responsible factor as to the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms. We concluded that the genetic error of cerebral vessels including defect of media caused intracranial aneurysms, and this result was supported from the evidence that cerebrovascular anomalies showed statistically high incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms.

  15. Congenital intracranial meningioma. A case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed.......A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed....

  16. Fetal intracranial neoplasm–not always a teratoma!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsig LE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although congenital intracranial tumors are very rare, it is important to know the differential diagnosis and distinguishing features of the different disease processes in order to accurately diagnosis and appropriately treat these patients in the neonatal period. We present a case of a rare congenital craniopharyngioma detected in a fetus on prenatal imaging. Teratoma is the most common congenital intracranial tumor. Hence this tumor was initially labelled as a teratoma, which is a pitfall that should be avoided.

  17. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  18. Association between intracranial plasmacytoma and multiple myeloma: clinicopathological outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, T H; Rhiew, R; Isaacson, S R; Orazi, A; Bruce, J N

    2001-11-01

    Intracranial plasmacytomas are rare lesions that can arise from the calvarium, dura, or cranial base and exhibit a benign course unless associated with myeloma. Attention has recently been focused on the role of the cell adhesion molecules CD56 and CD31 in the pathogenesis of myeloma. No such information is available for intracranial plasmacytomas and myeloma-associated lesions. We investigated the relationship between CD56 and CD31 expression, intracranial location, and progression to myeloma for a series of nine intracranial plasmacytomas (three dural, one calvarial, and five cranial base lesions). These parameters were also correlated with proliferation indices, as assessed by MIB-1 immunostaining of the histological sections. A single pathologist (AO) performed immunohistochemical analyses and reviewed all slides. Intracranial plasmacytomas presented more commonly in female patients (89%). The three dural lesions were CD56- and CD31-negative and exhibited MIB-1 staining of less than 10%; no patient developed myeloma or recurrence. Of the five cranial base lesions, three were CD56-positive, none was CD31-positive, and two exhibited MIB-1 labeling of more than 45%, with plasmablastic morphological features. Compared with other intracranial plasmacytomas, five of five patients with cranial base lesions developed bone marrow biopsy-proven myeloma (P myeloma soon after diagnosis. Both of the two highly proliferative plasmablastic lesions recurred, one after gross total resection without radiotherapy and the other after a biopsy and 2000-cGy radiotherapy. Among intracranial plasmacytomas, cranial base location was the strongest predictor of the development of multiple myeloma. Expression of the cell adhesion molecules CD31 and CD56 was not predictive of outcome. Extramedullary dural-based lesions were CD56-negative and were not associated with myeloma. A high proliferation index and plasmablastic morphological features were predictive of a short time to recurrence

  19. Fatal cerebral edema and intracranial hemorrhage associated with hypernatremic dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocharla, R.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Glasier, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    We report neuroimaging findings of intracranial hemorrhage and cerebral edema in an infant with obtundation and seizures, initially suspected to be secondary to non-accidental trauma but finally attributed to hypernatremic dehydration. Neuroimaging findings due to hypernatremic dehydration have not been previously described in the radiologic literature. Hypernatremia should be included in the differential diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in the infant without evidence of nonaccidental trauma. (orig.). With 1 fig

  20. Morphology parameters for intracranial aneurysm rupture risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Sujan; Tremmel, Markus; Mocco, J; Kim, Minsuok; Yamamoto, Junichi; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Hopkins, L Nelson; Meng, Hui

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify image-based morphological parameters that correlate with human intracranial aneurysm (IA) rupture. For 45 patients with terminal or sidewall saccular IAs (25 unruptured, 20 ruptured), three-dimensional geometries were evaluated for a range of morphological parameters. In addition to five previously studied parameters (aspect ratio, aneurysm size, ellipticity index, nonsphericity index, and undulation index), we defined three novel parameters incorporating the parent vessel geometry (vessel angle, aneurysm [inclination] angle, and [aneurysm-to-vessel] size ratio) and explored their correlation with aneurysm rupture. Parameters were analyzed with a two-tailed independent Student's t test for significance; significant parameters (P 41; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.92) and undulation index (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.11) had the strongest independent correlation with ruptured IA. From the receiver operating characteristic analysis, size ratio and aneurysm angle had the highest area under the curve values of 0.83 and 0.85, respectively. Size ratio and aneurysm angle are promising new morphological metrics for IA rupture risk assessment. Because these parameters account for vessel geometry, they may bridge the gap between morphological studies and more qualitative location-based studies.

  1. A dimensionless parameter for classifying hemodynamics in intracranial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a disease with high rates of mortality. Given the risk associated with the aneurysm surgery, quantifying the likelihood of aneurysm rupture is essential. There are many risk factors that could be implicated in the rupture of an aneurysm. However, the most important factors correlated to the IA rupture are hemodynamic factors such as wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) which are affected by the IA flows. Here, we carry out three-dimensional high resolution simulations on representative IA models with simple geometries to test a dimensionless number (first proposed by Le et al., ASME J Biomech Eng, 2010), denoted as An number, to classify the flow mode. An number is defined as the ratio of the time takes the parent artery flow transports across the IA neck to the time required for vortex ring formation. Based on the definition, the flow mode is vortex if An>1 and it is cavity if AnOSI on the human subject IA. This work was supported partly by the NIH grant R03EB014860, and the computational resources were partly provided by CCR at UB. We thank Prof. Hui Meng and Dr. Jianping Xiang for providing us the database of aneurysms and helpful discussions.

  2. Biotelemetric Wireless Intracranial Pressure Monitoring: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Behfar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of intracranial pressure (ICP is of great importance in management of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs. The existing clinically established ICP measurement methods require catheter insertion in the cranial cavity. This increases the risk of infection and hemorrhage. Thus, noninvasive but accurate techniques are attractive. In this paper, we present two wireless, batteryless, and minimally invasive implantable sensors for continuous ICP monitoring. The implants comprise ultrathin (50 μm flexible spiral coils connected in parallel to a capacitive microelectromechanical systems (MEMS pressure sensor. The implantable sensors are inductively coupled to an external on-body reader antenna. The ICP variation can be detected wirelessly through measuring the reader antenna’s input impedance. This paper also proposes novel implant placement to improve the efficiency of the inductive link. In this study, the performance of the proposed telemetry system was evaluated in a hydrostatic pressure measurement setup. The impact of the human tissues on the inductive link was simulated using a 5 mm layer of pig skin. The results from the in vitro measurement proved the capability of our developed sensors to detect ICP variations ranging from 0 to 70 mmHg at 2.5 mmHg intervals.

  3. Turnover in intracranial aneurysm phantoms: its relation to neck size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Sub; Lee, Young Jun; Rhim, Yoon Chul

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the physiologic background of aneurysms poorly visualized during 3D-TOF MRA, contrast-enhanced MRA (CEMRA) and DSA due to hemodynamic isolation. Using handmade elastic silicon phantoms to represent terminal basilar tip aneurysms, 3D-TOF MRA, CEMRA and DSA were used to determine blood turnover. Aneurysmal neck size was 2 mm and 10 mm, and the use of a pulsatile pump also helped recreate human physiologic parameters. We compared the results with those of computational fluid dynamics. DSA images of the narrow-necked aneurysm showed that a small volume of contrast medium washed into it during the systolic phase. As the width of its neck increased, the turnover volume of fragments of contrast bolus also increased. At CEMRA, the broad-necked aneurysm was visualized as the main bolus of Gd-DTPA passed through it, and at delayed CEMRA, the narrow-necked aneurysm was visualized faintly after the passage of bolus Gd-DTPA. The results correlated closely with those of 3D-TOF MRA and computational fluid dynamics. The visualization of intracranial aneurysms at 3D-TOF MRA, CEMRA and DSA was greatly dependent upon blood turnover, which varied according to aneurysmal neck size. A narrow-necked aneurysm might be missed at 3D-TOF MRA, CEMRA and DSA due to hemodynamic isolation

  4. Clinical characteristics associated with the intracranial dissemination of gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xu; Qin, Jun-Jie; Hao, Shu-Yu; Li, Huan; Zeng, Chun; Sun, Sheng-Jun; Yu, Lan-Bing; Gao, Zhi-Xian; Xie, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Glioma is the most common malignant tumor of the brain and the intracranial dissemination of gliomas is the late stage of the development of the tumor. However, there is little research in literature on the occurrence of intracranial dissemination of gliomas. In order to provide a reference for clinical work, we carried out this study on intracranial dissemination of glioma. A total of 629 patients with gliomas received tumor resection by the same surgeon from August 2010 to September 2015 were included in this study. The authors performed a retrospective review of the patients and the information regarding clinical features, histopathological results, molecular pathologic results and clinical outcomes was collected and analyzed. In this retrospective study, we found that the intracranial dissemination phenomenon occurred in 53 patients (8.43%). We analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients and found that the age at diagnosis (P = 0.011), WHO grade of the tumor (P dissemination. The higher grade of the tumor, the more prone to disseminate. Deletion of 1p/19q had no significant correlation with the intracranial dissemination. MMP9, Ki-67, and EGFR were highly expressed in tumor cells that caused dissemination, and the level of Ki-67 expression had significance in statistics (P 40 years), high pathological grade, invasion of the corpus callosum and high levels of Ki-67 expression were risk factors associated with the intracranial dissemination of gliomas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Intracranial electroencephalography power and phase synchronization changes during monaural and binaural beat stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Ann-Katrin; Höhne, Marlene; Axmacher, Nikolai; Chaieb, Leila; Elger, Christian E; Fell, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Auditory stimulation with monaural or binaural auditory beats (i.e. sine waves with nearby frequencies presented either to both ears or to each ear separately) represents a non-invasive approach to influence electrical brain activity. It is still unclear exactly which brain sites are affected by beat stimulation. In particular, an impact of beat stimulation on mediotemporal brain areas could possibly provide new options for memory enhancement or seizure control. Therefore, we examined how electroencephalography (EEG) power and phase synchronization are modulated by auditory stimulation with beat frequencies corresponding to dominant EEG rhythms based on intracranial recordings in presurgical epilepsy patients. Monaural and binaural beat stimuli with beat frequencies of 5, 10, 40 and 80 Hz and non-superposed control signals were administered with low amplitudes (60 dB SPL) and for short durations (5 s). EEG power was intracranially recorded from mediotemporal, temporo-basal and temporo-lateral and surface sites. Evoked and total EEG power and phase synchronization during beat vs. control stimulation were compared by the use of Bonferroni-corrected non-parametric label-permutation tests. We found that power and phase synchronization were significantly modulated by beat stimulation not only at temporo-basal, temporo-lateral and surface sites, but also at mediotemporal sites. Generally, more significant decreases than increases were observed. The most prominent power increases were seen after stimulation with monaural 40-Hz beats. The most pronounced power and synchronization decreases resulted from stimulation with monaural 5-Hz and binaural 80-Hz beats. Our results suggest that beat stimulation offers a non-invasive approach for the modulation of intracranial EEG characteristics. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A review of orbital and intracranial magnetic resonance imaging in 79 canine and 13 feline patients (2004-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Micki D; Broome, Michael; Dell'Anna, Giuseppe; Blades, Natalie J; Esson, Douglas W

    2011-07-01

    To review the distribution of orbital and intracranial disease in canine and feline patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following referral to a veterinary ophthalmologist and to correlate results of MRI with pathologic conditions including neoplasia, suspected optic neuritis (ON) and orbital cellulitis. Recognized and emerging imaging techniques are reviewed. Medical records of 79 canine and 13 feline patients were reviewed. Neoplasia was diagnosed in 53/92 (57.6%) of patients. The most prevalent types of neoplasia were carcinoma (16/53, 30.1%), sarcoma (11/53, 20.8%), lymphoma (8/53, 15.1%) and presumptive meningioma (9/53, 17.0%). Carcinomas and sarcomas were characterized by bony lysis and intracranial/sinonasal extension. Lymphoma was generally unilateral, less invasive and originated from the ventromedial orbit. Intracranial masses representing presumptive meningiomas frequently exhibited a 'dural tail' sign. Diagnosis of suspected ON was made in 13 of 92 (14.1%) patients. Results of MRI in patients with suspected ON included unilateral optic nerve hyperintensity (3/13, 23.0%), bilateral optic nerve hyperintensity (1/13, 7.7%) and optic chiasmal hyperintensity (3/13, 23.0%). Seven suspected ON patients demonstrated intracranial multifocal patchy contrast enhancement (7/13, 53.8%). Diagnosis of orbital cellulitis was made in 12/92 (13.0%) patients. Orbital neoplasia was the most common pathologic condition detected. Essential Roentgen characteristics are helpful when diagnosing pathologic processes and providing prognoses in cases of orbital or intracranial disease. Magnetic resonance imaging comprises an important diagnostic component in cases of suspected ON. Emerging contrast and functional MRI techniques as well as SI data may increase our ability to characterize disease processes. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Direct recordings from the auditory cortex in a cochlear implant user.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Etler, Christine P; Brugge, John F; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Reale, Richard A; Abbas, Paul J; Brown, Carolyn J; Howard, Matthew A

    2013-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve with a cochlear implant (CI) is the method of choice for treatment of severe-to-profound hearing loss. Understanding how the human auditory cortex responds to CI stimulation is important for advances in stimulation paradigms and rehabilitation strategies. In this study, auditory cortical responses to CI stimulation were recorded intracranially in a neurosurgical patient to examine directly the functional organization of the auditory cortex and compare the findings with those obtained in normal-hearing subjects. The subject was a bilateral CI user with a 20-year history of deafness and refractory epilepsy. As part of the epilepsy treatment, a subdural grid electrode was implanted over the left temporal lobe. Pure tones, click trains, sinusoidal amplitude-modulated noise, and speech were presented via the auxiliary input of the right CI speech processor. Additional experiments were conducted with bilateral CI stimulation. Auditory event-related changes in cortical activity, characterized by the averaged evoked potential and event-related band power, were localized to posterolateral superior temporal gyrus. Responses were stable across recording sessions and were abolished under general anesthesia. Response latency decreased and magnitude increased with increasing stimulus level. More apical intracochlear stimulation yielded the largest responses. Cortical evoked potentials were phase-locked to the temporal modulations of periodic stimuli and speech utterances. Bilateral electrical stimulation resulted in minimal artifact contamination. This study demonstrates the feasibility of intracranial electrophysiological recordings of responses to CI stimulation in a human subject, shows that cortical response properties may be similar to those obtained in normal-hearing individuals, and provides a basis for future comparisons with extracranial recordings.

  8. Intracranial Hemorrhage Following a 3-week Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 35-year-old female presented to the ED with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 11. Per her boyfriend, the patient was having headaches for the past 3 weeks. She was initially taken to an outside hospital where her GCS was reported as 13. A non-contrast head computed tomography (CT revealed a large lobar intraparenchymal hemorrhage within the left frontal parietal lobe with midline shift. Upon examination, vitals were notable for blood pressure of 209/88mmHg, and her left pupil was fixed and dilated. The patient had extension of her right arm to noxious stimuli, paralysis of her right leg, and purposeful movement of the left arm and left leg. The patient was started on a nicardipine drip in the ED and subsequently taken to the operating room for a decompressive craniectomy. Significant findings: The patient’s head CT showed a significant area of hyperdensity consistent with an intracranial hemorrhage located within the left frontal parietal lobe (red arrow. Additionally, there is rightward midline shift up to 1.1cm (green arrow and entrapment of the right lateral ventricle (blue arrow. Discussion: Intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although the mortality for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH has declined steadily over the past several decades, the mortality for IPH mortality has not significantly.1 One of the most serious considerations when treating a patient with IPH is the management of intracranial pressure (ICP.2 Once an IPH is identified, immediate steps should be taken to bring ICP within acceptable levels including elevating the head of the bed to 30 degrees, sedation, and controlling hypertension with medications.2-3 Even with early and aggressive care, the prognosis for IPH remains poor; the 30-day mortality rate for IPH is estimated to be less than 50%, and a 2010 systematic review estimated only 12-39% of IPH patients achieve independent function.4-5 Predictors of

  9. Structured Reporting in Neuroradiology: Intracranial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bink

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical feasibility, diagnostic yield, advantages, and disadvantages of structured reporting for routine MRI-reading in patients with primary diagnosis of intracranial tumors as compared to traditional neuroradiological free text reporting.MethodsA structured MRI reporting template was developed covering pathological, anatomical, and functional aspects in an itemized fashion. Retrospectively, 60 consecutive patients with first diagnosis of an intracranial tumor were selected from the radiology information system/PACS system. Structured reporting was performed by a senior neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical and radiological data. Reporting times were measured per patient. The diagnostic content was compared to free text reporting which was independently performed on the same MRI exams by two other neuroradiologists. The comparisons were categorized per item as: “congruent,” “partially congruent,” “incongruent,” or “not mentioned in free-style report.”ResultsTumor-related items: congruent findings were found for all items (17/17 with congruence rates ranging between 98 and 39% per item. Four items achieved congruence rates ≥90%, 5 items >80%, and 9 items ≥70%. Partially congruent findings were found for all items in up to 50% per item. Incongruent findings were present in 7/17 items in up to 5% per item. Free text reports did not mention 12 of 17 items (range 7–43% per item. Non-tumor-related items, including brain atrophy, microangiopathy, vascular pathologies, and various extracranial pathologies, which were not mentioned in free-text reports between 18 and 85% per item. Mean reporting time for structured reporting was 7:49 min (3:12–17:06 min.ConclusionFirst results showed that expert structured reporting ensured reliable detection of all relevant brain pathologies along with reproducible documentation of all predefined diagnostic items, which was not always the

  10. Somatostatin receptor imaging in intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Scheidhauer, K.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.; Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Klug, N.

