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Sample records for human interferon omega

  1. RP-HPLC determination of recombinant human interferon omega in the Pichia pastoris fermentation broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Pan, Hong-Chun; Peng, Li; Cai, Shao-Xi

    2005-07-15

    A rapid and valid reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for determination of recombinant human interferon omega (rhIFNomega) in the yeast Pichia pastoris fermentation broth was developed. The method is based on the hydrophobicity of rhIFNomega followed by RP-HPLC separation with UV detection. The chromatography analysis was performed on EC 250/4 NUCLEOSIL 300-5 C18 (250 mm x 4 mm i.d., 300 A, with a particle size of 5 microm) column. The compositions of the mobile phase A and B were 999:1 (v/v) water/TFA and 999:1 (v/v) acetonitrile/TFA at a flow rate of 1.0 ml min(-1). Detection was done by spectrophotometry at 280 nm and the column temperature was 30+/-1 degrees C. Calibration curve was linear (r=0.9986, n=7) in the range of 0.074-0.555 mg ml(-1) for rhIFNomega and the regression equation was y=2.02 x 10(6)x-1.27 x 10(5). Limit of detection for rhIFNomega was 0.053 mg ml(-1). The values of R.S.D. (%) of intra-day and inter-day precision were recovery rate of recovery experiment were <1.23 (n=3) and 97.97%.

  2. Treatment of a case of refractory feline chronic gingivostomatitis with feline recombinant interferon omega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southerden, P; Gorrel, C

    2007-02-01

    Chronic gingivostomatitis is a common debilitating disease in cats, which is often refractory to medical and surgical treatment. An eight-year-old, neutered female domestic shorthair cat with a history of gingivitis was presented with chronic gingivostomatitis. Initial treatment by extraction of all premolars and molars was unsuccessful. However, the condition resolved within six weeks of treatment with feline recombinant interferon omega (Virbagen; Virbac).

  3. AIRE gene mutations and autoantibodies to interferon omega in patients with chronic hypoparathyroidism without APECED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervato, Sara; Morlin, Luca; Albergoni, Maria Paola; Masiero, Stefano; Greggio, Nella; Meossi, Cristiano; Chen, Shu; del Pilar Larosa, Maria; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Rees Smith, Bernard; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Kämpe, Olle; Valenzise, Mariella; Betterle, Corrado

    2010-11-01

    To assess autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene mutations, class II HLA haplotypes, and organ- or non-organ-specific autoantibodies in patients with chronic hypoparathyroidism (CH) without associated Addison's disease (AD) or chronic candidiasis (CC). Twenty-four patients who had CH without AD or CC were included in the study. AIRE gene mutations in all 14 exons were studied using PCR in 24 patients, 105 healthy controls and 15 first-degree relatives of CH patients with AIRE mutations. Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) were determined for all 24 patients and 105 healthy controls. Autoantibodies to a range of antigens including NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein-5 (NALP5) and interferon omega (IFNω) were tested in all 24 patients. AIRE gene mutations were found in 6 of 24 (25%) patients, all females, and this was significantly higher (P AIRE mutations found in healthy controls (2/105). Three patients (12·5%) had homozygous AIRE mutations characteristic of Autoimmune-Poly-Endocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal-Dystrophy and all three were also positive for IFNω-autoantibodies. Three patients (12·5%) had heterozygous AIRE mutations; two of these were novel mutations. One of the patients with heterozygous AIRE mutations was positive for both NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 5 and IFNω autoantibodies. Heterozygous AIRE mutations were found in 10 of 15 first-degree relatives of CH patients with AIRE mutations, although none was affected by CH. Class II HLA haplotypes were not statistically different in patients with CH compared to healthy controls. Analysis of AIRE gene mutations together with serum autoantibody profile should be helpful in the assessment of patients with CH, in particular young women with associated autoimmune diseases. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Oral and subcutaneous therapy of canine atopic dermatitis with recombinant feline interferon omega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzlbauer, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-03-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a common allergic skin disease that has been treated with subcutaneously administered interferons (IFN). Recombinant feline IFN-ω (rFeIFN-ω) was reported to be efficacious for CAD. Whether dogs develop neutralizing antibodies against rFeIFN-ω during long-term treatment and whether orally administered IFNs are efficacious in CAD is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential development of antibodies against rFeIFN-ω in atopic dogs and to compare subcutaneous and oral IFN therapy. Twenty-six atopic dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group (n=15) received eight subcutaneous injections of rFeIFN-ω (Virbagen® omega, Virbac, Carros, France) over four months, the second group (n=11) received rFeIFN-ω daily orally. Concurrent medication was permitted, except systemically acting glucocorticoids and cyclosporin, which had to be withdrawn at least two weeks prior to the study. Serum samples for antibody detection were collected before and after the study. On days 0, 60 and 120 skin lesions and pruritus were evaluated using a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index=CADESI) and a validated pruritus score. Concurrent medications were recorded. For every visit a total score, consisting of CADESI, pruritus score and medication score was created. For antibody detection an indirect ELISA, using Virbagen® omega as antigen, was performed. Comparison of pruritus scores, CADESI and total scores between days 0 and 120 showed improvement in both groups, however, significant improvement could only be detected in the oral group with CADESI and total scores (61%, P=0.04 and 36%, P=0.02 respectively). Serum antibodies against rFeIFN-ω could not be detected in any of the dogs. In this study antibody production could not be demonstrated. It suggests better efficacy with oral IFN administration, which should be further verified in larger, randomized, controlled studies.

  5. The Use of Recombinant Feline Interferon Omega Therapy as an Immune-Modulator in Cats Naturally Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Oliveira Leal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are well-known cytokines that, among their main functions, are key components of the host immune response against viral infections. Due to its immune modulation properties, they are commonly used in the therapeutic approach of various retroviral infections, namely human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV. In HIV infection, it has been shown that IFN therapy limits early viral replication, particularly useful on post-exposure prophylaxis. In veterinary medicine, recombinant feline interferon omega (rFeIFN-ω was the first interferon licensed for use in cats. Several studies have recently shown that this compound seems to stimulate the innate immunity, decreasing clinical signs and co-infections in naturally FIV-infected cats. More than summarizing the main conclusions about rFeIFN-ω in cats, this review emphasizes the immune-modulation properties of IFN therapy, opening new perspectives for its use in retroviral infections. Either in FIV-infected cats or in HIV individuals, type I IFNs seem to induce an innate immune-modulation and should not be overlooked as a therapeutic option in retroviral infections.

  6. OMEGA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA由路易士·勃兰特始创于1848年,1892年,OMEGA推出全球第一块打簧手表,两年后,生产了举世闻名的OMEGA19令机芯。这一机芯的制造融会了当时革命性的瑞士首屈一指的制表厂商。OMEGA是希腊字母中最后一个,具有完美、成就、美轮美奂和卓越之意。从那时起,OMEGA以其先进科技结合卓越制表艺术,稳占表坛领导地位,创造无数骄人成就。

  7. Curcumin and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Enhance NK Cell-Induced Apoptosis of Pancreatic Cancer Cells but Curcumin Inhibits Interferon-γ Production: Benefits of Omega-3 with Curcumin against Cancer

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    Milan Fiala

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available STAT-3 and STAT-1 signaling have opposite effects in oncogenesis with STAT-3 acting as an oncogene and STAT-1 exerting anti-oncogenic activities through interferon-γ and interferon-α. The cytokine IL-6 promotes oncogenesis by stimulation of NFκB and STAT-3 signaling. Curcuminoids have bi-functional effects by blocking NFκB anti-apoptotic signaling but also blocking anti-oncogenic STAT-1 signaling and interferon-γ production. In our recent study (unpublished work [1] in pancreatic cancer cell cultures, curcuminoids enhanced cancer cell apoptosis both directly and by potentiating natural killer (NK cell cytotoxic function. The cytotoxic effects of curcuminoids were increased by incubation of cancer cells and NK cells in an emulsion with omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants (Smartfish, which enhanced cancer cell apoptosis and protected NK cells against degradation. However, as also shown by others, curcuminoids blocked interferon-γ production by NK cells. The combined use of curcuminoids and omega-3 in cancer immunotherapy will require deeper understanding of their in vivo interactions with the immune system.

  8. Oxidation of Marine Omega-3 Supplements and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. Albert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine omega-3 rich oils are used by more than a third of American adults for a wide range of purported benefits including prevention of cardiovascular disease. These oils are highly prone to oxidation to lipid peroxides and other secondary oxidation products. Oxidized oils may have altered biological activity making them ineffective or harmful, though there is also evidence that some beneficial effects of marine oils could be mediated through lipid peroxides. To date, human clinical trials have not reported the oxidative status of the trial oil. This makes it impossible to understand the importance of oxidation to efficacy or harm. However, animal studies show that oxidized lipid products can cause harm. Oxidation of trial oils may be responsible for the conflicting omega-3 trial literature, including the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The oxidative state of an oil can be simply determined by the peroxide value and anisidine value assays. We recommend that all clinical trials investigating omega-3 harms or benefits report the results of these assays; this will enable better understanding of the benefits and harms of omega-3 and the clinical importance of oxidized supplements.

  9. Oral Recombinant Feline Interferon-Omega as an alternative immune modulation therapy in FIV positive cats: clinical and laboratory evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, S; Leal, R O; McGahie, D; Sepúlveda, N; Duarte, A; Niza, M M R E; Tavares, L

    2014-02-01

    Recombinant-Feline Interferon-Omega (rFeIFN-ω) is an immune-modulator licensed for use subcutaneously in Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV) therapy. Despite oral protocols have been suggested, little is known about such use in FIV-infected cats. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical improvement, laboratory findings, concurrent viral excretion and acute phase proteins (APPs) in naturally FIV-infected cats under oral rFeIFN-ω therapy (0.1 MU/cat rFeIFN-ω PO, SID, 90 days). 11 FIV-positive cats were treated with oral rFeIFN-ω (PO Group). Results were compared to previous data from 7 FIV-positive cats treated with the subcutaneous licensed protocol (SC Group). Initial clinical scores were similar in both groups. Independently of the protocol, rFeIFN-ω induced a significant clinical improvement of treated cats. Concurrent viral excretion and APP's variation were not significant in the PO Group. Oral rFeIFN-ω can be an effective alternative therapy for FIV-infected cats, being also an option for treatment follow-up in cats submitted to the licensed protocol.

  10. Limited efficacy of topical recombinant feline interferon-omega for treatment of cats with acute upper respiratory viral disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballin, Anne C; Schulz, Bianka; Helps, Christopher; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Mueller, Ralf S; Hartmann, Katrin

    2014-12-01

    Despite a lack of controlled studies confirming its efficacy, recombinant feline interferon-omega (rfeIFN-ω) is used in the treatment of feline upper respiratory tract disease (FURTD), which is usually caused by feline calicivirus (FCV) or feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1). The aims of the present study were to investigate whether administration of rfeIFN-ω improves clinical signs in cats with acute FURTD and whether this treatment reduces shedding of FCV. Thirty-seven cats affected with acute FURTD were recruited into a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. The presence of FCV and/or FHV-1 was determined by performing quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on oropharyngeal and conjunctival swabs. Cats were randomly assigned to treatment groups, receiving either placebo or rfeIFN-ω (2.5 MU/kg) subcutaneously, followed by 0.5 MU topically at 8-h intervals via the conjunctiva, intranasally, and orally for 21 days. All cats received additional treatment with antibiotics, expectorants, and inhalation of nebulised physiological saline with camomile. Clinical signs and FCV shedding were evaluated over 42 days. All cats demonstrated improvement in clinical signs during the course of the study, with no significant difference in any of the assessed variables when comparing the two groups. FCV copy numbers decreased more rapidly in cats receiving rfeIFN-ω. Treatment with rfeIFN-ω was not effective in ameliorating clinical signs of acute viral FURTD compared to placebo, but might accelerate a reduction in FCV load in infected cats.

  11. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-06

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  12. Interferon

    CERN Multimedia

    De Somer,P

    1975-01-01

    Le Prof.Pierre de Somer est né en Belgique et a fait ses études de médecine à l'Université de Louvin où il a obtenu en 1942 son diplôme. En 1961 il a été nommé professeur ordinaire d'hygiène et de microbiologie à cette même Université et depuis 1967 il est recteur de l'Université catholique flamande de Louvin, président de la société belge de microbiologie et expert de l'O.M.S. Il nous parle de l'interferon et de ses perspectives dans le traitement de maladies virales avec présentation des clichées.

  13. Posttranscriptional control of human gamma interferon gene expression in transfected mouse fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Human gamma interferon genomic DNA was introduced into NIH 3T3 fibroblasts by calcium phosphate precipitation and was not expressed in these cells at the cytoplasmic mRNA or protein level. Treatment of the transfected cells with cycloheximide (1 microgram/ml) induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic gamma interferon mRNA and biologically active human gamma interferon. Analysis of the nuclear enriched RNA from untreated cells indicated that human gamma interferon mRNA was present, suggesting th...

  14. Evaluation of the effects of omega-3 & interferon alpha-2b administration on partial bladder outlet obstruction in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firat, Fatih; Uluocak, Nihat; Erdemir, Fikret; Atilgan, Dogan; Markoc, Fatma; Parlaktas, Bekir Suha; Yasar, Adem

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: In bladder outlet obstruction-induced rat models, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and collagen ratios have been shown to be increased. Increased TGF-β leads to fibrosis. In this study, the effect of omega-3 and interferon alpha-2b (IFN α-2b) was investigated on oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis in bladder structure in a partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) rat model. Methods: A total of 35 male Wistar albino rats, weighing 300-350 g, were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into five groups. At the end of the experimental period, bladders were harvested from all the rats, and pathological analysis of the rat bladder tissues was performed. In addition, investigations were carried out with enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems to study the antioxidant properties of omega-3 fatty acid and IFN alpha-2b. Results: Increased bladder weight in the PBOO group, in comparison to the control group, was decreased by the administration of omega-3 and IFN α-2b (P=0.002). Significantly higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were detected in group 2 in comparison to the control group. It was also detected that serum SOD, glutathione peroxidase and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly higher in group 2 when compared to the control group (P<0.05). In the pathologic evaluation, group 2 showed significantly increased inflammation and fibrosis compared to the control group. Omega-3 treatment significantly decreased inflammation. It was shown that IFN α-2b application partially decreased inflammation. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of the present study showed that in addition to the standard primary approaches to prevent the damage to the upper urinary tract secondary to PBOO, omega-3 fatty acid and IFN α-2b could be beneficial as adjunct treatment in clinical practice. However, this needs to be further investigated with prospective, randomized clinical trials with larger sample sizes

  15. Sensitivity of Selected Arenaviruses to a Human Interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-25

    AUSTRAC ? (Coat~oue do reviers t-d ner..eemy and Idenify by block number) -sessment of arenavirus sensitivities to an interferon (IF) of human cell...plays a determinant role in the outcome of infection with these viruses. However, at the same time, these results do not ruLe out the possibility that... role in the eventual outcome of the cellular infectious process. In arenavirus-cell interactions, where IF synthesis is induced either upon primary

  16. Omega-3: a link between global climate change and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jing X

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, global climate change has been shown to detrimentally affect many biological and environmental factors, including those of marine ecosystems. In particular, global climate change has been linked to an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide, UV irradiation, and ocean temperatures, resulting in decreased marine phytoplankton growth and reduced synthesis of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Marine phytoplankton are the primary producers of omega-3 PUFAs, which are essential nutrients for normal human growth and development and have many beneficial effects on human health. Thus, these detrimental effects of climate change on the oceans may reduce the availability of omega-3 PUFAs in our diets, exacerbating the modern deficiency of omega-3 PUFAs and imbalance of the tissue omega-6/omega-3 PUFA ratio, which have been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disease. This article provides new insight into the relationship between global climate change and human health by identifying omega-3 PUFA availability as a potentially important link, and proposes a biotechnological strategy for addressing the potential shortage of omega-3 PUFAs in human diets resulting from global climate change.

