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Sample records for human intestinal macrophages

  1. Human intestinal macrophages display profound inflammatory anergy despite avid phagocytic and bacteriocidal activity

    OpenAIRE

    Smythies, Lesley E.; Sellers, Marty; Ronald H Clements; Mosteller-Barnum, Meg; Meng, Gang; Benjamin, William H.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal macrophages, which are thought to orchestrate mucosal inflammatory responses, have received little investigative attention compared with macrophages from other tissues. Here we show that human intestinal macrophages do not express innate response receptors, including the receptors for LPS (CD14), Fcα (CD89), Fcγ (CD64, CD32, CD16), CR3 (CD11b/CD18), and CR4 (CD11c/CD18); the growth factor receptors IL-2 (CD25) and IL-3 (CD123); and the integrin LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18). Moreover, residen...

  2. Characterization of macrophage-like cells in the external layers of human small and large intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    -DR-positive (expressing the MHC class-II antigen), in contrast to macrophage-like cells in the subserosa and submucosa. Macrophage-like cells in the external muscle layer were mostly acid phosphatase-negative, and at the electron-microscopic level they were found to have features of macrophages: primary lysosomes, coated...... vesicles and pits. However, very few secondary lysosomes were present. Birbeck granules were not observed. It is concluded that in the external muscle layer of human small and large intestine numerous macrophages of a special type are present. It is discussed whether this cell type plays a role...

  3. The influence of microbial metabolites on human intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuenen, M.H.M.C. van; Ligt, R.A.F. de; Doornbos, R.P.; Woude, J.C.J. van der; Kuipers, E.J.; Venema, K.

    2005-01-01

    Microbial metabolites may influence the metabolic integrity of intestinal epithelial cells and induce mucosal immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the microbial metabolites butyrate, iso-valerate, and ammonium on Caco-2 cells and macrophages. Barrier functioning was determined

  4. Determination of tolerable fatty acids and cholera toxin concentrations using human intestinal epithelial cells and BALB/c mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamari, Farshad; Tychowski, Joanna; Lorentzen, Laura

    2013-05-30

    The positive role of fatty acids in the prevention and alleviation of non-human and human diseases have been and continue to be extensively documented. These roles include influences on infectious and non-infectious diseases including prevention of inflammation as well as mucosal immunity to infectious diseases. Cholera is an acute intestinal illness caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It occurs in developing nations and if left untreated, can result in death. While vaccines for cholera exist, they are not always effective and other preventative methods are needed. We set out to determine tolerable concentrations of three fatty acids (oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids) and cholera toxin using mouse BALB/C macrophages and human intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. We solubilized the above fatty acids and used cell proliferation assays to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of the fatty acids that are not detrimental to human intestinal epithelial cell viability. We solubilized cholera toxin and used it in an assay to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of cholera toxin that do not statistically decrease cell viability in BALB/C macrophages. We found the optimum fatty acid concentrations to be between 1-5 ng/μl, and that for cholera toxin to be cholera infections.

  5. Macrophage Isolation from the Mouse Small and Large Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harusato, Akihito; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate responses to the normal microbiota as well as pathogens. One of the most important steps in beginning to understand the functions of these cells is the ability to effectively isolate them from the complex intestinal environment. Here, we detail methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages from the mouse small and large intestine. PMID:27246032

  6. High-resolution transcriptome of human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Beyer

    Full Text Available Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like and alternative (M2-like polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7 as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226 cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease.

  7. Three-Dimensional Organotypic Co-Culture Model of Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Macrophages to Study "Salmonella Enterica" Colonization Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mark; Yang, J; Barilla, J.; Crabbe, A.; Sarker, S. F.; Liu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional/3-D organotypic models of human intestinal epithelium mimic the differentiated form and function of parental tissues often not exhibited by 2-D monolayers and respond to Salmonella in ways that reflect in vivo infections. To further enhance the physiological relevance of 3-D models to more closely approximate in vivo intestinal microenvironments during infection, we developed and validated a novel 3-D intestinal co-culture model containing multiple epithelial cell types and phagocytic macrophages, and applied to study enteric infection by different Salmonella pathovars.

  8. Recent progress in understandıng the function of intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsall, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal immune responses must be tightly controlled, particularly in the intestine, As members of the mononuclear phagocyte family, dendritic cells and macrophages, are well represented in intestinal tissues, and have developed unique functional niches. This review will focus on recent findings on antigen uptake and processing in the intestine, and the role of DCs in the imprinting homing receptors on T and B cells, the induction of IgA B cell responses, and the differentiation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). It will also address the unique phenotype of intestinal macrophages and briefly what is known regarding the relationships between these cell types. PMID:19079213

  9. Neuron-macrophage crosstalk in the intestine: a ‘microglia’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eVerheijden

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal macrophages are strategically located in different layers of the intestine, including the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis externa, where they perform complex tasks to maintain intestinal homeostasis. As the gastrointestinal tract is continuously challenged by foreign antigens, macrophage activation should be tightly controlled to prevent chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Unraveling the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue-specific control of macrophage activation is crucial to get more insight into intestinal immune regulation. Two recent reports provide unanticipated evidence that the enteric nervous system acts as a critical regulator of macrophage function in the myenteric plexus. Both studies clearly illustrate that enteric neurons reciprocally interact with intestinal macrophages and are actively involved in shaping their phenotype. This concept has striking parallels with the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal signals maintain microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, in a quiescent, anti-inflammatory state. This inevitably evokes the perception that the ENS and CNS share mechanisms of neuroimmune interaction. In line, intestinal macrophages, both in the muscularis externa and (submucosa, express high levels of CX3CR1, a feature that was once believed to be unique for microglia. CX3CR1 is the sole receptor of fractalkine (CX3CL1, a factor mainly produced by neurons in the CNS to facilitate neuron-microglia communication. The striking parallels between resident macrophages of the brain and intestine might provide a promising new line of thought to get more insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling macrophage activation in the gut.

  10. Macrophage-like cells in the muscularis externa of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L; Rumessen, J J;

    1985-01-01

    In muscularis externa of mouse small intestine, cells with ultrastructural features of macrophages were invariably observed in three layers: in the subserosal layer, between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers, and in association with the deep circular plexus. These macrophage-like cells...

  11. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O

    2017-01-01

    Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota-driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand the rea...

  12. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O;

    2017-01-01

    Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota-driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand the rea...

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  14. Tim-3 promotes intestinal homeostasis in DSS colitis by inhibiting M1 polarization of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingwei; Yu, Jiahui; Shi, Qingzhu; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Wei; Chen, Guojiang; Zhao, Zhi; Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Hou, Chunmei; Feng, Jiannan; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Wang, Lili; Li, Yan; Han, Gencheng

    2015-10-01

    Tim-3 is involved in the physiopathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that, in mouse with DSS colitis, Tim-3 inhibited the polarization of pathogenic pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, while Tim-3 downregulation or blockade resulted in an increased M1 response. Adoptive transfer of Tim-3-silenced macrophages worsened DSS colitis and enhanced inflammation, while Tim-3 overexpression attenuated DSS colitis by decreasing the M1 macrophage response. Co-culture of Tim-3-overexpressing macrophages with intestinal lymphocytes decreased the pro-inflammatory response. Tim-3 shaped intestinal macrophage polarization may be TLR-4 dependent since Tim-3 blockade failed to exacerbate colitis or increase M1 macrophage response in the TLR-4 KO model. Finally, Tim-3 signaling inhibited phosphorylation of IRF3, a TLR-4 downstream transcriptional factor regulating macrophage polarization. A better understanding of this pathway may shed new light on colitis pathogenesis and result in a new therapeutic strategy.

  15. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O; Kirkeby, Svend

    2017-06-01

    Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal. They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota-driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro-inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hr. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage marker) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. iba1(pos) cells showed an overall higher density than CD169(pos) and HO-1(pos) cells. Most HO-1(pos) and iba1(pos) cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep muscular plexus, mainly iba1(pos) cells were present, and were mostly CD169(neg) ; a few HO-1(pos) cells were present. A new subset of resident macrophages in the intestinal muscularis externa was discovered, identified as iba1(pos) CD169(neg) . HO-1 is constitutively present in most macrophages in serosa and at AP, suggesting a M2 phenotype. LPS-treatment results in an up-regulation of HO-1(pos) /CD169(neg) cells in serosa and at AP. Anat Rec, 300:1114-1122, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists.

  16. Ionized calcium‐binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO‐1 up‐regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Jan D.; Larsen, Jytte O.; Kirkeby, Svend

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal. They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota‐driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro‐inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hr. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium‐binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage marker) and heme oxygenase‐1 (HO‐1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. Results: iba1pos cells showed an overall higher density than CD169pos and HO‐1pos cells. Most HO‐1pos and iba1pos cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep muscular plexus, mainly iba1pos cells were present, and were mostly CD169neg; a few HO‐1pos cells were present. Conclusions: A new subset of resident macrophages in the intestinal muscularis externa was discovered, identified as iba1pos CD169neg. HO‐1 is constitutively present in most macrophages in serosa and at AP, suggesting a M2 phenotype. LPS‐treatment results in an up‐regulation of HO‐1pos/CD169neg cells in serosa and at AP. Anat Rec, 300:1114–1122, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:27860408

  17. Vagus Nerve Activity Augments Intestinal Macrophage Phagocytosis via Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor alpha 4 beta 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, Esmerij P.; Snoek, Susanne A.; Heinsbroek, Sigrid E.; Stanisor, Oana I.; Verseijden, Caroline; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Greaves, David R.; Gordon, Siamon; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The vagus nerve negatively regulates macrophage cytokine production via the release of acetylcholine (ACh) and activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). In various models of intestinal inflammation, vagus nerve efferent stimulation ameliorates disease. Given the act

  18. Immune antibodies and helminth products drive CXCR2-dependent macrophage-myofibroblast crosstalk to promote intestinal repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Esser-von Bieren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Helminth parasites can cause considerable damage when migrating through host tissues, thus making rapid tissue repair imperative to prevent bleeding and bacterial dissemination particularly during enteric infection. However, how protective type 2 responses targeted against these tissue-disruptive multicellular parasites might contribute to homeostatic wound healing in the intestine has remained unclear. Here, we observed that mice lacking antibodies (Aid-/- or activating Fc receptors (Fcrg-/- displayed impaired intestinal repair following infection with the murine helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hpb, whilst transfer of immune serum could partially restore chemokine production and rescue wound healing in Aid-/- mice. Impaired healing was associated with a reduced expression of CXCR2 ligands (CXCL2/3 by macrophages (MΦ and myofibroblasts (MF within intestinal lesions. Whilst antibodies and helminths together triggered CXCL2 production by MΦ in vitro via surface FcR engagement, chemokine secretion by intestinal MF was elicited by helminths directly via Fcrg-chain/dectin2 signaling. Blockade of CXCR2 during Hpb challenge infection reproduced the delayed wound repair observed in helminth infected Aid-/- and Fcrg-/- mice. Finally, conditioned media from human MΦ stimulated with infective larvae of the helminth Ascaris suum together with immune serum, promoted CXCR2-dependent scratch wound closure by human MF in vitro. Collectively our findings suggest that helminths and antibodies instruct a chemokine driven MΦ-MF crosstalk to promote intestinal repair, a capacity that may be harnessed in clinical settings of impaired wound healing.

  19. Immune antibodies and helminth products drive CXCR2-dependent macrophage-myofibroblast crosstalk to promote intestinal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser-von Bieren, Julia; Volpe, Beatrice; Sutherland, Duncan B; Bürgi, Jérôme; Verbeek, J Sjef; Marsland, Benjamin J; Urban, Joseph F; Harris, Nicola L

    2015-03-01

    Helminth parasites can cause considerable damage when migrating through host tissues, thus making rapid tissue repair imperative to prevent bleeding and bacterial dissemination particularly during enteric infection. However, how protective type 2 responses targeted against these tissue-disruptive multicellular parasites might contribute to homeostatic wound healing in the intestine has remained unclear. Here, we observed that mice lacking antibodies (Aid-/-) or activating Fc receptors (Fcrg-/-) displayed impaired intestinal repair following infection with the murine helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hpb), whilst transfer of immune serum could partially restore chemokine production and rescue wound healing in Aid-/- mice. Impaired healing was associated with a reduced expression of CXCR2 ligands (CXCL2/3) by macrophages (MΦ) and myofibroblasts (MF) within intestinal lesions. Whilst antibodies and helminths together triggered CXCL2 production by MΦ in vitro via surface FcR engagement, chemokine secretion by intestinal MF was elicited by helminths directly via Fcrg-chain/dectin2 signaling. Blockade of CXCR2 during Hpb challenge infection reproduced the delayed wound repair observed in helminth infected Aid-/- and Fcrg-/- mice. Finally, conditioned media from human MΦ stimulated with infective larvae of the helminth Ascaris suum together with immune serum, promoted CXCR2-dependent scratch wound closure by human MF in vitro. Collectively our findings suggest that helminths and antibodies instruct a chemokine driven MΦ-MF crosstalk to promote intestinal repair, a capacity that may be harnessed in clinical settings of impaired wound healing.

  20. Organic cation transporter Octn1-mediated uptake of food-derived antioxidant ergothioneine into infiltrating macrophages during intestinal inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takuya; Masuo, Yusuke; Takahashi, Saki; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Kato, Yukio

    2015-06-01

    OCTN1/SLC22A4 is expressed on apical membranes of small intestine, and is involved in gastrointestinal absorption of its substrates, including the food-derived antioxidant ergothioneine (ERGO). ERGO concentration in circulating blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease) is lower than that in healthy volunteers; thus, circulating ERGO is a potential diagnostic marker, although the mechanisms underlying low ERGO concentration in patients are unknown. Here, we focused on intestinal macrophages, which infiltrate sites of inflammation, and examined possible first-pass uptake of ERGO by macrophages. ERGO concentration in blood was lower in mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis than in controls. On the other hand, expression of octn1 gene product and ERGO concentration in intestinal tissues of DSS-treated mice were higher than in controls. Interestingly, lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) isolated from DSS-treated mice contained ERGO and showed [(3)H]ERGO uptake and Octn1 expression, whereas ERGO was undetectable in LPMCs of control mice. Functional expression of OCTN1 was also confirmed in LPS-stimulated human macrophage-like cell line, THP-1. In conclusion, OCTN1 is functionally expressed on activated intestinal macrophages, and ERGO uptake into these immune cells could contribute at least in part to the altered disposition of ERGO in intestinal inflammation.

  1. A primary human macrophage-enteroid co-culture model to investigate mucosal gut physiology and host-pathogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Gaelle; Baetz, Nicholas W.; Staab, Janet F.; Donowitz, Mark; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Zachos, Nicholas C.

    2017-01-01

    Integration of the intestinal epithelium and the mucosal immune system is critical for gut homeostasis. The intestinal epithelium is a functional barrier that secludes luminal content, senses changes in the gut microenvironment, and releases immune regulators that signal underlying immune cells. However, interactions between epithelial and innate immune cells to maintain barrier integrity and prevent infection are complex and poorly understood. We developed and characterized a primary human macrophage-enteroid co-culture model for in-depth studies of epithelial and macrophage interactions. Human intestinal stem cell-derived enteroid monolayers co-cultured with human monocyte-derived macrophages were used to evaluate barrier function, cytokine secretion, and protein expression under basal conditions and following bacterial infection. Macrophages enhanced barrier function and maturity of enteroid monolayers as indicated by increased transepithelial electrical resistance and cell height. Communication between the epithelium and macrophages was demonstrated through morphological changes and cytokine production. Intraepithelial macrophage projections, efficient phagocytosis, and stabilized enteroid barrier function revealed a coordinated response to enterotoxigenic and enteropathogenic E. coli infections. In summary, we have established the first primary human macrophage-enteroid co-culture system, defined conditions that allow for a practical and reproducible culture model, and demonstrated its suitability to study gut physiology and host responses to enteric pathogens. PMID:28345602

  2. Trafficking of Estrella lausannensis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Brigida; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    Estrella lausannensis is a new member of the Chlamydiales order. Like other Chlamydia-related bacteria, it is able to replicate in amoebae and in fish cell lines. A preliminary study investigating the pathogenic potential of Chlamydia-related bacteria found a correlation between antibody response to E. lausannensis and pneumonia in children. To further investigate the pathogenic potential of E. lausannensis, we determined its ability to grow in human macrophages and its intracellular trafficking. The replication in macrophages resulted in viable E. lausannensis; however, it caused a significant cytopathic effect. The intracellular trafficking of E. lausannensis was analyzed by determining the interaction of the Estrella-containing inclusions with various endocytic markers as well as host organelles. The E. lausannensis inclusion escaped the endocytic pathway rapidly avoiding maturation into phagolysosomes by preventing both EEA-1 and LAMP-1 accumulation. Compared to Waddlia chondrophila, another Chlamydia-related bacteria, the recruitment of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum was minimal for E. lausannensis inclusions. Estrella lausannensis appears to use a distinct source of nutrients and energy compared to other members of the Chlamydiales order. In conclusion, we hypothesize that E. lausannensis has a restricted growth in human macrophages, due to its reduced capacity to control programmed cell death.

  3. Microbial functionality in the human intestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salonen, A.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The extent of metabolic interactions between symbiotic intestinal microbes and the human host, and their system-wide effects on the host physiology are beginning to be understood. The metabolic capacity encoded by the intestinal microbiome significantly extends that of the host, making many of man's

  4. Species and prevalence determination of Human Intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Species and prevalence determination of Human Intestinal Parasites among Patients attending two ... the maintenance of proper personal hygiene, creating awareness to the ..... (2007), who reported a value of 21.1% in Owerri,. Imo State and ...

  5. Methods to Prevent or Treat Refractory Diseases by Focusing on Intestinal Microbes Using LPS and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Gen-Ichiro; Inagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal microbes are known to influence host homeostasis by producing various substances. Recently, the presence of a diverse range of intestinal microbiota has been shown to play a key role in the maintenance of health, along with influencing the host's innate immunity towards various diseases. For example, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy individuals was remarkably effective in cases of refractory Clostridium difficile colitis. Conversely, decreased number of intestinal microbes resulting from the oral administration of antibiotics reportedly suppressed the antitumor effects of immunotherapy or anticancer drugs. Furthermore, it has been shown that a change in the intestinal environment triggered by oral administration of antibiotics resulted in increased number of drug-resistant microbes causing nosocomial infections. Intestinal microbes are also shown to be effective in cancer treatment as they activate macrophages at the site of cancer. One of the effects of intestinal microbes on hosts that has been gaining increasing attention is the biological regulation caused by the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produced by Gram-negative bacteria. Among the intestinal microbiota present in the host, Gram-negative bacteria form the most dominant flora. The administration of antibiotics leads to a decreased number of intestinal microbes, as well as to suppression of cancer immunotherapy effects or anticancer drug effects, and this deterioration has been shown to be improved by oral administration of LPS. In this article, we discuss the functions of intestinal microbiota, that is currently undergoing a paradigm shift in relation to maintenance of health and the validity of LPS as a possible target for bio-treatment in the future.

  6. Human intestinal capillariasis in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prasert Saichua; Choosak Nithikathkul; Natthawut Kaewpitoon

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt and Taiwan; major outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and Thailand. This article reviews the epidemiology, history and sources of C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports indicated that 82 accumulated cases of intestinal capillariasis were found in Thailand from 1994-2006. That made Thailand a Capillaria-prevalent area. Sisaket, in northeast Thailand, was the first province which has reported intestinal capillariasis. Moreover, Buri Ram presented a high prevalence of intestinal capillariasis, totaling 24 cases from 1994-2006. About half of all cases have consumed raw or undercooked fish. However, even if the numbers of the intestinal capillariasis cases in Thailand is reduced, C. philippinensis infection cases are still reported. The improvement of personal hygiene, specifically avoiding consumption of undercooked fish and promoting a health education campaign are required. These strategies may minimize or eliminate C. philippinensis infection in Thailand.

  7. Human milk oligosaccharide consumption by intestinal microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Marcobal, A.; Sonnenburg, J L

    2012-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) constitute the third most abundant class of molecules in breast milk. Since infants lack the enzymes required for milk glycan digestion, this group of carbohydrates passes undigested to the lower part of the intestinal tract, where they can be consumed by specific members of the infant gut microbiota. We review proposed mechanisms for the depletion and metabolism of HMO by two major bacterial genera within the infant intestinal microbiota, Bifidobacterium and...

  8. Insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse intestinal macrophages is mediated by activation of JNK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y-L; Du, Y-F; Du, H; Shao, P

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been considered as a metabolic disorder disease, which closely related to insulin signaling impairment. Therefore, identifying the potential mechanism of insulin resistance is important for AD treatment. An APP/PS1 double transgenic AD mouse model was introduced to study insulin resistance in gut. The expressions of AD markers and key elements of insulin signaling were detected in ileum and intestinal macrophages of AD mice by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, mouse intestinal macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was treated by Aβ25-35 or Aβ25-35 + insulin to explore the mechanism of insulin resistance in vitro. The expression of IR-β and the activation of cell signaling related proteins (Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), protein kinase B (AKT) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)) in Aβ25-35-stimulated macrophages were performed via Western blotting. The expressions of IRS1, Aβ and Tuj in AD mice ileum were significantly different from WT mice (pinsulin could reverse these changes (pinsulin addition. Activation of JNK pathway played an important role in insulin resistance of AD mice, suggesting that inhibition of JNK pathway might be a new strategy toward resolving insulin resistance related diseases, such as AD.

  9. Interleukin-17 induces an atypical M2-like macrophage subpopulation that regulates intestinal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Nishikawa

    Full Text Available Interleukin 17 (IL-17 is a pleiotropic cytokine that acts on both immune and non-immune cells and is generally implicated in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Although IL-17 as well as their source, mainly but not limited to Th17 cells, is also abundant in the inflamed intestine, the role of IL-17 in inflammatory bowel disease remains controversial. In the present study, by using IL-17 knockout (KO mice, we investigated the role of IL-17 in colitis, with special focus on the macrophage subpopulations. Here we show that IL-17KO mice had increased susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis which was associated with decrease in expression of mRNAs implicated in M2 and/or wound healing macrophages, such as IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist, arginase 1, cyclooxygenase 2, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Lamina propria leukocytes from inflamed colon of IL-17KO mice contained fewer CD11b+Ly6C+MHC Class II+ macrophages, which were derived, at least partly, from blood monocytes, as compared to those of WT mice. FACS-purified CD11b+ cells from WT mice, which were more abundant in Ly6C+MHC Class II+ cells, expressed increased levels of genes associated M2/wound healing macrophages and also M1/proinflammatory macrophages. Depletion of this population by topical administration of clodronate-liposome in the colon of WT mice resulted in the exacerbation of colitis. These results demonstrate that IL-17 confers protection against the development of severe colitis through the induction of an atypical M2-like macrophage subpopulation. Our findings reveal a previously unappreciated mechanism by which IL-17 exerts a protective function in colitis.

  10. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and human intestinal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miquel, S.; Martin, R.; Rossi, O.; Bermudez-Humaran, L.G.; Chatel, J.M.; Sokol, H.; Thomas, M.; Wells, J.M.; Langella, P.

    2013-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is the most abundant bacterium in the human intestinal microbiota of healthy adults, representing more than 5% of the total bacterial population. Over the past five years, an increasing number of studies have clearly described the importance of this highly metabolically

  11. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and human intestinal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miquel, S.; Martin, R.; Rossi, O.; Bermudez-Humaran, L.G.; Chatel, J.M.; Sokol, H.; Thomas, M.; Wells, J.M.; Langella, P.

    2013-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is the most abundant bacterium in the human intestinal microbiota of healthy adults, representing more than 5% of the total bacterial population. Over the past five years, an increasing number of studies have clearly described the importance of this highly metabolically

  12. Fusion between Intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in a cancer context results in nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anne E; Anderson, Eric C; Davies, Paige S; Silk, Alain D; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Wong, Melissa H

    2011-02-15

    The most deadly phase in cancer progression is attributed to the inappropriate acquisition of molecular machinery leading to metastatic transformation and spread of disease to distant organs. Although it is appreciated that metastasis involves epithelial-mesenchymal interplay, the underlying mechanism defining this process is poorly understood. Specifically, how cancer cells evade immune surveillance and gain the ability to navigate the circulatory system remains a focus. One possible mechanism underlying metastatic conversion is fusion between blood-derived immune cells and cancer cells. While this notion is a century old, in vivo evidence that cell fusion occurs within tumors and imparts genetic or physiologic changes remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated in vivo cell fusion between blood cells and intestinal epithelial cells in an injury setting. Here, we hypothesize that immune cells, such as macrophages, fuse with tumor cells imparting metastatic capabilities by transferring their cellular identity. We used parabiosis to introduce fluorescent-labeled bone marrow-derived cells to mice with intestinal tumors, finding that fusion between circulating blood-derived cells and tumor epithelium occurs during the natural course of tumorigenesis. Moreover, we identify the macrophage as a key cellular partner for this process. Interestingly, cell fusion hybrids retain a transcriptome identity characteristic of both parental derivatives, while also expressing a unique subset of transcripts. Our data supports the novel possibility that tumorigenic cell fusion may impart physical behavior attributed to migratory macrophages, including navigation of circulation and immune evasion. As such, cell fusion may represent a promising novel mechanism underlying the metastatic conversion of cancer cells.

  13. Macrophages expressing arginase 1 and nitric oxide synthase 2 accumulate in the small intestine during Giardia lamblia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Jenny; Keselman, Aleksander; Li, Erqiu; Singer, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to inhibit Giardia lamblia in vitro and in vivo. This study sought to determine if Giardia infection induces arginase 1 (ARG1) expression in host macrophages to reduce NO production. Stimulations of RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells with Giardia extract induced arginase activity. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry showed increased ARG1 and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) expression in mouse intestine following infection. Flow cytometry demonstrated increased numbers of macrophages positive for both ARG1 and NOS2 in lamina propria following infection, but there was no evidence of increased expression of ARG1 in these cells.

  14. Role of soluble factors and three-dimensional culture in in vitro differentiation of intestinal macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tanja Spoettl; Martin Hausmann; Katrin Menzel; Heidi Piberger; Hans Herfarth; Juergen Schoelmerich; Frauke Bataille; Gerhard Rogler

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To examine the factor(s)involved in differentiation of intestinal macrophages(IMACs)using a recently established in vitro model.METHODS:To test whether soluble or membrane bound factors induce IMAC-differentiation,freshly elutriated monocytes(MO)were incubated with conditioned media or cell membranes of intestinal epithelial cells(IEC)or cultured with IEC in transwell systems.To determine the importance of an active migration of MO,threedimensional aggregates from a 1:1-mixture of MO and IEC were examined by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry.Apoptosis was examined by caspase-3 Western blots.Extracellular matrix production in differentiation models was compared by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS:IMAC differentiation was observed in a complex three-dimensional co-culture model(multicellular spheroid,MCS)with IEC after migration of MO into the spheroids.By co-culture of MO with conditioned media or membrane preparations of IEC no IMAC differentiation was induced.Co-culture of MO with IEC in transwellcultures,with the two cell populations separated by a membrane also did not result in intestinal-like differentiation of MO.In contrast to IEC-spheroids with immigrating MO in mixed MCS of IEC and MO only a small subpopulation of MO was able to survive the seven day culture period.CONCLUSION:Intestinal-like differentiation of MO in vitro is only induced in the complex three-dimensional MCS model after immigration of MO indicating a role of cell-matrix and/or cell-cell interactions during the differentiation of IMACs.

  15. Deficiency in macrophage-stimulating protein results in spontaneous intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility toward epithelial damage in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Merlijn; Huitema, Leonie F A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Brugman, Sylvia

    2014-12-01

    Several genome-wide association studies have identified the genes encoding for macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP) and its receptor RON (Recepteur d'Origine Nantais) as possible susceptibility factors in inflammatory bowel disease. While it has been shown that the MSP-RON signaling pathway is involved in tissue injury responses, current mouse models for MSP and RON deficiency have not clearly demonstrated a role of MSP-RON signaling in the context of intestinal inflammation. In this study, we report that the recently identified zebrafish Msp mutant (msp(t34230)) develops spontaneous intestinal inflammation over time. From 14 to 28 weeks postfertilization Msp-deficient zebrafish show intestinal eosinophilia, increased intestinal expression of inflammatory marker mmp9, and activation of intestinal goblet cells. Moreover, these Msp mutant zebrafish are more susceptible toward ethanol-induced epithelial damage, which resulted in increased infiltration and proliferation of immune cells within the lamina propria and prolonged intestinal proinflammatory cytokine responses in some mutant fish. In light of the recent development of many tools to visualize, monitor, and genetically modify zebrafish, these Msp-deficient zebrafish will enable in-depth in vivo analysis of epithelial and macrophage-specific MSP-RON signaling in the context of intestinal inflammation.

  16. Systematic validation of specific phenotypic markers for in vitro polarized human macrophages.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambarus, C.A.; Krausz, S.; Eijk, M. van der; Hamann, J.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Reedquist, K.A.; Tak, P.P.; Baeten, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polarization of macrophages by specific micro-environmental conditions impacts upon their function following subsequent activation. This study aimed to systematically validate robust phenotypic markers for in vitro polarized human macrophages in order to facilitate the study of macrophag

  17. Intestinal Monocyte-Derived Macrophages Control Commensal-Specific Th17 Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casandra Panea

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Generation of different CD4 T cell responses to commensal and pathogenic bacteria is crucial for maintaining a healthy gut environment, but the associated cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. Dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages (Mfs integrate microbial signals and direct adaptive immunity. Although the role of DCs in initiating T cell responses is well appreciated, how Mfs contribute to the generation of CD4 T cell responses to intestinal microbes is unclear. Th17 cells are critical for mucosal immune protection and at steady state are induced by commensal bacteria, such as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB. Here, we examined the roles of mucosal DCs and Mfs in Th17 induction by SFB in vivo. We show that Mfs, and not conventional CD103+ DCs, are essential for the generation of SFB-specific Th17 responses. Thus, Mfs drive mucosal T cell responses to certain commensal bacteria.

  18. Heat stress impairs performance parameters, induces intestinal injury, and decreases macrophage activity in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro-Filho, W M; Ribeiro, A; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Sakai, M; Sá, L R M; Ferreira, A J P; Palermo-Neto, J

    2010-09-01

    Studies on environmental consequences of stress on animal production have grown substantially in the last few years for economic and animal welfare reasons. Physiological, hormonal, and immunological deficits as well as increases in animals' susceptibility to diseases have been reported after different stressors in broiler chickens. The aim of the current experiment is to describe the effects of 2 different heat stressors (31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1 degrees C/10 h per d) applied to broiler chickens from d 35 to 42 of life on the corticosterone serum levels, performance parameters, intestinal histology, and peritoneal macrophage activity, correlating and discussing the obtained data under a neuroimmune perspective. In our study, we demonstrated that heat stress (31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1 degrees C) increased the corticosterone serum levels and decreased BW gain and food intake. Only chickens submitted to 36 +/- 1 degrees C, however, presented a decrease in feed conversion and increased mortality. We also showed a decrease of bursa of Fabricius (31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1 degrees C), thymus (36 +/- 1 degrees C), and spleen (36 +/- 1 degrees C) relative weights and of macrophage basal (31 +/- 1 and 36 +/- 1 degrees C) and Staphylococcus aureus-induced oxidative burst (31 +/- 1 degrees C). Finally, mild multifocal acute enteritis characterized by an increased presence of lymphocytes and plasmocytes within the jejunum's lamina propria was also observed. The stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation was taken as responsible for the negative effects observed on the chickens' performance and immune function and also the changes of the intestinal mucosa. The present obtained data corroborate with others in the field of neuroimmunomodulation and open new avenues for the improvement of broiler chicken welfare and production performance.

  19. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, B. van den; Erkus, O.; Boekhorst, J.; Goffau, M. de; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed

  20. Human macrophage differentiation involves an interaction between integrins and fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laouar, A.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Collart, F.; Huberman, E.

    1997-03-14

    The authors have examined the role of integrins and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in macrophage differentiation of (1) human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and (2) human peripheral blood monocytes induced by either PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Increased {beta}{sub 1} integrin and fibronectin (FN) gene expression was observed in PMA-treated HL-60 cells and PMA- or M-CSF-treated monocytes, even at a time preceding the manifestation of macrophage markers. Treated HL-60 cells and monocytes also released and deposited FN on the culture dishes. An HL-60 cell variant, HL-525, which is deficient in protein kinase C {beta} (PKC{beta}) and resistant to PMA-induced differentiation, failed to express FN after PMA treatment. Restoration of PKC{beta} resulted in PMA-induced FN gene expression and macrophage differentiation. The macrophage phenotype induced in HL-60 cells or monocytes was attenuated by anti-{beta}{sub 1} integrin or anti-FN MAbs. The authors suggest that macrophage differentiation involves activation of PKC and expression of specific integrins and ECM proteins. The stimulated cells, through their integrins, attach and spread on these substrates by binding to the deposited ECM proteins. This attachment and spreading in turn, through integrin signaling, leads to the macrophage phenotype.

  1. Adhesion of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to human intestinal enterocytes and cultured human intestinal mucosa.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The adhesion of classic enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains of human origin to isolated human small intestinal enterocytes and cultured small intestinal mucosa was investigated. An adhesion assay with isolated human enterocytes prepared from duodenal biopsy samples was developed and tested with EPEC strains known to cause diarrhea in healthy adult volunteers. In the assay a mean of 53 and 55% of enterocytes had brush border-adherent E. coli E2348 (O127;H6) and E851 (O142:H6), res...

  2. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts support in vitro and in vivo growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lahar

    Full Text Available The intestinal crypt-niche interaction is thought to be essential to the function, maintenance, and proliferation of progenitor stem cells found at the bases of intestinal crypts. These stem cells are constantly renewing the intestinal epithelium by sending differentiated cells from the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn to the villus tips where they slough off into the intestinal lumen. The intestinal niche consists of various cell types, extracellular matrix, and growth factors and surrounds the intestinal progenitor cells. There have recently been advances in the understanding of the interactions that regulate the behavior of the intestinal epithelium and there is great interest in methods for isolating and expanding viable intestinal epithelium. However, there is no method to maintain primary human small intestinal epithelium in culture over a prolonged period of time. Similarly no method has been published that describes isolation and support of human intestinal epithelium in an in vivo model. We describe a technique to isolate and maintain human small intestinal epithelium in vitro from surgical specimens. We also describe a novel method to maintain human intestinal epithelium subcutaneously in a mouse model for a prolonged period of time. Our methods require various growth factors and the intimate interaction between intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs and the intestinal epithelial cells to support the epithelial in vitro and in vivo growth. Absence of these myofibroblasts precluded successful maintenance of epithelial cell formation and proliferation beyond just a few days, even in the presence of supportive growth factors. We believe that the methods described here can be used to explore the molecular basis of human intestinal stem cell support, maintenance, and growth.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) induces M2 polarization of human macrophages via STAT3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2012-08-24

    It is known that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted postprandially from the L-cells of the small intestine and regulates glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 is now used for the treatment of diabetes because of its beneficial role against insulin resistance. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed on many cell types, including macrophages, and GLP-1 suppresses the development of atherosclerosis by inhibiting macrophage function. However, there have so far been few studies that have investigated the significance of GLP-1/GLP-1R signaling in macrophage activation. In the present study, we examined the effect of GLP-1 and exenatide, a GLP-1R agonist, on human monocyte-derived macrophage (HMDM) activation. We found that GLP-1 induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation. Silencing of GLP-1R suppressed the GLP-1-induced STAT3 activation. In addition, alternatively activated (M2) macrophage-related molecules, such as IL-10, CD163, and CD204 in HMDM, were significantly upregulated by GLP-1. Furthermore, the co-culture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with GLP-1-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the secretion of adiponectin compared to co-culture of the 3T3-L1 adipocytes with untreated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that GLP-1 induces macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype, which may contribute to the protective effects of GLP-1 against diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. DMPD: Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534111 Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-1...):575-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-...4 and IL-13. PubmedID 10534111 Title Differential responses of human monocytes an

  5. Production of inflammatory mediators by human macrophages obtained from ascites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Pruimboom (Wanda); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); C.J.A.M. Tak (Corné); I.L. Bonta; J.H.P. Wilson (Paul); F.J. Zijlstra (Freek)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAscites is a readily available source of human macrophages (Mø), which can be used to study Mø functions in vitro. We characterized the mediators of inflammation produced by human peritoneal Mø (hp-Mø) obtained from patients with portal hypertension and ascites. The production of the cy

  6. Alternative Functional In Vitro Models of Human Intestinal Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Kauffman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically relevant sources of absorptive intestinal epithelial cells are crucial for human drug transport studies. Human adenocarcinoma-derived intestinal cell lines, such as Caco-2, offer conveniences of easy culture maintenance and scalability, but do not fully recapitulate in vivo intestinal phenotypes. Additional sources of renewable physiologically relevant human intestinal cells would provide a much needed tool for drug discovery and intestinal physiology. We sought to evaluate and compare two alternative sources of human intestinal cells, commercially available primary human intestinal epithelial cells (hInEpCs and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal cells to Caco-2, for use in in vitro transwell monolayer intestinal transport assays. To achieve this for iPSC-derived cells, our previously described 3-dimensional intestinal organogenesis method was adapted to transwell differentiation. Intestinal cells were assessed by marker expression through immunocytochemical and mRNA expression analyses, monolayer integrity through Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER measurements and molecule permeability, and functionality by taking advantage the well-characterized intestinal transport mechanisms. In most cases, marker expression for primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells appeared to be as good as or better than Caco-2. Furthermore, transwell monolayers exhibited high TEER with low permeability. Primary hInEpCs showed molecule efflux indicative of P-glycoprotein transport. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells also showed neonatal Fc receptor-dependent binding of immunoglobulin G variants. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived intestinal cells exhibit expected marker expression and demonstrate basic functional monolayer formation, similar to or better than Caco-2. These cells could offer an alternative source of human intestinal cells for understanding normal intestinal epithelial physiology and drug transport.

  7. Lactic Acid Bacteria and the Human Intestinal Microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2015-01-01

    The great interest in the human microbiome has revived attention paid to LAB presence in the human intestine. This chapter first discusses the LAB associated with the human intestinal microbiota and their potential roles in health and diseases. It then addresses recent metagenomic studies that chall

  8. Dynamic efficiency of the human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Biagi, Elena; Turroni, Silvia; Maccaferri, Simone; Figini, Paolo; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    The emerging dynamic dimensions of the human intestinal microbiota (IM) are challenging the traditional definition of healthy gut microbiota, principally based on the static concepts of phylogenetic and functional core. On the other hand, recent researches are revealing that the microbiota plasticity is strategic for several aspects of our biology, addressing the different immunological and metabolic needs at various ages, and adjusting the ecosystem services in response to different lifestyle, physiological states or diets. In light of these studies, we propose to revise the traditional concept of healthy human IM, including its degree of plasticity among the fundamental requisites for providing host health. In order to make a model taking into account the relative importance of IM core functions and plasticity for the maintenance of host health, we address to Economics, where the efficiency of a productive system is measured by computing static and dynamic parameters.

  9. Differential Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Macrophages in Response to Intestinal Parasite Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mei Xing; Png, Chin Wen; Tay, Crispina Yan Bing; Teo, Joshua Ding Wei; Jiao, Huipeng; Lehming, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common enteric protistan parasite that can cause acute, as well as chronic, infection and is associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the pathogenic status of Blastocystis infection remains unclear. In this study, we found that Blastocystis antigens induced abundant expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in mouse intestinal explants, in mouse colitis colon, and in macrophages. Further investigation utilizing RAW264.7 murine macrophages showed that Blastocystis treatment in RAW264.7 macrophages induced the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38, the three major groups of mammalian mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases that play essential roles in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. ERK inhibition in macrophages significantly suppressed both mRNA and protein expression of IL-6 and TNF-α and mRNA expression of IL-1β. On the other hand, JNK inhibition resulted in reductions in both c-Jun and ERK activation and significant suppression of all three proinflammatory cytokines at both the mRNA and protein levels. Inhibition of p38 suppressed only IL-6 protein expression with no effect on the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α. Furthermore, we found that serine proteases produced by Blastocystis play an important role in the induction of ERK activation and proinflammatory cytokine expression by macrophages. Our study thus demonstrated for the first time that Blastocystis could induce the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines via the activation of MAP kinases and that infection with Blastocystis may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory intestinal diseases through the activation of inflammatory pathways in host immune cells, such as macrophages. PMID:25156742

  10. Immunohistochemical detection of human intestinal spirochetosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Sho; Shimizu, Ken; Oda, Tomohiro; Tominaga, Susumu; Nakanishi, Kuniaki

    2016-12-01

    Human intestinal spirochetosis (HIS) is a colorectal infection by Brachyspira species of spiral bacteria. Immunohistochemical cross-reaction to an antibody for Treponema pallidum aids its histologic diagnosis. This study's aim was to analyze the immunohistochemical characteristics of HIS. In this analysis, on 223 specimens from 83 HIS cases, we focused on so-called fringe formation (a histologic hallmark of HIS), spiral organisms within mucus or within crypts, and strong immunopositive materials in the mucosa, together with their location and the types of lesions. Fringe formation was found in 81.6% of all specimens and spiral organisms within mucus or within crypts in 97.3% and 57.0%, respectively. Strong immunopositive materials were observed in the surface epithelial layer in 87.9%, in the subepithelial layer in 94.6%, and in deeper mucosa in 2.2% of all specimens. The positive rates in conventional adenomas (24.0%, n = 146) and hyperplastic nodules (100%, n = 17) were each different from that found in inflammation (70.8%, n = 24), and spiral organisms were seen more frequently in the right-side large intestine than in the left (within mucus, 100%, n = 104 versus 95.0%, n = 119; within crypts, 65.4%, n = 104 versus 49.6%, n = 119). Thus, immunohistochemistry was effective not only in supporting the diagnosis of HIS but also in highlighting spiral organisms within mucus or crypts that were invisible in routine histology. Possibly, these spiral organisms may spread throughout the entire large intestine, although there is a potential problem with antibody specificity.

  11. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  12. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  13. Nimbolide Inhibits Nuclear Factor-КB Pathway in Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Macrophages and Alleviates Experimental Colitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji Yeon; Lee, Changhyun; Hwang, Sung Wook; Chun, Jaeyoung; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-10-01

    Nimbolide is a limonoid extracted from neem tree (Azadirachta indica) that has antiinflammatory properties. The effect of nimbolide on the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), macrophages and in murine colitis models was investigated. The IEC COLO 205, the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, and peritoneal macrophages from interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-) ) mice were preconditioned with nimbolide and then stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or lipopolysaccharide. Dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute colitis model and chronic colitis model in IL-10(-/-) mice were used for in vivo experiments. Nimbolide significantly suppressed the expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, and TNF-α) and inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα and the DNA-binding affinity of NF-κB in IECs and macrophages. Nimbolide ameliorated weight loss, colon shortening, disease activity index score, and histologic scores in dextran sulfate sodium colitis. It also improved histopathologic scores in the chronic colitis of IL-10(-/-) mice. Staining for phosphorylated IκBα was significantly decreased in the colon tissue after treatment with nimbolide in both models. Nimbolide inhibits NF-κB signaling in IECs and macrophages and ameliorates experimental colitis in mice. These results suggest nimbolide could be a potentially new treatment for inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  15. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy R. Finkbeiner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Short bowel syndrome (SBS is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, called human intestinal organoids (HIOs, have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  16. Bordetella pertussis modulates human macrophage defense gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Hugo Alberto; Oviedo, Juan Marcos; Gorgojo, Juan Pablo; Lamberti, Yanina; Rodriguez, Maria Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough, still causes outbreaks. We recently found evidence that B. pertussis can survive and even replicate inside human macrophages, indicating that this host cell might serve as a niche for persistence. In this work, we examined the interaction of B. pertussis with a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) that differentiates into macrophages in culture in order to investigate the host cell response to the infection and the mechanisms that promote that intracellular survival. To that end, we investigated the expression profile of a selected number of genes involved in cellular bactericidal activity and the inflammatory response during the early and late phases of infection. The bactericidal and inflammatory response of infected macrophages was progressively downregulated, while the number of THP-1 cells heavily loaded with live bacteria increased over time postinfection. Two of the main toxins of B. pertussis, pertussis toxin (Ptx) and adenylate cyclase (CyaA), were found to be involved in manipulating the host cell response. Therefore, failure to express either toxin proved detrimental to the development of intracellular infections by those bacteria. Taken together, these results support the relevance of host defense gene manipulation to the outcome of the interaction between B. pertussis and macrophages.

  17. Transcriptome-based network analysis reveals a spectrum model of human macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jia; Schmidt, Susanne V; Sander, Jil; Draffehn, Astrid; Krebs, Wolfgang; Quester, Inga; De Nardo, Dominic; Gohel, Trupti D; Emde, Martina; Schmidleithner, Lisa; Ganesan, Hariharasudan; Nino-Castro, Andrea; Mallmann, Michael R; Labzin, Larisa; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Latz, Eicke; Freeman, Tom C; Ulas, Thomas; Schultze, Joachim L

    2014-02-20

    Macrophage activation is associated with profound transcriptional reprogramming. Although much progress has been made in the understanding of macrophage activation, polarization, and function, the transcriptional programs regulating these processes remain poorly characterized. We stimulated human macrophages with diverse activation signals, acquiring a data set of 299 macrophage transcriptomes. Analysis of this data set revealed a spectrum of macrophage activation states extending the current M1 versus M2-polarization model. Network analyses identified central transcriptional regulators associated with all macrophage activation complemented by regulators related to stimulus-specific programs. Applying these transcriptional programs to human alveolar macrophages from smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) revealed an unexpected loss of inflammatory signatures in COPD patients. Finally, by integrating murine data from the ImmGen project we propose a refined, activation-independent core signature for human and murine macrophages. This resource serves as a framework for future research into regulation of macrophage activation in health and disease.

  18. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  19. Exploring food effects on indinavir absorption with human intestinal fluids in the mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstock, Nico; De Bruyn, Tom; Bevernage, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Mols, Raf; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2013-04-11

    Food can have a significant impact on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs, as it may affect drug solubility as well as permeability. Since fed state conditions cannot easily be implemented in the presently available permeability tools, including the frequently used Caco-2 system, exploring food effects during drug development can be quite challenging. In this study, we investigated the effect of fasted and fed state conditions on the intestinal absorption of the HIV protease inhibitor indinavir using simulated and human intestinal fluids in the in situ intestinal perfusion technique in mice. Although the solubility of indinavir was 6-fold higher in fed state human intestinal fluids (FeHIF) as compared to fasted state HIF (FaHIF), the intestinal permeation of indinavir was 22-fold lower in FeHIF as compared to FaHIF. Dialysis experiments showed that only a small fraction of indinavir is accessible for absorption in FeHIF due to micellar entrapment, possibly explaining its low intestinal permeation. The presence of ritonavir, a known P-gp inhibitor, increased the intestinal permeation of indinavir by 2-fold in FaHIF, while there was no increase when using FeHIF. These data confirm that drug-food interactions form a complex interplay between solubility and permeability effects. The use of HIF in in situ intestinal perfusions holds great promise for biorelevant absorption evaluation as it allows to directly explore this complex solubility/permeability interplay on drug absorption.

  20. TREM-1--expressing intestinal macrophages crucially amplify chronic inflammation in experimental colitis and inflammatory bowel diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schenk, Mirjam; Bouchon, Axel; Seibold, Frank; Mueller, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    ...). Myeloid cells of the normal intestine generally lack TREM-1 expression. In experimental mouse models of colitis and in patients with IBD, however, TREM-1 expression in the intestine was upregulated and correlated with disease activity...

  1. Intestinal and hepatic metabolism of glutamine and citrulline in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Poll, Marcel C G; Ligthart-Melis, Gerdien C; Boelens, Petra G; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Dejong, Cornelis H C

    2007-06-01

    Glutamine plays an important role in nitrogen homeostasis and intestinal substrate supply. It has been suggested that glutamine is a precursor for arginine through an intestinal-renal pathway involving inter-organ transport of citrulline. The importance of intestinal glutamine metabolism for endogenous arginine synthesis in humans, however, has remained unaddressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal conversion of glutamine to citrulline and the effect of the liver on splanchnic citrulline metabolism in humans. Eight patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery received a primed continuous intravenous infusion of [2-(15)N]glutamine and [ureido-(13)C-(2)H(2)]citrulline. Arterial, portal venous and hepatic venous blood were sampled and portal and hepatic blood flows were measured. Organ specific amino acid uptake (disposal), production and net balance, as well as whole body rates of plasma appearance were calculated according to established methods. The intestines consumed glutamine at a rate that was dependent on glutamine supply. Approximately 13% of glutamine taken up by the intestines was converted to citrulline. Quantitatively glutamine was the only important precursor for intestinal citrulline release. Both glutamine and citrulline were consumed and produced by the liver, but net hepatic flux of both amino acids was not significantly different from zero. Plasma glutamine was the precursor of 80% of plasma citrulline and plasma citrulline in turn was the precursor of 10% of plasma arginine. In conclusion, glutamine is an important precursor for the synthesis of arginine after intestinal conversion to citrulline in humans.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus impairs reverse cholesterol transport from macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedi Mujawar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Several steps of HIV-1 replication critically depend on cholesterol. HIV infection is associated with profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Whereas numerous studies have investigated the role of anti-HIV drugs in lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia, the effects of HIV infection on cellular cholesterol metabolism remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that HIV-1 impairs ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux from human macrophages, a condition previously shown to be highly atherogenic. In HIV-1-infected cells, this effect was mediated by Nef. Transfection of murine macrophages with Nef impaired cholesterol efflux from these cells. At least two mechanisms were found to be responsible for this phenomenon: first, HIV infection and transfection with Nef induced post-transcriptional down-regulation of ABCA1; and second, Nef caused redistribution of ABCA1 to the plasma membrane and inhibited internalization of apolipoprotein A-I. Binding of Nef to ABCA1 was required for down-regulation and redistribution of ABCA1. HIV-infected and Nef-transfected macrophages accumulated substantial amounts of lipids, thus resembling foam cells. The contribution of HIV-infected macrophages to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis was supported by the presence of HIV-positive foam cells in atherosclerotic plaques of HIV-infected patients. Stimulation of cholesterol efflux from macrophages significantly reduced infectivity of the virions produced by these cells, and this effect correlated with a decreased amount of virion-associated cholesterol, suggesting that impairment of cholesterol efflux is essential to ensure proper cholesterol content in nascent HIV particles. These results reveal a previously unrecognized dysregulation of intracellular lipid metabolism in HIV-infected macrophages and identify Nef and ABCA1 as the key players responsible for this effect. Our findings

  3. Human intestinal microbiota and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi

    2013-10-01

    The role of intestinal microbiota in immune-mediated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, has deservedly received a lot of attention. Evidently, changes in the intestinal microbiota are associated with type 1 diabetes as demonstrated by recent studies. Children with beta-cell autoimmunity have shown low abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and increase in the abundance of members of the Bacteroidetes phylum in fecal microbiota. These alterations could explain increased gut permeability, subclinical small intestinal inflammation, and dysregulation of oral tolerance in type 1 diabetes. However, these studies do not provide evidence of the causative role of the gut microbiota in the development of beta-cell autoimmunity, yet. In animal models, the composition of gut microbiota modulates the function of both innate and adaptive immunity, and intestinal bacteria are regulators of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, prevention of type 1 diabetes could, in the future, be based on the interventions targeted to the gut microbiota.

  4. Cytokine response of human THP-1 macrophages to Trichomonas tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govro, Emily J; Stuart, Melissa K

    2016-10-01

    Trichomonas tenax is a protozoan that inhabits the oral cavity of humans, most often those with poor oral hygiene. Although T. tenax is widely considered a commensal, recent studies have suggested a pathogenic role for the protozoan in persons with periodontitis. Here we investigated the capacity of T. tenax to induce pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in human macrophages, with the idea that elicitation of inflammation may be one mechanism by which T. tenax contributes to oral pathology. Human THP-1 cells differentiated to the macrophage phenotype (dTHP-1) were incubated with live or sonicated T. tenax at trophozoite:dTHP-1 ratios of 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20. Culture media removed from the wells after 4, 8, and 16 h of stimulation were assayed by ELISA for tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-8, and the immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10. Live T. tenax trophozoites failed to induce production of any of the cytokines tested, regardless of trophozoite:dTHP-1 cell ratio or length of co-incubation. T. tenax lysates stimulated interleukin-8 synthesis, but only after 16 h of incubation at the 1:5 trophozoite:dTHP-1 cell ratio. These results suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis by human macrophages in direct response to T. tenax contributes little to oral pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Copper induces the expression of cholesterogenic genes in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Per Arne; Englund, Mikael C O; Markström, Emilia; Ohlsson, Bertil G; Jernås, Margareta; Billig, Håkan; Torgerson, Jarl S; Wiklund, Olov; Carlsson, Lena M S; Carlsson, Björn

    2003-07-01

    Accumulation of lipids and cholesterol by macrophages and subsequent transformation into foam cells are key features in development of atherosclerosis. Serum copper concentrations have been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism behind the proatherogenic effect of copper is not clear. We used DNA microarrays to define the changes in gene expression profile in response to copper exposure of human macrophages. Expression monitoring by DNA microarray revealed 91 genes that were regulated. Copper increased the expression of seven cholesterogenic genes (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) synthase, IPP isomerase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, methyl sterol oxidase, H105e3 mRNA and sterol-C5-desaturase) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R), and decreased the expression of CD36 and lipid binding proteins. The expression of LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase was also investigated using real time PCR. The expression of both of these genes was increased after copper treatment of macrophages (Pmechanism for the association between copper and atherosclerosis. The effect of copper on cholesterogenic genes may also have implications for liver steatosis in early stages of Wilson's disease.

  6. A Systematic Approach to Identify Markers of Distinctly Activated Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan eSudan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Polarization has been a useful concept for describing activated macrophage phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, macrophage activation status within tumors and other settings are often inferred based on only a few markers. Complicating matters for relevance to human biology, many of the best studied macrophage activation markers have been best characterized in mice and sometimes are not similarly regulated in human macrophages. To identify novel markers of activated human macrophages, gene expression profiles for human macrophages of a single donor subjected to 33 distinct activating conditions were obtained and a set of putative activation markers were subsequently evaluated in macrophages from multiple donors using integrated fluidic circuit (IFC-based RT-PCR. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarray screen, highly-altered transcripts (>4-fold change in expression sorted the macrophage transcription profiles into two major and 13 minor clusters. Among the 1874 highly-altered transcripts, over 100 were uniquely altered in one major or two related minor clusters. IFC PCR-derived data confirmed the microarray results and to show the kinetics of expression of potential macrophage activation markers. Transcripts encoding chemokines, cytokines, and cell surface were prominent in our analyses. The activation markers identified by this study could be used to better characterize tumor-associated macrophages from biopsies as well as other macrophage populations collected from human clinical samples.