    1998-01-01

    The somatostatin analogue [ 111 In-DTPA-d-Phe 1 ]-octreotide ( 111 In-octreotide) allows scintigraphic visualization of somatostatin receptor-expressing tissue. While it is well known that a large variety of tissues express somatostatin receptors and 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy has a clearly defined role in various neuroendocrine diseases, the clinical value of 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy in brain tumours is still under clinical investigation. In 124 patients with 141 brain lesions (63 meningiomas, 24 pituitary adenomas, 10 gliomas WHO class I and II, 12 gliomas WHO class III and IV, 11 neurinomas and 2 neurofibromas, 7 metastases and 12 other varieties: three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, two epidermoids, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma, one haemangiopericytoma, one osteosarcoma, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst), 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 110-220 MBq 111 In-octreotide. Planar images of the head in four views with a 128 x 128 matrix and single-photon emission tomographic images (64 x 64 matrix) were acquired, and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Fifty-nine of the 63 meningiomas showed moderate to intense tracer uptake. Nine of 24 pituitary adenomas were visible; the remaining 15 did not show any tracer uptake. None of the class I and II gliomas with an intact blood-brain barrier were detected whereas 11/12 class III and IV gliomas showed 111 In-octreotide uptake. None of the neurinomas or neurofibromas were positive. Five of seven metastases were classified as positive, as were the osteosarcoma, two of three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma and one haemangiopericytoma. The other varieties (one non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, two epidermoids, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst) did not show 111 In-octreotide uptake. The results demonstrate that a large variety of intracranial lesions express somatostatin receptors and

  11. Somatostatin receptor imaging in intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M.; Scheidhauer, K.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Koeln (Germany); Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Klug, N. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kolen (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The somatostatin analogue [{sup 111}In-DTPA-d-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide ({sup 111}In-octreotide) allows scintigraphic visualization of somatostatin receptor-expressing tissue. While it is well known that a large variety of tissues express somatostatin receptors and {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy has a clearly defined role in various neuroendocrine diseases, the clinical value of {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy in brain tumours is still under clinical investigation. In 124 patients with 141 brain lesions (63 meningiomas, 24 pituitary adenomas, 10 gliomas WHO class I and II, 12 gliomas WHO class III and IV, 11 neurinomas and 2 neurofibromas, 7 metastases and 12 other varieties: three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, two epidermoids, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma, one haemangiopericytoma, one osteosarcoma, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst), {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 110-220 MBq {sup 111}In-octreotide. Planar images of the head in four views with a 128 x 128 matrix and single-photon emission tomographic images (64 x 64 matrix) were acquired, and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Fifty-nine of the 63 meningiomas showed moderate to intense tracer uptake. Nine of 24 pituitary adenomas were visible; the remaining 15 did not show any tracer uptake. None of the class I and II gliomas with an intact blood-brain barrier were detected whereas 11/12 class III and IV gliomas showed {sup 111}In-octreotide uptake. None of the neurinomas or neurofibromas were positive. Five of seven metastases were classified as positive, as were the osteosarcoma, two of three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma and one haemangiopericytoma. The other varieties (one non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, two epidermoids, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst) did not show {sup 111}In-octreotide uptake. The results demonstrate that a large variety of intracranial

  12. Quantifying response to intracranial pressure normalization in idiopathic intracranial hypertension via dynamic neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lublinsky, Svetlana; Kesler, Anat; Friedman, Alon; Horev, Anat; Shelef, Ilan

    2018-04-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterized by elevated intracranial pressure without a clear cause. To investigate dynamic imaging findings in IIH and their relation to mechanisms underlying intracranial pressure normalization. Prospective. Eighteen IIH patients and 30 healthy controls. T 1 -weighted, venography, fluid attenuation inversion recovery, and apparent diffusion coefficients were acquired on 1.5T scanner. The dural sinus was measured before and after lumbar puncture (LP). The degree of sinus occlusion was evaluated, based on 95% confidence intervals of controls. We studied a number of neuroimaging biomarkers associated with IIH (sinus occlusion; optic nerve; distribution of cerebrospinal fluid into the subarachnoid space, sulci and lateral ventricles (LVs); Meckel's caves; arachnoid granulation; pituitary and choroid plexus), before and after LP, using a set of specially developed quantification techniques. Relationships among various biomarkers were investigated (Pearson correlation coefficient) and linked to long-term disease outcomes (logistic regression). The t-test and the Wilcoxon rank test were used to compare between controls and before and after LP data. As a result of LP, the following were found to be in good accordance with the opening pressure: relative compression of cerebrospinal fluid (R = -0.857, P < 0.001) and brain volumes (R = -0.576, P = 0.012), LV expansion (R = 0.772, P < 0.001) and venous volume (R = 0.696, P = 0.001), enlargement of the pituitary (R = 0.640, P = 0.023), and shrinkage of subarachnoid space (R = -0.887, P < 0.001). The only parameter that had an impact on long-term prognosis was cross-sectional size of supplemental drainage veins after LP (sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 20%, and area under the curve of 0.845, P < 0.001). We present an approach for quantitative characterization of the intracranial venous system and its implementation as a diagnostic assistance

  13. Clinical application of multifocal visual evoked potentials in children with epilepsy caused by intracranial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Eiichi; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Kawasaki, Kensuke; Yoshii, Toshiaki; Hara, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether visual field defects could be objectively evaluated using multifocal visual evoked potential (m-VEP) in two children with epilepsy caused by intracranial disease in whom it was difficult to measure the visual field. To determine normal waves in m-VEP, recording was performed using a visual evoked response imaging system (VERIS) Junior Science program (Mayo, Aichi, Japan) in 20 healthy children (20 eyes) peak latency and amplitude were used for assessment. In the two children with epilepsy, m-VEPs were recorded, and compared with the results of static perimetry or the lesions observed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In the 20 healthy children, there was no significant difference in the peak latency or amplitude among 4 quadrants by one-way analysis of variance. m-VEP in the children with epilepsy showed abnormal waves, corresponding to the visual field defects in the static perimetry or the lesions observed by MRI. Objective evaluation of visual field defects using m-VEP may be useful in children with epilepsy caused by intracranial disease in whom kinetic/static perimetry as a subjective examination is difficult. (author)

  14. Relationship between intracranial internal carotid artery calcification and enlarged cerebral perivascular space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Xiao-Xiao [Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Shanghai (China); The First People' s Hospital of Wenling, Department of Neurology, Wenling (China); Li, Ge-Fei; Wu, Yi-Lan; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Zhao, Ying; Shi, Yan-Hui; Zhuang, Mei-Ting; Hou, Tian-Yu; Zhao, Rong; Liu, Feng-Di; Wang, Xue-Mei; Shen, Ying; Cui, Guo-Hong; Su, Jing-Jing; Chen, Wei [Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Shanghai (China); Tang, Xue-Mei; Sun, Ji; Liu, Jian-Ren [Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Shanghai (China)

    2017-06-15

    The association between intracranial internal carotid artery (IICA) calcification and lacunes, white matter hyperintensity (WMH), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) has been well researched. However, enlarged cerebral perivascular space (PVS) has not yet been reported to correlate with intracranial internal carotid artery calcification. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between IICA calcification and enlarged PVS. A total of 189 patients with ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory who presented within 7 days of ictus from 2012 to 2015 were enrolled respectively. All patients were required to have undergone head computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, or computed tomography angiography. Clinical characteristics were recorded. IICA calcification and enlarged PVS were semi-quantitatively evaluated, and the presence of lacunes, WMH, and CMBs was recorded. Of the 189 patients, 63.5% were male. Mean age of the patients was 68.6 ± 12.2 years. There were 104 patients with IICA calcification. Age, diabetes mellitus, lacunes, and white matter hyperintensity were significantly associated with IICA calcification (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age, diabetes mellitus, and lacunes were independent predictors of IICA calcification (P < 0.05). A lower risk of IICA calcification was found in patients with a higher enlarged PVS score (P = 0.004). Higher enlarged PVS scores were associated with a lesser degree of IICA calcification. There appears to be a relationship between reduced risk of IICA calcification and enlarged PVS. (orig.)

  15. Ictal time-irreversible intracranial EEG signals as markers of the epileptogenic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Kaspar; Rummel, Christian; Andrzejak, Ralph G; Goodfellow, Marc; Zubler, Frédéric; Abela, Eugenio; Wiest, Roland; Pollo, Claudio; Steimer, Andreas; Gast, Heidemarie

    2016-09-01

    To show that time-irreversible EEG signals recorded with intracranial electrodes during seizures can serve as markers of the epileptogenic zone. We use the recently developed method of mapping time series into directed horizontal graphs (dHVG). Each node of the dHVG represents a time point in the original intracranial EEG (iEEG) signal. Statistically significant differences between the distributions of the nodes' number of input and output connections are used to detect time-irreversible iEEG signals. In 31 of 32 seizure recordings we found time-irreversible iEEG signals. The maximally time-irreversible signals always occurred during seizures, with highest probability in the middle of the first seizure half. These signals spanned a large range of frequencies and amplitudes but were all characterized by saw-tooth like shaped components. Brain regions removed from patients who became post-surgically seizure-free generated significantly larger time-irreversibilities than regions removed from patients who still had seizures after surgery. Our results corroborate that ictal time-irreversible iEEG signals can indeed serve as markers of the epileptogenic zone and can be efficiently detected and quantified in a time-resolved manner by dHVG based methods. Ictal time-irreversible EEG signals can help to improve pre-surgical evaluation in patients suffering from pharmaco-resistant epilepsies. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A multicentre randomized controlled trial of moderate hypothermia to prevent intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Murphy, Nicholas; Brown, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Animal models and human case series of acute liver failure (ALF) suggest moderate hypothermia (MH) to have protective effects against cerebral oedema (CO) development and intracranial hypertension (ICH). However, the optimum temperature for patient management is unknown...... by sealed envelope to targeted temperature management (TTM) groups of 34°C (MH) or 36°C (control) for a period of 72h. Investigators were not blinded to group assignment. The primary outcome was a sustained elevation in ICP >25mmHg, with secondary outcomes the occurrence of predefined serious adverse...

  17. Assessment of the usability of a digital learning technology prototype for monitoring intracranial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Regina de Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the usability of a digital learning technology prototype as a new method for minimally invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure. Method: descriptive study using a quantitative approach on assessing the usability of a prototype based on Nielsen's ten heuristics. Four experts in the area of Human-Computer interaction participated in the study. Results: the evaluation delivered eight violated heuristics and 31 usability problems in the 32 screens of the prototype. Conclusion: the suggestions of the evaluators were critical for developing an intuitive, user-friendly interface and will be included in the final version of the digital learning technology.

  18. Intracranial hemorrhage in congenital bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibian, Shadi; Motlagh, Hoda; Naderi, Majid; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2018-01-01

    : Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), as a life-threatening bleeding among all kinds of congenital bleeding disorders (CBDs), is a rare manifestation except in factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency, which is accompanied by ICH, early in life, in about one-third of patients. Most inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) are mild to moderate bleeding disorders that can never experience a severe bleeding as in ICH; however, Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, a common and severe inherited platelet function disorder, can lead to ICH and occasional death. This bleeding feature can also be observed in grey platelet syndrome, though less frequently than in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. In hemophilia, intracerebral hemorrhage is affected by various risk factors one of which is the severity of the disease. The precise prevalence of ICH in these patients is not clear but an estimated incidence of 3.5-4% among newborns with hemophilia is largely ascertained. Although ICH is a rare phenomenon in CBDs, it can be experienced by every patient with severe hemophilia A and B, FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), FVIID, FXD, FVD, FIID, and afibrinogenemia. Upon observing the general signs and symptoms of ICH such as vomiting, seizure, unconsciousness, and headache, appropriate replacement therapies and cranial ultrasound scans must be done to decrease ICH-related morbidity and mortality.

  19. A case of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Masami; Tanji, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masakazu

    1981-01-01

    Intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is very rare, only 14 cases being reported in Europe and in the United States of America. Recently we experienced a case in which the follow-up indicating computed tomograms (CT) demonstrated interesting data on the radiosensitivity of this tumor. The patient, a 14-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with the complaint of left hemiplegia which had gradually progressed. CT revealed an area spreading upward from the right median base of the skull and consisted of two components showing (A) a density as high as that of calcium and (B) a density higher than that of surrounding brain tissue, but much lower than that of calcium. Temporoparietal craniotomy was performed to resect approximately one-half of the tumor. Histological finding revealed mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. The component-A was though to be a cartilaginous tissue, and-B to be an undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue. Postoperative irradiation of 7,000 rad was initiated. The effect of radiotherapy as seen on computed tomograms is as follows, (1) decrease in the volume of the tumor by 26%, (2) decrease in density and enhancement of the area which is considered to be the undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, (3) mild reduction of the area which is considered to be the caltilaginous tissue, and (4) a very high density of the entire tumor similar in degree to that of the bone one year later. These results suggested that radiotherapy is effective for this tumor. (author)

  20. Intracranial meningiomas after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffer, D.; Gomori, J.M.; Siegal, T.; Shalit, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Three patients who presented with intracranial meningiomas 12, 15, and 20 years, respectively, after therapeutic high-dose irradiation of a primary brain tumor are described. Analysis of these cases and similar documented cases suggests that meningiomas after high-dose irradiation constitute a recognizable entity. Patients with such tumors received radiation therapy at a young age (mean age, 9.4 years). After a latent period of 2 to 47 years (mean, 19.8 years) they developed meningiomas at the site of irradiation, at a much younger age than patients with ''spontaneous'' meningiomas. Similar to the situation with meningiomas after low-dose irradiation, a relatively high proportion of meningiomas induced by high-dose irradiation tend to be malignant and biologically aggressive. A very young age at the time of irradiation seems to predispose to the induction of malignant meningiomas, rather than benign tumors. These unusual features provide indirect evidence that high-dose radiation may play a role in the pathogenesis of meningiomas.41 references

  1. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A typical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algahtani, Hussein A.; Obeid, Tahir H.; Abuzinadah, Ahmad R.; Baeesa, Saleh S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to describe the clinical features of 5 patients with rare atypical presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), and propose the possible mechanism of this atypical presentation. We carried out a retrospective study of 5 patients, admitted at King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with IIH during the period from January 2001 to December 2005. All were females with their age ranges from 24 to 40 years. The clinical presentations, the laboratory and imaging studies were analyzed. The opening pressures of the lumbar puncture tests were documented. All patients were presented with headache. One had typical pain of trigeminal neuralgia and one with neck pain and radiculopathy. Facial diplegia was present in one patient and two patients had bilateral 6th cranial neuropathy. Papilledema was present in all patients except in one patient. Imaging study was normal in all patients, and they had a very high opening pressure during lumbar puncture, except in one patient. All patients achieved full recovery with medical therapy in 6 to 12 weeks with no relapse during the mean follow up of 2 years. Atypical finding in IIH are rare and require a high index of suspicion for early diagnosis. (author)

  2. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depreitere, Bart; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Güiza, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The literature on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in meningitis is limited to case reports and a handful of descriptive series. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships among ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and outcome in meningitis and to identify whether ICP affected clinical decisions. Between 1999 and 2011, a total of 17 patients with meningitis underwent ICP monitoring at the University Hospitals Leuven. Charts were reviewed for clinical history, ICP/CPP data, imaging findings, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Univariate correlations were computed for outcome and ICP/CPP variables, computed tomography characteristics, and Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head Injury outcome model variables. Treatment decisions were assessed regarding whether or not they were based on ICP. At drain placement, Glasgow Coma Scale scores showed a median of 8 (range 3-12). Six of 17 patients had either one or two nonreactive pupils. Significant correlations with outcome were found for the highest documented ICP value (r = -0.70), the number of episodes when CPP meningitis high ICP and low CPP represent secondary insults. The poor condition of the patients illustrates that the level of suspicion for increased ICP in meningitis may not be high enough.

  3. Suppurative intracranial processes in 15 domestic ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Lopes Câmara

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In addition to listeriosis which is relatively common in ruminants, there are three other uncommon suppurative intracranial processes (SIP identifiable in adult ungulates as brain abscess, basilar empyema and suppurative meningitis. The present paper reports the epidemiological, clinical, laboratorial, pathological and microbiological findings of 15 domestic ruminants with SIP. A total of 15 animals were selected (eight sheep, four cattle and three goats; with the definitive diagnoses of basilar empyema (n=3, brain abscess (n=1, listeriosis (n=5 and suppurative meningitis (n=6. Hematology revealed leukocytosis with inversion of the lymphocyte/ neutrophil ratio in 4 cases. In the majority of animals, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF presented light yellow coloration and cloudy aspect due to neutrophilic pleocytosis (15 - 997 leukocytes/µL. Microbiological culture of CSF or central nervous system (CNS fragments resulted on isolation of Trueperella (Arcanobacterium pyogenes,Listeria monocytogenes,Escherichia coli and Stenotrophomonas sp. In a goat with thalamic abscess, microbiological assay was not performed, but Gram positive bacilli type bacteria were observed in histology. The diagnosis of these outbreaks was based on the association of epidemiological, clinical, pathological and bacteriological findings; reiterating that the infectious component remains an important cause of CNS disease in domestic ruminants and also shows the need for dissemination of information about the most effective preventive measures for the ranchers.

  4. MRI of intracranial germ-cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, L.; Korogi, Y.; Sugahara, T.; Ikushima, I.; Shigematsu, Y.; Okuda, T.; Takahashi, M.; Kochi, M.; Ushio, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. Our aim was to review the MRI appearances of primary intracranial germ-cell tumours (GCT). We reviewed the MRI studies of 32 patients: 19 with germinomas, five with teratomas, one with an embryonal carcinoma, five with mixed and two with malignant nongerminomatous GCT. Eleven were in the pineal region, 12 suprasellar, five in the both sites, two in the basal ganglia and two in the corpus callosum. Contrast-enhanced images were available for 27 patients. The solid parts of GCT were nearly isointense with grey matter on both T1- and T2-weighted images. In seven patients with nongerminomatous GCT high-signal components were found on T1-weighted images, representing haemorrhage, high-protein fluid or fat. Cystic components were detected in 17 of 27 patients; eight germinomas and all nine nongerminomatous GCT had cysts. The solid components of germinomas enhanced homogeneously in eight cases and heterogeneously in 10, while all nongerminomatous GCT showed heterogeneous enhancement. MRI features tumours can facilitate correct diagnosis of GCT, including histological subtypes. (orig.)

  5. Intracranial Fluid Redistribution During a Spaceflight Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Pasternak, Ofer; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Wood, Scott J.; Riascos, Roy; Reuter-Lorenz, Patrica A.; Kofman, Igor S.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2017-01-01

    The neural correlates of spaceflight-induced sensorimotor impairments are unknown. Head down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) serves as a microgravity analog because it mimics the headward fluid shift and limb unloading of spaceflight. We investigated focal brain white matter (WM) changes and fluid shifts during 70 days of 6 deg HDBR in 16 subjects who were assessed pre (2x), during (3x), and post-HDBR (2x). Changes over time were compared to those in control subjects (n=12) assessed four times over 90 days. Diffusion MRI was used to assess WM microstructure and fluid shifts. Free-Water Imaging, derived from diffusion MRI, was used to quantify the distribution of intracranial extracellular free water (FW). Additionally, we tested whether WM and FW changes correlated with changes in functional mobility and balance measures. HDBR resulted in FW increases in fronto-temporal regions and decreases in posterior-parietal regions that largely recovered by two weeks post-HDBR. WM microstructure was unaffected by HDBR. FW decreased in the post-central gyrus and precuneus. We previously reported that gray matter increases in these regions were associated with less HDBR-induced balance impairment, suggesting adaptive structural neuroplasticity. Future studies are warranted to determine causality and underlying mechanisms.