  17. Preventive effects of omega-3 and omega-6 Fatty acids on peroxide mediated oxidative stress responses in primary human trabecular meshwork cells.

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    Theofilos Tourtas

    Full Text Available Pathologic processes in glaucoma include increased apoptosis, accumulation of extracellular material in the trabecular meshwork and optic nerve, condensations of the cytoskeleton and precocious cellular senescence. Oxidative stress was shown to generate these alterations in primary ocular cells. Fatty acids omega-3 and -6 are alleged to constitute a prophylaxis against these deleterious effects. Here, we tested actual preventive effects omega-3 and -6 against peroxide induced stress responses in primary human trabecular meshwork cells. Changes of mitochondrial activity, proliferation, heat shock proteins, extracellular matrix components, and inflammatory markers were evaluated. Alterations of the cytoskeleton were evaluated by phalloidin labeling. Here we report a repressive effect of omega-6 on metabolic activity and proliferation, which was not detected for omega-3. Both agents were able to prevent the anti-proliferative effect of H₂O₂, but only omega-3 prevented metabolic repression. Expression of heat shock protein 27 was unaltered by both fatty acids, whereas heat shock protein 90 was significantly induced by both. Omega-6 increased fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor synthesis, as well as the amount of secreted fibronectin. Omega-3, instead, induced plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 synthesis. H₂O₂ further increased fibronectin production in omega-6 supplemented cells, which was not the case in omega-3 treated cells. H₂O₂ stimulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and connective tissue growth factor was repressed by both fatty acids. Both fatty acids appeared to abolish H₂O₂ mediated stimulation of nuclear factor κB and IL-6, but not IL-1α and IL-8. H₂O₂ induced formation of cross-linked actin networks and stress fibers, which was reduced by preemptive application of omega-3. Omega-6, in contrast, had no protective effect on that, and even seemed to promote condensation. Based on the observed side

  18. Computer simulations of human interferon gamma mutated forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilkova, E.; Litov, L.; Petkov, P.; Petkov, P.; Markov, S.; Ilieva, N.

    2010-01-01

    In the general framework of the computer-aided drug design, the method of molecular-dynamics simulations is applied for investigation of the human interferon-gamma (hIFN-γ) binding to its two known ligands (its extracellular receptor and the heparin-derived oligosaccharides). A study of 100 mutated hIFN-γ forms is presented, the mutations encompassing residues 86-88. The structural changes are investigated by comparing the lengths of the α-helices, in which these residues are included, in the native hIFN-γ molecule and in the mutated forms. The most intriguing cases are examined in detail.

  19. A novel interferon-inducible domain: structural and functional analysis of the human interferon regulatory factor 1 gene promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned and functionally characterized the human interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) gene promoter. The promoter contains a CpG island, with several GC boxes, a CAAT box, but no TATA box. IRF-1 mRNA is strongly induced by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) but more weakly and transiently by IFN-alpha. There are several putative kappa B motifs and numerous AA(G/A)G(G/T)A and GAAANN motifs throughout the promoter. The IRF-1 promoter is not autoregulated by the IRF-1 gene product. IFN induci...

  20. Enhanced expression of beta2-microglobulin and HLA antigens on human lymphoid cells by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, I; Hokland, M; Berg, K

    1979-01-01

    Mononuclear cells from the blood of healthy normal humans were kept in cultures under nonstimulating conditions for 16 hr in the presence or absence of human interferon. The relative quantities of HLA antigens and beta(2)-microglobulin on the cultured cells were determined by quantitative...... was observed on B- and T-enriched lymphocyte populations and was found to be dose dependent with the optimum with "physiological" concentrations of interferon. Pretreatment of lymphocytes with interferon for 2 hr was found to be as effective as having interferon present during the total culture period...

  1. Secretion of human interferon alpha 2b by Streptomyces lividans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimienta, E; Fando, R; Sánchez, J C; Vallin, C

    2002-02-01

    Biologically active human interferon alpha 2b (HuIFNalpha-2b) was secreted into the culture medium by Streptomyces lividans transformed with recombinant plasmids coding for HuIFNalpha-2b fused to the Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 lipase A signal sequence. Levels were low, 15 or 100 ng/ml, depending on the plasmid used. Neither processed nor unprocessed HuIFNalpha-2b was detected in cell lysates of the transformants secreting the recombinant product. However, the secreted recombinant product was found to partially degrade when cultures reached the stationary phase by the action of an, as yet, unidentified mycelium-associated factor. Experimental evidence suggests that the degrading factor is related to mycelium-associated proteolytic activity.

  2. 78 FR 46593 - Prospective Grant of Start-up Exclusive License: Kits for the Detection of Human Interferon-Alpha...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... the Detection of Human Interferon-Alpha Subtypes and Allotypes AGENCY: National Institutes of Health...-2008/0), titled ``Compositions for Detecting Human Interferon- Alpha Subtypes and Methods of Use'', to.... This technology relates to use of kits for the detection of human interferon-alpha subtypes and...

  3. Effects of Maternal Supplementation With Omega-3 Precursors on Human Milk Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurier, Evelyne; Rigourd, Virginie; Perez, Paul; Buffin, Rachel; Couedelo, Leslie; Vaysse, Carole; Belcadi, Wafae; Sitta, Rémi; Nacka, Fabienne; Lamireau, Delphine; Cambonie, Gilles; Picaud, Jean-Charles; Billeaud, Claude

    2017-05-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) are important for newborn neurosensory development. Supplementation of breastfeeding mothers' diets with omega-3 PUFAs, such as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), may increase their concentration in human milk. Research aim: This study aimed to assess human milk composition after 15-day supplementation regimens containing either omega-3 PUFAs or olive oil, which does not provide ALA. A multicenter factorial randomized trial was conducted with four groups of breastfeeding women, with each group containing 19 to 22 women. After a 15-day ALA washout period, three groups received supplementation with omega-3 precursors for 15 days: an enriched margarine (M), a rapeseed oil (R), and a margarine and rapeseed oil (MR). The fourth was unexposed to omega-3 precursors (olive oil control diet, O). After 15 days, blind determination of human milk fatty acid (FA) composition was assessed by gas chromatography, and the FA composition was compared among groups using variance analyses. Alpha-linolenic acid content, expressed as the mean (standard deviation) total human milk FA percentage, was significantly higher after diet supplementation with omega-3 PUFAs, with values of 2.2% (0.7%) (MR), 1.3% (0.5%) (R), 1.1% (0.4%) (M), and 0.8% (0.3%) (O at D30) ( p milk and generated the most favorable LA-ALA ratio for LC-PUFA synthesis.

  4. Susceptibility of feline herpesvirus 1 and a feline calicivirus to feline interferon and recombinant human leukocyte interferons.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Burge, L J

    1985-01-01

    Feline lung monolayer cultures were treated with either a feline interferon (IFN) or one of two recombinant human alpha-IFNs and then challenged with feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (F-9 strain), or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with these IFNs reduced the viral yield for each of these three viruses as compared with that of control cultures. Vesicular stomatitis virus was more sensitive to each IFN than were FHV-1 or feline calicivirus F-9.

  5. Susceptibility of feline herpesvirus 1 and a feline calicivirus to feline interferon and recombinant human leukocyte interferons.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Burge, L J

    1985-01-01

    Feline lung monolayer cultures were treated with either a feline interferon (IFN) or one of two recombinant human alpha-IFNs and then challenged with feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (F-9 strain), or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with these IFNs reduced the viral yield for each of these three viruses as compared with that of control cultures. Vesicular stomatitis virus was more sensitive to each IFN than were FHV-1 or feline calicivirus F-9.

  6. [Gamma interferon induced in human leukocytes by phytohemagglutinin: its production and biological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielescu, G; Maniu, H; Georgescu, T; Cajal, N

    1988-01-01

    Human gamma type interferon (IFN) preparations were obtained through phytohemagglutinin stimulation of leukocytes from the peripheral blood. Biological value of these preparations varied between 160 u and 800 u/ml, depending on leukocyte incubation medium, culture system and inductor conservation. The rising of the antiviral activity through association between gamma (3 u) and alpha (27 u) interferons was revealed by the virus quantity reduction (in this case the vesicular stomatitis virus was used) during a 24-hour multiplication cycle. The protection ensured by the mixture of the two types of interferon was about ten times higher than the additive effect of the two preparations. Study of the antiproliferative activity of a gamma interferon preparation was conducted on two human cell lines of tumoral origin (T-10 from a glioblastoma, and HEp-2) and revealed the difficulties to quantify precisely this property of the crude gamma interferon preparations.

  7. Omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids in human and animal health: an African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, B S; Bosire, R V; Deckelbaum, R J

    2014-12-01

    Lipids are essential for plant and animal development, growth and nutrition and play critical roles in health and reproduction. The dramatic increase in the human population has put increasing pressure on human food sources, especially of those sources of food which contain adequate levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and more importantly, sources of food which have favorable ratios of the n-3 (18-carbon, α-linolenic acid, ALA) to n-6 (18-carbon linoleic acid, LA) PUFAs. Recent studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of the n-3 PUFAs in diets as well as potentially negative effects of excessive levels of n-6 PUFAs in diets. This review discusses these human health issues relating to changes in diets based on environmental and industrial changes as well as strategies in East Africa for improving lipid composition of food using indigenous sources.

  8. MOLECULAR CLONING AND HETEROLOGOUS EXPRESSION OF HUMAN INTERFERON ALPHA2b GENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Made Artika

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human alpha Interferons (hIFNα have been shown to have antiviral, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The human interferon alpha2b (hIFNα2b, is one of the human interferon alpha2 sub variants, naturally synthesized as a polypeptide of 188 amino acid residues, the first 23 residues of which represents a signal peptide. In the present study, the hIFNα2b gene was expressed after being fused with Glutathione S-Transferase (GST gene. The hIFNα2b gene was amplified from human genomic DNA by using a pair of specific primers, cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector and expressed in E. coli cells under the direction of the tac promoter. The expressed protein was purified using a one-step affinity chromatography column containing immobilized gluthatione-bound resin. The purified protein was shown to react specifically with anti-human-interferon-alpha antibody, confirming that the protein was the human interferon alpha molecule. This strategy has the potential to be used as an alternative mean for production of pure human interferon α proteins for therapeutic purposes and for further studies on their molecular characterization and mechanism of action.

  9. Enhanced expression of beta2-microglobulin and HLA antigens on human lymphoid cells by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, I; Hokland, M; Berg, K

    1979-01-01

    Mononuclear cells from the blood of healthy normal humans were kept in cultures under nonstimulating conditions for 16 hr in the presence or absence of human interferon. The relative quantities of HLA antigens and beta(2)-microglobulin on the cultured cells were determined by quantitative...... immunofluorescence (fluorescence-activated cell sorter) and by the capacity of cells to absorb out cytotoxic antibodies against the relevant antigens. Interferons of different origin and purities enhanced the expression of HLA antigens and beta(2)-microglobulins, whereas membrane immunoglobulins and antigens...... recognized by antiserum raised against human brain and T cells were the same on interferon-treated and control cells. Similar interferon effects were observed on an Epstein-Barrvirus-negative Burkitt lymphoma cell line. The enhanced expression of histocompatibility antigen subsequent to intereferon treatment...

  10. The use of oral recombinant feline interferon omega in two cats with type II diabetes mellitus and concurrent feline chronic gingivostomatitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Rodolfo O; Gil, Solange; Brito, Maria Tv; McGahie, David; Niza, Maria Mre; Tavares, Luís

    2013-10-23

    Feline Chronic Gingivostomatitis Syndrome (FCGS) is a common disease in clinical practice. Among the therapeutic options available, long-acting corticosteroids are frequently used due to their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Although they may improve the clinical symptoms, they can lead to a progressive form of the disease that becomes refractory to treatment. Furthermore, their direct relationship with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) is well known. Consequently, these drugs are controversial and not recommended for routine management of FCGS. Recombinant feline interferon-omega (rFeIFN-ω) is an immunomodulatory compound. Recently, its daily oral administration has been shown to be successful in treating refractory cases of FCGS. This case study describes two clinical cases of type II DM complicated by FCGS. Both animals were calicivirus positive and they had been previously treated with long-acting corticosteroids, which may have been the major cause of DM. The two cats were treated with glargine insulin (Lantus, starting dose 1 IU/cat twice daily (BID)), achieving remission 10 and 18 weeks later respectively. Considering the difficulty with control of FCGS in these animals, an oral daily dose of rFeIFN-ω was started as an alternative to long-acting corticosteroids. In both cats oral clinical signs gradually improved and 60 days after the start of therapy the owners reported a significant relief of pain during mastication. According to the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report that describes the successful use of rFeIFN-ω in the management of FCGS in type II diabetic cats, in which long-acting corticosteroids are contraindicated.

  11. Inhibition of growth of Toxoplasma gondii in cultured fibroblasts by human recombinant gamma interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, E R; Guyre, P M

    1984-01-01

    The growth of Toxoplasma gondii in cultured human fibroblasts was inhibited by recombinant human gamma interferon at concentrations of 8 to 16 U/ml. The interferon was titrated by observing a total inhibition of parasite plaque formation 7 days after infection. Inhibition of the growth of T. gondii in the early days after infection was measured by marked reductions in the incorporation of radioactive uracil, a precursor that can only be used by the parasites. This assay showed that when cells were pretreated with gamma interferon for 1 day and then infected, inhibition of T. gondii growth could be readily detected 1 or 2 days after infection. When the pretreatment was omitted and parasites and gamma interferon were added at the same time, no inhibition of parasite growth could be detected 1 day later, although it was apparent after 2 days. Cultures from which the gamma interferon had been removed by washing after a 1-day treatment showed inhibition of T. gondii growth. Gamma interferon had no effect on the viability of extracellular parasites, but it did inhibit the synthesis of host cell RNA and protein by ca. 50% 3 days after treatment. This degree of inhibition is unlikely, of itself, to compromise the growth of T. gondii. Recombinant alpha and beta interferons had no effect on the growth of T. gondii. Images PMID:6425215

  12. Fishy Business: Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Zinc Transporters and Free Zinc Availability in Human Neuronal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Damitha De Mel; Cenk Suphioglu

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA...

  13. Interferon-γ induces senescence in normal human melanocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suiquan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interferon-γ (IFN-γ plays an important role in the proceedings of vitiligo through recruiting lymphocytes to the lesional skin. However, the potential effects of IFN-γ on skin melanocytes and the subsequent contribution to the vitiligo pathogenesis are still unclear. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of IFN-γ on viability and cellular functions of melanocytes. METHODS: Primary human melanocytes were treated with IFN-γ. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle melanin content and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level were measured. mRNA expression was examined by real-time PCR. The release of interleukin 6 (IL-6 and heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70 was monitored by ELISA. β-galactosidase staining was utilized to evaluate melanocyte senescence. RESULTS: Persistent IFN-γ treatment induced viability loss, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence in melanocytes. Melanocyte senescence was characterized as the changes in pigmentation and morphology, as well as the increase of β-galactosidase activity. Increase of p21Cip1/Waf1 protein was evident in melanocytes after IFN-γ treatment. IFN-γ induction of senescence was attenuated by siRNAs against p21, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 or signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1, but not by JAK1 siRNA nor by p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α. IFN-γ treatment increased the accumulation of intracellular ROS in melanocytes, while ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC effectively inhibited IFN-γ induced p21 expression and melanocyte senescence. IL-6 and HSP-70 release was significantly induced by IFN-γ treatment, which was largely inhibited by NAC. The increase of IL-6 and HSP-70 release could also be observed in senescent melanocytes. CONCLUSION: IFN-γ can induce senescence in melanocytes and consequently enhance their immuno-competency, leading to a vitiligo-prone milieu.