  7. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  8. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Cramer

    Full Text Available The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  9. Legionella pneumophila transcriptome during intracellular multiplication in human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute pulmonary infection. L. pneumophila is able to infect and multiply in both phagocytic protozoa, such as Acanthamoeba castellanii, and mammalian professional phagocytes. The best-known L. pneumophila virulence determinant is the Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system (TFBSS, which is used to translocate more than 150 effector proteins to host cells. While the transcriptional response of Legionella to the intracellular environment of A. castellanii has been investigated, much less is known about the Legionella transcriptional response inside human macrophages. In this study, the transcriptome of L. pneumophila was monitored during exponential and post-exponential phase in rich AYE broth as well as during infection of human cultured macrophages. This was accomplished with microarrays and an RNA amplification procedure called SCOTS to detect small amounts of mRNA from low numbers of intracellular bacteria. Among the genes induced intracellularly are those involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathways leading to L-arginine, L-histidine and L-proline as well as many transport systems involved in amino acid and iron uptake. Gene involved in catabolism of glycerol is also induced during intracellular growth and could be used as a carbon source. The genes encoding the Icm/Dot system are not differentially expressed inside cells compared to control bacteria grown in rich broth, but the genes encoding several translocated effectors are strongly induced. Moreover, we used the transcriptome data to predict previously unrecognized Icm/Dot effector genes based on their expression pattern and confirmed translocation for three candidates. This study provides a comprehensive view of how L. pneumophila responds to the human macrophage intracellular environment.

  10. Release of salusin-beta from human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kengo; Fujimoto, Kazumi; Koyama, Takatoshi; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2010-06-01

    Salusin-alpha and salusin-beta are related bioactive peptides biosynthesized from the same precursor, prosalusin. Despite the potent hemodynamic and proatherosclerotic activities of salusin-beta, its exact distribution and biological functions remain largely undetermined because of technical difficulties associated with its unique physicochemical characteristics, such as marked adhesiveness to polypropylene and polystyrene. By circumventing these problems, we recently established a specific radioimmunoassay for detecting immunoreactive human salusin-beta. In the current study, we demonstrated the release of salusin-beta from the human monoblastic leukemia cell lines, THP-1 and U937. Dilution curves of extracted conditioned media from both cells were parallel with those of standard human salusin-beta by radioimmunoassay. Reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with radioimmunoassay detection of the culture supernatants revealed a major immunoreactive component that co-eluted with authentic salusin-beta. Both cell lines secreted salusin-beta-like immunoreactivity (LI) into serum-free media as a function of time (1234.3 + or - 122.7 and 186.7 + or - 9.1 fmol/10(5) cells per 24h). When THP-1 and U937 cells differentiated into macrophages after incubation with 2-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), they secreted far greater amounts of salusin-beta-LI into the culture supernatant (3351.9 + or - 899.3 and 1545.8 + or - 183.3 fmol/10(5) cells per 24h). TPA treatment accelerated the processing of prosalusin into its cleaved fragments, suggesting that the increased secretion of salusin-beta-LI in THP-1-derived macrophages was caused by the enhanced intracellular processing of prosalusin. Stimulation with the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), resulted in increased secretion of salusin-beta without inducing expression of the gene for preprosalusin, suggesting that TNF-alpha and LPS stimulated

  11. Immunomodulatory Properties of Streptococcus and Veillonella Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.; Meijerink, M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Wells, J.M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2014-01-01

    The human small intestine is a key site for interactions between the intestinal microbiota and the mucosal immune system. Here we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of representative species of commonly dominant small-intestinal microbial communities, including six streptococcal strains

  12. Chamomile Flower, Myrrh, and Coffee Charcoal, Components of a Traditional Herbal Medicinal Product, Diminish Proinflammatory Activation in Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissiennon, Cica; Hammoud, Dima; Rodewald, Steffen; Fester, Karin; Goos, Karl-Heinz; Nieber, Karen; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    A traditional herbal medicinal product, containing myrrh, chamomile flower, and coffee charcoal, has been used in Germany for the relief of gastrointestinal complaints for decades. Clinical studies suggest its use in the maintenance therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. However, the pharmacological mechanisms underlying the clinical effects are not yet fully understood.The present study aims to elucidate immunopharmacological activities of myrrh, chamomile flower, and coffee charcoal by studying the influence of each plant extract on gene expression and protein release of activated human macrophages.The plant extracts effect on gene and protein expression of activated human monocyte-derived macrophages was investigated by microarray gene expression analysis and assessment of the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators (TNFα, chemokine CXCL13, and interleukin-10) using an ELISA test system.The extracts of myrrh, chamomile flower, and coffee charcoal influenced gene expression of activated human macrophages within the cytokine/chemokine signaling pathway. Particularly, chemokine gene expression was suppressed. Subsequently, the production of CXCL13 and, to a minor extent, cytokine TNFα was inhibited by all herbal extracts. Chamomile flower and coffee charcoal extracts enhanced interleukin-10 release from activated macrophages. The observed effects on protein release were comparable to the effect of budesonide, which decreased TNFα and CXCL13 and enhanced interleukin-10 release.The components of the herbal medicinal product influence the activity of activated human macrophages on both gene and protein level. The induced alterations within chemokine/cytokine signaling could contribute to a positive effect on the immunological homeostasis, which is disturbed in patients with chronic intestinal inflammation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Trichothecene mycotoxins activate inflammatory response in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankkunen, Päivi; Rintahaka, Johanna; Aalto, Annika; Leino, Marina; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Alenius, Harri; Wolff, Henrik; Matikainen, Sampsa

    2009-05-15

    Damp building-related illnesses have caused concern for years in many countries. Although the problem is extensive, the knowledge of the immunological reactions behind damp building-related illnesses is still quite limited. Trichothecene mycotoxins form one major group of toxins, which possibly contribute to the illnesses. Stachybotrys chartarum is a well-known, but also controversial damp building mold and many strains of this mold are capable of producing trichothecenes. In this report, we have examined the effect of S. chartarum and trichothecene mycotoxins on the proinflammatory cytokine response in human macrophages. As a result, satratoxin-positive S. chartarum activated inflammasome-associated caspase-1, which is needed for proteolytic processing of IL-1beta and IL-18. Furthermore, purified trichothecene mycotoxins, roridin A, verrucarin A, and T-2 toxin activated caspase-1, and these mycotoxins also strongly enhanced LPS-dependent secretion of IL-1beta and IL-18. The satratoxin-positive strain of S. chartarum and the trichothecenes also triggered the activation of caspase-3, which is an effector caspase of apoptosis. Satratoxin-negative S. chartarum was not able to activate either caspase-1 or caspase-3. In conclusion, our results indicate that human macrophages sense trichothecene mycotoxins as a danger signal, which activates caspase-1, and further enables the secretion of IL-1beta and IL-18 from the LPS-primed cells.

  14. Understanding drug resistance in human intestinal protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taweel, Hend Aly

    2015-05-01

    Infections with intestinal protozoa continue to be a major health problem in many areas of the world. The widespread use of a limited number of therapeutic agents for their management and control raises concerns about development of drug resistance. Generally, the use of any antimicrobial agent should be accompanied by meticulous monitoring of its efficacy and measures to minimize resistance formation. Evidence for the occurrence of drug resistance in different intestinal protozoa comes from case studies and clinical trials, sometimes with a limited number of patients. Large-scale field-based assessment of drug resistance and drug sensitivity testing of clinical isolates are needed. Furthermore, the association of drug resistance with certain geographic isolates or genotypes deserves consideration. Drug resistance has been triggered in vitro and has been linked to modification of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, nitroreductases, antioxidant defense, or cytoskeletal system. Further mechanistic studies will have important implications in the development of second generation therapeutic agents.

  15. Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  16. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2016-11-21

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab')2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  17. Campylobacter-induced interleukin-8 responses in human intestinal epithelial cells and primary intestinal chick cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, Erika; Berndt, Angela; Hänel, Ingrid; Köhler, Heike

    2007-09-20

    Campylobacter (C.) jejuni and C. coli can cause gastrointestinal disorders in humans characterized by acute inflammation. Inflammatory signals are initiated during interaction between these pathogens and human intestinal cells, but nothing is known about the stimulation of avian intestinal cells by Campylobacter. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) as a proinflammatory chemokine plays an important role in mobilizing cellular defence mechanism. IL-8 mRNA expression in both human intestinal cells (INT 407) and primary intestinal chick cells (PIC) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The secretion of IL-8 protein by INT407 was measured using ELISA. Although C. jejuni and C. coli are considered to be harmless commensals in the gut of birds, the avian Campylobacter isolates investigated were able to induce the proinflammatory IL-8 in PIC as well as in INT407. In an in vitro system, C. jejuni as well as C. coli were able to induce IL-8 mRNA in PIC. Relation between the virulence properties like toxin production, the ability to invade and to survive in Caco-2 cells and the level of IL-8 mRNA produced by INT 407 and PIC after infection with Campylobacter strains was also investigated.

  18. Effect of heat stress on intestinal barrier function of human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-zhen XIAO

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the heat stress-induced dysfunction of intestinal barrier including intestinal tight junction and apoptosis of epithelial cells. Methods Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell monolayers, serving as the intestinal barrier model, were exposed to different temperature (37-43℃ for designated time. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and horseradish peroxidase (HRP flux permeability were measured to evaluate barrier integrity. Level of tight junction (TJ protein occludin was analyzed by Western blotting. Cell apoptosis rate was determined using Annexin V-FITC/PI kit by flow cytometry. Results Compared with the 37℃ group, TEER lowered and the permeability for HRP increased significantly after heat exposure (P<0.01 in 39℃, 41℃ and 43℃ groups. The expression of occludin increased when the temperature was elevated from 37℃ to 41℃, and it reached the maximal level at 41℃. However, its expression gradually decreased with passage of time at 43℃. Cell apoptosis was enhanced with elevation of the temperature (P<0.05 or P<0.01. Conclusion Heat stress can induce damage to tight junction and enhance apoptosis of epithelial cells, thus causing dysfunction of intestinal epithelial barrier.

  19. Helicobacter pylori phagosome maturation in primary human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlace Glenn N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a micro-aerophilic, spiral-shaped, motile bacterium that is the principal cause of gastric and duodenal ulcers in humans and is a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Despite provoking a strong innate and adaptive immune response in the host, H. pylori persists in the gastric mucosa, avoiding eradication by macrophages and other phagocytic cells, which are recruited to the site of infection. Here we have characterised the critical degradative process of phagosome maturation in primary human macrophages for five genotypically and phenotypically distinct clinical strains of H. pylori. Results All of the H. pylori strains examined showed some disruption to the phagosome maturation process, when compared to control E. coli. The early endosome marker EEA1 and late endosome marker Rab7 were retained on H. pylori phagosomes, while the late endosome-lysosome markers CD63, LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 were acquired in an apparently normal manner. Acquisition of EEA1 by H. pylori phagosomes appeared to occur by two distinct, strain specific modes. H. pylori strains that were negative for the cancer associated virulence factor CagA were detected in phagosomes that recruited large amounts of EEA1 relative to Rab5, compared to CagA positive strains. There were also strain specific differences in the timing of Rab7 acquisition which correlated with differences in the rate of intracellular trafficking of phagosomes and the timing of megasome formation. Megasomes were observed for all of the H. pylori strains examined. Conclusions H. pylori appeared to disrupt the normal process of phagosome maturation in primary human macrophages, appearing to block endosome fission. This resulted in the formation of a hybrid phagosome-endosome-lysosome compartment, which we propose has reduced degradative capacity. Reduced killing by phagocytes is consistent with the persistence of H. pylori in the host, and would

  20. Application of the Human Intestinal Tract Chip to the non-human primate gut microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello Gonzalez, T.D.G.; Passel, van M.W.J.; Tims, S.; Fuentes, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.; Belzer, C.

    2015-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is responsible for various health-related functions, and its diversity can be readily mapped with the 16S ribosomal RNA targeting Human Intestinal Tract (HIT) Chip. Here we characterise distal gut samples from chimpanzees, gorillas and marmosets, and compare them with

  1. Application of the Human Intestinal Tract Chip to the non-human primate gut microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello Gonzalez, T.D.G.; Passel, van M.W.J.; Tims, S.; Fuentes, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.; Belzer, C.

    2015-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is responsible for various health-related functions, and its diversity can be readily mapped with the 16S ribosomal RNA targeting Human Intestinal Tract (HIT) Chip. Here we characterise distal gut samples from chimpanzees, gorillas and marmosets, and compare them with

  2. Quantification and localization of M2 macrophages in human kidneys with acute tubular injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer MB

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Matthew B Palmer,1 Alfred A Vichot,2 Lloyd G Cantley,2 Gilbert W Moeckel1 1Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: This study addresses for the first time the question whether there is significant macrophage population in human kidney sections from patients with acute tubular injury (ATI. We examined therefore the interstitial macrophage population in human kidney tissue with biopsy-proven diagnosis of ATI, minimal change disease (MCD, and MCD with ATI. Kidney biopsies from patients with the above diagnoses were stained with antibodies directed against CD68 (general macrophage marker, CD163 (M2 marker, and HLA-DR (M1 marker and their respective electron microscopy samples were evaluated for the presence of interstitial macrophages. Our study shows that patients with ATI have significantly increased numbers of interstitial CD68+ macrophages, with an increase in both HLA-DR+ M1 macrophages and CD163+ M2 macrophages as compared to patients with MCD alone. Approximately 75% of macrophages were M2 (CD163+ whereas only 25% were M1 (HLA-DR+. M2 macrophages, which are believed to be critical for wound healing, were found to localize close to the tubular basement membrane of injured proximal tubule cells. Ultra structural examination showed close adherence of macrophages to the basement membrane of injured tubular epithelial cells. We conclude that macrophages accumulate around injured tubules following ATI and exhibit predominantly an M2 phenotype. We further speculate that macrophage-mediated repair may involve physical contact between the M2 macrophage and the injured tubular epithelial cell. Keywords: macrophages, acute kidney injury, CD163, HLA-DR, CD68, electron microscopy

  3. Anti-Inflammatory and Antiapoptotic Responses to Infection: A Common Denominator of Human and Bovine Macrophages Infected with Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiara Abendaño

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map is the causative agent of a chronic intestinal inflammation in ruminants named Johne's disease or paratuberculosis and a possible etiopathological agent of human Crohn's disease (CD. Analysis of macrophage transcriptomes in response to Map infection is expected to provide key missing information in the understanding of the role of this pathogen in establishing an inappropriate and persistent infection in a susceptible host and of the molecular mechanisms that might underlie the early phases of CD. In this paper we summarize transcriptomic studies of human and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs, and macrophages-like cell lines in vitro infected with Map. Most studies included in this paper consistently reported common gene expression signatures of bovine and human macrophages in response to Map such as enhanced expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-6, which promote bacterial survival. Overexpression of IL-10 could be responsible for the Map-associated reduction in the expression of the proapoptotic TNF-α gene observed in bovine and human macrophages.

  4. Cloning the human gene for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paralkar, V.; Wistow, G. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was originally identified as a lymphokine. However, recent work strongly suggests a wider role for MIF beyond the immune system. It is expressed specifically in the differentiating cells of the immunologically privileged eye lens and brain, is a delayed early response gene in fibroblasts, and is expressed in many tissues. Here, the authors report the structure of the remarkably small gene for human MIF that has three exons separated by introns of only 189 and 95 bp and covers less than 1 kb. The cloned sequence also includes 1 kb of 5[prime] flanking region. Primer extension and 5[prime] rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) of human brain RNA both indicate the presence of a single transcription start site in a TATA-less promoter. Northern blot analysis shows a single size of MIF mRNA (about 800 nt) in all human tissues examined. In contrast to previous reports, they find no evidence for multiple genes for MIF in the human genome. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Functional characterization of cholera toxin inhibitors using human intestinal organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D.; Pukin, Aliaksei V.; Fu, Ou; Quarles Van Ufford, Linda H C; Janssens, Hettie M.; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Pieters, Roland J.

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical drug testing in primary human cell models that recapitulate disease can significantly reduce animal experimentation and time-to-the-clinic. We used intestinal organoids to quantitatively study the potency of multivalent cholera toxin inhibitors. The method enabled the determination of IC

  6. In silico modelling of the human intestinal microflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerman, DJ; Wilkinson, MHF; Sloot, P; Tan, CJK; Dongarra, JJ; Hoekstra, AG

    2002-01-01

    The ecology of the human intestinal microflora and its interaction with the host are poorly understood. Though more and more data are being acquired, in part using modern molecular methods, development of a quantitative theory has not kept pace with this development. This is in part due to the compl

  7. In Silico Modelling of the Human Intestinal Microflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerman, Derk Jan; Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2002-01-01

    The ecology of the human intestinal microflora and its interaction with the host are poorly understood. Though more and more data are being acquired, in part using modern molecular methods, development of a quantitative theory has not kept pace with this development. This is in part due to the compl

  8. Dietary protein absorption of the small intestine in human neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Maaike W.; de Bruijn, Adrianus C. J. M.; Tibboel, Dick; Renes, Ingrid B.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The intestine plays a key role in the absorption of dietary proteins, which determines growth of human neonates. Bowel resection in the neonatal period brings loss of absorptive and protective surface and may consequently lead to malabsorption of dietary nutrients. However, there are no

  9. Functional characterization of cholera toxin inhibitors using human intestinal organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D.; Pukin, Aliaksei V.; Fu, Ou; Quarles Van Ufford, Linda H C; Janssens, Hettie M.; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Pieters, Roland J.

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical drug testing in primary human cell models that recapitulate disease can significantly reduce animal experimentation and time-to-the-clinic. We used intestinal organoids to quantitatively study the potency of multivalent cholera toxin inhibitors. The method enabled the determination of

  10. Methane and hydrogen production by human intestinal anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, L F; Holbrook, W P; Eastwood, M A

    1982-06-01

    The gas above liquid cultures of a variety of human intestinal anaerobic bacteria was sampled and analysed by headspace gas chromatography. Hydrogen production was greatest with strains of the genus Clostridium, intermediate with anaerobic cocci and least with Bacteroides sp. Very few strains produced methane although small amounts were detected with one strain of B. thetaiotaomicron, C. perfringens and C. histolyticum. There may be a relationship between these anaerobic bacteria and several gastrointestinal disorders in which there is a build up of hydrogen or methane in the intestines.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of human intestinal amoebas in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshyar, H; Rostamkhani, P; Rezaian, M

    2012-01-01

    Many microscopic-based epidemiological surveys on the prevalence of human intestinal pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoa including intestinal amoeba performed in Iran show a high prevalence of human intestinal amoeba in different parts of Iran. Such epidemiological studies on amoebiasis are confusing, mainly due to recently appreciated distinction between the Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. Differential diagnosis can be done by some methods such as PCR-based methods, monoclonal antibodies and the analysis of isoenzyme typing, however the molecular study of these protozoa in Iran is low. Based on molecular studies, it seems that E. dispar is predominant species especially in the central and northern areas of Iran and amoebiasis due to E. histolytica is a rare infection in the country. It is suggested that infection with E. moshkovskii may be common among Iranians. Considering the importance of molecular epidemiology of amoeba in Iran and also the current data, the present study reviews the data currently available on the molecular distribution of intestinal human amoeba in Iran.

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Intestinal Amoebas in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Many microscopic-based epidemiological surveys on the prevalence of human intestinal pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoa including intestinal amoeba performed in Iran show a high prevalence of human intestinal amoeba in different parts of Iran. Such epidemiological studies on amoebiasis are confusing, mainly due to recently appreciated distinction between the Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. Differential diagnosis can be done by some methods such as PCR-based methods, monoclonal antibodies and the analysis of isoenzyme typing, however the molecular study of these protozoa in Iran is low. Based on molecular studies, it seems that E. dispar is predominant species especially in the central and northern areas of Iran and amoebiasis due to E. histolytica is a rare infection in the country. It is suggested that infection with E. moshkovskii may be common among Iranians. Considering the importance of molecular epidemiology of amoeba in Iran and also the current data, the present study reviews the data currently available on the molecular distribution of intestinal human amoeba in Iran.

  13. Impact of diet on human intestinal microbiota and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Anne; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-01-01

    Our intestinal microbiota is involved in the breakdown and bioconversion of dietary and host components that are not degraded and taken up by our own digestive system. The end products generated by our microbiota fuel our enterocytes and support growth but also have signaling functions that generate systemic immune and metabolic responses. Due to the immense metabolic capacity of the intestinal microbiota and its relatively high plasticity, there is great interest in identifying dietary approaches that allow intentional and predictable modulation of the microbiota. In this article, we review the current insights on dietary influence on the human intestinal microbiota based on recent high-throughput molecular studies and interconnections with health. We focus especially on the emerging data that identify the amount and type of dietary fat as significant modulators of the colonic microbiota and its metabolic output.

  14. Tramadol differentially regulates M1 and M2 macrophages from human umbilical cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Chen, Liang; Sun, Yunyun; Li, Yuanhai

    2017-03-17

    Tramadol is an analgesic drug and relieves pain through activating μ-opioid receptors and inhibiting serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake. Emerging evidence shows that it also stimulates immune cells, including NK cells, splenocytes, and lymphocytes, and elevates IL-2 production. However, it remains unknown whether and how tramadol directly affects macrophages. To answer these questions, we collected human umbilical cord blood, isolated macrophages, and examined their responses to tramadol. Although tramadol did not alter resting macrophages and the antigen-presenting function in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages, it regulated M1 and M2 macrophages, which are, respectively, transformed by IFN-γ and IL-4. Interestingly, tramadol inhibits production and secretion of cytokines in M1 macrophages, but facilitates the production of inflammation-responding molecules, synthesized in M2 macrophages. We also found that STAT6 cascade pathway in M2 macrophages was significantly enhanced by tramadol. Therefore, this study reveals that tramadol regulates inflammation by inhibiting M1 macrophages (killing process), but promoting the function of M2 macrophages (healing process).

  15. Cyclic GMP protects human macrophages against peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Adriano G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO can be both pro- and anti-apoptotic in various cell types, including macrophages. This apparent paradox may result from the actions of NO-related species generated in the microenvironment of the cell, for example the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO-. In this study we have examined the ability of NO and ONOO- to evoke apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMϕ, and investigated whether preconditioning by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP is able to limit apoptosis in this cell type. Methods Characterisation of the NO-related species generated by (Z-1- [2-(2-aminoethyl-N-(2-ammonioethylamino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NO and 1,2,3,4-oxatriazolium, 5-amino-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-, chloride (GEA-3162 was performed by electrochemistry using an isolated NO electrode and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometry. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cultured to allow differentiation into MDMϕ. Resultant MDMϕ were treated for 24 h with DETA/NO (100 – 1000 μM or GEA-3162 (10 – 300 μM in the presence or absence of BAY 41–2272 (1 μM, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX; 1 μM, 1H- [1,2,4]oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 20 μM or 8-bromo-cGMP (1 mM. Apoptosis in MDMϕ was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of annexin V binding in combination with propidium iodide staining. Results Electrochemistry and EPR revealed that DETA/NO liberated free NO radical, whilst GEA-3162 concomitantly released NO and O2-, and is therefore a ONOO- generator. NO (DETA/NO had no effect on cell viability, but ONOO- (GEA-3162 caused a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis in MDMϕ. Preconditioning of MDMϕ with NO in combination with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, or the NO-independent stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY 41–2272, significantly attenuated ONOO--induced apoptosis in a cGMP-dependent manner

  16. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk

    2007-01-01

    RNA expression increased markedly when either type of monocytes was differentiated into macrophages. Upon further differentiation into foam cells EL mRNA decreased whereas protein levels remained high compared to monocytes. In conclusion, macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions display high levels...

  17. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Aimee M.; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity...... microorganisms, but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community, independent of identity to known genes, by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host....... Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex...

  18. Irf4-dependent CD103+CD11b+ dendritic cells and the intestinal microbiome regulate monocyte and macrophage activation and intestinal peristalsis in postoperative ileus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, Judith Mira; Gutweiler, Sebastian; Thiebes, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    and large intestinal POI suggested a potential role of the intestinal microbiota. Indeed, antibiotic treatment reduced iNOS levels and ameliorated POI. Conclusions: Our findings reveal that CD103+CD11b+ DCs and the intestinal microbiome are a prerequisite for the activation of intestinal monocytes...

  19. Infant intestinal Enterococcus faecalis down-regulates inflammatory responses in human intestinal cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shugui Wang; Lydia Hui Mei Ng; Wai Ling Chow; Yuan Kun Lee

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the ability of Lactic acid bacteria (LAB)to modulate inflammatory reaction in human intestinal celllines(Caco-2,HT-29 and HCT 116).Different strains of LAB isolatedfrom new born infants and fermented milk,together withthestrains obtained from culture collectionsweretested.METHODS:LABs were treated with human intestinal cell lines.ELISA was used to detect IL-8 and TGF-β protein secretion.Cytokines and Toll like receptors (TLRs) gene expression were assessed using RT-PCR.Conditional medium,sonicated bacteria and UV killed bacteria were used to find the effecter molecules on the bacteria.Carbohydrate oxidation and protein digestion were applied to figure out the molecules'residues.Adhesion assays were further carried out.RESULTS:It was found that Enterococcus faecalis is the main immune modulator among the LABs by downregulation of IL-8 secretion and upregulation of TGF-β.Strikingly,the effect was only observed in four strains of E.faecalis out of the 27 isolated and tested.This implies strain dependent immunomodulation in the host.In addition,E.faecalis may regulate inflammatory responses through TLR3,TLR4,TLR9 and TRAF6.Carbohydrates on the bacterial cell surface are involved in both its adhesion to intestinal cells and regulation of inflammatory responses in the host.CONCLUSION:These data provide a case for the modulation of intestinal mucosal immunity in which specific strains of E.faecalis have uniquely evolved to maintain colonic homeostasis and regulate inflammatoryresponses.

  20. Macrophages and dendritic cells emerge in the liver during intestinal inflammation and predispose the liver to inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Mikami

    Full Text Available The liver is a physiological site of immune tolerance, the breakdown of which induces immunity. Liver antigen-presenting cells may be involved in both immune tolerance and activation. Although inflammatory diseases of the liver are frequently associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, the underlying immunological mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we report two murine models of inflammatory bowel disease: RAG-2(-/- mice adoptively transferred with CD4(+CD45RB(high T cells; and IL-10(-/- mice, accompanied by the infiltration of mononuclear cells in the liver. Notably, CD11b(-CD11c(lowPDCA-1(+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs abundantly residing in the liver of normal wild-type mice disappeared in colitic CD4(+CD45RB(high T cell-transferred RAG-2(-/- mice and IL-10(-/- mice in parallel with the emergence of macrophages (Mφs and conventional DCs (cDCs. Furthermore, liver Mφ/cDCs emerging during intestinal inflammation not only promote the proliferation of naïve CD4(+ T cells, but also instruct them to differentiate into IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells in vitro. The emergence of pathological Mφ/cDCs in the liver also occurred in a model of acute dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis under specific pathogen-free conditions, but was canceled in germ-free conditions. Last, the Mφ/cDCs that emerged in acute DSS colitis significantly exacerbated Fas-mediated hepatitis. Collectively, intestinal inflammation skews the composition of antigen-presenting cells in the liver through signaling from commensal bacteria and predisposes the liver to inflammation.

  1. The role of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor in acute intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghua Xu; Nicholas H Hunt; Shisan Bao

    2008-01-01

    An imbalance of mucosal pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines is crucial in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).GM-CSF influences the development of hemopoietic cells.The precise role of GM-CSF in IBD remains to be elucidated.GM-CSF gene knockout (GM-CSF-/-) and wild-type (Wt) mice were challenged with 2.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for 7 days.The ensued clinical and pathological changes,macrophage infiltration,colonic cytokine production,and bacterial counts were examined.DSS-treated GM-CSF-/- mice developed more severe acute colitis than DSS-treated Wt mice,reflected by a greater body weight loss,more rectal bleeding,and aggravated histopathological changes.More infiltrating macrophages were observed in GM-CSF-/-,compared with Wt mice following DSS challenge,correlating with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)production.The levels of colonic IL-17 and TNF-α were increased significantly in GM-CSF-/- mice,but not in Wt mice,following DSS administration.The level of IL-6 was increased by 1.5- and 2-fold in the colon of GM-CSF-/-and Wt mice,respectively,following DSS challenge.No significant changes in IL-4 and IFN-y were detected in Wt and GM-CSF-/-mice following DSS treatment.The bacteria recovery from colon was increased about 15- and 5-fold,respectively,in Wt mice and GM-CSF-/- mice following DSS challenge.These results suggest that GM-CSF-/- mice are more susceptible to acute DSS-induced colitis,possibly because of an impaired gut innate immune response as a result of diminished GM-CSF.

  2. T3 Regulates a Human Macrophage-Derived TSH-β Splice Variant: Implications for Human Bone Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliram, R; Latif, R; Morshed, S A; Zaidi, M; Davies, T F

    2016-09-01

    TSH and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) are intimately involved in bone biology. We have previously reported the presence of a murine TSH-β splice variant (TSH-βv) expressed specifically in bone marrow-derived macrophages and that exerted an osteoprotective effect by inducing osteoblastogenesis. To extend this observation and its relevance to human bone biology, we set out to identify and characterize a TSH-β variant in human macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses using human TSH-β-specific primers identified a 364-bp product in macrophages, bone marrow, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells that was sequence verified and was homologous to a human TSH-βv previously reported. We then examined TSH-βv regulation using the THP-1 human monocyte cell line matured into macrophages. After 4 days, 46.1% of the THP-1 cells expressed the macrophage markers CD-14 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor and exhibited typical morphological characteristics of macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses of these cells treated in a dose-dependent manner with T3 showed a 14-fold induction of human TSH-βv mRNA and variant protein. Furthermore, these human TSH-βv-positive cells, induced by T3 exposure, had categorized into both M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes as evidenced by the expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor for M1 and CCL-22 for M2. These data indicate that in hyperthyroidism, bone marrow resident macrophages have the potential to exert enhanced osteoprotective effects by oversecreting human TSH-βv, which may exert its local osteoprotective role via osteoblast and osteoclast TSH receptors.

  3. Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives within and modulates apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine production of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Château, Alice; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-04-01

    The human-adapted organism Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhoea, a sexually transmitted infection. It readily colonizes the genital, rectal and nasalpharyngeal mucosa during infection. While it is well established that N. gonorrhoeae recruits and modulates the functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes during infection, how N. gonorrhoeae interacts with macrophages present in infected tissue is not fully defined. We studied the interactions of N. gonorrhoeae with two human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and primary monocytes, all differentiated into macrophages. Most engulfed bacteria were killed in the phagolysosome, but a subset of bacteria was able to survive and replicate inside the macrophages suggesting that those cells may be an unexplored cellular reservoir for N. gonorrhoeae during infection. N. gonorrhoeae was able to modulate macrophage apoptosis: N. gonorrhoeae induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells whereas it inhibited induced apoptosis in U937 cells and primary human macrophages. Furthermore, N. gonorrhoeae induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting a role for macrophages in recruiting polymorphonuclear leukocytes to the site of infection. These results indicate macrophages may serve as a significant replicative niche for N. gonorrhoeae and play an important role in gonorrheal pathogenesis.

  4. Role of intracellular free calcium in killing Penicillium marneffei within human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renqiong; Ji, Guangquan; Ma, Tuan; Huang, Xiaowen; Ren, Hong; Xi, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    Increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) promote phagocyte antimicrobial responses. Here, we investigated macrophages stimulated by Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei). [Ca(2+)]c was determined in macrophages loaded with the fluorescent calcium probe Fura 2/AM as they were stimulated by P. marneffei. We found that P. marneffei induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]c in human macrophages. Further, increased [Ca(2+)]c with the ionophore A23187 promoted phagosomal acidification and maturation and reduced intracellular replication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages, whereas decreased [Ca(2+)]c with the chelation MAPTAM decreased TNF-α production, inhibited phagosomal acidification and maturation and increased intracellular replication of P. marneffei. These data indicate that Ca(2+) signaling may play an important role in controlling the replication of P. marneffei within macrophages.

  5. Killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae by human alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman-Davis, Judy M; O'Reilly, Philip; Davis, Ian C; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Davis, Glenda; Young, K Randall; Devlin, Robert B; Matalon, Sadis

    2002-05-01

    We investigated putative mechanisms by which human surfactant protein A (SP-A) effects killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae by human alveolar macrophages (AMs) isolated from bronchoalveolar lavagates of patients with transplanted lungs. Coincubation of AMs with human SP-A (25 microg/ml) and Klebsiella resulted in a 68% decrease in total colony forming units by 120 min compared with AMs infected with Klebsiella in the absence of SP-A, and this SP-A-mediated effect was abolished by preincubation with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine. Incubation of transplant AMs with SP-A increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) by 70% and nitrite and nitrate (NO(x)) production by 45% (from 0.24 +/- 0.02 to 1.3 +/- 0.21 nmol small middle dot 10(6) AMs(-1).h(-1)). Preincubation with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and abrogated the SP-A-mediated Klebsiella phagocytosis and killing. In contrast, incubation of AMs from normal volunteers with SP-A decreased both [Ca(2+)](i) and NO(x) production and did not result in killing of Klebsiella. Significant killing of Klebsiella was also seen in a cell-free system by sustained production of peroxynitrite (>1 microM/min) at pH 5 but not at pH 7.4. These findings indicate that SP-A mediates pathogen killing by AMs from transplant lungs by stimulating phagocytosis and production of reactive oxygen-nitrogen intermediates.

  6. Development of the human infant intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chana Palmer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost immediately after a human being is born, so too is a new microbial ecosystem, one that resides in that person's gastrointestinal tract. Although it is a universal and integral part of human biology, the temporal progression of this process, the sources of the microbes that make up the ecosystem, how and why it varies from one infant to another, and how the composition of this ecosystem influences human physiology, development, and disease are still poorly understood. As a step toward systematically investigating these questions, we designed a microarray to detect and quantitate the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA gene sequences of most currently recognized species and taxonomic groups of bacteria. We used this microarray, along with sequencing of cloned libraries of PCR-amplified SSU rDNA, to profile the microbial communities in an average of 26 stool samples each from 14 healthy, full-term human infants, including a pair of dizygotic twins, beginning with the first stool after birth and continuing at defined intervals throughout the first year of life. To investigate possible origins of the infant microbiota, we also profiled vaginal and milk samples from most of the mothers, and stool samples from all of the mothers, most of the fathers, and two siblings. The composition and temporal patterns of the microbial communities varied widely from baby to baby. Despite considerable temporal variation, the distinct features of each baby's microbial community were recognizable for intervals of weeks to months. The strikingly parallel temporal patterns of the twins suggested that incidental environmental exposures play a major role in determining the distinctive characteristics of the microbial community in each baby. By the end of the first year of life, the idiosyncratic microbial ecosystems in each baby, although still distinct, had converged toward a profile characteristic of the adult gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Metabolism of (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene by cultured human bronchus and cultured human pulmonary alveolar macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1978-01-01

    The metabolism of (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene by cultured human bronchial epithelium and pulmonary alveolar macrophages was studied. Explants of bronchus were prepared and pulmonary alveolar macrophages were isolated from peripheral lung by trypsinization and by differential adhesion to plastic tissue...

  8. Intravenous Glucose Acutely Stimulates Intestinal Lipoprotein Secretion in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Lewis, Gary F

    2016-07-01

    Increased production of intestinal triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) contributes to dyslipidemia and increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. We have previously demonstrated that enteral glucose enhances lipid-stimulated intestinal lipoprotein particle secretion. Here, we assessed whether glucose delivered systemically by intravenous infusion also enhances intestinal lipoprotein particle secretion in humans. On 2 occasions, 4 to 6 weeks apart and in random order, 10 healthy men received a constant 15-hour intravenous infusion of either 20% glucose to induce hyperglycemia or normal saline as control. Production of TRL-apolipoprotein B48 (apoB48, primary outcomes) and apoB100 (secondary outcomes) was assessed during hourly liquid-mixed macronutrient formula ingestion with stable isotope enrichment and multicompartmental modeling, under pancreatic clamp conditions to limit perturbations in pancreatic hormones (insulin and glucagon) and growth hormone. Compared with saline infusion, glucose infusion induced both hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, increased plasma triglyceride levels, and increased TRL-apoB48 concentration and production rate (Plipoprotein production. Hyperglycemia may contribute to intestinal lipoprotein overproduction in type 2 diabetes. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02607839. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Evolution of symbiotic bacteria in the distal human intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The adult human intestine contains trillions of bacteria, representing hundreds of species and thousands of subspecies. Little is known about the selective pressures that have shaped and are shaping this community's component species, which are dominated by members of the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes divisions. To examine how the intestinal environment affects microbial genome evolution, we have sequenced the genomes of two members of the normal distal human gut microbiota, Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides distasonis, and by comparison with the few other sequenced gut and non-gut Bacteroidetes, analyzed their niche and habitat adaptations. The results show that lateral gene transfer, mobile elements, and gene amplification have played important roles in affecting the ability of gut-dwelling Bacteroidetes to vary their cell surface, sense their environment, and harvest nutrient resources present in the distal intestine. Our findings show that these processes have been a driving force in the adaptation of Bacteroidetes to the distal gut environment, and emphasize the importance of considering the evolution of humans from an additional perspective, namely the evolution of our microbiomes.

  10. Dysfunctional CFTR alters the bactericidal activity of human macrophages against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Del Porto

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation of the lung, as a consequence of persistent bacterial infections by several opportunistic pathogens represents the main cause of mortality and morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Mechanisms leading to increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in CF are not completely known, although the involvement of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR in microbicidal functions of macrophages is emerging. Tissue macrophages differentiate in situ from infiltrating monocytes, additionally, mature macrophages from different tissues, although having a number of common activities, exhibit variation in some molecular and cellular functions. In order to highlight possible intrinsic macrophage defects due to CFTR dysfunction, we have focused our attention on in vitro differentiated macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes. Here we report on the contribution of CFTR in the bactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa of monocyte derived human macrophages. At first, by real time PCR, immunofluorescence and patch clamp recordings we demonstrated that CFTR is expressed and is mainly localized to surface plasma membranes of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM where it acts as a cAMP-dependent chloride channel. Next, we evaluated the bactericidal activity of P. aeruginosa infected macrophages from healthy donors and CF patients by antibiotic protection assays. Our results demonstrate that control and CF macrophages do not differ in the phagocytic activity when infected with P. aeruginosa. Rather, although a reduction of intracellular live bacteria was detected in both non-CF and CF cells, the percentage of surviving bacteria was significantly higher in CF cells. These findings further support the role of CFTR in the fundamental functions of innate immune cells including eradication of bacterial infections by macrophages.

  11. Pharmacological effects of mitraphylline from Uncaria tomentosa in primary human monocytes: Skew toward M2 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, S; de la Puerta, R; Fernandez-Arche, A; Quilez, A M; Muriana, F J G; Garcia-Gimenez, M D; Bermudez, B

    2015-07-21

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willdenow ex Roemer & Schultes) DC. (Rubiaceae) is a Peruvian thorny liana, commonly known as "cat׳s claw", and traditionally used in folk medicine to deal with several inflammatory diseases. Mitraphylline (MTP) is the most abundant pentacyclic oxindolic alkaloid (POA) from U. Tomentosa and has been reported to modify the inflammatory response. Herein, we have sought to identify the mechanisms underlying this modulatory effect of MTP on primary human monocytes and its ability to regulate differentiation processes on human primary monocyte and monocyte-derived macrophages. In vitro studies with human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages were performed. Monocytes and M0 macrophages were exposed to MTP (25μM) and LPS (100ng/mL). M0 macrophages were polarized to M1 and M2 phenotypes in the absence or presence of MTP. The activation state of monocytes/macrophages was assessed by flow cytometry, gene expression and protein analysis of different specific markers. In human primary monocytes, the incubation of MTP for 24h reduced the number of classical (CD14(++)CD16(-)) and intermediate (CD14(++)CD16(+)) subsets when compared to untreated or LPS-treated cells. MTP also reduced the chemotactic capacity of human primary monocytes. In addition, MTP promoted the polarization of M0 macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, the abrogation of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα, IL-6 or IL-1β, as well as the restoration of markers for M2 macrophages in LPS-treated M1 macrophages. Our results suggest that MTP may be a key modulator for regulating the plasticity of monocytes/macrophages and the attenuation of the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthetic cationic peptide IDR-1018 modulates human macrophage differentiation.

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    Olga M Pena

    Full Text Available Macrophages play a critical role in the innate immune response. To respond in a rapid and efficient manner to challenges in the micro-environment, macrophages are able to differentiate towards classically (M1 or alternatively (M2 activated phenotypes. Synthetic, innate defense regulators (IDR peptides, designed based on natural host defence peptides, have enhanced immunomodulatory activities and reduced toxicity leading to protection in infection and inflammation models that is dependent on innate immune cells like monocytes/macrophages. Here we tested the effect of IDR-1018 on macrophage differentiation, a process essential to macrophage function and the immune response. Using transcriptional, protein and systems biology analysis, we observed that differentiation in the presence of IDR-1018 induced a unique signature of immune responses including the production of specific pro and anti-inflammatory mediators, expression of wound healing associated genes, and increased phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Transcription factor IRF4 appeared to play an important role in promoting this IDR-1018-induced phenotype. The data suggests that IDR-1018 drives macrophage differentiation towards an intermediate M1-M2 state, enhancing anti-inflammatory functions while maintaining certain pro-inflammatory activities important to the resolution of infection. Synthetic peptides like IDR-1018, which act by modulating the immune system, could represent a powerful new class of therapeutics capable of treating the rising number of multidrug resistant infections as well as disorders associated with dysregulated immune responses.

  13. Candida albicans Chitin Increases Arginase-1 Activity in Human Macrophages, with an Impact on Macrophage Antimicrobial Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Donna M.; Brown, Gordon D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can cause a variety of diseases, ranging from superficial mucosal infections to life-threatening systemic infections. Phagocytic cells of the innate immune response, such as neutrophils and macrophages, are important first-line responders to an infection and generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as part of their protective antimicrobial response. During an infection, host cells generate nitric oxide through the enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to kill the invading pathogen. Inside the phagocyte, iNOS competes with the enzyme arginase-1 for a common substrate, the amino acid l-arginine. Several pathogenic species, including bacteria and parasitic protozoans, actively modulate the production of nitric oxide by inducing their own arginases or the host’s arginase activity to prevent the conversion of l-arginine to nitric oxide. We report here that C. albicans blocks nitric oxide production in human-monocyte-derived macrophages by induction of host arginase activity. We further determined that purified chitin (a fungal cell wall polysaccharide) and increased chitin exposure at the fungal cell wall surface induces this host arginase activity. Blocking the C. albicans-induced arginase activity with the arginase-specific substrate inhibitor Nω-hydroxy-nor-arginine (nor-NOHA) or the chitinase inhibitor bisdionin F restored nitric oxide production and increased the efficiency of fungal killing. Moreover, we determined that C. albicans influences macrophage polarization from a classically activated phenotype toward an alternatively activated phenotype, thereby reducing antimicrobial functions and mediating fungal survival. Therefore, C. albicans modulates l-arginine metabolism in macrophages during an infection, potentiating its own survival. PMID:28119468

  14. The helminth Trichuris suis suppresses TLR4-induced inflammatory responses in human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottow, M. K.; Klaver, E. J.; van der Pouw Kraan, T. C. T. M.

    2014-01-01

    -CSF)-differentiated) macrophages. Interestingly, we here show that T. suis SPs potently skew inflammatory macrophages into a more anti-inflammatory state in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent manner, and less effects are seen when stimulating macrophages with TLR2 or -3 ligands. Gene microarray analysis of GM......Recent clinical trials in patients with inflammatory diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have shown the beneficial effects of probiotic helminth administration, although the underlying mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Potential cellular targets may...... include innate immune cells that propagate inflammation in these diseases, like pro-inflammatory macrophages. We here investigated the effects of the helminth Trichuris suis soluble products (SPs) on the phenotype and function of human inflammatory (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM...

  15. Viral infection of human lung macrophages increases PDL1 expression via IFNβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl J Staples

    Full Text Available Lung macrophages are an important defence against respiratory viral infection and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-induced macrophage PDL1 expression in the murine lung leads to rapid modulation of CD8+ T cell responses via the PD1 receptor. This PD1/PDL1 pathway may downregulate acute inflammatory responses to prevent tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of PDL1 regulation by human macrophages in response to viral infection. Ex-vivo viral infection models using influenza and RSV were established in human lung explants, isolated lung macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and analysed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Incubation of lung explants, lung macrophages and MDM with X31 resulted in mean cellular infection rates of 18%, 18% and 29% respectively. Viral infection significantly increased cell surface expression of PDL1 on explant macrophages, lung macrophages and MDM but not explant epithelial cells. Infected MDM induced IFNγ release from autologous CD8+ T cells, an effect enhanced by PDL1 blockade. We observed increases in PDL1 mRNA and IFNβ mRNA and protein release by MDM in response to influenza infection. Knockdown of IFNβ by siRNA, resulted in a 37.5% reduction in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection, and a significant decrease in PDL1 mRNA. Furthermore, when MDM were incubated with IFNβ, this cytokine caused increased expression of PDL1 mRNA. These data indicate that human macrophage PDL1 expression modulates CD8+ cell IFNγ release in response to virus and that this expression is regulated by autologous IFNβ production.

  16. Regulation of the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1 gene in primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Gemperle

    Full Text Available The formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1 is mainly expressed by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and plays a role in chemotaxis, killing of microorganisms through phagocytosis, and the generation of reactive oxygen species. A large number of ligands have been identified triggering FPR1 including formylated and non-formylated peptides of microbial and endogenous origin. While the expression of FPR1 in neutrophils has been investigated intensively, knowledge on the regulation of FPR1 expression in polarized macrophages is lacking. In this study we show that primary human neutrophils, monocytes and resting macrophages do express the receptor on their cell surface. Polarization of macrophages with IFNγ, LPS and with the TLR8 ligand 3M-002 further increases FPR1 mRNA levels but does not consistently increase protein expression or chemotaxis towards the FPR1 ligand fMLF. In contrast, polarization of primary human macrophages with IL-4 and IL-13 leading to the alternative activated macrophages, reduces FPR1 cell surface expression and abolishes chemotaxis towards fMLF. These results show that M2 macrophages will not react to triggering of FPR1, limiting the role for FPR1 to chemotaxis and superoxide production of resting and pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages.

  17. Fcgamma receptor-mediated suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Bercoff, Danielle; David, Annie; Sudry, Hugues; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Pancino, Gianfranco

    2003-04-01

    Permissiveness of monocytes and macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is modulated by various stimuli. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) through the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (FcgammaR) inhibits HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Viral p24 production was decreased by 1.5 to 3 log units in MDM infected with both R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains upon stimulation by immobilized IgG but not upon stimulation by soluble IgG or by F(ab')(2) IgG fragments. Although MDM activation by immobilized IgG induced high levels of macrophage-derived chemokine secretion as well as a sustained down-regulation of CD4 and a transient decrease in CCR5 expression, these factors did not appear to play a major role in the suppression of HIV-1 replication. Single-cycle infection of FcgammaR-stimulated MDM with HIV-1 virions pseudotyped with either HIV-1 R5 or vesicular stomatitis virus G envelopes was inhibited, suggesting a postentry restriction of viral replication. PCR analyses of HIV-1 DNA intermediate replication forms suggested that reverse transcription is not affected by stimulation with immobilized human IgG, at least during the first replication cycle. The accumulation of PCR products corresponding to nuclear unintegrated two-long-terminal-repeat circles and the relative decrease of integrated HIV-1 DNA signals suggest an inhibition of proviral integration. Our data, showing that FcgammaR-mediated activation of MDM is a potent mechanism of HIV-1 suppression, raise the possibility that FcgammaR cross-linking by immune complexes may contribute to the control of viral replication in macrophages.

  18. EC,ASMC and Macrophage Oxidize Human Low Density Lipoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Zhao-ming; Wu Jun-zhu; Li Xiao-ming; Chen Li-da; Hong Jia-ling

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of LDL oxidation in vivo , LDL was incubated with endothelium cell (EC),artery smooth muscle cell (ASMC) and macrophage, and then the change of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in cell and medium and the oxidation of LDL by those three cells were assessed. The result showed that LDL promoted the activity of cellular and secretive myeloperoxidase which was concentration-dependent on LDL; with elevation of MPO activity, oxidation of LDL intensified, which was expressed by the formation of conjugated dienes and the elevation of thiobarbituric acid teactive substance (TBARS). Macrophage's MPO activity went up with the increase of LDL at both low and high concentration; EC's MPO activity went up with the increase of LDL only at high concentration and ASMC's MPO activity wasn't sensitive to LDL concentration change. The results suggest that Macrophage might be crucial to the oxidation of LDL in vivo, in which MPO might play an important role.

  19. Human intestinal mucus proteins isolated by transanal irrigation and proctosigmoidoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Andrea Gómez Buitrago

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal mucus essentially consistsof a network of Mucin2 glycoproteinsembedded in many lower molecularweight proteins. This paper contributes tothe proteomic study of human intestinalmucus by comparing two sample collectionmethods (transanal irrigation and brushcytology during proctosigmoidoscopy andanalysis techniques (electrophoresis anddigestion in solution. The entire samplecollection and treatment process is explained,including protein extraction, digestion anddesalination and peptide characterisationusing a nanoAcquity UPLC chromatographcoupled to an HDMS spectrometer equippedwith a nanoESI source. Collecting mucus viatransanal irrigation provided a larger samplevolume and protein concentration from asingle patient. The proctosigmoidoscopysample could be analysed via digestion insolution after depleting albumin. The analysisindicates that a simple mucus lysis methodcan evaluate the electrophoresis and digestionin solution techniques. Studying humanintestinal mucus complexes is importantbecause they perform two essential survivalfunctions for humans as the first biochemicaland physical defences for the gastrointestinaltract and a habitat for intestinal microbiota,which are primarily hosted in the colon andexceeds the human genetic information andcell number 100- and 10-fold (1.

  20. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Marguerite Moore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including, metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity of this microbial community, its recalcitrance to standard cultivation and the immense diversity of its encoded genes has necessitated the development of novel molecular, microbiological, and genomic tools. Functional metagenomics is one such culture-independent technique used for decades to study environmental microorganisms but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community independent of identity to known genes by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host. Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex community and its human host.

  1. Human Milk Hyaluronan Enhances Innate Defense of the Intestinal Epithelium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David R.; Rho, Hyunjin K.; Kessler, Sean P.; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R.; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K.; de la Motte, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn. PMID:23950179

  2. Human milk hyaluronan enhances innate defense of the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David R; Rho, Hyunjin K; Kessler, Sean P; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K; de la Motte, Carol A

    2013-10-04

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn.

  3. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk.

  4. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points.

  5. Human milk and infant intestinal mucosal glycans guide succession of the neonatal intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, David S; Morelli, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Infants begin acquiring intestinal microbiota at parturition. Initial colonization by pioneer bacteria is followed by active succession toward a dynamic ecosystem. Keystone microbes engage in reciprocal transkingdom communication with the host, which is essential for human homeostasis and health; therefore, these bacteria should be considered mutualists rather than commensals. This review discusses the maternal role in providing infants with functional and stable microbiota. The initial fecal inoculum of microbiota results from the proximity of the birth canal and anus; the biological significance of this anatomic proximity could underlie observed differences in microbiota between vaginal and cesarean birth. Secondary sources of inocula include mouths and skin of kin, animals and objects, and the human milk microbiome, but guiding microbial succession may be a primary role of human milk. The unique glycans of human milk cannot be digested by the infant, but are utilized by mutualist bacteria. These prebiotic glycans support expansion of mutualist microbiota, which manifests as differences in microbiota among breastfed and artificially fed infants. Human milk glycans vary by maternal genotype. Milks of genetically distinct mothers and variations in infant mucosal glycan expression support discrete microbiota. Early colonization may permanently influence microbiota composition and function, with ramifications for health.

  6. M2 Polarization of Human Macrophages Favors Survival of the Intracellular Pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae.

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    Tanja Buchacher

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens have developed various strategies to escape immunity to enable their survival in host cells, and many bacterial pathogens preferentially reside inside macrophages, using diverse mechanisms to penetrate their defenses and to exploit their high degree of metabolic diversity and plasticity. Here, we characterized the interactions of the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae with polarized human macrophages. Primary human monocytes were pre-differentiated with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or macrophage colony-stimulating factor for 7 days to yield M1-like and M2-like macrophages, which were further treated with interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide or with interleukin-4 for 48 h to obtain fully polarized M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells exhibited distinct morphology with round or spindle-shaped appearance for M1 and M2, respectively, distinct surface marker profiles, as well as different cytokine and chemokine secretion. Macrophage polarization did not influence uptake of C. pneumoniae, since comparable copy numbers of chlamydial DNA were detected in M1 and M2 at 6 h post infection, but an increase in chlamydial DNA over time indicating proliferation was only observed in M2. Accordingly, 72±5% of M2 vs. 48±7% of M1 stained positive for chlamydial lipopolysaccharide, with large perinuclear inclusions in M2 and less clearly bordered inclusions for M1. Viable C. pneumoniae was present in lysates from M2, but not from M1 macrophages. The ability of M1 to restrict chlamydial replication was not observed in M1-like macrophages, since chlamydial load showed an equal increase over time for M1-like and M2-like macrophages. Our findings support the importance of macrophage polarization for the control of intracellular infection, and show that M2 are the preferred survival niche for C. pneumoniae. M1 did not allow for chlamydial proliferation, but failed to completely eliminate chlamydial infection

  7. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Kovbasnjuk (Olga); N.C. Zachos (Nicholas C.); J. Foulke-Abel (Jennifer); J. In (Julie); E. Blutt, E. (Sarah); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); M. Estes (Mary); M. Donowitz (Mark)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractIdentification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate “indefinite” ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed “mini-intesti

  8. Vasoactive intestinal peptide signaling axis in human leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Glenn; Paul; Dorsam; Keith; Benton; Jarrett; Failing; Sandeep; Batra

    2011-01-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling axis constitutes a master "communication coordinator" between cells of the nervous and immune systems.To date,VIP and its two main receptors expressed in T lymphocytes,vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC)1 and VPAC2,mediate critical cellular functions regulating adaptive immunity,including arresting CD4 T cells in G 1 of the cell cycle,protection from apoptosis and a potent chemotactic recruiter of T cells to the mucosa associated lymphoid compartment of the gastrointestinal tissues.Since the discovery of VIP in 1970,followed by the cloning of VPAC1 and VPAC2 in the early 1990s,this signaling axis has been associated with common human cancers,including leukemia.This review highlights the present day knowledge of the VIP ligand and its receptor expression profile in T cell leukemia and cell lines.Also,there will be a discussion describing how the anti-leukemic DNA binding transcription factor,Ikaros,regulates VIP receptor expression in primary human CD4 T lymphocytes and T cell lymphoblastic cell lines (e.g.Hut-78).Lastly,future goals will be mentioned that are expected to uncover the role of how the VIP signaling axis contributes to human leukemogenesis,and to establish whether the VIP receptor signature expressed by leukemic blasts can provide therapeutic and/or diagnostic information.