  6. Pulsatile flow effects on the hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trung B; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-11-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations are carried out to systematically investigate the effect of the incoming flow waveform on the hemodynamics and wall shear stress patterns of an anatomic sidewall intracranial aneurysm model. Various wave forms are constructed by appropriately scaling a typical human waveform such that the waveform maximum and time-averaged Reynolds numbers, the Womersley number (α), and the pulsatility index (PI) are systematically varied within the human physiologic range. We show that the waveform PI is the key parameter that governs the vortex dynamics across the aneurysm neck and the flow patterns within the dome. At low PI, the flow in the dome is similar to a driven cavity flow and is characterized by a quasi-stationary shear layer that delineates the parent artery flow from the recirculating flow within the dome. At high PI, on the other hand, the flow is dominated by vortex ring formation, transport across the neck, and impingement and breakdown at the distal wall of the aneurysm dome. We further show that the spatial and temporal characteristics of the wall shear stress field on the aneurysm dome are strongly correlated with the vortex dynamics across the neck. We finally argue that the ratio between the characteristic time scale of transport by the mean flow across the neck and the time scale of vortex ring formation can be used to predict for a given sidewall aneurysm model the critical value of the waveform PI for which the hemodynamics will transition from the cavity mode to the vortex ring mode.

  7. Assessment of intracranial metastases from neuroendocrine tumors/carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Ragab Shalaby

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common sites of origin for neuroendocrine carcinoma are gastrointestinal tract and its accessory glands, and lungs. Materials and Methods: One-hundred fifty cases diagnosed with metastatic brain lesions were retrieved from hospital records within 5 years. For these cases, the primary neoplasm, histopathological classification, metastasis, treatment, and fate all were studied. Results: Intracranial deposits were detected in 10%. The primary lesion was in the lungs in 87% of patients, and 1 patient in the breast and 1 in esophagus. Pathological classification of the primary lesion was Grade 2 (MIB-1: 3–20% in 1 patient and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MIB-1: ≥21% in 14 patients. The median period from onset of the primary lesion up to diagnosis of brain metastasis was 12.8 months. About 33% of patients had a single metastasis whereas 67% patients had multiple metastases. Brain metastasis was extirpated in 33% of patients. Stereotactic radiotherapy alone was administered in 20% of patients, and brain metastasis was favorably controlled in most of the patients with coadministration of cranial irradiation as appropriate. The median survival period from diagnosis of brain metastasis was 8.1 months. Conclusion: Most of patients with brain metastasis from neuroendocrine carcinoma showed the primary lesion in the lungs, and they had multiple metastases to the liver, lymph nodes, bones, and so forth at the time of diagnosis of brain metastasis. The guidelines for accurate diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine carcinoma should be immediately established based on further analyses of those patients with brain metastasis.

  8. Valid and efficient manual estimates of intracranial volume from magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasson, Niklas; Olsson, Erik; Rudemo, Mats; Eckerström, Carl; Malmgren, Helge; Wallin, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Manual segmentations of the whole intracranial vault in high-resolution magnetic resonance images are often regarded as very time-consuming. Therefore it is common to only segment a few linearly spaced intracranial areas to estimate the whole volume. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate how the validity of intracranial volume estimates is affected by the chosen interpolation method, orientation of the intracranial areas and the linear spacing between them. Intracranial volumes were manually segmented on 62 participants from the Gothenburg MCI study using 1.5 T, T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance images. Estimates of the intracranial volumes were then derived using subsamples of linearly spaced coronal, sagittal or transversal intracranial areas from the same volumes. The subsamples of intracranial areas were interpolated into volume estimates by three different interpolation methods. The linear spacing between the intracranial areas ranged from 2 to 50 mm and the validity of the estimates was determined by comparison with the entire intracranial volumes. A progressive decrease in intra-class correlation and an increase in percentage error could be seen with increased linear spacing between intracranial areas. With small linear spacing (≤15 mm), orientation of the intracranial areas and interpolation method had negligible effects on the validity. With larger linear spacing, the best validity was achieved using cubic spline interpolation with either coronal or sagittal intracranial areas. Even at a linear spacing of 50 mm, cubic spline interpolation on either coronal or sagittal intracranial areas had a mean absolute agreement intra-class correlation with the entire intracranial volumes above 0.97. Cubic spline interpolation in combination with linearly spaced sagittal or coronal intracranial areas overall resulted in the most valid and robust estimates of intracranial volume. Using this method, valid ICV estimates could be obtained in less than five

  9. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dydensborg Sander, Stine; Størdal, Ketil; Plato Hansen, Tine

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease......-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports...... on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. RESULTS: We identified 2,247 children who were...

  10. Modeling Cyclic Variation of Intracranial Pressure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daley, M

    2001-01-01

    ...) recording during mechanical ventilation are due to cyclic extravascular compressional modulation primarily of the cerebral venous bed, an established isovolumetric model of cerebrospinal fluid...

  11. Micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiong; Yao Yan; Ma Jiahao; Zhang Zhaohua; Zhang Yanhang; Wang Qian; Ren Tianling

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement which belongs to BioMEMS. It can be used in lumbar puncture surgery to measure intracranial pressure. Miniaturization is key for lumbar puncture surgery because the sensor must be small enough to allow it be placed in the reagent chamber of the lumbar puncture needle. The size of the sensor is decided by the size of the sensor chip and package. Our sensor chip is based on silicon piezoresistive effect and the size is 400 × 400 μm 2 . It is much smaller than the reported polymer intracranial pressure sensors such as liquid crystal polymer sensors. In terms of package, the traditional dual in-line package obviously could not match the size need, the minimal size of recently reported MEMS-based intracranial pressure sensors after packaging is 10 × 10 mm 2 . In this work, we are the first to introduce a quad flat no-lead package as the package form of piezoresistive intracranial pressure sensors, the whole size of the sensor is minimized to only 3 × 3 mm 2 . Considering the liquid measurement environment, the sensor is gummed and waterproof performance is tested; the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.9 × 10 −2 mV/kPa. (paper)

  12. IDIOPATHIC INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN A WOMAN WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan N. Dimitrov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH or benign intracranial hypertension is a neurological syndrome characterized by elevated intracranial pressure. This uncommon disorder occurs primarily in obese women aged 10 to 50 years, sometimes in association with endocrine and metabolic dysfunction, with systemic diseases or when treated with multiple medications. We describe a case of IIH in a 43-year-old woman with schizophrenia treated with risperidone, demonstrating a typical clinical picture of benign intracranial hypertension. For the 5 years of treatment with risperidone she put on 35 kg in total (BMI> 35; for the last 2-3 months she began to complain of visual obscurations, nausea with vomiting. Ophthalmoscopy revealed bilateral asymmetric papilledema (OD>OS. Magnetic resonance imaging was normal, intracranial pressure was elevated IIH was diagnosed. Risperidone was discontinued and replaced with Seroquel 200 mg daily. Treatment with furosemide and mannitol 10 % was initiated. Papilledema resolved completely over the next 2 months. The patient was followed-up for four years after risperidone withdrawal. Weight loss of 28 kg was noted for four years. There were no relapses of headache, nausea, visual obscuration. Ophthalmologic examination revealed no papilledema.We suggest that prolonged use of antipsychotics, such as risperidone, should require proper surveillance for possible development of IIH and routine ophthalmologic examinations should be performed.

  13. Intracranial hemorrhage: principles of CT and MRI interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizel, P.M.; Makkat, S.; Miert, E. van; Goethem, J.W. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Schepper, A.M. de

    2001-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage represents a frequent challenge for the practicing radiologist. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a synoptic overview of the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage, using text, tables, and figures to illustrate time-dependent changes. We examine the underlying physical, biological, and biochemical factors of evolving hematoma and correlate them with the aspect on cross-sectional imaging techniques. On CT scanning, the appearance of intracranial blood is determined by density changes which occur over time, reflecting clot formation, clot retraction, clot lysis and, eventually, tissue loss. However, MRI has become the technique of choice for assessing the age of an intracranial hemorrhage. On MRI the signal intensity of intracranial hemorrhage is much more complex and is influenced by multiple variables including: (a) age, location, and size of the lesion; (b) technical factors (e.g., sequence type and parameters, field strength); and (c) biological factors (e.g., pO2, arterial vs venous origin, tissue pH, protein concentration, presence of a blood-brain barrier, condition of the patient). We discuss the intrinsic magnetic properties of sequential hemoglobin degradation products. The differences in evolution between extra- and intracerebral hemorrhages are addressed and illustrated. (orig.)

  14. INTRACRANIAL STENOSIS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zarei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    INTRODUCTION: This study was conducted to investigate pattern and risk factors associated with the location of atherosclerotic occlusive lesions in cerebral vessels. Previous studies of patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA suggest that extracranial atherosclerosis is more common in the white race. Noninvasive techniques such as duplex ultrasound, transcranial Doppler (TCD, and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA allow vascular assessment of a more representative proportion of the patients, compared to conventional angiography alone.    METHODS: We evaluated patients with cerebrovascular problems (stroke and/or TIA during a period of 6 months, using duplex ultrasonography, TCD and MRA to detect significant stenosis according to standard criteria.    RESULTS: Stenosis of extracranial and intracranial arteries was detected in 38% and 29% of cases, respectively. MCA was the most frequent involved intracranial artery (11% bilaterally and 5% unilaterally. Intracranial lesions tend to be multiple. There was no significant difference between men and women in terms of frequency and distribution of stenosis. No correlation was found between opium use and stenosis. The women had significantly more poor windows than men (P<0.05. The extracranial stenosis was significantly more frequent than intracranial stenosis (P<0.01.    CONCLUSION: The relations between hypertension and extracranial stenosis, and diabetes and MCA stenosis were statistically significant. TCD seemed to be a better technique for evaluating intracranial lesions in men than in women.      Keywords: Atherosclerosis, Stenosis, Carotid artery, Doppler Sonography.  

  15. Pediatric Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Presenting With Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, Sietze; Stokroos, Robert; Weber, Jacobiene W; van Tongeren, Joost

    2015-12-01

    To present the rare case of a young boy with idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss developing over several months. This was accompanied by headaches, otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo. Furthermore, we aim to provide a concise review on this matter, as this report represents the second case in literature of pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with hearing loss. Workup of a 9-year-old boy with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, including (among others) physical examination, audiometry, diagnostic imaging, and lumbar puncture. Physical examination including fundoscopy as well as imaging showed no abnormalities. At presentation, pure tone audiometry revealed bone conduction thresholds of about 30 dB HL in both ears. Two months later, this declined to about 35 dB HL in both ears. Lumbar puncture revealed an increased intracranial pressure. The boy was thus diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. After the lumbar puncture, the otological complaints gradually resolved, and the hearing normalized (bone conduction thresholds of 0-5 dB HL). Although rare, sensorineural hearing loss in the pediatric population together with otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo can be due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and as such can be reversible. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Headaches caused by decreased intracranial pressure: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokri, Bahram

    2003-06-01

    More patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension are now being diagnosed, and it is realized that most cases result from spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. A broader clinical and imaging spectrum of the disorder is recognized. This paper reviews new insights into the variability of clinical manifestations, imaging features, etiological factors, anatomy of leaks, and implications of these in patient management. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension should not be equated with post-lumbar puncture headaches. In a substantial minority of patients, headaches are not orthostatic and may mimic other types of headache. Additional diverse neurological manifestations may dominate the clinical picture and patients may occasionally have no headache at all. Reports on unusual presentations of the disorder continue to appear in the literature. Furthermore, additional imaging features of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are recognized. High-flow and slow-flow leaks may present diagnostic challenges, and require modification of diagnostic studies aimed at locating the site of the leak. Stigmata of connective tissue abnormality, especially abnormalities of fibrillin and elastin, are seen in a notable minority of patients, pointing to weakness of the dural sac as one of the etiological factors. After treatment of spontaneous intracranial hypotension, surgically or by epidural blood patch, a rebound and self-limiting intracranial hypertension may sometimes develop. In the past decade, interest in spontaneous intracranial hypotension has been rekindled, with a substantial growth of knowledge on various aspects of the disorder. We are in the learning phase, and new information will probably appear in the future, with notable diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  17. Sinusitis and intracranial sepsis: the CT imaging and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxton, V.J.; Boldt, D.W.; Shield, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    The CT imaging and clinical presentation in 14 children with coexistent intracranial sepsis and sinusitis were reviewed. A routine CT head scan (10-mm thick semi-axial slices through the cranium done before and after intravenous contrast medium administration) was found to be an inadequate initial investigation as the intracranial collection was missed in four patients and the abnormal sinuses not shown in six. In half the children the dagnosis of sinusitis was unsuspected at the time of admission. The dominant clinical features were fever, intense headache and facial swelling in early adolescent males. In this clinical setting we recommend: (1) The routine scan is extended through the frontal and ethmoidal sinuses and photographed at a window level and width showing both bone detail and air/soft tissue interfaces; (2) direct coronal projections are performed through the anterior cranial fossa if no collection is seen on the routine study; (3) an early repeat scan within 48 h if the initial study shows no intracranial pathology but the fronto-ethomoidal sinuses are abnormal and there is a high clinical supicion of intracranial sepsis; and (4) in the presence of intracranial sepsis the vault is viewed at bone window settings to exclude cranial osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  18. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Navajas, Joaquín; Mender, Bedeho M W; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw. A camera mounted on the head captured images of the hand and jigsaw, while eye movements were recorded using an eye-tracking device. This combination of data allowed us to reconstruct the retinal images seen as humans undertook the jigsaw task. These retinal images were then fed into the neural network model during self-organization of its synaptic connectivity using a biologically plausible trace learning rule. A trace learning mechanism encourages neurons in the model to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur in close temporal proximity. In the data recorded from human subjects, we found that the participant's gaze often shifted through a sequence of locations around a fixed spatial configuration of the hand and one of the jigsaw pieces. In this case, trace learning should bind these retinal images together onto the same subset of output neurons. The simulation results consequently confirmed that some cells learned to respond selectively to the hand and a jigsaw piece in a fixed spatial configuration across different retinal views.

  19. Intracranial meningiomas managed at Memfys hospital for neurosurgery in Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezue, Wilfred C; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C; Ndubuisi, Chika C; Chikani, Mark C; Achebe, David S

    2012-09-01

    The epidemiology and pathology of meningioma in Nigeria are still evolving and little has been published about this tumor in Nigeria, especially in the southeast region. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of intracranial meningioma managed in our center with the pattern reported in the literature worldwide. Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial meningioma between January 2002 and December 2010 at a Private neurosurgery Hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. We excluded patients whose histology results were inconclusive. Meningiomas constituted 23.8% of all intracranial tumors seen in the period. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The peak age range for males and females were in the fifth and sixth decades, respectively. The most common location is the Olfactory groove in 26.5% of patients followed by convexity in 23.5%. Presentation varied with anatomical location of tumor. Patients with olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) mostly presented late with personality changes and evidence of raised ICP. Tuberculum sellar and sphenoid region tumors presented earlier with visual impairment with or without hormonal abnormalities. Seizures occurred in 30.9% of all patients and in 45% of those with convexity meningiomas. Only 57.4% of the patients were managed surgically and there was no gender difference in this group. WHO grade1 tumors were the most common histological types occurring in 84.6%. One patient had atypical meningioma and two had anaplastic tumors. The pattern of meningioma in our area may have geographical differences in location and histology. Childhood meningioma was rare.

  20. The Significance of Arachnoid Granulation in Patients With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watane, Gaurav Vishwasrao; Patel, Bhumi; Brown, Derek; Taheri, M Reza

    The aim of this article was to study the significance of arachnoid granulations (AGs) in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). In an institutional review board-approved retrospective chart review study, 79 patients with clinical diagnosis of idiopathic increased intracranial pressure were compared with 63 patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Inclusion criteria also included available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, older than 18 years, and female sex. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure due to other causes were excluded. The electronic medical records were mined for presence of the following: body mass index, age, headache, vision changes, tinnitus, and vertigo. The MRI of the brain was reviewed for the presence of the following features: empty sella, prominent cerebrospinal fluid space in the optic sheaths, tortuosity of the optic nerves and enlarged Meckel cave. In addition, the number, size, and location of AGs associated with major venous drainage sinuses were documented in all patients. Using statistical analysis, association between various imaging and clinical signs were evaluated. The association between AG and various imaging and clinical signs were evaluated. The percentage of patients with AG were significantly higher in patients with IIH. Patients with IIH tended to have 0 to 3 AG. The most common imaging findings observed in MRI of the brain of patients with IIH were empty sella and prominent cerebrospinal fluid space in the optic sheaths. The prevalence of these MRI findings in patients with IIH was inversely proportional to the number of AG. A similar inverse trend was also noted with the opening pressure of patients with IIH and number of AG. The study establishes that there is a relationship between presence of AG and IIH. Arachnoid granulation seems to act in a compensatory mechanism in patients with IIH.

  1. Intracranial meningiomas managed at Memfys hospital for neurosurgery in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred C Mezue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The epidemiology and pathology of meningioma in Nigeria are still evolving and little has been published about this tumor in Nigeria, especially in the southeast region. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of intracranial meningioma managed in our center with the pattern reported in the literature worldwide. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial meningioma between January 2002 and December 2010 at a Private neurosurgery Hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. We excluded patients whose histology results were inconclusive. Results: Meningiomas constituted 23.8% of all intracranial tumors seen in the period. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The peak age range for males and females were in the fifth and sixth decades, respectively. The most common location is the Olfactory groove in 26.5% of patients followed by convexity in 23.5%. Presentation varied with anatomical location of tumor. Patients with olfactory groove meningioma (OGM mostly presented late with personality changes and evidence of raised ICP. Tuberculum sellar and sphenoid region tumors presented earlier with visual impairment with or without hormonal abnormalities. Seizures occurred in 30.9% of all patients and in 45% of those with convexity meningiomas. Only 57.4% of the patients were managed surgically and there was no gender difference in this group. WHO grade1 tumors were the most common histological types occurring in 84.6%. One patient had atypical meningioma and two had anaplastic tumors. Conclusion: The pattern of meningioma in our area may have geographical differences in location and histology. Childhood meningioma was rare.