  14. The tiers and dimensions of evasion of the type I interferon response by human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Lisi; Verweij, Marieke C; DeFilippis, Victor R

    2013-12-13

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a member of the β-herpesvirus family that invariably occupies hosts for life despite a consistent multi-pronged antiviral immune response that targets the infection. This persistence is enabled by the large viral genome that encodes factors conferring a wide assortment of sophisticated, often redundant phenotypes that disable or otherwise manipulate impactful immune effector processes. The type I interferon system represents a first line of host defense against infecting viruses. The physiological reactions induced by secreted interferon act to effectively block replication of a broad spectrum of virus types, including HCMV. As such, the virus must exhibit counteractive mechanisms to these responses that involve their inhibition, tolerance, or re-purposing. The goal of this review is to describe the impact of the type I interferon system on HCMV replication and to showcase the number and diversity of strategies employed by the virus that allow infection of hosts in the presence of interferon-dependent activity.

  15. Selective effects of alpha interferon on human T-lymphocyte subsets during mixed lymphocyte cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Hokland, P; Heron, I

    1983-01-01

    Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) cultures of human lymphocyte subsets with or without the addition of physiological doses of human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) were compared with respect to surface marker phenotypes and proliferative capacities of the responder cells. A selective depression on the T...

  16. LGP2 downregulates interferon production during infection with seasonal human influenza A viruses that activate interferon regulatory factor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malur, Meghana; Gale, Michael; Krug, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    LGP2, a member of the RIG-I-like receptor family, lacks the amino-terminal caspase activation recruitment domains (CARDs) required for initiating the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and interferon (IFN) transcription. The role of LGP2 in virus infection is controversial, and the only LGP2 experiments previously carried out with mammalian influenza A viruses employed an attenuated, mouse-adapted H1N1 A/PR/8/34 (PR8) virus that does not encode the NS1 protein. Here we determine whether LGP2 has a role during infection with wild-type, nonattenuated influenza A viruses that have circulated in the human population, specifically two types of seasonal influenza A viruses: (i) H3N2 and H1N1 viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription and (ii) recent H1N1 viruses that block these two activations. In human cells infected with an H3N2 virus that activates IRF3, overexpression of LGP2 or its repressor domain decreased STAT1 activation and IFN-β transcription approximately 10-fold. Overexpression of LGP2 also caused a 10-fold decrease of STAT1 activation during infection with other seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3. Using LGP2(+/+) and LGP2(-/-) mouse cells, we show that endogenous LGP2 decreased IFN production during H3N2 virus infection 3- to 4-fold. In contrast, in both mouse and human cells infected with H1N1 viruses that do not activate IRF3, LGP2 had no detectable role. These results demonstrate that LGP2 downregulates IFN production during infection by seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription. It is intriguing that LGP2, a host protein induced during influenza A virus infection, downregulates the host antiviral IFN response.

  17. 13 native human interferon-alpha species assessed for immunoregulatory properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, I; Hokland, M; Berg, K

    1983-01-01

    Human leukocytes treated with Sendai virus yield interferon predominantly of the alpha-type (HuIFN-alpha). Successful attempts to purify these "native" species have been performed and the final analysis, which included an SDS-PAGE disclosed 13 stained and separated IFN-proteins in the molecular w...

  18. Increased expression of beta 2-microglobulin and histocompatibility antigens on human lymphoid cells induced by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Heron, I; Berg, K

    1982-01-01

    Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of interferon for various incubation periods. Subsequently, the amount of beta 2-Microglobulin and HLA-A, B and C surface antigens was estimated by means of quantitative immunofluorescence (flow c...

  19. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in aloe vera

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed a system for transgenic expression of proteins in Aloe Vera. Using this approach we have generated plants expressing the human gene interferon alpha 2, IFNa2. IFNa2 is a small secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the body’s immune response to viral infections a...

  20. Increased expression of beta 2-microglobulin and histocompatibility antigens on human lymphoid cells induced by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Heron, I; Berg, K

    1982-01-01

    Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of interferon for various incubation periods. Subsequently, the amount of beta 2-Microglobulin and HLA-A, B and C surface antigens was estimated by means of quantitative immunofluorescence (flow...... cytofluorometry) and by a radioimmunoassay for beta 2-Microglobulin. It was found that the amounts of these MHC antigens increased in a dose and time-dependent way after interferon treatment. Furthermore, the influence of different temperatures on this IFN-induced increase in beta 2-Microglobulin was gradually...... enhanced after incubation at 37 degrees C to 39 degrees C incubation mostly suppressed the beta 2-Microglobulin increase observed at 39 degrees C. The total amount of membrane associated beta 2-Microglobulin was estimated by a radioimmunoassay. After interferon treatment a beta 2-Microglobulin increase...

  1. Use of recombinant human interferon alpha-2a in the management of a dog with epitheliotropic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzannes, Sophia; Ibarrola, Patricia; Batchelor, Daniel J; Burrow, Rachel D; Blackwood, Laura

    2008-01-01

    An 8-year-old, mixed-breed dog with preputial epitheliotropic lymphoma was initially treated with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone. A short-term partial response was followed by disease progression after 4 weeks. Recombinant human interferon alpha-2a was administered starting at week 7. The interferon therapy resulted in rapid resolution of clinical signs and a 10-week disease-free interval. The lymphoma recurred at 17 weeks and did not respond to rescue chemotherapy. Additional oral lesions were treated with localized radiotherapy followed by increased dosages of interferon. This additional interferon treatment resulted in another 12 weeks of stable disease.

  2. Modulation of gene expression in a human cell line caused by poliovirus, vaccinia virus and interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoddevik Gunnar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project was initiated to describe the response of a human embryonic fibroblast cell line to the replication of two different viruses, and, more specifically, to look for candidate genes involved in viral defense. For this purpose, the cells were synchronously infected with poliovirus in the absence or presence of interferon-alpha, or with vaccinia virus, a virus that is not inhibited by interferon. By comparing the changes in transcriptosome due to these different challenges, it should be possible to suggest genes that might be involved in defense. Results The viral titers were sufficient to yield productive infection in a majority of the cells. The cells were harvested in triplicate at various time-points, and the transcriptosome compared with mock infected cells using oligo-based, global 35 k microarrays. While there was very limited similarities in the response to the different viruses, a large proportion of the genes up-regulated by interferon-alpha were also up-regulated by poliovirus. Interferon-alpha inhibited poliovirus replication, but there were no signs of any interferons being induced by poliovirus. The observations suggest that the cells do launch an antiviral response to poliovirus in the absence of interferon. Analyses of the data led to a list of candidate antiviral genes. Functional information was limited, or absent, for most of the candidate genes. Conclusion The data are relevant for our understanding of how the cells respond to poliovirus and vaccinia virus infection. More annotations, and more microarray studies with related viruses, are required in order to narrow the list of putative defence-related genes.

  3. Innate immune interferon responses to human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rose; Towers, Greg; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2012-07-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) responses represent the canonical host innate immune response to viruses, which serves to upregulate expression of antiviral restriction factors and augment adaptive immune defences. There is clear evidence for type I IFN activity in both acute and chronic HIV-1 infection in vivo, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells have been identified as one important source for these responses, through innate immune detection of viral RNA by Toll-like receptor 7. In addition, new insights into the molecular mechanisms that trigger induction of type I IFNs suggest innate immune receptors for viral DNA may also mediate these responses. It is widely recognised that HIV-1 restriction factors share the characteristic of IFN-inducible expression, and that the virus has evolved to counteract these antiviral mechanisms. However, in some target cells, such as macrophages, IFN can still effectively restrict virus. In this context, HIV-1 shows the ability to evade innate immune recognition and thereby avoid induction of type I IFN in order to successfully establish productive infection. The relative importance of evasion of innate immune detection and evasion of IFN-inducible restriction in the natural history of HIV-1 infection is not known, and the data suggest that type I IFN responses may play a role in both viral control and in the immunopathogenesis of progressive disease. Further study of the relationship between HIV-1 infection and type I IFN responses is required to unravel these issues and inform the development of novel therapeutics or vaccine strategies.

  4. Fishy business: effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and free zinc availability in human neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mel, Damitha; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2014-08-15

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s) for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration.

  5. Fishy Business: Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Zinc Transporters and Free Zinc Availability in Human Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damitha De Mel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 (ω-3 fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA. The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA. Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration.

  6. Evaluation of the effects of omega-3 & interferon alpha-2b administration on partial bladder outlet obstruction in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Firat

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The results of the present study showed that in addition to the standard primary approaches to prevent the damage to the upper urinary tract secondary to PBOO, omega-3 fatty acid and IFN α-2b could be beneficial as adjunct treatment in clinical practice. However, this needs to be further investigated with prospective, randomized clinical trials with larger sample sizes.

  7. MDP Up-Regulates the Gene Expression of Type I Interferons in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiumei Xie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Muramyldipeptide (MDP, the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2. Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  8. MDP up-regulates the gene expression of type I interferons in human aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qingshan; Yang, Mei; Liu, Xueting; Zhou, Lina; Xiao, Zhilin; Chen, Xiaobin; Chen, Meifang; Xie, Xiumei; Hu, Jinyue

    2012-03-23

    Muramyldipeptide (MDP), the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2). Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  9. Interferon gamma blocks the growth of Toxoplasma gondii in human fibroblasts by inducing the host cells to degrade tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, E R

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of human fibroblasts with human recombinant gamma interferon blocked the growth of Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. Growth of the parasite was measured by a plaque assay 7 days after infection or by the incorporation of [3H]uracil 1 or 2 days after infection. The antitoxoplasma activity induced in the host cells by gamma interferon was strongly dependent upon the tryptophan concentration of the medium. Progressively higher minimal inhibitory concentrations of gamma interferon were observed as the tryptophan concentration in the culture medium was increased. Treatment with gamma interferon did not make the cells impermeable to tryptophan. The kinetics of [3H]tryptophan uptake into the acid-soluble pools of control and gamma interferon-treated cultures were identical during the first 48 sec. Thereafter uptake of [3H]tryptophan into the acid-soluble pool of control fibroblasts reached the expected plateau after 96 sec. In contrast, uptake of [3H]tryptophan continued for at least 12 min in the gamma interferon-treated cultures. At that time, the acid-soluble pool of the gamma interferon-treated cultures contained 8 times the radioactivity of the control cultures. This continued accumulation was the result of rapid intracellular degradation of [3H]tryptophan into kynurenine and N-formylkynurenine that leaked slowly from the cells. These two metabolites were also recovered from the medium of cultures treated for 1 or 2 days with gamma interferon. Human recombinant alpha and beta interferons, which have no antitoxoplasma activity, did not induce any detectable degradation of tryptophan. Several hypotheses are presented to explain how the intracellular degradation of tryptophan induced by gamma interferon could restrict the growth of an obligate intracellular parasite. Images PMID:6422465

  10. Expression and localization of the omega-3 fatty acid receptor GPR120 in human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, S; Ramirez, V I; Gaccioli, F; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-07-01

    Fatty acids can function as signaling molecules, acting through receptors in the cytosol or on the cell surface. G-Protein Receptor (GPR)120 is a membrane-bound receptor mediating anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects of the omega-3 fatty acid docohexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR120 dysfunction is associated with obesity in humans. Cellular localization of GPR120 and the influence of maternal obesity on GPR120 protein expression in the placenta are unknown. Herein we demonstrate that GPR120 is predominantly expressed in the microvillous membrane (MVM) of human placenta and that the expression level of this receptor in MVM is not altered by maternal body mass index (BMI).

  11. Antagonist peptides of human interferon-α2b isolated from phage display library inhibit interferon induced antiviral activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang TIAN; Gang BAI; Zheng-he LI; Wen-bo YANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To screen human interferon (IFN)-α2b antagonist peptides from a phage displayed heptapeptide library. Methods: WISH cells and polyclonal anti-IFN-α2b antibodies were used to select IFN receptor-binding peptides from a phage displayed heptapeptide library. The specific binding of phage clones was examined by phage ELISA and immunohistochemistry. The specific binding activities of synthetic peptides to WISH cells were detected by competition assay. Effects of synthetic peptides to IFN-induced antiviral activity were analyzed by evaluating the cytopathic effect (CPE) using the MTT method. Results: Twenty-three positive clones were obtained after seven rounds of selection. Ten clones were randomly picked from the positive clones and were sequenced. The corresponding amino acid sequences suggested 3 groups homologous to the 3 domains of IFN-α2b, defined by residues 24-41, 43-49, and 148-158 of IFN-α2b. As they presented as corresponding to IFN receptor-binding domains, AB loop and E helix, clone № 26 and 35 were chosen for further characterization and shown to bind to WISH cells. Two peptides corresponding to clone № 26 and 35, designated SP-7(SLSPGLP) and FY-7(FSAPVRY) were shown to compete with GFP-IFN-α2b for binding to its receptor and to inhibit the IFN-α2b-induced antiviral activity. Conclusion: Both IFN-α2b antagonist peptides, SP-7 and FY-7, were able to inhibit the IFN-induced antiviral activity, and could be helpful in laying the foundation for the molecular mechanism of the interaction between IFN and its receptor.

  12. The human P-glycoprotein transporter enhances the type I interferon response to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Nadejda; Kaplan Zeevi, Millie; Weinstein, Shiri; Peer, Dan; Herskovits, Anat A

    2015-06-01

    Human multidrug efflux transporters are known for their ability to extrude antibiotics and toxic compounds out of cells, yet accumulating data indicate they have additional functions in diverse physiological processes not related to drug efflux. Here, we show that the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (also named MDR1 and ABCB1) is transcriptionally induced in the monocytic cell line THP-1 upon infection with the human intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Notably, we found that P-gp is important for full activation of the type I interferon response elicited against L. monocytogenes bacteria. Both inhibition of P-gp function by verapamil and inhibition of its transcription using mRNA silencing led to a reduction in the magnitude of the type I response in infected cells. This function of P-gp was specific to type I interferon cytokines elicited against cytosolic replicating bacteria and was not observed in response to cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a molecule that was shown to be secreted by L. monocytogenes during infection and to trigger type I interferons. Moreover, P-gp was not involved in activation of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as those triggered by vacuolar-restricted L. monocytogenes or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for P-gp in proper development of an innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, highlighting the complexity in employing therapeutic strategies that involve inhibition of multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps.

  13. A quantitative infection assay for human type I, II, and III interferon antiviral activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon virus infection, cells secrete a diverse group of antiviral molecules that signal proximal cells to enter into an antiviral state, slowing or preventing viral spread. These paracrine signaling molecules can work synergistically, so measurement of any one antiviral molecule does not reflect the total antiviral activity of the system. Results We have developed an antiviral assay based on replication inhibition of an engineered fluorescent vesicular stomatitis virus reporter strain on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Our assay provides a quantitative functional readout of human type I, II, and III interferon activities, and it provides better sensitivity, intra-, and inter-assay reproducibility than the traditional crystal violet based assay. Further, it eliminates cell fixation, rinsing, and staining steps, and is inexpensive to implement. Conclusions A dsRed2-strain of vesicular stomatitis virus that is sensitive to type I, II, and III interferons was used to develop a convenient and sensitive assay for interferon antiviral activity. We demonstrate use of the assay to quantify the kinetics of paracrine antiviral signaling from human prostate cancer (PC3) cells in response to viral infection. The assay is applicable to high-throughput screening for anti-viral compounds as well as basic studies of cellular antiviral signaling. PMID:23829314

  14. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U.; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  15. Synergism between human tumor necrosis factor and human interferon-alpha: effects on cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, K; Ando, S; Kurimoto, M

    1987-08-01

    The cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of highly purified natural human tumor necrosis factor (HuTNF-alpha) and natural human interferon-alpha (HuIFN-alpha) on 23 cell lines were studied in vitro. Natural HuTNF-alpha showed cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on PC-9, KHG-2, HT-1197, KG-1 and L-929 cells, and HuIFN-alpha showed both effects on KHG-2 and Daudi cells. A mixture of HuTNF-alpha and HuIFN-alpha (1:1, by unit) showed cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on HuTNF-alpha- or HuIFN-alpha-resistant cell lines such as KB, KATO-III, HEp-2, P-4788, as well as on HuTNF-alpha- or HuIFN-alpha-susceptible cells. Thus, the combined preparation of HuTNF-alpha and HuIFN-alpha expanded the spectrum of sensitive cells. The dosage of the mixed preparation required to produce 50% inhibition of cell growth was less than 20% of that of HuTNF-alpha or HuIFN-alpha alone. These results indicate that the cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of HuTNF-alpha and HuIFN-alpha are synergistically enhanced when they are administered together.