  9. Oxysterol mixture and, in particular, 27-hydroxycholesterol drive M2 polarization of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Barbara; Bellora, Francesca; Ricciarelli, Roberta; De Ciucis, Chiara; Furfaro, AnnaLisa; Leardi, Riccardo; Colla, Renata; Pacini, Davide; Traverso, Nicola; Moretta, Alessandro; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Bottino, Cristina; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in atherosclerosis progression. Classically activated M1 macrophages have been found in rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques whereas alternatively activated macrophages, M2, localize in stable plaque. Macrophage accumulation of cholesterol and of its oxidized derivatives (oxysterols) leads to the formation of foam cells, a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions. In this study, the effects of oxysterols in determining the functional polarization of human macrophages were investigated. Monocytes, purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors, were differentiated into macrophages (M0) and treated with an oxysterol mixture, cholesterol, or ethanol, every 4 H for a total of 4, 8, and 12 H. The administration of the compounds was repeated in order to maintain the levels of oxysterols constant throughout the treatment. Compared with ethanol treatment, the oxysterol mixture decreased the surface expression of CD36 and CD204 scavenger receptors and reduced the amount of reactive oxygen species whereas it did not affect either cell viability or matrix metalloprotease-9 activity. Moreover, the oxysterol mixture increased the expression of both liver X receptor α and ATP-binding cassette transporter 1. An enhanced secretion of the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 accompanied these events. The results supported the hypothesis that the constant levels of oxysterols and, in particular, of 27-hydroxycholesterol stimulate macrophage polarization toward the M2 immunomodulatory functional phenotype, contributing to the stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques.

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of human polarized macrophages: more than one role of alternative activation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Derlindati

    Full Text Available Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population which in response to the cytokine milieu polarize in either classically activated macrophages (M1 or alternatively activated macrophages (M2. This plasticity makes macrophages essential in regulating inflammation, immune response and tissue remodeling and a novel therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to describe the transcriptomic profiles of differently polarized human macrophages to generate new hypotheses on the biological function of the different macrophage subtypes.Polarization of circulating monocytes/macrophages of blood donors was induced in vitro by IFN-γ and LPS (M1, by IL-4 (M2a, and by IL-10 (M2c. Unstimulated cells (RM served as time controls. Gene expression profile of M1, M2a, M2c and RM was assessed at 6, 12 and 24h after polarization with Whole Human Genome Agilent Microarray technique. When compared to RM, M1 significantly upregulated pathways involved in immunity and inflammation, whereas M2a did the opposite. Conversely, decreased and increased expression of mitochondrial metabolism, consistent with insulin resistant and insulin sensitive patterns, was seen in M1 and M2a, respectively. The time sequence in the expression of some pathways appeared to have some specific bearing on M1 function. Finally, canonical and non-canonical Wnt genes and gene groups, promoting inflammation and tissue remodeling, were upregulated in M2a compared to RM.Our data in in vitro polarized human macrophages: 1. confirm and extend known inflammatory and anti-inflammatory gene expression patterns; 2. demonstrate changes in mitochondrial metabolism associated to insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in M1 and M2a, respectively; 3. highlight the potential relevance of gene expression timing in M1 function; 4. unveil enhanced expression of Wnt pathways in M2a suggesting a potential dual (pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory role of M2a in

  11. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  12. Human Alveolar Macrophages May Not Be Susceptible to Direct Infection by a Human Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettensohn, David B; Frampton, Mark W; Nichols, Joan E; Roberts, Norbert J

    2016-12-01

    The current studies were undertaken to determine the susceptibility of human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to influenza A virus (IAV) infection in comparison with autologous peripheral blood-derived monocytes-macrophages (PBMs). AMs and PBMs were exposed to IAV in vitro and examined for their ability to bind and internalize IAV, and synthesize viral proteins and RNA. PBMs but not AMs demonstrated binding and internalization of the virus, synthesizing viral proteins and RNA. Exposure of AMs in the presence of a sialidase inhibitor or anti-IAV antibody resulted in viral protein synthesis by the cells. Exposure of AMs to fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled IAV in the presence of anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody also resulted in viral protein synthesis. Thus, human AMs are apparently not susceptible to direct infection by a human IAV but are likely to be infected indirectly in the setting of exposure in the presence of antibody that binds the challenging strain of IAV. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. First report of human intestinal sarcocystosis in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, Virak; Marti, Hanspeter; Chhay, Saomony; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Human intestinal sarcocystosis (HIS), caused by Sarcocystis species, is acquired by eating undercooked meat from sarcocyst-containing cattle (S. hominis, S. heydorni) and pigs (S. suihominis). We report on the detection of human intestinal Sarcocystis infections in a cross-sectional survey of Strongyloides stercoralis in early 2014, in Rovieng District, Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Among 1081 participants, 108 (10.0%) were diagnosed with Sarcocystis spp. oocysts in stool samples. Males had a significantly higher risk of infection than females (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9, p=0.001). None of the reported symptoms (abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, muscle pain and itching skin) occurring in the two weeks preceding the examinations were associated with a Sarcocystis infection. Many Sarcocystis cases were found among those who had participated in a wedding celebration and Chinese New Year festivities, where they had consumed raw or insufficiently cooked beef (83.3%) and pork (38.9%) based dishes. This report documents the first HIS cases in Cambodia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. EC,ASMC and Macrophage Oxidize Human Low Density Lipoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai; Zhao-ming; Wu; Jun-zhu; 等

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of LDL oxidation in vivo, LDL was incubated with endothelium cell (EC),artery smooth muscle cell (ASMC) and macrophage, and then the change of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in cell and medium and the oxidation of LDL by those three cells were assessed. The result showed that LDL promoted the activity of cellular and secretive myeloperoxidase which was concentration-dependent on LDL; with elevation of MPO activity, oxidation of LDL intensified, which was expressed by the formation of conjugated dienes and the elevation of thiobarbituric acid teactive substance (TBARS). Macrophage's MPO activity went up with the increase of LDL at both low and high concentration; EC's MPO activity went up with the increase of LDL only at high concentration and ASMC's MPO activity wasn't sensitive to LDL concentration change. The results LDL in vivo, in which MPO might play an important role.

  15. Transgenic Expression of Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor LPA2 in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells Induces Intestinal Dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Yoshida

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA acts on LPA2 receptor to mediate multiple pathological effects that are associated with tumorigenesis. The absence of LPA2 attenuates tumor progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer, but whether overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to malignant transformation in the intestinal tract has not been studied. In this study, we expressed human LPA2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs under control of the villin promoter. Less than 4% of F1-generation mice had germline transmission of transgenic (TG human LPA2; as such only 3 F1 mice out of 72 genotyped had TG expression. These TG mice appeared anemic with hematochezia and died shortly after birth. TG mice were smaller in size compared with the wild type mouse of the same age and sex. Morphological analysis showed that TG LPA2 colon had hyper-proliferation of IECs resulting in increased colonic crypt depth. Surprisingly, TG small intestine had villus blunting and decreased IEC proliferation and dysplasia. In both intestine and colon, TG expression of LPA2 compromised the terminal epithelial differentiation, consistent with epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, we showed that epithelial dysplasia was observed in founder mouse intestine, correlating LPA2 overexpression with epithelial dysplasia. The current study demonstrates that overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to intestinal dysplasia.

  16. New Data on Human Macrophages Polarization by Hymenolepis diminuta Tapeworm—An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawistowska-Deniziak, Anna; Basałaj, Katarzyna; Strojny, Barbara; Młocicki, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Helminths and their products can suppress the host immune response to escape host defense mechanisms and establish chronic infections. Current studies indicate that macrophages play a key role in the immune response to pathogen invasion. They can be polarized into two distinct phenotypes: M1 and M2. The present paper examines the impact of the adult Hymenolepis diminuta (HD) tapeworm and its excretory/secretory products (ESP) on THP-1 macrophages. Monocytes were differentiated into macrophages and cultured with a living parasite or its ESP. Our findings indicate that HD and ESP have a considerable impact on human THP-1 macrophages. Macrophages treated with parasite ESP (with or without LPS) demonstrated reduced expression of cytokines (i.e., IL-1α, TNFα, TGFβ, IL-10) and chemokines (i.e., IL-8, MIP-1α, RANTES, and IL-1ra), while s-ICAM and CxCL10 expression rose after ESP stimulation. In addition, inflammatory factor expression rose significantly when macrophages were exposed to living parasites. Regarding induced and repressed pathways, significant differences were found between HD and ESP concerning their influence on the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, STAT2, STAT3, AMPKα1, Akt 1/2/3 S473, Hsp60, and Hck. The superior immunosuppressive properties of ESP compared to HD were demonstrated with lower levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23, and IL-12p70 following stimulation. The presence of HD and its ESP were found to stimulate mixed M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes. Our findings indicate new molecular mechanisms involved in the response of human macrophages to tapeworm infection, this could be a valuable tool in understanding the mechanisms underlying the processes of immune regulation during cestodiasis. PMID:28265273

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with Human Dendritic Cells, Macrophages, and Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Moos, Verena; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Hagen, Jana; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Pang, Ervinna; Belogolova, Elena; Churin, Yuri; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause chronic gastritis, gastric cancer, or lymphoma. Myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are most likely involved in the induction and expression of the underlying inflammatory responses. To study the interaction of human APC subsets with H. pylori, we infected monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived (classically activated; M1) macrophages with H. pylori and analyzed phenotypic alterations, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and immunostimulation. Since we detected CD163+ (alternatively activated; M2) macrophages in gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive patients, we also included monocyte-derived M2 macrophages in the study. Upon H. pylori infection, monocytes secreted interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12p40 (partially secreted as IL-23) but not IL-12p70. Infected DCs became activated, as shown by the enhanced expression of CD25, CD80, CD83, PDL-1, and CCR7, and secreted IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-23. However, infection led to significantly downregulated CD209 and suppressed the constitutive secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). H. pylori-infected M1 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD32, downregulated CD11b and HLA-DR, and secreted mainly IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, and IL-23. Activation of DCs and M1 macrophages correlated with increased capacity to induce T-cell proliferation and decreased phagocytosis of dextran. M2 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD206 and secreted IL-10 but produced less of the proinflammatory cytokines than M1 macrophages. Thus, H. pylori affects the functions of human APC subsets differently, which may influence the course and the outcome of H. pylori infection. The suppression of MIF in DCs constitutes a novel immune evasion mechanism exploited by H. pylori. PMID:22615251

  18. Cytokines and macrophage function in humans - role of stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We have begun this study to commence the determination of the role of mild chronic stress in the effects of space flight on macrophage/monocyte function, a component of the immune response. Medical students undergoing regular periods of stress and relaxation have been shown to be an excellent model for determining the effects of stress on immune responses. We have begun using this model using the macrophage/monocyte as model leukocyte. The monocyte/macrophage plays a central role in immunoregulation. The studies to be included in this three year project are the effects of stress on: (1) interactions of monocytes with microbes, (2) monocyte production of cytokines, (3) monocyte phagocytosis and activity, and (4) monocyte expression of cell surface antigens important in immune responses. Stress hormone levels will also be carried out to determine if there is a correlation between stress effects on immune responses and hormonal levels. Psychological testing to insure subjects are actually stressed or relaxed at the time of testing will also be carried out. The results obtained from the proposed studies should be comparable with space flight studies with whole animals and isolated cell cultures. When complete this study should allow the commencement of the establishment of the role of stress as one compartment of the induction of immune alterations by space flight.

  19. Entrance and Survival of Brucella pinnipedialis Hooded Seal Strain in Human Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72 – 96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  20. Entrance and survival of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages and epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett K Larsen

    Full Text Available Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis and cetaceans (B. ceti from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17 by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1, two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1, and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3 were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72-96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3, suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary.

  1. Interleukin-1β mediates macrophage-induced impairment of insulin signaling in human primary adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dan; Madi, Mohamed; Ding, Cherlyn; Fok, Matthew; Steele, Thomas; Ford, Christopher; Hunter, Leif; Bing, Chen

    2014-08-01

    Adipose tissue expansion during obesity is associated with increased macrophage infiltration. Macrophage-derived factors significantly alter adipocyte function, inducing inflammatory responses and decreasing insulin sensitivity. Identification of the major factors that mediate detrimental effects of macrophages on adipocytes may offer potential therapeutic targets. IL-1β, a proinflammatory cytokine, is suggested to be involved in the development of insulin resistance. This study investigated the role of IL-1β in macrophage-adipocyte cross-talk, which affects insulin signaling in human adipocytes. Using macrophage-conditioned (MC) medium and human primary adipocytes, we examined the effect of IL-1β antagonism on the insulin signaling pathway. Gene expression profile and protein abundance of insulin signaling molecules were determined, as was the production of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokines. We also examined whether IL-1β mediates MC medium-induced alteration in adipocyte lipid storage. MC medium and IL-1β significantly reduced gene expression and protein abundance of insulin signaling molecules, including insulin receptor substrate-1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase p85α, and glucose transporter 4 and phosphorylation of Akt. In contrast, the expression and release of the proinflammatory markers, including IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 by adipocytes were markedly increased. These changes were significantly reduced by blocking IL-1β activity, its receptor binding, or its production by macrophages. MC medium-inhibited expression of the adipogenic factors and -stimulated lipolysis was also blunted with IL-1β neutralization. We conclude that IL-1β mediates, at least in part, the effect of macrophages on insulin signaling and proinflammatory response in human adipocytes. Blocking IL-1β could be beneficial for preventing obesity-associated insulin resistance and inflammation in human adipose tissue. Copyright

  2. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Liu, Hao [Affiliated Cancer Hospital and Cancer Research Institute, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510095 (China); Wang, Hongsheng [Department of Microbial and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Xu, Meiying, E-mail: xumy@gdim.cn [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health.

  3. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Register, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture.The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular......-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in women...... with aortic calcifications compared to those without. CONCLUSIONS: Human macrophage foam cells degrade the atherosclerotic plaques though cathepsin K mediated processes, resulting in increase in levels of CTX-I. Serum CTX-I was not elevated in women with aortic calcification, likely due to the contribution...

  4. Prediction of drug intestinal absorption in human using the Ussing chamber system: A comparison of intestinal tissues from animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Masateru; Koga, Toshihisa; Kondo, Satoshi; Yoda, Noriaki; Emoto, Chie; Mukai, Tadashi; Toguchi, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    An adequate evaluation system for drug intestinal absorption is essential in the pharmaceutical industry. Previously, we established a novel prediction system of drug intestinal absorption in humans, using the mini-Ussing chamber equipped with human intestinal tissues. In this system, the TI value was defined as the sum of drug amounts transported to the basal-side component (X(corr)) and drug amounts accumulated in the tissue (T(corr)), which are normalized by AUC of a drug in the apical compartment, as an index for drug absorption. In order to apply this system to the screening assay, it is important to understand the differences between animal and human tissues in the intestinal absorption of drugs. In this study, the transport index (TI) values of three drugs, with different levels of membrane permeability, were determined to evaluate the rank order of drug absorbability in intestinal tissues from rats, dogs, and monkeys. The TI values in small intestinal tissues in rats and dogs showed a good correlation with those in humans. On the other hand, the correlation of TI values in monkeys was lower compared to rats and dogs. The rank order of the correlation coefficient between human and investigated animal tissues was as follows: dog (r(2)=0.978), rat (r(2)=0.955), and monkey (r(2)=0.620). TI values in large intestinal tissues from rats (r(2)=0.929) and dogs (r(2)=0.808) also showed a good correlation. The obtained TI values in small intestinal tissues in rats and dogs were well correlated with the fraction of drug absorbed (Fa) in humans. From these results, the mini-Ussing chamber, equipped with intestinal tissues in rats and dogs, would be useful as a screening tool in the drug discovery stage. In addition, the obtained TI values can be used for the prediction of the Fa in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Nicotinergic Peptides SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 on Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Immunocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex I. Chernyavsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A search for novel and more efficient therapeutic modalities of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is one of the most important tasks of contemporary medicine. The anti-inflammatory action of nicotine in IBD might be therapeutic, but its toxicity due to off-target and nonreceptor effects limited its use and prompted a search for nontoxic nicotinergic drugs. We tested the hypothesis that SLURP-1 and -2—the physiological nicotinergic substances produced by the human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC and immunocytes—can mimic the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine. We used human CCL-241 enterocytes, CCL-248 colonocytes, CCRF-CEM T-cells, and U937 macrophages. SLURP-1 diminished the TLR9-dependent secretion of IL-8 by CCL-241, and IFNγ-induced upregulation of ICAM-1 in both IEC types. rSLURP-2 inhibited IL-1β-induced secretion of IL-6 and TLR4- and TLR9-dependent induction of CXCL10 and IL-8, respectively, in CCL-241. rSLURP-1 decreased production of TNFα by T-cells, downregulated IL-1β and IL-6 secretion by macrophages, and moderately upregulated IL-10 production by both types of immunocytes. SLURP-2 downregulated TNFα and IFNγR in T-cells and reduced IL-6 production by macrophages. Combining both SLURPs amplified their anti-inflammatory effects. Learning the pharmacology of SLURP-1 and -2 actions on enterocytes, colonocytes, T cells, and macrophages may help develop novel effective treatments of IBD.

  6. INTESTINAL VIROME AND NORMAL MICROFLORA OF HUMAN: FEATURES OF INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobyr V.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Intestinal bacteria defend the host organism and narrow pathogenic bacterial colonization. However, the microbiome effect to enteric viruses is unexplored largely as well as role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of viral infections in general. This review focuses on precisely these issues. Keywords: microbiome, virome, normal microflora, enteric viruses, contagiousness. In this review article, facts about viral persistence in the human gut are summarized. It is described the role of viral populations during health and diseases. After analyzing of the literary facts it was concluded that the gastrointestinal tract is an environment for one from the most complex microbial ecosystems, which requires of more deeper study of its composition, role in physiological processes, as well as the dynamics of changes under influence of the environment. Normal microflora performs a different important functions providing the physiological homeostasis of the human body, including, in particular, an important role in the human metabolic processes, supporting of homeostasis, limiting of colonization by infectious bacteria. The multifactorial significance of the normal gastrointestinal microflora can be divided into immunological, structural and metabolic functions. At the same time, interaction between intestinal microflora and enteric viruses has not been studied largely. In recent years, much attention is paid to study of viruses-bacteria associations, and it is possible, obtained results should change our understanding of microbiota role in the systematic pathogenesis of the diseases with viral etiology. In contrast to the well-known benefits of normal microflora to the host, the viruses can use intestinal microflora as a trigger for replication at the optimal region. Recent studies give a reason for assumption that depletion of normal microflora with antibiotics can determining the antiviral effect. Thus, the role of commensal bacteria in viral

  7. The predominant cholecystokinin in human plasma and intestine is cholecystokinin-33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Sun, G; Christensen, T;

    2001-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) occurs in multiple molecular forms; the major ones are CCK-58, -33, -22, and -8. Their relative abundance in human plasma and intestine, however, is debated. To settle the issue, extracts of intestinal biopsies and plasma from 10 human subjects have been examined...... is the second most abundant ( approximately 34% and 30%, respectively). In contrast, CCK-58 is less abundant in human intestines ( approximately 18%) and plasma ( approximately 11%). Its predominance in feline intestines, however, was confirmed. Hence, the results show a significant species variation...

  8. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells.

  9. Common occurrence of antibacterial agents in human intestinal microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima eDrissi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments have revealed many active mechanisms by which bacteria can inhibit the growth of other organisms. Bacteriocins are a diverse group of natural ribosomally-synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by a wide range of bacteria and which seem to play an important role in mediating competition within bacterial communities. In this study, we have identified and established the structural classification of putative bacteriocins encoded by 317 microbial genomes in the human intestine. On the basis of homologies to available bacteriocin sequences, mainly from lactic acid bacteria, we report the widespread occurrence of bacteriocins across the gut microbiota: 175 bacteriocins were found to be encoded in Firmicutes, 79 in Proteobacteria, 34 in Bacteroidetes and 25 in Actinobacteria. Bacteriocins from gut bacteria displayed wide differences among phyla with regard to class distribution, net positive charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure, but the α-helix was the most abundant structure. The peptide structures and physiochemical properties of bacteriocins produced by the most abundant bacteria in the gut, the Firmicutes and the Bacteroidetes, seem to ensure low antibiotic activity and participate in permanent intestinal host defence against the proliferation of harmful bacteria. Meanwhile, the potentially harmful bacteria, including the Proteobacteria, displayed highly effective bacteriocins, probably supporting the virulent character of diseases. These findings highlight the eventual role played by bacteriocins in gut microbial competition and their potential place in antibiotic therapy.

  10. NFATc1 regulation of TRAIL expression in human intestinal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingding Wang

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL; Apo2 has been shown to promote intestinal cell differentiation. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT participates in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes, including differentiation. Here, we examined the role of NFAT in the regulation of TRAIL in human intestinal cells. Treatment with a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA plus the calcium ionophore A23187 (Io increased NFAT activation and TRAIL expression; pretreatment with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, an antagonist of NFAT signaling, diminished NFAT activation and TRAIL induction. In addition, knockdown of NFATc1, NFATc2, NFATc3, and NFATc4 blocked PMA/Io increased TRAIL protein expression. Expression of NFATc1 activated TRAIL promoter activity and increased TRAIL mRNA and protein expression. Deletion of NFAT binding sites from the TRAIL promoter did not significantly abrogate NFATc1-increased TRAIL promoter activity, suggesting an indirect regulation of TRAIL expression by NFAT activation. Knockdown of NFATc1 increased Sp1 transcription factor binding to the TRAIL promoter and, importantly, inhibition of Sp1, by chemical inhibition or RNA interference, increased TRAIL expression. These studies identify a novel mechanism for TRAIL regulation by which activation of NFATc1 increases TRAIL expression through negative regulation of Sp1 binding to the TRAIL promoter.

  11. Excipient-mediated supersaturation stabilization in human intestinal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevernage, Jan; Forier, Thomas; Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2011-04-04

    It was the purpose of this study to investigate excipient-mediated precipitation inhibition upon induction of supersaturation of poorly water-soluble drugs in aspirated human intestinal fluids (HIF) representing both the fasted and fed state. Etravirine, ritonavir, loviride, danazol and fenofibrate were selected as model compounds. For comparative purposes, precipitation inhibition was also evaluated in simple aqueous buffer, and in intestinal simulation media representative for the fasted and fed state (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively). Supersaturation was induced in the test media containing predissolved excipient (HPMC-AS, HPMC-E5, HPMC-E50, HPMC-E4M, HPMC-P and PVP) at a defined degree of supersaturation (DS = 20) using the solvent shift method. The results illustrate that cellulosic polymers can reduce the precipitation rate and stabilize supersaturation in HIF. The extent of stabilization was compound and excipient dependent but independent of the nutritional state. Whenever excipient effects were observed, the predictive value of simple buffer or FaSSIF/FeSSIF was rather limited. In general, excipient-mediated precipitation inhibition was less pronounced in HIF compared to simple aqueous buffer or FaSSIF/FeSSIF. However, excipients showing no effect in simple aqueous buffer or FaSSIF/FeSSIF also proved to be ineffective in HIF, indicating the value of these simulation media in the elimination of excipients during formulation development.

  12. Response of intestinal cells and macrophages to an orally administered cellulose-PEG based polymer as a potential treatment for intractable edemas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Annaclaudia; Sannino, Alessandro; Cozzolino, Anna; Quintiliano, Sergio Nappo; Lamberti, Monica; Ambrosio, Luigi; Nicolais, Luigi

    2005-07-01

    The elimination of water from the body represents a fundamental therapeutic goal in those diseases in which oedemas occur. Aim of this work is the design of a material able to absorb large amount of water to be used, by oral administration, in those cases in which resistance to diuretics appears. Sorption and mechanical properties of the cellulose based superabsorbent hydrogel acting as a water elimination system have been modulated through the insertion of molecular spacers between the crosslinks. Starting polymers are the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose (CMCNa), a polyelectrolyte cellulose derivative, and the hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), a non-polyelectrolyte derivative. Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) with various molecular weights, has been linked by its free ends at two divinylsulfone (DVS) crosslinker molecules, in order to increase the average distance between two crosslinking sites and thus acting as spacer. Both the effect of concentration and molecular weight of the spacer resulted to significantly affect the hydrogel final sorption properties and thus the efficiency of the body water elimination system. Biocompatibility studies have been performed to test the hydrogel compatibility with respect to intestinal and macrophages cell lines. To investigate the effects of intestinal cells conditioned media after the contact with the gel on macrophages nitric oxide release tests have been carried out.

  13. Community and genomic analysis of the human small intestine microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.

    2013-01-01

      Our intestinal tract is densely populated by different microbes, collectively called microbiota, of which the majority are bacteria. Research focusing on the intestinal microbiota often use fecal samples as a representative of the bacteria that inhabit the end of the large intestine. These s

  14. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in circular muscle of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    1993-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) may be important regulatory cells in gut muscle layers. This study examined ICC within the circular muscle of human small intestine.......Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) may be important regulatory cells in gut muscle layers. This study examined ICC within the circular muscle of human small intestine....

  15. Advanced approaches to characterize the human intestinal microbiota by computational meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikkilä, J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2010-01-01

    GOALS: We describe advanced approaches for the computational meta-analysis of a collection of independent studies, including over 1000 phylogenetic array datasets, as a means to characterize the variability of human intestinal microbiota. BACKGROUND: The human intestinal microbiota is a complex micr

  16. Household air pollution causes dose-dependent inflammation and altered phagocytosis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylance, Jamie; Fullerton, Duncan G; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K A; Wootton, Daniel G; Glennie, Sarah J; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Stephen B

    2015-05-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke-exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions.

  17. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithelial cells, while endothelin-3 was added to stimulate their growth. By adding endothelin-3, the achievement ratio (viable cell cultures/total cultures was enhanced to 60% of a total of 10 cultures (initiated from 8 distinct fetal small intestines, allowing the generation of viable epithelial cell cultures. Western blot, real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 had high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated markers such as sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV also showed high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells, with the expression of surface markers (cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 and secretion of cytokines (sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, may be cultured by the thermolysin and endothelin-3 method and maintained for at least 20 passages. This is relatively simple, requiring no sophisticated techniques or instruments, and may have a number of varied applications.

  18. NLRP3 Inflammasome Expression and Signaling in Human Diabetic Wounds and in High Glucose Induced Macrophages

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    Xiaotian Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To investigate the contribution and mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome expression in human wounds in diabetes mellitus and in high glucose induced macrophages. Methods. In the present study, we compared the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome in debridement wound tissue from diabetic and nondiabetic patients. We also examined whether high glucose induces NLRP3 inflammasome expression in cultures THP-1-derived macrophages and the influence on IL-1β expression. Results. The expressions of NLRP3, caspase1, and IL-1β, at both the mRNA and protein level, were significantly higher in wounds of diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic wounds (P<0.05. High glucose induced a significant increase in NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β expression in THP-1-derived macrophages. M1 macrophage surface marker with CCR7 was significantly upregulated after high glucose stimulation. SiRNA-mediated silencing of NLRP3 expression downregulates the expression of IL-1β. Conclusion. The higher expression of NLRP3, caspase1, and secretion of IL-1β, signaling, and activation might contribute to the hyperinflammation in the human diabetic wound and in high glucose induced macrophages. It may be a novel target to treat the DM patients with chronic wound.

  19. Modulation of Stat-1 in Human Macrophages Infected with Different Species of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria

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    Giuditta Fiorella Schiavano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The infection of human macrophages by pathogenic bacteria induces different signaling pathways depending on the type of cellular receptors involved in the microorganism entry and on their mechanism(s of survival and replication in the host cell. It was reported that Stat proteins play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the changes in Stat-1 activation (phosphorylation in p-tyr701 after uptake of two Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila characterized by their varying abilities to enter, survive, and replicate in human macrophages. Comparing the results obtained with Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, Stat-1 activation in macrophages does not seem to be related to LPS content. The p-tyr701Stat-1 expression levels were found to be independent of the internalized bacterial number and IFN-γ release. On the contrary, Jak/Stat-1 pathway activation only occurs when an active infection has been established in the host macrophage, and it is plausible that the differences in the expression levels of p-tyr701Stat-1 could be due to different survival mechanisms or to differences in bacteria life cycles within macrophages.

  20. Discovering Molecules That Regulate Efferocytosis Using Primary Human Macrophages and High Content Imaging.

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    Sandra Santulli-Marotto

    Full Text Available Defective clearance of apoptotic cells can result in sustained inflammation and subsequent autoimmunity. Macrophages, the "professional phagocyte" of the body, are responsible for efficient, non-phlogistic, apoptotic cell clearance. Controlling phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages is an attractive therapeutic opportunity to ameliorate inflammation. Using high content imaging, we have developed a system for evaluating the effects of antibody treatment on apoptotic cell uptake in primary human macrophages by comparing the Phagocytic Index (PI for each antibody. Herein we demonstrate the feasibility of evaluating a panel of antibodies of unknown specificities obtained by immunization of mice with primary human macrophages and show that they can be distinguished based on individual PI measurements. In this study ~50% of antibodies obtained enhance phagocytosis of apoptotic cells while approximately 5% of the antibodies in the panel exhibit some inhibition. Though the specificities of the majority of antibodies are unknown, two of the antibodies that improved apoptotic cell uptake recognize recombinant MerTK; a receptor known to function in this capacity in vivo. The agonistic impact of these antibodies on efferocytosis could be demonstrated without addition of either of the MerTK ligands, Gas6 or ProS. These results validate applying the mechanism of this fundamental biological process as a means for identification of modulators that could potentially serve as therapeutics. This strategy for interrogating macrophages to discover molecules regulating apoptotic cell uptake is not limited by access to purified protein thereby increasing the possibility of finding novel apoptotic cell uptake pathways.

  1. R1: Immunohistochemical study of mucins in human intestinal spirochetosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Sho; Shimizu, Ken; Tominaga, Susumu; Nakanishi, Kuniaki

    2017-02-08

    Most patients with human intestinal spirochetosis (HIS; a colorectal bacterial infection caused by Brachyspira species) seem asymptomatic, and its pathogenicity remains unclear. Recently, alterations in mucin expression were reported in animal Brachyspira infection. The present question was "Is mucin expression altered in HIS?". Using antibodies for MUCs 1, 2, 4, 5 AC, and 6, we immunohistochemically compared 215 specimens from 83 histology-confirmed HIS cases with 106 specimens from 26 non-HIS cases. Positive staining (which included even focal positive staining) was rated "high (+)" or "low (+)". Results were analysed for four categories of lesions, and associations between MUC expression and spirochetal presence were also analysed. In the "specimens without polyps or adenocarcinoma" category: high (+) MUC2-positivity was more frequent in HIS than in control. In the hyperplasia/serrated polyp category: in HIS (vs. control), the MUC5AC-positivity rate was lower, while high (+) MUC4-positivity was more frequent. In the conventional adenoma category: in HIS (vs. control), the MUC1-positivity rate was lower, while both high (+) MUC2-positivity and high (+) MUC5AC-positivity were less frequent. In the adenocarcinoma category: high (+) MUC2-positivity was more frequent in HIS than in control. Among the above mucins, only MUC1-positivity was significantly associated with an absence of the so-called fringe formation, an absence of spiral organisms within mucus, and an absence of strong immunopositive materials within the epithelial layer and within the subepithelial layer. The results suggest that Brachyspira infection or a related change in the microbiome may alter the large intestine mucin-expression profile in humans.

  2. M1- and M2-type macrophage responses are predictive of adverse outcomes in human atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica De Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease caused by endothelial injury, lipid deposition and oxidative stress. This progressive disease can be converted into an acute clinical event by plaque rupture and thrombosis. In the context of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, macrophages uniquely possess a dual functionality, regulating lipid accumulation and metabolism and sustaining the chronic inflammatory response, two of the most well documented pathways associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. Macrophages are heterogeneous cell populations and it is hypothesized that, during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, macrophages in the developing plaque can switch from a pro-inflammatory (MΦ1 to an anti-inflammatory (MΦ2 phenotype and vice versa, depending on the microenvironment. The aim of this study was to identify changes in macrophage subpopulations in the progression of human atherosclerotic disease. Established atherosclerotic plaques from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with existing coronary artery disease undergoing carotid endarterectomy were recruited to the study. Comprehensive histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to quantify the cellular content and macrophage subsets of atherosclerotic lesion. In parallel, expression of MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophage markers were analysed by real time-PCR and Western blot analysis.Gross analysis and histological staining demonstrated that symptomatic plaques presented greater haemorrhagic activity and the internal carotid was the most diseased segment, based on the predominant prevalence of fibrotic and necrotic tissue, calcifications and haemorrhagic events. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that both MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophages are present in human plaques. However, MΦ2 macrophages are localised to more stable locations within the lesion. Importantly, gene and protein expression analysis of MΦ1/ MΦ2 markers evidenced that MΦ1

  3. Metaproteomics of the Human Intestinal Tract to Assess Microbial Functionality and Interactions with the Host

    OpenAIRE

    Kolmeder, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    Human physiological processes are complemented by those of the microbiota, the collection of all microbes living in and on our body. The human intestinal microbiota is one of the most prominent representatives and many associations with a wide spectrum of human diseases have been identified. Analysing faecal material with nucleic acid based approaches revealed the species richness of the intestinal microbiota and its individuality, being unique to each human being. In addition, to date approx...

  4. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

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    Larsen Lise

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM of atherosclerotic plaques by cathepsin K mediated processes. Methods We 1 cultured human macrophages on ECM and measured cathepsin K generated fragments of type I collagen (C-terminal fragments of Type I collagen (CTX-I 2 investigated the presence of CTX-I in human coronary arteries and 3 finally investigated the clinical potential by measuring circulating CTX-I in women with and without radiographic evidence of aortic calcified atherosclerosis. Results Immune-histochemistry of early and advanced lesions of coronary arteries demonstrated co-localization of Cathepsin-K and CTX-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in women with aortic calcifications compared to those without. Conclusions Human macrophage foam cells degrade the atherosclerotic plaques though cathepsin K mediated processes, resulting in increase in levels of CTX-I. Serum CTX-I was not elevated in women with aortic calcification, likely due to the contribution of CTX-I from osteoclastic bone resorption which involves Cathepsin-K. The human macrophage model system may be used to identify important pathway leading to excessive proteolytic plaque remodeling and plaque rupture.

  5. Cyclic AMP enhancing drugs modulate eicosanoid release from human alveolar macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D. Beusenberg; H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); I.L. Bonta; J.G.C. van Amsterdam (Jan)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX), salbutamol and sodium nitroprusside was evaluated regarding PGE2 and LTB4 release and cAMP and cGMP level in human alveolar macrophages obtained from controls and COPD patients. Basal levels per five million co

  6. Human in vivo regional intestinal permeability: quantitation using site-specific drug absorption data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Erik; Dahlgren, David; Roos, Carl; Lennernäs, Hans

    2015-06-01

    Application of information on regional intestinal permeability has been identified as a key aspect of successful pharmaceutical product development. This study presents the results and evaluation of an approach for the indirect estimation of site-specific in vivo intestinal effective permeability (Peff) in humans. Plasma concentration-time profiles from 15 clinical studies that administered drug solutions to specific intestinal regions were collected and analyzed. The intestinal absorption rate for each drug was acquired by deconvolution, using historical intravenous data as reference, and used with the intestinal surface area and the dose remaining in the lumen to estimate the Peff. Forty-three new Peff values were estimated (15 from the proximal small intestine, 11 from the distal small intestine, and 17 from the large intestine) for 14 active pharmaceutical ingredients representing a wide range of biopharmaceutical properties. A good correlation (r(2) = 0.96, slope = 1.24, intercept = 0.030) was established between these indirect jejunal Peff estimates and jejunal Peff measurements determined directly using the single-pass perfusion double balloon technique. On average, Peff estimates from the distal small intestine and large intestine were 90% and 40%, respectively, of those from the proximal small intestine. These results support the use of the evaluated deconvolution method for indirectly estimating regional intestinal Peff in humans. This study presents the first comprehensive data set of estimated human regional intestinal permeability values for a range of drugs. These biopharmaceutical data can be used to improve the accuracy of gastrointestinal absorption predictions used in drug development decision-making.

  7. Tacaribe virus but not junin virus infection induces cytokine release from primary human monocytes and macrophages.

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    Allison Groseth

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the development of disease during arenavirus infection are poorly understood. However, common to all hemorrhagic fever diseases is the involvement of macrophages as primary target cells, suggesting that the immune response in these cells may be of paramount importance during infection. Thus, in order to identify features of the immune response that contribute to arenavirus pathogenesis, we have examined the growth kinetics and cytokine profiles of two closely related New World arenaviruses, the apathogenic Tacaribe virus (TCRV and the hemorrhagic fever-causing Junin virus (JUNV, in primary human monocytes and macrophages. Both viruses grew robustly in VeroE6 cells; however, TCRV titres were decreased by approximately 10 fold compared to JUNV in both monocytes and macrophages. Infection of both monocytes and macrophages with TCRV also resulted in the release of high levels of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, while levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-12 were not affected. However, we could show that the presence of these cytokines had no direct effect on growth of either TCRV of JUNV in macrophages. Further analysis also showed that while the production of IL-6 and IL-10 are dependent on viral replication, production of TNF-α also occurs after exposure to UV-inactivated TCRV particles and is thus independent of productive virus infection. Surprisingly, JUNV infection did not have an effect on any of the cytokines examined indicating that, in contrast to other viral hemorrhagic fever viruses, macrophage-derived cytokine production is unlikely to play an active role in contributing to the cytokine dysregulation observed in JUNV infected patients. Rather, these results suggest that an early, controlled immune response by infected macrophages may be critical for the successful control of infection of apathogenic viruses and prevention of subsequent disease, including systemic cytokine dysregulation.

  8. Effect of ceftobiprole on the normal human intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, Tobias; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Beck, Olof; Asker-Hagelberg, Charlotte; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2010-12-01

    Ceftobiprole is a new broad-spectrum pyrrolidinone cephem active against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Gram-negative bacteria such as Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of administration of ceftobiprole on the normal intestinal microflora. Twelve healthy subjects (six males and six females) aged 20-31 years received ceftobiprole 500 mg by intravenous infusion every 8h for 7 days. Plasma samples were collected on Days -1, 1, 4, 7, 10, 14 and 21 for determination of drug concentration by biological and chemical methods. Faecal samples were collected on Days -1, 2, 4, 7, 10, 14 and 21. For analysis of the microflora, faecal specimens were cultured on non-selective and selective media. Different colony types were counted, isolated in pure culture and identified to genus level. All new colonising aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were tested for susceptibility to ceftobiprole. Plasma concentrations of ceftobiprole 10 min after completion of infusion were as follows: Day 1, 14.7-23.6 mg/L; Day 4, 15.9-24.5 mg/L; and Day 7, 15.9-23.9 mg/L. No ceftobiprole was detected in plasma on Days -1, 10, 14 and 21. No measurable concentrations of ceftobiprole were found in faeces on Days -1, 2, 4, 7, 10, 14 and 21. There were minor changes in the numbers of enteric bacteria, enterococci and Candida albicans and there were moderate changes in the numbers of bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, clostridia and Bacteroides spp. during the same period. No Clostridium difficile strains or toxins were found. No new colonising aerobic and anaerobic bacteria with ceftobiprole minimum inhibitory concentrations of ≥ 4 mg/L were found. Ceftobiprole had no significant ecological impact on the human intestinal microflora.

  9. Directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into intestinal tissue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Jason R; Mayhew, Christopher N; Rankin, Scott A; Kuhar, Matthew F; Vallance, Jefferson E; Tolle, Kathryn; Hoskins, Elizabeth E; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V; Wells, Susanne I; Zorn, Aaron M; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M

    2011-02-03

    Studies in embryonic development have guided successful efforts to direct the differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into specific organ cell types in vitro. For example, human PSCs have been differentiated into monolayer cultures of liver hepatocytes and pancreatic endocrine cells that have therapeutic efficacy in animal models of liver disease and diabetes, respectively. However, the generation of complex three-dimensional organ tissues in vitro remains a major challenge for translational studies. Here we establish a robust and efficient process to direct the differentiation of human PSCs into intestinal tissue in vitro using a temporal series of growth factor manipulations to mimic embryonic intestinal development. This involved activin-induced definitive endoderm formation, FGF/Wnt-induced posterior endoderm pattering, hindgut specification and morphogenesis, and a pro-intestinal culture system to promote intestinal growth, morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. The resulting three-dimensional intestinal 'organoids' consisted of a polarized, columnar epithelium that was patterned into villus-like structures and crypt-like proliferative zones that expressed intestinal stem cell markers. The epithelium contained functional enterocytes, as well as goblet, Paneth and enteroendocrine cells. Using this culture system as a model to study human intestinal development, we identified that the combined activity of WNT3A and FGF4 is required for hindgut specification whereas FGF4 alone is sufficient to promote hindgut morphogenesis. Our data indicate that human intestinal stem cells form de novo during development. We also determined that NEUROG3, a pro-endocrine transcription factor that is mutated in enteric anendocrinosis, is both necessary and sufficient for human enteroendocrine cell development in vitro. PSC-derived human intestinal tissue should allow for unprecedented studies of human intestinal development and disease.

  10. Biotransformation of prim-O-glucosylcimifugin by human intestinal flora and its inhibition on NO production and DPPH free radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Yang, Xin-Bao; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Liu, Jian-Xun

    2012-01-01

    prim-O-Glucosylcimifugin (PGCN), a highest content chromone in the roots of Saposhnikovia divaricata, was incubated with human intestinal flora (HIF), and two biotransformation products were obtained from the incubated solution by chromatographic methods. The chemical structures of the two biotransformation products were elucidated as cimifugin (CN) and 5-O-methylvisamminol (MVL), respectively, on the basis of NMR and MS data. The biotransformation product CN was formed through a deglucosylation of PGCN by β-glucosidase secreted from the HIF, and then the hydroxymethyl group of CN was reduced to lead to occurrence of MVL. All of these compounds were evaluated for their effect on the inhibition of nitric oxide production induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free-radical scavenging activity in cell-free bioassay system.

  11. Human and simulated intestinal fluids as solvent systems to explore food effects on intestinal solubility and permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappaerts, Jef; Wuyts, Benjamin; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2014-10-15

    The mixed micelles and vesicles present in the intraluminal environment of the postprandial state exhibit suitable solubilizing capacities for lipophilic drugs. This increase in solubility, however, is accompanied by a decrease in the free fraction caused by micellar entrapment of these lipophilic compounds. In this study, both simulated and aspirated human intestinal fluids of fasted and fed state conditions were used to evaluate the influence of food on the intestinal disposition of a series of structurally related β-blockers, with varying logP values. Using the in situ intestinal perfusion technique with mesenteric blood sampling in rats, it was demonstrated that fed state conditions significantly decreased the absorptive flux of the more lipophilic compounds metoprolol, propranolol and carvedilol, whereas the influence on the flux of the hydrophilic β-blocker atenolol was limited. The solubility of BCS class II compound carvedilol was found to increase significantly in simulated and aspirated media of the fed state. Intestinal perfusions using intestinal media saturated with carvedilol, revealed a higher flux in the fasted state compared to the fed state, despite the higher solubility in the fed state. This study underscores the importance of addressing the complex nature of the behavior of compounds in the intraluminal environment in fasted and fed state conditions. Moreover, our data point out the value of studying the effect of food on both solubility and permeability using biorelevant experimental conditions.

  12. Macrophage-specific nanotechnology-driven CD163 overexpression in human macrophages results in an M2 phenotype under inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Vazquez, Perla Abigail; Bernal, Laura; Paige, Candler A; Grosick, Rachel L; Moracho Vilrriales, Carolina; Ferreira, David Wilson; Ulecia-Morón, Cristina; Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso

    2017-08-01

    M1 macrophages release proinflammatory factors during inflammation. They transit to an M2 phenotype and release anti-inflammatory factors to resolve inflammation. An imbalance in the transition from M1 to M2 phenotype in macrophages contributes to the development of persistent inflammation. CD163, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich family, is an M2 macrophage marker. The functional role of CD163 during the resolution of inflammation is not completely known. We postulate that CD163 contributes to the transition from M1 to M2 phenotype in macrophages. We induced CD163 gene in THP-1 and primary human macrophages using polyethylenimine nanoparticles grafted with a mannose ligand (Man-PEI). This nanoparticle specifically targets cells of monocytic origin via mannose receptors. Cells were challenged with a single or a double stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A CD163 or empty plasmid was complexed with Man-PEI nanoparticles for cell transfections. Quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and ELISAs were used for molecular assessments. CD163-overexpressing macrophages displayed reduced levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-α and monocytes chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 after a single stimulation with LPS. Following a double stimulation paradigm, CD163-overexpressing macrophages showed an increase of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-1ra and a reduction of MCP-1. This anti-inflammatory phenotype was partially blocked by an anti-CD163 antibody (effects on IL-10 and IL-1ra). A decrease in the release of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 was observed in CD163-overexpressing human primary macrophages. The release of IL-6 was blocked by an anti-CD163 antibody in the CD163-overexpressing group. Our data show that the induction of the CD163 gene in human macrophages under inflammatory conditions produces changes in cytokine secretion in favor of an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Targeting macrophages to induce CD163 using cell-directed nanotechnology is an attractive

  13. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages.

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    Evelyn Guirado

    Full Text Available Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies that can identify specific virulence properties of M. avium isolates found in water that predict a level of risk to exposed individuals. In this work we have characterized 15 clinical and environmental M. avium spp. isolates provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA to improve our understanding of the key processes involved in the binding, uptake and survival of these isolates in primary human macrophages. M. avium serovar 8 was predominant among the isolates studied. Different amounts and exposure of mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM and glycopeptidolipids (GPLs, both major mycobacterial virulence factors, were found among the isolates studied. Reference clinical isolate 104 serovar 1 and clinical isolates 11 and 14 serovar 8 showed an increased association with macrophages. Serum opsonization increased the cell association and survival at 2 h post infection for all isolates. However, only the clinical isolates 104 and 3 among those tested showed an increased growth in primary human macrophages. The other isolates varied in their survival in these cells. Thus we conclude that the amounts of cell envelope ManLAM and GPL, as well as GPL serovar specificity are not the only important bacterial factors for dictating the early interactions of M. avium with human macrophages.

  14. Human Macrophage Response to L. (Viannia) panamensis: Microarray Evidence for an Early Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Ricardo; Ettinger, Nicholas A.; Tikhonova, Irina; Alexander, Neal D.; Valderrama, Liliana; Hager, Janet; Wilson, Mary E.; Lin, Aiping; Zhao, Hongyu; Saravia, Nancy G.; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous findings indicate that susceptibility to Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis infection of monocyte-derived macrophages from patients and asymptomatically infected individuals were associated with the adaptive immune response and clinical outcome. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the basis for this difference we examined differential gene expression of human monocyte-derived macrophages following exposure to L. (V.) panamensis. Gene activation profiles were determined using macrophages from healthy volunteers cultured with or without stationary phase promastigotes of L. (V.) panamensis. Significant changes in expression (>1.5-fold change; p<0.05; up- or down-regulated) were identified at 0.5, 4 and 24 hours. mRNA abundance profiles varied over time, with the highest level of activation occurring at earlier time points (0.5 and 4 hrs). In contrast to observations for other Leishmania species, most significantly changed mRNAs were up- rather than down-regulated, especially at early time points. Up-regulated transcripts over the first 24 hours belonged to pathways involving eicosanoid metabolism, oxidative stress, activation of PKC through G protein coupled receptors, or mechanism of gene regulation by peroxisome proliferators via PPARα. Additionally, a marked activation of Toll-receptor mediated pathways was observed. Comparison with published microarray data from macrophages infected with L. (Leishmania) chagasi indicate differences in the regulation of genes involved in signaling, motility and the immune response. Conclusions Results show that the early (0.5 to 24 hours) human monocyte-derived macrophage response to L. (Viannia) panamensis is not quiescent, in contrast to published reports examining later response times (48–96 hours). Early macrophage responses are important for the developing cellular response at the site of infection. The kinetics and the mRNA abundance profiles induced by L. (Viannia) panamensis illustrate the

  15. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Degradation of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone by human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, Annett; Engst, Wolfram; Blaut, Michael

    2005-03-09

    The degradation of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone by human intestinal microbiota was studied in vitro. Human fecal slurries converted neohesperidin dihydrochalcone anoxically to 3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propionic acid or 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propionic acid. Two transient intermediates were identified as hesperetin dihydrochalcone 4'-beta-d-glucoside and hesperetin dihydrochalcone. These metabolites suggest that neohesperidin dihydrochalcone is first deglycosylated to hesperetin dihydrochalcone 4'-beta-d-glucoside and subsequently to the aglycon hesperetin dihydrochalcone. The latter is hydrolyzed to the corresponding 3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propionic acid and probably phloroglucinol. Eubacterium ramulus and Clostridium orbiscindens were not capable of converting neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. However, hesperetin dihydrochalcone 4'-beta-d-glucoside was converted by E. ramulus to hesperetin dihydrochalcone and further to 3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propionic acid, but not by C. orbiscindens. In contrast, hesperetin dihydrochalcone was cleaved to 3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propionic acid by both species. The latter reaction was shown to be catalyzed by the phloretin hydrolase from E. ramulus.

  17. The Reactive Oxygen Species in Macrophage Polarization: Reflecting Its Dual Role in Progression and Treatment of Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hor-Yue Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High heterogeneity of macrophage is associated with its functions in polarization to different functional phenotypes depending on environmental cues. Macrophages remain in balanced state in healthy subject and thus macrophage polarization may be crucial in determining the tissue fate. The two distinct populations, classically M1 and alternatively M2 activated, representing the opposing ends of the full activation spectrum, have been extensively studied for their associations with several disease progressions. Accumulating evidences have postulated that the redox signalling has implication in macrophage polarization and the key roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in tissue environment have provided the clue for the reasons of ROS abundance in certain phenotype. M1 macrophages majorly clearing the pathogens and ROS may be crucial for the regulation of M1 phenotype, whereas M2 macrophages resolve inflammation which favours oxidative metabolism. Therefore how ROS play its role in maintaining the homeostatic functions of macrophage and in particular macrophage polarization will be reviewed here. We also review the biology of macrophage polarization and the disturbance of M1/M2 balance in human diseases. The potential therapeutic opportunities targeting ROS will also be discussed, hoping to provide insights for development of target-specific delivery system or immunomodulatory antioxidant for the treatment of ROS-related diseases.

  18. High-throughput analysis of the impact of antibiotics on the human intestinal microbiota composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladirat, S.E.; Schols, H.A.; Nauta, A.; Schoterman, M.H.C.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Montijn, R.C.; Gruppen, H.; Schuren, F.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic treatments can lead to a disruption of the human microbiota. In this in-vitro study, the impact of antibiotics on adult intestinal microbiota was monitored in a new high-throughput approach: a fermentation screening-platform was coupled with a phylogenetic microarray analysis (Intestinal-

  19. Formation and blood supply of the large intestine in human neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haina N.I.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the large intestine has been carried out on 24 specimens of human newborns. It has been established that the form and size of the neonates large intestine demonstrated a sidnificant individual variability. The hepatic and splenic flexures of the colon had different relations with the inferior border of the liver and spleen.

  20. Naturally occurring products of proglucagon 111-160 in the porcine and human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, T; Thim, L; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the glucagon gene is expressed in the mammalian intestine. Here it codes for "glicentin" (proglucagon 1-69) and a glucagon-like peptide, proglucagon 78-107, recently isolated from porcine intestine. We studied the fate of the remaining COOH-terminal part of progl...... that this is the structure of the naturally occurring human peptide....

  1. Microbial communities in the human small intestine: coupling diversity to metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booijink, Carien C G M; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel; de Vos, Willem M

    2007-06-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the main site where the conversion and absorption of food components takes place. The host-derived physiological processes and the residing microorganisms, especially in the small intestine, contribute to this nutrient supply. To circumvent sampling problems of the small intestine, several model systems have been developed to study microbial diversity and functionality in the small intestine. In addition, metagenomics offers novel possibilities to gain insight into the genetic potential and functional properties of these microbial communities. Here, an overview is presented of the most recent insights into the diversity and functionality of the microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract, with a focus on the small intestine.

  2. Genetic programs expressed in resting and IL-4 alternatively activated mouse and human macrophages : similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Fernando O.; Helming, Laura; Milde, Ronny; Varin, Audrey; Melgert, Barbro N.; Draijer, Christina; Thomas, Benjamin; Fabbri, Marco; Crawshaw, Anjali; Ho, Ling Pei; Ten Hacken, Nick H.; Jimenez, Viviana Cobos; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Hamann, Jorg; Greaves, David R.; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Gordon, Siamon

    2013-01-01

    The molecular repertoire of macrophages in health and disease can provide novel biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Th2-IL-4-activated macrophages (M2) have been associated with important diseases in mice, yet no specific markers are available for their detection in human tissues. Al

  3. Enhanced M1 macrophage polarization in human helicobacter pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and in vaccinated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Quiding-Järbrink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori triggers a chronic gastric inflammation that can progress to atrophy and gastric adenocarcinoma. Polarization of macrophages is a characteristic of both cancer and infection, and may promote progression or resolution of disease. However, the role of macrophages and their polarization during H. pylori infection has not been well defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a mouse model of infection and gastric biopsies from 29 individuals, we have analyzed macrophage recruitment and polarization during H. pylori infection by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. We found a sequential recruitment of neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages to the gastric mucosa of infected mice. Gene expression analysis of stomach tissue and sorted macrophages revealed that gastric macrophages were polarized to M1 after H. pylori infection, and this process was substantially accelerated by prior vaccination. Human H. pylori infection was characterized by a mixed M1/M2 polarization of macrophages. However, in H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was markedly increased compared to uncomplicated gastritis, indicative of an enhanced M1 macrophage polarization in this pre-malignant lesion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that vaccination of mice against H. pylori amplifies M1 polarization of gastric macrophages, and that a similar enhanced M1 polarization is present in human H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis.

  4. Phenylbutyrate induces LL-37-dependent autophagy and intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Rokeya Sultana; Rao Muvva, S S V Jagadeeswara; Wan, Min; Raqib, Rubhana; Bergman, Peter; Brighenti, Susanna; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    LL-37 is a human antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the cathelicidin family with multiple activities including a mediator of vitamin D-induced autophagy in human macrophages, resulting in intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In a previous trial in healthy volunteers, we have shown that LL-37 expression and subsequent Mtb-killing can be further enhanced by 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), also an inducer of LL-37 expression. Here, we explore a potential mechanism(s) behind PBA and LL-37-induced autophagy and intracellular killing of Mtb. Mtb infection of macrophages downregulated the expression of both the CAMP transcript and LL-37 peptide as well as certain autophagy-related genes (BECN1 and ATG5) at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, activation of LC3-II in primary macrophages and THP-1 cells was not detected. PBA and the active form of vitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3), separately or particularly in combination, were able to overcome Mtb-induced suppression of LL-37 expression. Notably, reactivation of autophagy occurred by stimulation of macrophages with PBA and promoted colocalization of LL-37 and LC3-II in autophagosomes. Importantly, PBA treatment failed to induce autophagy in Mtb-infected THP-1 cells, when the expression of LL-37 was silenced. However, PBA-induced autophagy was restored when the LL-37 knockdown cells were supplemented with synthetic LL-37. Interestingly, we have found that LL-37-induced autophagy was mediated via P2RX7 receptor followed by enhanced cytosolic free Ca(2+), and activation of AMPK and PtdIns3K pathways. Altogether, these results suggest a novel activity for PBA as an inducer of autophagy, which is LL-37-dependent and promotes intracellular killing of Mtb in human macrophages.