  2. Analysis of cerebral blood flow and intracranial hypertension in critical patients with non-hepatic hyperammonemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larangeira, Alexandre Sanches; Tanita, Marcos Toshiyuki; Dias, Marcos Antonio; Filho, Olavo Franco Ferreira; Delfino, Vinicius Daher Alvares; Cardoso, Lucienne Tibery Queiroz; Grion, Cintia Magalhães Carvalho

    2018-05-03

    Hyperammonemia in adults is generally associated with cerebral edema, decreased cerebral metabolism, and increased cerebral blood flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between non-hepatic hyperammonemia and intracranial hypertension assessed by Doppler flowmetry and measurement of the optic nerve sheath. A prospective cohort study in critically ill patients hospitalized in intensive care units of a University Hospital between March 2015 and February 2016. Clinical data and severity scores were collected and the Glasgow coma scale was recorded. Serial serum ammonia dosages were performed in all study patients. Transcranial Doppler evaluation was carried out for the first 50 consecutive results of each stratum of ammonemia: normal (<35 μmol/L), mild hyperammonemia (≥35 μmol/L and < 50 μmol/L), moderate hyperammonemia (≥50 μmol/L and < 100 μmol/L), and severe hyperammonemia (≥100 μmol/L). The measurement of the optic nerve sheath was performed at the same time as the Doppler examination if the patient scored less than 8 on the Glasgow coma scale. There was no difference in flow velocity in the cerebral arteries between patients with and without hyperammonemia. Patients with hyperammonemia presented longer ICU stay. Optic nerve sheath thickness was higher in the group with severe hyperammonemia and this group presented an association with intracranial hypertension. Higher mortality was observed in the severe hyperammonemia group. There was an association between severe hyperammonemia and signs of intracranial hypertension. No correlation was found between ammonia levels and cerebral blood flow velocity through the Doppler examination.

  3. Abnormalities of Microcirculation and Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressures in Severe Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the states of microcirculation, cerebral perfusion intracranial pressures in patients with isolated severe brain injury (SBI and to determine their possible relationships. Subjects and methods. 148 studies were performed in 16 victims with SBI. According to the outcome of brain traumatic disease, the patients were divided into two groups: 1 those who had a good outcome (n=8 and 2 those who had a fatal outcome (n=8. Microcirculation was examined by skin laser Doppler flowmetry using a LAKK-01 capillary blood flow laser analyzer (LAZMA Research-and-Production Association, Russian Federation. All the victims underwent surgical interventions to remove epi-, subdural, and intracerebral hematomas. A Codman subdural/intraparenchymatous intracranial pressure (ICD sensor (Johnson & Johnson, United Kingdom was intraoperatively inserted in the victims. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP was calculated using the generally accepted formula: CPP = MBP (mean blood pressure — ICD. ICD, CPP, and microcirculation were studied on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Their values were recorded simultaneously. Ninety and 58 studies were conducted in the group of patients with good and fatal outcomes, respectively. Results. No correlation between the changes in MBP, ICD, and microcirculatory parameters suggested that the value of ICD was determined by the nature of brain damage and it was the leading and determining indicator in the diagnosis and treatment of secondary cerebral lesions. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations directly correlated with ICD, which indicated that they might be used to evaluate cerebral perfusion and impaired cerebral circulation indirectly in victims with severe brain injury. Conclusion. The laser Doppler flowmetric technique makes it possible not only to qualitatively, but also quantitatively determine changes in the tissue blood flow system in severe brain injury. With this technique, both the local and central

  4. Chronic microelectrode investigations of normal human brain physiology using a hybrid depth electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, M A; Volkov, I O; Noh, M D; Granner, M A; Mirsky, R; Garell, P C

    1997-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have unique access to in vivo human brain tissue, and in the course of clinical treatment important scientific advances have been made that further our understanding of normal brain physiology. In the modern era, microelectrode recordings have been used to systematically investigate the cellular properties of lateral temporal cerebral cortex. The current report describes a hybrid depth electrode (HDE) recording technique that was developed to enable neurosurgeons to simultaneously investigate normal cellular physiology during chronic intracranial EEG recordings. The HDE combines microelectrode and EEG recordings sites on a single shaft. Multiple microelectrode recordings are obtained from MRI defined brain sites and single-unit activity is discriminated from these data. To date, over 60 HDEs have been placed in 20 epilepsy surgery patients. Unique physiologic data have been gathered from neurons in numerous brain regions, including amygdala, hippocampus, frontal lobe, insula and Heschl's gyrus. Functional activation studies were carried out without risking patient safety or comfort.

  5. The Early Development of Human Mirror Mechanisms: Evidence from Electromyographic Recordings at 3 and 6 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turati, Chiara; Natale, Elena; Bolognini, Nadia; Senna, Irene; Picozzi, Marta; Longhi, Elena; Cassia, Viola Macchi

    2013-01-01

    In primates and adult humans direct understanding of others' action is provided by mirror mechanisms matching action observation and action execution (e.g. Casile, Caggiano & Ferrari, 2011). Despite the growing body of evidence detailing the existence of these mechanisms in the adult human brain, their origins and early development are…

  6. Computed tomography in ruptured intracranial aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Michiyasu; Ogawa, Akira; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Komatsu, Shinro; Suzuki, Jiro.

    1983-01-01

    The differences between initial bleeding and rebleeding due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm was investigated by CT. The study included 120 cases of ruptured cerebral aneurysm; 71 cases had only one bleeding and 49 cases had rebleeding. All the cases underwent CT examinations within 2 weeks following bleeding. Subarachnoid hemorrhages were classified into three groups according to the CT findings: Diffuse high type-high density areas in the entire basal cistern; Localized high type-high density area in a restricted part of the basal cistern; and Iso or Low type-no high density areas in the basal cistern. CT scans done within 24 hours following initial bleeding showed Diffuse high type in 96% of the cases and Localized high type in 4%. On the other hand, in rebleeding cases, Diffuse high type was 50%, Localized high type 25% and Iso or Low type 25%. In rebleeding cases within three days following initial bleeding, Diffuse high type was 90% and Iso or Low type 10%. However, between day 4 and day 14, Diffuse high type was 14%, Localized high type 42% and Iso or Low type 42%. After day 15, Diffuse high type was 36%, Localized type 36% and Iso or Low type 28%. Intracerebral hematoma and/or ventricular hemorrhage secondary to ruptured aneurysms were also investigated. Following initial bleeding, 18% of cases showed intracerebral and/or ventricular hemorrhage, however, the incidence increased up to 59% in rebleeding cases. These observations indicate that the subarachnoid hemorrhage due to re-ruptured aneurysm tends to be more localized than in initial bleeding cases and that intracerebral and/or ventricular hemorrhage seems more frequent in rebleeding cases. (author)

  7. Familial intracranial aneurysms: is anatomic vulnerability heritable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jason; Brown, Robert D; Moomaw, Charles J; Hornung, Richard; Sauerbeck, Laura; Woo, Daniel; Foroud, Tatiana; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Flaherty, Matthew L; Meissner, Irene; Anderson, Craig; Rouleau, Guy; Connolly, E Sander; Deka, Ranjan; Koller, Daniel L; Abruzzo, Todd; Huston, John; Broderick, Joseph P

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that family members with intracranial aneurysms (IAs) often harbor IAs in similar anatomic locations. IA location is important because of its association with rupture. We tested the hypothesis that anatomic susceptibility to IA location exists using a family-based IA study. We identified all affected probands and first-degree relatives (FDRs) with a definite or probable phenotype in each family. We stratified each IA of the probands by major arterial territory and calculated each family's proband-FDR territory concordance and overall contribution to the concordance analysis. We then matched each family unit to an unrelated family unit selected randomly with replacement and performed 1001 simulations. The median concordance proportions, odds ratios (ORs), and P values from the 1001 logistic regression analyses were used to represent the final results of the analysis. There were 323 family units available for analysis, including 323 probands and 448 FDRs, with a total of 1176 IAs. IA territorial concordance was higher in the internal carotid artery (55.4% versus 45.6%; OR, 1.54 [1.04-2.27]; P=0.032), middle cerebral artery (45.8% versus 30.5%; OR, 1.99 [1.22-3.22]; P=0.006), and vertebrobasilar system (26.6% versus 11.3%; OR, 2.90 [1.05-8.24], P=0.04) distributions in the true family compared with the comparison family. Concordance was also higher when any location was considered (53.0% versus 40.7%; OR, 1.82 [1.34-2.46]; PIA development, we found that IA territorial concordance was higher when probands were compared with their own affected FDRs than with comparison FDRs, which suggests that anatomic vulnerability to IA formation exists. Future studies of IA genetics should consider stratifying cases by IA location.

  8. Routine intracranial pressure monitoring in acute coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Rob J; Raper, Joseph; Todhunter, Emma

    2015-11-02

    We know that the brain damage resulting from traumatic and other insults is not due solely to the direct consequences of the primary injury. A significant and potentially preventable contribution to the overall morbidity arises from secondary hypoxic-ischaemic damage. Brain swelling accompanied by raised intracranial pressure (ICP) prevents adequate cerebral perfusion with well-oxygenated blood.Detection of raised ICP could be useful in alerting clinicians to the need to improve cerebral perfusion, with consequent reductions in brain injury. To determine whether routine ICP monitoring in severe coma of any cause reduces the risk of all-cause mortality or severe disability at final follow-up. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL Plus, ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED & CPCI-S), clinical trials registries and reference lists. We ran the most recent search on 22 May 2015. All randomised controlled studies of real-time ICP monitoring by invasive or semi-invasive means in acute coma (traumatic or non-traumatic aetiology) versus clinical care without ICP monitoring (that is, guided only by clinical or radiological inference of the presence of raised ICP). Two authors (ET and RF) worked independently to identify the one study that met inclusion criteria. JR and RF independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors for additional information, including details of methods and outcome data. One randomized controlled trial (RCT) meeting the selection criteria has been identified to date.The included study had 324 participants. We judged risk of bias to be low for all categories except blinding of participants and personnel, which is not feasible for this intervention. There were few missing data, and we analysed all on an intention-to-treat basis.Participants could be 13 years of age or older (mean age of sample 29

  9. Common variants at 6q22 and 17q21 are associated with intracranial volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arfan Ikram, M.; Fornage, M.; Smith, A.V.; Seshadri, S.; Schmidt, R.; Debette, S.; Vrooman, H.A.; Sigurdsson, S.; Ropele, S.; Taal, H.R.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Coker, L.H.; Longstreth, Jr. W.T.; Niessen, W.J.; DeStefano, A.L.; Beiser, A.; Zijdenbos, A.P.; Struchalin, M.; Jack, C.R.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Knopman, D.S.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Pennell, C.E.; Thiering, E.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Hakonarson, H.; Heinrich, J.; Palmer, L.J.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; McCarthy, M.I.; Grant, S.F.A.; St Pourcain, B.; Timpson, N.J.; Smith, G.D.; Sovio, U.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Groen-Blokhuis, M.M.; Hottenga, J.J.; Middeldorp, C.M.; Nivard, M.G.; Willemsen, G.; Boomsma, D.I.; Nalls, M.A.; Au, R.; Hofman, A.; Gudnason, H.; van der Lugt, A.; Harris, T.B.; Meeks, W.M.; Vernooij, M.W.; van Buchem, M.A.; Catellier, D.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Gudnason, V.; Windham, B.G.; Wolf, P.A.; van Duijn, C.M.; Mosley, T.H.; Schmidt, H.; Launer, L.J.; Breteler, M.M.B.; DeCarli, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    During aging, intracranial volume remains unchanged and represents maximally attained brain size, while various interacting biological phenomena lead to brain volume loss. Consequently, intracranial volume and brain volume in late life reflect different genetic influences. Our genome-wide

  10. Common variants at 6q22 and 17q21 are associated with intracranial volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Ikram (Arfan); M. Fornage (Myriam); G.D. Smith; S. Seshadri (Sudha); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); S. Debette (Stéphanie); H.A. Vrooman (Henri); S. Sigurdsson (Stefan); S. Ropele (Stefan); H.R. Taal (Rob); D.O. Mook-Kanamori (Dennis); L.H. Coker (Laura); W.T. Longstreth Jr; W.J. Niessen (Wiro); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); A. Beiser (Alexa); A.P. Zijdenbos; M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); D.S. Knopman (David); A.L. Hartikainen; C.E. Pennell (Craig); E. Thiering (Eelisabeth); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); J. Heinrich (Joachim); C. Palmer (Cameron); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); S.F.A. Grant (Struan); B.S. Pourcain (Beate); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); G.D. Smith; U. Sovio (Ulla); M.A. Nalls (Michael); R. Au (Rhoda); A. Hofman (Albert); H. Gudnason (Haukur); A. van der Lugt (Aad); T.B. Harris (Tamara); W.M. Meeks (William); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); D.J. Catellier (Diane); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); P.A. Wolf (Philip); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); T.H. Mosley (Thomas); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); L.J. Launer (Lenore); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); C. DeCarli (Charles); L.S. Adair (Linda); W.Q. Ang (Wei); M. Atalay (Mustafa); C.E.M. van Beijsterveldt (Toos); N.E. Bergen (Nienke); P.J. Benke (Paul); D. Berry (Diane); L. Coin (Lachlan); O.S.P. Davis (Oliver S.); P. Elliott (Paul); C. Flexeder (Claudia); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); R. Gaillard (Romy); M. Groen-Blokhuis (Maria); L.-K. Goh; C.M.A. Haworth (Claire M.); D. Hadley (David); J. Hedebrand (Johannes); A. Hinney (Anke); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); J.W. Holloway (John); J.J. Holst; J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M. Horikoshi (Momoko); V. Huikari (Ville); E. Hypponen (Elina); T.O. Kilpeläinen (Tuomas); M. Kirin (Mirna); M. Kowgier (Matthew); T.A. Lakka (Timo); L.A. Lange (Leslie); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A. Lewin (Alex); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); V. Lindi (Virpi); R. Maggi (Reedik); J.A. Marsh (Julie); C.M. Middeldorp (Christel); I.Y. Millwood (Iona); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); M. Nivard (Michel); C. Nohr (Christian); I. Ntalla (Ioanna); E. Oken (Emily); K. Panoutsopoulou (Kalliope); J. Pararajasingham (Jennifer); A. Rodriguez (Alfredo Chapin); R.M. Salem (Rany); S. Sebert (Sylvain); N. Siitonen (Niina); D.P. Strachan (David); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); B. Valcárcel (Beatriz); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); C. Cooper (Charles); M.H. Gillman (Matthew); B. Hocher (Berthold); T.A. Lakka (Timo); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); G.V. Dedoussis (George); K.K. Ong (Ken); E. Pearson (Ewan); T.S. Price (Thomas); C. Power (Christopher); O. Raitakari (Olli); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); A. Scherag (Andre); O. Simell (Olli); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); J.F. Wilson (James)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDuring aging, intracranial volume remains unchanged and represents maximally attained brain size, while various interacting biological phenomena lead to brain volume loss. Consequently, intracranial volume and brain volume in late life reflect different genetic influences. Our

  11. A hybrid clinical-research depth electrode for acute and chronic in vivo microelectrode recording of human brain neurons. Technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, M A; Volkov, I O; Granner, M A; Damasio, H M; Ollendieck, M C; Bakken, H E

    1996-01-01

    For several decades, important scientific information has been gained from in vivo microelectrode recordings of individual human cerebral cortical neurons in patients with epilepsy. The experimental methods used, however, are technically complex and require a highly skilled intraoperative team. There are also significant experimental time limitations, as well as constraints on the type of behavioral tests conducted, and the brain regions that may be safely studied. In this report, a new method is described for obtaining in vivo microelectrode recordings using a hybrid depth electrode (HDE). High-impedance research recording contacts are interspersed between low-impedance clinical electroencephalographic (EEG) contacts along the HDE shaft. The HDE has the same external physical properties as a standard clinical depth electrode (DE). Following preclinical laboratory testing, 15 HDEs were used in the evaluation of six patients with medically refractory epilepsy. High-quality EEG recordings were obtained in all cases (two acute intraoperative, four from the chronic epilepsy monitoring unit). Action potentials from individual neurons were successfully recorded during all experimental sessions; however, the chronic preparations were clearly superior. Chronic HDEs are placed using a standard stereotactic system, and the locations of recording contacts are documented on a postimplantation imaging study. The quality of the chronic research recordings was excellent over study periods ranging from 5 to 14 days. The patients rested comfortably on the ward and were able to cooperate with complex experimental instructions. Basic neuroscientists participated fully in all aspects of the chronic investigations. The use of an HDE in place of a standard clinical DE may now allow detailed physiological investigations of any brain region targeted for clinical DE implantation.

  12. Intracranial hypotension - a look beyond “bilateral subdural hematomas”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, B.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The intracranial hypotension (ICH) is a disorder due to spontaneous or iatrogenic CSF leak and a low intracranial pressure. The clinical presentation is characterized by drug resistant orthostatic headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, neck pain and etc. The intracranial hypotension is defined as a benign disorder and the treatment is predominantly conservative. Due to this fact it is very important to differentiate this entity from subdural hematomas and hygromas which are treated surgically. Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of ICH. Nowadays there are a lot of clinical and imaging features of this disorder. Regardless of clinical varieties and atypical forms, MRI gives enough information for the correct or probable diagnosis in the vast majority of the cases. The initial imaging resemblance with posttraumatic subdural hematomas and hygromas can result in giving the wrong diagnosis and therefore performing unneeded surgical interventions. the aim of this presentation is to discuss the contemporary criteria, algorithm and imaging features of ICH

  13. Proximal Limb Weakness Reverting After CSF Diversion In Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about two young girls who developed progressive visual failure secondary to increased intracranial pressure and had significant proximal muscle weakness of limbs. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP may present with "false localizing signs", besides having headache, vomiting and papilledema. Radicular pain as a manifestation of raised ICP is rare and motor weakness attributable to polyradiculopathy is exceptional. Two patients with increased intracranial pressure without lateralizing signs′ had singnificant muscle weakness. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests did not disclose any other cause for weakness. Following theco-peritoneal shunt, in both patients, there was variable recovery of vision but the proximal weakness and symptoms of elevated ICP improved rapidly. Recognition of this uncommon manifestation of raised ICP may obviate the need for unnecessary investigation and reduce morbidity due to weakness by CSF diversion procedure.