  16. Synergism between human tumor necrosis factor and human interferon-alpha: effects on cells in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orita,Kunzo

    1987-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of highly purified natural human tumor necrosis factor (HuTNF-alpha and natural human interferon-alpha (HuIFN-alpha on 23 cell lines were studied in vitro. Natural HuTNF-alpha showed cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on PC-9, KHG-2, HT-1197, KG-1 and L-929 cells, and HuIFN-alpha showed both effects on KHG-2 and Daudi cells. A mixture of HuTNF-alpha and HuIFN-alpha (1:1, by unit showed cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on HuTNF-alpha- or HuIFN-alpha-resistant cell lines such as KB, KATO-III, HEp-2, P-4788, as well as on HuTNF-alpha- or HuIFN-alpha-susceptible cells. Thus, the combined preparation of HuTNF-alpha and HuIFN-alpha expanded the spectrum of sensitive cells. The dosage of the mixed preparation required to produce 50% inhibition of cell growth was less than 20% of that of HuTNF-alpha or HuIFN-alpha alone. These results indicate that the cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of HuTNF-alpha and HuIFN-alpha are synergistically enhanced when they are administered together.

  17. Antiproliferative activity of recombinant human interferon-λ2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... His- hIFN-λ2 vector, the stably transformed BmN cells expressing hIFN-λ2 gene were selected using. Zeocin. Following ... of human cells and tissues, after IFN-λs and its receptors binding .... observed under a microscope to visualize green fluore- scence. .... –related cytokines: from structure to function. Eur.

  18. Bridging the species divide: transgenic mice humanized for type-I interferon response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Harari

    Full Text Available We have generated transgenic mice that harbor humanized type I interferon receptors (IFNARs enabling the study of type I human interferons (Hu-IFN-Is in mice. These "HyBNAR" (Hybrid IFNAR mice encode transgenic variants of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 with the human extracellular domains being fused to transmembrane and cytoplasmic segments of mouse sequence. B16F1 mouse melanoma cells harboring the HyBNAR construct specifically bound Hu-IFN-Is and were rendered sensitive to Hu-IFN-I stimulated anti-proliferation, STAT1 activation and activation of a prototypical IFN-I response gene (MX2. HyBNAR mice were crossed with a transgenic strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under the control of the IFN-responsive MX2 promoter (MX2-Luciferase. Both the HyBNAR and HyBNAR/MX2-Luciferase mice were responsive to all Hu-IFN-Is tested, inclusive of IFNα2A, IFNβ, and a human superagonist termed YNSα8. The mice displayed dose-dependent pharmacodynamic responses to Hu-IFN-I injection, as assessed by measuring the expression of IFN-responsive genes. Our studies also demonstrated a weak activation of endogenous mouse interferon response, especially after high dose administration of Hu-IFNs. In sharp contrast to data published for humans, our pharmacodynamic readouts demonstrate a very short-lived IFN-I response in mice, which is not enhanced by sub-cutaneous (SC injections in comparison to other administration routes. With algometric differences between humans and mice taken into account, the HyBNAR mice provides a convenient non-primate pre-clinical model to advance the study of human IFN-Is.

  19. Activation of the human beta interferon gene by the adenovirus type 12 E1B gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiroki, K.; Toth, M.

    1988-01-01

    The transcription of endogenous beta interferon mRNA was activated in human embryo kidney (HEK) cells infected with adenovirus 12 (Ad12) but was activated only inefficiently or not at all in HEK cells infected with Ad5 and rc-1 (Ad5 dl312 containing the Ad12 E1A region). The analysis with Ad12 mutants showed that Ad12 E1B products, especially the 19K protein, were important for the expression of the endogenous beta interferon gene and Ad12 E1A products were not involved in the expression. The expression of exogeneously transfected pIFN-CAT (a hybrid plasmid having the human beta interferon promoter fused with the CAT gene) was activated in HEK and chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells infected with either Ad12 or Ad5. The analysis of cotransfection of CEF cells with pIFN-CAT and plasmids containing fragments of Ad12 or Ad5 DNA showed that Ad12 or Ad5 E1B (possibly the 19K protein) was and E1A was not involved in the expression of the exogenous pIFN-CAT.

  20. Dissecting Interferon-Induced Transcriptional Programs in Human Peripheral Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Simon J.; Popper, Stephen J.; Rubins, Kathleen H.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Brown, Patrick O.; Levin, Michael; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Interferons are key modulators of the immune system, and are central to the control of many diseases. The response of immune cells to stimuli in complex populations is the product of direct and indirect effects, and of homotypic and heterotypic cell interactions. Dissecting the global transcriptional profiles of immune cell populations may provide insights into this regulatory interplay. The host transcriptional response may also be useful in discriminating between disease states, and in understanding pathophysiology. The transcriptional programs of cell populations in health therefore provide a paradigm for deconvoluting disease-associated gene expression profiles. We used human cDNA microarrays to (1) compare the gene expression programs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) elicited by 6 major mediators of the immune response: interferons α, β, ω and γ, IL12 and TNFα; and (2) characterize the transcriptional responses of purified immune cell populations (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes) to IFNγ stimulation. We defined a highly stereotyped response to type I interferons, while responses to IFNγ and IL12 were largely restricted to a subset of type I interferon-inducible genes. TNFα stimulation resulted in a distinct pattern of gene expression. Cell type-specific transcriptional programs were identified, highlighting the pronounced response of monocytes to IFNγ, and emergent properties associated with IFN-mediated activation of mixed cell populations. This information provides a detailed view of cellular activation by immune mediators, and contributes an interpretive framework for the definition of host immune responses in a variety of disease settings. PMID:20339534

  1. Human genomic library screened with 17-base oligonucleotide probes yields a novel interferon gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Torczynski, R M; Fuke, M; Bollon, A P

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented that has permitted a human genomic library to be screened for low-copy genes using 17-base synthetic oligonucleotides as probes. Parallel screening with two different 17-base probes permitted the unambiguous identification of clones containing interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) genes. The isolated human IFN-alpha genes were sequenced, and one appears to be IFN-alpha L; the other is one not previously described, which we have designated IFN-alpha WA. The IFN-alpha WA sequence d...

  2. Interferon gamma response region in the promoter of the human DPA gene.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) response region of the human class II major histocompatibility complex gene, DPA, has been localized to a 52-base-pair (bp) DNA fragment in the proximal promotor at -107 to -55 bp after transfection into HeLa cells of a series of 5', 3', and gap deletion mutants linked to a reporter gene, human growth hormone, as well as of synthetic oligonucleotides fused to the heterologous promoter thymidine kinase. The 52-mer sequence contains the X and Y box elements cons...

  3. Isolation and characterization of a new mutant human cell line unresponsive to alpha and beta interferons.

    OpenAIRE

    John, J.; McKendry, R; Pellegrini, S; Flavell, D; Kerr, I M; Stark, G R

    1991-01-01

    Previously we described human cell line 2fTGH, in which expression of guanine phosphoribosyltransferase is tightly controlled by the upstream region of interferon (IFN)-stimulated human gene 6-16. After mutagenesis of 2fTGH and selection with 6-thioguanine and IFN-alpha, we isolated 11.1, a recessive mutant that does not respond to IFN-alpha. We now describe U2, a second recessive mutant, selected similarly, that complements 11.1. U2 had no response to IFN-alpha or IFN-beta, and its response ...

  4. High-level expression of a chemically synthesized gene for human interferon-gamma using a prokaryotic expression vector.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    A chemically synthesized gene for human interferon-gamma has been cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector under the regulation of a synthetic constitutive transcriptional-translational control unit that contains a strong bacteriophage T5 early promoter and a strong ribosome-binding site. Cells harboring the recombinant plasmid express high levels (4 X 10(9) units per liter of culture) of antiviral activity specific for interferon-gamma. Analysis of total cell lysates on NaDodSO4/polyacryl...

  5. Effects of beta interferon on human fibroblasts at different population doubling levels. Proliferation, cell volume, thymidine uptake, and DNA synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Cellular aging had no effect on the ability of beta interferon to increase cell volume and population doubling time in 76-109 cells, a line of human skin fibroblasts. However, DNA synthesis in cells at high population doubling levels (PDL 55-70) was inhibited after 72 h of beta interferon treatment (1,000 U/ml) while no inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed in cells at middle population doubling levels (PDL 30-40).

  6. Identification of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Proteins That Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, M A G; Ribaudo, Michael; Guo, Ju-Tao; Barik, Sailen

    2016-12-15

    A major arm of cellular innate immunity is type I interferon (IFN), represented by IFN-α and IFN-β. Type I IFN transcriptionally induces a large number of cellular genes, collectively known as IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, which act as antivirals. The IFIT (interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats) family proteins constitute a major subclass of ISG proteins and are characterized by multiple tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). In this study, we have interrogated IFIT proteins for the ability to inhibit the growth of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family and a major cause of respiratory disease in children. We found that IFIT1 significantly inhibited PIV3, whereas IFIT2, IFIT3, and IFIT5 were less effective or not at all. In further screening a set of ISG proteins we discovered that several other such proteins also inhibited PIV3, including IFITM1, IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase), PKR (protein kinase, RNA activated), and viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum associated, interferon inducible)/Cig5. The antiviral effect of IDO, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of tryptophan degradation, could be counteracted by tryptophan. These results advance our knowledge of diverse ISG proteins functioning as antivirals and may provide novel approaches against PIV3.

  7. Structural insights into the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of human omega-class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huina; Brock, Joseph; Liu, Dan; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-07-13

    The reduction of dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbic acid (AA) is a vital cellular function. The omega-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze several reductive reactions in cellular biochemistry, including DHA reduction. In humans, two isozymes (GSTO1-1 and GSTO2-2) with significant DHA reductase (DHAR) activity are found, sharing 64% sequence identity. While the activity of GSTO2-2 is higher, it is significantly more unstable in vitro. We report the first crystal structures of human GSTO2-2, stabilized through site-directed mutagenesis and determined at 1.9 Å resolution in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The structure of a human GSTO1-1 has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution in complex with the reaction product AA, which unexpectedly binds in the G-site, where the glutamyl moiety of GSH binds. The structure suggests a similar mode of ascorbate binding in GSTO2-2. This is the first time that a non-GSH-based reaction product has been observed in the G-site of any GST. AA stacks against a conserved aromatic residue, F34 (equivalent to Y34 in GSTO2-2). Mutation of Y34 to alanine in GSTO2-2 eliminates DHAR activity. From these structures and other biochemical data, we propose a mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis of DHAR activity.

  8. HIV-1 Vpr induces interferon-stimulated genes in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atif Zahoor

    Full Text Available Macrophages act as reservoirs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and play an important role in its transmission to other cells. HIV-1 Vpr is a multi-functional protein involved in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis; however, its exact role in HIV-1-infected human macrophages remains poorly understood. In this study, we used a microarray approach to explore the effects of HIV-1 Vpr on the transcriptional profile of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs. More than 500 genes, mainly those involved in the innate immune response, the type I interferon pathway, cytokine production, and signal transduction, were differentially regulated (fold change >2.0 after infection with a recombinant adenovirus expressing HIV-1 Vpr protein. The differential expression profiles of select interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs and genes involved in the innate immune response, including STAT1, IRF7, MX1, MX2, ISG15, ISG20, IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3, IFI27, IFI44L, APOBEC3A, DDX58 (RIG-I, TNFSF10 (TRAIL, and RSAD2 (viperin were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and were consistent with the microarray data. In addition, at the post-translational level, HIV-1 Vpr induced the phosphorylation of STAT1 at tyrosine 701 in human MDMs. These results demonstrate that HIV-1 Vpr leads to the induction of ISGs and expand the current understanding of the function of Vpr and its role in HIV-1 immune pathogenesis.

  9. On the biologic origin of C6-C10-dicarboxylic and C6-C10-omega-1-hydroxy monocarboxylic acids in human and rat with acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiencies: in vitro studies on the omega- and omega-1-oxidation of medium-chain (C6-C12) fatty acids in human and rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, N; Mortensen, P B; Kølvraa, S

    1983-10-01

    C6-C10-dicarboxylic acid C6-C10-omega-1-hydroxy monocarboxylic acids were measured in postmitochondrial (10,000 g) fractions of rat liver after incubation with hexanoic, octanoic, and decanoic acids. In livers both from fed and starved rats, the proportion of decanoic acid converted to sebacic acid was high (approximately 25%) with only minor accumulation of the intermediate 10-hydroxy decanoic acid (1-2%). The conversion of octanoic and hexanoic acids to suberic and adipic acids, respectively, was low (less than 1%). The intermediate 8-hydroxy octanoic and 6-hydroxy hexanoic acids were also accumulated in very small amounts (less than 1%). It was concluded that cytochrome-P-450-mediated omega-hydroxylation was of decisive importance for the production rate of the dicarboxylic acids. Analysis of kinetic parameters of human and rat liver microsomal omega- and omega-1-hydroxylation of hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and dodecanoic acids gave the following results: in rats, the apparent Km values for the omega-hydroxylation for dodecanoic and decanoic acids are low, ie., 171 and 3.1 mumole/liter, respectively, whereas they are high for octanoic and hexanoic acids (8211 and 8822 mumole/liter, respectively). In two different humans, the corresponding Km values for dodecanoic, decanoic, octanoic, and hexanoic acids are 3.6-186, 522-247, 4861-3892, and 6825-10400 mumole/liter, respectively. Based on these results, it is argued that adipic and suberic acids found in urine from rats and humans with acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiencies are not biosynthesized by direct omega-oxidation of hexanoic and octanoic acids, but most probably by means of beta-oxidation of sebacic and dodecanedioic acids, produced by direct omega-oxidation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Interferon-alpha induces transient suppressors of cytokine signalling expression in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brender, C; Nielsen, M; Röpke, C;

    2001-01-01

    The suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins comprise a newly identified family of negative feedback regulators of cytokine signalling. SOCS expression is differentially induced upon cytokine stimulation in different cell types. Here we show that interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is a potent...... induction neither CIS, SOCS-1, nor SOCS-2 expression levels declined after 6 h. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that IFNalpha induces SOCS expression in human T cells. Moreover, we show that IFNalpha and IL-2 induce distinct patterns of expression kinetics, suggesting that dynamic changes...

  11. Comparison of the effect of interferon on two human hepatoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M.; Schoub, B.D.; Lyons, S.F.; Chiu, M.N. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Virology)

    1985-06-01

    Two human hepatoma cell lines, the PLC/PRF/5 and the Mahlavu cells, which differ in their production of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), responded differently to interferon (IFN). After IFN treatment both cell lines were able to inhibit Sindbis virus replication. Oligo A synthetase (E enzyme) could be activated in the PLC/PRF/5 cells although they were not sensitive to exogenous 2 - 5 oligoadenylic acid (2 - 5 A). In contrast, the Mahlavu cells were sensitive to exogenous 2 - 5 A, but unable to activate the E enzyme. Both cell lines were unable to stimulate phosphorylation of the exogenous initiator factor eIF-2.