  5. A Sensitive Medium-Throughput Method to Predict Intestinal Absorption in Humans Using Rat Intestinal Tissue Segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Laís Cristina; Da Silva, Taynara Lourenço; Antunes, Alisson Henrique; Rezende, Kênnia Rocha

    2015-09-01

    A range of in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo approaches are currently used for drug development. Highly predictive human intestinal absorption models remain lagging behind the times because of numerous variables concerning permeability through gastrointestinal tract in humans. However, there is a clear need for a drug permeability model early in the drug development process that can balance the requirements for high throughput and effective predictive potential. The present study developed a medium throughput screening Snapwell (MTS-Snapwell) ex vivo model to provide an alternative method to classify drug permeability. Rat small intestine tissue segments were mounted in commercial Snapwell™ inserts. Unidirectional drug transport (A-B) was measured by collecting samples at different time points. Viability of intestinal tissue segments was measured by examining transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) and phenol red and caffeine transport. As a result, the apparent permeability (Papp; ×10(-6) cm/s) was determined for atenolol (10.7 ± 1.2), caffeine (17.6 ± 3.1), cimetidine (6.9 ± 0.1), metoprolol (12.6 ± 0.7), theophylline (15.3 ± 1.6) and, ranitidine (3.8 ± 0.4). All drugs were classified in high/low permeability according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System showing high correlation with human data (r = 0.89). These findings showed a high correlation with human data (r = 0.89), suggesting that this model has potential predictive capacity for paracellular and transcellular passively absorbed molecules.

  6. Involvement of Concentrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 in Intestinal Absorption of Trifluridine Using Human Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Chiba, Masato; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102, which is effective for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, is a combination drug of anticancer trifluridine (FTD; which is derived from pyrimidine nucleoside) and FTD-metabolizing enzyme inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) at a molecular ratio of 1:0.5. To evaluate the intestinal absorption mechanism of FTD, the uptake and transcellular transport of FTD by human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer as a model of human intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. The uptake and membrane permeability of FTD by HIEC monolayers were saturable, Na(+) -dependent, and inhibited by nucleosides. These transport characteristics are mostly comparable with those of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs). Moreover, the uptake of FTD by CNT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes was the highest among human CNT transporters. The obtained Km and Vmax values of FTD by CNT1 were 69.0 μM and 516 pmol/oocyte/30 min, respectively. The transcellular transport of FTD by Caco-2 cells, where CNT1 is heterologously expressed, from apical to basolateral side was greater than that by Mock cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that FTD exhibits high oral absorption by the contribution of human CNT1. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Production of human intestinal trefoil factor in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yong; PENG Xi; Lü Shang-jun; ZHANG Yong; WANG Shi-liang

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To construct a Pichia pastoris (P. Pastoris) expression vector of human intestinal trefoil factor (hITF) and study its expression and purification procedures. Methods:hITF gene encoding mature peptide was modified with a polyhistidine tag sequence at the N-terminal, and then inserted into the P. Pastoris expression vector pGAPZαA at the ownstream of the α-mating factor signal. After gene sequencing, the recombinant pGAPZαA-hITF was transformed into the P. Pastoris strain X-33 with lithium chloride. rhITF was induced to constitutively express in shake flask, and then analyzed with Tricine SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The obtained rhITF was isolated from the cultured supernatants y ammonium sulfate precipitation, Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, and ultrafiltration. Results:The correctness and integrity of rhITF were identified by restriction digestion and gene sequencing. rhITF was successfully expressed to 50 mg/L as a secretive protein. After purification, the purity was above 95%.Tricine SDS-PAGE and Western-blot analysis howed that rhITF presented as a single band with a molecular weight of 10 kDa, a little larger than 7 879 Da as assayed by mass spectrometry analysis. Conclusion:hITF P. Pastoris expression vector is successfully constructed and rhITF is expressed in P. Pastoris at commercially relevant level. This research lays foundation for the further functional tudying of hITF.

  8. Clinical features of human intestinal capillariasis in Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jong Bair; Kao-Pin Hwang; Tsang-En Wang; Tai-Cherng Liou; Shee-Chan Lin; Chin-Roa Kao; Tao-Yeuan Wang; Kwok-Kuen Pang

    2004-01-01

    Human intestinal capillariasis is a rare parasitosis that was first recognized in the Philippines in the 1960 s. Parasitosis is a life threatening disease and has been reported from Thailand, Japan, South of Taiwan (Kaoh-Siung), Korea,Tran, Egypt, Italy and Spain. Its clinical symptoms are characterized by chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain,borborygmus, marked weight loss, protein and electrolyte loss and cachexia. Capillariasis may be fatal if early treatment is not given. We reported 14 cases living in rural areas of Taiwan. Three cases had histories of travelling to Thailand. They might have been infected in Thailand while stayed there. Two cases had the diet of raw freshwater fish before. Three cases received emergency laparotomy due to peritonitis and two cases were found of enteritis cystica profunda. According to the route of transmission,freshwater and brackish-water fish may act as the intermediate host of the parasite. The most simple and convenient method of diagnosing capillariasis is stool examination. Two cases were diagnosed by histology.Mebendazole or albendezole 200 mg orally twice a day for 20-30 d is the treatment of choice. All the patients were cured, and relapses were not observed within 12 mo.

  9. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Secreted Hookworm Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) that Interacts with the Human MIF Receptor CD74

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho,Y.; Jones, B.; Vermeire, J.; Leng, L.; DiFedele, L.; Harrison, L.; Xiong, H.; Kwong, Y.; Chen, Y.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Hookworms, parasitic nematodes that infect nearly one billion people worldwide, are a major cause of anemia and malnutrition. We hypothesize that hookworms actively manipulate the host immune response through the production of specific molecules designed to facilitate infection by larval stages and adult worm survival within the intestine. A full-length cDNA encoding a secreted orthologue of the human cytokine, Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) has been cloned from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum. Elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structure of recombinant AceMIF (rAceMIF) revealed an overall structural homology with significant differences in the tautomerase sites of the human and hookworm proteins. The relative bioactivities of human and hookworm MIF proteins were compared using in vitro assays of tautomerase activity, macrophage migration, and binding to MIF receptor CD74. The activity of rAceMIF was not inhibited by the ligand ISO-1, which was previously determined to be an inhibitor of the catalytic site of human MIF. These data define unique immunological, structural, and functional characteristics of AceMIF, thereby establishing the potential for selectively inhibiting the hookworm cytokine as a means of reducing parasite survival and disease pathogenesis.

  10. Enhancer Turnover Is Associated with a Divergent Transcriptional Response to Glucocorticoid in Mouse and Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Alasdair W; Young, Robert S; Hume, David A; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2016-01-15

    Phenotypic differences between individuals and species are controlled in part through differences in expression of a relatively conserved set of genes. Genes expressed in the immune system are subject to especially powerful selection. We have investigated the evolution of both gene expression and candidate enhancers in human and mouse macrophages exposed to glucocorticoid (GC), a regulator of innate immunity and an important therapeutic agent. Our analyses revealed a very limited overlap in the repertoire of genes responsive to GC in human and mouse macrophages. Peaks of inducible binding of the GC receptor (GR) detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation-Seq correlated with induction, but not repression, of target genes in both species, occurred at distal regulatory sites not promoters, and were strongly enriched for the consensus GR-binding motif. Turnover of GR binding between mice and humans was associated with gain and loss of the motif. There was no detectable signal of positive selection at species-specific GR binding sites, but clear evidence of purifying selection at the small number of conserved sites. We conclude that enhancer divergence underlies the difference in transcriptional activation after GC treatment between mouse and human macrophages. Only the shared inducible loci show evidence of selection, and therefore these loci may be important for the subset of responses to GC that is shared between species.

  11. Mechanism involved in interleukin-21-induced phagocytosis in human monocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, F; Girard, D

    2017-02-01

    The interleukin (IL)-21/IL-21 receptor (R) is a promising system to be exploited for the development of therapeutic strategies. Although the biological activities of IL-21 and its cell signalling events have been largely studied in immunocytes, its interaction with human monocytes and macrophages have been neglected. Previously, we reported that IL-21 enhances Fc gamma receptor (FcRγ)-mediated phagocytosis in human monocytes and in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and identified Syk as a novel molecular target of IL-21. Here, we elucidate further how IL-21 promotes phagocytosis in these cells. Unlike its ability to enhance phagocytosis of opsonized sheep red blood cells (SRBCs), IL-21 did not promote phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and zymosan by monocytes and did not alter the cell surface expression of CD16, CD32 and CD64. In HMDM, IL-21 was found to enhance phagocytosis of zymosan. In addition, we found that IL-21 activates p38, protein kinase B (Akt), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 and STAT-3 in monocytes and HMDM. Using a pharmacological approach, we demonstrate that IL-21 enhances phagocytosis by activating some mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt and Janus kinase (JAK)-STAT pathways. These results obtained in human monocytes and macrophages have to be considered for a better exploitation of the IL-21/IL-21R system for therapeutic purposes. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  12. HIV-1 Vpr induces interferon-stimulated genes in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atif Zahoor

    Full Text Available Macrophages act as reservoirs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and play an important role in its transmission to other cells. HIV-1 Vpr is a multi-functional protein involved in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis; however, its exact role in HIV-1-infected human macrophages remains poorly understood. In this study, we used a microarray approach to explore the effects of HIV-1 Vpr on the transcriptional profile of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs. More than 500 genes, mainly those involved in the innate immune response, the type I interferon pathway, cytokine production, and signal transduction, were differentially regulated (fold change >2.0 after infection with a recombinant adenovirus expressing HIV-1 Vpr protein. The differential expression profiles of select interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs and genes involved in the innate immune response, including STAT1, IRF7, MX1, MX2, ISG15, ISG20, IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3, IFI27, IFI44L, APOBEC3A, DDX58 (RIG-I, TNFSF10 (TRAIL, and RSAD2 (viperin were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and were consistent with the microarray data. In addition, at the post-translational level, HIV-1 Vpr induced the phosphorylation of STAT1 at tyrosine 701 in human MDMs. These results demonstrate that HIV-1 Vpr leads to the induction of ISGs and expand the current understanding of the function of Vpr and its role in HIV-1 immune pathogenesis.

  13. Reactivation of Intestinal Inflammation Is Suppressed by Catestatin in a Murine Model of Colitis via M1 Macrophages and Not the Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Rabbi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available While there is growing awareness of a relationship between chromogranin-A (CHGA and susceptibility to inflammatory conditions, the role of human catestatin [(hCTS; CHGA352–67] in the natural history of established inflammatory bowel disease is not known. Recently, using two different experimental models, we demonstrated that hCTS-treated mice develop less severe acute colitis. We have also shown the implication of the macrophages in this effect. The aims of this study were to determine (1 whether hCTS treatment could attenuate the reactivation of inflammation in adult mice with previously established chronic colitis; (2 whether this effect is mediated through macrophages or the gut microbiota. Quiescent colitis was induced in 7–8-week-old C57BL6 mice using four cycles (2–4% of dextran sulfate sodium. hCTS (1.5 mg/kg/day treatment or vehicle started 2 days before the last induction of colitis and continuing for 7 days. At sacrifice, macro- and microscopic scores were determined. Colonic pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF- α], anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF- β, classically activated (M1 (iNOS, Mcp1, and alternatively activated (M2 (Ym1, Arg1 macrophages markers were studied using ELISA and/or RT-qPCR. In vitro, peritoneal macrophages isolated from naïve mice and treated with hCTS (10−5 M, 12 h were exposed to either lipopolysaccharide (100 ng/ml, 12 h to polarize M1 macrophages or to IL-4/IL-13 (20 ng/ml to polarize M2 macrophages. M1/M2 macrophage markers along with cytokine gene expression were determined using RT-qPCR. Feces and mucosa-associated microbiota (MAM samples were collected, and the V4 region of 16 s rRNA was sequenced. Micro- and macroscopic scores, colonic IL-6, IL-1β, TNF- α, and M1 macrophages markers were significantly decreased in the hCTS-treated group. Treatment did not have any effect on colonic IL-10, TGF-β, and M2 markers nor modified the bacterial

  14. Diclofenac toxicity in human intestine ex vivo is not related to the formation of intestinal metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Horvatovich, Peter; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of diclofenac (DCF), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is associated with a high prevalence of gastrointestinal side effects. In vivo studies in rodents suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF produced by the liver or the intestine might be responsible for this toxicity. In the prese

  15. Diclofenac toxicity in human intestine ex vivo is not related to the formation of intestinal metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Horvatovich, Peter; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of diclofenac (DCF), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is associated with a high prevalence of gastrointestinal side effects. In vivo studies in rodents suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF produced by the liver or the intestine might be responsible for this toxicity. In the prese

  16. Isolation of human monocytes by double gradient centrifugation and their differentiation to macrophages in teflon-coated cell culture bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menck, Kerstin; Behme, Daniel; Pantke, Mathias; Reiling, Norbert; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias; Klemm, Florian

    2014-09-09

    Human macrophages are involved in a plethora of pathologic processes ranging from infectious diseases to cancer. Thus they pose a valuable tool to understand the underlying mechanisms of these diseases. We therefore present a straightforward protocol for the isolation of human monocytes from buffy coats, followed by a differentiation procedure which results in high macrophage yields. The technique relies mostly on commonly available lab equipment and thus provides a cost and time effective way to obtain large quantities of human macrophages. Briefly, buffy coats from healthy blood donors are subjected to a double density gradient centrifugation to harvest monocytes from the peripheral blood. These monocytes are then cultured in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon-coated cell culture bags in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The differentiated macrophages can be easily harvested and used for subsequent studies and functional assays. Important methods for quality control and validation of the isolation and differentiation steps will be highlighted within the protocol. In summary, the protocol described here enables scientists to routinely and reproducibly isolate human macrophages without the need for cost intensive tools. Furthermore, disease models can be studied in a syngeneic human system circumventing the use of murine macrophages.

  17. Cyclosporin A Decreases Human Macrophage Interleukin-6 Synthesis at Post-Transcriptional Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan E. Losa García

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to its well-established effect on T cells, cyclosporin A (CsA also inhibits inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of CsA on macrophage cytokine production. We measured the effect of CsA on basal and phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA-stimulated production of interleukin-6 using the human monocyte cell line U937 differentiated with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO. Interleukin-6 levels were measured in supernatant and cell lysates using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We found that CsA decreases not only IL-6 release but also cytokine synthesis. The concentration of CsA used did not affect either cell viability or proliferation. Three possibilities may be advanced to explain the CsA-due decrease in IL-6 production by macrophages: (a inhibition of the synthesis of an early common regulatory protein, (b inhibition of cytokine gene transcription, or (c modulation of post-transcriptional events. The first possibility was tested by measuring the effect of cycloheximide on the experimental system during the first 3 hours of culture. Although cycloheximide decreased total cytokine synthesis, the pattern of cytokine modulation by CsA persisted. These data suggest that CsA-mediated macrophage cytokine inhibition is not mediated by an early common regulatory protein. To further explore the inhibition mechanism, we measured IL-6 mRNA levels by Northern blot. IL-6 mRNA levels were unaffected by CsA both in resting and PMA-stimulated cells. We conclude that in human macrophages CsA diminishes IL-6 production at post-transcriptional level.

  18. Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Doo; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking.

  19. Aminopeptidase N (CD13 Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica I. Villaseñor-Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13 is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors for the Fc portion of IgG antibodies (FcγRs. In this work, we analyzed the possible interaction of CD13 with other phagocytic receptors. We found out that the cross-linking of CD13 positively modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors of the innate immune system, since a significant increase in the phagocytosis of zymosan particles or heat-killed E. coli was observed when CD13 was cross-linked using anti-CD13 antibodies, in both macrophages and dendritic cells. Also, we observed that, during the phagocytosis of zymosan, CD13 redistributes and is internalized into the phagosome. These findings suggest that, besides its known functions, CD13 participates in phagocytic processes in dendritic cells and macrophages.

  20. Eradication of intracellular Francisella tularensis in THP-1 human macrophages with a novel autophagy inducing agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunn John S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autophagy has been shown recently to play an important role in the intracellular survival of several pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we investigated the effect of a novel small-molecule autophagy-inducing agent, AR-12, on the survival of Francisella tularensis, the causative bacterium of tularemia in humans and a potential bioterrorism agent, in macrophages. Methods and results Our results show that AR-12 induces autophagy in THP-1 macrophages, as indicated by increased autophagosome formation, and potently inhibits the intracellular survival of F. tularensis (type A strain, Schu S4 and F. novicida in macrophages in association with increased bacterial co-localization with autophagosomes. The effect of AR-12 on intracellular F. novicida was fully reversed in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyl adenine or the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine. Intracellular F. novicida were not susceptible to the inhibitory activity of AR-12 added at 12 h post-infection in THP-1 macrophages, and this lack of susceptibility was independent of the intracellular location of bacteria. Conclusion Together, AR-12 represents a proof-of-principle that intracellular F. tularensis can be eradicated by small-molecule agents that target innate immunity.

  1. Can probiotics modulate human disease by impacting intestinal barrier function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, Peter A.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert Jan; Cani, Patrice D.; Mercenier, Annick; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Garcia-Ródenas, Clara L.; Wells, Jerry M.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal barrier integrity is a prerequisite for homeostasis of mucosal function, which is balanced to maximise absorptive capacity, while maintaining efficient defensive reactions against chemical and microbial challenges. Evidence is mounting that disruption of epithelial barrier integrity is

  2. Metabolism of puerarin and daidzin by human intestinal bacteria and their relation to in vitro cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D H; Yu, K U; Bae, E A; Han, M J

    1998-06-01

    When puerarin or daidzin were incubated for 24 h with human intestinal bacteria, two metabolites, daidzein and calycosin, were produced from them, respectively. The metabolic time course of puerarin was as follows: at an early time, puerarin was converted to daidzin, and then calycosin. The metabolic time course of daidzin by human intestinal bacteria was also similar to that of puerarin. The in vitro cytotoxicities of these metabolites, calycosin and daidzein, were superior to those of puerarin and daidzein.

  3. Sustained Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Inhibition in Primary Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor...

  4. Increased Infiltration of Macrophages in Omental Adipose Tissue Is Associated With Marked Hepatic Lesions in Morbid Human Obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raffaella Cancello; Joan Tordjman; Christine Poitou; Gaël Guilhem; Jean Luc Bouillot; Danielle Hugol; Christiane Coussieu; Arnaud Basdevant; Avner Bar Hen; Pierre Bedossa; Michèle Guerre-Millo; Karine Clément

    2006-01-01

    Increased Infiltration of Macrophages in Omental Adipose Tissue Is Associated With Marked Hepatic Lesions in Morbid Human Obesity Raffaella Cancello 1 2 3 , Joan Tordjman 1 2 3 , Christine Poitou 1 2 3...

  5. Mucosal biofilm communities in the human intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Bahrami, Bahram; Macfarlane, George T

    2011-01-01

    Complex and highly variable site-dependent bacterial ecosystems exist throughout the length of the human gastrointestinal tract. Until relatively recently, the majority of our information on intestinal microbiotas has come from studies on feces, or from aspirates taken from the upper gut. However, there is evidence showing that mucosal bacteria growing in biofilms on surfaces lining the gut differ from luminal populations, and that due to their proximity to the epithelial surface, these organisms may be important in modulating the host's immune system and contributing to some chronic inflammatory diseases. Over the past decade, increasing interest in mucosal bacteria, coupled with advances in molecular approaches for assessing microbial diversity, has begun to provide some insight into the complexity of these mucosa-associated communities. In gastrointestinal conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease), it has been shown that a dysbiosis exists in microbial community structure, and that there is a reduction in putatively protective mucosal organisms such as bifidobacteria. Therefore, manipulation of mucosal communities may be beneficial in restoring normal functionality in the gut, thereby improving the immune status and general health of the host. Biofilm structure and function has been studied intensively in the oral cavity, and as a consequence, mucosal communities in the mouth will not be covered in this chapter. This review addresses our current knowledge of mucosal populations in the gastrointestinal tract, changes that can occur in community structure in disease, and therapeutic modulation of biofilm composition by antibiotics, prebiotics, and probiotics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) inhibits human renal cell carcinoma proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Eva; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Bajo, Ana M; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Schally, Andrew V; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2012-10-01

    Clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) is an aggressive and fatal neoplasm. The present work was undertaken to investigate the antiproliferative potential of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) exposure on non-tumoral (HK2) and tumoral (A498, cRCC) human proximal tubular epithelial cell lines. Reverse transcription and semiquantitative PCR was used at the VIP mRNA level whereas enzyme immunoanalysis was performed at the protein level. Both renal cell lines expressed VIP as well as VIP/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (VPAC) receptors whereas only HK2 cells expressed formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL-1). Receptors were functional, as shown by VIP stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. Treatment with 0.1μM VIP (24h) inhibited proliferation of A498 but not HK2 cells as based on a reduction in the incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine and BrdU (5'-Br-2'-deoxyuridine), PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) expression and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) expression and activation. VPAC(1)-receptor participation was established using JV-1-53 antagonist and siRNA transfection. Growth-inhibitory response to VIP was related to the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) signaling systems as shown by studies on adenylate cyclase stimulation, and using the EPAC-specific compound 8CPT-2Me-cAMP and specific kinase inhibitors such as H89, wortmannin and PD98059. The efficacy of VIP on the prevention of tumor progression was confirmed in vivo using xenografted athymic mouse. These actions support a potential role of this peptide and its agonists in new therapies for cRCC.

  7. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation induces markers of alternative macrophage activation and reduces established hepatic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Manuelpillai

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatic inflammation from multiple etiologies leads to a fibrogenic response that can progress to cirrhosis and liver failure. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC from term delivered placenta has been shown to decrease mild to moderate hepatic fibrosis in a murine model. To model advanced human liver disease and assess the efficacy of hAEC therapy, we transplanted hAEC in mice with advanced hepatic fibrosis. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were administered carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4 twice weekly resulting in bridging fibrosis by 12 weeks. hAEC (2 × 10(6 were infused via the tail vein at week 8 or weeks 8 and 10 (single and double dose, respectively. Human cells were detected in mouse liver four weeks after transplantation showing hAEC engraftment. CCl(4 treated mice receiving single or double hAEC doses showed a significant but similar decrease in liver fibrosis area associated with decreased activation of collagen-producing hepatic stellate cells and decreased hepatic protein levels of the pro-fibrogenic cytokine, transforming growth factor-beta1. CCl(4 administration caused hepatic T cell infiltration that decreased significantly following hAEC transplantation. Hepatic macrophages play a crucial role in both fibrogenesis and fibrosis resolution. Mice exposed to CCl(4 demonstrated increased numbers of hepatic macrophages compared to normal mice; the number of macrophages decreased significantly in CCl(4 treated mice given hAEC. These mice had significantly lower hepatic protein levels of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 than mice given CCl(4 alone. Alternatively activated M2 macrophages are associated with fibrosis resolution. CCl(4 treated mice given hAEC showed increased expression of genes associated with M2 macrophages including YM-1, IL-10 and CD206. We provide novel data showing that hAEC transplantation induces a wound healing M2 macrophage phenotype associated with reduction of established

  8. Transformation of trollioside and isoquercetin by human intestinal flora in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Shi, Duo-Zhi; Wang, Teng-Yu; Zheng, Shi-Qi; Liu, Li-Jia; Sun, Zhen-Xiao; Wang, Ru-Feng; Ding, Yi

    2016-03-01

    The present study was designed to determine the intestinal bacterial metabolites of trollioside and isoquercetin and their antibacterial activities. A systematic in vitro biotransformation investigation on trollioside and isoquercetin, including metabolite identification, metabolic pathway deduction, and time course, was accomplished using a human intestinal bacterial model. The metabolites were analyzed and identified by HPLC and HPLC-MS. The antibacterial activities of trollioside, isoquercetin, and their metabolites were evaluated using the broth microdilution method with berberine as a positive control, and their potency was measured as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). Our results indicated that trollioside and isoquercetin were metabolized by human intestinal flora through O-deglycosylation, yielding aglycones proglobeflowery acid and quercetin, respectively The antibacterial activities of both metabolites were more potent than that of their parent compounds. In conclusion, trollioside and isoquercetin are totally and rapidly transformed by human intestinal bacteria in vitro and the transformation favors the improvement of the antibacterial activities of the parent compounds.

  9. Sustained small interfering RNA-mediated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inhibition in primary macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Erwei; Lee, Sang-Kyung; Dykxhoorn, Derek M; Novina, Carl; Zhang, Dong; Crawford, Keith; Cerny, Jan; Sharp, Phillip A; Lieberman, Judy; Manjunath, N; Shankar, Premlata

    2003-07-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor in macrophages, and the viral structural gene for p24 were targeted either singly or in combination. When transfected 2 days prior to infection, both CCR5 and p24 siRNAs effectively reduced HIV-1 infection for the entire 15-day period of observation, and combined targeting of both genes abolished infection. To investigate whether exogenously introduced siRNA is maintained stably in macrophages, we tested the kinetics of siRNA-mediated viral inhibition by initiating infections at various times (2 to 15 days) after transfection with CCR5 and p24 siRNAs. HIV suppression mediated by viral p24 siRNA progressively decreased and was lost by day 7 posttransfection. In contrast, viral inhibition by cellular CCR5 knockdown was sustained even when transfection preceded infection by 15 days, suggesting that the continued presence of target RNA may be needed for persistence of siRNA. The longer sustenance of CCR5 relative to p24 siRNA in uninfected macrophages was also confirmed by detection of internalized siRNA by modified Northern blot analysis. We also tested the potential of p24 siRNA to stably silence HIV in the setting of an established infection where the viral target gene is actively transcribed. Under these circumstances, long-term suppression of HIV replication could be achieved with p24 siRNA. Thus, siRNAs can induce potent and long-lasting HIV inhibition in nondividing cells such as macrophages.

  10. SOX9 is expressed in normal stomach, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric carcinoma in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashikawa Kimura, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroyuki; Sugano, Kentaro

    2011-11-01

    SOX9 is a marker for stem cells in the intestine and overexpression of SOX9 is found in some types of cancer. However, the expression of SOX9 in normal stomach, precancerous intestinal metaplasia, and gastric carcinoma has not yet been clarified. This study aimed to investigate SOX9 expression in the corpus and pyloric regions of the normal human stomach, premalignant intestinal metaplasia, and gastric carcinoma by using immunohistochemistry. We evaluated SOX9 expression in 46 clinical samples (early gastric well-differentiated adenocarcinoma including surrounding intestinal metaplasia) resected under esophagogastroduodenoscopy. A small amount of SOX9 was expressed in the neck/isthmus of the corpus region and SOX9 expression was predominantly restricted to the neck/isthmus of the pyloric region in normal human stomach. In the intestinal metaplastic mucosa, SOX9- and PCNA-positive cells were located at the base of the intestinal metaplastic mucosa. Almost all of the gastric carcinoma cells expressed SOX9. SOX9 is expressed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric carcinoma in humans.

  11. Differentiation-dependent activation of the human intestinal alkaline phosphatase promoter by HNF-4 in intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Bressendorff, Simon; Troelsen, Jesper T

    2005-01-01

    of the enterocytes, we have conducted a computer-assisted cis-element search of the proximal human ALPI promoter sequence. A putative recognition site for the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4 was predicted at the positions from -94 to -82 in relation to the translational start site. The ability......The intestinal alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPI) encodes a digestive brush-border enzyme, which is highly upregulated during small intestinal epithelial cell differentiation. To identify new putative promoter motifs responsible for the regulation of ALPI expression during differentiation...... of HNF-4alpha to stimulate the expression from the ALPI promoter was investigated in the nonintestinal Hela cell line. Cotransfection with an HNF-4alpha expression vector demonstrated a direct activation of the ALPI promoter through this -94 to -82 element. EMSA showed that HNF-4alpha from nuclear...

  12. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  13. QSAR Study and VolSurf Characterization of Human Intestinal Absorption of Druge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡桂香; 商志才; 等

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design,optimization,and selection of candidates for the develoment of oral drugs.In this study,a computerized method(VolSurf with GRID) was used as a novel tool for predicting human intestinal absorption of test compound,and for determining the critical molecular properties needed for human intestinal absorption.The tested molecules consisted of 20 diverse drug-like compounds.Partial least squares(PLS) discriminant analysis was used to correlate the experimental data with the theoretical molecular properties of human intestinal absorption.A good correlation(r2=0.95,q2=0.86) between the molecular modeling results and the experimental data demonstrated that human intestinal absorption could be predicted from the three-dimensional(3D) molecular structure of a compound .Favorable structureal properties identified for the potent intestinal absorption of drugs included strong imbalance between the center of mass of a molecule and the barycentre of its hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions and a definitive hydrophobic region as well as less hydrogen bonding donors and acceptors in the molecule.

  14. In vitro cytotoxicity of Manville Code 100 glass fibers: Effect of fiber length on human alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones William

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs are inorganic noncrystalline materials widely used in residential and industrial settings for insulation, filtration, and reinforcement purposes. SVFs conventionally include three major categories: fibrous glass, rock/slag/stone (mineral wool, and ceramic fibers. Previous in vitro studies from our laboratory demonstrated length-dependent cytotoxic effects of glass fibers on rat alveolar macrophages which were possibly associated with incomplete phagocytosis of fibers ≥ 17 μm in length. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of fiber length on primary human alveolar macrophages, which are larger in diameter than rat macrophages, using length-classified Manville Code 100 glass fibers (8, 10, 16, and 20 μm. It was hypothesized that complete engulfment of fibers by human alveolar macrophages could decrease fiber cytotoxicity; i.e. shorter fibers that can be completely engulfed might not be as cytotoxic as longer fibers. Human alveolar macrophages, obtained by segmental bronchoalveolar lavage of healthy, non-smoking volunteers, were treated with three different concentrations (determined by fiber number of the sized fibers in vitro. Cytotoxicity was assessed by monitoring cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase release and loss of function as indicated by a decrease in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence. Results Microscopic analysis indicated that human alveolar macrophages completely engulfed glass fibers of the 20 μm length. All fiber length fractions tested exhibited equal cytotoxicity on a per fiber basis, i.e. increasing lactate dehydrogenase and decreasing chemiluminescence in the same concentration-dependent fashion. Conclusion The data suggest that due to the larger diameter of human alveolar macrophages, compared to rat alveolar macrophages, complete phagocytosis of longer fibers can occur with the human cells. Neither incomplete phagocytosis nor length-dependent toxicity was

  15. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of cell lines and scrapings of the human intestinal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renes Johan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro models are indispensable study objects in the fields of cell and molecular biology, with advantages such as accessibility, homogeneity of the cell population, reproducibility, and growth rate. The Caco-2 cell line, originating from a colon carcinoma, is a widely used in vitro model for small intestinal epithelium. Cancer cells have an altered metabolism, making it difficult to infer their representativity for the tissue from which they are derived. This study was designed to compare the protein expression pattern of Caco-2 cells with the patterns of intestinal epithelial cells from human small and large intestine. HT-29 intestinal cells, Hep G2 liver cells and TE 671 muscle cells were included too, the latter two as negative controls. Results Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed on each tissue and cell line protein sample. Principal component and cluster analysis revealed that global expression of intestinal epithelial scrapings differed from that of intestinal epithelial cell lines. Since all cultured cell lines clustered together, this finding was ascribed to an adaptation of cells to culture conditions and their tumor origin, and responsible proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. When investigating the profiles of Caco-2 cells and small intestinal cells in detail, a considerable overlap was observed. Conclusion Numerous proteins showed a similar expression in Caco-2 cells, HT-29 cells, and both the intestinal scrapings, of which some appear to be characteristic to human intestinal epithelium in vivo. In addition, several biologically significant proteins are expressed at comparable levels in Caco-2 cells and small intestinal scrapings, indicating the usability of this in vitro model. Caco-2 cells, however, appear to over-express as well as under-express certain proteins, which needs to be considered by scientists using this cell line. Hence, care should be taken to prevent misinterpretation of

  17. NLRP3 Inflammasome Expression and Signaling in Human Diabetic Wounds and in High Glucose Induced Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Dai, Jiezhi; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. To investigate the contribution and mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome expression in human wounds in diabetes mellitus and in high glucose induced macrophages. Methods. In the present study, we compared the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome in debridement wound tissue from diabetic and nondiabetic patients. We also examined whether high glucose induces NLRP3 inflammasome expression in cultures THP-1-derived macrophages and the influence on IL-1β expression. Results. The expressions of NLRP3, caspase1, and IL-1β, at both the mRNA and protein level, were significantly higher in wounds of diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic wounds (P CCR7 was significantly upregulated after high glucose stimulation. SiRNA-mediated silencing of NLRP3 expression downregulates the expression of IL-1β. Conclusion. The higher expression of NLRP3, caspase1, and secretion of IL-1β, signaling, and activation might contribute to the hyperinflammation in the human diabetic wound and in high glucose induced macrophages. It may be a novel target to treat the DM patients with chronic wound. PMID:28164132

  18. The transcriptome of Legionella pneumophila-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T D Price

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades and replicates within alveolar macrophages through injection of ∼ 300 effector proteins by its Dot/Icm type IV translocation apparatus. The bona fide F-box protein, AnkB, is a nutritional virulence effector that triggers macrophages to generate a surplus of amino acids, which is essential for intravacuolar proliferation. Therefore, the ankB mutant represents a novel genetic tool to determine the transcriptional response of human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs to actively replicating L. pneumophila.Here, we utilized total human gene microarrays to determine the global transcriptional response of hMDMs to infection by wild type or the ankB mutant of L. pneumophila. The transcriptomes of hMDMs infected with either actively proliferating wild type or non-replicative ankB mutant bacteria were remarkably similar. The transcriptome of infected hMDMs was predominated by up-regulation of inflammatory pathways (IL-10 anti-inflammatory, interferon signaling and amphoterin signaling, anti-apoptosis, and down-regulation of protein synthesis pathways. In addition, L. pneumophila modulated diverse metabolic pathways, particularly those associated with bio-active lipid metabolism, and SLC amino acid transporters expression.Taken together, the hMDM transcriptional response to L. pneumophila is independent of intra-vacuolar replication of the bacteria and primarily involves modulation of the immune response and metabolic as well as nutritional pathways.

  19. MicroRNA Response of Primary Human Macrophages to Arcobacter Butzleri Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Bruegge, Jennifer; Backes, Christina; Gölz, Greta; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Scharek-Tedin, Lydia; Franke, Andre; Alter, Thomas; Einspanier, Ralf; Keller, Andreas; Sharbati, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in infectious diseases is becoming more and more apparent, and the use of miRNAs as a diagnostic tool and their therapeutic application has become the major focus of investigation. The aim of this study was to identify miRNAs involved in the immune signaling of macrophages in response to Arcobacter (A.) butzleri infection, an emerging foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis. Therefore, primary human macrophages were isolated and infected, and miRNA expression was studied by means of RNAseq. Analysis of the data revealed the expression of several miRNAs, which were previously associated with bacterial infections such as miR-155, miR-125, and miR-212. They were shown to play a key role in Toll-like receptor signaling where they act as fine-tuners to establish a balanced immune response. In addition, miRNAs which have yet not been identified during bacterial infections such as miR-3613, miR-2116, miR-671, miR-30d, and miR-629 were differentially regulated in A. butzleri-infected cells. Targets of these miRNAs accumulated in pathways such as apoptosis and endocytosis – processes that might be involved in A. butzleri pathogenesis. Our study contributes new findings about the interaction of A. butzleri with human innate immune cells helping to understand underlying regulatory mechanisms in macrophages during infection. PMID:27429792

  20. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by HIV protease inhibitors increases intracellular accumulation of berberine in murine and human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibin Zha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV protease inhibitor (PI-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR, a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123 efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic.

  1. A breakdown in communication? Understanding the effects of aging on the human small intestine epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabbott, Neil A

    2015-10-01

    In the intestine, a single layer of epithelial cells sealed together at their apical surfaces by tight junctions helps to prevent the luminal commensal and pathogenic micro-organisms and their toxins from entering host tissues. The intestinal epithelium also helps to maintain homoeostasis in the mucosal immune system by expressing anti-inflammatory cytokines in the steady state and inflammatory cytokines in response to pathogens. Although the function of the mucosal immune system is impaired in elderly humans, the molecular mechanisms which cause this dramatic functional decline are poorly understood. Our current understanding of the effects of aging on the physical and immunological properties of the intestinal epithelial barrier is also very limited. In this issue of Clinical Science, Man et al. provide further insight into the effects of aging on small intestinal barrier function in humans and the influence that gut luminal micro-organisms may have on it. Using human terminal ileal biopsy tissues they show that intestinal permeability to solutes, but not macromolecules, was significantly increased in the intestines of elderly humans. This was accompanied by elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 which appeared to modulate claudin-2 expression and solute permeability in the epithelium. Conversely, IL-8 synthesis in response to flagellin stimulation was reduced in intestines of the elderly subjects, but was not associated with effects on Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) expression. These data provide an important advance in our understanding on the effects of aging on intestinal permeability and innate mucosal immune responsiveness in elderly humans.

  2. The anti-inflammatory effects of PGE2 on human lung macrophages are mediated by the EP4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sharonjit K; Yao, Yiwen; Kay, Linda J; Bewley, Martin A; Marriott, Helen M; Peachell, Peter T

    2016-11-01

    PGE2 inhibits cytokine generation from human lung macrophages. However, the EP receptor that mediates this beneficial anti-inflammatory effect of PGE2 has not been defined. The aim of this study was to identify the EP receptor by which PGE2 inhibits cytokine generation from human lung macrophages. This was determined by using recently developed EP receptor ligands. The effects of PGE2 and EP-selective agonists on LPS-induced generation of TNF-α and IL-6 from macrophages were evaluated. The effects of EP2 -selective (PF-04852946, PF-04418948) and EP4 -selective (L-161,982, CJ-042794) receptor antagonists on PGE2 responses were studied. The expression of EP receptor subtypes by human lung macrophages was determined by RT-PCR. PGE2 inhibited LPS-induced and Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced cytokine generation from human lung macrophages. Analysis of mRNA levels indicated that macrophages expressed EP2 and EP4 receptors. L-902,688 (EP4 receptor-selective agonist) was considerably more potent than butaprost (EP2 receptor-selective agonist) as an inhibitor of TNF-α generation from macrophages. EP2 receptor-selective antagonists had marginal effects on the PGE2 inhibition of TNF-α generation, whereas EP4 receptor-selective antagonists caused rightward shifts in the PGE2 concentration-response curves. These studies demonstrate that the EP4 receptor is the principal receptor that mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of PGE2 on human lung macrophages. This suggests that EP4 receptor agonists could be effective anti-inflammatory agents in human lung disease. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Nogo-B is associated with cytoskeletal structures in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gredler Viktoria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reticulon Nogo-B participates in cellular and immunological processes in murine macrophages. Since leukocytes are an essential part of the immune system in health and disease, we decided to investigate the expression of Nogo-A, Nogo-B and Nogo-C in different human immune cell subpopulations. Furthermore, we analyzed the localization of Nogo-B in human monocyte-derived macrophages by indirect immunofluorescence stainings to gain further insight into its possible function. Findings We describe an association of Nogo-B with cytoskeletal structures and the base of filopodia, but not with focal or podosomal adhesion sites of monocyte-derived macrophages. Nogo-B positive structures are partially co-localized with RhoA staining and Rac1 positive membrane ruffles. Furthermore, Nogo-B is associated with the tubulin network, but not accumulated in the Golgi region. Although Nogo-B is present in the endoplasmic reticulum, it can also be translocated to large cell protrusions or the trailing end of migratory cells, where it is homogenously distributed. Conclusions Two different Nogo-B staining patterns can be distinguished in macrophages: firstly we observed ER-independent Nogo-B localization in cell protrusions and at the trailing end of migrating cells. Secondly, the localization of Nogo-B in actin/RhoA/Rac1 positive regions supports an influence on cytoskeletal organization. To our knowledge this is the first report on Nogo-B expression at the base of filopodia, thus providing further insight into the distribution of this protein.

  4. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    folds that closely resembled the intestinal villi and formation of a tight barrier. Furthermore, the microelectrodes embedded in the microchip also allow real-time monitoring of the barrier integrity by means of measuring the trans-epithelial electrical resistance. Demonstrations of transport studies...... using different compounds on the in vitro human intestinal model in the microfluidic device showed comparable results with static cultures. In addition, a normal commensal intestinal bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) was successfully co-cultured on the luminal surface of the cultured epithelium...

  5. Isolation and Identification of Intestinal CYP3A Inhibitors from Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) using Human Intestinal Microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyung; Sy-Cordero, Arlene; Graf, Tyler N.; Brantley, Scott J.; Paine, Mary F.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2010-01-01

    Cranberry juice is used routinely, especially among women and the elderly, to prevent and treat urinary tract infections. These individuals are likely to be taking medications concomitantly with cranberry juice, leading to concern about potential drug-dietary substance interactions, particularly in the intestine, which, along with the liver, is rich in expression of the prominent drug metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). Using a systematic in vitro-in vivo approach, a cranberry juice product was identified recently that elicited a pharmacokinetic interaction with the CYP3A probe substrate midazolam in 16 healthy volunteers. Relative to water, a cranberry juice inhibited intestinal first-pass midazolam metabolism. In vitro studies were initiated to identify potential enteric CYP3A inhibitors from cranberry via a bioactivity-directed fractionation approach involving dried whole cranberry [Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae)], midazolam, and human intestinal microsomes (HIM). Three triterpenes (maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid) were isolated. The inhibitory potency (IC50) of maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid was 7.4, 8.8, and triterpenes may have contributed to the midazolam-cranberry juice interaction observed in the clinical study. PMID:20717876

  6. Association between the ABO blood group and the human intestinal microbiota composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäkivuokko Harri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mucus layer covering the human intestinal epithelium forms a dynamic surface for host-microbial interactions. In addition to the environmental factors affecting the intestinal equilibrium, such as diet, it is well established that the microbiota composition is individually driven, but the host factors determining the composition have remained unresolved. Results In this study, we show that ABO blood group is involved in differences in relative proportion and overall profiles of intestinal microbiota. Specifically, the microbiota from the individuals harbouring the B antigen (secretor B and AB differed from the non-B antigen groups and also showed higher diversity of the Eubacterium rectale-Clostridium coccoides (EREC and Clostridium leptum (CLEPT -groups in comparison with other blood groups. Conclusions Our novel finding indicates that the ABO blood group is one of the genetically determined host factors modulating the composition of the human intestinal microbiota, thus enabling new applications in the field of personalized nutrition and medicine.

  7. Characterization of two cysteine proteases secreted by Blastocystis ST7, a human intestinal parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Texier, Catherine; Poirier, Philippe; Viscogliosi, Eric; Tan, Kevin S W; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2012-09-01

    Blastocystis spp. are unicellular anaerobic intestinal parasites of both humans and animals and the most prevalent ones found in human stool samples. Their association with various gastrointestinal disorders raises the questions of its pathogenicity and of the molecular mechanisms involved. Since secreted proteases are well-known to be implicated in intestinal parasite virulence, we intended to determine whether Blastocystis spp. possess such pathogenic factors. In silico analysis of the Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7) genome sequence highlighted 22 genes coding proteases which were predicted to be secreted. We characterized the proteolytic activities in the secretory products of Blastocystis ST7 using specific protease inhibitors. Two cysteine proteases, a cathepsin B and a legumain, were identified in the parasite culture supernatant by gelatin zymographic SDS-PAGE gel and MS/MS analysis. These proteases might act on intestinal cells and disturb gut function. This work provides serious molecular candidates to link Blastocystis spp. and intestinal disorders.

  8. Molecular characterisation of non-absorptive and absorptive enterocytes in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, N; Newrzella, D; Böhm, C;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Perturbation of differentiation of the crypt-villus axis of the human small intestine is associated with several intestinal disorders of clinical importance. At present, differentiation of small intestinal enterocytes in the crypt-villus axis is not well characterised. SUBJECTS...... genes, and vesicle/transport related genes was found. CONCLUSION: Two types of enterocytes were dissected at the molecular level, the non-absorptive enterocyte located in the upper part of crypts and the absorptive enterocyte found in the middle of villi. These data improve our knowledge about...... the physiology of the crypt-villus architecture in human small intestine and provide new insights into pathophysiological phenomena, such as villus atrophy, which is clinically important....

  9. Differential bacterial survival, replication, and apoptosis-inducing ability of Salmonella serovars within human and murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwan, W R; Huang, X Z; Hu, L; Kopecko, D J

    2000-03-01

    Salmonella serovars are associated with human diseases that range from mild gastroenteritis to host-disseminated enteric fever. Human infections by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi can lead to typhoid fever, but this serovar does not typically cause disease in mice or other animals. In contrast, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, which are usually linked to localized gastroenteritis in humans and some animal species, elicit a systemic infection in mice. To better understand these observations, multiple strains of each of several chosen serovars of Salmonella were tested for the ability in the nonopsonized state to enter, survive, and replicate within human macrophage cells (U937 and elutriated primary cells) compared with murine macrophage cells (J774A.1 and primary peritoneal cells); in addition, death of the infected macrophages was monitored. The serovar Typhimurium strains all demonstrated enhanced survival within J774A.1 cells and murine peritoneal macrophages, compared with the significant, almost 100-fold declines in viable counts noted for serovar Typhi strains. Viable counts for serovar Enteritidis either matched the level of serovar Typhi (J774A. 1 macrophages) or were comparable to counts for serovar Typhimurium (murine peritoneal macrophages). Apoptosis was significantly higher in J774A.1 cells infected with serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 compared to serovar Typhi strain Ty2. On the other hand, serovar Typhi survived at a level up to 100-fold higher in elutriated human macrophages and 2- to 3-fold higher in U937 cells compared to the serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis strains tested. Despite the differential multiplication of serovar Typhi during infection of U937 cells, serovar Typhi caused significantly less apoptosis than infections with serovar Typhimurium. These observations indicate variability in intramacrophage survival and host cytotoxicity among the various serovars and are the first to show differences in

  10. Platelet-activating factor increases reactive oxygen species-mediated microbicidal activity of human macrophages infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Arissa Felipe; Morato, Camila Imai; Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; Dorta, Miriam Leandro; de Oliveira, Milton Adriano Pelli; Ribeiro-Dias, Fátima

    2017-09-29

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is produced by macrophages during inflammation and infections. We evaluated whether PAF is able to modulate the infection of human macrophages by Leishmania braziliensis, the main Leishmania sp. in Brazil. Monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated with promastigote forms in absence or presence of exogenous PAF. We observed that the treatment of macrophages with low concentrations of PAF prior to infection increased the phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. More importantly, exogenous PAF reduced the parasitism when it was added before, during or after infection. In addition, treatment with a PAF antagonist (PCA 4248) resulted in a significant increase of macrophage infection in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that endogenous PAF is important to control L. braziliensis infection. Mechanistically, while exogenous PAF increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) treatment with PCA 4248 reduced oxidative burst during L. braziliensis infection. The microbicidal effects of exogenous PAF were abolished when macrophages were treated with apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. The data show that PAF promotes the production of ROS induced by L. braziliensis, suggesting that this lipid mediator may be relevant to control L. braziliensis infection in human macrophages. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages and inhibition of MCP-1 reduce angiogenesis and tumor growth in a human melanoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Silvina; Bravo, Alicia I; Guglielmotti, Angelo; van Rooijen, Nico; Maschi, Fabricio; Vecchi, Annunciata; Mantovani, Alberto; Mordoh, José; Wainstok, Rosa

    2007-08-01

    Chemokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 are key agonists that attract macrophages to tumors. In melanoma, it has been previously shown that variable levels of MCP-1/CCL2 appear to correlate with infiltrating macrophages and tumor fate, with low to intermediate levels of the chemokine contributing to melanoma development. To work under such conditions, a poorly tumorigenic human melanoma cell line was transfected with an expression vector encoding MCP-1. We found that M2 macrophages are associated to MCP-1+ tumors, triggering a profuse vascular network. To target the protumoral macrophages recruitment and reverting tumor growth promotion, clodronate-laden liposomes (Clod-Lip) or bindarit were administered to melanoma-bearing mice. Macrophage depletion after Clod-Lip treatment induced development of smaller tumors than in untreated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-CD31 antibody revealed scarce vascular structures mainly characterized by narrow vascular lights. Pharmacological inhibition of MCP-1 with bindarit also reduced tumor growth and macrophage recruitment, rendering necrotic tumor masses. We suggest that bindarit or Clod-Lip abrogates protumoral-associated macrophages in human melanoma xenografts and could be considered as complementary approaches to antiangiogenic therapy.

  12. Impact of Diet on Human Intestinal Microbiota and Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salonen, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Our intestinal microbiota is involved in the breakdown and bioconversion of dietary and host components that are not degraded and taken up by our own digestive system. The end products generated by our microbiota fuel our enterocytes and support growth but also have signaling functions that generate

  13. Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    intestinal tissues from AIDS patients with cryptosporidiosis, we did not detect CXCL-8 (90). Finally, CXCL-8 attracts mainly granu - locytes. However, in...cryptosporidiosis but not after reconstitution of immunity. Infect. Immun. 75:481–487. 91. Weinstock, J. V., A. Blum, J. Walder, and R. Walder. 1988. Eosinophils

  14. Impact of Diet on Human Intestinal Microbiota and Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salonen, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Our intestinal microbiota is involved in the breakdown and bioconversion of dietary and host components that are not degraded and taken up by our own digestive system. The end products generated by our microbiota fuel our enterocytes and support growth but also have signaling functions that generate

  15. Host-Microbe Interactions in the Neonatal Intestine: Role of Human Milk Oligosaccharides123

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Sharon M.; Wang, Mei; LI, MIN; Friedberg, Iddo; Schwartz, Scott L.; Robert S Chapkin

    2012-01-01

    The infant intestinal microbiota is shaped by genetics and environment, including the route of delivery and early dietary intake. Data from germ-free rodents and piglets support a critical role for the microbiota in regulating gastrointestinal and immune development. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) both directly and indirectly influence intestinal development by regulating cell proliferation, acting as prebiotics for beneficial bacteria and modulating immune development. We have shown that ...

  16. Development of Functional Microfold (M Cells from Intestinal Stem Cells in Primary Human Enteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Rouch

    Full Text Available Intestinal microfold (M cells are specialized epithelial cells that act as gatekeepers of luminal antigens in the intestinal tract. They play a critical role in the intestinal mucosal immune response through transport of viruses, bacteria and other particles and antigens across the epithelium to immune cells within Peyer's patch regions and other mucosal sites. Recent studies in mice have demonstrated that M cells are generated from Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs, and that infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium increases M cell formation. However, it is not known whether and how these findings apply to primary human small intestinal epithelium propagated in an in vitro setting.Human intestinal crypts were grown as monolayers with growth factors and treated with recombinant RANKL, and assessed for mRNA transcripts, immunofluorescence and uptake of microparticles and S. Typhimurium.Functional M cells were generated by short-term culture of freshly isolated human intestinal crypts in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. RANKL stimulation of the monolayer cultures caused dramatic induction of the M cell-specific markers, SPIB, and Glycoprotein-2 (GP2 in a process primed by canonical WNT signaling. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a pseudopod phenotype of GP2-positive M cells that preferentially take up microparticles. Furthermore, infection of the M cell-enriched cultures with the M cell-tropic enteric pathogen, S. Typhimurium, led to preferential association of the bacteria with M cells, particularly at lower inoculum sizes. Larger inocula caused rapid induction of M cells.Human intestinal crypts containing ISCs can be cultured and differentiate into an epithelial layer with functional M cells with characteristic morphological and functional properties. This study is the first to demonstrate that M cells can be induced to form from primary human intestinal epithelium, and that S. Typhimurium preferentially infect these cells in an

  17. Assessing DNA methylation in the developing human intestinal epithelium: potential link to inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraiczy, J; Nayak, K; Ross, A; Raine, T; Mak, T N; Gasparetto, M; Cario, E; Rakyan, V; Heuschkel, R; Zilbauer, M

    2016-05-01

    DNA methylation is one of the major epigenetic mechanisms implicated in regulating cellular development and cell-type-specific gene expression. Here we performed simultaneous genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression analysis on purified intestinal epithelial cells derived from human fetal gut, healthy pediatric biopsies, and children newly diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results were validated using pyrosequencing, real-time PCR, and immunostaining. The functional impact of DNA methylation changes on gene expression was assessed by employing in-vitro assays in intestinal cell lines. DNA methylation analyses allowed identification of 214 genes for which expression is regulated via DNA methylation, i.e. regulatory differentially methylated regions (rDMRs). Pathway and functional analysis of rDMRs suggested a critical role for DNA methylation in regulating gene expression and functional development of the human intestinal epithelium. Moreover, analysis performed on intestinal epithelium of children newly diagnosed with IBD revealed alterations in DNA methylation within genomic loci, which were found to overlap significantly with those undergoing methylation changes during intestinal development. Our study provides novel insights into the physiological role of DNA methylation in regulating functional maturation of the human intestinal epithelium. Moreover, we provide data linking developmentally acquired alterations in the DNA methylation profile to changes seen in pediatric IBD.

  18. HSV-1-induced chemokine expression via IFI16-dependent and IFI16-independent pathways in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søby, Stine; Laursen, Rune R; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Innate recognition is essential in the antiviral response against infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Chemokines are important for control of HSV via recruitment of natural killer cells, T lymphocytes, and antigen-presenting cells. We previously found that early HSV-1......-mediated chemokine responses are not dependent on TLR2 and TLR9 in human macrophages. Here, we investigated the role of the recently identified innate IFN-inducible DNA receptor IFI16 during HSV-1 infection in human macrophages. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were purified from buffy coats...... and monocytes were differentiated to macrophages. Macrophages infected with HSV-1 were analyzed using siRNA-mediated knock-down of IFI16 by real-time PCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. RESULTS: We determined that both CXCL10 and CCL3 are induced independent of HSV-1 replication. IFI16 mediates CCL3 m...

  19. Pioglitazone Suppresses CXCR7 Expression To Inhibit Human Macrophage Chemotaxis through Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Duo; Zhu, Zhicheng; Li, Dan; Xu, Rihao; Wang, Tiance; Liu, Kexiang

    2015-11-17

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Pioglitazone, the widely used thiazolidinedione, is shown to be efficient in the prevention of cardiovascular complications of T2DM. In this study, we report that pioglitazone inhibits CXCR7 expression and thus blocks chemotaxis in differentiated macrophage without perturbing cell viability or macrophage differentiation. In addition, pioglitazone-mediated CXCR7 suppression and chemotaxis inhibition occur via activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) but not PPARα in differentiated macrophage. More importantly, pioglitazone therapy-induced PPARγ activation suppresses CXCR7 expression in human carotid atherosclerotic lesions. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pioglitazone suppresses CXCR7 expression to inhibit human macrophage chemotaxis through PPARγ.