  14. Intracranial Hemorrhage Revealing Pseudohypoparathyroidism as a Cause of Fahr Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Swami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT4, low FT3, and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  15. CT diagnosis of hyperdense intracranial neoplasms. Review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Reiichi; Ando, Kumiko; Tominaga, Satoru; Nakao, Norio; Ikeda, Jouta; Takemura, Yuriko; Morikawa, Tsutomu

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to typical astrocytic tumors that show hypodense areas on computed tomographic images, some intracranial tumors show hyperdense areas on CT images. The major reasons for hyperdensity on CT images are hypercellular lesions, intratumoral calcification, and intratumoral hemorrhage. Malignant lymphomas, germinomas, and medulloblastomas show homogenous hyperdensity on CT images because of their hypercellularity. Tumorous lesions such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, central neurocytomas, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas often present with hyperdense calcified lesions on CT images. Intratumoral hemorrhage also causes hyperdensity on CT images, and is often associated with metastatic brain tumors, glioblastomas, pituitary adenomas, and rarely with any of the other intracranial tumors. Although magnetic resonance imaging is now the major diagnostic tool for diseases of the central nervous system, the first imaging studies for patients with neurologic symptoms are still CT scans. Hyperdense areas on CT images are a clue to making an accurate diagnosis of intracranial neoplasms. (author)

  16. Intracranial arterial anatomy: evaluation by computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regattieri, Neysa Aparecida Tinoco; Haetinger, Rainer Guilherme; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2010-01-01

    By many decades, the intracranial arteries study was realized exclusively by angiography through selective arterial catheterization. Nowadays, with the technologic evaluation of computerized tomography devices with multi detectors allowing acquisitions with even more thinner slices, higher speed and better resolution, it had appeared a new modality of investigation: the computed tomography angiography, less invasive and with minor morbidity than conventional arteriography. Many studies in the literature have been analyzing the sensibility of the new method for the detection of intracranial aneurysms and comparing them with the conventional arteriography. There is a necessity to recognize the normal intracranial arterial anatomy and its variations using images obtained from multiplanar reformations, in order to give important information for surgeries strategies, such as wall calcifications, aneurismatic neck position and relationships with surrounding anatomical structures. (author)

  17. Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: predictive factors of intracranial hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbos, Florent; Bertrand, Gérald; Croisille, Laure; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bierling, Philippe; Kaplan, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    In Caucasians, fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is most frequently caused by maternal alloimmunization against the human platelet antigen HPA-1a. The most serious complication of severe FNAIT is intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). ICH mainly occurs in utero; therefore, there is a need to identify noninvasive predictive factors of ICH to facilitate early identification of this condition and to determine response to maternal therapy. We studied gynecologic and immunogenetic variables of severe cases of anti-HPA-1a FNAIT within three groups: Group I, FNAIT without ICH; Group II, FNAIT with ICH; and Group III, suspected FNAIT cases without detectable maternal anti-HPA-1a alloantibodies. ICH was associated with a poor outcome because it led to death in 59% of cases. Multigravida (two or more pregnancies) was overrepresented in Group II, consistent with the high concentrations of maternal HPA-1a alloantibody and the frequent detection of a strong newborn-specific HLA class I antibody response at delivery. The proportion of HLA-DRB4*01:01P (*01:01 or *01:03) women was similar in Groups I and II, but this allele was overrepresented in Group III, in which FNAIT was less severe than in the other two groups. Finally, antenatal intravenous immunoglobulin therapy tended to be more effective in HLA-DRB3*01:01(+)/HLA-DRB4*01:01P(+) women than for HLA-DRB3*01:01(+)/HLA-DRB4*01:01P(-) women. The number of gestations is a predictive factor of ICH in anti-HPA-1a-alloimmunized women. Maternal immunogenetic variables should be investigated in the context of maternal immunization and may predict response to maternal therapy in subsequent pregnancies. © 2015 AABB.

  18. Radiation therapy for intracranial ependymomas: impact of age on outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Houng T.; Sneed, Penny K.; Wara, William M.; Edwards, Michael S.; Wilson, Charles B.; Larson, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The records of patients with intracranial ependymoma who received radiation therapy at UCSF were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the impact of Karnofsky performance status (KPS), age, histology, and treatment on outcome. Materials and Methods: Between 1978 and 1996, 45 patients with intracranial ependymoma received postoperative radiation therapy. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were calculated from the date of diagnosis. Median follow up for surviving patients was 72 months. Ages ranged from 4 months to 56 years, with a median of 8 years. The tumor was infratentorial in 35 and supratentorial in 10. All patients had either biopsy (3), subtotal resection (30), or gross total resection (12). There were 29 low grade and 16 anaplastic ependymomas. Thirty-seven patients received standard fractionation to a median dose of 54 Gy. Eight patients received hyperfractionation at 1.0 Gy BID to a median dose of 72 Gy. Thirty-eight patients had partial brain irradiation and seven had craniospinal irradiation. Twenty-three patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. For the infants ≤ 3 years old (n=12), all but one had a subtotal resection and most received chemotherapy prior to radiation therapy. Seven infants received radiation therapy at the time of disease progression and five had radiation therapy prior to progression. Most of the patients > 3 years old were irradiated prior to progression. Results: The five-year actuarial OS and PFS were 65% and 46% for the whole group. Histology and treatment factors such as extent of resection, hyperfractionation, and adjuvant chemotherapy did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, (25(45)) patients had disease progression. Only two patients failed in the brain outside the primary site. Six patients developed leptomeningeal spread (four concurrent with local failure and two subsequent to local failure). Five-year OS for patients ≤ 3 years old was 21% versus 80% for patients > 3 years old (p=0

  19. Intracranial Pressure Response to Non-Penetrating Ballistic Impact: An Experimental Study Using a Pig Physical Head Model and Live Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai; Kang, Jianyi; Chen, Jing; Li, Guanhua; Li, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the intracranial pressure response to non-penetrating ballistic impact using a "scalp-skull-brain" pig physical head model and live pigs. Forty-eight ballistic tests targeting the physical head model and anesthetized pigs protected by aramid plates were conducted with standard 9 mm bullets at low (279-297 m/s), moderate (350-372 m/s), and high (409-436 m/s) velocities. Intracranial pressure responses were recorded with pressure sensors embedded in similar brain locations in the physical head model and the anesthetized pigs. Three parameters of intracranial pressure were determined from the measured data: intracranial maximum pressure (Pmax), intracranial maximum pressure impulse (PImax), and the duration of the first positive phase (PPD). The intracranial pressure waves exhibited blast-like characteristics for both the physical model and l live pigs. Of all three parameters, Pmax is most sensitive to impact velocity, with means of 126 kPa (219 kPa), 178 kPa (474 kPa), and 241 kPa (751 kPa) for the physical model (live pigs) for low, moderate, and high impact velocities, respectively. The mean PPD becomes increasingly short as the impact velocity increases, whereas PImax shows the opposite trend. Although the pressure parameters of the physical model were much lower than those of the live pigs, good correlations between the physical model and the live pigs for the three pressure parameters, especially Pmax, were found using linear regression. This investigation suggests that Pmax is a preferred parameter for predicting the severity of the brain injury resulting from behind armor blunt trauma (BABT). PMID:23055817

  20. MR imaging of intracranial calcification; experimental and clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jong Hoon; Kim, Byung Jin; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Yang, Sung Yeul [Chonnam University Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-15

    This study was performed to evaluate MR signal intensity (SI) of calcification and to assess the capability of MRI in detection of various intracranial calcifications. The MR findings and ROI value of experimental model of calcium carbonate suspension according to each concentration (20, 35, 50%) and diameter (1-10 mm) and hydroxyapatite suspension according to each concentration (10, 20, 30, 40, 50%) were analyzed. A specimen of calcification in craniopharyngioma was analyzed for its composition by XRD (X-ray diffractometer) and ICP (inductively coupled plasma) methods. MRI of 34 patients with intracranial calcifications were retrospectively analyzed for signal intensity of the calcification and its capability to detect calcifications according to size, location, and contrast with adjacent lesion. The calcium carbonate phantom with larger diameter and low concentration showed lower signal intensity on T2 than T1WI. Hydroxyapatite phantom showed high signal intensity in 10-30% concentration and low signal intensity in 40-50% concentration on T1 weighted image. The 5 cases of 34 intracranial calcifications showed high signal intensity on T1 weighted image. The capability of MRI in the detection of intracranial calcifications decreased in the circumstances such as small size (< 2.5 mm) and intraventricular location. Although the size of calcification was small, the detection was easy in the good contrast with adjacent lesion. However, the detection of the small sized calcification was easy if the contrast with adjacent lesion was good. Intracranial calcification shows generally low signal intensity on T1 and T2 weighted image with the exception of occasional high SI on T1WI. Detection of intracranial calcification in MRI is affected by its composition, size, location, and contrast with adjacent lesion.

  1. Study on the effect of location of intracranial arterial stenosis on the safety of stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-jie SUN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of location of intracranial arterial stenosis on the safety of intracranial stenting. Methods A total of 73 patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS were divided into intracranial internal carotid artery (IICA, N = 18, middle cerebral artery (MCA-M1 segment (MCA-M1, N = 11, intracranial vertebral artery (IVA, N = 27 and basilar artery (BA, N = 17. All of them underwent intracranial stenting. The improvement of intracranial arterial stenosis, cerebrovascular complications including perforating events, artery dissection, in-stent thrombosis, distal stent arterial embolism and cerebral hyperperfusion, and neurological complications including transient ischemic attack (TIA, ischemic stroke and intracranial hemorrhage were recorded. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS was used to evaluate the prognosis 30 d after operation. Results A total of 73 stents were implanted in 73 patients (35 Apollo balloon-expandable stents and 38 Wingspan self-expandable stents. Among them, 10 cases (10/18 were treated with Apollo stents and 8 cases (8/18 with Wingspan stents in IICA group, 5 cases (5/11 were treated with Apollo stents and 6 cases (6/11 with Wingspan stents in MCA-M1 group, 16 cases (59.26%, 16/27 were treated with Apollo stents and 11 cases (40.74%, 11/27 with Wingspan stents in IVA group, and 4 cases (4/17 were treated with Apollo stents and 13 cases (13/17 with Wingspan stents in BA group. No significant difference was seen in stent type among 4 groups (χ2 = 7.422, P = 0.201. The stenosis rate of IICA group after treatment [(10.94 ± 1.99%] was significantly improved than before treatment [(90.89 ± 7.71%; t = 69.545, P = 0.000]. The stenosis rate of MCA-M1 group after treatment [(10.37 ± 2.14%] was significantly improved than before treatment [(87.64 ± 9.46%; t = 26.000, P = 0.000]. The stenosis rate of IVA group after treatment [(11.02 ± 1.99% ] was significantly improved than before

  2. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  3. Flurbiprofen and hypertension but not hydroxyethyl starch are associated with post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma requiring surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, M; Li, X; Wang, A; Zhang, L; Han, R; Gelb, A W

    2014-11-01

    Post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma is one of the most serious complications after neurosurgery. We examined whether post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma requiring surgery is associated with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs flurbiprofen, hypertension, or hydroxyethyl starch (HES). A case-control study was conducted among 42 359 patients who underwent elective craniotomy procedures at Beijing Tiantan Hospital between January 2006 and December 2011. A one-to-one control group without post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma was selected matched by age, pathologic diagnosis, tumour location, and surgeon. Perioperative blood pressure records up to the diagnosis of haematoma, the use of flurbiprofen and HES were examined. The incidence of post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma and the odds ratios for the risk factors were determined. A total of 202 patients suffered post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma during the study period, for an incidence of 0.48% (95% CI=0.41-0.55). Haematoma requiring surgery was associated with an intraoperative systolic blood pressure of >160 mm Hg (OR=2.618, 95% CI=2.084-2.723, P=0.007), an intraoperative mean blood pressure of >110 mm Hg (OR=2.600, 95% CI=2.312-3.098, P=0.037), a postoperative systolic blood pressure of >160 mm Hg (OR=2.060, 95% CI= 1.763-2.642, P=0.022), a postoperative mean blood pressure of >110 mm Hg (OR=3.600, 95% CI= 3.226-4.057, P=0.001), and the use of flurbiprofen during but not after the surgery (OR=2.256, 95% CI=2.004-2.598, P=0.005). The intraoperative infusion of HES showed no significant difference between patients who had a haematoma and those who did not. Intraoperative and postoperative hypertension and the use of flurbiprofen during surgery are risk factors for post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma requiring surgery. The intraoperative infusion of HES was not associated with a higher incidence of haematoma. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British

  4. POST-NOAC: Portuguese observational study of intracranial hemorrhage on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Matos, Cláudia; Alves, José Nuno; Marto, João Pedro; Ribeiro, Joana Afonso; Monteiro, Ana; Araújo, José; Silva, Fernando; Grenho, Fátima; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Sargento-Freitas, João; Pinho, João; Azevedo, Elsa

    2017-08-01

    Background There is a lower reported incidence of intracranial hemorrhage with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with vitamin K antagonist. However, the functional outcome and mortality of intracranial hemorrhage patients were not assessed. Aims To compare the outcome of vitamin K antagonists- and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants-related intracranial hemorrhage. Methods We included consecutive patients with acute non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage on oral anticoagulation therapy admitted between January 2013 and June 2015 at four university hospitals. Clinical and demographic data were obtained from individual medical records. Intracranial hemorrhage was classified as intracerebral, extra-axial, or multifocal using brain computed tomography. Three-month functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale. Results Among 246 patients included, 24 (9.8%) were anticoagulated with a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and 222 (90.2%) with a vitamin K antagonists. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants patients were older (81.5 vs. 76 years, p = 0.048) and had intracerebral hemorrhage more often (83.3% vs. 63.1%, p = 0.048). We detected a non-significant trend for larger intracerebral hemorrhage volumes in vitamin K antagonists patients ( p = 0.368). Survival analysis adjusted for age, CHA 2 DS 2 VASc, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation reversal revealed that non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants did not influence three-month mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.39-1.80, p = 0.638). Multivariable ordinal regression for three-month functional outcome did not show a significant shift of modified Rankin Scale scores in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants patients (odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95%CI 0.55-2.87, p = 0.585). Conclusions We detected no significant differences in the three-month outcome between non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

  5. Correlation between the clinical presentation and DSA of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chun; Hua Jia; Chen Kemin; Yin Yan; Ge Xin; Ying Yiping

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between the clinical presentation and cerebral angiographic features of intracranial aneurysms. Methods: The authors retrospectively analyzed the relationship between the size, location and shape of 48 patient's cerebral aneurysms and their clinical presentations. Results: Clinical symptoms of cerebral aneurysms were related with their size, location and shape. Aneurysms in different location or at same location may cause similar symptoms or different symptoms. Rotation DSA is a useful examination supplemented to conventional DSA. Conclusions: The relationship between the location and the presentation of intracranial aneurysms is not specific. Rotation DSA plays important role in showing the characteristics of the cerebral aneurysms

  6. Computerized tomography in the study of intracranial complications in hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaut, J.L.; Gastaut, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    CT was used to examine 100 patients with various hematologic disorders. It was generally in patients with clinical signs of encephalic alteration (68% of the cases) that we demonstrated lesions. In several cases, the lesions were detected by CT, whereas common neurological investigational methods remained negative. The most interesting findings were in acute leukemias (leucoblastic infiltrations, cerebral hemorrhages and infarctions, and iatrogenic morphologic modifications) and in Hodgkin diseases (intracranial localizations). CT permits a more complete neurologic work-up for patients with hematologic disorders and provides a better knowledge of the frequency and varieties of intracranial complications. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB [de

  7. Massive intracranial calcifications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Carvalho Neto, Arnolfo de; Ono, Sergio E.

    2004-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies usually show brain atrophy, cerebral infarction and/or intracranial bleeding. Extensive intracranial calcification in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is rare. We report a case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with seizures and massive basal ganglia calcification and mild calcifications in the frontal lobes, seen on the brain computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintensity on FLAIR images and hypointense signals on T2 * gradient echo images in the basal ganglia. (author)

  8. Intracranial neurenteric cyst: A rare cause of chemical meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseer A Choh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial neurenteric cysts are exceedingly rare congenital intracranial lesions that result from disorder of gastrulation. Still, more rarely, the cyst contents may leak into the CSF and give rise to recurrent episodes of chemical meningitis. We present a case of chemical meningitis due to a leaking posterior fossa neurenteric cyst in a young female, with emphasis on its imaging features. The final diagnosis was achieved by sufficiently characteristic imaging features; histopathologic documentation could not be achieved as the patient denied surgery.

  9. Non tumoral intracranial expansive processes: clinical tomographic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, P.; Herrera, G.; Valneica, F.

    1991-01-01

    Presentation of clinical-tomographic correlation in 111 cases of non tumoral intracranial expansive processes seen between 1984-1988 in the Hospital Cayetano Heredia (Lima, Peru). Emphasis is given fundamentally to: the importance of establishing the organicity of partial and late epilepsy; the high incidence rate of inflammatory infectious processes with CNS compromise in under developing countries; the necessity of making public the importance of two parasitic diseases in the differential diagnosis of non tumoral intracranial expansive processes: free living amebiasis, and toxoplasmosis (especially in association with AIDS). (author)

  10. Intracranial dural arterio-venous fistula presenting with progressive myelopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbonnaya, Ebere Sunny

    2011-01-01

    Spinal dural arterio-venous fistula (DAVF) is rare and usually involves the thoracic segments. The classical presentation is a slowly progressive ataxia. Clinical presentation of intracranial DAVF depends on the site of the DAVF, as well as the vessels involved. Patients may present with pulsatile tinnitus, occipital bruit, headache, dementia, visual impairment as well as neurological deterioration distant from the DAVF as a result of venous hypertension and cortical haemorrhage. The authors present a rare case of progressive myelopathy secondary to an intracranial DAVF.