  12. High-expression of recombinant human concensus interferon-α by Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Yuyou; SHI Qiqi; HE Yun; ZHUANG Yingping; WANG Yonghong; ZHANG Siliang; CHU Ju; LIU Zhimin

    2007-01-01

    The present work focused on the high expression of recombinant human consensus interferon-α (cIFN) by Pichia pastoris.The cycle of glycerol feeding,the strategy of methanol feeding and the optimum pH for protein induction were studied.The optimized strategies were a 4-h glycerol-feeding period,induction pH being kept at 5.0 and methanol concentration being kept under 5 g/L.The maximum dry cell weight,cIFN production and bioactivity obtained were 168,1.24 g/L and 5.4 × 107 U/mL,respectively.

  13. The Preliminary Study of Interferon-γGene Transfection to Human Tenon's Capsule Fibroblasts in Vitro#

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuqing Lan; Jian Ge; Mingkai Lin; Jianliang Zheng; Huiyi Chen; Haiquan Liu; Jing Wei; Yanyan Li

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the results of the interferon-gamma(IFN-y) gene transfer and transient expression in human Tenon's capsule fibroblast in vitro in order to find a way to gene therapy in vivo. Method: Using LipofectAMINE, IFN-γ gene was transferred in human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts with plasmid pcDNA3 IFN-y. Its mRNA transcription and protein expression were determined by RT-PCR and flow cytometry assay respectively.Result: The human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts transferred the IFN-γgene can express the IFN-γin transcription and protein level transiently.Conclusion: IFN-γ gene can be transferred successfully and expressed efficiently in human tenon's capsule fibroblast in vitro.

  14. Comparative efficacy of a recombinant feline interferon omega in refractory cases of calicivirus-positive cats with caudal stomatitis: a randomised, multi-centre, controlled, double-blind study in 39 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennet, Philippe R; Camy, Guy A L; McGahie, David M; Albouy, Maxime V

    2011-08-01

    Chronic caudal stomatitis with alveolar/buccal mucositis in calicivirus-positive cats is the most severe presentation of feline chronic gingivostomatitis. Refractory cases are helped by antibiotic and anti-inflammatory treatments often including glucocorticoids. In order to evaluate the comparative efficacy of oromucosal administration of recombinant feline interferon omega (rFeIFN-ω) versus oral administration of glucocorticoids, a randomised, multi-centre, controlled, double-blind study was performed in 39 cats. The progression of behavioural, clinical and lesional scores was assessed over 90 days. Daily oromucosal treatment with 0.1 MU of rFeIFN-ω was associated with a significant improvement of clinical lesions (caudal stomatitis and alveolar/buccal mucositis) and a decrease of pain scores from D0 to D90. Although no such statistical improvement was noticed in the prednisolone group, there was, however, no significant difference between the two groups for most of the parameters, except pain at D60 and D90.

  15. The Interferon System of Humans and Fish - A Structural Point of View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamming, Ole Jensen

    2010-01-01

      Interferon lambda (IFN-l), også kaldet type III interferoner, tilhører gruppen af små helix rige cytokiner. De er i stand til at inducere en antiviral tilstand i kroppens celler. IFN-l signalerer via en receptor der består af to dele: Interleukin 10 receptor 2 (IL-10R2) og Interferon lambda...... for bindingen til receptor komplekset. Jeg har desuden bestemt strukturen af to interferoner fra zebrafisk og viser at disse er tættere beslægtet med type I interferoner end med type III interferoner   ...

  16. The Interferon System of Humans and Fish - A Structural Point of View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamming, Ole Jensen

    2010-01-01

      Interferon lambda (IFN-l), også kaldet type III interferoner, tilhører gruppen af små helix rige cytokiner. De er i stand til at inducere en antiviral tilstand i kroppens celler. IFN-l signalerer via en receptor der består af to dele: Interleukin 10 receptor 2 (IL-10R2) og Interferon lambda...... for bindingen til receptor komplekset. Jeg har desuden bestemt strukturen af to interferoner fra zebrafisk og viser at disse er tættere beslægtet med type I interferoner end med type III interferoner   ...

  17. OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS AND LOCAL ANIMAL HUSBANDRY: TASKS AND POSSIBILITIES FOR THE HUMAN HEALTHY NUTRITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. SEREGI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The positive nutritional effects of PUFA in the human diet nowadays are wellknown. The presence of PUFA in food of animal origin is first of all influenced by the feeding. The animal feeds rich in omega-3 PUFA are considered as basic feeds, such as meadow, grass, hay, green forage, grains etc. In the newly accessed EU countries the traditional breeding methods are typical (housing, lairage, pasture. This tendency is reflected also in the composition of local breeds: the so called indigenous, traditional breeds are characteristic. The development and expansion of local breeding methods is of crucial importance for the viable region, the protection (many times the restoration of environment and for the above mentioned human nutritional advantages. With modern control methods of origin, with adherence of food-safety rules, the local commercialization of the traditional foods can be solved, as many positive examples show in different countries. The need for diverse, tasteful and safe products of special quality is also increasing. Our aim is to support and favour the local, traditional breeding for direct commercialization with ensuring the proper conditions, financial support and legislation.

  18. Immunomodulatory Effectiveness of Fish Oil and omega-3 Fatty Acids in Human Non-melanoma Skin Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Khurram; Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal; Yuen, Ng Pei; Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif

    2016-01-01

    Fish oil is composed of various fatty acids among which omega-3 fatty acids are considered as most beneficial. The effects of fish oil on the activity of a topical anticancer drug, imiquimod, and the immunomodulatory activity of omega-3 fatty acids was investigated in human basal and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Imiquimod-fish oil mixture exhibited higher carcinoma cell growth inhibition and immunomodulatory activity than imiquimod alone, especially against squamous cell carcinoma cells. Omega-3 fatty acids exhibited growth inhibition of both basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and modulated the immune response. Omega-3 fatty acids of fish oil serve as inducers of interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, and as suppressors of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which not only depress tumor growth but also adequately control the inflammatory side effects of imiquimod. Thus, imiquimod administration with fish oil could be beneficial for inhibition of non-melanoma skin carcinoma cells but further in vivo studies are needed to understand their role in skin cancer.

  19. Omega-3: A Link between Global Climate Change and Human Health

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jing X.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, global climate change has been shown to detrimentally affect many biological and environmental factors, including those of marine ecosystems. In particular, global climate change has been linked to an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide, UV irradiation, and ocean temperatures, resulting in decreased marine phytoplankton growth and reduced synthesis of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Marine phytoplankton are the primary producers of omega-3 PUFAs, which are ess...

  20. Interferon alpha regulates MAPK and STAT1 pathways in human hepatoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Hao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling events triggered by interferon (IFN account for the molecular mechanisms of antiviral effect. JAK-STAT pathway plays a critical role in IFN signaling, and other pathways are also implicated in IFN-mediated antiviral effect. Changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and STAT1 pathways were evaluated in human hepatoma cells Huh7 and HepG2 upon IFN alpha treatment. Results Phosphorylation of ERK was significantly and specifically up-regulated, whereas enhanced phosphorylation of upstream kinase MEK was unobservable upon IFN alpha treatment. A mild increase in p38 MAPK, SAPK/JNK and downstream target ATF-2 phosphorylation was detectable after exposure to IFN alpha, indicating differential up-regulation of the MAPK signaling cascades. Moreover, STAT1 phosphorylation was strongly enhanced by IFN alpha. Conclusion IFN alpha up-regulates MAPK and STAT1 pathways in human hepatoma cells, and may provide useful information for understanding the IFN signaling.

  1. OMEGA 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fivi Melva Diana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kejadian gizi kurang di Indonesia dari tahun ke tahun masihtinggi Penyebab tingginya angka kejadian gizi kurang di Indonesia salah satunya diduga karena kurangnya konsumsi makanan sumber omega 6, secara alami terdapat pada minyak biji-bijian, minyakjagung dan kacang kedelai. Omega 6 merupakan asam lemak tak jenuh ganda yang mempunyai banyak manfaat terutama untuk pertumbuhan dan perkembangan kecerdasan balita. Tulisan ini membahas tentang defenisi omega 6, sumber, klasifikasi, manfaat dan kerugian bila mengkonsumsi omega 6. Disarankan untuk melakukan penelitian lebih lanjut mengenai hubungan konsumsi omega 6 dengan tumbuh-kembang anak, selain itu bagi ibu-ibu disarankan untuk memperhatikan konsumsi makanan dari sumber omega 6 guna pengoptimalan tumbuh-kembang anak. Hal ini jika terlaksana dapat memberikan dukungan terhadap program pemerintah di bidang promosi kesehatan.

  2. Hepatitis C virus infection suppresses the interferon response in the liver of the human hepatocyte chimeric mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Tsuge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Recent studies indicate that hepatitis C virus (HCV can modulate the expression of various genes including those involved in interferon signaling, and up-regulation of interferon-stimulated genes by HCV was reported to be strongly associated with treatment outcome. To expand our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying treatment resistance, we analyzed the direct effects of interferon and/or HCV infection under immunodeficient conditions using cDNA microarray analysis of human hepatocyte chimeric mice. METHODS: Human serum containing HCV genotype 1b was injected into human hepatocyte chimeric mice. IFN-α was administered 8 weeks after inoculation, and 6 hours later human hepatocytes in the mouse livers were collected for microarray analysis. RESULTS: HCV infection induced a more than 3-fold change in the expression of 181 genes, especially genes related to Organismal Injury and Abnormalities, such as fibrosis or injury of the liver (P = 5.90E-16∼3.66E-03. IFN administration induced more than 3-fold up-regulation in the expression of 152 genes. Marked induction was observed in the anti-fibrotic chemokines such as CXCL9, suggesting that IFN treatment might lead not only to HCV eradication but also prevention and repair of liver fibrosis. HCV infection appeared to suppress interferon signaling via significant reduction in interferon-induced gene expression in several genes of the IFN signaling pathway, including Mx1, STAT1, and several members of the CXCL and IFI families (P = 6.0E-12. Genes associated with Antimicrobial Response and Inflammatory Response were also significantly repressed (P = 5.22×10(-10∼1.95×10(-2. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide molecular insights into possible mechanisms used by HCV to evade innate immune responses, as well as novel therapeutic targets and a potential new indication for interferon therapy.

  3. Possible role of phosphoinositide-3-kinase in Mx1 protein translation and antiviral activity of interferon-omega-stimulated HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Youngjun; Kim, Mihee; Choi, Minjoung; Kim, Sunhee; Park, Kidae; Oh, Ilung; Chung, Seungtae; Suh, Hongwon; Hong, Seunghwa; Park, Suenie

    2011-01-01

    Interferon ω (IFN-ω), a cytokine released during innate immune activation, is well known for promoting direct antiviral responses; however, the possible signal pathways that are initiated by IFN-ω binding to the type I IFN receptors have not been fully studied. Here, we provide evidence that activation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signaling plays a pivotal role in the generation of IFN-ω-mediated biological responses. We found that LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor)-attenuated antiviral activities are induced by IFN-ω treatment. Although such effects of LY294002 are unrelated to regulatory activities on IFN-ω-dependent Mx1 (myxovirus resistance 1) or Mx2 gene transcriptional regulation, translation of Mx1 protein, which was known as a key mediator of cell-autonomous antiviral resistance, was significantly reduced by PI3K inhibition. Further studies showed that PI3K inhibition using LY294002 leads to a decrease in PI3K substrate Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 phosphorylation/activation. In addition, although LY294002 was not able to reduce STAT1 activation, we found that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 S6 kinase pathway was significantly attenuated by inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These results indicate that the PI3K/Akt pathway is a common and central integrator for antiviral responses in IFN-ω signaling via its regulatory effects on mTOR that are required for initiation of mRNA translation of Mx genes.

  4. Targeted induction of interferon-λ in humanized chimeric mouse liver abrogates hepatotropic virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The interferon (IFN system plays a critical role in innate antiviral response. We presume that targeted induction of IFN in human liver shows robust antiviral effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. METHODS: This study used chimeric mice harboring humanized livers and infected with HCV or HBV. This mouse model permitted simultaneous analysis of immune responses by human and mouse hepatocytes in the same liver and exploration of the mechanism of antiviral effect against these viruses. Targeted expression of IFN was induced by treating the animals with a complex comprising a hepatotropic cationic liposome and a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, pIC (LIC-pIC. Viral replication, IFN gene expression, IFN protein production, and IFN antiviral activity were analyzed (for type I, II and III IFNs in the livers and sera of these humanized chimeric mice. RESULTS: Following treatment with LIC-pIC, the humanized livers of chimeric mice exhibited increased expression (at the mRNA and protein level of human IFN-λs, resulting in strong antiviral effect on HBV and HCV. Similar increases were not seen for human IFN-α or IFN-β in these animals. Strong induction of IFN-λs by LIC-pIC occurred only in human hepatocytes, and not in mouse hepatocytes nor in human cell lines derived from other (non-hepatic tissues. LIC-pIC-induced IFN-λ production was mediated by the immune sensor adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1, suggesting dual recognition of LIC-pIC by both sensor adaptor pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the expression and function of various IFNs differ depending on the animal species and tissues under investigation. Chimeric mice harboring humanized livers demonstrate that IFN-λs play an important role in the defense against human hepatic virus infection.

  5. Cell-Based Screen Identifies Human Interferon-Stimulated Regulators of Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitson, Jennifer L.; Chen, Didi; Jimenez, Alyssa; Mettlen, Marcel; Schoggins, John W.; Alto, Neal M.

    2016-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) activated transcriptional response is a critical antiviral defense mechanism, yet its role in bacterial pathogenesis remains less well characterized. Using an intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) as a model bacterial pathogen, we sought to identify the roles of individual interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in context of bacterial infection. Previously, IFN has been implicated in both restricting and promoting Lm growth and immune stimulatory functions in vivo. Here we adapted a gain-of-function flow cytometry based approach to screen a library of more than 350 human ISGs for inhibitors and enhancers of Lm infection. We identify 6 genes, including UNC93B1, MYD88, AQP9, and TRIM14 that potently inhibit Lm infection. These inhibitors act through both transcription-mediated (MYD88) and non-transcriptional mechanisms (TRIM14). Further, we identify and characterize the human high affinity immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIa as an enhancer of Lm internalization. Our results reveal that FcγRIa promotes Lm uptake in the absence of known host Lm internalization receptors (E-cadherin and c-Met) as well as bacterial surface internalins (InlA and InlB). Additionally, FcγRIa-mediated uptake occurs independently of Lm opsonization or canonical FcγRIa signaling. Finally, we established the contribution of FcγRIa to Lm infection in phagocytic cells, thus potentially linking the IFN response to a novel bacterial uptake pathway. Together, these studies provide an experimental and conceptual basis for deciphering the role of IFN in bacterial defense and virulence at single-gene resolution. PMID:28002492

  6. B Meson Decays to mega K*, omega rho, omega omega, omega phi, and omega f0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Abrams,; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego

    2006-07-28

    The authors describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states {omega}K*, {omega}p, {omega}{omega}, and {omega}{phi} with 233 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. They also search for the vector-scalar B decay to {omega}f{sub 0}.

  7. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid attenuates human astrocyte neurotoxicity induced by interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashioka Sadayuki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds Increasing evidence shows that the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. It is tempting to evaluate the potential of SAHA as a therapeutic agent in various neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Methods We examined the effects of SAHA on interferon (IFN-γ-induced neurotoxicity of human astrocytes and on IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 3 in human astrocytes. We also studied the effects of SAHA on the astrocytic production of two representative IFN-γ-inducible inflammatory molecules, namely IFN-γ-inducible T cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1. Results SAHA significantly attenuated the toxicity of astrocytes activated by IFN-γ towards SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells. In the IFN-γ-activated astrocytes, SAHA reduced the STAT3 phosphorylation. SAHA also inhibited the IFN-γ-induced astrocytic production of I-TAC, but not ICAM-1. These results indicate that SAHA suppresses IFN-γ-induced neurotoxicity of human astrocytes through inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway. Conclusion Due to its anti-neurotoxic and anti-inflammatory properties, SAHA appears to have the therapeutic or preventive potential for a wide range of neuroinflammatory disorders associated with activated astrocytes.