  20. Generation of dendritic cells and macrophages from human induced pluripotent stem cells aiming at cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, S; Haruta, M; Matsumura, K; Matsunaga, Y; Fukushima, S; Ikeda, T; Takamatsu, K; Irie, A; Nishimura, Y

    2011-09-01

    This report describes generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. iPS cell-derived DC (iPS-DC) exhibited the morphology of typical DC and function of T-cell stimulation and antigen presentation. iPS-DC loaded with cytomegalovirus (CMV) peptide induced vigorous expansion of CMV-specific autologous CD8+ T cells. Macrophages (iPS-MP) with activity of zymosan phagocytosis and C5a-induced chemotaxis were also generated from iPS cells. Genetically modified iPS-MPs were generated by the introduction of expression vectors into undifferentiated iPS cells, isolation of transfectant iPS cell clone and subsequent differentiation. By this procedure, we generated iPS-MP expressing a membrane-bound form of single chain antibody (scFv) specific to amyloid β (Aβ), the causal protein of Alzheimer's disease. The scFv-transfectant iPS-MP exhibited efficient Aβ-specific phagocytosis activity. iPS-MP expressing CD20-specific scFv engulfed and killed BALL-1 B-cell leukemia cells. Anti-BALL-1 effect of iPS-MP in vivo was demonstrated in a xeno-transplantation model using severe combined immunodeficient mice. In addition, we established a xeno-free culture protocol to generate iPS-DC and iPS-MP. Collectively, we demonstrated the possibility of application of iPS-DC and macrophages to cell therapy.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 endocytic trafficking through macrophage bridging conduits facilitates spread of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiu, Irena; Gendelman, Howard E

    2011-12-01

    Bridging conduits (BC) sustain communication and homeostasis between distant tethered cells. These are also exploited commonly for direct cell-to-cell transfer of microbial agents. Conduits efficiently spread infection, effectively, at speeds faster than fluid phase exchange while shielding the microbe against otherwise effective humoral immunity. Our laboratory has sought to uncover the mechanism(s) for these events for human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) infection. Indeed, in our prior works HIV-1 Env and Gag antigen and fluorescent virus tracking were shown sequestered into endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi organelles but the outcomes for spreading viral infection remained poorly defined. Herein, we show that HIV-1 specifically traffics through endocytic compartments contained within BC and directing such macrophage-to-macrophage viral transfers. Following clathrin-dependent viral entry, HIV-1 constituents bypass degradation by differential sorting from early to Rab11(+) recycling endosomes and multivesicular bodies. Virus-containing endocytic viral cargoes propelled by myosin II through BC spread to neighboring uninfected cells. Disruption of endosomal motility with cytochalasin D, nocodasole and blebbistatin diminish intercellular viral spread. These data lead us to propose that HIV-1 hijacks macrophage endocytic and cytoskeletal machineries for high-speed cell-to-cell spread.

  2. Human monocytes/macrophages are a target of Neisseria meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoso, Susanna; Mazzon, Cristina; Sztukowska, Maryta; Cecchini, Paola; Kasic, Tihana; Capecchi, Barbara; Tavano, Regina; Papini, Emanuele

    2008-05-01

    Specific surface proteins of Neisseria meningitidis have been proposed to stimulate leukocytes during tissue invasion and septic shock. In this study, we demonstrate that the adhesin N. meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA) involved in the colonization of the respiratory epithelium by hypervirulent N. meningitidis B strains also binds to and activates human monocytes/macrophages. Expression of NadA on the surface on Escherichia coli does not increase bacterial-monocyte association, but a NadA-positive strain induced a significantly higher amount of TNF-alpha and IL-8 compared with the parental NadA-negative strain, suggesting that NadA has an intrinsic stimulatory action on these cells. Consistently, highly pure, soluble NadA(Delta351-405), a proposed component of an antimeningococcal vaccine, efficiently stimulates monocytes/macrophages to secrete a selected pattern of cytokines and chemotactic factors characterized by high levels of IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha and low levels of the main vasoactive mediators TNF-alpha and IL-1. NadA(Delta351-405) also inhibited monocyte apoptosis and determined its differentiation into a macrophage-like phenotype.

  3. Human flora-associated (HFA) animals as a model for studying the role of intestinal flora in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Kikuji

    2005-09-01

    Although the intestinal flora in animals plays an important role in health and disease, there is little direct information regarding the role of the human intestinal flora. By inoculating germfree animals with human faeces, the major components of the human flora can be transferred into the ex-germfree animals, i.e. human flora-associated (HFA) animals. HFA animals therefore provide a stable model for studying the ecosystem and metabolism of the human intestinal flora. Results with HFA animals suggest the role of the human intestinal flora is somewhat different from the role of the animal flora in conventional experimental animals. Studies using HFA animals, therefore, will provide much needed information on the precise role of the intestinal flora in relation to humans. HFA animals also can be used as models to investigate the interactions between the human intestinal flora, host factors, dietary manipulations, and therapeutics, such as probiotics, prebiotics, and antibiotics.

  4. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie C; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A; Klein, Thomas W; Sleasman, John W; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency.

  5. Toxicity and antibacterial assessment of chitosan-coated silver nanoparticles on human pathogens and macrophage cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Prajna Jena1, Soumitra Mohanty1, Rojee Mallick1, Biju Jacob2, Avinash Sonawane11School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Orissa, India; 2Center for Innovation, Technopark Technology Business Incubator, Bangalore, Karnataka, IndiaBackground: Pathogenic bacteria are able to develop various strategies to counteract the bactericidal action of antibiotics. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have emerged as a potential alternative to conventional antibiotics because of their potent antimicrobial properties. The purpose of this study was to synthesize chitosan-stabilized AgNPs (CS-AgNPs and test for their cytotoxic, genotoxic, macrophage cell uptake, antibacterial, and antibiofilm activities.Methods: AgNPs were synthesized using chitosan as both a stabilizing and a reducing agent. Antibacterial activity was determined by colony-forming unit assay and scanning electron microscopy. Genotoxic and cytotoxic activity were determined by DNA fragmentation, comet, and MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assays. Cellular uptake and intracellular antibacterial activity were tested on macrophages.Results: CS-AgNPs exhibited potent antibacterial activity against different human pathogens and also impeded bacterial biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated that CS-AgNPs kill bacteria by disrupting the cell membrane. CS-AgNPs showed no significant cytotoxic or DNA damage effect on macrophages at the bactericidal dose. Propidium iodide staining indicated active endocytosis of CS-AgNPs resulting in reduced intracellular bacterial survival in macrophages.Conclusion: The present study concludes that at a specific dose, chitosan-based AgNPs kill bacteria without harming the host cells, thus representing a potential template for the design of antibacterial agents to decrease bacterial colonization and to overcome the problem of drug resistance.Keywords: chitosan-silver nanoparticles, antibiofilm, cytotoxicity

  6. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie C.; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A.; Klein, Thomas W.; Sleasman, John W.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2014-01-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency. PMID:24562630

  7. MicroRNA expression profile in human macrophages in response to Leishmania major infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Lemaire

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania (L. are intracellular protozoan parasites able to survive and replicate in the hostile phagolysosomal environment of infected macrophages. They cause leishmaniasis, a heterogeneous group of worldwide-distributed affections, representing a paradigm of neglected diseases that are mainly embedded in impoverished populations. To establish successful infection and ensure their own survival, Leishmania have developed sophisticated strategies to subvert the host macrophage responses. Despite a wealth of gained crucial information, these strategies still remain poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, an evolutionarily conserved class of endogenous 22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs, are described to participate in the regulation of almost every cellular process investigated so far. They regulate the expression of target genes both at the levels of mRNA stability and translation; changes in their expression have a profound effect on their target transcripts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report in this study a comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression profiles in L. major-infected human primary macrophages of three healthy donors assessed at different time-points post-infection (three to 24 h. We show that expression of 64 out of 365 analyzed miRNAs was consistently deregulated upon infection with the same trends in all donors. Among these, several are known to be induced by TLR-dependent responses. GO enrichment analysis of experimentally validated miRNA-targeted genes revealed that several pathways and molecular functions were disturbed upon parasite infection. Finally, following parasite infection, miR-210 abundance was enhanced in HIF-1α-dependent manner, though it did not contribute to inhibiting anti-apoptotic pathways through pro-apoptotic caspase-3 regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that alteration in miRNA levels likely plays an important role in regulating macrophage functions following L. major

  8. High taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota by Ligase Detection Reaction - Universal Array approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitali Beatrice

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affecting the core functional microbiome, peculiar high level taxonomic unbalances of the human intestinal microbiota have been recently associated with specific diseases, such as obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, and intestinal inflammation. Results In order to specifically monitor microbiota unbalances that impact human physiology, here we develop and validate an original DNA-microarray (HTF-Microbi.Array for the high taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota. Based on the Ligase Detection Reaction-Universal Array (LDR-UA approach, the HTF-Microbi.Array enables specific detection and approximate relative quantification of 16S rRNAs from 30 phylogenetically related groups of the human intestinal microbiota. The HTF-Microbi.Array was used in a pilot study of the faecal microbiota of eight young adults. Cluster analysis revealed the good reproducibility of the high level taxonomic microbiota fingerprint obtained for each of the subject. Conclusion The HTF-Microbi.Array is a fast and sensitive tool for the high taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota in terms of presence/absence of the principal groups. Moreover, analysis of the relative fluorescence intensity for each probe pair of our LDR-UA platform can provide estimation of the relative abundance of the microbial target groups within each samples. Focusing the phylogenetic resolution at division, order and cluster levels, the HTF-Microbi.Array is blind with respect to the inter-individual variability at the species level.

  9. Analysis of the human monocyte-derived macrophage transcriptome and response to lipopolysaccharide provides new insights into genetic aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, J Kenneth; Arner, Erik; Daub, Carsten; De Hoon, Michiel; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Wells, Christine A; Rehli, Michael; Pavli, Paul; Summers, Kim M; Hume, David A

    2017-03-01

    The FANTOM5 consortium utilised cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) to provide an unprecedented insight into transcriptional regulation in human cells and tissues. In the current study, we have used CAGE-based transcriptional profiling on an extended dense time course of the response of human monocyte-derived macrophages grown in macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1) to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We propose that this system provides a model for the differentiation and adaptation of monocytes entering the intestinal lamina propria. The response to LPS is shown to be a cascade of successive waves of transient gene expression extending over at least 48 hours, with hundreds of positive and negative regulatory loops. Promoter analysis using motif activity response analysis (MARA) identified some of the transcription factors likely to be responsible for the temporal profile of transcriptional activation. Each LPS-inducible locus was associated with multiple inducible enhancers, and in each case, transient eRNA transcription at multiple sites detected by CAGE preceded the appearance of promoter-associated transcripts. LPS-inducible long non-coding RNAs were commonly associated with clusters of inducible enhancers. We used these data to re-examine the hundreds of loci associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in genome-wide association studies. Loci associated with IBD were strongly and specifically (relative to rheumatoid arthritis and unrelated traits) enriched for promoters that were regulated in monocyte differentiation or activation. Amongst previously-identified IBD susceptibility loci, the vast majority contained at least one promoter that was regulated in CSF1-dependent monocyte-macrophage transitions and/or in response to LPS. On this basis, we concluded that IBD loci are strongly-enriched for monocyte-specific genes, and identified at least 134 additional candidate genes associated with IBD susceptibility from reanalysis

  10. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-08-29

    Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs) represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1-11) have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes), goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines.

  11. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1–11 have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes, goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines.

  12. Intestinal microbiota in human health and disease: the impact of probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, J.; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G.T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonise the human gastrointestinal tract play an important role in human health. The development of culture-independent molecular techniques has provided new insights in the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we summarise the

  13. Intestinal microbiota in human health and disease: the impact of probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, J.; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G.T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonise the human gastrointestinal tract play an important role in human health. The development of culture-independent molecular techniques has provided new insights in the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we summarise the

  14. Analyzing the functionality of the human intestinal microbiota by stable isotope probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovatcheva, P.P.

    2010-01-01

    Key words: gut bacteria, dietary carbohydrates, digestion, RNA-SIP, TIM-2, HITChip, human trial The human gastro-intestinal (GI) tract comprises a series of complex and dynamic organs ranging from the stomach to the distal colon, which harbor immense microbial assemblages, with considerable diversi

  15. Among plant lignans, pinoresinol has the strongest antiinflammatory properties in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    During, Alexandrine; Debouche, Céline; Raas, Thomas; Larondelle, Yvan

    2012-10-01

    Dietary lignans show some promising health benefits, but little is known about their fate and activities in the small intestine. The purpose of this study was thus to investigate whether plant lignans are taken up by intestinal cells and modulate the intestinal inflammatory response using the Caco-2 cell model. Six lignan standards [secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), secoisolariciresinol (SECO), pinoresinol (PINO), lariciresinol, matairesinol (MAT), and hydroxymatairesinol] and their colonic metabolites [enterolactone (ENL) and enterodiol] were studied. First, differentiated cells were exposed to SDG, SECO, PINO, or ENL at increasing concentrations for 4 h, and their cellular contents (before and after deconjugation) were determined by HPLC. Second, in IL-1β-stimulated confluent and/or differentiated cells, lignan effects were tested on different soluble proinflammatory mediators quantified by enzyme immunoassays and on the NF-κB activation pathway by using cells transiently transfected. SECO, PINO, and ENL, but not SDG, were taken up and partly conjugated by cells, which is a saturable conjugation process. PINO was the most efficiently conjugated (75% of total in cells). In inflamed cells, PINO significantly reduced IL-6 by 65% and 30% in confluent and differentiated cells, respectively, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-derived prostaglandin E(2) by 62% in confluent cells. In contrast, MAT increased significantly COX-2-derived prostaglandin E(2) in confluent cells. Moreover, PINO dose-dependently decreased IL-6 and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 secretions and NF-κB activity. Our findings suggest that plant lignans can be absorbed and metabolized in the small intestine and, among the plant lignans tested, PINO exhibited the strongest antiinflammatory properties by acting on the NF-κB signaling pathway, possibly in relation to its furofuran structure and/or its intestinal metabolism.

  16. Haemophilus ducreyi-induced interleukin-10 promotes a mixed M1 and M2 activation program in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2012-12-01

    During microbial infection, macrophages are polarized to classically activated (M1) or alternatively activated (M2) cells in response to microbial components and host immune mediators. Proper polarization of macrophages is critical for bacterial clearance. To study the role of macrophage polarization during Haemophilus ducreyi infection, we analyzed a panel of macrophage surface markers in skin biopsy specimens of pustules obtained from experimentally infected volunteers. Lesional macrophages expressed markers characteristic of both M1 and M2 polarization. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) also expressed a mixed M1 and M2 profile of surface markers and cytokines/chemokines upon infection with H. ducreyi in vitro. Endogenous interleukin 10 (IL-10) produced by infected MDM downregulated and enhanced expression of several M1 and M2 markers, respectively. Bacterial uptake, mediated mainly by class A scavenger receptors, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathways were required for H. ducreyi-induced IL-10 production in MDM. Compared to M1 cells, IL-10-polarized M2 cells displayed enhanced phagocytic activity against H. ducreyi and similar bacterial killing. Thus, IL-10-modulated macrophage polarization may contribute to H. ducreyi clearance during human infection.

  17. Human macrophages chronically exposed to LPS can be reactivated by stimulation with MDP to acquire an antimicrobial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Torres, Martha; Arellano, Monserrat; Juárez, Esmeralda

    2017-02-21

    Macrophages are important in host defense and can differentiate into functionally distinct subsets named classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated. In several inflammatory disorders, macrophages become tolerized to prevent deleterious consequences. This tolerization reduces the ability of macrophages to respond to bacterial components (e.g., LPS) maintaining a low level of inflammation but compromising the ability of macrophages to mount an effective immune response during subsequent pathogen encounters. In this study, we aimed to reactivate human monocyte-derived macrophages chronically exposed to LPS by re-stimulation with muramyl dipeptide (MDP). We observed an undefined profile of cell surface marker expression during endotoxin tolerance and absence of TNFα production. Stimulating macrophages chronically exposed to LPS with LPS+MDP restored TNFα, production together with an increased production of IL1, IL6, IFNγ, IL4, IL5 and IL10. These results suggest that macrophages chronically exposed to LPS possess a mixed M1-M2 phenotype with sufficient antimicrobial and homeostatic potential.

  18. Osteogenesis differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells by CO2 laser-treatment stimulating macrophages via BMP2 signalling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Hui; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-11-01

    Immune reactions play an important role in determining the biostimulation of bone formation, either in new bone formation or inflammatory fibrous tissue encapsulation. Macrophage cell, the important effector cells in the immune reaction, which are indispensable for osteogenesis and their heterogeneity and plasticity, render macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. However, there are very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteogenesis. In this study, we used CO2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of macrophage cells on the CO2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) was also significantly up regulated by the CO2 laser stimulation, indicating that macrophage may participate in the CO2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Interestingly, when laser treatment macrophage-conditioned medium were applied to human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs), the osteogenesis differentiation of hPDLs was significantly enhanced, indicating the important role of macrophages in CO2 laser-induced osteogenesis. These findings provided valuable insights into the mechanism of CO2 laser-stimulated osteogenic differentiation, and a strategy to optimize the evaluation system for the in vitro osteogenesis capacity of laser treatment.

  19. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in human granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Zhang, Zhifen; Xia, Li-Xia; Huang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) has been proved to have a positive role in the follicular development. We investigated its effect on human granulosa cells and found that M-CSF could stimulate the production of E2. The production of FSH receptors was enhanced by M-CSF in vitro in a dose-dependent manner with or without the addition of tamoxifen (p M-CSF and its receptor (p M-CSF (p M-CSF has a role in regulating the response of granulosa cells to gonadotropins. Its function is associated with JAK/STAT-signaling pathway.

  20. Circulating intestine-derived exosomal miR-328 in plasma, a possible biomarker for estimating BCRP function in the human intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotanda, Keisuke; Hirota, Takeshi; Saito, Jumpei; Fukae, Masato; Egashira, Yu; Izumi, Noritomo; Deguchi, Mariko; Kimura, Miyuki; Matsuki, Shunji; Irie, Shin; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2016-08-30

    A variant in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) gene, 421C> A is a useful biomarker for describing large inter-individual differences in the pharmacokinetics of sulfasalazine (SASP), a BCRP substrate. However, large intra-genotypic variability still exists in spite of the incorporation of this variant into the pharmacokinetics of SASP. Since miR-328 negatively regulates BCRP expression in human tissues, we hypothesized that exosomal miR-328 in plasma, which leaks from the intestines, is a possible biomarker for estimating BCRP activity in the human intestines. We established an immunoprecipitation-based quantitative method for circulating intestine-derived miR-328 in plasma using an anti-glycoprotein A33 antibody. A clinical study was conducted with an open-label, non-randomized, and single-arm design involving 33 healthy participants. Intestine-derived exosomal miR-328 levels positively correlated (P intestinal BCRP activity, resulting in the high AUC of SASP. Circulating intestine-derived exosomal miR-328 in plasma has potential as a possible biomarker for estimating BCRP function in the human intestines.

  1. Study of the Biotransformation of Tongmai Formula by Human Intestinal Flora and Its Intestinal Permeability across the Caco-2 Cell Monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tongmai formula (TMF is a well-known Chinese medicinal preparation that contains isoflavones as its major bioactive constituents. As traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs are usually used by oral administration, their fate inside the intestinal lumen, including their biotransformation by human intestinal flora (HIF and intestinal absorption deserves study. In this work TMF extract was incubated with human intestinal bacteria under anaerobic conditions and the changes in the twelve main constituents of TMF were then investigated. Their intestinal permeabilities, i.e., the transport capability across the intestinal brush border were investigated with a human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco­2 cell monolayer model to predict the absorption mechanism. Meanwhile, rapid HPLC-DAD methods were established for the assay. According to the biotransformation curves of the twelve constituents and the permeability coefficients, the intestinal absorption capacity of the typical compounds was elevated from the levels of 10−7 cm/s to 10−5 cm/s from those of the original compounds in TMF. Among them the main isoflavone glycosides puerarin (4, mirificin (6 and daidzin (7 were transformed into the same aglycone, daidzein (10. Therefore it was predicted that the aglycone compounds might be the real active ingredients in TMF. The models used can represent a novel path for the TCM studies.

  2. Study of the Biotransformation of Tongmai Formula by Human Intestinal Flora and Its Intestinal Permeability across the Caco-2 Cell Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuai; Xu, Wei; Wang, Fu-Rong; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2015-10-15

    Tongmai formula (TMF) is a well-known Chinese medicinal preparation that contains isoflavones as its major bioactive constituents. As traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) are usually used by oral administration, their fate inside the intestinal lumen, including their biotransformation by human intestinal flora (HIF) and intestinal absorption deserves study. In this work TMF extract was incubated with human intestinal bacteria under anaerobic conditions and the changes in the twelve main constituents of TMF were then investigated. Their intestinal permeabilities, i.e., the transport capability across the intestinal brush border were investigated with a human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2) cell monolayer model to predict the absorption mechanism. Meanwhile, rapid HPLC-DAD methods were established for the assay. According to the biotransformation curves of the twelve constituents and the permeability coefficients, the intestinal absorption capacity of the typical compounds was elevated from the levels of 10(-7) cm/s to 10(-5) cm/s from those of the original compounds in TMF. Among them the main isoflavone glycosides puerarin (4), mirificin (6) and daidzin (7) were transformed into the same aglycone, daidzein (10). Therefore it was predicted that the aglycone compounds might be the real active ingredients in TMF. The models used can represent a novel path for the TCM studies.

  3. Transgenic milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin modulates the intestinal flora in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Jianwu; Yu, Tian; Wang, Jing; Li, Ning

    2012-06-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a beneficial multifunctional protein in milk. The objective of this study was to determine whether bovine transgenic milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) can modulate intestinal flora in the neonatal pig as an animal model for the human infant. We fed 7-day-old piglets (i) ordinary whole milk (OM), (ii) a 1:1 mixture of OM and rhLF milk (MM), or (iii) rhLF milk (LFM). LFM provided better average daily mass gain than OM (P = 0.007). PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that the LFM piglets exhibited more diversity of the intestinal flora than the OM group. Except for the colon in the LFM group, an increasing trend in microbial diversity occurred from the duodenum to the colon. Fecal flora was not different across different ages or different treatment groups, but a cluster analysis showed that the fecal flora of OM- and MM-fed piglets had a higher degree of similarity than that of LFM-fed piglets. Based on culture-based bacterial counts of intestinal content samples, concentrations of Salmonella spp. in the colon and of Escherichia coli throughout the intestine were reduced with LFM (P intestine were also increased with LFM (P ≤ 0.01). We suggest that rhLF can modulate the intestinal flora in piglets.

  4. The human milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose augments the adaptive response to extensive intestinal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezoff, Ethan A; Hawkins, Jennifer A; Ollberding, Nicholas J; Karns, Rebekah; Morrow, Ardythe L; Helmrath, Michael A

    2016-03-15

    Intestinal resection resulting in short bowel syndrome (SBS) carries a heavy burden of long-term morbidity, mortality, and cost of care, which can be attenuated with strategies that improve intestinal adaptation. SBS infants fed human milk, compared with formula, have more rapid intestinal adaptation. We tested the hypothesis that the major noncaloric human milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose (2'-FL) contributes to the adaptive response after intestinal resection. Using a previously described murine model of intestinal adaptation, we demonstrated increased weight gain from 21 to 56 days (P < 0.001) and crypt depth at 56 days (P < 0.0095) with 2'-FL supplementation after ileocecal resection. Furthermore, 2'-FL increased small bowel luminal content microbial alpha diversity following resection (P < 0.005) and stimulated a bloom in organisms of the genus Parabacteroides (log2-fold = 4.1, P = 0.035). Finally, transcriptional analysis of the intestine revealed enriched ontologies and pathways related to antimicrobial peptides, metabolism, and energy processing. We conclude that 2'-FL supplementation following ileocecal resection increases weight gain, energy availability through microbial community modulation, and histological changes consistent with improved adaptation.

  5. The human small intestinal microbiota is driven by rapid uptake and conversion of simple carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; Raes, Jeroen; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) harbors a complex community of microbes. The microbiota composition varies between different locations in the GI tract, but most studies focus on the fecal microbiota, and that inhabiting the colonic mucosa. Consequently, little is known about...... the microbiota at other parts of the GI tract, which is especially true for the small intestine because of its limited accessibility. Here we deduce an ecological model of the microbiota composition and function in the small intestine, using complementing culture-independent approaches. Phylogenetic microarray...... analyses demonstrated that microbiota compositions that are typically found in effluent samples from ileostomists (subjects without a colon) can also be encountered in the small intestine of healthy individuals. Phylogenetic mapping of small intestinal metagenome of three different ileostomy effluent...

  6. Soluble immune complexes shift the TLR-induced cytokine production of distinct polarized human macrophage subsets towards IL-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A Ambarus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Costimulation of murine macrophages with immune complexes (ICs and TLR ligands leads to alternative activation. Studies on human myeloid cells, however, indicate that ICs induce an increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production. This study aimed to clarify the effect of ICs on the pro- versus anti-inflammatory profile of human polarized macrophages. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors were polarized for four days with IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, GM-CSF, M-CSF, or LPS, in the presence or absence of heat aggregated gamma-globulins (HAGGs. Phenotypic polarization markers were measured by flow cytometry. Polarized macrophages were stimulated with HAGGs or immobilized IgG alone or in combination with TLR ligands. TNF, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-23 were measured by Luminex and/or RT-qPCR. RESULTS: HAGGs did not modulate the phenotypic polarization and the cytokine production of macrophages. However, HAGGs significantly altered the TLR-induced cytokine production of all polarized macrophage subsets, with the exception of MΦ(IL-4. In particular, HAGGs consistently enhanced the TLR-induced IL-10 production in both classically and alternatively polarized macrophages (M1 and M2. The effect of HAGGs on TNF and IL-6 production was less pronounced and depended on the polarization status, while IL-23p19 and IL-12p35 expression was not affected. In contrast with HAGGs, immobilized IgG induced a strong upregulation of not only IL-10, but also TNF and IL-6. CONCLUSION: HAGGs alone do not alter the phenotype and cytokine production of in vitro polarized human macrophages. In combination with TLR-ligands, however, HAGGs but not immobilized IgG shift the cytokine production of distinct macrophage subsets toward IL-10.

  7. Comprehensive postmortem analyses of intestinal microbiota changes and bacterial translocation in human flora associated mice.

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    Markus M Heimesaat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postmortem microbiological examinations are performed in forensic and medical pathology for defining uncertain causes of deaths and for screening of deceased tissue donors. Interpretation of bacteriological data, however, is hampered by false-positive results due to agonal spread of microorganisms, postmortem bacterial translocation, and environmental contamination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a kinetic survey of naturally occurring postmortem gut flora changes in the small and large intestines of conventional and gnotobiotic mice associated with a human microbiota (hfa applying cultural and molecular methods. Sacrificed mice were kept under ambient conditions for up to 72 hours postmortem. Intestinal microbiota changes were most pronounced in the ileal lumen where enterobacteria and enterococci increased by 3-5 orders of magnitude in conventional and hfa mice. Interestingly, comparable intestinal overgrowth was shown in acute and chronic intestinal inflammation in mice and men. In hfa mice, ileal overgrowth with enterococci and enterobacteria started 3 and 24 hours postmortem, respectively. Strikingly, intestinal bacteria translocated to extra-intestinal compartments such as mesenteric lymphnodes, spleen, liver, kidney, and cardiac blood as early as 5 min after death. Furthermore, intestinal tissue destruction was characterized by increased numbers of apoptotic cells and neutrophils within 3 hours postmortem, whereas counts of proliferative cells as well as T- and B-lymphocytes and regulatory T-cells decreased between 3 and 12 hours postmortem. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that kinetics of ileal overgrowth with enterobacteria and enterococci in hfa mice can be used as an indicator for compromized intestinal functionality and for more precisely defining the time point of death under defined ambient conditions. The rapid translocation of intestinal bacteria starting within a few minutes after death will help

  8. THP-1 macrophages and SGBS adipocytes - a new human in vitro model system of inflamed adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela eKeuper

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with an accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue. This inflammation of adipose tissue is a key event in the pathogenesis of several obesity-related disorders, particularly insulin resistance.Here, we summarized existing model systems that mimic the situation of inflamed adipose tissue in vitro, most of them being murine. Importantly, we introduce our newly established human model system which combines the THP-1 monocytic cell line and the preadipocyte cell strain SGBS. THP-1 cells, which originate from an acute monocytic leukemia, differentiate easily into macrophages in vitro. The human preadipocyte cell strain SGBS (Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome was recently introduced as a unique to tool to study human fat cell functions. SGBS cells are characterized by a high capacity for adipogenic differentiation. SGBS adipocytes are capable of fat cell-specific metabolic functions such as insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis and beta-adrenergic-stimulated lipolysis and they secrete typical adipokines including leptin, adiponectin, and RBP4. Applying either macrophage-conditioned medium or a direct co-culture of macrophages and fat cells, our model system can be used to distinguish between paracrine and cell-contact dependent effects.In conclusion, we propose this model as a useful tool to study adipose inflammation in vitro. It represents an inexpensive, highly reproducible human system. The methods described here can be easily extended for usage of primary human macrophages and fat cells.

  9. Preservation Analysis of Macrophage Gene Coexpression Between Human and Mouse Identifies PARK2 as a Genetically Controlled Master Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codoni, Veronica; Blum, Yuna; Civelek, Mete; Proust, Carole; Franzén, Oscar; Björkegren, Johan L. M.; Le Goff, Wilfried; Cambien, Francois; Lusis, Aldons J.; Trégouët, David-Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are key players involved in numerous pathophysiological pathways and an in-depth characterization of their gene regulatory networks can help in better understanding how their dysfunction may impact on human diseases. We here conducted a cross-species network analysis of macrophage gene expression data between human and mouse to identify conserved networks across both species, and assessed whether such networks could reveal new disease-associated regulatory mechanisms. From a sample of 684 individuals processed for genome-wide macrophage gene expression profiling, we identified 27 groups of coexpressed genes (modules). Six modules were found preserved (P Parkinson, and Huntington diseases. We further conducted an expression quantitative trait loci analysis to identify SNP that could regulate macrophage OXPHOS gene expression in humans. This analysis identified the PARK2 rs192804963 as a trans-acting variant influencing (minimal P-value = 4.3 × 10−8) the expression of most OXPHOS genes in humans. Further experimental work demonstrated that PARK2 knockdown expression was associated with increased OXPHOS gene expression in THP1 human macrophages. This work provided strong new evidence that PARK2 participates to the regulatory networks associated with oxidative phosphorylation and suggested that PARK2 genetic variations could act as a trans regulator of OXPHOS gene macrophage expression in humans. PMID:27558669

  10. Non-opsonic phagocytosis of homologous non-toxigenic and toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains by human U-937 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Cíntia Silva; dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; de Souza, Monica Cristina; dos Santos Dourado, Fernanda; de Souza de Oliveira Dias, Alexandre Alves; Sabbadini, Priscila Soares; Pereira, Gabriela Andrade; Cabral, Maulori Curié; Hirata Junior, Raphael; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2010-01-01

    As interactions between bacteria and macrophages dictate the outcome of most infectious diseases, analyses of molecular mechanisms of non-opsonic phagocytosis should lead to new approaches for the prevention of diphtheria and systemic Corynebacterium diphtheriae infections. The present study aimed to evaluate human macrophage-bacteria interactions in the absence of opsonin antibodies and the influence of the tox gene on this process. Homologous C. diphtheriae tox+ and tox- strains were evaluated for adhesion, entering and survival within U-937 human macrophages at different incubation periods. Higher numbers of viable bacteria associated with and internalized by macrophages were demonstrated for the tox+ strain. However, viable intracellular bacteria were detected at T-24 hr only for the tox- strain. Cytoskeletal inhibitors, cytochalasin E, genistein and colchicine, inhibited intracellular viability of both strains at different levels. Bacterial replication was evidenced at T-24 hr in supernatants of monolayers infected with the tox- strain. Host cell death and nuclear alterations were evidenced by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and DAPI fluorescence microscopy. ELISA of histone-associated DNA fragments allowed detection of apoptosis and necrosis induced by tox+ and tox- strains at T-1 hr and T-3 hr. In conclusion, human macrophages in the absence of opsonins may not be promptly effective at killing diphtheria bacilli. The presence of the tox gene influences the susceptibility of C. diphtheriae to human macrophages and the outcome of non-opsonic phagocytosis. C. diphtheriae strains exhibit strategies to survive within macrophages and to exert apoptosis and necrosis in human phagocytic cells, independent of the tox gene.

  11. Oral supplementation with non-absorbable antibiotics or curcumin attenuates western diet-induced atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance in LDLR-/- mice--role of intestinal permeability and macrophage activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha S Ghosh

    Full Text Available Association between circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS and metabolic diseases (such as Type 2 Diabetes and atherosclerosis has shifted the focus from Western diet-induced changes in gut microbiota per se to release of gut bacteria-derived products into circulation as the possible mechanism for the chronic inflammatory state underlying the development of these diseases. Under physiological conditions, an intact intestinal barrier prevents this release of LPS underscoring the importance of examining and modulating the direct effects of Western diet on intestinal barrier function. In the present study we evaluated two strategies, namely selective gut decontamination and supplementation with oral curcumin, to modulate Western-diet (WD induced changes in intestinal barrier function and subsequent development of glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis. LDLR-/- mice were fed WD for 16 weeks and either received non-absorbable antibiotics (Neomycin and polymyxin in drinking water for selective gut decontamination or gavaged daily with curcumin. WD significantly increased intestinal permeability as assessed by in vivo translocation of FITC-dextran and plasma LPS levels. Selective gut decontamination and supplementation with curcumin significantly attenuated the WD-induced increase in plasma LPS levels (3.32 vs 1.90 or 1.51 EU/ml, respectively and improved intestinal barrier function at multiple levels (restoring intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of tight junction proteins, ZO-1 and Claudin-1. Consequently, both these interventions significantly reduced WD-induced glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis in LDLR-/- mice. Activation of macrophages by low levels of LPS (50 ng/ml and its exacerbation by fatty acids is likely the mechanism by which release of trace amounts of LPS into circulation due to disruption of intestinal barrier function induces the development of these diseases. These studies not only establish the important role

  12. Quercetin induces apoptosis of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and decreases the proinflammatory response of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamani-Matsuda, Maria; Rambert, Jérôme; Malvy, Denis; Lejoly-Boisseau, Hélène; Daulouède, Sylvie; Thiolat, Denis; Coves, Sara; Courtois, Pierrette; Vincendeau, Philippe; Mossalayi, M Djavad

    2004-03-01

    In addition to parasite spread, the severity of disease observed in cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is associated with increased levels of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide derivatives. In the present study, quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone), a potent immunomodulating flavonoid, was shown to directly induce the death of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the causative agent of HAT, without affecting normal human cell viability. Quercetin directly promoted T. b. gambiense death by apoptosis as shown by Annexin V binding. In addition to microbicidal activity, quercetin induced dose-dependent decreases in the levels of TNF-alpha and nitric oxide produced by activated human macrophages. These results highlight the potential use of quercetin as an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of African trypanomiasis.

  13. P-gp activity and inhibition in the different regions of human intestine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; de Jager, Marina H; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2017-03-01

    Although intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been extensively studied in vitro and in animals, its activity and the consequences of P-gp inhibition for drug disposition and toxicity in humans are still difficult to accurately extrapolate from these studies. Moreover, existing in vitro models do not take into consideration that the intestine is heterogeneous with respect to P-gp expression. Recently, we reported rat precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) as a physiological ex vivo model to study the regional gradient of P-gp activity and inhibition. Here we extended the application of PCIS to the human intestine. For this purpose rhodamine 123 (R123) accumulation in the presence or absence of the P-gp inhibitors verapamil, cyclosporine A, quinidine, ketoconazole, PSC833 and CP100356 was measured in PCIS of human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon. R123 accumulation in the presence of the P-gp inhibitors appeared to be most enhanced in the ileum compared to the other regions. Moreover, the regional differences in accumulation are in line with published differences in abundance of P-gp. The rank order of the potency of the P-gp inhibitors, reflected by their IC50 , was comparable to that in rat PCIS. However, the increase in accumulation of the P-gp substrate R123 by the inhibitors was larger in human ileum PCIS than in rat PCIS, indicating species difference in P-gp abundance. These data show that human PCIS are an appropriate ex vivo model to study the activity of intestinal P-gp and predict the inhibitory effect of drugs and of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions in the human intestine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of an ethanolic Caesalpinia sappan extract in human chondrocytes and macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengqian Q; Otero, Miguel; Unger, Frank M; Goldring, Mary B; Phrutivorapongkul, Ampai; Chiari, Catharina; Kolb, Alexander; Viernstein, Helmut; Toegel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Caesalpinia sappan is a common remedy in Traditional Chinese Medicine and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease with an inflammatory component that drives the degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix. In order to provide a scientific basis for the applicability of Caesalpinia sappan in arthritic diseases, the present study aimed to assess the effects of an ethanolic Caesalpinia sappan extract (CSE) on human chondrocytes and macrophages. Materials and Methods Primary human chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage specimens of OA patients. Primary cells, SW1353 chondrocytes and THP-1 macrophages were serum-starved and pretreated with different concentrations of CSE prior to stimulation with 10 ng/ml of interleukin-1beta (IL-1ß) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Following viability tests, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were evaluated by Griess assay and ELISA, respectively. Using validated real-time PCR assays, mRNA levels of IL-1ß, TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were quantified. SW1353 cells were cotransfected with a COX-2 luciferase reporter plasmid and nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-κB) p50 and p65 expression vectors in the presence or absence of CSE. Results CSE dose-dependently inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1ß and TNF-α in IL-1ß-stimulated chondrocytes and LPS-stimulated THP-1 macrophages. CSE further suppressed the synthesis of NO in primary OA chondrocytes by blocking iNOS mRNA expression. The inhibition of COX-2 transcription was found to be related with the CSE inhibition of the p65/p50-driven transactivation of the COX-2 promoter. Conclusions The present report is first to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of CSE in an in vitro cell model of joint inflammation. CSE can effectively abrogate the IL-1ß-induced over-expression of

  15. Ebola virion attachment and entry into human macrophages profoundly effects early cellular gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Wahl-Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV infections are associated with high lethality in primates. ZEBOV primarily targets mononuclear phagocytes, which are activated upon infection and secrete mediators believed to trigger initial stages of pathogenesis. The characterization of the responses of target cells to ZEBOV infection may therefore not only further understanding of pathogenesis but also suggest possible points of therapeutic intervention. Gene expression profiles of primary human macrophages exposed to ZEBOV were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative PCR to gain insight into the cellular response immediately after cell entry. Significant changes in mRNA concentrations encoding for 88 cellular proteins were observed. Most of these proteins have not yet been implicated in ZEBOV infection. Some, however, are inflammatory mediators known to be elevated during the acute phase of disease in the blood of ZEBOV-infected humans. Interestingly, the cellular response occurred within the first hour of Ebola virion exposure, i.e. prior to virus gene expression. This observation supports the hypothesis that virion binding or entry mediated by the spike glycoprotein (GP(1,2 is the primary stimulus for an initial response. Indeed, ZEBOV virions, LPS, and virus-like particles consisting of only the ZEBOV matrix protein VP40 and GP(1,2 (VLP(VP40-GP triggered comparable responses in macrophages, including pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signals. In contrast, VLP(VP40 (particles lacking GP(1,2 caused an aberrant response. This suggests that GP(1,2 binding to macrophages plays an important role in the immediate cellular response.

  16. Lineage-specific expression of bestrophin-2 and bestrophin-4 in human intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Go; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Murano, Tatsuro

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate the absorption and secretion of anions, such as HCO3(-) or Cl(-). Bestrophin genes represent a newly identified group of calcium-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs). Studies have suggested that, among the four human bestrophin-family genes, bestrophin-2...... (BEST2) and bestrophin-4 (BEST4) might be expressed within the intestinal tissue. Consistently, a study showed that BEST2 is expressed by human colonic goblet cells. However, their precise expression pattern along the gastrointestinal tract, or the lineage specificity of the cells expressing these genes...

  17. Membrane potential gradient is carbon monoxide-dependent in mouse and human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Lei; Farrugia, Gianrico; Harmsen, W Scott; Szurszewski, Joseph H

    2007-08-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the change in resting membrane potential (RMP) across the thickness of the circular muscle layer in the mouse and human small intestine and to determine whether the gradient in RMP is dependent on the endogenous production of carbon monoxide (CO). Conventional sharp glass microelectrodes were used to record the RMPs of circular smooth muscle cells at different depths in the human small intestine and in wild-type, HO2-KO, and W/W(V) mutant mouse small intestine. In the wild-type mouse and human intestine, the RMP of circular smooth muscle cells near the myenteric plexus was -65.3 +/- 2 mV and -58.4 +/- 2 mV, respectively, and -60.1 +/- 2 mV and -49.1 +/- 1 mV, respectively, in circular smooth muscle cells at the submucosal border. Oxyhemoglobin (20 microM), a trapping agent for CO, and chromium mesoporphyrin IX, an inhibitor of heme oxygenase, abolished the transwall gradient. The RMP gradients in mouse and human small intestine were not altered by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (200 microM). No transwall RMP gradient was found in HO2-KO mice and W/W(V) mutant mice. TTX (1 microM) and 1H-[1,2,4-]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 microM) had no effect on the RMP gradient. These data suggest that the gradient in RMP across the thickness of the circular muscle layer of mouse and human small intestine is CO dependent.

  18. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A; Tentschert, J; Jungnickel, H; Goetz, M E; Luch, A [BfR - Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Product Safety, Thielallee 88-92, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Graf, P [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Mantion, A; Thuenemann, A F [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Draude, F; Galla, S; Arlinghaus, H F [University of Muenster, Institute of Physics, Wilhelm Klemm Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Plendl, J [Free University of Berlin, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Koserstrasse 20, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Masic, A; Taubert, A, E-mail: andrea.haase@bfr.bund.de, E-mail: alexandre.mantion@bam.de [University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry, Karl- Liebknecht- Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2011-07-06

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  19. Intestinal Microbiota Distinguish Gout Patients from Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhuang; Zhang, Jiachao; Wang, Zhanli; Ang, Kay Ying; Huang, Shi; Hou, Qiangchuan; Su, Xiaoquan; Qiao, Jianmin; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Lifeng; Koh, Eileen; Danliang, Ho; Xu, Jian; Lee, Yuan Kun; Zhang, Heping

    2016-02-08

    Current blood-based approach for gout diagnosis can be of low sensitivity and hysteretic. Here via a 68-member cohort of 33 healthy and 35 diseased individuals, we reported that the intestinal microbiota of gout patients are highly distinct from healthy individuals in both organismal and functional structures. In gout, Bacteroides caccae and Bacteroides xylanisolvens are enriched yet Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum depleted. The established reference microbial gene catalogue for gout revealed disorder in purine degradation and butyric acid biosynthesis in gout patients. In an additional 15-member validation-group, a diagnosis model via 17 gout-associated bacteria reached 88.9% accuracy, higher than the blood-uric-acid based approach. Intestinal microbiota of gout are more similar to those of type-2 diabetes than to liver cirrhosis, whereas depletion of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and reduced butyrate biosynthesis are shared in each of the metabolic syndromes. Thus the Microbial Index of Gout was proposed as a novel, sensitive and non-invasive strategy for diagnosing gout via fecal microbiota.

  20. Fatal human anaplasmosis associated with macrophage activation syndrome in Greece and the Public Health response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiodras, Sotirios; Spanakis, Nikos; Spanakos, Gregory; Pervanidou, Danai; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Campos, Elsa; Petra, Theofania; Kanellopoulos, Petros; Georgiadis, George; Antalis, Emmanouil; Kontos, Vassileios; Giannopoulos, Lambros A; Tselentis, Yiannis; Papa, Anna; Tsakris, Athanassios; Saroglou, George

    2017-02-08

    Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) is a tick-borne disease caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum that has the potential to spread in new geographical areas. The first fatal case of HGA in Greece is presented. Fever of unknown origin, renal and respiratory insufficiency and development of macrophage activation syndrome characterized the clinical presentation. Amplification and sequencing of a fragment of the groEL gene revealed the presence of A. phagocytophilum. The epidemiological and clinical features were collected during an epidemiological investigation. Public health measures were instituted by the Hellenic Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. The Public Health intervention required the collaboration of epidemiologists, veterinarians and microbiologists. Emphasis was given to communication activities and misconceptions concerning canines and their role in the disease. The emergence of human anaplasmosis in a new geographical area highlights the importance of disease awareness and of the need for continued support for tick and tick-borne disease surveillance networks.

  1. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail;

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages (MPs) exert either beneficial or deleterious effects on tissue repair, depending on their activation/polarization state. They are crucial for adult skeletal muscle repair, notably by acting on myogenic precursor cells. However, these interactions have not been fully characterized. Here......, we explored both in vitro and in vivo, in human, the interactions of differentially activated MPs with myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) during adult myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration. We showed in vitro that through the differential secretion of cytokines and growth factors, proinflammatory...... MPs inhibited MPC fusion while anti-inflammatory MPs strongly promoted MPC differentiation by increasing their commitment into differentiated myocytes and the formation of mature myotubes. Furthermore, the in vivo time course of expression of myogenic and MP markers was studied in regenerating human...

  2. Inhibition of transglutaminase 2 reduces efferocytosis in human macrophages: Role of CD14 and SR-AI receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eligini, S; Fiorelli, S; Tremoli, E; Colli, S

    2016-10-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TGM2), a member of the transglutaminase family of enzymes, is a multifunctional protein involved in numerous events spanning from cell differentiation, to signal transduction, apoptosis, and wound healing. It is expressed in a variety of cells, macrophages included. Macrophage TGM2 promotes the clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and emerging evidence suggests that defective efferocytosis contributes to the consequences of inflammation-associated diseases, including atherosclerotic lesion progression and its sequelae. Of interest, active TGM2 identified in human atherosclerotic lesions plays critical roles in plaque stability through effects on matrix cross-linking and TGFβ activity. This study explores the mechanisms by which TGM2 controls efferocytosis in human macrophages. Herein we show that TGM2 increases progressively during monocyte differentiation towards macrophages and controls their efferocytic potential as well as morphology and viability. Two experimental approaches that took advantage of the inhibition of TGM2 activity and protein silencing give proof that TGM2 reduction significantly impairs macrophage efferocytosis. Among the mechanisms involved we highlighted a role of the receptors CD14 and SR-AI whose levels were markedly reduced by TGM2 inhibition. Conversely, CD36 receptor and αvβ3 integrin levels were not influenced. Of note, lipid accumulation and IL-10 secretion were reduced in macrophages displaying defective efferocytosis. Overall, our data define a crucial role of TGM2 activity during macrophage differentiation via mechanisms involving CD14 and SR-AI receptors and show that TGM2 inhibition triggers a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin II reduces constitutive protein secretion from primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Kockx

    Full Text Available Dynamins are fission proteins that mediate endocytic and exocytic membrane events and are pharmacological therapeutic targets. These studies investigate whether dynamin II regulates constitutive protein secretion and show for the first time that pharmacological inhibition of dynamin decreases secretion of apolipoprotein E (apoE and several other proteins constitutively secreted from primary human macrophages. Inhibitors that target recruitment of dynamin to membranes (MiTMABs or directly target the GTPase domain (Dyngo or Dynole series, dose- and time- dependently reduced the secretion of apoE. SiRNA oligo's targeting all isoforms of dynamin II confirmed the involvement of dynamin II in apoE secretion. Inhibition of secretion was not mediated via effects on mRNA or protein synthesis. 2D-gel electrophoresis showed that inhibition occurred after apoE was processed and glycosylated in the Golgi and live cell imaging showed that inhibited secretion was associated with reduced post-Golgi movement of apoE-GFP-containing vesicles. The effect was not restricted to macrophages, and was not mediated by the effects of the inhibitors on microtubules. Inhibition of dynamin also altered the constitutive secretion of other proteins, decreasing the secretion of fibronectin, matrix metalloproteinase 9, Chitinase-3-like protein 1 and lysozyme but unexpectedly increasing the secretion of the inflammatory mediator cyclophilin A. We conclude that pharmacological inhibitors of dynamin II modulate the constitutive secretion of macrophage apoE as a class effect, and that their capacity to modulate protein secretion may affect a range of biological processes.

  4. 2,4-Decadienal downregulates TNF-alpha gene expression in THP-1 human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona, J; Vallvé, J C; Ribalta, J; Heras, M; Olivé, S; Masana, L

    2001-09-01

    Oxidized lipoproteins inhibit TNF-alpha secretion by human THP-1 macrophages due, at least in part, to aldehydes derived from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. This study extends these findings by investigating the effect of three aldehydes (2,4-decadienal (2,4-DDE), hexanal and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)) on TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNA expression. The 2,4-DDE and 4-HNE showed considerable biological activity which induced cytotoxicity on THP-1 macrophages at concentration of 50 microM. Hexanal, on the other hand, had a lower cytotoxic capacity and concentration of 1000 microM was needed for the effect to be observed. Exposure of THP-1 macrophages to aldehydes for 24 h inhibited TNF-alpha mRNA expression but increased or did not affect IL-1beta mRNA levels. The inhibitory action of 2,4-DDE was dose dependent and began at 5 microM (46%, P<0.001). The effect of 4-HNE was less inhibitory than 4-DDE but only when cytotoxic concentrations were used (50 microM). Very high concentrations of hexanal (200 microM) were needed to inhibit TNF-alpha expression (23%, P<0.001). This downregulation of TNF-alpha gene expression by 2,4-DDE was parallel to a lower protein production. These data indicate that low levels of 2,4-DDE may modulate inflammatory action by inhibiting TNF-alpha mRNA gene expression and that the biological activity of 2,4-DDE may be involved in the development of atherosclerosis.

  5. Proinflammatory Macrophages Enhance the Regenerative Capacity of Human Myoblasts by Modifying Their Kinetics of Proliferation and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, Maximilien; Negroni, Elisa; Vallese, Denis; Yacoub–Youssef, Houda; Chaouch, Soraya; Wolff, Annie; Aamiri, Ahmed; Di Santo, James P; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Mouly, Vincent; Riederer, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages have been shown to be essential for muscle repair by delivering trophic cues to growing skeletal muscle precursors and young fibers. Here, we investigated whether human macrophages, either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory, coinjected with human myoblasts into regenerating muscle of Rag2−/− γC−/− immunodeficient mice, could modify in vivo the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted human myogenic precursors. Our results clearly show that proinflammatory macrophages improve in vivo the participation of injected myoblasts to host muscle regeneration, extending the window of proliferation, increasing migration, and delaying differentiation. Interestingly, immunostaining of transplanted proinflammatory macrophages at different time points strongly suggests that these cells are able to switch to an anti-inflammatory phenotype in vivo, which then may stimulate differentiation during muscle regeneration. Conceptually, our data provide for the first time in vivo evidence strongly suggesting that proinflammatory macrophages play a supportive role in the regulation of myoblast behavior after transplantation into preinjured muscle, and could thus potentially optimize transplantation of myogenic progenitors in the context of cell therapy. PMID:23070116

  6. Proinflammatory macrophages enhance the regenerative capacity of human myoblasts by modifying their kinetics of proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, Maximilien; Negroni, Elisa; Vallese, Denis; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Chaouch, Soraya; Wolff, Annie; Aamiri, Ahmed; Di Santo, James P; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Mouly, Vincent; Riederer, Ingo

    2012-11-01

    Macrophages have been shown to be essential for muscle repair by delivering trophic cues to growing skeletal muscle precursors and young fibers. Here, we investigated whether human macrophages, either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory, coinjected with human myoblasts into regenerating muscle of Rag2(-/-) γC(-/-) immunodeficient mice, could modify in vivo the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted human myogenic precursors. Our results clearly show that proinflammatory macrophages improve in vivo the participation of injected myoblasts to host muscle regeneration, extending the window of proliferation, increasing migration, and delaying differentiation. Interestingly, immunostaining of transplanted proinflammatory macrophages at different time points strongly suggests that these cells are able to switch to an anti-inflammatory phenotype in vivo, which then may stimulate differentiation during muscle regeneration. Conceptually, our data provide for the first time in vivo evidence strongly suggesting that proinflammatory macrophages play a supportive role in the regulation of myoblast behavior after transplantation into preinjured muscle, and could thus potentially optimize transplantation of myogenic progenitors in the context of cell therapy.

  7. The Bacillus anthracis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, Anthrolysin O, kills human neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rest Richard F

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis is an animal and human pathogen whose virulence is characterized by lethal and edema toxin, as well as a poly-glutamic acid capsule. In addition to these well characterized toxins, B. anthracis secretes several proteases and phospholipases, and a newly described toxin of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC family, Anthrolysin O (ALO. Results In the present studies we show that recombinant ALO (rALO or native ALO, secreted by viable B. anthracis, is lethal to human primary polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs, lymphocytes, THP-1 monocytic human cell line and ME-180, Detroit 562, and A549 epithelial cells by trypan blue exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release viability assays. ALO cytotoxicity is dose and time dependent and susceptibility to ALO-mediated lysis differs between cell types. In addition, the viability of monocytes and hMDMs was assayed in the presence of vegetative Sterne strains 7702 (ALO+, UT231 (ALO-, and a complemented strain expressing ALO, UT231 (pUTE544, and was dependent upon the expression of ALO. Cytotoxicity of rALO is seen as low as 0.070 nM in the absence of serum. All direct cytotoxic activity is inhibited by the addition of cholesterol or serum concentration as low as 10%. Conclusion The lethality of rALO and native ALO on human monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes supports the idea that ALO may represent a previously unidentified virulence factor of B. anthracis. The study of other factors produced by B. anthracis, along with the major anthrax toxins, will lead to a better understanding of this bacterium's pathogenesis, as well as provide information for the development of antitoxin vaccines for treating and preventing anthrax.

  8. Activation of AMPK inhibits cholera toxin stimulated chloride secretion in human and murine intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailín C Rogers

    Full Text Available Increased intestinal chloride secretion through chloride channels, such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, is one of the major molecular mechanisms underlying enterotoxigenic diarrhea. It has been demonstrated in the past that the intracellular energy sensing kinase, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, can inhibit CFTR opening. We hypothesized that pharmacological activation of AMPK can abrogate the increased chloride flux through CFTR occurring during cholera toxin (CTX mediated diarrhea. Chloride efflux was measured in isolated rat colonic crypts using real-time fluorescence imaging. AICAR and metformin were used to activate AMPK in the presence of the secretagogues CTX or forskolin (FSK. In order to substantiate our findings on the whole tissue level, short-circuit current (SCC was monitored in human and murine colonic mucosa using Ussing chambers. Furthermore, fluid accumulation was measured in excised intestinal loops. CTX and forskolin (FSK significantly increased chloride efflux in isolated colonic crypts. The increase in chloride efflux could be offset by using the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin. In human and mouse mucosal sheets, CTX and FSK increased SCC. AICAR and metformin inhibited the secretagogue induced rise in SCC, thereby confirming the findings made in isolated crypts. Moreover, AICAR decreased CTX stimulated fluid accumulation in excised intestinal segments. The present study suggests that pharmacological activation of AMPK effectively reduces CTX mediated increases in intestinal chloride secretion, which is a key factor for intestinal water accumulation. AMPK activators may therefore represent a supplemental treatment strategy for acute diarrheal illness.

  9. Glucose induces intestinal human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 to prevent neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoshima, Naoya; Fujie, Yoshiko; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2014-09-11

    Inadequate calorie intake or starvation has been suggested as a cause of neonatal jaundice, which can further cause permanent brain damage, kernicterus. This study experimentally investigated whether additional glucose treatments induce the bilirubin-metabolizing enzyme--UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1--to prevent the onset of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Neonatal humanized UGT1 (hUGT1) mice physiologically develop jaundice. In this study, UGT1A1 expression levels were determined in the liver and small intestine of neonatal hUGT1 mice that were orally treated with glucose. In the hUGT1 mice, glucose induced UGT1A1 in the small intestine, while it did not affect the expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. UGT1A1 was also induced in the human intestinal Caco-2 cells when the cells were cultured in the presence of glucose. Luciferase assays demonstrated that not only the proximal region (-1300/-7) of the UGT1A1 promoter, but also distal region (-6500/-4050) were responsible for the induction of UGT1A1 in the intestinal cells. Adequate calorie intake would lead to the sufficient expression of UGT1A1 in the small intestine to reduce serum bilirubin levels. Supplemental treatment of newborns with glucose solution can be a convenient and efficient method to treat neonatal jaundice while allowing continuous breastfeeding.