  11. 111In-pentetreotide therapy in patients with inoperable benign intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minutoli, F.; Sindoni, A.; Cardile, D.; Amato, E.; Cassalia, L.; Herberg, A.; Baldari, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: in the last years Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) acquired greater importance as an alternative or complementary treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and other somatostatin receptor positive (sstr+) tumors. Many studies about PRRT using different radiopharmaceuticals, mainly 90 Y and 177 Lu (beta-emitters) labelled peptides, are reported in the literature. 177 Lu-labeled somatostatin analogues seem to be more effective because of their favourable physical properties and the better objective response. On the other hand, only few reports exist on PRRT using 111 In-Pentetreotide, an Auger-emitter. The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of 111 In-Pentetreotide therapy in patients with sstr+ inoperable benign intracranial tumors in which the use of beta-emitters radiopharmaceuticals (characterized by higher penetration range) could be unsafe and questionable since lesions were close to critical anatomical structures, such as optic chiasm or medulla oblongata. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed clinical records of 9 patients (7 Females and 2 Males) affected by sstr+ benign intracranial tumors (mean age: 58.4 years, range 50-81): 8 patients had meningiomas/meningiomatosis and 1 patient had a pituitary macroadenomas. A previous diagnostic scintigraphy with 111 In-Pentetreotide demonstrated high intralesional radiotracer uptake. All patients underwent PRRT with high therapeutic activities of 111 In-Pentetreotide (1-7 cycles, median 4 cycles, activity per cycle 3.7-7.5 GBq, median activity per cycle 7 GBq, cumulative activity range 13.7-66 GBq). Efficacy of PRRT was evaluated according to RECIST criteria. Toxicity was also assessed considering hematological parameters and GFR value estimated by renal dynamic scintigraphy. Results: no patient had acute damage. Complete response was observed in 1 patient (11.1%). Partial response was observed in 2 patients (22.2%); stable disease was observed

  12. Wingspan stent system in the treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianxiao; Li Zhaoshuo; Wang Ziliang; Xue Jiangyu; Bai Weixing; Li Li; Zhai Shuiting; Feng Yingpu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the safety, feasibility, short- and mid-term efficacy of wingspan stent for treating patients with symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis. Methods: A total of 113 patients with severe symptomatic intracranial stenosis were enrolled and Gateway-wingspan stenting were performed on all patients. The technical success, the pre- and post-stenting stenosis, perioperative complications, clinical outcome and restenosis rates were recorded, and chi-square test was used for analysis of complication rate by comparing our results with the results of Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) study and NIH multi-center Wingspan stenting trial. Results: The technical success rate was 99.1% (112/ 113). The mean pre and post-stent stenoses were (80.7±9.3)% and (27.7±9.7)% (χ 2 =9.397, P<0.05). The total complication rate was 4.4% (5/113) during the follow-up (mean 14.5 months, range 1-28 months), and the frequency of' restenosis was 12.5% (5/40) at 6 months. The primary endpoint events, ischemic stroke, and lesion-related ischemic stroke were lower in our study (4.5%, 3.5%, 3.5%) compared with the results of WASID trial (21.1%, 20.4%, 15.0%, P<0.05). For those with poor outcome in the three high-risk sub-groups which were with more than 70% stenosis, or last event from the treatment was less than 17 days, or NIHSS was above 1, a better outcome was observed in our group (4.5%, 4.7% and 2.0% in our study, 19.0%, 17.0% and 19.6% in previous study, P<0.05). The medium-term efficacy in this group (4.5%) significantly improved compared with NIH study (14.0%, P< 0.05). Conclusions: Wingspan stenting for symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis is with good safety, feasibility and low perioperative stroke rate and mortality. The incidence of primary endpoint events and the ischemic events are lower than those of medication group, and the efficacy of stenting is significantly better than medication even in high-risk population. (authors)

  13. Human or natural forcing in the geo morphological process in Pocitos and Ramirez beaches. 80 years of aero photographic records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, O.; Panario, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work is about the Ramirez and Pocitos sand-beaches evolution (Montevideo), in order to know their tendencies and the natural or anthropogenic forcing s. For this analysis were used multi temporal remote sensing, GIS (sand cycle) and historical background techniques. The data were processed by statistics, various shoreline proxy records as well as the correlations with climatic variables (precipitation, wind patterns) and Parana and Uruguay rivers flooding

  14. MRI-validation of SEP monitoring for ischemic events during microsurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayenbühl, Niklaus; Sarnthein, Johannes; Oinas, Minna; Erdem, Eren; Krisht, Ali F

    2011-09-01

    During surgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms, reduction in SEP amplitude is thought to indicate cortical ischemia and subsequent neurological deficits. Since the sensitivity of SEP is questioned, we investigated SEP with respect to post-operative ischemia. In 36 patients with 51 intracranial aneurysms, clinical evaluation and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) was performed before and within 24h after surgery. During surgery, time of temporary occlusion was recorded. MRI images were reviewed for signs of ischemia. For 43 clip applications (84%), we observed neither pathologic SEP events nor ischemia in MRI. In two cases where reduction lasted >10 min after clip release, SEP events correlated with ischemia in the MRI. Only one of the ischemic patients was symptomatic and developed a transient hemiparesis. While pathologic SEP events correlated with visible ischemia in MRI only in two cases with late SEP recovery, ischemia in MRI may have been transient or may not have reached detection threshold in the other cases, in agreement with the absence of permanent neurological deficits. In complex aneurysm cases, where prolonged temporary occlusion is expected, SEP should be used to detect ischemia at a reversible stage to improve the safety of aneurysm clipping. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Intracranial cystic lesions; Intrakranielle zystische Laesionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Goetschi, S. [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Baden (Switzerland); Shariat, K. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Winterthur (Switzerland); Ulmer, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Kiel (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    Intracerebral cysts are common findings in imaging of the neurocranium and are not always clinically significant. The pathological spectrum of intracerebral cysts is, however, very broad and in addition to incidental findings includes developmental disorders, malformation tumors, primary and secondary neoplasms and infectious etiologies, such as cerebral abscess formation, cysticercosis or residuals after congenital cytomegalovirus infections. Intracerebral cystic defects may be caused by inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) diseases, such as multiple sclerosis as well as by mitochondriopathies, leukodystrophy, electrolyte disturbances or osmotic demyelination syndrome or brain infarctions, e.g. after lacunar infarctions or as encephalomalacic changes after severe traumatic brain injury. In addition to the radiological findings of cysts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or in computed tomography (CT), the localization, patient age, patient medical history and laboratory diagnostics are helpful for the differential diagnostics. In addition to the morphological assessment, advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging for epidermoids or the use of MR spectroscopy, can provide valuable information for the differential diagnosis. Intracranial cysts can be subdivided into intraventricular and periventricular cysts, intra-axial cysts and cysts in the external fluid-filled spaces. Associated tumor nodules and the contrast medium behavior of the cyst walls and/or associated soft tissue components as well as the reaction of the adjacent parenchyma are helpful for the diagnosis and assessment. (orig.) [German] Bei der Bildgebung des Neurokraniums sind intrazerebrale Zysten haeufig und haben nicht immer einen Krankheitswert. Das Spektrum der intrazerebralen Zysten ist jedoch sehr gross und beinhaltet neben Inzidentalbefunden auch Entwicklungsstoerungen, Missbildungstumoren, primaere und sekundaere Neoplasien sowie infektiologische Ursachen, wie z. B

  16. MRI findings of intracranial cavernous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Hee; Kim, Dong Ik; Cho, Yong Kuk

    1995-01-01

    To analyze the variable MRI features and clinical significance of intracranial cavernous malformations. Forty patients(mean age 35.4) with cavernous malformation were evaluated by MRI. Eleven patients were surgically confirmed. Cavernous malformations were divided into four categories on the basis of the MR imaging characteristics, especially on T2-weighted image. Type I lesion was defined as an extralesional subacute hemorrhage outside the low signal rim, type II as an intralesional hemorrhage surrounded by low signal rim, type III lesion as an intralesional thrombosis with variegated central core surrounded by low signal rim, and type IV lesion as a focal old hemorrhagic core with small low signal intensity. Type IV was further divided into IVa and IVb, whether the lesion has small iso-or hypersignal central core (IVa) or not (IVb). Follow-up MRI was evaluated in 12 patients who were managed conservatively. Follow-up intervals ranged from 2 weeks to 29 months (mean 6 months). Total 80 lesions were detected in 40 patients. Multiple lesions were noted in 10 patients. The topography of the cavernous malformations was supratentorial in 75% and infratentorial in 23%. There were 10 lesions in type I, 15 in type II, 21 in type III, 14 in type IVa, and 20 in type IVb. Type I lesions mainly showed mass effect and edema. Type III lesions showed minimal contrast enhancements in 7 lesions on delayed images. Type II lesions showed the characteristics of both type I and type III lesions. On follow up images, decrease in size in 5, change of type in 7, rebleeding in 2 and no change in 12 lesions were demonstrated. Hemorrhage, edema and mass effect were combined in the cases of rebleeding. On follow-up study, the estimated risk of bleeding was 32.3%/person-year and 13.7%/lesion-year. Cavernous malformations show as variable appearance, on MR imaging suggesting variable stages of evolution. The MR morphologic classification and evaluation of secondary findings are helpful to

  17. Treatment of symptomatic high-grade intracranial stenoses with the balloon-expandable Pharos stent: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurre, W.; Berkefeld, J.; Mesnil de Rochemont, R. du; Sitzer, M.; Neumann-Haefelin, T.

    2008-01-01

    We report our first clinical experience with a CE-marked flexible monorail balloon-expandable stent for treatment of high-grade intracranial stenoses. Between April 2006 and November 2007 21 patients with symptomatic intracranial stenoses (>70%) were treated with the PHAROS stent. In seven patients, the procedure was performed during acute stroke intervention. Procedural success, clinical complication rates and mid-term follow-up data were prospectively recorded. During a median follow-up period of 7.3 months one additional patient died of an unknown cause 3 months after the intervention. A patient with a significant residual stenosis presented with a new stroke after further progression of the residual stenosis. None of the successfully treated patients experienced ipsilateral stroke. Recanalization of intracranial stenoses with the balloon-expandable Pharos stent is technically feasible. The periprocedural complication rate and mid-term follow-up results were in the range of previously reported case series. This pilot study was limited by the small sample size and severe morbidity of the included patients. Final evaluation of the efficacy of Pharos stent treatment demands further investigation. (orig.)

  18. A reliable method for intracranial electrode implantation and chronic electrical stimulation in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Melanie; Lang, Min; Gane, Jonathan; Wu, Chiping; Burnham, W McIntyre; Zhang, Liang

    2013-08-06

    Electrical stimulation of brain structures has been widely used in rodent models for kindling or modeling deep brain stimulation used clinically. This requires surgical implantation of intracranial electrodes and subsequent chronic stimulation in individual animals for several weeks. Anchoring screws and dental acrylic have long been used to secure implanted intracranial electrodes in rats. However, such an approach is limited when carried out in mouse models as the thin mouse skull may not be strong enough to accommodate the anchoring screws. We describe here a screw-free, glue-based method for implanting bipolar stimulating electrodes in the mouse brain and validate this method in a mouse model of hippocampal electrical kindling. Male C57 black mice (initial ages of 6-8 months) were used in the present experiments. Bipolar electrodes were implanted bilaterally in the hippocampal CA3 area for electrical stimulation and electroencephalographic recordings. The electrodes were secured onto the skull via glue and dental acrylic but without anchoring screws. A daily stimulation protocol was used to induce electrographic discharges and motor seizures. The locations of implanted electrodes were verified by hippocampal electrographic activities and later histological assessments. Using the glue-based implantation method, we implanted bilateral bipolar electrodes in 25 mice. Electrographic discharges and motor seizures were successfully induced via hippocampal electrical kindling. Importantly, no animal encountered infection in the implanted area or a loss of implanted electrodes after 4-6 months of repetitive stimulation/recording. We suggest that the glue-based, screw-free method is reliable for chronic brain stimulation and high-quality electroencephalographic recordings in mice. The technical aspects described this study may help future studies in mouse models.

  19. Chronic cortical and electromyographic recordings from a fully implantable device: preclinical experience in a nonhuman primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryapolova-Webb, Elena; Afshar, Pedram; Stanslaski, Scott; Denison, Tim; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Starr, Philip A.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Analysis of intra- and perioperatively recorded cortical and basal ganglia local field potentials in human movement disorders has provided great insight into the pathophysiology of diseases such as Parkinson's, dystonia, and essential tremor. However, in order to better understand the network abnormalities and effects of chronic therapeutic stimulation in these disorders, long-term recording from a fully implantable data collection system is needed. Approach. A fully implantable investigational data collection system, the Activa® PC + S neurostimulator (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN), has been developed for human use. Here, we tested its utility for extended intracranial recording in the motor system of a nonhuman primate. The system was attached to two quadripolar paddle arrays: one covering sensorimotor cortex, and one covering a proximal forelimb muscle, to study simultaneous cortical field potentials and electromyography during spontaneous transitions from rest to movement. Main results. Over 24 months of recording, movement-related changes in physiologically relevant frequency bands were readily detected, including beta and gamma signals at approximately 2.5 μV/\\sqrtHz and 0.7 μV/\\sqrt{Hz}, respectively. The system architecture allowed for flexible recording configurations and algorithm triggered data recording. In the course of physiological analyses, sensing artifacts were observed (˜1 μVrms stationary tones at fixed frequency), which were mitigated either with post-processing or algorithm design and did not impact the scientific conclusions. Histological examination revealed no underlying tissue damage; however, a fibrous capsule had developed around the paddles, demonstrating a potential mechanism for the observed signal amplitude reduction. Significance. This study establishes the usefulness of this system in measuring chronic brain and muscle signals. Use of this system may potentially be valuable in human trials of chronic brain

  20. Open Ephys electroencephalography (Open Ephys  +  EEG): a modular, low-cost, open-source solution to human neural recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christopher; Voigts, Jakob; Agrawal, Uday; Ladow, Max; Santoyo, Juan; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) offers a unique opportunity to study human neural activity non-invasively with millisecond resolution using minimal equipment in or outside of a lab setting. EEG can be combined with a number of techniques for closed-loop experiments, where external devices are driven by specific neural signals. However, reliable, commercially available EEG systems are expensive, often making them impractical for individual use and research development. Moreover, by design, a majority of these systems cannot be easily altered to the specification needed by the end user. We focused on mitigating these issues by implementing open-source tools to develop a new EEG platform to drive down research costs and promote collaboration and innovation. Here, we present methods to expand the open-source electrophysiology system, Open Ephys (www.openephys.org), to include human EEG recordings. We describe the equipment and protocol necessary to interface various EEG caps with the Open Ephys acquisition board, and detail methods for processing data. We present applications of Open Ephys  +  EEG as a research tool and discuss how this innovative EEG technology lays a framework for improved closed-loop paradigms and novel brain-computer interface experiments. The Open Ephys  +  EEG system can record reliable human EEG data, as well as human EMG data. A side-by-side comparison of eyes closed 8-14 Hz activity between the Open Ephys  +  EEG system and the Brainvision ActiCHamp EEG system showed similar average power and signal to noise. Open Ephys  +  EEG enables users to acquire high-quality human EEG data comparable to that of commercially available systems, while maintaining the price point and extensibility inherent to open-source systems.

  1. Open Ephys electroencephalography (Open Ephys  +  EEG): a modular, low-cost, open-source solution to human neural recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christopher; Voigts, Jakob; Agrawal, Uday; Ladow, Max; Santoyo, Juan; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Electroencephalography (EEG) offers a unique opportunity to study human neural activity non-invasively with millisecond resolution using minimal equipment in or outside of a lab setting. EEG can be combined with a number of techniques for closed-loop experiments, where external devices are driven by specific neural signals. However, reliable, commercially available EEG systems are expensive, often making them impractical for individual use and research development. Moreover, by design, a majority of these systems cannot be easily altered to the specification needed by the end user. We focused on mitigating these issues by implementing open-source tools to develop a new EEG platform to drive down research costs and promote collaboration and innovation. Approach. Here, we present methods to expand the open-source electrophysiology system, Open Ephys (www.openephys.org), to include human EEG recordings. We describe the equipment and protocol necessary to interface various EEG caps with the Open Ephys acquisition board, and detail methods for processing data. We present applications of Open Ephys  +  EEG as a research tool and discuss how this innovative EEG technology lays a framework for improved closed-loop paradigms and novel brain-computer interface experiments. Main results. The Open Ephys  +  EEG system can record reliable human EEG data, as well as human EMG data. A side-by-side comparison of eyes closed 8-14 Hz activity between the Open Ephys  +  EEG system and the Brainvision ActiCHamp EEG system showed similar average power and signal to noise. Significance. Open Ephys  +  EEG enables users to acquire high-quality human EEG data comparable to that of commercially available systems, while maintaining the price point and extensibility inherent to open-source systems.

  2. Peri-procedural complications and associated risk factors in wingspan stent-assistant angioplasty of intracranial artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhaoshuo; Li Tianxiao; Wang Ziliang; Bai Weixing; Xue Jiangyu; Zhu Liangfu; Li Li

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the cerebrovascular complications from stenting for symptomatic intracranial stenosis and to detect the factors associated with complications. Methods: Medical records of Wingspan stenting were reviewed for 306 cases with symptomatic intracranial stenosis from July 2007 to February 2012, including transient ischemic attack, ischemic stroke, death and intracranial hemorrhage as clinical in-hospital complications. The location of lesions included middle cerebral artery level M1 (114 lesions), intracranial portion of the internal carotid artery (50 lesions), vertebral artery 4 (75 lesions), venebro-basilar artery (14 lesions), basilar artery (76 lesions). Complications were evaluated and analyzed to find out whether they were associated with patient-or stenosis-related risk factors using χ"2 test. Results: The technical success rate was 99% (303/306). Cerebrovascular complications rate was 6.9% (21/303), with 1.6% (14/303) of disabling stroke events and 0.7% (2/303) of deaths. Hemorrhagic events were consisted of procedure-related events (3 cases), hyperperfusion (3 cases), ischemic events of perforator stroke (8 cases), transient ischemic attack (3 cases), embolization (2 cases), thrombosis in stent (2 cases). Hemorrhagic events were associated with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates (χ"2 = 2.908, P < 0.05) and occurred more frequently after treatment of middle cerebral artery stenosis than other lesions (χ"2 = 1.168, P < 0.05). Perforating branches were detected to be affected mainly in the basilar artery than other locations (χ"2 = 4.263, P < 0.05). Conclusion: The complication rates in the study are preliminary consistent with the previously published data. Hemorrhagic events are prone to occur in the treatment of middle cerebral artery stenosis, while perforating branches are affected mainly in the basilar artery. (authors)

  3. A Systematic Review of the Usefulness of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein for Predicting Acute Intracranial Lesions following Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu M. Luoto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe extensive use of computed tomography (CT after acute head injury is costly and carries potential iatrogenic risk. This systematic review examined the usefulness of blood-based glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP for predicting acute trauma-related CT-positive intracranial lesions following head trauma. The main objective was to summarize the current evidence on blood-based GFAP as a potential screening test for acute CT-positive intracranial lesions following head trauma.MethodsWe screened MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Web of Science, the Cochrane Database, Scopus, Clinical Trials, OpenGrey, ResearchGate, and the reference lists of eligible publications for original contributions published between January 1980 and January 2017. Eligibility criteria included: (i population: human head and brain injuries of all severities and ages; (ii intervention: blood-based GFAP measurement ≤24 h post-injury; and (iii outcome: acute traumatic lesion on non-contrast head CT ≤24 h post-injury. Three authors completed the publication screening, data extraction, and quality assessment of eligible articles.ResultsThe initial search identified 4,706 articles, with 51 eligible for subsequent full-text assessment. Twenty-seven articles were ultimately included. Twenty-four (89% studies reported a positive association between GFAP level and acute trauma-related intracranial lesions on head CT. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for GFAP prediction of intracranial pathology ranged from 0.74 to 0.98 indicating good to excellent discrimination. GFAP seemed to discriminate mass lesions and diffuse injury, with mass lesions having significantly higher GFAP levels. There was considerable variability between the measured GFAP averages between studies and assays. No well-designed diagnostic studies with specific GFAP cutoff values predictive of acute traumatic intracranial lesions have been published.ConclusionIntracranial

  4. Intracranial calcification in Raine syndrome: radiological pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Mane, K.; Al-Dayel, F.; McDonald, P.