  8. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT. PMID:21435270

  9. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Jern; Chang, Chu-Ting; Wang, Guei-Jane; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lu, Shao-Chun; Kuo, Yuh-Chi

    2011-03-25

    Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT.

  10. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Shwu-Fen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arctium lappa (Niubang, a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC, isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT.

  11. Immunogenicity of Recombinant Human Interferon Beta-1b in Immune-Tolerant Transgenic Mice Corresponds with the Biophysical Characteristics of Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haji Abdolvahab, Mohadeseh; Fazeli, Ahmad; Halim, Andhyk|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412608294; Sediq, Ahmad S; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Schellekens, Huub|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068406762

    2016-01-01

    Determining to what extent biophysical characteristics of aggregates affect immunogenicity of therapeutic interferon beta-1b. Three recombinant human interferon beta-1b (rhIFNβ-1b) samples with different levels of aggregates generated by copper oxidation, thermal stress, or left untreated, as well

  12. Immunogenicity of Recombinant Human Interferon Beta-1b in Immune-Tolerant Transgenic Mice Corresponds with the Biophysical Characteristics of Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haji Abdolvahab, Mohadeseh; Fazeli, Ahmad; Halim, Andhyk; Sediq, Ahmad S; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Schellekens, Huub

    2016-01-01

    Determining to what extent biophysical characteristics of aggregates affect immunogenicity of therapeutic interferon beta-1b. Three recombinant human interferon beta-1b (rhIFNβ-1b) samples with different levels of aggregates generated by copper oxidation, thermal stress, or left untreated, as well a

  13. Human genome-wide RNAi screen identifies an essential role for inositol pyrophosphates in Type-I interferon response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyas Kudukkil Pulloor

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The pattern recognition receptor RIG-I is critical for Type-I interferon production. However, the global regulation of RIG-I signaling is only partially understood. Using a human genome-wide RNAi-screen, we identified 226 novel regulatory proteins of RIG-I mediated interferon-β production. Furthermore, the screen identified a metabolic pathway that synthesizes the inositol pyrophosphate 1-IP7 as a previously unrecognized positive regulator of interferon production. Detailed genetic and biochemical experiments demonstrated that the kinase activities of IPPK, PPIP5K1 and PPIP5K2 (which convert IP5 to1-IP7 were critical for both interferon induction, and the control of cellular infection by Sendai and influenza A viruses. Conversely, ectopically expressed inositol pyrophosphate-hydrolases DIPPs attenuated interferon transcription. Mechanistic experiments in intact cells revealed that the expression of IPPK, PPIP5K1 and PPIP5K2 was needed for the phosphorylation and activation of IRF3, a transcription factor for interferon. The addition of purified individual inositol pyrophosphates to a cell free reconstituted RIG-I signaling assay further identified 1-IP7 as an essential component required for IRF3 activation. The inositol pyrophosphate may act by β-phosphoryl transfer, since its action was not recapitulated by a synthetic phosphonoacetate analogue of 1-IP7. This study thus identified several novel regulators of RIG-I, and a new role for inositol pyrophosphates in augmenting innate immune responses to viral infection that may have therapeutic applications.

  14. Native human interferon-α is a strong inductor of endogenous cytokines involved in the suppression of procollagen type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santak, G; Santak, M; Forčić, D

    2013-09-01

    Native human interferon-α (nHuIFN-α) has a stronger reductive effect on procollagen type I mRNA expression than recombinant human interferon-α (rHuIFN-α). It is partially due to the additive activity of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which is present in small concentrations in nHuIFN-α. Here, we show that the reductive effect is also the result of the endogenous cytokines induced by the activity of nHuIFN-α. In the culture of MRC5 fibroblasts, we have further found that nHuIFN-α induces endogenous interferons in higher amounts than rHuIFN-α, measured with PCR. That is more pronounced when interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is measured. This result puts a new light on IFN-γ activity in the nHuIFN-α treatment because its role was neglected due to the loss of its activity during the nHuIFN-α preparation process. The findings lead to the conclusion that endogenous cytokines play a significant role in the nHuIFN-α -mediated reduction of procollagen type I mRNA and are therefore an important factor in potential therapeutic usage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Trigger Cell Cycle Arrest and Induce Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastoma LA-N-1 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wai Wing So; Wai Nam Liu; Kwok Nam Leung

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids are dietary long-chain fatty acids with an array of health benefits. Previous research has demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effect of n-3 fatty acids on different cancer cell lines in vitro, yet their anti-tumor effects and underlying action mechanisms on human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells have not yet been reported. In this study, we showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) exhibited time- and concentration-dependent anti-proliferative ...

  16. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  17. Secretion of interferon gamma from human immune cells is altered by exposure to tributyltin and dibutyltin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Shanieek; Reid, Jacqueline; Whalen, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) are widespread environmental contaminants found in food, beverages, and human blood samples. Both of these butyltins (BTs) interfere with the ability of human natural killer (NK) cells to lyse target cells and alter secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) from human immune cells in vitro. The capacity of BTs to interfere with secretion of other pro-inflammatory cytokines has not been examined. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a modulator of adaptive and innate immune responses, playing an important role in overall immune competence. This study shows that both TBT and DBT alter secretion of IFNγ from human immune cells. Peripheral blood cell preparations that were increasingly reconstituted were used to determine if exposures to either TBT or DBT affected IFNγ secretion and how the makeup of the cell preparation influenced that effect. IFNγ secretion was examined after 24 h, 48 h, and 6 day exposures to TBT (200 - 2.5 nM) and DBT (5 - 0.05 µM) in highly enriched human NK cells, a monocyte-depleted preparation of PBMCs, and monocyte-containing PBMCs. Both BTs altered IFNγ secretion from immune cells at most of the conditions tested (either increasing or decreasing secretion). However, there was significant variability among donors as to the concentrations and time points that showed changes as well as the baseline secretion of IFNγ. The majority of donors showed an increase in IFNγ secretion in response to at least one concentration of TBT or DBT at a minimum of one length of exposure.

  18. Alterations in interferon-gamma and nitric oxide levels in human echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Aissa, S; Amri, M; Bouteldja, R; Wietzerbin, J; Touil-Boukoffa, C

    2006-05-15

    Human cystic hydatid disease is characterized by the long-term coexistence of Echinococcus granulosus and its host without effective rejection of the parasite. This parasitic helminth infection currently constitutes a major health problem in Algeria. We investigated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and nitrite (NO2-) production in PBMC culture 2 supernatants from Algerian patients (n = 35), stimulated by a major antigen (antigen 5). Nitrite was also observed in 74 sera and 28 cyst fluids of patients carrying cysts in different locations. In addition, we report the detection of Nitric Oxide Synthase-2 (NOS2) in liver biopsies of patients (n = 8) by an immunochemical method using human NOS2 antibody. In vivo nitrite levels in host sera and cyst biological fluid point to a tight relation between host response and macro-parasite effects. Our in vitro results indicate a correlation between nitrite and IFN-gamma production in PBMC culture supernatants. Furthermore, by immunohistochemistry NOS2 expression was observed in hepatocytes and Küpffer cells from hydatid patients. Collectively, our data imply NO production in host defense against the extracellular parasite, probably in response to an IFN-gamma activating signal. Concomitant enhanced levels of IFN-gamma and nitrite represent useful indicators of the clinical aggressiveness of hydatidosis.

  19. Interferon-α abrogates tolerance induction by human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bacher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Administration of interferon-α (IFN-α represents an approved adjuvant therapy as reported for malignancies like melanoma and several viral infections. In malignant diseases, tolerance processes are critically involved in tumor progression. In this study, the effect of IFN-α on tolerance induction by human tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC was analyzed. We focussed on tolerogenic IL-10-modulated DC (IL-10 DC that are known to induce anergic regulatory T cells (iTregs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IFN-α promoted an enhanced maturation of IL-10 DC as demonstrated by upregulation of the differentiation marker CD83 as well as costimulatory molecules. IFN-α treatment resulted in an increased capacity of DC to stimulate T cell activation compared to control tolerogenic DC. We observed a strengthened T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ production of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells stimulated by IFN-α-DC, demonstrating a restoration of the immunogenic capacity of tolerogenic DC in the presence of IFN-α. Notably, restimulation experiments revealed that IFN-α treatment of tolerogenic DC abolished the induction of T cell anergy and suppressor function of iTregs. In contrast, IFN-α neither affected the priming of iTregs nor converted iTregs into effector T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IFN-α inhibits the induction of T cell tolerance by reversing the tolerogenic function of human DC.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a new mutant human cell line unresponsive to alpha and beta interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, J; McKendry, R; Pellegrini, S; Flavell, D; Kerr, I M; Stark, G R

    1991-08-01

    Previously we described human cell line 2fTGH, in which expression of guanine phosphoribosyltransferase is tightly controlled by the upstream region of interferon (IFN)-stimulated human gene 6-16. After mutagenesis of 2fTGH and selection with 6-thioguanine and IFN-alpha, we isolated 11.1, a recessive mutant that does not respond to IFN-alpha. We now describe U2, a second recessive mutant, selected similarly, that complements 11.1. U2 had no response to IFN-alpha or IFN-beta, and its response to IFN-gamma was partially defective. Although many genes did respond to IFN-gamma in U2, the 9-27 gene did not and the antiviral response of U2 cells to IFN-gamma was greatly reduced. Band shift assays showed that none of the transcription factors normally induced in 2fTGH cells by IFN-alpha (E and M) or IFN-gamma (G) were induced in U2. However, extracts of untreated U2 cells gave rise to a novel band that was increased by treatment with IFN-gamma but not IFN-alpha. Band shift complementation assays revealed that untreated and IFN-gamma-treated U2 cells lack the functional E gamma subunit of transcription factor E and that IFN-alpha-treated U2 cells do contain the functional E alpha subunit.

  1. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and -β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5-67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43-100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  2. Regulation of the stability of poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced human fibroblast interferon mRNA: selective inactivation of interferon mRNA and lack of involvement of 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase activation during the shutoff of interferon production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, P B; Gupta, S L

    1980-06-01

    The inactivation of interferon mRNA during the shutoff phase of interferon production in poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced human fibroblast cultures is selective. We have determined that the shutoff of interferon production, which takes place from 3 to 8 hr after the beginning of induction, is not associated with an appreciable declined in the rate of bulk cellular protein synthesis or of cellular protein secretion. While the amount of translatable interferon mRNA declined markedly during the shutoff phase, the level of translatable bulk cellular mRNA and the stability of [3H]uridine-labeled mRNA were unaffected. Superinduction with actinomycin D selectively stabilized interferon mRNA with no apparent effect on the stability of bulk cellular mRNA. Furthermore, an activation of the 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase/endonuclease system does not appear to be involved in the shutoff phenomenon. Uninduced FS-4 cells contained a low basal level of 2'5'-oligo(A) synthetase activity, which was unchanged in poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced cells during the shutoff phase. Treatment of FS-4 cells with interferon for 16-18 hr prior to induction increased the enzyme activity by approximately 200-fold. However, this did not inhibit interferon production after induction with poly(I)xpoly(C) alone or after superinduction with cycloheximide or actinomycin D or both. Furthermore, the rates of decay of interferon production were comparable in cells with either a basal or an increased level of 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase. Thus a 200-fold increase in 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase level did not affect either the stability of interferon mRNA or the efficacy of interferon superinduction by metabolic inhibitors.

  3. B Meson Decays to mega K*, omega rho, omega omega, omega phi, and omega f0

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, Yu K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Doll, D; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le, F; Diberder; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perl, M; Perazzo, A; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z

    2006-01-01

    We describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states omega K*, omega rho, omega omega, and omega phi with 233 times 10^{6} BB pairs produced in e+e- annihilation at sqrt{s}=10.58 GeV. We also search for the vector-scalar B decay to omega f_0. We measure the following branching fractions in units of 10^{-6}: BR(B0 --> omega K*0) = 2.4 +/- 1.1 +/- 0.7 ( omega K*+) = 0.6 {+1.4}_{-1.2} {+1.1}_{-0.9} ( omega rho0) = -0.6 +/- 0.7 {+0.8}_{-0.3} ( omega rho+) = 10.6 +/- 2.1 {+1.6}_{-1.0}, BR(B0 --> omega omega) = 1.8 {+1.3}_{-0.9} +/- 0.4 ( omega phi) = 0.1 +/- 0.5 +/- 0.1 ( omega f_0) = 0.9 +/- 0.4 {+0.2}_{-0.1} ( omega rho+ decays we also measure the longitudinal spin component f_L=0.82 +/- 0.11 +/- 0.02 and the charge asymmetry A_CP=0.04 +/- 0.18 +/- 0.02.

  4. Effects and Interactions of Prostaglandins and Interferon-γ on Steroidogenesis of Human Luteal Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王寒正; 沈维维; 孙志达; 张翔; 龚岳亭

    1996-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory has demonstrated that T lymphocyte-derived cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) may play a role in human luteal regression by inhibiting luteal progesterone production. Prostaglandin F2a has been known as an important luteolytic factor in a wide range of mammalian species. It was of interest to investigate the effects of IFN-γ on prostaglandin synthesis and their possible interaction with the inhibition on human luteal steroidogenesis. Human luteal cells were cultured for four days in the presence or absence of IFN-γ. Simultaneously, the productions of progesterone, prostaglandin F2a ( PGF2a ), prostaglandin E2 ( PGE2 ), and 6-ketoprostaglandin F1a(PGF1a) were evaluated. Concomitant with the inhibition of progesterone production induced by IFN-γ, a biphasic pattern of response of. prostaglandin synthesis was observed, i.e. a slight decrease of PGF2a and PGF1a after a 48 h exposure to IFN-γ while an increase of PGE2 after 96 h. In a separate experiment, a luteotropic action of PGE2 and PGF2a on human luteal cells from different stages was observed during 48 and 96 h periods of culture. In addition, while indomethacin (INDO) treatment markedly blocked the prostaglandin synthesis, the basal as well as hCG stimulated progesterone production was still inhibited by IFN-γ as usual. These results suggested that prostaglandins appeared to be not responsible for the observed inhibition of progesterone production since the inhibitory effect was not influenced by concurrent treatment with INDO which suppressed prostaglandin synthesis,

  5. Supplementation with the omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid: influence on the lipid composition and fatty acid profile of human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aparecida Fagundes Queiroz Bortolozo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the impact of supplementing the diet of women during pregnancy and lactation with fish oil containing the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid, and its influence on the composition of human milk. METHODS: The sample comprised 60 women aged 18 to 38 years with appropriate dietary pattern, all of them healthy and nonsmokers. The intervention consisted of a daily supplementation with fish oil capsules that corresponded to a daily intake of 315mg of docosahexaenoic acid and 80mg of eicosapentaenoic acid during the third trimester of pregnancy and the first three months postpartum. The total fat content and fatty acid profile of their milk were determined by creamatocrit and gas chromatography. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis and the significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference between the fat contents of the study (fish oil capsules and control (capsules containing corn starch as filler groups. However, the milk of women taking fish oil contained higher docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid levels 30 and 60 days after delivery. These results demonstrate that high omega-3 intake can influence its concentration in human milk. CONCLUSIONS: Given the importance of docosahexaenoic acid in the neonatal period, it is appropriate for pregnant and breastfeeding women to supplement on long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which may be done by adding fish oil to the regular diet.

  6. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2016-03-02

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity.