  10. Genome-wide analysis reveals loci encoding anti-macrophage factors in the human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J Dowling

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important human pathogen whose infection biology is still poorly understood. The bacterium is endemic to tropical regions, including South East Asia and Northern Australia, where it causes melioidosis, a serious disease associated with both high mortality and antibiotic resistance. B. pseudomallei is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is able to replicate in macrophages. However despite the critical nature of its interaction with macrophages, few anti-macrophage factors have been characterized to date. Here we perform a genome-wide gain of function screen of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 to identify loci encoding factors with anti-macrophage activity. We identify a total of 113 such loci scattered across both chromosomes, with positive gene clusters encoding transporters and secretion systems, enzymes/toxins, secondary metabolite, biofilm, adhesion and signal response related factors. Further phenotypic analysis of four of these regions shows that the encoded factors cause striking cellular phenotypes relevant to infection biology, including apoptosis, formation of actin 'tails' and multi-nucleation within treated macrophages. The detailed analysis of the remaining host of loci will facilitate genetic dissection of the interaction of this important pathogen with host macrophages and thus further elucidate this critical part of its infection cycle.

  11. Limited proteolysis by macrophage elastase inactivates human alpha 1- proteinase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Inflammatory mouse peritoneal macrophages secrete a metalloproteinase that is not inhibited by alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor. This proteinase, macrophage elastase, recognizes alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor with macrophage elastase does not involve a stable proteinase-inhibitor complex and results in the proteolytic removal of a peptide of apparent molecular weight 4,000-5,000 from the inhibitor. After degradation by macrophage elastase, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor is no longer able to inhibit h...

  12. Human macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces the differentiation of trophoblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S; Saito, M; Enomoto, M; Ito, A; Motoyoshi, K; Nakagawa, T; Ichijo, M

    1993-01-01

    When human cytotrophoblastic cells in the early stage of pregnancy were cultured in a serum-free medium in the presence of human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), the cytotrophoblastic cells fused and formed a typical syncytiotrophoblast which had a dense distribution of microvilli revealed under an electron microscope. On the other hand, cytotrophoblasts incubated with anti-M-CSF antibody showed hardly any syncytiotrophoblast formation. Following this finding, we studied the differentiation of chorionic cells from the viewpoint of hormone secretion. When cytotrophoblasts were incubated in the presence of M-CSF, the supernatant of the culture showed an increase in human chorionic gonadotropin and human placental lactogen levels in proportion to the concentration of M-CSF added. When cytotrophoblasts were incubated in the presence of anti-M-CSF antibody or anti-fms antibody, human chorionic gonadotropin and human placental lactogen secretion were suppressed. Thus, M-CSF was morphologically and endocrinologically found to induce the differentiation of chorionic cells.

  13. Th1-like human T-cell clones recognizing Leishmania gp63 inhibit Leishmania major in human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Hey, A S; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    The major surface protease of Leishmania major, gp63, has been suggested as a vaccine candidate for cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this study gp63 was purified from L. major promastigotes. A panel of human T-cell clones recognizing this protein were generated from individuals who had previously had...... self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis. The T-cell clones expressed CD4, and the alpha chain of the T-cell antigen receptor. GP63 reactive T-cell clones activated by antigen or by immobilized anti-CD3 antibody released relative large amounts of interferon-gamma and no or little interleukin-4, thereby...... resembling Th1 cells. Autologous mononuclear cells and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cell lines were equally efficient in presenting the antigen to the T cells. The gp63 reactive T cells induced resistance to infection in cultured human macrophages by L. major. The data confirm that human CD4+ T cells...

  14. Polyphenol-rich grape powder extract (GPE) attenuates inflammation in human macrophages and in human adipocytes exposed to macrophage-conditioned media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, A; Bumrungpert, A; Kennedy, A; Martinez, K; Chuang, C-C; West, T; Dawson, B; Jia, W; McIntosh, M

    2010-05-01

    Obesity-associated inflammation is characterized by an increased abundance of macrophages (MPhis) in white adipose tissue (WAT), leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and prostaglandins (PGs) that can cause insulin resistance. Grape powder extract (GPE) is rich in phenolic phytochemicals that possess anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We examined the ability of GPE to prevent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in human MPhis and silence the cross-talk between human MPhis and adipocytes. We investigated the effect of GPE pretreatment on LPS-mediated activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1), and induction of inflammatory genes in human MPhis (that is, differentiated U937 cells). In addition, we determined the effect of GPE pretreatment of MPhis on inflammation and insulin resistance in primary human adipocytes incubated with LPS-challenged MPhi-conditioned medium (MPhi-CM). Pretreatment of MPhis with GPE attenuated LPS-induction of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-1beta; chemokines, such as IL-8 and interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10); and a marker of PG production, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Grape powder extract also attenuated LPS activation of MAPKs, NF-kappaB and AP-1 (c-Jun), as evidenced by decreased (1) phosphorylation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38; (2) degradation of IkappaBalpha and activation of an NF-kappaB reporter construct; and (3) phosphorylation of c-Jun and Elk-1. Using LPS-challenged MPhi-CM, GPE pretreatment attenuated MPhi-mediated inflammatory gene expression, activation of an NF-kappaB reporter and suppression of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in human adipocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that GPE attenuates LPS-mediated inflammation in MPhis, possibly by decreasing the activation of MAPKs, NF-kappaB and AP-1

  15. Analysis of diversity and function of the human small intestinal microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booijink, C.C.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the main site where the conversion and absorption of food components takes place in humans. As the small intestine is the first site of interaction between the microbiota and ingested food, knowledge about the microbial composition as well as functionality is essen

  16. Human intestinal flora and the induction of chronic arthritis : studies in an animal model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Severijnen

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic joint inflammation, is unknown. A microbial involvement is suspected, but no particular microorganism has been incriminated. The human intestinal microflora is an abundant and continuous source of bacterial antigens and may be involved

  17. Microbial Eco-Physiology of the human intestinal tract: a flow cytometric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, Ben K.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a multifaceted approach to further enhance our view of the complex human intestinal microbial ecosystem. This approach combines me advantages of flow cyrometry (FCM), a single cell and high-throughput technology, and molecular techniques that have proven themselves to be invalu

  18. The mucin degrader Akkermansia muciniphila is an abundant resident of the human intestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derrien, M.M.N.; Collado, M.C.; Ben-Amor, K.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.

    2008-01-01

    A 16S rRNA-targeted probe, MUC-1437, was designed and validated in order to determine the presence and numbers of cells of Akkermansia muciniphila, a mucin degrader, in the human intestinal tract. As determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization, A. muciniphila accounted more than 1% of the total

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Veillonella parvula HSIVP1, Isolated from the Human Small Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, B. van den; Boekhorst, J.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Veillonella species are frequently encountered commensals in the human small intestine. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the first cultured representative from this ecosystem, Veillonella parvula strain HSIVP1. The genome is predicted to encode all the necessary enzymes required for the

  20. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  1. High-throughput analysis of the impact of antibiotics on the human intestinal microbiota composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladirat, S.E.; Schols, H.A.; Nauta, A.; Schoterman, M.H.C.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Montijn, R.C.; Gruppen, H.; Schuren, F.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic treatments can lead to a disruption of the human microbiota. In this in-vitro study, the impact of antibiotics on adult intestinal microbiota was monitored in a new high-throughput approach: a fermentation screening-platform was coupled with a phylogenetic microarray analysis

  2. Analysis of diversity and function of the human small intestinal microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booijink, C.C.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the main site where the conversion and absorption of food components takes place in humans. As the small intestine is the first site of interaction between the microbiota and ingested food, knowledge about the microbial composition as well as functionality is

  3. Microbial Eco-Physiology of the human intestinal tract: a flow cytometric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, Ben K.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a multifaceted approach to further enhance our view of the complex human intestinal microbial ecosystem. This approach combines me advantages of flow cyrometry (FCM), a single cell and high-throughput technology, and molecular techniques that have proven themselves to be

  4. Microbial Eco-Physiology of the human intestinal tract: a flow cytometric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, Ben K.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a multifaceted approach to further enhance our view of the complex human intestinal microbial ecosystem. This approach combines me advantages of flow cyrometry (FCM), a single cell and high-throughput technology, and molecular techniques that have proven themselves to be invalu

  5. Type I collagen as an extracellular matrix for the in vitro growth of human small intestinal epithelium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jabaji, Ziyad; Brinkley, Garrett J; Khalil, Hassan A; Sears, Connie M; Lei, Nan Ye; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y

    2014-01-01

    .... There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells...

  6. Type I Collagen as an Extracellular Matrix for the In Vitro Growth of Human Small Intestinal Epithelium: e107814

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ziyad Jabaji; Garrett J Brinkley; Hassan A Khalil; Connie M Sears; Nan Ye Lei; Michael Lewis; Matthias Stelzner; Martín G Martín; James C Y Dunn

    2014-01-01

    .... There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells...

  7. The response of human macrophages to β-glucans depends on the inflammatory milieu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Municio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: β-glucans are fungal cell wall components that bind to the C-type lectin-like receptor dectin-1. Polymorphisms of dectin-1 gene are associated with susceptibility to invasive fungal infection and medically refractory ulcerative colitis. The purpose of this study has been addressing the response of human macrophages to β-glucans under different conditions mimicking the composition of the inflammatory milieu in view of the wide plasticity and large range of phenotypical changes showed by these cells, and the relevant role of dectin-1 in several pathophysiological conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Serum-differentiated macrophages stimulated with β-glucans showed a low production of TNFα and IL-1β, a high production of IL-6 and IL-23, and a delayed induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and PGE2 biosynthesis that resembled the responses elicited by crystals and those produced when phagosomal degradation of the phagocytic cargo increases ligand access to intracellular pattern recognition receptors. Priming with a low concentration of LPS produced a rapid induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and a synergistic release of PGE2. When the differentiation of the macrophages was carried out in the presence of M-CSF, an increased expression of dectin-1 B isoform was observed. In addition, this treatment made the cells capable to release arachidonic acid in response to β-glucan. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that the macrophage response to fungal β-glucans is strongly influenced by cytokines and microbial-derived factors that are usual components of the inflammatory milieu. These responses can be sorted into three main patterns i an elementary response dependent on phagosomal processing of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and/or receptor-independent, direct membrane binding linked to the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing transmembrane adaptor DNAX-activating protein 12, ii a response primed by TLR4-dependent signals, and iii

  8. The Response of Human Macrophages to β-Glucans Depends on the Inflammatory Milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Olimpio; Hugo, Etzel; Rodríguez, Mario; Domingo, Esther; Alonso, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Background β-glucans are fungal cell wall components that bind to the C-type lectin-like receptor dectin-1. Polymorphisms of dectin-1 gene are associated with susceptibility to invasive fungal infection and medically refractory ulcerative colitis. The purpose of this study has been addressing the response of human macrophages to β-glucans under different conditions mimicking the composition of the inflammatory milieu in view of the wide plasticity and large range of phenotypical changes showed by these cells, and the relevant role of dectin-1 in several pathophysiological conditions. Principal Findings Serum-differentiated macrophages stimulated with β-glucans showed a low production of TNFα and IL-1β, a high production of IL-6 and IL-23, and a delayed induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and PGE2 biosynthesis that resembled the responses elicited by crystals and those produced when phagosomal degradation of the phagocytic cargo increases ligand access to intracellular pattern recognition receptors. Priming with a low concentration of LPS produced a rapid induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and a synergistic release of PGE2. When the differentiation of the macrophages was carried out in the presence of M-CSF, an increased expression of dectin-1 B isoform was observed. In addition, this treatment made the cells capable to release arachidonic acid in response to β-glucan. Conclusions These results indicate that the macrophage response to fungal β-glucans is strongly influenced by cytokines and microbial-derived factors that are usual components of the inflammatory milieu. These responses can be sorted into three main patterns i) an elementary response dependent on phagosomal processing of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and/or receptor-independent, direct membrane binding linked to the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing transmembrane adaptor DNAX-activating protein 12, ii) a response primed by TLR4-dependent signals, and iii) a response dependent

  9. HIV-1 Nef impairs key functional activities in human macrophages through CD36 downregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Olivetta

    Full Text Available Monocytes and macrophages utilize the class A and B scavenger receptors to recognize and perform phagocytosis of invading microbes before a pathogen-specific immune response is generated. HIV-1 Nef protein affects the innate immune system impairing oxidative burst response and phagocytic capacity of macrophages. Our data show that exogenous recombinant myristoylated Nef protein induces a marked CD36 downregulation in monocytes from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages (MDMs differentiated by cytokines and in MDMs contained in a mixed culture obtained expanding PBMCs under Human Erythroid Massive Amplification condition. Under the latter culture condition we identify three main populations after 6 days of expansion: lymphocytes (37.8 ± 14.7%, erythroblasts (46.7±6.1% and MDMs (15.7 ± 7.5%. The Nef addition to the cell culture significantly downregulates CD36 expression in MDMs, but not in erythroid cells. Furthermore, CD36 inhibition is highly specific since it does not modify the expression levels of other MDM markers such as CD14, CD11c, CD86, CD68, CD206, Toll-like Receptor 2 and Toll-like Receptor 4. Similar results were obtained in MDMs infected with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1-expressing Nef. The reduced CD36 membrane expression is associated with decrease of correspondent CD36 mRNA transcript. Furthermore, Nef-induced CD36 downregulation is linked to both impaired scavenger activity with reduced capability to take up oxidized lipoproteins and to significant decreased phagocytosis of fluorescent beads and GFP-expressing Salmonella tiphymurium. In addition we observed that Nef induces TNF-α release in MDMs. Although these data suggest a possible involvement of TNF-α in mediating Nef activity, our results exclude a possible relationship between Nef-induced TNF-α release and Nef-mediated CD36 downregulation. The present work shows that HIV-1 Nef protein may have a role in the strategies elaborated by HIV-1 to

  10. Production of macrophage migration inhibitory factor by human and murine neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Qian; Johnson, Bryon D; Schauer, Dennis W; Casper, James T; Orentas, Rimas J

    2002-01-01

    Tumor cells avoid immune recognition by subverting the ability of the immune system to mount an inflammatory response that generates cytotoxic effector cells. This can be achieved through cytokine production by the tumor itself. Our objective was to determine the cytokine profile of neuroblastoma (NB) lesions in tumor vaccine models. We found that the murine NB cell line, Neuro2a, secretes macrophage migration inhibitory factor, MIF, a multifunctional cytokine with the potential to block effective immune responses to a tumor. Patient-derived NB cell lines were also found to produce MIF. MIF production by NB was documented at the level of RNA by RNAse protection, soluble cytokine production by ELISA, and in a macrophage migration assay. Our studies also confirmed reports of IL-6 production by human NB cell lines. NB culture-derived MIF was also shown to activate tumor cell migration. This supports the hypothesis that MIF is a tumor-derived cytokine that may play a role in NB aggressiveness and evasion of immune recognition. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Oleacein enhances anti-inflammatory activity of human macrophages by increasing CD163 receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipek, Agnieszka; Czerwińska, Monika E; Kiss, Anna K; Wrzosek, Małgorzata; Naruszewicz, Marek

    2015-12-15

    Oleacein (dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl elenolic acid linked to hydroxytyrosol; 3,4-DHPEA-EDA) have been proven to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. In this study, we examined whether oleacein could increase CD163 and IL-10 receptor expression as well as HO-1 intracellular secretion in human macrophages. Effect of oleacein (10 and 20 μmol/l) or oleacein together with complexes of haemoglobin (Hb) and haptoglobin 1-1 (Hp11) or haptoglobin 2-2 (Hp22) on expression of IL-10 and CD163 receptor was determined by Flow Cytometry. Expression of CD163mRNA was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) intracellular secretion in macrophages was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Oleacein (OC) together with complexes HbHp11 or HbHp22 stimulated the expression of CD163 (30-100-fold), IL-10 (170-300-fold) and HO-1 secretion (60-130-fold) after 5 days of coincubation. The 2-fold (24 h), 4-fold (48 h) increase of CD163 mRNA level and its final (72 h) decrease was also observed. Our results suggested that oleacein enhances anti-inflammatory activity of complexes haemoglobin with haptoglobin 1-1 and 2-2 and could play a potential role in the prevention of inflammatory disease related to atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Probiotic Lactobacillus Strains Stimulate the Inflammatory Response and Activate Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Rocha-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli have been shown to promote health functions. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism by which four different strains of probiotics affected innate immunity, such as regulation of ROS, cytokines, phagocytosis, bactericidal activity, signaling by NF-κB pp65, and TLR2 activation. The production of ROS was dependent on the concentration and species of Lactobacillus. The results obtained from the tested strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. rhamnosus KLSD, L. helveticus IMAU70129, and L. casei IMAU60214 showed that strains induced early proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-8,TNF-α, IL-12p70, and IL-6. However, IL-1β expression was induced only by L. helveticus and L. casei strains (after 24 h stimulation. Phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of macrophages against various pathogens, such as S. aureus, S. typhimurium, and E. coli, were increased by pretreatment with Lactobacillus. The nuclear translocation NF-κB pp65 and TLR2-dependent signaling were also increased by treatment with the probiotics. Taken together, the experiments demonstrate that probiotic strains of Lactobacillus exert early immunostimulatory effects that may be directly linked to the initial inflammation of the response of human macrophages.

  13. Isolation and characterization of cytotoxic effector cells and antibody producing cells from human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDermott, R P

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the ability of intestinal and peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from patients with inflammatory bowel disease to mediate killing against cell line targets in spontaneous, antibody-dependent, lectin-induced, and interferon-induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, as well as responsiveness in the allogeneic mixed leukocyte reaction, and effector capabilities in cell-mediated lympholysis. IMC were poor mediators of spontaneous or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity with cell line cells as targets (in comparison to normal PBMC, but were capable of killing antibody coated chicken red blood cells. Although IMC were capable of responding to allogeneic cell surface antigens in the mixed leukocyte reaction, they did not exhibit effector function in cell-mediated lympholysis. Mitogenic lectins induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity by isolated intestinal mononuclear cells from controls and patients. HFIF induces cytotoxicity by control but not inflammatory bowel disease intestinal cells. Pokeweed mitogen was the lectin which induced the greatest amount of killing against human cell line targets. We therefore speculate that exogenous agents, or endogenous factors released during viral infection, could play a role in inducing cell mediated cytotoxic damage to the intestine in inflammatory bowel disease patients. In addition, the functional differences between IMC and PBMC indicate that intestinal MNC may have unique cell capabilities which must be better understood prior to the delineation of immunopathologic events in solid organ tissues. We have also examined the secretion of IgA, IgM, and IgG by isolated human IMC, human bone marrow MNC from rib specimens, and PBMC from patients with CD, UC, SLE, or Henoch-Schoenlein purpura (HSP). Control IMC exhibited high spontaneous secretion of IgA, while intestinal MNC from UC and CD patients exhibited only modest increases in IgA secretion. PBMC from patients with CD, UC, SLE, or HSP exhibited markedly

  14. Glycosylation of human fetal mucins: a similar repertoire of O-glycans along the intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Maes, Emmanuel; Rousset, Monique; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Capon, Calliope

    2009-05-01

    Intestinal mucins are very high molecular weight glycoproteins secreted by goblet cells lining the crypt and the surface of the colonic mucosa. Profound alterations of mucin O-glycans are observed in diseases such as cancer and inflammation, modifying the function of the cell and its antigenic and adhesive properties. Based on immunohistochemical studies, certain cancer- and inflammation- associated glycans have been defined as oncofetal antigens. However, little or no chemical analysis has allowed the structural elucidation of O-glycans expressed on human fetal mucins. In this paper, mucins were isolated from different regions of the normal human intestine (ileum, right, transverse and left colon) of eight fetuses with A, B or O blood group. After alkaline borohydride treatment, the released oligosaccharides were investigated by nanoESI Q-TOF MS/MS (electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry). More than 117 different glycans were identified, mainly based on core 2 structures. Some core 1, 3 and 4 oligosaccharides were also found. Most of the structures were acidic with NeuAc residues mainly alpha2-6 linked to the N-acetylgalactosaminitol and sulphate residues 3-linked to galactose or 6-linked to GlcNAc. In contrast to adult human intestinal mucins, Sda/Cad determinants were not expressed on fetal mucin O-glycans and the presence of an acidic gradient along the intestinal tract was not observed. Similar patterns of glycosylation were found in each part of the intestine and the level of expression of the major oligosaccharides was in the same order of magnitude. This study could help determining new oncofetal antigens, which can be exploited for the diagnosis or the treatment of intestinal diseases.

  15. Investigation of the interactions between Chrysanthemum morifolium flowers extract and intestinal bacteria from human and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jin-Hua; Duan, Jin-Ao; Qian, Yi-Yun; Qian, Da-Wei; Guo, Jian-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Flos Chrysanthemi, dried flower of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat, has drawn much attention recently owing to its potential beneficial health effects for human. Flos Chrysanthemi products are usually taken orally and metabolized by intestinal microflora. However, there has been no investigation of the comprehensive metabolic profile of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract by intestinal flora owing to its chemical complexity and the limitations of analytical methods. In this paper, a rapid, sensitive and automated analysis method, ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry including MS(E) technology and automated data processing Metabolynx™ software, was developed and successfully applied for the biotransformation and metabolic profile of flavonoids in the Flos Chrysanthemi extract by intestinal flora from human and rat. A total of 32 metabolites were detected and tentatively identified in human and rat intestinal bacterial samples. These metabolites indicated that hydrolysis, hydroxylation, acetylation, methylation, hydrogenation and deoxygenation were the major conversion pathways of flavonoids in the Flos Chrysanthemi extract in vitro. Furthermore, the effects of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract on the growth of different intestinal bacteria were detected using an Emax precision microplate reader. Certain pathogenic bacteria such as Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Clostridium and Bacteroides were significantly inhibited by Flos Chrysanthemi, while commensal probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium were moderately promoted. Our observation provided further evidence for the importance of intestinal bacteria in the metabolism and potential activity of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract. The results will also be helpful for the further pharmacokinetic study of Flos Chrysanthemi and to unravel how it works in vivo.

  16. Effect of Jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 on the replication of Penicillium marneffei in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renqiong; Xi, Liyan; Huang, Xiaowen; Ma, Tuan; Ren, Hong; Ji, Guangquan

    2015-05-01

    Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei) is a human pathogen which persists in macrophages and threatens the immunocompromised patients. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we evaluated the effect of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 (JNK1/2) on cytokine expression, phagosomal maturation and multiplication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-stimulated human macrophages. P. marneffei induced the rapid phosphorylation of JNK1/2. Using the specific inhibitor of JNK1/2 (SP600125), we found that the inhibition of JNK1/2 suppressed P. marneffei-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-10 production. In addition, the presence of SP600125 increased phagosomal acidification and maturation and decreased intracellular replication. These data suggest that JNK1/2 may play an important role in promoting the replication of P. marneffei. Our findings further indicate that the pathogen through the JNK1/2 pathway may attenuate the immune response and macrophage antifungal function.

  17. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    KAUST Repository

    Bokil, Nilesh J.

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1 + vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  18. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokil, Nilesh J; Totsika, Makrina; Carey, Alison J; Stacey, Katryn J; Hancock, Viktoria; Saunders, Bernadette M; Ravasi, Timothy; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A; Sweet, Matthew J

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1(+) vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival.

  19. Effects of beauvericin, enniatin b and moniliformin on human dendritic cells and macrophages: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficheux, A S; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of emerging mycotoxins beauvericin, enniatin B and moniliformin on human dendritic cells and macrophages. Beauvericin and enniatin B were cytotoxic on these cells. IC50 were equal to 1.0 μM, 2.9 μM and 2.5 μM beauvericin for immature dendritic cells, mature dendritic cells and macrophages, respectively. IC50 were equal to 1.6 μM, 2.6 μM and 2.5 μM for immature dendritic cells, mature dendritic cells and macrophages exposed to enniatin B, respectively. Effects on the differentiation process of monocytes into macrophages or into immature dendritic cells as well as effects on dendritic cells maturation have been studied. The differentiation process of monocytes into immature dendritic cells was not disturbed in the presence of beauvericin. Dendritic cells exposed to beauvericin during the maturation process presented a decrease of CCR7 expression and an increase of IL-10 secretion. Monocytes exposed to beauvericin during the differentiation process into macrophages presented a decrease of endocytosis ability. The differentiation process of monocytes into immature dendritic cells was not disturbed in the presence of enniatin B. Dendritic cells exposed to enniatin B during the maturation process presented a decrease of expression of the maturation makers CD80, CD86 and CCR7 and an increase of IL-10 secretion. Monocytes exposed to enniatin B during the differentiation process into macrophages presented a decrease of endocytosis ability and an increase of CD71. CD1a expression and endocytosis capacity were decreased on immature dendritic cells exposed to moniliformin. Monocytes-derived macrophages exposed to moniliformin during the differentiation process presented a decrease of endocytosis ability, and a decrease of CD71 and HLA-DR expression. According to these results, immunological disorders could be observed on human after ingestion of these alimentary toxins.

  20. Human lung-resident macrophages express CB1 and CB2 receptors whose activation inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiano, Rosaria I; Loffredo, Stefania; Borriello, Francesco; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Orlando, Pierangelo; Secondo, Agnese; Granata, Francescopaolo; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Varricchi, Gilda; Santini, Mario; Triggiani, Massimo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Marone, Gianni

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are pivotal effector cells in immune responses and tissue remodeling by producing a wide spectrum of mediators, including angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 has been suggested as a new strategy to modulate angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We investigated whether human lung-resident macrophages express a complete endocannabinoid system by assessing their production of endocannabinoids and expression of cannabinoid receptors. Unstimulated human lung macrophage produce 2-arachidonoylglycerol,N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine,N-palmitoyl-ethanolamine, and N-oleoyl-ethanolamine. On LPS stimulation, human lung macrophages selectively synthesize 2-arachidonoylglycerol in a calcium-dependent manner. Human lung macrophages express cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2, and their activation induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species generation. Cannabinoid receptor activation by the specific synthetic agonists ACEA and JWH-133 (but not the endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol) markedly inhibits LPS-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and angiopoietins and modestly affects IL-6 secretion. No significant modulation of TNF-α or IL-8/CXCL8 release was observed. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A by human monocyte-derived macrophages is not modulated by activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2. Given the prominent role of macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling in many tumors, we identified the expression of cannabinoid receptors in lung cancer-associated macrophages. Our results demonstrate that cannabinoid receptor activation selectively inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors from human lung macrophage but not from monocyte-derived macrophages. Activation of cannabinoid receptors on tissue-resident macrophages might be a novel strategy to modulate macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling

  1. Bacteroides fragilis induce necrosis on mice peritoneal macrophages: In vitro and in vivo assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, J.M.B.D., E-mail: jmanya@terra.com.br [Laboratorio de Tecnologia em Cultura de Celulas, UEZO, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biologia de Anaerobios, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Seabra, S.H. [Laboratorio de Tecnologia em Cultura de Celulas, UEZO, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Vallim, D.C. [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Americo, M.A.; Fracallanza, S.E.L. [Laboratorio de Bacteriologia Medica, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Vommaro, R.C. [Laboratorio de Ultra-estrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, IBCCF, UFRJ (Brazil); Domingues, R.M.C.P. [Laboratorio de Biologia de Anaerobios, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-10-02

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacteria component of human intestinal microbiota and agent of infections. In the host B. fragilis interacts with macrophages, which produces toxic radicals like NO. The interaction of activated mice peritoneal macrophages with four strains of B. fragilis was evaluated on this study. Previously was shown that such strains could cause metabolic and morphologic alterations related to macrophage death. In this work propidium iodide staining showed the strains inducing macrophage necrosis in that the labeling was evident. Besides nitroblue tetrazolium test showed that B. fragilis stimulates macrophage to produce oxygen radicals. In vivo assays performed in BalbC mice have results similar to those for in vitro tests as well as scanning electron microscopy, which showed the same surface pore-like structures observed in vitro before. The results revealed that B. fragilis strains studied lead to macrophage death by a process similar to necrosis.

  2. Preservation Analysis of Macrophage Gene Coexpression Between Human and Mouse Identifies PARK2 as a Genetically Controlled Master Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Codoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key players involved in numerous pathophysiological pathways and an in-depth characterization of their gene regulatory networks can help in better understanding how their dysfunction may impact on human diseases. We here conducted a cross-species network analysis of macrophage gene expression data between human and mouse to identify conserved networks across both species, and assessed whether such networks could reveal new disease-associated regulatory mechanisms. From a sample of 684 individuals processed for genome-wide macrophage gene expression profiling, we identified 27 groups of coexpressed genes (modules. Six modules were found preserved (P < 10−4 in macrophages from 86 mice of the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. One of these modules was significantly [false discovery rate (FDR = 8.9 × 10−11] enriched for genes belonging to the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS pathway. This pathway was also found significantly (FDR < 10−4 enriched in susceptibility genes for Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington diseases. We further conducted an expression quantitative trait loci analysis to identify SNP that could regulate macrophage OXPHOS gene expression in humans. This analysis identified the PARK2 rs192804963 as a trans-acting variant influencing (minimal P-value = 4.3 × 10−8 the expression of most OXPHOS genes in humans. Further experimental work demonstrated that PARK2 knockdown expression was associated with increased OXPHOS gene expression in THP1 human macrophages. This work provided strong new evidence that PARK2 participates to the regulatory networks associated with oxidative phosphorylation and suggested that PARK2 genetic variations could act as a trans regulator of OXPHOS gene macrophage expression in humans.

  3. Human intestinal microbiota: cross-talk with the host and its potential role in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Guidotti, Marco; Fabbri, Alessia; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Fiorentini, Carla

    2011-02-01

    In this review, we discuss the multifactorial role of intestinal microbiota in colorectal cancer. The peculiar metabolism of dietary compounds of the individual microbiota complement, its overall immunostimulation and immunomodulatory activity, and eventually the production of toxins that perturb the regulation of cell growth, define the balance of positive and negative risk factors for colorectal cancer development. Moreover, shaping the composition of the human intestinal microbiota, diet has an indirect impact in determining the balance between health and disease. The integration of diet, microbial, and host factors in a system approach is mandatory to determine the overall balance of risk and protective factors for colorectal cancer onset.

  4. Chromosomal localization of the human apolipoprotein B gene and detection of homologous RNA in monkey intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeb, S.S.; Disteche, C.; Motulsky, A.G.; Lebo, R.V.; Kan, Y.W.

    1986-01-01

    A cDNA clone of the human apolipoprotein B-100 was used as a hybridization probe to detect homologous sequences in both flow-sorted and in situ metaphase chromosomes. The results indicate that the gene encoding this protein is on the distal end of the short arm of chromosome 2 (2p23-2p24). RNA isolated from monkey small intestine contained sequences (6.5 and 18 kilobases) homologous to the cDNA of apolipoprotein B-100. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that one gene codes for both the intestinal (B-48) and the hepatic (B-100) forms.

  5. Influence of Sae-regulated and Agr-regulated factors on the escape of Staphylococcus aureus from human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzenmayer, Lisa; Geiger, Tobias; Daiber, Ellen; Schulte, Berit; Autenrieth, Stella E; Fraunholz, Martin; Wolz, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is not a classical intracellular pathogen, it can survive within phagocytes and many other cell types. However, the pathogen is also able to escape from cells by mechanisms that are only partially understood. We analysed a series of isogenic S. aureus mutants of the USA300 derivative JE2 for their capacity to destroy human macrophages from within. Intracellular S. aureus JE2 caused severe cell damage in human macrophages and could efficiently escape from within the cells. To obtain this full escape phenotype including an intermittent residency in the cytoplasm, the combined action of the regulatory systems Sae and Agr is required. Mutants in Sae or mutants deficient in the Sae target genes lukAB and pvl remained in high numbers within the macrophages causing reduced cell damage. Mutants in the regulatory system Agr or in the Agr target gene psmα were largely similar to wild-type bacteria concerning cell damage and escape efficiency. However, these strains were rarely detectable in the cytoplasm, emphasizing the role of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) for phagosomal escape. Thus, Sae-regulated toxins largely determine damage and escape from within macrophages, whereas PSMs are mainly responsible for the escape from the phagosome into the cytoplasm. Damage of macrophages induced by intracellular bacteria was linked neither to activation of apoptosis-related caspase 3, 7 or 8 nor to NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation.

  6. Morphometric Characterization of Rat and Human Alveolar Macrophage Cell Models and their Response to Amiodarone using High Content Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ewelina; Patel, Aateka; Ball, Doug; Klapwijk, Jan; Millar, Val; Kumar, Abhinav; Martin, Abigail; Mahendran, Rhamiya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Forbes, Ben; Hutter, Victoria

    2017-05-24

    Progress to the clinic may be delayed or prevented when vacuolated or "foamy" alveolar macrophages are observed during non-clinical inhalation toxicology assessment. The first step in developing methods to study this response in vitro is to characterize macrophage cell lines and their response to drug exposures. Human (U937) and rat (NR8383) cell lines and primary rat alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were characterized using high content fluorescence imaging analysis quantification of cell viability, morphometry, and phospholipid and neutral lipid accumulation. Cell health, morphology and lipid content were comparable (p content. Responses to amiodarone, a known inducer of phospholipidosis, required analysis of shifts in cell population profiles (the proportion of cells with elevated vacuolation or lipid content) rather than average population data which was insensitive to the changes observed. A high content image analysis assay was developed and used to provide detailed morphological characterization of rat and human alveolar-like macrophages and their response to a phospholipidosis-inducing agent. This provides a basis for development of assays to predict or understand macrophage vacuolation following inhaled drug exposure.

  7. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, B L N; Linnekamp, J F; Starr, T K; Largaespada, D A; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O'Sullivan, M G; Medema, J P; Fijneman, R J A; Meijer, G A; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, C A; Scott, P M; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, R T

    2016-08-11

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid-base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated Apc(Min) mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc(+/+) mice aged to ~1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc(+/+) Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  8. Metagenomics of the human intestinal tract: from who is there to what is done there

    OpenAIRE

    Lapaque, Nicolas; Doré, Joël; Blottière, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    The human gastro-intestinal tract is colonized by 10(6)-10(14) microorganisms from the three domains, eukaria, archaea and bacteria that are collectively referred as the human gut microbiota. Gut microbiota actively contributes to the digestion of the nutrients, mainly the fibers otherwise undigested by the host, and participate to the host capacity of energy recovery from food. It plays also a key role in gut homeostasis, impacting on its barrier function and regulating the immune and metabo...

  9. Inhibition of human pancreatic and biliary output but not intestinal motility by physiological intraileal lipid loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Holst, Jens Juul; Layer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . Physiological postprandial ileal lipid concentrations dose dependently inhibited human digestive pancreatic protease and bile acid output, but not intestinal motor activity. Thus physiological postprandial ileal nutrient exposure may be of importance for the termination of digestive secretory responses......Lipid perfusion into the distal ileal lumen at supraphysiological loads inhibits pancreatic exocrine secretion and gastrointestinal motility in humans. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of physiological postprandial intraileal lipid concentrations on endogenously stimulated...

  10. Interaction of Campylobacter spp. and human probiotics in chicken intestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganan, M; Martinez-Rodriguez, A J; Carrascosa, A V; Vesterlund, S; Salminen, S; Satokari, R

    2013-03-01

    Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial food-borne diarrhoeal disease throughout the world. The principal risk of human contamination is handling and consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To colonize poultry, Campylobacter adheres to and persists in the mucus layer that covers the intestinal epithelium. Inhibiting adhesion to the mucus could prevent colonization of the intestine. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the protective effect of defined commercial human probiotic strains on the adhesion of Campylobacter spp. to chicken intestinal mucus, in a search for alternatives to antibiotics to control this food-borne pathogen. The probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS and a starter culture strain Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis adhered well to chicken intestinal mucus and were able to reduce the binding of Campylobacter spp. when the mucus was colonized with the probiotic strain before contacting the pathogen. Human-intended probiotics could be useful as prophylactics in poultry feeding for controlling Campylobacter spp. colonization. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Reductive dechlorination of methoxychlor and DDT by human intestinal bacterium Eubacterium limosum under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, You-Jin; Seo, Jiyoung; Kang, Su-Il; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2008-04-01

    Methoxychlor [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)ethane], a substitute for 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), is a compound of environmental concern because of potential long-term health risks related to its endocrine-disrupting and carcinogenic potency. In order to determine the metabolic fate of methoxychlor and DDT in the human intestinal gut, Eubacterium limosum (ATCC 8486), a strict anaerobe isolated from the human intestine that is capable of O-demethylation toward O-methylated isoflavones, was used as a model intestinal microbial organism. Under anaerobic incubation conditions, E. limosum completely transformed methoxychlor and DDT in 16 days. Based on gas chromatography-mass chromatography analyses, the metabolites produced from methoxychlor and DDT by E. limosum were confirmed to be 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)ethane (methoxydichlor) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD), respectively. This study suggests that E. limosum in the human intestinal gut might be a participant in the reductive dechlorination of methoxychlor to the more antiandrogenic active methoxydichlor.

  12. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Intestinal Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbester, Jessica L; Goulding, David; Vallier, Ludovic; Hannan, Nicholas; Hale, Christine; Pickard, Derek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms the first line of defense against infections mediated by enteric pathogens such as salmonellae. Here we exploited intestinal "organoids" (iHOs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) to explore the interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with iHOs. Imaging and RNA sequencing were used to analyze these interactions, and clear changes in transcriptional signatures were detected, including altered patterns of cytokine expression after the exposure of iHOs to bacteria. S. Typhimurium microinjected into the lumen of iHOs was able to invade the epithelial barrier, with many bacteria residing within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. An S. Typhimurium invA mutant defective in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 invasion apparatus was less capable of invading the iHO epithelium. Hence, we provide evidence that hIPSC-derived organoids are a promising model of the intestinal epithelium for assessing interactions with enteric pathogens.

  13. Human milk oligosaccharide effects on intestinal function and inflammation after preterm birth in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine O.; Martin, Lena; Østergaard, Mette V.

    2017-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) may mediate prebiotic and anti-inflammatory effects in newborns. This is particularly important for preterm infants who are highly susceptible to intestinal dysfunction and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We hypothesized that HMO supplementation of infant formula...... (IF) improves intestinal function, bacterial colonization and NEC resistance immediately after preterm birth, as tested in a preterm pig model. Mixtures of HMOs were investigated in intestinal epithelial cells and in preterm pigs (n=112) fed IF supplemented without (CON) or with a mixture of four HMOs...... (4-HMO) or >25 HMOs (25-HMO, 5-10 g/L given for 5 or 11 days). The 25-HMO blend decreased cell proliferation and both HMO blends decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-8 secretion in IPEC-J2 cells, relative to control (P

  14. Identification of interstitial cells of Cajal. Significance for studies of human small intestine and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1994-01-01

    electron microscopical studies emphasized similarities between ICC and fibroblasts. In our early studies of ICC in the external musculature of mouse small intestine, we identified ICC by their characteristic morphology and topography, and we analyzed the relation between ICC, autonomic nerves and smooth......Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described a century ago by Ramón y Cajal a.o. as primitive neurons in the intestines. In the period 1900-1960 a large number of light microscopical studies of ICC were published, in which ICC were identified by heir characteristic morphology. After 1960...... functions (mechanoreceptive, mediating inhibitory nervous input). In spite of this possible fundamental importance for G-I motility, ICC have not been adequately described or even identified in human intestine, and hence, never included in ultrastructural studies of G-I neuropathology. This survey presents...

  15. Protein abundance of clinically relevant multidrug transporters along the entire length of the human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdzik, Marek; Gröer, Christian; Penski, Jette; Lapczuk, Joanna; Ostrowski, Marek; Lai, Yurong; Prasad, Bhagwat; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal transporters are crucial determinants in the oral absorption of many drugs. We therefore studied the mRNA expression (N = 33) and absolute protein content (N = 10) of clinically relevant transporters in healthy epithelium of the duodenum, the proximal and distal jejunum and ileum, and the ascending, transversal, descending, and sigmoidal colon of six organ donors (24-54 years). In the small intestine, the abundance of nearly all studied proteins ranged between 0.2 and 1.6 pmol/mg with the exception of those of OCT3 (intestinal segment. ABCB1, ABCG2, PEPT1, and ASBT were significantly more abundant in jejunum and ileum than in colon. In contrast to this, the level of expression of ABCC2, ABCC3, and OCT3 was found to be highest in colon. Site-dependent differences in the levels of gene and protein expression were observed for ABCB1 and ASBT. Significant correlations between mRNA and protein levels have been found for ABCG2, ASBT, OCT3, and PEPT1 in the small intestine. Our data provide further physiological pieces of the puzzle required to predict intestinal drug absorption in humans.

  16. Biotransformation of 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester by human intestinal flora and evaluation on their inhibition of NO production and antioxidant activity of the products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiu-Wei; Wang, Nan; Li, Wei; Xu, Wei; Wu, Shuai

    2013-05-01

    4,5-O-Dicaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester (1) was anaerobically incubated with human intestinal flora and four biotransformation products (2-5) were obtained. Their structures were elucidated as 3,4-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid methyl ester (2), 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (3), trans-caffeic acid (4) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid (5) on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Using high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with a diode array detector, chromatographic separation of 1-5 was performed on an analytical C18 column. The time course of the biotransformation was studied to probe into the biotransformation mechanism of 1 by human intestinal flora. In addition, the inhibitory activity of the parent compound 1 and its four main biotransformation products 2-5 on the inhibition of nitric oxide production induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and their DPPH free radical-scavenging activity in cell-free bioassay system were estimated.

  17. Anti-inflammatory properties of fruit juices enriched with pine bark extract in an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium: the effect of gastrointestinal digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontela-Saseta, Carmen; López-Nicolás, Rubén; González-Bermúdez, Carlos A; Martínez-Graciá, Carmen; Ros-Berruezo, Gaspar

    2013-03-01

    Enrichment of fruit juices with pine bark extract (PBE) could be a strategy to compensate for phenolic losses during the gastrointestinal digestion. A coculture system with Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages was established as an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium for evaluating the anti-inflammatory capacity of fruit juices enriched with PBE (0.5 g L(-1)) before and after in vitro digestion. The digestion of both PBE-enriched pineapple and red fruit juice led to significant changes in most of the analysed phenolic compounds. The in vitro inflammatory state showed cell barrier dysfunction and overproduction of IL-8, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the inflamed cells, incubation with nondigested samples reduced (Pproperties of PBE-enriched fruit juices decreased after digestion; further research on the bioavailability of the assayed compounds is needed to properly assess their usefulness for the treatment of gut inflammation.

  18. Galactomannan Downregulates the Inflammation Responses in Human Macrophages via NFκB2/p100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Toledano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that galactomannan, a polysaccharide consisting of a mannose backbone with galactose side groups present on the cell wall of several fungi, induces a reprogramming of the inflammatory response in human macrophages through dectin-1 receptor. The nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells 2 (NFκB2/p100 was overexpressed after galactomannan challenge. Knocking down NFκB2/p100 using small interfering RNA (siRNA indicated that NFκB2/p100 expression is a crucial factor in the progression of the galactomannan-induced refractoriness. The data presented in this study could be used as a modulator of inflammatory response in clinical situations where refractory state is required.

  19. Granulocyte and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors as therapy in human and veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Varón, Emilio; Villamayor, Lucía

    2007-07-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSFs) are endogenous cytokines that regulate granulocyte colonies and play a major role in the stimulation of granulopoiesis (neutrophils, basophils and eosinophils) and in the regulation of microbicidal functions. There are numerous pathological conditions in which neutrophils are decreased, the most common being neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, which increases the risk of serious microbial infections developing with the potential for high morbidity and mortality. New methods in molecular biology have led to the identification and cloning of CSF genes and biopharmaceutical production. Since then, CSFs have been widely used for the prevention and treatment of neutropenia associated with cancer chemotherapy, for mobilising haematopoietic cell precursors, and for other neutropenia-related pathologies. This review focuses on the use of CSFs within both human and veterinary medicine. Clinical applications, pharmacology, tolerability and the potential role of these factors in veterinary medicine are considered.

  20. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated...... with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact...... with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may...

  1. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced thei

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced thei

  3. [EVALUATION OF THE HUMAN SENSITIVITY TO SMALLPOX VIRUS BY THE PRIMARY CULTURES OF THE MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamedyanskaya, A S; Titova, K A; Sergeev, Al A; Kabanov, A S; Bulychev, L E; Sergeev, Ar A; Galakhova, D O; Nesterov, A E; Nosareva, O V; Shishkina, L N; Taranov, O S; Omigov, V V; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the primary cultures of granulocytes, mononuclear, and monocyte-macrophage cells derived from human blood were performed using variola virus (VARV) in the doses of 0.001-0.021 PFU/cell (plaques-forming units per cell). Positive dynamics of the virus accumulation was observed only in the monocyte-macrophages with maximum values of virus concentration (5.0-5.5 Ig PFU/ml) mainly within six days after the infection. The fact of VARV replication in the monocyte-macrophages was confirmed by the data of electron microscopy. At the same time, virus vaccines when tested in doses 3.3 and 4.2 Ig PFU/ml did not show the ability to reproduce in these human cells. The people sensitivity to VARV as assessed from the data obtained on human monocyte-macrophages corresponded to -1 PFU (taking into account the smooth interaction of the virus in the body to the cells of this type), which is consistent to previously found theoretical data on the virus sensitivity. The human susceptibility to VARV assessed experimentally can be used to predict the adequacy of developed smallpox models (in vivo) based on susceptible animals. This is necessary for reliable assessment of the efficiency of development of drugs for treatment and prophylaxis of the smallpox.

  4. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D;

    1991-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma...

  5. Distinct cytokine release profiles from human endothelial and THP-1 macrophage-like cells exposed to different amphotericin B formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtinen, Lloyd W; Bremer, Lindsay A; Prall, David N; Schwartzhoff, Jenifer; Hartsel, Scott C

    2005-01-01

    Amphotericin B(AmB) formulations, Fungizone, and Amphotec caused substantially greater proinflammatory cytokine release than AmBisome (L-AMB) and Abelcet in TPA differentiated THP-1 macrophages as determined by antibody based protein arrays. Lipopolysaccharide but not AmB induced significant pro-inflammatory cytokines in human endothelial cells.

  6. Degradation of amyloid beta by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived macrophages expressing Neprilysin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutaro Takamatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell-derived macrophage-like cells for Alzheimer's disease (AD. In previous studies, we established the technology to generate macrophage-like myeloid lineage cells with proliferating capacity from human iPS cells, and we designated the cells iPS-ML. iPS-ML reduced the level of Aβ added into the culture medium, and the culture supernatant of iPS-ML alleviated the neurotoxicity of Aβ. We generated iPS-ML expressing the Fc-receptor-fused form of a single chain antibody specific to Aβ. In addition, we made iPS-ML expressing Neprilysin-2 (NEP2, which is a protease with Aβ-degrading activity. In vitro, expression of NEP2 but not anti-Aβ scFv enhanced the effect to reduce the level of soluble Aβ oligomer in the culture medium and to alleviate the neurotoxicity of Aβ. To analyze the effect of iPS-ML expressing NEP2 (iPS-ML/NEP2 in vivo, we intracerebrally administered the iPS-ML/NEP2 to 5XFAD mice, which is a mouse model of AD. We observed significant reduction in the level of Aβ in the brain interstitial fluid following administration of iPS-ML/NEP2. These results suggested that iPS-ML/NEP2 may be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of AD.

  7. Responses of murine and human macrophages to leptospiral infection: a study using comparative array analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xue

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a re-emerging tropical infectious disease caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. The different host innate immune responses are partially related to the different severities of leptospirosis. In this study, we employed transcriptomics and cytokine arrays to comparatively calculate the responses of murine peritoneal macrophages (MPMs and human peripheral blood monocytes (HBMs to leptospiral infection. We uncovered a series of different expression profiles of these two immune cells. The percentages of regulated genes in several biological processes of MPMs, such as antigen processing and presentation, membrane potential regulation, and the innate immune response, etc., were much greater than those of HBMs (>2-fold. In MPMs and HBMs, the caspase-8 and Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD-like apoptosis regulator genes were significantly up-regulated, which supported previous results that the caspase-8 and caspase-3 pathways play an important role in macrophage apoptosis during leptospiral infection. In addition, the key component of the complement pathway, C3, was only up-regulated in MPMs. Furthermore, several cytokines, e.g. interleukin 10 (IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, were differentially expressed at both mRNA and protein levels in MPMs and HBMs. Some of the differential expressions were proved to be pathogenic Leptospira-specific regulations at mRNA level or protein level. Though it is still unclear why some animals are resistant and others are susceptible to leptospiral infection, this comparative study based on transcriptomics and cytokine arrays partially uncovered the differences of murine resistance and human susceptibility to leptospirosis. Taken together, these findings will facilitate further molecular studies on the innate immune response to leptospiral infection.

  8. Flagella from five Cronobacter species induce pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadnna Cruz-Córdova

    Full Text Available Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng induced the release of IL-8 (3314-6025 pg/ml, TNF-α (39-359 pg/ml, and IL-10 (2-96 pg/ml, in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200 suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95-100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria.

  9. Flagella from Five Cronobacter Species Induce Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Macrophage Derivatives from Human Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rocha-Ramírez, Luz M.; Ochoa, Sara A.; Gónzalez-Pedrajo, Bertha; Espinosa, Norma; Eslava, Carlos; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Sadowinski-Pine, Stanislaw; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Estrada-García, Iris; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre; Rosas, Irma; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10) in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng) induced the release of IL-8 (3314–6025 pg/ml), TNF-α (39–359 pg/ml), and IL-10 (2–96 pg/ml), in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200) suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95–100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria. PMID:23284883

  10. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei stimulate differential inflammatory responses from human alveolar type II cells (ATII and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eLu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII and alveolar macrophages (AM play a crucial role in the lung’s innate immune response. Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP and Burkholderia mallei (BM are facultative Gram-negative bacilli that cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. The inhalation of these pathogens can cause lethal disease and death in humans. We sought to compare the pathogenesis of and host responses to BP and BM through contact with human primary ATII cells and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDM. We hypothesized that because BP and BM induce different disease outcomes, each pathogen would induce distinct, unique host immune responses from resident pulmonary cells. Our findings showed that BP adhered readily to ATII cells compared to BM. BP, but not BM, was rapidly internalized by macrophages where it replicated to high numbers. Further, BP induced significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ATII cells (IL-6, IL-8 and macrophages (IL-6, TNFα at 6h post-infection compared to BM (p<0.05. Interestingly, BM induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in ATII cells and macrophages at 6h post-infection, with delayed induction of inflammatory cytokines at 24h post-infection. Because BP is flagellated and produces LPS, we confirmed that it stimulated both Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and TLR5 via NF-κb activation while the non-flagellated BM stimulated only TLR4. These data show the differences in BP and BM pathogenicity in the lung when infecting human ATII cells and macrophages and demonstrate the ability of these pathogens to elicit distinct immune responses from resident lung cells which may open new targets for therapeutic intervention to fight against these pathogens.

  11. Effects of ozone exposure on lipid metabolism in human alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, M.; Madden, M.C.; Samet, J.M. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)); Koren, H.S. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) store arachidonic acid (AA), which is esterified in cellular phospholipids until liberated by phospholipase A[sub C] or C after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. After release, there can be subsequent metabolism of AA into various potent, biologically active mediators including prostaglandins and platelet-activating factor (PAF). To examine the possibility that these mediators may account for some of the pathophysiologic alterations seen in the lung after ozone (O[sub 3]) exposure, human AM were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage of normal subjects, plated into tissue culture dishes, and the adherent cells were incubated with [[sup 3]H]AA or [[sup 3]H]lysoPAF. Human AM exposed to 1.0 ppm O[sub 3] for 2 hr released 65 [+-] 12% more tritium, derived from [[sup 3]H]AA, than paired, air-exposed controls into media supernatants. In other studies using a similar O[sub 3] exposure protocol, there was also a significant increase in human AM prostaglandin E[sub 2] production (2.0 [+-] 0.5-fold increase above air-exposure values, p < 0.02, n = 5). These potent lipid mediators, originally derived from human AM, may play an important role in the mechanisms of O[sub 3] lung toxicity. 25 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Effects of ozone exposure on lipid metabolism in human alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, M.; Madden, M.C.; Samet, J.M.; Koren, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) store arachidonic acid (AA) which is esterified in cellular phospholipids until liberated by phospholipase A2 or C after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Following release, there can be subsequent metabolism of AA into various potent, biological active mediators including prostaglandins and platelet activating factor (PAF). To examine the possibility that these mediators may account for some of the pathophysiologic alterations seen in the lung following O3 exposure, human AM were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage of normal subjects, plated into tissue culture dishes, and the adherent cells were incubated with 3H-AA or 3H-lysoPAF. Human AM exposed 1.0 ppm O3 for 2 hr released 65 + or - 12% more tritium, derived from 3H-AA, than paired air-exposed controls into media supernatants. In other studies using a similar O3 exposure protocol, there was also a significant increase in human AM PGE2 production (2.0 + or - 0.5 fold-increase above air-exposure values, p<0.01, n=17). In additional studies, using a similar O3 exposure protocol (1.0 ppm for 1 hr), there was also a significant increase in human AM PAF content (1.7 + or - 0.2 fold-increase above air-exposure values, p<0.02, n=5).

  13. Alarmin S100A9 Induces Proinflammatory and Catabolic Effects Predominantly in the M1 Macrophages of Human Osteoarthritic Synovium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Martijn H; Blom, Arjen B; Schelbergen, Rik F; Koenders, Marije I; van de Loo, Fons A; van den Berg, Wim B; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; van der Kraan, Peter M; van Lent, Peter L

    2016-10-01

    The alarmins S100A8 and S100A9 have been shown to regulate synovial activation, cartilage damage, and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we investigated the effect of S100A9 on the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloprotease (MMP) in OA synovium, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-differentiated/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-differentiated macrophages, and OA fibroblasts. We determined which cell types in the synovium produced S100A8 and S100A9. Further, the production of proinflammatory cytokines and MMP, and the activation of canonical Wnt signaling, was determined in human OA synovium, OA fibroblasts, and monocyte-derived macrophages following stimulation with S100A9. We observed that S100A8 and S100A9 were mainly produced by GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages present in the synovium, and to a lesser extent by M-CSF-differentiated macrophages, but not by fibroblasts. S100A9 stimulation of OA synovial tissue increased the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Additionally, various MMP were upregulated after S100A9 stimulation. Experiments to determine which cell type was responsible for these effects revealed that mainly stimulation of GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages and to a lesser extent M-CSF-differentiated macrophages with S100A9 increased the expression of these proinflammatory cytokines and MMP. In contrast, stimulation of fibroblasts with S100A9 did not affect their expression. Finally, stimulation of GM-CSF-differentiated, but not M-CSF-differentiated macrophages with S100A9 activated canonical Wnt signaling, whereas incubation of OA synovium with the S100A9 inhibitor paquinimod reduced the activation of canonical Wnt signaling. Predominantly mediated by M1-like macrophages, the alarmin S100A9 stimulates the production of proinflammatory and catabolic mediators and activates canonical Wnt signaling in OA

  14. Human Intestinal Parasite Burden and Poor Sanitation in Rural Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Megan L; McAtee, Shannon; Bryan, Patricia E; Jeun, Rebecca; Ward, Tabitha; Kraus, Jacob; Bottazzi, Maria E; Hotez, Peter J; Flowers, Catherine C; Mejia, Rojelio

    2017-09-05

    Hookworm infection affects 430 million people worldwide, causing iron deficiency, impaired cognitive development, and stunting in children. Because of the environmental conditions needed for the hookworm life-cycle, this parasite is endemic to resource-limited countries. Necator americanus was endemic in the southern United States before improvement of sewage disposal systems and eradication programs. With continued poverty, poor sanitation, and an environment suitable for the hookworm life-cycle in some regions of the southern United States, a current prevalence study using modern molecular diagnostics is warranted. Lowndes County, Alabama, was chosen as the study site given previous high hookworm burdens, degree of poverty, and use of open-sewage systems. Participants were interviewed, and stool, serum, and soil samples were tested for nine intestinal parasites using a multiparallel quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays . We found that, among 24 households, 42.4% reported exposure to raw sewage within their home, and from 55 stool samples, 19 (34.5%) tested positive for N. americanus, four (7.3%) for Strongyloides stercoralis, and one (1.8%) for Entamoeba histolytica. Stool tested positive for N. americanus contained low levels of parasite DNA (geometric mean 0.0302 fg/µL). Soil studies detected one (2.9%) Cryptosporidium species, and Toxocara serology assay detected one (5.2%) positive in this population. Individuals living in this high-risk environment within the United States continue to have stool samples positive for N. americanus. Gastrointestinal parasites known to be endemic to developing countries are identifiable in American poverty regions, and areas with lower disease burden are more likely to be identified by using qPCR.