    1998-01-01

    We report the seventh known patient with Raine syndrome, a recently recognised, lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia associated with severe craniofacial dysmorphism and intracranial calcification in whom the CT findings are correlated with the gross and microscopic abnormalities found in the brain at autopsy. (orig.)

  5. New decision analytical models for management of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffijberg, H.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses decision analysis, cost-effectiveness models and the analysis of heterogeneity, applied to intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a subset of stroke that usually occurs at relatively young age and has poor prognosis. Although, the

  6. Burr Hole Drainage for Complicated Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fang Liu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a potentially severe condition that is caused by continuous cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Clinically, most patients have a benign course and the condition remits after conservative management. We report two consecutive patients who presented with acute expansion of subdural collection and disturbed consciousness. Both patients recovered completely after undergoing burr hole drainage.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Of Intracranial Glioma In A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seizures can occur as focal or generalized, but can also be the single symptom of intracranial tumors (Oliver and Lorenz, 1993; Bagley and Gavin, 1998; LeCouteur, 2001 and Taylor, 2003). Seizures seen in dogs with a brain tumor are evidences that indicative of an underlying structural brain disease (Oliver and Lorenz, ...

  8. Genetic risk load according to the site of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Femke N. G.; Kurki, Mitja I.; Kleinloog, Rachel; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Gaál, Emília I.; Lehto, Hanna; Kivisaari, Riku; Laakso, Aki; Niemelä, Mika; Hernesniemi, Juha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Rinkel, Gabriël J. E.; Ruigrok, Ynte M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether risk alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with intracranial aneurysm (IA) are enriched in patients with familial IA, IA located at the middle cerebral artery (MCA), or IA rupture at a younger age. In this case-only study, we calculated genetic risk scores

  9. Shared Genetic Risk Factors of Intracranial, Abdominal, and Thoracic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Femke N G; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Ripke, Stephan; Anderson, Graig; de Andrade, Mariza; Baas, Annette F; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Böttinger, Erwin P; Bown, Matthew J; Broderick, Joseph; Bijlenga, Philippe; Carrell, David S; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; Ebeling, Christian; Eriksson, Johan G; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Friedrich, Christoph M; Gaál, Emília I; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Harrison, Seamus C; Hernesniemi, Juha; Hofman, Albert; Inoue, Ituro; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Jones, Gregory T; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivisaari, Riku; Ko, Nerissa; Koskinen, Seppo; Kubo, Michiaki; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kurki, Mitja I; Laakso, Aki; Lai, Dongbing; Leal, Suzanne M; Lehto, Hanna; LeMaire, Scott A; Low, Siew-Kee; Malinowski, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Mosley, Thomas H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Niemelä, Mika; Pacheco, Jennifer; Peissig, Peggy L; Pera, Joanna; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rij, Andre M; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saratzis, Athanasios; Slowik, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tromp, Gerard; Uitterlinden, André G; Verma, Shefali S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Wang, Gao T; Han, Buhm; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracranial aneurysms (IAs), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) all have a familial predisposition. Given that aneurysm types are known to co-occur, we hypothesized that there may be shared genetic risk factors for IAs, AAAs, and TAAs. METHODS AND

  10. Shared genetic risk factors of intracranial, abdominal, and thoracic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Femke N G; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Ripke, Stephan; Anderson, Graig; de Andrade, Mariza; Baas, Annette F; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Böttinger, Erwin P; Bown, Matthew J; Broderick, Joseph; Bijlenga, Philippe; Carrell, David S; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; Ebeling, Christian; Eriksson, Johan G; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Friedrich, Christoph M; Gaál, Emília I; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Harrison, Seamus C; Hernesniemi, Juha; Hofman, Albert; Inoue, Ituro; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Jones, Gregory T; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivisaari, Riku; Ko, Nerissa; Koskinen, Seppo; Kubo, Michiaki; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kurki, Mitja I; Laakso, Aki; Lai, Dongbing; Leal, Suzanne M; Lehto, Hanna; LeMaire, Scott A; Low, Siew-Kee; Malinowski, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Mosley, Thomas H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Niemelä, Mika; Pacheco, Jennifer; Peissig, Peggy L; Pera, Joanna; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rij, Andre M; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saratzis, Athanasios; Slowik, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tromp, Gerard; Uitterlinden, André G; Verma, Shefali S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Wang, Gao T; Han, Buhm; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-01-01

    Background--Intracranial aneurysms (IAs), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) all have a familial predisposition. Given that aneurysm types are known to co-occur, we hypothesized that there may be shared genetic risk factors for IAs, AAAs, and TAAs. Methods and

  11. Model-Based, Noninvasive Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    vasoactive medication drip rates and ventilator settings, nursing progress notes, discharge summaries, radiology reports, provider order entry data...the interaction of intracranial pressure and cerebral hemodynamics . Journal of Applied Physiology 82(4):1256-1269, 1997. [5] M Saeed, M Villarroel, AT

  12. Patterns of Traumatic Intracranial Bleeds at Kenyatta National

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valued eMachines Customer

    Conclusion: Acute subdural hematomas are the commonest traumatic ... Most of the intracranial bleeds were acute, 27.5% (n=14) followed by chronic, 9.8% .... Gentry LR, Godersky JC, Thomson B. MR imaging of head trauma: review of the ...

  13. Non Traumatic Intracranial Infections at the University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non traumatic intracranial infections are a well recognized disease process encountered in neurosurgery and otolaryngology practices. In this case series study, we analyze the patients that presented with this condition to the neurosurgical unit of the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. Methods: ...

  14. The syndrome of pseudotumour cerebri and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clare; Plant, Gordon T

    2011-02-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition in which raised intracranial pressure is associated with a high body mass index, and in those societies in which the prevalence of obesity is increasing the disorder is of increasing importance. It is one cause of the syndrome of pseudotumour cerebri but the cause and the link with a rise in body weight are not understood. Furthermore the treatment of the more severe, sight-threatening cases is controversial. A major theme in recent years has been an attempt to identify the underlying mechanism of IIH. Some theories - such as the dural sinus stenosis theory - seem to ignore the relationship with weight gain; others have proposed a direct link between obesity and raised intracranial pressure through a specific fat distribution in the body; others through the production of lipokines; and yet others have suggested a converse causation with raised intracranial pressure giving rise to obesity. Uncontrolled case series continue to demonstrate the success of interventions such as cerebrospinal fluid diversion procedures, venous sinus stenting and bariatric surgery but there are no level 1 clinical trials. Interest in IIH is increasing and currently generating numerous studies but there is no consensus view on either cause or management.

  15. The cardiovascular and intracranial effects of laryngoscopy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation is a potent sympathetic stimulus in adults. Neonates are frequendy intubated, but few data exist on the cerebral effects of this intervention. The cardiovascular and intracranial effects of laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation were studied in 17 hypercarbic neonatal piglets.

  16. Post-operative intracranial foreign body granuloma: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djindjian, M.; Brugieres, P.; Razavi-Encha, F.; Allegret, C.; Poirier, J.; Paris-12 Univ., 94 - Creteil

    1987-01-01

    The authors report and discuss some clinical, radiological, histological and ultrastructural aspects of an intracranial foreign body granuloma. This granuloma, which simulated a cavernoma, was due to a surgical swab forgotten during a previous neurosurgical evacuation of an intracerebral hematoma. (orig.)

  17. Advanced Imaging of Intracranial Atherosclerosis: Lessons from Interventional Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Pavlin-Premrl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke. Patients with a high degree of stenosis have a significant rate of stroke despite medical therapy. Two randomized trials of stenting have failed to show benefit. Improving periprocedural complication rates and patient selection may improve stenting outcomes. Fractional flow reserve (FFR, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS, and optical coherence tomography (OCT are intravascular imaging techniques employed to improve patient selection and stent placement in interventional cardiology. FFR has been shown to improve cardiovascular outcomes when used in patient selection for intervention. Studies of FFR in intracranial atherosclerosis show that the measure may predict which plaques lead to stroke. IVUS is used in cardiology to quantify stenosis and assist with stent placement. Comparisons with histology show that it can reliably characterize plaques. Several case reports of IVUS in intracranial arteries show the technique to be feasible and indicate it may improve stent placement. Plaque characteristics on IVUS may help identify vulnerable plaques. In interventional cardiology, OCT provides excellent visualization of vessel geometry and is useful periprocedurally. Images reliably identify thin-capped fibroatheromas and other plaque features. Case reports indicate that OCT is safe for use in intracranial arteries. OCT can be used to identify perforator vessels and so may be useful in avoiding perforator strokes, a common complication of stenting. Plaque characteristics on OCT may be useful in patient selection.

  18. Intracranial epidural hematoma in a newborn with DIC secondary to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidural hematoma in newborns is rare, it occurs more frequently in infants born from nulliparous mothers with delivery difficulties. Intracranial hemorrhage in infants is usually secondary to vascular malformations, anticoagulation, inherited or acquired coagulopathy. Hematological disorders are infrequently associated with ...

  19. Nodular Purpura and Intracranial Bleeding due to Late Onset ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She developed nodular purpuric spots for about three days prior to the intracranial bleeding. She was unconscious and responding only to pain, and was severely pale. She was transfused with two units of whole blood and underwent a craniotomy for draining the hemorrhage. She was treated with Vitamin K supplements.

  20. Holographic observation of magnetic resonance image CT of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Kinjiro; Watanabe, Saburo; Yuasa, Hiromi; Yamada, Takahisa; Hoshino, Daisaku; Suzuki, Masane; Saito, Takayuki.

    1987-01-01

    In 1975, we developed a new method of 3-dimensional observation of CT pictures using Gabor's holography principle. In this study, we are reporting our experience with the multi-tomogram holography using magnetic resonance image CT in order to reconstruct 3-dimensional viewing of the central nervous system and intracranial lesions. (J.P.N.)

  1. Late Neolithic phytolith and charcoal records of human activities and vegetation change in Shijiahe culture, Tanjialing site, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hong Zhu

    Full Text Available There is significant archaeological evidence marking the collapse of the Shijiahe culture in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River in China during the late Neolithic Period. However, the causes for this cultural collapse remain unclear. Our sedimentary records from a 3.3 m long profile and 76 phytolith and charcoal samples from the Tanjialing archaeological sites provide records of interactions between an ancient culture and vegetation change. During the early Shijiahe culture (c, 4850-4400 cal BP, the climate was warm and humid. Fire was intensively used to clear the vegetation. In the mid-period of the Shijiahe culture (c, 4400-4200 cal BP, the climate became slightly dry-cold and this was accompanied by decreasing water, leading to settlements. From c, 4200 cal BP, severe drought eroded the economic foundation of rice-cultivation. These conditions forced people to abandon the Shijiahe ancient city to find water in other regions, leading to the collapse of the Shijiahe culture.

  2. A Wireless Fully Passive Neural Recording Device for Unobtrusive Neuropotential Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiourti, Asimina; Lee, Cedric W L; Chae, Junseok; Volakis, John L

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel wireless fully passive neural recording device for unobtrusive neuropotential monitoring. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring emulated brain signals in a wireless fully passive manner. In this paper, we propose a novel realistic recorder that is significantly smaller and much more sensitive. The proposed recorder utilizes a highly efficient microwave backscattering method and operates without any formal power supply or regulating elements. Also, no intracranial wires or cables are required. In-vitro testing is performed inside a four-layer head phantom (skin, bone, gray matter, and white matter). Compared to our former implementation, the neural recorder proposed in this study has the following improved features: 1) 59% smaller footprint, 2) up to 20-dB improvement in neuropotential detection sensitivity, and 3) encapsulation in biocompatible polymer. For the first time, temporal emulated neuropotentials as low as 63 μVpp can be detected in a wireless fully passive manner. Remarkably, the high-sensitivity achieved in this study implies reading of most neural signals generated by the human brain. The proposed recorder brings forward transformational possibilities in wireless fully passive neural detection for a very wide range of applications (e.g., epilepsy, Alzheimer's, mental disorders, etc.).

  3. On the Use of Biomineral Oxygen Isotope Data to Identify Human Migrants in the Archaeological Record: Intra-Sample Variation, Statistical Methods and Geographical Considerations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Lightfoot

    Full Text Available Oxygen isotope analysis of archaeological skeletal remains is an increasingly popular tool to study past human migrations. It is based on the assumption that human body chemistry preserves the δ18O of precipitation in such a way as to be a useful technique for identifying migrants and, potentially, their homelands. In this study, the first such global survey, we draw on published human tooth enamel and bone bioapatite data to explore the validity of using oxygen isotope analyses to identify migrants in the archaeological record. We use human δ18O results to show that there are large variations in human oxygen isotope values within a population sample. This may relate to physiological factors influencing the preservation of the primary isotope signal, or due to human activities (such as brewing, boiling, stewing, differential access to water sources and so on causing variation in ingested water and food isotope values. We compare the number of outliers identified using various statistical methods. We determine that the most appropriate method for identifying migrants is dependent on the data but is likely to be the IQR or median absolute deviation from the median under most archaeological circumstances. Finally, through a spatial assessment of the dataset, we show that the degree of overlap in human isotope values from different locations across Europe is such that identifying individuals' homelands on the basis of oxygen isotope analysis alone is not possible for the regions analysed to date. Oxygen isotope analysis is a valid method for identifying first-generation migrants from an archaeological site when used appropriately, however it is difficult to identify migrants using statistical methods for a sample size of less than c. 25 individuals. In the absence of local previous analyses, each sample should be treated as an individual dataset and statistical techniques can be used to identify migrants, but in most cases pinpointing a specific

  4. Versatile, modular 3D microelectrode arrays for neuronal ensemble recordings: from design to fabrication, assembly, and functional validation in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, F.; Livi, A.; Lanzilotto, M.; Maranesi, M.; Bonini, L.; Paul, O.; Ruther, P.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Application-specific designs of electrode arrays offer an improved effectiveness for providing access to targeted brain regions in neuroscientific research and brain machine interfaces. The simultaneous and stable recording of neuronal ensembles is the main goal in the design of advanced neural interfaces. Here, we describe the development and assembly of highly customizable 3D microelectrode arrays and demonstrate their recording performance in chronic applications in non-human primates. Approach. System assembly relies on a microfabricated stacking component that is combined with Michigan-style silicon-based electrode arrays interfacing highly flexible polyimide cables. Based on the novel stacking component, the lead time for implementing prototypes with altered electrode pitches is minimal. Once the fabrication and assembly accuracy of the stacked probes have been characterized, their recording performance is assessed during in vivo chronic experiments in awake rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) trained to execute reaching-grasping motor tasks. Main results. Using a single set of fabrication tools, we implemented three variants of the stacking component for electrode distances of 250, 300 and 350 µm in the stacking direction. We assembled neural probes with up to 96 channels and an electrode density of 98 electrodes mm-2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the shank alignment is accurate to a few µm at an angular alignment better than 1°. Three 64-channel probes were chronically implanted in two monkeys providing single-unit activity on more than 60% of all channels and excellent recording stability. Histological tissue sections, obtained 52 d after implantation from one of the monkeys, showed minimal tissue damage, in accordance with the high quality and stability of the recorded neural activity. Significance. The versatility of our fabrication and assembly approach should significantly support the development of ideal interface geometries for a broad

  5. Increased Intracranial Pressure in the Setting of Enterovirus and Other Viral Meningitides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules C. Beal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased intracranial pressure due to viral meningitis has not been widely discussed in the literature, although associations with Varicella and rarely Enterovirus have been described. Patients with increased intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid analysis suggestive of a viral process are sometimes classified as having atypical idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH. However, a diagnosis of IIH requires normal cerebrospinal fluid, and therefore in these cases an infection with secondary intracranial hypertension may be a more likely diagnosis. Here seven patients are presented with elevated intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid suggestive of viral or aseptic meningitis. Of these, 1 had Enterovirus and the remainder were diagnosed with nonspecific viral meningitis. These data suggest that viral meningitis may be associated with elevated intracranial pressure more often than is commonly recognized. Enterovirus has previously been associated with increased intracranial pressure only in rare case reports.

  6. Records of ectoparasites on humans and sheep from Viking-age deposits in the former western settlement of Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, J P

    1990-07-01

    During recent archaeological excavations in Viking Greenland, specimens of the human flea, Pulex irritans L., and the body louse, Pediculus humanus humanus L., were recovered from several farmsteads. Bovicola ovis (Schrank) and the sheep ked, Melophagus ovinus (L.), also were found in associated deposits. The specimens were dated from about AD 990 to AD 1350. These finds raise questions about the levels of hygiene of the Viking farmers and open some interesting medical and biogeographical conundrums.

  7. The imaging appearances of intracranial CNS infections in adult HIV and AIDS patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offiah, C.E. [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, Stott Lane, Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: chockycj@yahoo.co.uk; Turnbull, I.W. [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, Stott Lane, Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The spectrum of pathology affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is broad and comprises predominantly opportunistic infections and neoplasms. It is estimated that approximately one-third of all patients with AIDS develop neurological complications. The organisms responsible for AIDS are human retroviruses: primarily the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). In this review we shall focus on the neurological complications of HIV and AIDS which are applicable to the more frequently occurring intracranial infective organisms. Attention will be paid specifically to those CNS manifestations occurring in the adult HIV and AIDS population as infection in the paediatric HIV and AIDS group, although bearing some similarities, demonstrates some important differences.

  8. The imaging appearances of intracranial CNS infections in adult HIV and AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offiah, C.E.; Turnbull, I.W.