  7. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have suggested that omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids elicit divergent effects on body fat gain through mechanisms of adipogenesis, browning of adipose tissue, lipid homeostasis, brain-gut-adipose tissue axis, and most importantly systemic inflammation. Prospective studies clearly show an increase in the risk of obesity as the level of omega-6 fatty acids and the omega-6/omega-3 ratio increase in red blood cell (RBC membrane phospholipids, whereas high omega-3 RBC membrane phospholipids decrease the risk of obesity. Recent studies in humans show that in addition to absolute amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid intake, the omega-6/omega-3 ratio plays an important role in increasing the development of obesity via both AA eicosanoid metabolites and hyperactivity of the cannabinoid system, which can be reversed with increased intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. A balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio is important for health and in the prevention and management of obesity.

  8. Conjunctival papilloma caused by human papillomavirus type 11 treated with systemic interferon in a five-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okan, Gökhan; Ayan, Inci; Karslioğlu, Safak; Altiok, Ender; Yenmiş, Güven; Vural, Gürcan

    2010-01-01

    Conjunctival papilloma is a benign tumor of the conjunctival mucosa. In childhood, papilloma represents 7-10% of conjunctival tumors. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-6 and HPV-11 are the major HPV types responsible for conjunctival lesions. A five-year-old boy with a two-year history of conjunctival papilloma caused by HPV type 11 treated with systemic interferon alpha is reported and the literature is reviewed.

  9. Engineering human interferon α1c/86D with phage display technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马学军; 胡荣; 吕海; 魏开坤; 张丽兰; 薛水星; 侯云德

    1999-01-01

    Human interferon-α1c/86D (IFNα1c/86D) was functionally displayed on the surface of the filamentous bacteriophage using a phagemid vector system (pCANTAB5E). The key amino acid residues involved in the receptor binding were further defined with phage displayed 6-mer peptide library and two neutralizing antibodies against linear epitopes on the IFN-α1b, indicating that residues 30, 33, 34, (AB-loop) and residues 124, 126, 127 (D helix, DE-loop) were more critical than the adjacent residues for recognition of receptor. In addition, a cassette mutagenesis library was generated by fully randomizing the sequence of the four positions 29, 31, 32 and 35 in AB-loop, and used to select phage-IFN variants with WISH-hased panning method. Three phage-IFN variants were isolated to possess more antiviral activity in the range of 4—16-fold than parental phage-IFN after IPTG-induced soluble expression. The results suggest that phage displayed phage-IFN α1c/86D variants with increased specific activity might be obta

  10. CONSTRUCTION AND STUDY OF Althaea officinalis TRANSGENIC ROOTS CULTURE WITH HUMAN INTERFERON α2B GENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Matvieieva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to obtain Althaea officinalis L. «hairy» root culture with human interferon α2b gene (ifn-α2b, to measure fructans content and antiviral activity of extracts from the transgenic roots. Transformation of leaf and root explants was carried out by means of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation. Antiviral activity was measured by the reduction in cytopathic effect of vesicular stomatitis virus (Indiana strain in bovine kidney cells line MDBK. Transformation frequency was 100% for leaf and root explants. RT-PCR confirmed ifn- α2b gene transcription. The clones of transgenic roots differed in mass increasing from 0, 036 ± 0,008 up to 0,371 ± 0,019 g in 30 days cultivation and in fructan synthesis from 67,2± 4,47 up to 154,6 ± 6,62 mg/g roots dry weight. Extracts from «hairy»roots culture were characterized by high antiviral activity against vesicular stomatitis virus — up to 26 000 IU/ g of roots fresh weight. In some cases the genetic transformation shown to lead increasing the growth rate and increasing the level of fructan synthesis in transgenic A. officinalis roots. Extracts from cultivated in vitro marshmallow transgenic roots were characterized by high level of antiviral activity against vesicular stomatitis virus. Thus, there were obtained transgenic A. officinalis roots, characterized by high growth rate, significant accumulation of fructans and high antiviral activity.

  11. Crystal Structure of Human Interferon-[lamda]1 in Complex with Its High-Affinity Receptor Interferon-[lamda]R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miknis, Zachary; Magracheva, Eugenia; Li, Wei; Zdanov, Alexander; Kotenko, Sergei V.; Wlodawer, Alexander (NJMS); (NCI)

    2010-12-01

    Interferon (IFN)-{lambda}1 [also known as interleukin (IL)-29] belongs to the recently discovered group of type III IFNs. All type III IFNs initiate signaling processes through formation of specific heterodimeric receptor complexes consisting of IFN-{lambda}R1 and IL-10R2. We have determined the structure of human IFN-{lambda}1 complexed with human IFN-{lambda}R1, a receptor unique to type III IFNs. The overall structure of IFN-{lambda}1 is topologically similar to the structure of IL-10 and other members of the IL-10 family of cytokines. IFN-{lambda}R1 consists of two distinct domains having fibronectin type III topology. The ligand-receptor interface includes helix A, loop AB, and helix F on the IFN site, as well as loops primarily from the N-terminal domain and inter-domain hinge region of IFN-{lambda}R1. Composition and architecture of the interface that includes only a few direct hydrogen bonds support an idea that long-range ionic interactions between ligand and receptor govern the process of initial recognition of the molecules while hydrophobic interactions finalize it.

  12. omega-3多不饱和脂肪酸对人肺腺癌细胞H460及H1975细胞周期及细胞凋亡的影响%Effect of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Cell Cycle and Apoptosis of Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells Line H1975 and H460

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾斯逊; 李昌林; 丁振宇; 王椿

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of the omega-3 PUFAs on cell cycle and apoptosis of human lung ade-nocarcinoma cells Line H1975 and H460. Methods:CCK-8 method was used to detect the effect of omega-3 PUFAs on the cell activities of human lung adenocarcinoma cells line H1975 and H460, flow cytometry was used to detect the effect of o-mega-3 PUFAs on the cell apoptosis and cell cycle of human lung adenocarcinoma cells Line H1975 and H460. Western blot method was used to detect the expression of survivin protein in cells line H1975 and H460. Results:Omega-3 PUFAs inhibited the growth of tumor cells and promote cell apoptosis of human lung adenocarcinoma cells line H460 and H1975 ( P<0. 05), However, the cell cycles were not significantly changed by Omega-3 PUFAs . The expression of survivin de-creased after treated with omega-3 PUFAs. Conclusion:Omega-3 PUFAs can inhibit cell activity and promote apoptosis of lung adenocarcinoma cells line H1975 and H460.%目的::探讨omega-3多不饱和脂肪酸(omega-3PUFAs)对人肺腺癌细胞H460及H1975细胞周期及细胞凋亡的影响。方法:采用CCK-8法检测omega-3PUFAs对人肺腺癌细胞H1975及H460细胞活性的影响,采用流式细胞仪检测omega-3PUFAs对H1975及H460细胞凋亡及细胞周期的影响,采用Western-blot法检测survivin蛋白在H460及H1975肿瘤细胞中的表达。结果:omega-3PUFAs可抑制人肺腺癌细胞H460及H1975肿瘤细胞的生长及诱导细胞凋亡(P<0.05),而omega-3PUFAs对人肺腺癌细胞H1975及H460的细胞周期无明显影响。 omega-3PUFAs处理肿瘤细胞后,survivin表达减弱。结论:omega-3PUFAs可抑制人肺腺癌细胞的细胞活性及诱导肿瘤细胞凋亡。

  13. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Bowen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  14. QKI-7 regulates expression of interferon-related genes in human astrocyte glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human QKI gene, called quaking homolog, KH domain RNA binding (mouse, is a candidate gene for schizophrenia encoding an RNA-binding protein. This gene was shown to be essential for myelination in oligodendrocytes. QKI is also highly expressed in astrocytes, but its function in these cells is not known. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the effect of small interference RNA (siRNA-mediated QKI depletion on global gene expression in human astrocyte glioma cells. Microarray measurements were confirmed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. The presence of QKI binding sites (QRE was assessed by a bioinformatic approach. Viability and cell morphology were also studied. The most significant alteration after QKI silencing was the decreased expression of genes involved in interferon (IFN induction (P = 6.3E-10, including IFIT1, IFIT2, MX1, MX2, G1P2, G1P3, GBP1 and IFIH1. All eight genes were down-regulated after silencing of the splice variant QKI-7, but were not affected by QKI-5 silencing. Interestingly, four of them were up-regulated after treatment with the antipsychotic agent haloperidol that also resulted in increased QKI-7 mRNA levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The coordinated expression of QKI-7 splice variant and IFN-related genes supports the idea that this particular splice variant has specific functions in astrocytes. Furthermore, a role of QKI-7 as a regulator of an inflammatory gene pathway in astrocytes is suggested. This hypothesis is well in line with growing experimental evidence on the role of inflammatory components in schizophrenia.

  15. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Mohan S.; O’Neal, Justin T.; Fedorova, Nadia B.; Puri, Vinita; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target. PMID:28152048

  16. Interferon-γ Reduces the Proliferation of Primed Human Renal Tubular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar García-Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a progressive deterioration of the kidney function, which may eventually lead to renal failure and the need for dialysis or kidney transplant. Whether initiated in the glomeruli or the tubuli, CKD is characterized by progressive nephron loss, for which the process of tubular deletion is of key importance. Tubular deletion results from tubular epithelial cell death and defective repair, leading to scarring of the renal parenchyma. Several cytokines and signaling pathways, including transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β and the Fas pathway, have been shown to participate in vivo in tubular cell death. However, there is some controversy about their mode of action, since a direct effect on normal tubular cells has not been demonstrated. We hypothesized that epithelial cells would require specific priming to become sensitive to TGF-β or Fas stimulation and that this priming would be brought about by specific mediators found in the pathological scenario. Methods: Herein we studied whether the combined effect of several stimuli known to take part in CKD progression, namely TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ, and Fas stimulation, on primed resistant human tubular cells caused cell death or reduced proliferation. Results: We demonstrate that these cytokines have no synergistic effect on the proliferation or viability of human kidney (HK2 cells. We also demonstrate that IFN-γ, but not the other stimuli, reduces the proliferation of cycloheximide-primed HK2 cells without affecting their viability. Conclusion: Our results point at a potentially important role of IFN-γ in defective repair, leading to nephron loss during CKD.

  17. Correlation of omega-3 levels in serum phospholipid from 2053 human blood samples with key fatty acid ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe William

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This research was conducted to explore the relationships between the levels of omega-3 fatty acids in serum phospholipid and key fatty acid ratios including potential cut-offs for risk factor assessment with respect to coronary heart disease and fatal ischemic heart disease. Methods Blood samples (n = 2053 were obtained from free-living subjects in North America and processed for determining the levels of total fatty acids in serum phospholipid as omega-3 fatty acids including EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5 n-3 and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6 n-3 by combined thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatographic analyses. The omega-3 levels were correlated with selected omega-6: omega-3 ratios including AA (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6: EPA and AA:(EPA+DHA. Based on previously-published levels of omega-3 fatty acids considered to be in a 'lower risk' category for heart disease and related fatality, 'lower risk' categories for selected fatty acid ratios were estimated. Results Strong inverse correlations between the summed total of omega-3 fatty acids in serum phospholipid and all four ratios (omega-6:omega-3 (n-6:n-3, AA:EPA, AA:DHA, and AA:(EPA+DHA were found with the most potent correlation being with the omega-6:omega-3 ratio (R2 = 0.96. The strongest inverse relation for the EPA+DHA levels in serum phospholipid was found with the omega-6: omega-3 ratio (R2 = 0.94 followed closely by the AA:(EPA+DHA ratio at R2 = 0.88. It was estimated that 95% of the subjects would be in the 'lower risk' category for coronary heart disease (based on total omega-3 ≥ 7.2% with omega-6:omega-3 ratios Conclusions Strong inverse correlations between the levels of omega-3 fatty acids in serum (or plasma phospholipid and omega-6: omega-3 ratios are apparent based on this large database of 2053 samples. Certain fatty acid ratios may aid in cardiovascular disease-related risk assessment if/when complete profiles are not available.

  18. OMEGA 3

    OpenAIRE

    Fivi Melva Diana

    2012-01-01

    Di Indonesia terjadi masalah gizi ganda yaitu gizi kurang pada balita dan gizi lebih terjadi pada orang dewasa. Penyebab tingginya angka kejadian gizi ganda di Indonesia salah satunya diduga karena kelebihan dan kekurangan konsumsi makanan sumber omega 3, EPA, DHA yang secara alami terdapat pada ASI, ikan dan minyak ikan. Omega 3 merupakan asam lemak tak jenuh ganda yang mempunyai banyak manfaat dintaranya dapat mencegah CVD (Cardiovascular Disease) dan untuk optimal tumbuh-kembang anak jika ...

  19. Space mutagenesis of genetically engineered bacteria expressing recombinant human interferon α1b and screening of higher yielding strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Changting; Liu, Jinyi; Fang, Xiangqun; Xu, Chen; Guo, Yinghua; Chang, De; Su, Longxiang

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the space mutagenesis of genetically engineered bacteria expressing recombinant human interferon α1b. The genetically engineered bacteria expressing the recombinant interferon α1b were sent into outer space on the Chinese Shenzhou VIII spacecraft. After the 17 day space flight, mutant strains that highly expressed the target gene were identified. After a series of screening of spaceflight-treated bacteria and the quantitative comparison of the mutant strains and original strain, we found five strains that showed a significantly higher production of target proteins, compared with the original strain. Our results support the notion that the outer space environment has unique effects on the mutation breeding of microorganisms, including genetically engineered strains. Mutant strains that highly express the target protein could be obtained through spaceflight-induced mutagenesis.

  20. Interferon-γ-induced upregulation of immunoproteasome subunit assembly overcomes bortezomib resistance in human hematological cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewerth, Denise; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Assaraf, Yehuda G; van Meerloo, Johan; Kirk, Christopher J; Anderl, Janet; Blank, Jonathan L; van de Ven, Peter M; Zweegman, Sonja; Jansen, Gerrit; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2014-01-13

    Despite encouraging results with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, emergence of resistance can limit its efficacy, hence calling for novel strategies to overcome bortezomib-resistance. We previously showed that bortezomib-resistant human leukemia cell lines expressed significantly lower levels of immunoproteasome at the expense of constitutive proteasomes, which harbored point mutations in exon 2 of the PSMB5 gene encoding the β5 subunit. Here we investigated whether up-regulation of immunoproteasomes by exposure to interferon-γ restores sensitivity to bortezomib in myeloma and leukemia cell lines with acquired resistance to bortezomib. RPMI-8226 myeloma, THP1 monocytic/macrophage and CCRF-CEM (T) parental cells and sub lines with acquired resistance to bortezomib were exposed to Interferon-γ for 24-48 h where after the effects on proteasome subunit expression and activity were measured, next to sensitivity measurements to proteasome inhibitors bortezomib, carfilzomib, and the immunoproteasome selective inhibitor ONX 0914. At last, siRNA knockdown experiments of β5i and β1i were performed to identify the contribution of these subunits to sensitivity to proteasome inhibition. Statistical significance of the differences were determined using the Mann-Whitney U test. Interferon-γ exposure markedly increased immunoproteasome subunit mRNA to a significantly higher level in bortezomib-resistant cells (up to 30-fold, 10-fold, and 6-fold, in β1i, β5i, and β2i, respectively) than in parental cells. These increases were paralleled by elevated immunoproteasome protein levels and catalytic activity, as well as HLA class-I. Moreover, interferon-γ exposure reinforced sensitization of bortezomib-resistant tumor cells to bortezomib and carfilzomib, but most prominently to ONX 0914, as confirmed by cell growth inhibition studies, proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis, activation of PARP cleavage and accumulation of

  1. Influence of carbohydrates on the stability and structure of a hyperglycosylated human interferon alpha mutein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceaglio, Natalia; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Oggero, Marcos

    2010-08-01

    Protein physical and chemical instability is one of the major challenges in the development of biopharmaceuticals during every step of the process, ranging from production to final delivery. This is particularly applicable to human recombinant interferon alpha-2b (rhIFN-alpha2b), a pleiotropic cytokine currently used worldwide for the treatment of various cancer and chronic viral diseases, which presents a poor stability in solution. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that the introduction of four N-glycosylation sites in order to construct a heavily glycosylated IFN variant (4N-IFN) resulted in a markedly prolonged plasma half-life which was reflected in an enhanced therapeutic activity in mice in comparison with the commercial non-glycosylated rhIFN-alpha2b (NG-IFN). Herein, we evaluated the influence of glycosylation on the in vitro stability of 4N-IFN towards different environmental conditions. Interestingly, the hyperglycosylated cytokine showed enhanced stability against thermal stress, acid pH and repetitive freeze-thawing cycles in comparison with NG-IFN. Besides, microcalorimetric analysis indicated a much higher melting temperature of 4N-IFN, also demonstrating a higher solubility of this variant as denoted by the absence of precipitation at the end of the experiment, in contrast with the NG-IFN behaviour. Furthermore, far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of 4N-IFN was virtually superimposed with that of NG-IFN, indicating that the IFN structure was not altered by the addition of carbohydrate moieties. The same conclusion could be inferred from limited proteolysis studies. Our results suggest that glycoengineering could be a useful strategy for protecting rhIFN-alpha2b from inactivation by various external factors and for overcoming aggregation problems during the production process and storage.