  15. Learning in a simple biological system: a pilot study of classical conditioning of human macrophages in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsonne Gustav

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in cell biology and gene regulation suggest mechanisms whereby associative learning could be performed by single cells. Therefore, we explored a model of classical conditioning in human macrophages in vitro. In macrophage cultures, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; unconditioned stimulus was paired once with streptomycin (conditioned stimulus. Secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6 was used as response measure. At evocation, conditioning was not observed. Levels of IL-6 were higher only in those cultures that had been exposed to LPS in the learning phase (p's However, habituation was evident, with a 62% loss of the IL-6 response after three LPS presentations (p

  16. Reactive-oxygen-species-mediated P. aeruginosa killing is functional in human cystic fibrosis macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Cifani

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen for chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. About 80% of adult CF patients have chronic P. aeruginosa infection, which accounts for much of the morbidity and most of the mortality. Both bacterial genetic adaptations and defective innate immune responses contribute to the bacteria persistence. It is well accepted that CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR dysfunction impairs the airways-epithelium-mediated lung defence; however, other innate immune cells also appear to be affected, such as neutrophils and macrophages, which thus contribute to this infectious pathology in the CF lung. In macrophages, the absence of CFTR has been linked to defective P. aeruginosa killing, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS production. To learn more about macrophage dysfunction in CF patients, we investigated the generation of the oxidative burst and its impact on bacterial killing in CF macrophages isolated from peripheral blood or lung parenchyma of CF patients, after P. aeruginosa infection. Our data demonstrate that CF macrophages show an oxidative response of similar intensity to that of non-CF macrophages. Intracellular ROS are recognized as one of the earliest microbicidal mechanisms against engulfed pathogens that are activated by macrophages. Accordingly, NADPH inhibition resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular bacteria survival in CF and non-CF macrophages, both as monocyte-derived macrophages and as lung macrophages. These data strongly suggest that the contribution of ROS to P. aeruginosa killing is not affected by CFTR mutations.

  17. Effect of bisacodyl on the structure and function of rodent and human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D R; Sillery, J; Rachmilewitz, D; Rubin, C E; Tytgat, G N

    1977-05-01

    The effect of bisacodyl on intestinal structure and function was investigated. Net water transport was measured under steady state conditions in vivo during single pass infusions of rodent and of human intestinal segments. Each segment served as its own control. Bisacodyl inhibited water absorption in rat jejunum, ileum, and colon. The degree of inhibition was linearly related to the logarithm of the bisacodyl concentration over the range of 0.05 to 2.0 mg per 100 ml. In human jejunal segments, bisacodyl, 1 mg per 100 ml, caused net water secretion. Bisacodyl, 5 mg every 6 hr, increased ileostomy output by 15% when it was fed to 5 patients with established ileostomies. By light microscopy, bisacodyl, 2 mg per 100 ml, erased cytoplasmic and nuclear detail within surface absorptive cells of rat intestine. By electron microscopy, the involved cells contained sparse and abnormal cytoplasmic organelles and nuclei which were deficient in chromatin. These results suggest that the laxative effect of bisacodyl is related to its ability to inhibit intestinal water absorption. Reduced absorption may be secondary to changes in surface absorptive cells.

  18. Activation of Intestinal Human Pregnane X Receptor Protects against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Jie; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Qu, Aijuan; Tanaka, Naoki; Kimura, Shioko; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of intestinal human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in colon cancer was determined through investigation of the chemopreventive role of rifaximin, a specific agonist of intestinal human PXR, toward azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)–induced colon cancer. Rifaximin treatment significantly decreased the number of colon tumors induced by AOM/DSS treatment in PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. Additionally, rifaximin treatment markedly increased the survival r...

  19. Short- and long-term effects of oral vancomycin on the human intestinal microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Sandrine; Scher, Jose U.; Djukovic, Ana; Jiménez, Nuria; Littman, Dan R.; Abramson, Steven B.; Pamer, Eric G.; Ubeda, Carles

    2017-01-01

    Background Oral vancomycin remains the mainstay of therapy for severe infections produced by Clostridium difficile, the most prevalent cause of healthcare-associated infectious diarrhoea in developed countries. However, its short- and long-term effects on the human intestinal microbiota remain largely unknown. Methods We utilized high-throughput sequencing to analyse the effects of vancomycin on the faecal human microbiota up to 22 weeks post-antibiotic cessation. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota perturbations was studied in mice. Results During vancomycin therapy, most intestinal microbiota genera and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were depleted in all analysed subjects, including all baseline OTUs from the phylum Bacteroidetes. This was accompanied by a vast expansion of genera associated with infections, including Klebsiella and Escherichia/Shigella. Following antibiotic cessation, marked differences in microbiota resilience were observed among subjects. While some individuals recovered a microbiota close to baseline composition, in others, up to 89% of abundant OTUs could no longer be detected. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota changes was further demonstrated in mice, which developed analogous microbiota alterations. During vancomycin treatment, mice were highly susceptible to intestinal colonization by an antibiotic-resistant pathogen and, upon antibiotic cessation, a less-resilient microbiota allowed higher levels of pathogen colonization. Conclusions Oral vancomycin induces drastic and consistent changes in the human intestinal microbiota. Upon vancomycin cessation, the microbiota recovery rate varied considerably among subjects, which could influence, as validated in mice, the level of susceptibility to pathogen intestinal colonization. Our results demonstrate the negative long-term effects of vancomycin, which should be considered as a fundamental aspect of the cost–benefit equation for antibiotic prescription. PMID

  20. Short- and long-term effects of oral vancomycin on the human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Sandrine; Scher, Jose U; Djukovic, Ana; Jiménez, Nuria; Littman, Dan R; Abramson, Steven B; Pamer, Eric G; Ubeda, Carles

    2017-01-01

    Oral vancomycin remains the mainstay of therapy for severe infections produced by Clostridium difficile, the most prevalent cause of healthcare-associated infectious diarrhoea in developed countries. However, its short- and long-term effects on the human intestinal microbiota remain largely unknown. We utilized high-throughput sequencing to analyse the effects of vancomycin on the faecal human microbiota up to 22 weeks post-antibiotic cessation. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota perturbations was studied in mice. During vancomycin therapy, most intestinal microbiota genera and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were depleted in all analysed subjects, including all baseline OTUs from the phylum Bacteroidetes. This was accompanied by a vast expansion of genera associated with infections, including Klebsiella and Escherichia/Shigella. Following antibiotic cessation, marked differences in microbiota resilience were observed among subjects. While some individuals recovered a microbiota close to baseline composition, in others, up to 89% of abundant OTUs could no longer be detected. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota changes was further demonstrated in mice, which developed analogous microbiota alterations. During vancomycin treatment, mice were highly susceptible to intestinal colonization by an antibiotic-resistant pathogen and, upon antibiotic cessation, a less-resilient microbiota allowed higher levels of pathogen colonization. Oral vancomycin induces drastic and consistent changes in the human intestinal microbiota. Upon vancomycin cessation, the microbiota recovery rate varied considerably among subjects, which could influence, as validated in mice, the level of susceptibility to pathogen intestinal colonization. Our results demonstrate the negative long-term effects of vancomycin, which should be considered as a fundamental aspect of the cost-benefit equation for antibiotic prescription. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  1. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, B. van den; Boekhorst, J.; Herrmann, R.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus s

  2. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.; Boekhorst, te J.; Herrmann, R.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus

  3. The differential role of human macrophage in triggering secondary bystander effects after either gamma-ray or carbon beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; He, Mingyuan; Tu, Wenzhi; Konishi, Teruaki; Liu, Weili; Xie, Yuexia; Dang, Bingrong; Li, Wenjian; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-07-10

    The abscopal effect could be an underlying factor in evaluating prognosis of radiotherapy. This study established an in vitro system to examine whether tumor-generated bystander signals could be transmitted by macrophages to further trigger secondary cellular responses after different irradiations, where human lung cancer NCI-H446 cells were irradiated with either γ-rays or carbon ions and co-cultured with human macrophage U937 cells, then these U937 cells were used as a bystander signal transmitter and co-cultured with human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Results showed that U937 cells were only activated by γ-irradiated NCI-H446 cells so that the secondary injuries in BEAS-2B cells under carbon ion irradiation were weaker than γ-rays. Both TNF-α and IL-1α were involved in the γ-irradiation induced secondary bystander effect but only TNF-α contributed to the carbon ion induced response. Further assay disclosed that IL-1α but not TNF-α was largely responsible for the activation of macrophages and the formation of micronucleus in BEAS-2B cells. These data suggest that macrophages could transfer secondary bystander signals and play a key role in the secondary bystander effect of photon irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation has conspicuous advantage due to its reduced secondary injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-05-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced their homing patterns following administration to mice with ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury using whole body bioluminescence imaging. The effect of MSCs on macrophage phenotype following direct and indirect coculture was assessed using qPCR. Human cytokine production was measured using multiplex arrays. After IR, MSCs homed to injured kidneys where they afforded protection indicated by decreased proximal tubule kidney injury molecule-1 expression, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine levels. SDS-PAGE and immunofluorescence labeling revealed MSCs reduced collagen α1(I) and IV by day 7 post-IR. Gelatin zymography confirmed that MSC treatment significantly increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in IR kidneys, which contributed to a reduction in total collagen. Following direct and indirect coculture, macrophages expressed genes indicative of an anti-inflammatory "M2" phenotype. MSC-derived human GM-CSF, EGF, CXCL1, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, PDGF-AA, and CCL5 were identified in culture supernatants. In conclusion, MSCs home to injured kidneys and promote repair, which may be mediated by their ability to promote M2 macrophage polarization.

  5. The human CD5L/AIM-CD36 axis: A novel autophagy inducer in macrophages that modulates inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjurjo, Lucía; Amézaga, Núria; Aran, Gemma; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Arias, Lilibeth; Armengol, Carolina; Borràs, Francesc E; Sarrias, Maria-Rosa

    2015-01-01

    CD5L (CD5 molecule-like) is a secreted glycoprotein that participates in host response to bacterial infection. CD5L influences the monocyte inflammatory response to the bacterial surface molecules lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) by inhibiting TNF secretion. Here we studied the intracellular events that lead to macrophage TNF inhibition by human CD5L. To accomplish this goal, we performed functional analyses with human monocytic THP1 macrophages, as well as with peripheral blood monocytes. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) reversed the inhibitory effect of CD5L on TNF secretion. Among the various PtdIns3K isoforms, our results indicated that CD5L activates PtdIns3K (whose catalytic subunit is termed PIK3C3), a key modulator involved in autophagy. Further analysis revealed a concomitant enhancement of autophagy markers such as cellular LC3-II content, increased LC3 puncta, as well as LC3-LysoTracker Red colocalization. Moreover, electron microscopy showed an increased presence of cytosolic autophagosomes in THP1 macrophages overexpressing CD5L. Besides preventing TNF secretion, CD5L also inhibited IL1B and enhanced IL10 secretion. This macrophage anti-inflammatory pattern of CD5L was reverted upon silencing of autophagy protein ATG7 by siRNA transfection. Additional siRNA experiments in THP1 macrophages indicated that the induction of autophagy mechanisms by CD5L was achieved through cell-surface scavenger receptor CD36, a multiligand receptor expressed in a wide variety of cell types. Our data represent the first evidence that CD36 is involved in autophagy and point to a significant contribution of the CD5L-CD36 axis to the induction of macrophage autophagy.

  6. Bactericidal Effect of Gold-Chitosan Nanocomposites in Coculture Models of Pathogenic Bacteria and Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Gracia; Regiel-Futyra, Anna; Andreu, Vanesa; Sebastián, Víctor; Kyzioł, Agnieszka; Stochel, Grażyna; Arruebo, Manuel

    2017-05-31

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to develop resistance mechanisms to avoid the antimicrobial potential of antibiotics has become an increasing problem for the healthcare system. The search for more effective and selective antimicrobial materials, though not harmful to mammalian cells, seems imperative. Herein we propose the use of gold-chitosan nanocomposites as effective bactericidal materials avoiding damage to human cells. Nanocomposites were obtained by taking advantage of the reductive and stabilizing action of chitosan solutions on two different gold precursor concentrations. The resulting nanocomposites were added at different final concentrations to a coculture model formed by Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) or Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and human macrophages. Gold-chitosan colloids exhibited superior bactericidal ability against both bacterial models without showing cytotoxicity on human cells at the concentrations tested. Morphological and in vitro viability studies supported the feasibility of the infection model here described to test novel bactericidal nanomaterials. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy analyses pointed to the disruption of the bacterial wall as the lethal mechanism. Data obtained in the present study suggest that gold-chitosan nanocomposites are powerful and promising nanomaterials for reducing bacteria-associated infections, respecting the integrity of mammalian cells, and displaying high selectivity against the studied bacteria.

  7. The β-hemolysin and intracellular survival of Streptococcus agalactiae in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubha Sagar

    Full Text Available S. agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS is a major microbial pathogen in human neonates and causes invasive infections in pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. The S. agalactiae β-hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor for the development of invasive disease. To examine the role of β-hemolysin in the interaction with professional phagocytes, the THP-1 monocytic cell line and human granulocytes were infected with a serotype Ia S. agalactiae wild type strain and its isogenic nonhemolytic mutant. We could show that the nonhemolytic mutants were able to survive in significantly higher numbers than the hemolytic wild type strain, in THP-1 macrophage-like cells and in assays with human granulocytes. Intracellular bacterial multiplication, however, could not be observed. The hemolytic wild type strain stimulated a significantly higher release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α than the nonhemolytic mutant in THP-1 cells, while similar levels of the chemokine Interleukin-8 were induced. In order to investigate bacterial mediators of IL-8 release in this setting, purified cell wall preparations from both strains were tested and found to exert a potent proinflammatory stimulus on THP-1 cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the β-hemolysin has a strong influence on the intracellular survival of S. agalactiae and that a tightly controlled regulation of β-hemolysin expression is required for the successful establishment of S. agalactiae in different host niches.

  8. Megaselia scalaris causing human intestinal myiasis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazayad, Said A M; Rifaat, Manal M A

    2005-04-01

    Megaselia scalaris is a worldwide distributed insect of medical importance. In a laboratory-based study, stool samples with undefined maggot infestation were examined and the presence of M. scalaris maggots was confirmed. Binocular stereo-microscopy was used for identification of the maggots. Larvae were allowed to develop into adults onto a human stool culture. The larvae and the emerged flies were identified using standard keys. This may be the first report of M. scalaris as a causative agent of human myiasis in Egypt. Details of the third instar larva, pupa and adults were given.

  9. Impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor 4-phenylbutyrate on the clearance of apoptotic pancreatic carcinoma cells by human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Lena; Welsch, Thilo; Dovzhanskiy, Dmitriy I; Felix, Klaus; Giese, Nathalia A; Krysko, Dmitri V; Werner, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to have potent anticancer activities, partly induced by tumour cell apoptosis. The clearance of apoptotic tumour cells is an important mechanism of antitumour immune surveillance. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) and its immunological effects on the macrophage clearance of apoptotic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. To this end, a co-culture system of human macrophages from donors and PDAC patients, and PDAC cell lines (T3M4, PANC-1 and AsPC-1) was established to study the effect of 4-PB. Apoptosis and phagocytic activity were analysed using flow cytometry, and phagocytosis was confirmed by confocal microscopy. Further, p21 expression was quantified by immunoblot analysis. 4-PB treatment (0-10 mM) resulted in a dose-dependent induction of tumour cell apoptosis in two of the cell lines (T3M4 and PANC-1), but it also induced human macrophage apoptosis. The apoptotic effect of gemcitabine on PDAC cells was further enhanced by 4-PB. Moreover, 4-PB led to a dose-dependent overexpression of the cell cycle regulator p21 in tumour cells. In co-culture, apoptotic PDAC cells were phagocytosed by donor macrophages and phagocytosis was increased through tumour cell exposure to 4-PB and/or gemcitabine, whereas phagocytosis of PANC-1 cells was reduced using macrophages of PDAC patients treated with 4-PB. The 4-PB treatment induced human macrophage expression of the pro-angiogenic IL-8 and simultaneously inhibited inflammatory cytokine release through modulation of IL-10 and TNFα after phagocytosis of apoptotic PDAC cells. In conclusion, the 4-PB treatment activated tumour cell death in PDAC cells, resulting in tumour cell phagocytosis by macrophages. The latter were characterized by an anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokine response demonstrating adverse, tumour-promoting effects of macrophages on tumour cells. Thus, the potential of 4-PB as an anticancer agent against

  10. Similarity of hydrolyzing activity of human and rat small intestinal disaccharidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oku T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsuneyuki Oku¹, Kenichi Tanabe¹, Shigeharu Ogawa², Naoki Sadamori¹, Sadako Nakamura¹¹Graduate School of Human Health Science, University of Nagasaki, Siebold, Nagayo, Japan; ²Juzenkai Hospital, Kagomachi, Nagasaki, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to clarify whether it is possible to extrapolate results from studies of the hydrolyzing activity of disaccharidases from rats to humans.Materials and methods: We measured disaccharidase activity in humans and rats using identical preparation and assay methods, and investigated the similarity in hydrolyzing activity. Small intestinal samples without malignancy were donated by five patients who had undergone bladder tumor surgery, and homogenates were prepared to measure disaccharidase activity. Adult rat homogenates were prepared using small intestine.Results: Maltase activity was the highest among the five disaccharidases, followed by sucrase and then palatinase in humans and rats. Trehalase activity was slightly lower than that of palatinase in humans and was similar to that of sucrase in rats. Lactase activity was the lowest in humans, but was similar to that of palatinase in rats. Thus, the hydrolyzing activity of five disaccharidases was generally similar in humans and rats. The relative activity of sucrose and palatinase versus maltase was generally similar between humans and rats. The ratio of rat to human hydrolyzing activity of maltase, sucrase, and palatinase was 1.9–3.1, but this was not a significant difference. Leaf extract from Morus alba strongly inhibited the activity of maltase, sucrase, and palatinase, but not trehalase and lactase, and the degree of inhibition was similar in humans and rats. L-arabinose mildly inhibited sucrase activity, but hardly inhibited the activity of maltase, palatinase, trehalase and lactase in humans and rats. The digestibility of 1-kestose, galactosylsucrose, and panose by small intestinal enzymes was very similar between humans and

  11. Hypoxic pretreatment of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regulating macrophage polarization

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    Chuan TONG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs on macrophage polarization under hypoxia. Methods  hUC-MSCs were obtained by explants adherent culture and cultured under normoxia (21% O2 and hypoxia (5% O2. The multi-directional differentiation of hUC-MSCs was observed by osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation induction. Live/death staining was performed to detect the cell viability, and ELISA was executed to detect the protein content in supernatant of hUC-MSCs. Transwell chamber was employed to co-culture the hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia and macrophage (THP-1 stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (IPS, then the polarization of THP-1 was detected by immunofluorescence, and the secretions of inflammatory factor and anti-inflammatory factor of THP-1 were detected by ELISA. Results  hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia showed the ability of osteogenic and adipogenic multi-directional differentiation. Live/death staining showed the high cell viability of hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. The expression levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO were significantly higher in the hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia than in those cultured under normoxia. hUCMSCs cultured under hypoxia promoted the polarization of THP-1 to M2, obviously reduced the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β, and increased the expression of IL-10 significantly. Conclusion hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia may promote the polarization of THP-1 to M2 and improve the viability of anti-inflammatory. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.07.01

  12. Importance of the HIF pathway in cobalt nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyga, Agata; Hart, Alister; Tetley, Teresa D

    2015-01-01

    Recent, unexpected high failure rates of metal-on-metal hip implants have reintroduced the issue of cobalt toxicity. An adverse reaction to cobalt ions and cobalt-induced lung injury occurs during environmental exposure and is now strictly controlled. Currently adverse reaction occurs to cobalt nanoparticles during wear and tear of metal-on-metal hip implants of which the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The putative role of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway in the mechanism of cobalt nanoparticle (Co-NPs) toxicity was examined using the U937 cell line, human alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages. Co-NPs (5-20 μg/ml)-induced cytotoxicity (viability ranged from 75% to cobalt ions (Co(II); up to 350 μM) did not. Co-NPs induced HIF-1α stabilization. Addition of ascorbic acid (100 µM) and glutathione (1 mM) both prevented the increased ROS. However, only treatment with ascorbic acid reduced HIF-1α levels and prevented cell death, indicating that a ROS-independent pathway is involved in Co-NPs-induced cytotoxicity. Replenishing intracellular ascorbate, which is crucial in preventing HIF pathway activation, modified Co-induced HIF target gene expression and the inflammatory response, by decreasing interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) mRNA and protein expression. Addition of glutathione had no effect on Co-NPs-induced HIF target gene expression or inflammatory response. Thus, Co-NPs induce the HIF pathway by depleting intracellular ascorbate, leading to HIF stabilization and pathway activation. This suggests a strong, ROS-independent role for HIF activation in Co-NPs-induced cytotoxicity and a possible role for HIF in metal-on-metal hip implant pathology.

  13. Enhancement of human ACAT1 gene expression to promote the macrophage-derived foam cell formation by dexamethasone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li YANG; Ta Yuan CHANG; Bo Liang LI; Jin Bo YANG; Jia CHEN; Guang Yao YU; Pei ZHOU; Lei LEI; Zhen Zhen WANG; Catherine CY CHANG; XinYing YANG

    2004-01-01

    In macrophages, the accumulation of cholesteryl esters synthesized by the activated acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) results in the foam cell formation, a hallmark of early atherosclerotic lesions. In this study,with the treatment of a glucocorticoid hormone dexamethasone (Dex), lipid staining results clearly showed the large accumulation of lipid droplets containing cholesteryl esters in THP- 1-derived macrophages exposed to lower concentration of the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). More notably, when treated together with specific anti-ACAT inhibitors, the abundant cholesteryl ester accumulation was markedly diminished in THP-l-derived macrophages, confirming that ACAT is the key enzyme responsible for intracellular cholesteryl ester synthesis. RT-PCR and Western blot results indicated that Dex caused up-regulation of human ACAT1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels in THP-1 and THP- 1-derived macrophages. The luciferase activity assay demonstrated that Dex could enhance the activity of human ACAT1 gene P1 promoter, a major factor leading to the ACAT1 activation, in a cell-specific manner.Further experimental evidences showed that a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) located within human ACAT1gene P1 promoter to response to the elevation of human ACAT1 gene expression by Dex could be functionally bound with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) proteins. These data supported the hypothesis that the clinical treatment with Dex,which increased the incidence of atherosclerosis, may in part due to enhancing the ACAT1 expression to promote the accumulation of cholesteryl esters during the macrophage-derived foam cell formation, an early stage of atherosclerosis.

  14. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  15. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartholomeus Van den Bogert

    Full Text Available The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  16. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine. PMID:24386196

  17. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  18. Type I collagen as an extracellular matrix for the in vitro growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyad Jabaji

    Full Text Available We previously reported in vitro maintenance and proliferation of human small intestinal epithelium using Matrigel, a proprietary basement membrane product. There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells.Human small intestine was procured from fresh surgical pathology specimens. Small intestinal crypts were isolated using EDTA chelation. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts were isolated from a pediatric sample and expanded in vitro. After suspension in Matrigel or type I collagen gel, crypts were co-cultured above a confluent layer of myofibroblasts. Crypts were also grown in monoculture with exposure to myofibroblast conditioned media; these were subsequently sub-cultured in vitro and expanded with a 1∶2 split ratio. Cultures were assessed with light microscopy, RT-PCR, histology, and immunohistochemistry.Collagen supported viable human epithelium in vitro for at least one month in primary culture. Sub-cultured epithelium expanded through 12 passages over 60 days. Histologic sections revealed polarized columnar cells, with apical brush borders and basolaterally located nuclei. Collagen-based cultures gave rise to monolayer epithelial sheets at the gel-liquid interface, which were not observed with Matrigel. Immunohistochemical staining identified markers of differentiated intestinal epithelium and myofibroblasts. RT-PCR demonstrated expression of α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin in myofibroblasts and E-Cadherin, CDX2, villin 1, intestinal alkaline phosphatase, chromogranin A, lysozyme, and Lgr5 in epithelial cells. These markers were maintained through several passages.Type I collagen gel supports long-term in vitro maintenance and expansion of fully elaborated human intestinal epithelium. Collagen-based methods yield familiar enteroid structures as well as a new pattern of sheet

  19. Generation of L cells in mouse and human small intestine organoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; Bartfeld, Sina;

    2014-01-01

    functional L cells from three-dimensional cultures of mouse and human intestinal crypts. We show that short-chain fatty acids selectively increase the number of L cells, resulting in an elevation of GLP-1 release. This is accompanied by the upregulation of transcription factors associated with the endocrine......Upon a nutrient challenge, L cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate...... lineage of intestinal stem cell development. Thus, our platform allows us to study and modulate the development of L cells in mouse and human crypts as a potential basis for novel therapeutic strategies in patients with type 2 diabetes....

  20. Metabolomics analysis of Cistus monspeliensis leaf extract on energy metabolism activation in human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Yoichi; Han, Junkyu; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Smaoui, Abderrazak; Isoda, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells.

  1. Metabolomics Analysis of Cistus monspeliensis Leaf Extract on Energy Metabolism Activation in Human Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Shimoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells.

  2. Diagnosis of edema and inflammation in human intestines using ultrawideband radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sonny; Narayanan, Ram M.; Messaris, Evangelos

    2015-05-01

    Human intestines are vital organs, which are often subjected to chronic issues. In particular, Crohn's disease is a bowel aliment resulting in inflammation along the lining of one's digestive tract. Moreover, such an inflammatory condition causes changes in the thickness of the intestines; and we posit induce changes in the dielectric properties detectable by radar. This detection hinges on the increase in fluid content in the afflicted area, which is described by effective medium approximations (EMA). In this paper, we consider one of the constitutive parameters (i.e. relative permittivity) of different human tissues and introduce a simple numerical, electromagnetic multilayer model. We observe how the increase in water content in one layer can be approximated to predict the effective permittivity of that layer. Moreover, we note trends in how such an accumulation can influence the total effective reflection coefficient of the multiple layers.

  3. Production of Fibronectin by the Human Alveolar Macrophage: Mechanism for the Recruitment of Fibroblasts to Sites of Tissue Injury in Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, Stephen I.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Bitterman, Peter B.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    1981-11-01

    Because cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system are known to produce fibronectin and because alveolar macrophages are activated in many interstitial lung diseases, the present study was designed to evaluate a role for the alveolar macrophage as a source of the increased levels of fibronectin found in the lower respiratory tract in interstitial lung diseases and to determine if such fibronectin might contribute to the development of the fibrosis found in these disorders by being a chemoattractant for human lung fibroblasts. Production of fibronectin by human alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and maintained in short-term culture in serum-free conditions was demonstrated; de novo synthesis was confirmed by the incorporation of [14C]proline. This fibronectin had a monomer molecular weight of 220,000 and was antigenically similar to plasma fibronectin. Macrophages from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis produced fibronectin at a rate 20 times higher than did normal macrophages; macrophages from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis produced fibronectin at 10 times the normal rate. Macrophages from 6 of 10 patients with various other interstitial disorders produced fibronectin at rates greater than the rate of highest normal control. Human alveolar macrophage fibronectin was chemotactic for human lung fibroblasts, suggesting a functional role for this fibronectin in the derangement of the alveolar structures that is characteristic of these disorders.

  4. Metabolism of liriodendrin and syringin by human intestinal bacteria and their relation to in vitro cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D H; Lee, K T; Bae, E A; Han, M J; Park, H J

    1999-02-01

    When liriodendrin or syringin was incubated for 24 h with human intestinal bacteria, two metabolites, (+)-syringaresinol-beta-D-glucopyranoside and (+)-syringaresinol, from liriodendrin and one metabolite, synapyl alcohol, from syringin were produced. The metabolic time course of liriodendrin was as follows: at early time, liriodendrin was converted to (+)-syringaresinol-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and then (+)-syringaresinol. The in vitro cytotoxicities of these metabolites, (+)-syringaresinol and synapyl alcohol, were superior to those of liriodendrin and syringin.

  5. Mapping of liver-enriched transcription factors in the human intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank; Lehner; Ulf; Kulik; Juergen; Klempnauer; Juergen; Borlak

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the gene expression pattern of hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 (HNF6) and other liverenriched transcription factors in various segments of the human intestine to better understand the differentiation of the gut epithelium. METHODS: Samples of healthy duodenum and jejunum were obtained from patients with pancreatic cancer whereas ileum and colon was obtained from patients undergoing right or left hemicolectomy or (recto)sigmoid or rectal resection. All surgical specimens were subjected to his...

  6. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien Andersen, L.; Karim, A. B.; Roager, Henrik Munch

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, w...... of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P ...

  7. Ultrastructural study of adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to erythrocytes and human intestinal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The adhesion to erythrocytes and human intestinal epithelial cells of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains H10407, B2C, and H10407P, expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and type 1 fimbriae, respectively, was examined by electron microscopy. CFA and type 1 fimbriae were visualized by negative staining in thin sections after en bloc staining with ruthenium red and by immune labeling with antisera raised against purified fimbriae. By negative and ruthenium red staining,...

  8. Consensus hologram QSAR modeling for the prediction of human intestinal absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2012-04-15

    Consistent in silico models for ADME properties are useful tools in early drug discovery. Here, we report the hologram QSAR modeling of human intestinal absorption using a dataset of 638 compounds with experimental data associated. The final validated models are consistent and robust for the consensus prediction of this important pharmacokinetic property and are suitable for virtual screening applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Induces the Expression of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1) in Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copin, C.; Derudas, B.; Marx, N.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the initiator of the blood coagulation cascade after interaction with the activated factor VII (FVIIa). Moreover, the TF/FVIIa complex also activates intracellular signalling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines. The TF/FVIIa complex is inhibited by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that, together with PPARα and PPARβ/δ, controls macrophage functions. However, whether PPARγ activation modulates the expression of TFP1-1 in human macrophages is not known. Here we report that PPARγ activation increases the expression of TFPI-1 in human macrophages in vitro as well as in vivo in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The induction of TFPI-1 expression by PPARγ ligands, an effect shared by the activation of PPARα and PPARβ/δ, occurs also in proinflammatory M1 and in anti-inflammatory M2 polarized macrophages. As a functional consequence, treatment with PPARγ ligands significantly reduces the inflammatory response induced by FVIIa, as measured by variations in the IL-8, MMP-2, and MCP-1 expression. These data identify a novel role for PPARγ in the control of TF the pathway. PMID:28115923

  10. GABA and Topiramate Inhibit the Formation of Human Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells by Modulating Cholesterol-Metabolism-Associated Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, acts on GABA receptors to play an important role in the modulation of macrophage functions. The present study examined the effects of GABA and a GABA receptor agonist on modulating cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs. Methods: ORO stain, HPLC, qRT-PCR, Western blot and EMSA were carried out using HMDMs exposed to ox-LDL with or without GABAergic agents as the experimental model. Results: GABA and topiramate reduced the percentage of cholesterol ester in lipid-laden HMDMs by down-regulating SR-A, CD36 and LOX-1 expression and up-regulating ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI expression in lipid-laden HMDMs. The production of TNF-a was decreased in GABA-and topiramate-treated lipid-laden HMDMs, and levels of interleukin (IL-6 did not change. The activation of two signaling pathways, p38MAPK and NF-γB, was repressed by GABA and topiramate in lipid-laden HMDMs. Conclusion: GABA and topiramate inhibit the formation of human macrophage-derived foam cells and may be a possibility for macrophage targeted therapy of atherosclerotic lesions.

  11. Analysis of the human monocyte-derived macrophage transcriptome and response to lipopolysaccharide provides new insights into genetic aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kenneth Baillie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The FANTOM5 consortium utilised cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE to provide an unprecedented insight into transcriptional regulation in human cells and tissues. In the current study, we have used CAGE-based transcriptional profiling on an extended dense time course of the response of human monocyte-derived macrophages grown in macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1 to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We propose that this system provides a model for the differentiation and adaptation of monocytes entering the intestinal lamina propria. The response to LPS is shown to be a cascade of successive waves of transient gene expression extending over at least 48 hours, with hundreds of positive and negative regulatory loops. Promoter analysis using motif activity response analysis (MARA identified some of the transcription factors likely to be responsible for the temporal profile of transcriptional activation. Each LPS-inducible locus was associated with multiple inducible enhancers, and in each case, transient eRNA transcription at multiple sites detected by CAGE preceded the appearance of promoter-associated transcripts. LPS-inducible long non-coding RNAs were commonly associated with clusters of inducible enhancers. We used these data to re-examine the hundreds of loci associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in genome-wide association studies. Loci associated with IBD were strongly and specifically (relative to rheumatoid arthritis and unrelated traits enriched for promoters that were regulated in monocyte differentiation or activation. Amongst previously-identified IBD susceptibility loci, the vast majority contained at least one promoter that was regulated in CSF1-dependent monocyte-macrophage transitions and/or in response to LPS. On this basis, we concluded that IBD loci are strongly-enriched for monocyte-specific genes, and identified at least 134 additional candidate genes associated with IBD susceptibility

  12. Analysis of the human monocyte-derived macrophage transcriptome and response to lipopolysaccharide provides new insights into genetic aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Erik; De Hoon, Michiel; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Pavli, Paul; Summers, Kim M.; Hume, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The FANTOM5 consortium utilised cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) to provide an unprecedented insight into transcriptional regulation in human cells and tissues. In the current study, we have used CAGE-based transcriptional profiling on an extended dense time course of the response of human monocyte-derived macrophages grown in macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF1) to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We propose that this system provides a model for the differentiation and adaptation of monocytes entering the intestinal lamina propria. The response to LPS is shown to be a cascade of successive waves of transient gene expression extending over at least 48 hours, with hundreds of positive and negative regulatory loops. Promoter analysis using motif activity response analysis (MARA) identified some of the transcription factors likely to be responsible for the temporal profile of transcriptional activation. Each LPS-inducible locus was associated with multiple inducible enhancers, and in each case, transient eRNA transcription at multiple sites detected by CAGE preceded the appearance of promoter-associated transcripts. LPS-inducible long non-coding RNAs were commonly associated with clusters of inducible enhancers. We used these data to re-examine the hundreds of loci associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in genome-wide association studies. Loci associated with IBD were strongly and specifically (relative to rheumatoid arthritis and unrelated traits) enriched for promoters that were regulated in monocyte differentiation or activation. Amongst previously-identified IBD susceptibility loci, the vast majority contained at least one promoter that was regulated in CSF1-dependent monocyte-macrophage transitions and/or in response to LPS. On this basis, we concluded that IBD loci are strongly-enriched for monocyte-specific genes, and identified at least 134 additional candidate genes associated with IBD susceptibility from reanalysis

  13. Prebiotic effects of almonds and almond skins on intestinal microbiota in healthy adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhibin; Lin, Xiuchun; Huang, Guangwei; Zhang, Wen; Rao, Pingfan; Ni, Li

    2014-04-01

    Almonds and almond skins are rich in fiber and other components that have potential prebiotic properties. In this study we investigated the prebiotic effects of almond and almond skin intake in healthy humans. A total of 48 healthy adult volunteers consumed a daily dose of roasted almonds (56 g), almond skins (10 g), or commercial fructooligosaccharides (8 g) (as positive control) for 6 weeks. Fecal samples were collected at defined time points and analyzed for microbiota composition and selected indicators of microbial activity. Different strains of intestinal bacteria had varying degrees of growth sensitivity to almonds or almond skins. Significant increases in the populations of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were observed in fecal samples as a consequence of almond or almond skin supplementation. However, the populations of Escherichia coli did not change significantly, while the growth of the pathogen Clostridum perfringens was significantly repressed. Modification of the intestinal microbiota composition induced changes in bacterial enzyme activities, specifically a significant increase in fecal β-galactosidase activity and decreases in fecal β-glucuronidase, nitroreductase and azoreductase activities. Our observations suggest that almond and almond skin ingestion may lead to an improvement in the intestinal microbiota profile and a modification of the intestinal bacterial activities, which would induce the promotion of health beneficial factors and the inhibition of harmful factors. Thus we believe that almonds and almond skins possess potential prebiotic properties.

  14. Intestinal flora of animal models of human diseases as an environmental factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, K; Narushima, S

    2005-03-01

    Genetically-engineered animals are known to be useful in clarifying the functions of many genes and as animal models for human diseases. However, it has been widely reported that pathophysiology is not expressed in these animals when they become germfree or SPF animals, i.e., the pathophysiology is not the result of genes alone and a combination of gene function and intestinal flora as an environmental factor are necessary. It is important to determine the roles of each of these two factors by pathophysiological analysis. Gnotobiotic mice were produced by establishment of specified bacterial species in germfree animals to form the intestinal flora of SPF animals and they were placed in barrier facilities. Measures have been taken against infections by bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae. In addition, gnotobiotic mice with a highly normal physiology are required. Analysis of the effects of each bacterial species and combinations of bacteria on in vivo functions, i.e., the cross-talk between the host and intestinal flora, is essential in the creation of better laboratory animals. Monitoring of the intestinal flora, a key factor in the colonies produced, is a topic for future research.

  15. Biocompatibility and Inflammatory Potential of Titanium Alloys Cultivated with Human Osteoblasts, Fibroblasts and Macrophages

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    Jana Markhoff

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The biomaterials used to maintain or replace functions in the human body consist mainly of metals, ceramics or polymers. In orthopedic surgery, metallic materials, especially titanium and its alloys, are the most common, due to their excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Aside from the established Ti6Al4V alloy, shape memory materials such as nickel-titanium (NiTi have risen in importance, but are also discussed because of the adverse effects of nickel ions. These might be reduced by specific surface modifications. In the present in vitro study, the osteoblastic cell line MG-63 as well as primary human osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages were cultured on titanium alloys (forged Ti6Al4V, additive manufactured Ti6Al4V, NiTi, and Diamond-Like-Carbon (DLC-coated NiTi to verify their specific biocompatibility and inflammatory potential. Additive manufactured Ti6Al4V and NiTi revealed the highest levels of metabolic cell activity. DLC-coated NiTi appeared as a suitable surface for cell growth, showing the highest collagen production. None of the implant materials caused a strong inflammatory response. In general, no distinct cell-specific response could be observed for the materials and surface coating used. In summary, all tested titanium alloys seem to be biologically appropriate for application in orthopedic surgery.

  16. Mapping of macrophage elastase cleavage sites in insoluble human skin elastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddese, Samuel; Weiss, Anthony S; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2008-06-01

    Macrophage elastase (MMP-12) is a member of the family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and is active against multiple extracellular protein substrates such as elastin. Its effect on elastin is central to emphysema in the lung and photoaging of skin. Its expression in the skin increases on photodamaged skin and upon aging. Detecting and characterizing peptides cleaved in elastin, therefore, helps to understand such degradative disease processes in the skin and is also needed to assist in the rational design of agents that specifically inhibit the degradation. In this study, cleavage sites of MMP-12 in human skin elastin were extensively investigated. The peptides formed as a result of cleavages by this enzyme in the human skin elastin were characterized using mass spectrometry. A total of 41 peptides ranging from 4 to 41 amino acids were identified and 36 cleavage sites were determined. Amino acids encoded by exons 5, 6, 26, 28-31 were particularly susceptible to cleavages by MMP-12 and none or very few cleavages were detected from domains encoded by the remaining exons. The amino acid preferences of the different subsites on the catalytic domain of MMP-12 were analyzed.

  17. Sustained inflammasome activity in macrophages impairs wound healing in type 2 diabetic humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Rita E; Fang, Milie M; Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2014-03-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that sustained activity of the Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome in wounds of diabetic humans and mice contributes to the persistent inflammatory response and impaired healing characteristic of these wounds. Macrophages (Mp) isolated from wounds on diabetic humans and db/db mice exhibited sustained inflammasome activity associated with low level of expression of endogenous inflammasome inhibitors. Soluble factors in the biochemical milieu of these wounds are sufficient to activate the inflammasome, as wound-conditioned medium activates caspase-1 and induces release of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 in cultured Mp via a reactive oxygen species-mediated pathway. Importantly, inhibiting inflammasome activity in wounds of db/db mice using topical application of pharmacological inhibitors improved healing of these wounds, induced a switch from proinflammatory to healing-associated Mp phenotypes, and increased levels of prohealing growth factors. Furthermore, data generated from bone marrow-transfer experiments from NLRP-3 or caspase-1 knockout to db/db mice indicated that blocking inflammasome activity in bone marrow cells is sufficient to improve healing. Our findings indicate that sustained inflammasome activity in wound Mp contributes to impaired early healing responses of diabetic wounds and that the inflammasome may represent a new therapeutic target for improving healing in diabetic individuals.

  18. Differential Constitutive and Cytokine-Modulated Expression of Human Toll-like Receptors in Primary Neutrophils, Monocytes, and Macrophages

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    D. Shane O'Mahony, Uyenvy Pham, Ramesh Iyer, Thomas R. Hawn, W. Conrad Liles

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Toll-like receptors (TLRs comprise a family of proteins that recognizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and initiates host innate immune responses. Neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages are critical cellular components of the human innate immune system. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ, have been shown to up-regulate microbicidal activity in these effector cells of innate immunity. Currently, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects are not completely understood. We hypothesized that these cytokines may up-regulate TLR expression as a mechanism to facilitate microbial recognition and augment the innate immune response. Using quantitative realtime rt-PCR technology, we examined constitutive expression of TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 mRNA and the effects of G-CSF, GM-CSF, M-CSF, and IFN-γ on TLR mRNA expression in purified populations of normal human neutrophils, monocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Relative constitutive expression of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 was similar in neutrophils and monocytes. Constitutive expression of TLR5 was less in neutrophils compared to monocytes. Constitutive expression of TLR4 was greater and that of TLR9 lower in monocyte-derived macrophages compared to monocytes. Of the cytokines examined, IFN-γ and GM-CSF caused the greatest effects on TLR expression. IFN- γ up-regulated TLR2 and TLR4 in neutrophils and monocytes. GM-CSF up-regulated expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in neutrophils and TLR2 in monocytes. TLR5 was down-regulated by inflammatory cytokines in monocytes. These results suggest a potential role for IFN- γ and/or GM-CSF as therapeutic immunomodulators of the host defense to infection.

  19. Human amniotic membrane as an intestinal patch for neomucosal growth in the rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, M; Gökçora, H; Erekul, S; Dindar, H; Yücesan, S

    1992-05-01

    This experiment was carried out as a preliminary study, an attempt to grow new intestinal mucosa on human amniotic membrane in the terminal ileum in 37 rabbits. After ketamin sulfate anesthesia at laparatomy, 5-cm ileal defects were patched with human amniotic membrane (5 x 2 cm). These patched intestines were investigated on the first postoperative day and the 2nd, 5th, 10th, and 20th weeks corresponding to 4, 5, 5, 10, and 10 rabbits, respectively. Only three rabbits died in the early postoperative period. There was no evidence of intestinal obstruction or dilatation with barium meal. Microscopically, the neomucosa consisted of a thin layer of columnar epithelial cells at 2 weeks with more maturity of the villi and less irregularity and branching by 20 weeks. All patches were covered with neomucosa commencing at 2 weeks and covering the whole patch area by 20 weeks. This technique's advantages are the large size and the ease of the availability of the human amniotic membrane for neonates at risk without jeopardizing the neonates tissues. It is hoped that this method might be considered when neonatal material is scarce.

  20. Human macrophage responses to clinical isolates from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex discriminate between ancient and modern lineages.

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    Damien Portevin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is a correlation between phylogenetic relationship and inflammatory response amongst a panel of clinical isolates representative of the global diversity of the human Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC. Measurement of cytokines from infected human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages revealed a wide variation in the response to different strains. The same pattern of high or low response to individual strains was observed for different pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and was conserved across multiple human donors. Although each major phylogenetic lineage of MTBC included strains inducing a range of cytokine responses, we found that overall inflammatory phenotypes differed significantly across lineages. In particular, comparison of evolutionarily modern lineages demonstrated a significant skewing towards lower early inflammatory response. The differential response to ancient and modern lineages observed using GM-CSF derived macrophages was also observed in autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, but not in human unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We hypothesize that the reduced immune responses to modern lineages contribute to more rapid disease progression and transmission, which might be a selective advantage in the context of expanding human populations. In addition to the lineage effects, the large strain-to-strain variation in innate immune responses elicited by MTBC will need to be considered in tuberculosis vaccine development.

  1. Cholesterol Oxidase Binds TLR2 and Modulates Functional Responses of Human Macrophages

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    Katarzyna Bednarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (ChoD is considered to be an important virulence factor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, but its influence on macrophage activity is unknown. Here we used Nocardia erythropolis ChoD, which is very similar to the Mtb enzyme (70% identity at the amino-acid level, to evaluate the impact of bacterial ChoD on the activity of THP-1-derived macrophages in vitro. We found that ChoD decreased the surface expression of Toll-like receptor type 2 (TLR2 and complement receptor 3 (CR3 on these macrophages. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that ChoD competed with lipoteichoic acid for ligand binding sites on TLR2 but not on CR3, suggesting that ChoD signaling is mediated via TLR2. Binding of ChoD to the membrane of macrophages had diverse effects on the activity of macrophages, activating p38 mitogen activated kinase and stimulating production of a large amount of interleukin-10. Moreover, ChoD primed macrophages to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species in response to the phorbol myristate acetate, which was reduced by “switching off” TLR-derived signaling through interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases 1 and 4 inhibition. Our study revealed that ChoD interacts directly with macrophages via TLR2 and influences the biological activity of macrophages during the development of the initial response to infection.

  2. The First Trimester Gravid Serum Regulates Procalcitonin Expression in Human Macrophages Skewing Their Phenotype In Vitro

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    Damiano Rami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Procalcitonin (PCT is one of the best diagnostic and prognostic markers in clinical practice, widely used to evaluate the evolution of bacterial infections. Although it is mainly produced by thyroid, during sepsis almost all the peripheral tissues are involved in PCT production. Parenchymal cells have been suggested as the main source of PCT expression; however the contribution of macrophages is not clear yet. In response to environmental cues, tissue macrophages acquire distinct functional phenotypes, ranging from proinflammatory (M1 to anti-inflammatory (M2 phenotype. Macrophages at the fetal-maternal interface show immunosuppressive M2-like activities required for the maintenance of immunological homeostasis during pregnancy. This study aims to clarify the ability to synthesise PCT of fully differentiated (M0, polarized (M1/M2 macrophages and those cultured either in the presence of first trimester gravid serum (GS or pregnancy hormones. We found out that M1 macrophages upregulate PCT expression following LPS stimulation compared to M0 and M2. The GS downregulates PCT expression in macrophages, skewing them towards an M2-like phenotype. This effect seems only partially mediated by the hormonal milieu. Our findings strengthen the key role of macrophages in counteracting inflammatory stimuli during pregnancy, suggesting PCT as a possible new marker of M1-like macrophages.

  3. The first trimester gravid serum regulates procalcitonin expression in human macrophages skewing their phenotype in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Damiano; La Bianca, Martina; Agostinis, Chiara; Zauli, Giorgio; Radillo, Oriano; Bulla, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is one of the best diagnostic and prognostic markers in clinical practice, widely used to evaluate the evolution of bacterial infections. Although it is mainly produced by thyroid, during sepsis almost all the peripheral tissues are involved in PCT production. Parenchymal cells have been suggested as the main source of PCT expression; however the contribution of macrophages is not clear yet. In response to environmental cues, tissue macrophages acquire distinct functional phenotypes, ranging from proinflammatory (M1) to anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. Macrophages at the fetal-maternal interface show immunosuppressive M2-like activities required for the maintenance of immunological homeostasis during pregnancy. This study aims to clarify the ability to synthesise PCT of fully differentiated (M0), polarized (M1/M2) macrophages and those cultured either in the presence of first trimester gravid serum (GS) or pregnancy hormones. We found out that M1 macrophages upregulate PCT expression following LPS stimulation compared to M0 and M2. The GS downregulates PCT expression in macrophages, skewing them towards an M2-like phenotype. This effect seems only partially mediated by the hormonal milieu. Our findings strengthen the key role of macrophages in counteracting inflammatory stimuli during pregnancy, suggesting PCT as a possible new marker of M1-like macrophages.

  4. Proteomic-based identification of CD4-interacting proteins in human primary macrophages.

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    Rui André Saraiva Raposo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human macrophages (Mφ express low levels of CD4 glycoprotein, which is constitutively recycled, and 40-50% of its localization is intracellular at steady-state. Although CD4-interacting proteins in lymphoid cells are well characterised, little is known about the CD4 protein interaction-network in human Mφ, which notably lack LCK, a Src family protein tyrosine kinase believed to stabilise CD4 at the surface of T cells. As CD4 is the main cellular receptor used by HIV-1, knowledge of its molecular interactions is important for the understanding of viral infection strategies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed large-scale anti-CD4 immunoprecipitations in human primary Mφ followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis to elucidate the protein interaction-network involved in induced CD4 internalization and degradation. Proteomic analysis of CD4 co-immunoisolates in resting Mφ showed CD4 association with a range of proteins found in the cellular cortex, membrane rafts and components of clathrin-adaptor proteins, whereas in induced internalization and degradation CD4 is associated with components of specific signal transduction, transport and the proteasome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first time that the anti-CD4 co-immunoprecipitation sub-proteome has been analysed in human primary Mφ. Our data have identified important Mφ cell surface CD4-interacting proteins, as well as regulatory proteins involved in internalization and degradation. The data give valuable insights into the molecular pathways involved in the regulation of CD4 expression in Mφ and provide candidates/targets for further biochemical studies.

  5. Simultaneous gene expression profiling in human macrophages infected with Leishmania major parasites using SAGE

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    Smandi Sondos

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania (L are intracellular protozoan parasites that are able to survive and replicate within the harsh and potentially hostile phagolysosomal environment of mammalian mononuclear phagocytes. A complex interplay then takes place between the macrophage (MΦ striving to eliminate the pathogen and the parasite struggling for its own survival. To investigate this host-parasite conflict at the transcriptional level, in the context of monocyte-derived human MΦs (MDM infection by L. major metacyclic promastigotes, the quantitative technique of serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE was used. Results After extracting mRNA from resting human MΦs, Leishmania-infected human MΦs and L. major parasites, three SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced generating up to 28,173; 57,514 and 33,906 tags respectively (corresponding to 12,946; 23,442 and 9,530 unique tags. Using computational data analysis and direct comparison to 357,888 publicly available experimental human tags, the parasite and the host cell transcriptomes were then simultaneously characterized from the mixed cellular extract, confidently discriminating host from parasite transcripts. This procedure led us to reliably assign 3,814 tags to MΦs' and 3,666 tags to L. major parasites transcripts. We focused on these, showing significant changes in their expression that are likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of parasite infection: (i human MΦs genes, belonging to key immune response proteins (e.g., IFNγ pathway, S100 and chemokine families and (ii a group of Leishmania genes showing a preferential expression at the parasite's intra-cellular developing stage. Conclusion Dual SAGE transcriptome analysis provided a useful, powerful and accurate approach to discriminating genes of human or parasitic origin in Leishmania-infected human MΦs. The findings presented in this work suggest that the Leishmania parasite modulates key transcripts in human MΦs that may

  6. The action of berry phenolics against human intestinal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Nohynek, Liisa; Alakomi, Hanna-Leena; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2005-01-01

    Phenolic compounds present in berries selectively inhibit the growth of human gastrointestinal pathogens. Especially cranberry, cloudberry, raspberry, strawberry and bilberry possess clear antimicrobial effects against e.g. salmonella and staphylococcus. Complex phenolic polymers, such as ellagitannins, are strong antibacterial agents present in cloudberry, raspberry and strawberry. Berry phenolics seem to affect the growth of different bacterial species with different mechanisms. Adherence of bacteria to epithelial surfaces is a prerequisite for colonization and infection of many pathogens. Antimicrobial activity of berries may also be related to anti-adherence activity of the berries. Utilization of enzymes in berry processing increases the amount of phenolics and antimicrobial activity of the berry products. Antimicrobial berry compounds are likely to have many important applications in the future as natural antimicrobial agents for food industry as well as for medicine.

  7. Prediction of human drug clearance by multiple metabolic pathways: integration of hepatic and intestinal microsomal and cytosolic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, Helen E; Houston, J Brian; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2011-05-01

    The current study assesses hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation, sulfation, and cytochrome P450 (P450) metabolism of raloxifene, quercetin, salbutamol, and troglitazone using different in vitro systems. The fraction metabolized by conjugation and P450 metabolism was estimated in liver and intestine, and the importance of multiple metabolic pathways on accuracy of clearance prediction was assessed. In vitro intrinsic sulfation clearance (CL(int, SULT)) was determined in human intestinal and hepatic cytosol and compared with hepatic and intestinal microsomal glucuronidation (CL(int, UGT)) and P450 clearance (CL(int, CYP)) expressed per gram of tissue. Hepatic and intestinal cytosolic scaling factors of 80.7 mg/g liver and 18 mg/g intestine were estimated from published data. Scaled CL(int, SULT) ranged between 0.7 and 11.4 ml · min(-1) · g(-1) liver and 0.1 and 3.3 ml · min(-1) · g(-1) intestine (salbutamol and quercetin were the extremes). Salbutamol was the only compound with a high extent of sulfation (51 and 28% of total CL(int) for liver and intestine, respectively) and also significant renal clearance (26-57% of observed plasma clearance). In contrast, the clearance of quercetin was largely accounted for by glucuronidation. Drugs metabolized by multiple pathways (raloxifene and troglitazone) demonstrated improved prediction of intravenous clearance using data from all hepatic pathways (44-86% of observed clearance) compared with predictions based only on the primary pathway (22-36%). The assumption of no intestinal first pass resulted in underprediction of oral clearance for raloxifene, troglitazone, and quercetin (3-22% of observed, respectively). Accounting for the intestinal contribution to oral clearance via estimated intestinal availability improved prediction accuracy for raloxifene and troglitazone (within 2.5-fold of observed). Current findings emphasize the importance of both hepatic and intestinal conjugation for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation

  8. Enterocyte shedding and epithelial lining repair following ischemia of the human small intestine attenuate inflammation.