    2006-01-01

    The spectrum of pathology affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is broad and comprises predominantly opportunistic infections and neoplasms. It is estimated that approximately one-third of all patients with AIDS develop neurological complications. The organisms responsible for AIDS are human retroviruses: primarily the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). In this review we shall focus on the neurological complications of HIV and AIDS which are applicable to the more frequently occurring intracranial infective organisms. Attention will be paid specifically to those CNS manifestations occurring in the adult HIV and AIDS population as infection in the paediatric HIV and AIDS group, although bearing some similarities, demonstrates some important differences

  9. Prediction of three-dimensional arm trajectories based on ECoG signals recorded from human sensorimotor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Nakanishi

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interface techniques have been applied in a number of studies to control neuromotor prostheses and for neurorehabilitation in the hopes of providing a means to restore lost motor function. Electrocorticography (ECoG has seen recent use in this regard because it offers a higher spatiotemporal resolution than non-invasive EEG and is less invasive than intracortical microelectrodes. Although several studies have already succeeded in the inference of computer cursor trajectories and finger flexions using human ECoG signals, precise three-dimensional (3D trajectory reconstruction for a human limb from ECoG has not yet been achieved. In this study, we predicted 3D arm trajectories in time series from ECoG signals in humans using a novel preprocessing method and a sparse linear regression. Average Pearson's correlation coefficients and normalized root-mean-square errors between predicted and actual trajectories were 0.44~0.73 and 0.18~0.42, respectively, confirming the feasibility of predicting 3D arm trajectories from ECoG. We foresee this method contributing to future advancements in neuroprosthesis and neurorehabilitation technology.

  10. Characteristic CT and MRI findings of intracranial chondroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Fuhong; Qiu, Shijun; Liu, Zhenyin; Lv, Xiaofei; Feng, Xia; Xiong, Wei; An, Jie; Chen, Jing; Yang, Weicong; Wen, Chuhong [Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)], E-mail: qiushijun006@163.com; Jiang, Jianwei; Chang, Jun [Department of Radiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China)

    2012-12-15

    Background. Intracranial chondromas are rare benign tumors. To date, few data are available on their neuroradiological features. Purpose. To describe a series of patients with intracranial chondroma and to analyze and discuss the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that may distinguish chondromas from other intracranial neoplasms. Material and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and medical imaging data of six patients who had pathologically confirmed intracranial chondromas in our two institutions between July 2006 and September 2011. Both CT and MRI scanning were performed in all six cases. Results. Five tumors were located at the skull base and one originated from the falx. CT images revealed well-demarcated, irregular lobulated and variable density masses with obvious calci?cation (6/6), no or slight enhancement, without peritumoral edema, and frequently accompanied by erosion and destruction of surrounding bone (5/6). Tumor parenchyma appeared heterogeneously hypointense on T1WI, and hyperintense or mixed hyperintense and hypointense on T2WI, while the calcification appeared hypointense on T1WI and T2WI in five cases, demonstrating significant inhomogeneous enhancement on postcontrast MRI, which revealed the typical 'punica granatum seeds' sign. Only one case showed homogeneous low signal intensity on T1WI and high signal intensity on T2WI, and relatively uniform obvious enhancement on postcontrast scans. Conclusion. These characteristic CT and MR findings, combined with the location of the lesions and the history of a long duration of clinical symptoms, may prove helpful in differentiating intracranial chondromas from other more common tumors.

  11. Secondary Intracranial Hypertension in Pediatric Patients With Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Miguel Ángel; Cantarín-Extremera, Verónica; Andión-Catalán, Maitane; Duat-Rodríguez, Anna; Jiménez-Echevarría, Saioa; Bermejo-Arnedo, Ignacio; Hortigüela-Saeta, Montesclaros; Rekarte-García, Saray; Babín-López, Lara; Ruano Domínguez, David

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the clinical characteristics of a pediatric population with hemato-oncological disease and intracranial hypertension, analyze the therapeutic response and outcome, and compare its characteristics with respect to a control group with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. We retrospectively analyzed patients with hemato-oncological disease and secondary intracranial hypertension in our center during the past five years. We compared these individuals with a historical cohort with idiopathic intracranial hypertension from our institution (control group). We identified eight patients, all with leukemia, and 21 controls. Mean age at diagnosis was 10.6 years, and 62% of individuals were female. Most of them were under treatment with drugs (62% corticosteroids, 75% active chemotherapy). Mean opening pressure of cerebrospinal fluid was 35 cm H 2 O. All had headache, but only 28% complained of visual symptoms. Only 12.5% exhibited papilledema at the time of diagnosis (versus 71% in controls). All of them were treated with acetazolamide, with average therapy duration of nine months, and all had a favorable outcome (versus 57% of controls who needed second-line treatment). None of them showed long-term visual complications (versus 20% of controls). Patients with hemato-oncological disease and secondary intracranial hypertension may not develop typical symptomatology. Thus, diagnosis and recognition of this entity among this cohort may be difficult. Associated factors are diverse and do not show an obvious causal relationship. A high index of suspicion must be maintained for diagnosis, because a favorable outcome is expected with prompt treatment. Acetazolamide is effective as a first-line therapy and caused few side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radionuclide cisternographic findings in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Dong Jin; Kim, Jae Seung; Ryu, Jin Sook; Shin, Jung Woo; Im, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Myoung Chong; Jung, Sung Joo; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Hee Kyung

    1998-01-01

    Radionuclide cisternography may be helpful in understanding pathophysiology of postural headache and low CSF pressure in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. The purpose of this study was to characterize radionuclide cisternogrpahic findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. The study population consists of 15 patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Diagnosis was based on their clinical symptoms and results of lumbar puncture. All patients underwent radionuclide cisternography following injection of 111 to 222 MBq of Tc-99m DTPA into the lumbar subarachnoid space. Sequential images were obtained between 1/2 hour and 24 hour after the injection of Tc-99m DTPA. Radioactivity of the bladder, soft tissue uptake, migration of radionuclide in the subarachnoid space, and extradural leakage of radionuclide were evaluated according to the scan time. Radionuclide cisternogram showed delayed migration of radionuclide into the cerebral convexity (14/15), increased soft tissue uptake (11/15), and early visualization of bladder activity at 30 min (6/10) and 2 hr (13/13). Cisternography also demonstrated leakage site of CSF in 4 cases and 2 of these were depicted at 30min. Epidural blood patch was done in 11 patients and headache was improved in all cases. The characteristics findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension were delayed migration of radionuclide and early visualization of the soft tissue and bladder activity. These scintigraphic findings suggest that CSF leakage rather than increased CSF absorption or decreased production may be the main pathophysiology of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Early and multiple imaging including the bladder and soft tissue is required to observe the entire dynamics of radionuclide migration

  13. Characteristic CT and MRI findings of intracranial chondroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Fuhong; Qiu, Shijun; Liu, Zhenyin; Lv, Xiaofei; Feng, Xia; Xiong, Wei; An, Jie; Chen, Jing; Yang, Weicong; Wen, Chuhong; Jiang, Jianwei; Chang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background. Intracranial chondromas are rare benign tumors. To date, few data are available on their neuroradiological features. Purpose. To describe a series of patients with intracranial chondroma and to analyze and discuss the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that may distinguish chondromas from other intracranial neoplasms. Material and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and medical imaging data of six patients who had pathologically confirmed intracranial chondromas in our two institutions between July 2006 and September 2011. Both CT and MRI scanning were performed in all six cases. Results. Five tumors were located at the skull base and one originated from the falx. CT images revealed well-demarcated, irregular lobulated and variable density masses with obvious calci?cation (6/6), no or slight enhancement, without peritumoral edema, and frequently accompanied by erosion and destruction of surrounding bone (5/6). Tumor parenchyma appeared heterogeneously hypointense on T1WI, and hyperintense or mixed hyperintense and hypointense on T2WI, while the calcification appeared hypointense on T1WI and T2WI in five cases, demonstrating significant inhomogeneous enhancement on postcontrast MRI, which revealed the typical 'punica granatum seeds' sign. Only one case showed homogeneous low signal intensity on T1WI and high signal intensity on T2WI, and relatively uniform obvious enhancement on postcontrast scans. Conclusion. These characteristic CT and MR findings, combined with the location of the lesions and the history of a long duration of clinical symptoms, may prove helpful in differentiating intracranial chondromas from other more common tumors

  14. Intracranial ganglioglioma: clinicopathological and MRI findings in 16 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D. [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China); Henning, T.D. [UCSF, Department of Radiology, Contrast Media Laboratory, San Francisco, CA, 94107 (United States); Zou, L.-G. [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China); Hu, L.-B. [Department of Radiology, The Second Hospital of ChongQing, ChongQing 400000 (China); Wen, L. [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China)], E-mail: cqzdwl@yahoo.com.cn; Feng, X.-Y. [Department of Radiology, HuaShan Hospital, Medical Center of FuDan University, ShangHai 200040 (China); Dai, S.-H.; Wang, W.-X.; Sun, Q.-R. [Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China); Zhang, Z.-G. [Department of Pathology, XinQiao Hosptial, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing 400037 (China)

    2008-01-15

    Aim: To record the clinical findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of intracranial gangliogliomas in 16 patients. Materials and methods: Sixteen patients were imaged using unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI. Eight patients underwent unenhanced CT and of these, three underwent contrast-enhanced CT. Two radiologists read the images retrospectively. The images were studied with regard to location, size, margin, signal intensity, enhancement characteristics, cystic changes, and presence of calcifications. Clinical data, such as presenting signs and symptoms, physical findings, and medical histories, were collected. Histopathological and immunohistochemical studies were performed and analysed by two pathologists. Results: In 12 cases the tumours were located in one of the cerebral hemispheres; in the other cases they were located in the brainstem, cerebellum, suprasellar area or the thalamus. The tumour dimension varied from 1-7 cm, with a mean of 3.6 cm {+-} 1.8 cm. The MRI features of ganglioglioma in the present cohort can be divided into three patterns: cystic (n = 2), cystic-solid (n = 6), and solid (n = 8). Solid lesions had a predilection for the temporal lobe; cystic and cystic-solid tumours had a wide anatomical distribution. Cystic lesions were significantly smaller than both cystic-solid and solid lesions (F = 4.28, P < 0.05). Cystic changes in the cystic-solid tumours showed one of the following patterns: those with walls showing contrast enhancement, those containing an enhancing nodule, or cysts without an obvious wall. The solid portion of cystic-solid gangliogliomas and the entire tumour in solid tumours showed homogeneous enhancement of variable degrees on T1-weighted (T1W) spin-echo (SE) images. Five tumours had mild or moderate oedema. In one patient two separate gangliogliomas were found, each lesion exhibiting different MRI features: solid and cystic-solid. One case of cortical ganglioglioma was found, causing bone erosion

  15. Intracranial ganglioglioma: clinicopathological and MRI findings in 16 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Henning, T.D.; Zou, L.-G.; Hu, L.-B.; Wen, L.; Feng, X.-Y.; Dai, S.-H.; Wang, W.-X.; Sun, Q.-R.; Zhang, Z.-G.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To record the clinical findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of intracranial gangliogliomas in 16 patients. Materials and methods: Sixteen patients were imaged using unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI. Eight patients underwent unenhanced CT and of these, three underwent contrast-enhanced CT. Two radiologists read the images retrospectively. The images were studied with regard to location, size, margin, signal intensity, enhancement characteristics, cystic changes, and presence of calcifications. Clinical data, such as presenting signs and symptoms, physical findings, and medical histories, were collected. Histopathological and immunohistochemical studies were performed and analysed by two pathologists. Results: In 12 cases the tumours were located in one of the cerebral hemispheres; in the other cases they were located in the brainstem, cerebellum, suprasellar area or the thalamus. The tumour dimension varied from 1-7 cm, with a mean of 3.6 cm ± 1.8 cm. The MRI features of ganglioglioma in the present cohort can be divided into three patterns: cystic (n = 2), cystic-solid (n = 6), and solid (n = 8). Solid lesions had a predilection for the temporal lobe; cystic and cystic-solid tumours had a wide anatomical distribution. Cystic lesions were significantly smaller than both cystic-solid and solid lesions (F = 4.28, P < 0.05). Cystic changes in the cystic-solid tumours showed one of the following patterns: those with walls showing contrast enhancement, those containing an enhancing nodule, or cysts without an obvious wall. The solid portion of cystic-solid gangliogliomas and the entire tumour in solid tumours showed homogeneous enhancement of variable degrees on T1-weighted (T1W) spin-echo (SE) images. Five tumours had mild or moderate oedema. In one patient two separate gangliogliomas were found, each lesion exhibiting different MRI features: solid and cystic-solid. One case of cortical ganglioglioma was found, causing bone erosion due

  16. Post-upgrade testing on a radiotherapy oncology information system with an embedded record and verify system following the IAEA Human Health Report No. 7 recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyathi, Thulani; Colyer, Christopher; Bhardwaj, Anup Kumar; Rijken, James; Morton, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Record and verify (R&V) systems have proven that their application in radiotherapy clinics leads to a significant reduction in mis-treatments of patients. The purpose of this technical note is to share our experience of acceptance testing, commissioning and setting up a quality assurance programme for the MOSAIQ® oncology information system and R&V system after upgrading from software version 2.41 to 2.6 in a multi-vendor, multi-site environment. Testing was guided primarily by the IAEA Human Report No. 7 recommendations, but complemented by other departmental workflow specific tests. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time successful implementation of the IAEA Human Health Report Series No. 7 recommendations have been reported in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Deciphering human-climate interactions in an ombrotrophic peat record: REE, Nd and Pb isotope signatures of dust supplies over the last 2500 years (Misten bog, Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagel, N.; Allan, M.; Le Roux, G.; Mattielli, N.; Piotrowska, N.; Sikorski, J.

    2014-06-01

    A high-resolution peat record from Eastern Belgium reveals the chronology of dust deposition for the last 2500 years. REE and lithogenic elements in addition to Nd and Pb isotopes were measured in a 173 cm age-dated peat profile and provide a continuous chronology of dust source and intensity. Calculated dust flux show pronounced increases c. 300 BC, 600 AD, 1000 AD, 1200 AD and from 1700 AD, corresponding to local and regional human activities combined with climate change. The Industrial Revolution samples (1700-1950 AD) are characterised by a significant enrichment in Sc-normalised REE abundance (sum REE/Sc > 25) due to intensive coal combustion. For the pre-Industrial Revolution samples, the Sc-normalised REE abundance (10 climate. Combining REE abundance, fractionation between Light REE and Heavy REE and Nd isotope data in ombrotrophic peat allows one to distinguish between dust flux changes related to human and climate forcings.

  18. A palaeoenvironmental record of natural and human change from the Auckland Isthmus, New Zealand, during the Late Holocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horrocks, M.; Deng, Y.; Nichol, S.L.; Shane, P.A.; Ogden, J.

    2002-01-01

    A multi-proxy analysis of a sediment core from Waiatarua, Auckland Isthmus, adds to an environmental history from the local wetland spanning the Late Glacial to modern times. Several distal tephra were recorded in the core: 8.5 ka Rotoma (reworked), 6.1 ka Tuhua (primary and reworked), most likely the 1.8 ka Taupo (the latter is previously unreported for the Auckland Isthmus), and one unidentified, possibly 665 yr BP Kaharoa. Pollen and diatom analyses of the core show that during the period c. 6000-c. 4800 yr BP, the site was a lake fringed with Cyperaceae/Leptospermum swamp. The lake became progressively shallower after c. 4800 yr BP, probably due to hydroseral infilling. Surrounding the lake was forest dominated by Dacrydium, Prumnopitys, Metrosideros, and Nestegis. Transition to the Polynesian era appears unclear because the site probably endured a hiatus due to destruction of peat by burning in European times. (author). 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Headache in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Findings From the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah I; Quiros, Peter A; Subramanian, Prem S; Mejico, Luis J; Gao, Shan; McDermott, Michael; Wall, Michael

    2017-09-01

    To characterize the phenotype, headache-related disability, medical co-morbidities, use of symptomatic headache medications, and headache response to study interventions in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT). Patients with untreated IIH and mild vision loss enrolled in the IIHTT and randomized to acetazolamide (ACZ) and weight loss or placebo (PLB) and weight loss had prospective assessment of headache disability using the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) questionnaire. Subjects with headache at the baseline visit were assigned a headache phenotype using the International Classification for Headache Disorders version 3 beta (ICHD-3b). Medication overuse was determined using the participants' reported medication use for the preceding month and ICHD-3b thresholds for diagnosing medication overuse headache. We investigated relationships between headache disability and various other clinical characteristics at baseline and at 6 months. Headache was present in 139 (84%) of the 165 enrollees at baseline. The most common headache phenotypes were migraine (52%), tension-type headache (22%), probable migraine (16%), and probable tension-type headache (4%). Fifty-one (37%) participants overused symptomatic medications at baseline, most frequently simple analgesics. A similar amount of improvement in the adjusted mean (± standard error) HIT-6 score occurred in the ACZ (-9.56 ± 1.05) and PLB groups (-9.11 ± 1.14) at 6 months (group difference -0.45, 95% CI -3.50 to 2.60, P = .77). Headache disability did not correlate with any of the studies, variables of interest, which included: the lumbar puncture opening pressure at baseline or at 6 months, body mass index, the amount of weight lost, papilledema grade, perimetric mean deviation, or the use of hormonal contraception. Headache disability was significantly associated with patient-reported quality of life in the physical, mental, and visual domains. Headache was common, of varied

  20. Long-term follow-up of surgical resection alone for primary intracranial rostrotentorial tumors in dogs: 29 cases (2002-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Suñol

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial neoplasia is frequently encountered in dogs. After a presumptive diagnosis of intracranial neoplasia is established based on history, clinical signs and advanced imaging characteristics, the decision to treat and which treatment to choose must be considered. The objective of this study is to report survival times (ST for dogs with intracranial meningiomas and gliomas treated with surgical resection alone (SRA, to identify potential prognostic factors affecting survival, and to compare the results with the available literature. Medical records of 29 dogs with histopathologic confirmation of intracranial meningiomas and gliomas treated with SRA were retrospectively reviewed. For each dog, signalment, clinical signs, imaging findings, type of surgery, treatment, histological evaluation, and ST were obtained. Twenty-nine dogs with a histological diagnosis who survived >7 days after surgery were included. There were 15 (52% meningiomas and 14 (48% gliomas. All tumors had a rostrotentorial location. At the time of the statistical analysis, only two dogs were alive. Median ST for meningiomas was 422 days (mean, 731 days; range, 10-2735 days. Median ST for gliomas was 66 days (mean, 117 days; range, 10-730 days. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that ST was significantly longer for meningiomas than for gliomas (P7 days postoperatively, SRA might be an appropriate treatment, particularly for meningiomas, when radiation therapy is not readily available. Also, the presence of midline shift and ventricular compression might be negative prognostic factors for dogs with meningiomas.