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    Robert A Matthijsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, we observed that small-intestinal ischemia and reperfusion was found to entail a rapid loss of apoptotic and necrotic cells. This study was conducted to investigate whether the observed shedding of ischemically damaged epithelial cells affects IR induced inflammation in the human small gut. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a newly developed IR model of the human small intestine, the inflammatory response was studied on cellular, protein and mRNA level. Thirty patients were consecutively included. Part of the jejunum was subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and variable reperfusion periods (mean reperfusion time 120 (+/-11 minutes. Ethical approval and informed consent were obtained. Increased plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP levels indicated loss in epithelial cell integrity in response to ischemia and reperfusion (p<0.001 vs healthy. HIF-1alpha gene expression doubled (p = 0.02 and C3 gene expression increased 4-fold (p = 0.01 over the course of IR. Gut barrier failure, assessed as LPS concentration in small bowel venous effluent blood, was not observed (p = 0.18. Additionally, mRNA expression of HO-1, IL-6, IL-8 did not alter. No increased expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, TNFalpha release, increased numbers of inflammatory cells (p = 0.71 or complement activation, assessed as activated C3 (p = 0.14, were detected in the reperfused tissue. CONCLUSIONS: In the human small intestine, thirty minutes of ischemia followed by up to 4 hours of reperfusion, does not seem to lead to an explicit inflammatory response. This may be explained by a unique mechanism of shedding of damaged enterocytes, reported for the first time by our group.

  9. Human intestinal microbiota and diseases%人体肠道细菌群落与疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁幸鐾; 糜祖煌

    2011-01-01

    肠道定植有100万亿细菌,这占到了人体细菌总量的绝大多数.一旦肠道菌群失调,就会产生一系列疾病.本文介绍了人体肠道细菌群落异常与5种肠道疾病和5种肠道外疾病的关系,并推荐用益生菌和益生素来治疗人体肠道细菌群落异常.为了解人体肠道细菌群落和人体健康的关系,美国国立卫生研究院已启动了人类微生物组计划,欧洲委员会也正在资助人类肠道宏基因组学项目,而中国在此项目中亦取得了可喜进步.基于肠道宏基因组的个体化医疗时代已不再遥远.%Gut homes 100 trillion microorganisms-the vast majority of our complement of microbes.Shifts in the microbial species that reside in our intestines have been associated with a long list of pathologies.The review introduces a strong correlation between disrupted microbial composition and 5 kinds of gastrointestinal problems as well as 5 kinds of extra-gastrointestinal problems, and recommends probiotics and prebiotics to treat microbiota-associated illness.In order to find out the relationship between human intestinal microbiota and diseases, the National Institutes of Health launched the Human Microbiome Project at the end of 2007, and the European Commission is funding a related effort, called Metagenomics of the Human Intestinal Tract, in which China makes delightful progress.In sum, individual therapy based on intestinal metagenomics is coming.

  10. Ricin crosses polarized human intestinal cells and intestines of ricin-gavaged mice without evident damage and then disseminates to mouse kidneys.

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    Alyssa D Flora

    Full Text Available Ricin is a potent toxin found in the beans of Ricinus communis and is often lethal for animals and humans when aerosolized or injected and causes significant morbidity and occasional death when ingested. Ricin has been proposed as a bioweapon because of its lethal properties, environmental stability, and accessibility. In oral intoxication, the process by which the toxin transits across intestinal mucosa is not completely understood. To address this question, we assessed the impact of ricin on the gastrointestinal tract and organs of mice after dissemination of toxin from the gut. We first showed that ricin adhered in a specific pattern to human small bowel intestinal sections, the site within the mouse gut in which a variable degree of damage has been reported by others. We then monitored the movement of ricin across polarized human HCT-8 intestinal monolayers grown in transwell inserts and in HCT-8 cell organoids. We observed that, in both systems, ricin trafficked through the cells without apparent damage until 24 hours post intoxication. We delivered a lethal dose of purified fluorescently-labeled ricin to mice by oral gavage and followed transit of the toxin from the gastrointestinal tracts to the internal organs by in vivo imaging of whole animals over time and ex vivo imaging of organs at various time points. In addition, we harvested organs from unlabeled ricin-gavaged mice and assessed them for the presence of ricin and for histological damage. Finally, we compared serum chemistry values from buffer-treated versus ricin-intoxicated animals. We conclude that ricin transverses human intestinal cells and mouse intestinal cells in situ prior to any indication of enterocyte damage and that ricin rapidly reaches the kidneys of intoxicated mice. We also propose that mice intoxicated orally with ricin likely die from distributive shock.

  11. Ricin crosses polarized human intestinal cells and intestines of ricin-gavaged mice without evident damage and then disseminates to mouse kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, Alyssa D; Teel, Louise D; Smith, Mark A; Sinclair, James F; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; O'Brien, Alison D

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potent toxin found in the beans of Ricinus communis and is often lethal for animals and humans when aerosolized or injected and causes significant morbidity and occasional death when ingested. Ricin has been proposed as a bioweapon because of its lethal properties, environmental stability, and accessibility. In oral intoxication, the process by which the toxin transits across intestinal mucosa is not completely understood. To address this question, we assessed the impact of ricin on the gastrointestinal tract and organs of mice after dissemination of toxin from the gut. We first showed that ricin adhered in a specific pattern to human small bowel intestinal sections, the site within the mouse gut in which a variable degree of damage has been reported by others. We then monitored the movement of ricin across polarized human HCT-8 intestinal monolayers grown in transwell inserts and in HCT-8 cell organoids. We observed that, in both systems, ricin trafficked through the cells without apparent damage until 24 hours post intoxication. We delivered a lethal dose of purified fluorescently-labeled ricin to mice by oral gavage and followed transit of the toxin from the gastrointestinal tracts to the internal organs by in vivo imaging of whole animals over time and ex vivo imaging of organs at various time points. In addition, we harvested organs from unlabeled ricin-gavaged mice and assessed them for the presence of ricin and for histological damage. Finally, we compared serum chemistry values from buffer-treated versus ricin-intoxicated animals. We conclude that ricin transverses human intestinal cells and mouse intestinal cells in situ prior to any indication of enterocyte damage and that ricin rapidly reaches the kidneys of intoxicated mice. We also propose that mice intoxicated orally with ricin likely die from distributive shock.

  12. Hot spices influence permeability of human intestinal epithelial monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Jarolim, E; Gajdzik, L; Haberl, I; Kraft, D; Scheiner, O; Graf, J

    1998-03-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that hot spices may interact with epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract to modulate their transport properties. Using HCT-8 cells, a cell line from a human ileocoecal carcinoma, we studied the effects of spices on transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), permeability for fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextrans with graded molecular weight, and morphological alterations of tight junctions by immunofluorescence using an anti-ZO-1 antibody, a marker for tight junction integrity. Two different reactivity patterns were observed: paprika and cayenne pepper significantly decreased the TER and increased permeability for 10-, 20- and 40-kDa dextrans but not for -70 kDa dextrans. Simultaneously, tight junctions exhibited a discontinuous pattern. Applying extracts from black or green pepper, bay leaf or nutmeg increased the TER and macromolecular permeability remained low. Immunofluorescence ZO-1 staining was preserved. In accordance with the above findings, capsaicin transiently reduced resistance and piperine increased resistance, making them candidates for causing the effects seen with crude spice extracts. The observation that Solanaceae spices (paprika, cayenne pepper) increase permeability for ions and macromolecules might be of pathophysiological importance, particularly with respect to food allergy and intolerance.

  13. Prostaglandin E2 suppresses beta1-integrin expression via E-prostanoid receptor in human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Shunji; Ichiyama, Takashi; Kohno, Fumitaka; Korenaga, Yuno; Ohsaki, Ayami; Hirano, Reiji; Haneda, Yasuhiro; Fukano, Reiji; Furukawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Beta1-integrins mediate cell attachment to different extracellular matrix proteins, intracellular proteins, and intercellular adhesions. Recently, it has been reported that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has anti-inflammatory properties such as inhibition of the expression of adhesion molecules or production of chemokines. However, the effect of PGE2 on the expression of beta1-integrin remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGE2 on the expression of beta1-integrin in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 and in CD14+ monocytes/macrophages in human peripheral blood. For this, we examined the role of four subtypes of PGE2 receptors and E-prostanoid (EP) receptors on PGE2-mediated inhibition. We found that PGE2 significantly inhibited the expression of beta1-integrin, mainly through EP4 receptors in THP-1 cells and CD14+ monocytes/macrophages in human peripheral blood. We suggest that PGE2 has anti-inflammatory effects, leading to the inhibited expression of beta1-integrin in human monocytes/macrophages, and that the EP4 receptor may play an important role in PGE2-mediated inhibition. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficient, long term production of monocyte-derived macrophages from human pluripotent stem cells under partly-defined and fully-defined conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie van Wilgenburg

    Full Text Available Human macrophages are specialised hosts for HIV-1, dengue virus, Leishmania and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Yet macrophage research is hampered by lack of appropriate cell models for modelling infection by these human pathogens, because available myeloid cell lines are, by definition, not terminally differentiated like tissue macrophages. We describe here a method for deriving monocytes and macrophages from human Pluripotent Stem Cells which improves on previously published protocols in that it uses entirely defined, feeder- and serum-free culture conditions and produces very consistent, pure, high yields across both human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC and multiple human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC lines over time periods of up to one year. Cumulatively, up to ∼3×10(7 monocytes can be harvested per 6-well plate. The monocytes produced are most closely similar to the major blood monocyte (CD14(+, CD16(low, CD163(+. Differentiation with M-CSF produces macrophages that are highly phagocytic, HIV-1-infectable, and upon activation produce a pro-inflammatory cytokine profile similar to blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Macrophages are notoriously hard to genetically manipulate, as they recognise foreign nucleic acids; the lentivector system described here overcomes this, as pluripotent stem cells can be relatively simply genetically manipulated for efficient transgene expression in the differentiated cells, surmounting issues of transgene silencing. Overall, the method we describe here is an efficient, effective, scalable system for the reproducible production and genetic modification of human macrophages, facilitating the interrogation of human macrophage biology.

  15. Enterocyte shedding and epithelial lining repair following ischemia of the human small intestine attenuate inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijsen, Robert A; Derikx, Joep P M; Kuipers, Dian; van Dam, Ronald M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Buurman, Wim A

    2009-09-15

    Recently, we observed that small-intestinal ischemia and reperfusion was found to entail a rapid loss of apoptotic and necrotic cells. This study was conducted to investigate whether the observed shedding of ischemically damaged epithelial cells affects IR induced inflammation in the human small gut. Using a newly developed IR model of the human small intestine, the inflammatory response was studied on cellular, protein and mRNA level. Thirty patients were consecutively included. Part of the jejunum was subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and variable reperfusion periods (mean reperfusion time 120 (+/-11) minutes). Ethical approval and informed consent were obtained. Increased plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) levels indicated loss in epithelial cell integrity in response to ischemia and reperfusion (pintestine, thirty minutes of ischemia followed by up to 4 hours of reperfusion, does not seem to lead to an explicit inflammatory response. This may be explained by a unique mechanism of shedding of damaged enterocytes, reported for the first time by our group.

  16. Otilonium bromide inhibits calcium entry through L-type calcium channels in human intestinal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strege, P R; Evangelista, S; Lyford, G L; Sarr, M G; Farrugia, G

    2004-04-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is used as an intestinal antispasmodic. The mechanism of action of OB is not completely understood. As Ca(2+) entry into intestinal smooth muscle is required to trigger contractile activity, our hypothesis was that OB blocked Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of OB on Ca(2+), Na(+) and K(+) ion channels in human jejunal circular smooth muscle cells and on L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed heterologously in HEK293 cells. Whole cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp techniques. Otilonium bromide (0.09-9 micromol L(-1)) was used as this reproduced clinical intracellular concentrations. In human circular smooth muscle cells, OB inhibited L-type Ca(2+) current by 25% at 0.9 micromol L(-1) and 90% at 9 micromol L(-1). Otilonium bromide had no effect on Na(+) or K(+) currents. In HEK293 cells, 1 micromol L(-1) OB significantly inhibited the expressed L-type Ca(2+) channels. Truncation of the alpha(1C) subunit C and N termini did not block the inhibitory effects of OB. Otilonium bromide inhibited Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) at concentrations similar to intestinal tissue levels. This effect may underlie the observed muscle relaxant effects of the drug.

  17. Effects of Acute Hyperglucagonemia on Hepatic and Intestinal Lipoprotein Production and Clearance in Healthy Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Changting; Pavlic, Mirjana; Szeto, Linda; Patterson, Bruce W.; Lewis, Gary F.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The metabolism of hepatic- and intestinally derived lipoproteins is regulated in a complex fashion by nutrients, hormones, and neurologic and other factors. Recent studies in animal models suggest an important role for glucagon acting via the glucagon receptor in regulating hepatic triglyceride (TG) secretion. Here we examined the direct effects of glucagon on regulation of hepatic and intestinal lipoprotein metabolism in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eight healthy men underwent two studies each, in random order, 4–6 weeks apart in which de novo lipogenesis, kinetics of larger VLDL1 TG, and kinetics of VLDL1 and smaller VLDL2 apolipoprotein (apo)B100 and B48 were studied using established stable isotope enrichment methods. Subjects were studied in the constant fed state under conditions of a pancreatic clamp (with infusion of somatostatin, insulin, and growth hormone) at either basal glucagon (BG study, 64.5 ± 2.1 pg/mL) or hyperglucagonemia (high glucagon [HG] study, 183.2 ± 5.1 pg/mL). RESULTS There were no significant differences in plasma concentration of VLDL1 or VLDL2 TG, apoB100 or apoB48 between BG and HG studies. There was, however, lower (P lipoprotein metabolism. CONCLUSIONS Glucagon acutely regulates hepatic but not intestinal lipoprotein particle metabolism in humans both by decreasing hepatic lipoprotein particle production as well as by inhibiting particle clearance, with no net effect on particle concentration. PMID:20980459

  18. Comprehensive Survey of Intestinal Microbiota Changes in Offspring of Human Microbiota-Associated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Klitzing, Eliane; Öz, Fulya; Ekmekciu, Ira; Escher, Ulrike; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary abiotic mice generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment provide a valuable tool for association studies with microbiota derived from different vertebrate hosts. We here generated human microbiota-associated (hma) mice by human fecal microbiota transplantation of secondary abiotic mice and performed a comprehensive survey of the intestinal microbiota dynamics in offspring of hma mice over 18 weeks following weaning as compared to their mothers applying both cultural and molecular methods. Mice were maintained under standard hygienic conditions with open cages, handled under aseptic conditions, and fed autoclaved chow and water. Within 1 week post weaning, fecal loads of commensal enterobacteria and enterococci had decreased, whereas obligate anaerobic bacteria such as Bacteroides/Prevotella species and clostridia were stably colonizing the intestines of hma offspring at high loads. Lactobacilli numbers were successively increasing until 18 weeks post weaning in both hma offspring and mothers, whereas by then, bifidobacteria were virtually undetectable in the former only. Interestingly, fecal lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were higher in mothers as compared to their offspring at 5 and 18 weeks post weaning. We conclude that the intestinal microbiota composition changes in offspring of hma mice, but also their mothers over time particularly affecting aerobic and microaerobic species. PMID:28386472

  19. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van Camp, John

    2015-09-08

    Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  20. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Kamiloglu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  1. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokil, Nilesh J.; Totsika, Makrina; Carey, Alison J.;

    2011-01-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular...... or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1+ vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data......, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival...

  2. Characterization of HIV-1 Infection and Innate Sensing in Different Types of Primary Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth A. Diget

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV pathogenesis and contribute to establishment of a viral reservoir responsible for continuous virus production and virus transmission to T cells. In this study, we investigated the differences between various monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs generated through different differentiation protocols and evaluated different cellular, immunological, and virological properties. We found that elevated and persistent HIV-1 pWT/BaL replication could be obtained only in MDMs grown in RPMI containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. Interestingly, this MDM type was also most responsive to toll-like receptor stimulation. By contrast, all MDM types were activated to a comparable extent by intracellular DNA, and the macrophage serum-free medium-(Mac-SFM-differentiated MDMs responded strongly to membrane fusion through expression of CXCL10. Finally, we found that HIV infection of RPMI/M-CSF-differentiated MDMs induced low-grade expression of two interferon-stimulated genes in some donors. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the differentiation protocol used greatly influences the ability of MDMs to activate innate immune reactions and support HIV-1 replication. Paradoxically, the data show that the MDMs with the strongest innate immune response were also the most permissive for HIV-1 replication.

  3. Classification of M1/M2-polarized human macrophages by label-free hyperspectral reflectance confocal microscopy and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, Francesca R; Mozetic, Pamela; Fioramonti, Marco; Iuliani, Michele; Ribelli, Giulia; Pantano, Francesco; Santini, Daniele; Tonini, Giuseppe; Trombetta, Marcella; Businaro, Luca; Selci, Stefano; Rainer, Alberto

    2017-08-21

    The possibility of detecting and classifying living cells in a label-free and non-invasive manner holds significant theranostic potential. In this work, Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) has been successfully applied to the analysis of macrophagic polarization, given its central role in several pathological settings, including the regulation of tumour microenvironment. Human monocyte derived macrophages have been investigated using hyperspectral reflectance confocal microscopy, and hyperspectral datasets have been analysed in terms of M1 vs. M2 polarization by Principal Components Analysis (PCA). Following PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis has been implemented for semi-automatic classification of macrophagic polarization from HSI data. Our results confirm the possibility to perform single-cell-level in vitro classification of M1 vs. M2 macrophages in a non-invasive and label-free manner with a high accuracy (above 98% for cells deriving from the same donor), supporting the idea of applying the technique to the study of complex interacting cellular systems, such in the case of tumour-immunity in vitro models.

  4. MicroRNA-181b regulates ALX/FPR2 receptor expression and proresolution signaling in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdomenico, Anna Maria; Recchiuti, Antonio; Simiele, Felice; Codagnone, Marilina; Mari, Veronica Cecilia; Davì, Giovanni; Romano, Mario

    2015-02-06

    Regulatory mechanisms of ALX/FPR2, the lipoxin A4 receptor, expression have considerable relevance in inflammation resolution. Because microRNAs (miRs) are emerging as key players in inflammation resolution, here we examined microRNA-mediated regulation of ALX/FPR2 (lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor 2) expression. By matching data from bioinformatic algorithms, we found 27 miRs predicted to bind the 3'-UTR of ALX/FPR2. Among these, we selected miR-181b because of its link with inflammation. Using a luciferase reporter system, we assessed miR-181b binding to ALX/FPR2 3'-UTR. Consistent with this, miR-181b overexpression in human macrophages significantly down-regulated ALX/FPR2 protein levels (-25%), whereas miR-181b knockdown gave a significant increase in ALX/FPR2 (+60%). miR-181b levels decreased during monocyte to macrophage differentiation (-50%), whereas ALX/FPR2 expression increased significantly (+60%). miR-181b overexpression blunted lipoxin A4 (0.1-10 nm)- and resolvin D1 (0.01-10 nm)-stimulated phagocytic activity of macrophages. These results unravel novel regulatory mechanisms of ALX/FPR2 expression and ligand-evoked macrophages proresolution responses mediated by miR-181b, thus uncovering novel components of the endogenous inflammation resolution circuits.

  5. E durans strain M4-5 isolated from human colonic flora attenuates intestinal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avram-Hananel, Liraz; Stock, Julia; Parlesak, Alexandr;

    2010-01-01

    effects, mediated by regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory immune factors as well as preservation of intestine epithelial integrity, suggesting that this novel anti-inflammatory bacterium may be preferentially a useful prophylactic treatment to avoid inflammatory bowel disease.......PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of a unique high-butyrate-producing bacterial strain from human colonic flora, Enterococcus durans, in prevention and treatment of intestinal inflammation. METHODS: A compartmentalized Caco-2/leukocyte coculture model...... was used to examine the in vitro effects of E durans and its metabolite butyrate on basal and Escherichia coli-stimulated secretion of proinflammatory immune factors (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. A murine model of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis was used...

  6. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Inhibits Human Small-Cell Lung Cancer Proliferation in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruno, Kaname; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1998-11-01

    Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is an aggressive, rapidly growing and metastasizing, and highly fatal neoplasm. We report that vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits the proliferation of SCLC cells in culture and dramatically suppresses the growth of SCLC tumor-cell implants in athymic nude mice. In both cases, the inhibition was mediated apparently by a cAMP-dependent mechanism, because the inhibition was enhanced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in proportion to increases in intracellular cAMP levels, and the inhibition was abolished by selective inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. If confirmed in clinical trials, this antiproliferative action of vasoactive intestinal peptide may offer a new and promising means of suppressing SCLC in human subjects, without the toxic side effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  7. Prostaglandin E2 regulates macrophage colony stimulating factor secretion by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, A; Trimoreau, F; Faucher, J L; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1999-07-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate marrow haematopoiesis by secreting growth factors such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and several functions of cells of the mononuclear-phagocytic lineage. By using a specific ELISA we found that their constitutive secretion of M-CSF is enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) markedly reduces in a time- and dose-dependent manner the constitutive and TNF-alpha-induced M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, other lipid mediators such as 12-HETE, 15-HETE, leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4 and lipoxin A4 have no effect. EP2/EP4 selective agonists (11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1) and EP2 agonist (19-OH PGE2) inhibit M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells while an EP1/EP3 agonist (sulprostone) has no effect. Stimulation with PGE2 induces an increase of intracellular cAMP levels in bone marrow stromal cells. cAMP elevating agents (forskolin and cholera toxin) mimic the PGE2-induced inhibition of M-CSF production. In conclusion, PGE2 is a potent regulator of M-CSF production by human bone marrow stromal cells, its effects being mediated via cAMP and PGE receptor EP2/EP4 subtypes.

  8. Surface coating mediates the toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles towards human-like macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Nadège; Hillaireau, Hervé; Vergnaud, Juliette; Tsapis, Nicolas; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Fattal, Elias

    2015-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the toxicity of a series of poly(lactide-co-glycolic) (PLGA) nanoparticles on human-like THP-1 macrophages. Positively-, negatively-charged and neutral nanoparticles (200 nm) were prepared using chitosan (CS), poloxamer 188 (PF68) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as stabilizer. Stabilizer-free PLGA nanoparticles were obtained as well. When used at therapeutically relevant concentrations (up to 0.1 mg/mL in vitro), all tested nanoparticles showed no or scarce signs of toxicity, as assessed by cell mitochondrial activity, induction of apoptosis and necrosis, production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. At high concentrations (above 1mg/mL), cytotoxicity was found to be induced by the presence of stabilizers, whatever the toxicological pattern of the stabilizer itself. While stabilizer-free PLGA nanoparticles exerted no cytotoxicity, the slightly cytotoxic CS polymer conferred PLGA nanoparticles significant cytotoxicity when used as nanoparticle stabilizer; more surprisingly, the otherwise innocuous PVA and PF68 polymers also conferred a significant cytotoxicity to PLGA nanoparticles. These results unveiled the critical toxicological contribution played by stabilizers used for the formulation of PLGA nanoparticles when used at high concentrations, which may have implications for local toxicities of PLGA-based nanomedicine, and provided additional insight in cytotoxic effects of internalized nanoparticles.

  9. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'homme, Laurent; Esser, Nathalie; Riva, Laura; Scheen, André; Paquot, Nicolas; Piette, Jacques; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in many obesity-associated diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and gouty arthritis, through its ability to induce interleukin (IL)-1β release. The molecular link between obesity and inflammasome activation is still unclear, but free fatty acids have been proposed as one triggering event. Here we reported opposite effects of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) compared with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) on NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages. Palmitate and stearate, both SFAs, triggered IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1/ASC/NLRP3-dependent pathway. Unlike SFAs, the UFAs oleate and linoleate did not lead to IL-1β secretion. In addition, they totally prevented the IL-1β release induced by SFAs and, with less efficiency, by a broad range of NLRP3 inducers, including nigericin, alum, and monosodium urate. UFAs did not affect the transcriptional effect of SFAs, suggesting a specific effect on the NLRP3 activation. These results provide a new anti-inflammatory mechanism of UFAs by preventing the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1β processing. By this way, UFAs might play a protective role in NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:24006511

  10. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Xiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts (OCs originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+ BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3+ cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (Rαhigh subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rαhigh cells also generated macrophages (MΦs and dendritic cells (DCs but lacked granulocyte (GR-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rαlow subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP and gave rise to the IL3Rαhigh subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP. Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+FLT3+ IL3Rαlow and IL3Rαhigh subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  11. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanling; Zijl, Sebastiaan; Wang, Liqin; de Groot, Daniel C; van Tol, Maarten J; Lankester, Arjan C; Borst, Jannie

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclasts (OCs) originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM) by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b(-)CD34(+)c-KIT(+) BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3(+) cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (R)α(high) subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rα(high) cells also generated macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) but lacked granulocyte (GR)-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rα(low) subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP) and gave rise to the IL3Rα(high) subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP). Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b(-)CD34(+)c-KIT(+)FLT3(+) IL3Rα(low) and IL3Rα(high) subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  12. Modulation of human alveolar macrophage properties by ozone exposure in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, S.; Madden, M.C.; Newman, S.L.; Devlin, R.B.; Koren, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3)(0.1-1.0 ppm for 2-4 hr). The functions studied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Exposure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-dependent increase in release of prostaglandin E2(PGE2), an important modulator of inflammation, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particulate immune complexes was decreased by O3, the authors found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Superoxide (O2) production in response to phorbol ester was reduced after exposure of HAM to O3 while the basal O2 release in response to plastic adherence was not affected. Growth inhibition of the opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not affected by O3 exposure. The production of inflammatory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, compared to controls, O3-exposed HAM produced significantly lower levels of these cytokines when simulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  13. Activation of the inflammasome by (1,3)-β-glucans and trichothecene mycotoxins in human macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Kankkunen, PÀivi

    2014-01-01

    The human body is constantly exposed to a variety of microbes and their metabolites. In the early stage of an infection, the cells of innate immunity, including dendritic cells, macrophages, neutrophils and natural killer cells initiate a rapid immune response mediated via the different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed by these cells. PRRs, including membrane-bound Toll-like receptors, C-type lectin -like receptors (CLRs), and cytoplasmic NOD-like receptors (NLRs) recognize diff...

  14. Effect of size of man-made and natural mineral fibers on chemiluminescent response in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Fiber size is an important factor in the tumorigenicity of various mineral fibers and asbestos fibers in animal experiments. We examined the time course of the ability to induce lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) from human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to Japan Fibrous Material standard reference samples (glass wool, rock wool, micro glass fiber, two types of refractory ceramic fiber, refractory mullite fiber, potassium titanium whisker, silicon carbide whisker, titanium oxide...

  15. Immunomodulatory properties of Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates from the human small intestine microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartholomeus van den Bogert

    Full Text Available The human small intestine is a key site for interactions between the intestinal microbiota and the mucosal immune system. Here we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of representative species of commonly dominant small-intestinal microbial communities, including six streptococcal strains (four Streptococcus salivarius, one S. equinus, one S. parasanguinis one Veillonella parvula strain, one Enterococcus gallinarum strain, and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 as a bench mark strain on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. The different streptococci induced varying levels of the cytokines IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-12p70, while the V. parvula strain showed a strong capacity to induce IL-6. E. gallinarum strain was a potent inducer of cytokines and TLR2/6 signalling. As Streptococcus and Veillonella can potentially interact metabolically and frequently co-occur in ecosystems, immunomodulation by pair-wise combinations of strains were also tested for their combined immunomodulatory properties. Strain combinations induced cytokine responses in dendritic cells that differed from what might be expected on the basis of the results obtained with the individual strains. A combination of (some streptococci with Veillonella appeared to negate IL-12p70 production, while augmenting IL-8, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α responses. This suggests that immunomodulation data obtained in vitro with individual strains are unlikely to adequately represent immune responses to mixtures of gut microbiota communities in vivo. Nevertheless, analysing the immune responses of strains representing the dominant species in the intestine may help to identify immunomodulatory mechanisms that influence immune homeostasis.

  16. Modeling the human intestinal mucin (MUC2) C-terminal cystine knot dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivan, Vatsala D; Narpala, Sandeep R; Budil, David E; Sacco, Albert; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2011-11-01

    Intestinal mucus, a viscous secretion that lines the mucosa, is believed to be a barrier to absorption of many therapeutic compounds and carriers, and is known to play an important physiological role in controlling pathogen invasion. Nevertheless, there is as yet no clear understanding of the barrier properties of mucus, such as the nature of the molecular interactions between drug molecules and mucus components as well as those that govern gel formation. Secretory mucins, large and complex glycoprotein molecules, are the principal determinants of the viscoelastic properties of intestinal mucus. Despite the important role that mucins play in controlling transport and in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, their structures remain poorly characterized. The major intestinal secretory mucin gene, MUC2, has been identified and fully sequenced. The present study was undertaken to determine a detailed structure of the cysteine-rich region within the C-terminal end of human intestinal mucin (MUC2) via homology modeling, and explore possible configurations of a dimer of this cysteine-rich region, which may play an important role in governing mucus gel formation. Based on sequence-structure alignments and three-dimensional modeling, a cystine knot tertiary structure homologous to that of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is predicted at the C-terminus of MUC2. Dimers of this C-terminal cystine knot (CTCK) were modeled using sequence alignment based on HCG and TGF-beta, followed by molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. Results support the formation of a cystine knot dimer with a structure analogous to that of HCG.

  17. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvigny, Benoît; de Wouters, Tomas; Kaci, Ghalia; Jacouton, Elsa; Delorme, Christine; Doré, Joël; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M; Guédon, Eric; Lapaque, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB) in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  18. Lysophosphatidylcholine enhances carotenoid uptake from mixed micelles by Caco-2 human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, T; Kushiro, M; Zhang, H; Nara, E; Ono, H; Nagao, A

    2001-11-01

    Despite the interest in the beneficial roles of dietary carotenoids in human health, little is known about their solubilization from foods to mixed bile micelles during digestion and the intestinal uptake from the micelles. We investigated the absorption of carotenoids solubilized in mixed micelles by differentiated Caco-2 human intestinal cells, which is a useful model for studying the absorption of dietary compounds by intestinal cells. The micelles were composed of 1 micromol/L carotenoids, 2 mmol/L sodium taurocholate, 100 micromol/L monoacylglycerol, 33.3 micromol/L fatty acid and phospholipid (0-200 micromol/L). The phospholipid content of micelles had profound effects on the cellular uptake of carotenoids. Uptake of micellar beta-carotene and lutein was greatly suppressed by phosphatidylcholine (PC) in a dose-dependent manner, whereas lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), the lipolysis product of PC by phospholipase A2 (PLA2), markedly enhanced both beta-carotene and lutein uptake. The addition of PLA2 from porcine pancreas to the medium also enhanced the uptake of carotenoids from micelles containing PC. Caco-2 cells could take up 15 dietary carotenoids, including epoxy carotenoids, such as violaxanthin, neoxanthin and fucoxanthin, from micellar carotenoids, and the uptakes showed a linear correlation with their lipophilicity, defined as the distribution coefficient in 1-octanol/water (log P(ow)). These results suggest that pancreatic PLA2 and lysoPC are important in regulating the absorption of carotenoids in the digestive tract and support a simple diffusion mechanism for carotenoid absorption by the intestinal epithelium.

  19. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  20. Downregulation of host tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO) gene restricts the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in human macrophage model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gogulamudi, Venkateswara Reddy; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Kaul, Deepak; Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    .... Recently, tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO) gene has been recognized as playing a central role in the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages by arresting the phagosome maturation process...

  1. Human intestinal acyl-CoA synthetase 5 is sensitive to the inhibitor triacsin C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elke Kaemmerer; Anne Peuscher; Andrea Reinartz; Christian Liedtke; Ralf Weiskirchen; Jürgen Kopitz; Nikolaus Gassler

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether human acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) is sensitive to the ACSL inhibitor triacsin C.METHODS: The ACSL isoforms ACSL1 and ACSL5 from rat as well as human ACSL5 were cloned and recombinantly expressed as 6xHis-tagged enzymes. Ni2+-affinity purified recombinant enzymes were assayed at pH 7.5 or pH 9.5 in the presence or absence of triacsin C. In addition, ACSL5 transfected CaCo2 cells and intestinal human mucosa were monitored. ACSL5 expression in cellular systems was verified using Western blot and immunofluorescence.The ACSL assay mix included TrisHCl (pH 7.4), ATP, CoA, EDTA, DTT, MgCl2, [9,10-3H] palmitic acid, and triton X-100. The 200 μL reaction was initiated with the addition of solubilized, purified recombinant proteins or cellular lysates. Reactions were terminated after 10, 30 or 60 min of incubation with Doles medium.RESULTS: Expression of soluble recombinant ACSL pro-teins was found after incubation with isopropyl beta-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside and after ultracentrifugatio these were further purified to near homogeneity with Ni2+-affinity chromatography. Triacsin C selectively and strongly inhibited recombinant human ACSL5 protein at pH 7.5 and pH 9.5, as well as recombinant rat ACSL1 (sensitive control), but not recombinant rat ACSL5 (insensitive control). The IC50 for human ACSL5 was about 10 μmol/L. The inhibitory triacsin C effect was similar for different incubation times (10, 30 and 60 min) and was not modified by the N- or C-terminal location of the 6xHis-tag. In order to evaluate ACSL5 sensitivity to triacsin C in a cellular environment, stable human ACSL5 CaCo2 transfectants and mechanically dissected normal human intestinal mucosa with high physiological expression of ACSL5 were analyzed. In both models, ACSL5 peak activity was found at pH 7.5 and pH 9.5, corresponding to the properties of recombinant human ACSL5 protein. In the presence of triacsin C (25 μmol/L), total ACSL activity was dramatically diminished in

  2. Unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Brozek, John [Genfit, Loos (France); Derudas, Bruno [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte [Inserm ERI-9 and Equipe d' Accueil 2693, IFR114, Universite de Lille, Lille (France); Staels, Bart, E-mail: bart.staels@pasteur-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France)

    2009-08-28

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPAR{gamma} promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPAR{beta}/{delta} in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPAR{alpha}. Here, we show that in contrast to PPAR{gamma}, expression of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  3. Effect Of α2-Adrenergic Agonists And Antagonists On Cytokine Release From Human Lung Macrophages Cultured In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, O.; Staiano, R.I.; De Robertis, E.; Conti, G.; Di Crescenzo, V.; Loffredo, S.; Marone, G.; Marinosci, G. Zito; Cataldi, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The most trusted hypothesis to explain how α2-adrenergic agonists may preserve pulmonary functions in critically ill patients is that they directly act on macrophages by interfering with an autocrine/paracrine adrenergic system that controls cytokine release through locally synthetized noradrenaline and α1- and α2-adrenoreceptors. We tested this hypothesis in primary cultures of resident macrophages from human lung (HLMs). HLMs were isolated by centrifugation on percoll gradients from macroscopically healthy human lung tissue obtained from four different patients at the time of lung resection for cancer. HLMs from these patients showed a significant expression of α2A, α2B and α2C adrenoreceptors both at the mRNA and at the protein level. To evaluate whether α2 adrenoreceptors controlled cytokine release from HMLs, we measured IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α concentrations in the culture medium in basal conditions and after preincubation with several α2-adrenergic agonists or antagonists. Neither the pretreatment with the α2-adrenergic agonists clonidine, medetomidine or dexdemetomidine or with the α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine caused significant changes in the response of any of these cytokines to LPS. These results show that, different from what reported in rodents, clonidine and dexdemetomidine do not directly suppress cytokine release from human pulmonary macrophages. This suggests that alternative mechanisms such as effects on immune cells activation or the modulation of autonomic neurotransmission could be responsible for the beneficial effects of these drugs on lung function in critical patients. PMID:27896229

  4. Establishment of an In vitro System to Study Intracellular Behavior of Candida glabrata in Human THP-1 Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Maruti Nandan; Borah, Sapan; Gorityala, Neelima; Kaur, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    A cell culture model system, if a close mimic of host environmental conditions, can serve as an inexpensive, reproducible and easily manipulatable alternative to animal model systems for the study of a specific step of microbial pathogen infection. A human monocytic cell line THP-1 which, upon phorbol ester treatment, is differentiated into macrophages, has previously been used to study virulence strategies of many intracellular pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we discuss a protocol to enact an in vitro cell culture model system using THP-1 macrophages to delineate the interaction of an opportunistic human yeast pathogen Candida glabrata with host phagocytic cells. This model system is simple, fast, amenable to high-throughput mutant screens, and requires no sophisticated equipment. A typical THP-1 macrophage infection experiment takes approximately 24 hr with an additional 24-48 hr to allow recovered intracellular yeast to grow on rich medium for colony forming unit-based viability analysis. Like other in vitro model systems, a possible limitation of this approach is difficulty in extrapolating the results obtained to a highly complex immune cell circuitry existing in the human host. However, despite this, the current protocol is very useful to elucidate the strategies that a fungal pathogen may employ to evade/counteract antimicrobial response and survive, adapt, and proliferate in the nutrient-poor environment of host immune cells. PMID:24378622

  5. Extracellular traps are associated with human and mouse neutrophil and macrophage mediated killing of larval Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne-Année, Sandra; Kerepesi, Laura A; Hess, Jessica A; Wesolowski, Jordan; Paumet, Fabienne; Lok, James B; Nolan, Thomas J; Abraham, David

    2014-06-01

    Neutrophils are multifaceted cells that are often the immune system's first line of defense. Human and murine cells release extracellular DNA traps (ETs) in response to several pathogens and diseases. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is crucial to trapping and killing extracellular pathogens. Aside from neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils also release ETs. We hypothesized that ETs serve as a mechanism of ensnaring the large and highly motile helminth parasite Strongyloides stercoralis thereby providing a static target for the immune response. We demonstrated that S. stercoralis larvae trigger the release of ETs by human neutrophils and macrophages. Analysis of NETs revealed that NETs trapped but did not kill larvae. Induction of NETs was essential for larval killing by human but not murine neutrophils and macrophages in vitro. In mice, extracellular traps were induced following infection with S. stercoralis larvae and were present in the microenvironment of worms being killed in vivo. These findings demonstrate that NETs ensnare the parasite facilitating larval killing by cells of the immune system.

  6. PLASMA AND LUNG MACROPHAGE CAROTENOID RESPONSIVENESS TO SUPPLEMENTATION AND OZONE EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE:: To examine the effect of ozone exposure and vegetable juice supplementation on plasma and lung macrophage concentrations of carotenoids. DESIGN:: A randomized trial. SETTING:: Subjects were exposed to ambient air prior to antioxidant supplementation and to ozone after...

  7. Alteration of human macrophages microRNA expression profile upon infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda Furci

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: This study signifies the miRNA host response upon intracellular mycobacterial infection in macrophages, providing new aspects of regulation in host-pathogen interactions, at post-transcriptional levels.

  8. A novel method for the culture and polarized stimulation of human intestinal mucosa explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilingiri, Katerina; Sonzogni, Angelica; Caprioli, Flavio; Rescigno, Maria

    2013-05-01

    Few models currently exist to realistically simulate the complex human intestine's micro-environment, where a variety of interactions take place. Proper homeostasis directly depends on these interactions, as they shape an entire immunological response inducing tolerance against food antigens while at the same time mounting effective immune responses against pathogenic microbes accidentally ingested with food. Intestinal homeostasis is preserved also through various complex interactions between the microbiota (including food-associated beneficial bacterial strains) and the host, that regulate the attachment/degradation of mucus, the production of antimicrobial peptides by the epithelial barrier, and the "education" of epithelial cells' that controls the tolerogenic or immunogenic phenotype of unique, gut-resident lymphoid cells' populations. These interactions have been so far very difficult to reproduce with in vitro assays using either cultured cell lines or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, mouse models differ substantially in components of the intestinal mucosa (mucus layer organization, commensal bacteria community) with respect to the human gut. Thus, studies of a variety of treatments to be brought in the clinics for important stress-related or pathological conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease or colorectal cancer have been difficult to carry out. To address these issues, we developed a novel system that enables us to stimulate explants of human intestinal mucosa that retain their in situ conditioning by the host microbiota and immune response, in a polarized fashion. Polarized apical stimulation is of great importance for the outcome of the elicited immune response. It has been repeatedly shown that the same stimuli can produce completely different responses when they bypass the apical face of the intestinal epithelium, stimulating epithelial cells basolaterally or coming into direct contact with lamina

  9. Mast cell expression of the serotonin1A receptor in guinea pig and human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Liu, Sumei; Fei, Guijun; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2013-05-15

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is released from enterochromaffin cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. We tested a hypothesis that elevation of 5-HT in the environment of enteric mast cells might degranulate the mast cells and release mediators that become paracrine signals to the enteric nervous system, spinal afferents, and secretory glands. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, ELISA, and pharmacological analysis were used to study expression of 5-HT receptors by mast cells in the small intestine and action of 5-HT to degranulate the mast cells and release histamine in guinea pig small intestine and segments of human jejunum discarded during Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Mast cells in human and guinea pig preparations expressed the 5-HT1A receptor. ELISA detected spontaneous release of histamine in guinea pig and human preparations. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-PIPAT evoked release of histamine. A selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, suppressed stimulation of histamine release by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT. Mast cell-stabilizing drugs, doxantrazole and cromolyn sodium, suppressed the release of histamine evoked by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT in guinea pig and human preparations. Our results support the hypothesis that serotonergic degranulation of enteric mast cells and release of preformed mediators, including histamine, are mediated by the 5-HT1A serotonergic receptor. Association of 5-HT with the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome) underlies a question of whether selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonists might have therapeutic application in disorders of this nature.

  10. Human intestinal parasites in non-biting synanthropic flies in Ogun State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenusi, Adedotun Adesegun; Adewoga, Thomas O Sunday

    2013-01-01

    Filth-feeding and breeding, non-biting synanthropic flies have been incriminated in the dissemination of human enteropathogens in the environment. This study determined the species of non-biting synanthropic flies associated with four filthy sites in Ilishan, Ogun State, southwest Nigeria, and assessed their potentials for mechanical transmission of human intestinal parasites. 7190 flies identified as Musca domestica (33.94%), Chrysomya megacephala (26.01%), Musca sorbens (23.23%), Lucilia cuprina (8.76%), Calliphora vicina (4.59%), Sarcophaga sp. (2.78%) and Fannia scalaris (0.70%) were examined for human intestinal parasites by the formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. Eggs of the following parasites: Ascaris lumbricoides (34.08%), Trichuris trichiura (25.87%), hookworms (20.45%), Taenia sp. (2.36%), Hymenolepis nana (1.11%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.56%), Strongyloides stercoralis (larvae; 3.89%) and cysts of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (27.26%), Entamoeba coli (22.67%), Giardia lamblia (3.34%) and Cryptosporidium sp. (1.81%) were isolated from the body surfaces and or gut contents of 75.24% of 719 pooled fly batches. The helminths A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura and the protozoans, E. histolytica/dispar and E. coli were the dominant parasites detected, both on body surfaces and in the gut contents of flies. C. megacephala was the highest carrier of parasites (diversity and number). More parasites were isolated from the gut than from body surfaces (P parasites than those from abattoir, garbage or open-air market. Synanthropic fly species identified in this study can be of potential epidemiological importance as mechanical transmitters of human intestinal parasites acquired naturally from filth and carried on their body surfaces and or in the gut, because of their vagility and feeding mechanisms.

  11. Lineage-specific expression of bestrophin-2 and bestrophin-4 in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Ito

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs regulate the absorption and secretion of anions, such as HCO3(- or Cl(-. Bestrophin genes represent a newly identified group of calcium-activated Cl(- channels (CaCCs. Studies have suggested that, among the four human bestrophin-family genes, bestrophin-2 (BEST2 and bestrophin-4 (BEST4 might be expressed within the intestinal tissue. Consistently, a study showed that BEST2 is expressed by human colonic goblet cells. However, their precise expression pattern along the gastrointestinal tract, or the lineage specificity of the cells expressing these genes, remains largely unknown. Here, we show that BEST2 and BEST4 are expressed in vivo, each in a distinct, lineage-specific manner, in human IECs. While BEST2 was expressed exclusively in colonic goblet cells, BEST4 was expressed in the absorptive cells of both the small intestine and the colon. In addition, we found that BEST2 expression is significantly down-regulated in the active lesions of ulcerative colitis, where goblet cells were depleted, suggesting that BEST2 expression is restricted to goblet cells under both normal and pathologic conditions. Consistently, the induction of goblet cell differentiation by a Notch inhibitor, LY411575, significantly up-regulated the expression of not BEST4 but BEST2 in MUC2-positive HT-29 cells. Conversely, the induction of absorptive cell differentiation up-regulated the expression of BEST4 in villin-positive Caco-2 cells. In addition, we found that the up- or down-regulation of Notch activity leads to the preferential expression of either BEST4 or BEST2, respectively, in LS174T cells. These results collectively confirmed that BEST2 and BEST4 could be added to the lineage-specific genes of humans IECs due to their abilities to clearly identify goblet cells of colonic origin and a distinct subset of absorptive cells, respectively.

  12. Human gut-on-a-chip inhabited by microbial flora that experiences intestinal peristalsis-like motions and flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Huh, Dongeun; Hamilton, Geraldine; Ingber, Donald E

    2012-06-21

    Development of an in vitro living cell-based model of the intestine that mimics the mechanical, structural, absorptive, transport and pathophysiological properties of the human gut along with its crucial microbial symbionts could accelerate pharmaceutical development, and potentially replace animal testing. Here, we describe a biomimetic 'human gut-on-a-chip' microdevice composed of two microfluidic channels separated by a porous flexible membrane coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) and lined by human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells that mimics the complex structure and physiology of living intestine. The gut microenvironment is recreated by flowing fluid at a low rate (30 μL h(-1)) producing low shear stress (0.02 dyne cm(-2)) over the microchannels, and by exerting cyclic strain (10%; 0.15 Hz) that mimics physiological peristaltic motions. Under these conditions, a columnar epithelium develops that polarizes rapidly, spontaneously grows into folds that recapitulate the structure of intestinal villi, and forms a high integrity barrier to small molecules that better mimics whole intestine than cells in cultured in static Transwell models. In addition, a normal intestinal microbe (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) can be successfully co-cultured for extended periods (>1 week) on the luminal surface of the cultured epithelium without compromising epithelial cell viability, and this actually improves barrier function as previously observed in humans. Thus, this gut-on-a-chip recapitulates multiple dynamic physical and functional features of human intestine that are critical for its function within a controlled microfluidic environment that is amenable for transport, absorption, and toxicity studies, and hence it should have great value for drug testing as well as development of novel intestinal disease models.

  13. Exenatide (a GLP-1 agonist) improves the antioxidative potential of in vitro cultured human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bułdak, Łukasz; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Bułdak, Rafał Jakub; Machnik, Grzegorz; Bołdys, Aleksandra; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages are dominant cells in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. They are also a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress, which is particularly high in subjects with diabetes, is responsible for accelerated atherosclerosis. Novel antidiabetic drugs (e.g., glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists) were shown to reduce ROS level. Therefore, we conceived a study to evaluate the influence of exenatide, a GLP-1 agonist, on redox status in human monocytes/macrophages cultured in vitro, which may explain the beneficial effects of incretin-based antidiabetic treatment. Human macrophages obtained from 10 healthy volunteers were in vitro subjected to the treatment with GLP-1 agonist (exenatide) in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), antagonist of GLP-1 receptors (exendin 9-39), or protein kinase A inhibitor (H89). Afterwards, reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde level, NADPH oxidase, and antioxidative enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase] expression was evaluated. Finally, we estimated the activity of the abovementioned enzymes in the presence of H89. According to our findings, exenatide reduced ROS and malondialdyhyde (MDA) level by decreasing the expression of ROS-generating NADPH oxidase and by increasing the expression and activities of SOD and GSH-Px. We also showed that this effect was significantly inhibited by exendin 9-39 (a GLP-1 antagonist) and blocked by H89. Exenatide improved the antioxidative potential and reduced oxidative stress in cultured human monocytes/macrophages, and this finding may be responsible for the pleiotropic effects of incretin-based therapies. This effect relied on the stimulation of GLP-1 receptor.

  14. Escherichia albertii, a novel human enteropathogen, colonizes rat enterocytes and translocates to extra-intestinal sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Denise; Hernandes, Rodrigo T.; Liberatore, Ana Maria A.; Abe, Cecilia M.; de Souza, Rodrigo B.; Romão, Fabiano T.; Sperandio, Vanessa; Koh, Ivan H.

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death of children up to five years old in the developing countries. Among the etiological diarrheal agents are atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC), one of the diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes that affects children and adults, even in developed countries. Currently, genotypic and biochemical approaches have helped to demonstrate that some strains classified as aEPEC are actually E. albertii, a recently recognized human enteropathogen. Studies on particular strains are necessary to explore their virulence potential in order to further understand the underlying mechanisms of E. albertii infections. Here we demonstrated for the first time that infection of fragments of rat intestinal mucosa is a useful tool to study the initial steps of E. albertii colonization. We also observed that an E. albertii strain can translocate from the intestinal lumen to Mesenteric Lymph Nodes and liver in a rat model. Based on our finding of bacterial translocation, we investigated how E. albertii might cross the intestinal epithelium by performing infections of M-like cells in vitro to identify the potential in vivo translocation route. Altogether, our approaches allowed us to draft a general E. albertii infection route from the colonization till the bacterial spreading in vivo. PMID:28178312

  15. Metabolism of the benzidine-based azo dye Direct Black 38 by human intestinal microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, B.W.; Cerniglia, C.E.; Federle, T.W.

    1985-07-01

    Benzidine-based azo dyes are proven mutagens and have been linked to bladder cancer. Previous studies have indicated that their initial reduction is the result of the azo reductase activity of the intestinal microbiota. Metabolism of the benzidine-based dye Direct Black 38 was examined by using a semicontinuous culture system that simulates the lumen of the human large intestine. The system was inoculated with freshly voided feces, and an active flora was maintained as evidenced by volatile fatty acid and gas production. Within 7 days after exposure to the dye, the following metabolites were isolated and identified by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry: benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl, monoacetylbenzidine, and acetylaminobiphenyl. Benzidine reached its peak level after 24 h, accounting for 39.1% of the added dye. Its level began to decline, and by day 7 the predominant metabolite was acetylaminobiphenyl, which accounted for 51.1% of the parent compound. Formation of the deaminated and N-acetylated analogs of benzidine, which have enhanced mutagenicity and lipophilicity, previously has not been attributed to the intestinal microbiota.

  16. Drug supersaturation in simulated and human intestinal fluids representing different nutritional states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevernage, Jan; Brouwers, Joachim; Clarysse, Sarah; Vertzoni, Maria; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    It was the purpose of this study to explore supersaturation of poorly soluble drugs in human intestinal fluids (HIF), and to assess potential food effects on the creation and maintenance of supersaturation. Duodenal fluids were collected from healthy volunteers and pooled according to three nutritional states (fasted-, fed-, and fat-enriched fed state). Supersaturation was created at a fixed degree of supersaturation (DS=20) using the solvent-shift method. Fasted- and fed-state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF) were used as intestinal simulation media. Supersaturation in HIF showed to be stable up to a certain degree for different poorly soluble drugs. In HIF as well as in FaSSIF and FeSSIF, supersaturation appeared to be compound and medium specific. Supersaturation stability was found to be inversely proportional to the solubility in the corresponding media. Food intake affected itraconazole supersaturation positively. On the contrary, etravirine and loviride supersaturation decreased upon food intake. Supersaturation experiments in FaSSIF and FeSSIF showed similar results as in HIF for etravirine and loviride, whereas itraconazole supersaturation behaved differently in HIF versus simulation media. The present study illustrates, for the first time, that supersaturation can be created and maintained in HIF, even in the absence of excipients. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  17. Infection with fully mature Corynosoma cf. validum causes ulcers in the human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keitaro; Ito, Takahiro; Sato, Tomonobu; Goto, Mitsuru; Kawamoto, Toru; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yoshinori; Nakao, Minoru; Hasegawa, Hideo; Fujiya, Mikihiro

    2016-06-01

    Corynosoma is a parasite that can normally be found in the intestinal tract of fish-eating mammals, particularly in seals and birds. The present case proposed that Corynosoma could attain full maturity in the human intestine. A 70-year-old female complained of abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a swelling of the intraperitoneal lymph nodes with no responsible lesion. Video capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy detected several ulcerations and one parasite in the ileum, which was tightly attached at the bottom of the ulcerations. The parasite was cylindrical and measured approximately 10 mm (long) x 3 mm (wide). Pathologically, the worm had a four-layered body wall and contained embryonated eggs. The sequences of the parasite-derived nuclear ribosomal DNA fragment and mitochondrial DNA fragment of cox1 were almost identical to those of Corynosoma validum. The patient's abdominal pain immediately improved after the administration of pyrantel pamoate (1,500 mg). Corynosoma was possibly the responsible disease in a patient who complained of abdominal pain and in whom no responsible lesion was detected by CT, gastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. Examinations of the small intestines should be aggressively performed in such cases.

  18. Bovine and soybean milk bioactive compounds: Effects on inflammatory response of human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvello, Rosa; Aresta, Antonella; Trapani, Adriana; Zambonin, Carlo; Cianciulli, Antonia; Salvatore, Rosaria; Clodoveo, Maria Lisa; Corbo, Filomena; Franchini, Carlo; Panaro, Maria Antonietta

    2016-11-01

    In this study the effects of commercial bovine and soybean milks and their bioactive compounds, namely genistein, daidzein and equol, on the inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of human intestinal Caco-2 cells were examined, in terms of nitric oxide (NO) release and inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) expression. Both milks and their bioactive compounds significantly inhibited, dose-dependently, the expression of iNOS mRNA and protein, resulting in a decreased NO production. The NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated intestinal cells was also examined. In all cases we observed that cell pre-treatment before LPS activation inhibited the IkB phosphorylation. Accordingly, quantification of bioactive compounds by solid phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography has shown that they were absorbed, metabolized and released by Caco-2 cells in culture media. In conclusion, we demonstrated that milks and compounds tested are able to reduce LPS-induced inflammatory responses from intestinal cells, interfering with NF-kB dependent molecular mechanisms.

  19. Exogenous HIV-1 Nef upsets the IFN-γ-induced impairment of human intestinal epithelial integrity.

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    Maria Giovanna Quaranta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mucosal tissues play a central role in the transmission of HIV-1 infection as well as in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Despite several clinical studies reported intestinal dysfunction during HIV infection, the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced impairments of mucosal epithelial barrier are still unclear. It has been postulated that HIV-1 alters enterocytic function and HIV-1 proteins have been detected in several cell types of the intestinal mucosa. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on human epithelial cell line. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated Caco-2 cells, as a model for homeostatic and inflamed gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. We investigated the effect of exogenous recombinant Nef on monolayer integrity analyzing its uptake, transepithelial electrical resistance, permeability to FITC-dextran and the expression of tight junction proteins. Moreover, we measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators. Exogenous Nef was taken up by Caco-2 cells, increased intestinal epithelial permeability and upset the IFN-γ-induced reduction of transepithelial resistance, interfering with tight junction protein expression. Moreover, Nef inhibited IFN-γ-induced apoptosis and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-3α production by Caco-2 cells while down-regulated IL-10 production. T