  2. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on UVR-related cancer risk in humans. An assessment of early genotoxic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhodes, L.E.; Shahbakhti, H.; Azurdia, R.M.; Moison, R.M.W.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Homburg, M.I.; Dean, M.P.; McArdle, F.; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G.M.J.; Epe, B.; Vink, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) protect against photocarcinogenesis in animals, but prospective human studies are scarce. The mechanism(s) underlying the photoprotection are uncertain, although ω-3 PUFAs may influence oxidative stress. We examined the effect of

  3. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on UVR-related cancer risk in humans. An assessment of early genotoxic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhodes, L.E.; Shahbakhti, H.; Azurdia, R.M.; Moison, R.M.W.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Homburg, M.I.; Dean, M.P.; McArdle, F.; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G.M.J.; Epe, B.; Vink, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) protect against photocarcinogenesis in animals, but prospective human studies are scarce. The mechanism(s) underlying the photoprotection are uncertain, although ω-3 PUFAs may influence oxidative stress. We examined the effect of supplementatio

  4. Omega-3 fatty acids modify human cortical visual processing--a double-blind, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Isabelle; Crewther, David P; Pipingas, Andrew; Rowsell, Renee; Cockerell, Robyn; Crewther, Sheila G

    2011-01-01

    While cardiovascular and mood benefits of dietary omega-3 fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are manifest, direct neurophysiological evidence of their effects on cortical activity is still limited. Hence we chose to examine the effects of two proprietary fish oil products with different EPA:DHA ratios (EPA-rich, high EPA:DHA; DHA-rich) on mental processing speed and visual evoked brain activity. We proposed that nonlinear multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) would be sensitive to any alteration of the neural function induced by omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, because the higher order kernel responses directly measure the degree of recovery of the neural system as a function of time following stimulation. Twenty-two healthy participants aged 18-34, with no known neurological or psychiatric disorder and not currently taking any nutritional supplementation, were recruited. A double-blind, crossover design was utilized, including a 30-day washout period, between two 30-day supplementation periods of the EPA-rich and DHA-rich diets (with order of diet randomized). Psychophysical choice reaction times and multi-focal nonlinear visual evoked potential (VEP) testing were performed at baseline (No Diet), and after each supplementation period. Following the EPA-rich supplementation, for stimulation at high luminance contrast, a significant reduction in the amplitude of the first slice of the second order VEP kernel response, previously related to activation in the magnocellular pathway, was observed. The correlations between the amplitude changes of short latency second and first order components were significantly different for the two supplementations. Significantly faster choice reaction times were observed psychophysically (compared with baseline performance) under the EPA-rich (but not DHA-rich) supplementation, while simple reaction times were not affected. The reduced nonlinearities observed under the EPA

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids modify human cortical visual processing--a double-blind, crossover study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Bauer

    Full Text Available While cardiovascular and mood benefits of dietary omega-3 fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA are manifest, direct neurophysiological evidence of their effects on cortical activity is still limited. Hence we chose to examine the effects of two proprietary fish oil products with different EPA:DHA ratios (EPA-rich, high EPA:DHA; DHA-rich on mental processing speed and visual evoked brain activity. We proposed that nonlinear multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP would be sensitive to any alteration of the neural function induced by omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, because the higher order kernel responses directly measure the degree of recovery of the neural system as a function of time following stimulation. Twenty-two healthy participants aged 18-34, with no known neurological or psychiatric disorder and not currently taking any nutritional supplementation, were recruited. A double-blind, crossover design was utilized, including a 30-day washout period, between two 30-day supplementation periods of the EPA-rich and DHA-rich diets (with order of diet randomized. Psychophysical choice reaction times and multi-focal nonlinear visual evoked potential (VEP testing were performed at baseline (No Diet, and after each supplementation period. Following the EPA-rich supplementation, for stimulation at high luminance contrast, a significant reduction in the amplitude of the first slice of the second order VEP kernel response, previously related to activation in the magnocellular pathway, was observed. The correlations between the amplitude changes of short latency second and first order components were significantly different for the two supplementations. Significantly faster choice reaction times were observed psychophysically (compared with baseline performance under the EPA-rich (but not DHA-rich supplementation, while simple reaction times were not affected. The reduced nonlinearities observed under the

  6. Differences in type I interferon signaling antagonism by dengue viruses in human and non-human primate cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy A Medina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: In vitro studies have shown that dengue virus (DENV can thwart the actions of interferon (IFN-α/β and prevent the development of an antiviral state in infected cells. Clinical studies looking at gene expression in patients with severe dengue show a reduced expression of interferon stimulated genes compared to patients with dengue fever. Interestingly, there are conflicting reports as to the ability of DENV or other flaviviruses to inhibit IFN-α/β signaling. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to determine the relative inhibition of IFN-α/β signaling by DENVs, a method combining flow cytometry and a four-parameter logistic regression model was established. A representative isolate from DENV-1, -3 and -4 and seventeen representative isolates encompassing all DENV-2 genotypes were evaluated. All of the DENVs evaluated in this study were capable of inhibiting IFN-α/β signaling. Most of the strains were able to inhibit IFN-α/β to a degree similar to DENV strain 16681; however, DENV-2 sylvatic strains demonstrated an increased inhibition of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (pSTAT1. Surprisingly, we were unable to observe inhibition of pSTAT1 by DENV-2 sylvatic strains or the Asian strain 16681 in non-human primate (NHP cell lines. Analysis in primary Rhesus macaque dendritic cells suggests that DENVs are capable of inhibiting IFN signaling in these cells. However, contrary to human dendritic cells, production of IFN-α was detected in the supernatant of DENV-infected Rhesus macaque dendritic cells. CONCLUSIONS: The ability of DENVs to inhibit IFN-α/β signaling is conserved. Although some variation in the inhibition was observed, the moderate differences may be difficult to correlate with clinical outcomes. DENVs were unable to inhibit pSTAT1 in NHP cell lines, but their ability to inhibit pSTAT1 in primary Rhesus macaque dendritic cells suggests that this may be a cell specific

  7. Extended interferon-alpha therapy accelerates telomere length loss in human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M O'Bryan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I interferons have pleiotropic effects on host cells, including inhibiting telomerase in lymphocytes and antiviral activity. We tested the hypothesis that long-term interferon treatment would result in significant reduction in average telomere length in peripheral blood T lymphocytes. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a flow cytometry-based telomere length assay on peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from the Hepatitis-C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C study, we measured T cell telomere lengths at screening and at months 21 and 45 in 29 Hepatitis-C virus infected subjects. These subjects had failed to achieve a sustained virologic response following 24 weeks of pegylated-interferon-alpha plus ribavirin treatment and were subsequently randomized to either a no additional therapy group or a maintenance dose pegylated-IFNα group for an additional 3.5 years. Significant telomere loss in naïve T cells occurred in the first 21 months in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere losses were similar in both groups during the final two years. Expansion of CD8(+CD45RA(+CD57(+ memory T cells and an inverse correlation of alanine aminotransferase levels with naïve CD8(+ T cell telomere loss were observed in the control group but not in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere length at screening inversely correlated with Hepatitis-C viral load and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sustained interferon-alpha treatment increased telomere loss in naïve T cells, and inhibited the accumulation of T cell memory expansions. The durability of this effect and consequences for immune senescence need to be defined.

  8. Transcriptome analysis reveals a classical interferon signature induced by IFNλ4 in human primary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauber, Chris; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Terczynska-Dyla, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The IFNL4 gene is negatively associated with spontaneous and treatment-induced clearance of hepatitis C virus infection. The activity of IFNλ4 has an important causal role in the pathogenesis, but the molecular details are not fully understood. One possible reason for the detrimental effect of IF...... genes being regulated in hepatocytes as well as airway epithelial cells. Thus we provide an in-depth analysis of the liver interferon response seen over an array of interferon subtypes and compare it to the response in the lung epithelium....

  9. Interferon-λ4 (IFNL4 transcript expression in human liver tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Amanzada

    Full Text Available Eradication of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, both spontaneous and treatment-induced, is marked by the wildtype allele C of a single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of the IL28B gene, rs12979860. This favorable allele was recently described to be in linkage disequilibrium with the wildtype allele TT of a dinucleotide polymorphism, ss469415590, located within a new protein-coding gene. While the TT allele introduces a frame-shift and disrupts the open reading frame, only the variant allele, ΔG, creates a novel type III interferon (IFN protein, IFN-λ4/IFNL4. Absence of IFNL4 is thus supposed to favor resolution of HCV infection. As to date IFNL4 mRNA transcription has only been investigated in polyI:C-stimulated primary human hepatocytes and not yet in HCV infection in vivo, this study analyzed IFNL4 mRNA expression in human liver biopsy specimens. Samples were obtained from patients with a broad panel of disorders including no liver disease, liver diseases of non-viral etiology, chronic hepatitis B and chronic hepatitis C. Hepatic IFNL4 transcripts were detectable exclusively in a subgroup of chronic hepatitis C patients (24/45. Their amounts were positively related to liver HCV RNA copy numbers (p = 0.0023, r = 0.56 suggesting that the hepatic viral load influences IFNL4 transcription irrespective of IFNL4 governing genotype. Both, the IFNL4 creating allele ΔG (p<0.0001 and actual IFNL4 transcription (p = 0.0015 were found to be correlated to the activation of IFN stimulatory genes (ISGs. By contrast, IFNL4 ss469415590 genotypes were not found to be related to IFN-λ2/3/IL28 or IFN-λ1/IL29 gene expression. In conclusion, this study is the first report on intrahepatic transcript levels of the recently discovered IFNL4 gene. Data indicate that HCV infection in particular might activate IFNL4 transcription in the liver. It provides a possible explanation as to why hepatitis C patients show ISG stimulation in their livers in the

  10. Human DEAD Box Helicase 3 Couples IκB Kinase ε to Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Activation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The human DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3) has been implicated in different processes contributing to gene expression. Interestingly, DDX3 is required as an essential host factor for the replication of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) and is therefore considered a potential drug target. On the other hand, DDX3 interacts with IκB kinase ε (IKKε) and TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and contributes to the induction of antiviral type I interferons (IFNs). However, the molecular mechanism by which DDX3 contr...

  11. Interferon-beta induces distinct gene expression response patterns in human monocytes versus T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Henig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocytes, which are key players in innate immunity, are outnumbered by neutrophils and lymphocytes among peripheral white blood cells. The cytokine interferon-β (IFN-β is widely used as an immunomodulatory drug for multiple sclerosis and its functional pathways in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs have been previously described. The aim of the present study was to identify novel, cell-specific IFN-β functions and pathways in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-activated monocytes that may have been missed in studies using PBMCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole genome gene expression profiles of human monocytes and T cells were compared following in vitro priming to TNF-α and overnight exposure to IFN-β. Statistical analyses of the gene expression data revealed a cell-type-specific change of 699 transcripts, 667 monocyte-specific transcripts, 21 T cell-specific transcripts and 11 transcripts with either a difference in the response direction or a difference in the magnitude of response. RT-PCR revealed a set of differentially expressed genes (DEGs, exhibiting responses to IFN-β that are modulated by TNF-α in monocytes, such as RIPK2 and CD83, but not in T cells or PBMCs. Known IFN-β promoter response elements, such as ISRE, were enriched in T cell DEGs but not in monocyte DEGs. The overall directionality of the gene expression regulation by IFN-β was different in T cells and monocytes, with up-regulation more prevalent in T cells, and a similar extent of up and down-regulation recorded in monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: By focusing on the response of distinct cell types and by evaluating the combined effects of two cytokines with pro and anti-inflammatory activities, we were able to present two new findings First, new IFN-β response pathways and genes, some of which were monocytes specific; second, a cell-specific modulation of the IFN-β response transcriptome by TNF-α.

  12. Activity of superior interferon α against HIV-1 in severe combined immunodeficient mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; TONG Xiao; Tadashi Nakasone; YUE Xue-tian; Naoki Yamamoto; LIU Xin-yuan; YANG Rong-ge

    2011-01-01

    Background Interferon (IFN) can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro and in clinic.However, IFN therapy for HIV infection was limited by its moderate antiviral efficacy and its frequent adverse effects. In the present study we evaluated the anti-HIV efficacy of a novel synthesized superior interferon α (slFNα).Methods We performed in vitro experiments with HIV-1 IIB infected MT4 cells, and evaluated in vivo anti-HIV efficacy of slFNα in severe combined immunodeficient (SClD) mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes (hu-PBL-SClD mice).Results We found that the 50% effective concentrations (EC5o) of slFNα against the replication of HIV-1 in MT4 cells was 0.06 ng/ml, representing stronger antiviral activity than interferon-α in vitro. In the hu-PBL-SCID mice, a dose-dependent protection pattern was observed: with 0.45 μg and 1.35 μg slFNα daily treatments, parts of SCID mice were protected from HIV infection, whereas 2.25 μg sIFNα daily treatments resulted in a terminally complete protection.Conclusions slFNα shows good anti-HIV activity both in vitro and in SCID mice, may be a promising anti-HIV agent deserving clinical investigation, especially considering the potential of IFN-α to inhibit HIV replication in patients infected with drug-resistant variants or co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  13. The loss of immunodominant epitopes affects interferon-γ production and lytic activity of the human influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.M. Berkhoff (Eufemia); M.M. Geelhoed-Mieras (Martina); E.J. Verschuren (Esther); C.A. van Baalen (Carel); R.A. Gruters (Rob); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn the present study, we examined the effect of the loss of the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B*3501-restricted nucleoprotein (NP)418-426epitope on interferon (IFN)-γ-production and lytic activity of the human cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in vitro. Extensive amino acid variation

  14. Omega-3 N-acylethanolamines are endogenously synthesised from omega-3 fatty acids in different human prostate and breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I; Wahle, K W J; Cascio, M G; Smoum-Jaouni, R; Mechoulam, R; Pertwee, R G; Heys, S D

    2011-12-01

    Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids inhibit breast and prostate cancer cell growth. We previously showed that N-acylethanolamine derivatives of n-3 (n-3-NAE) are endocannabinoids, which regulate cancer cell proliferation. These n-3-NAE are synthesised in certain cells/tissues, after supplementing with fatty acids, however, no one has assessed whether and to what extent this occurs in cancer cells. We determined levels of endogenous n-3-NAEs in hormone sensitive and insensitive prostate and breast cancer cells and subsequent effects on other endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol), before and after supplementing with DHA and EPA fatty acids, using HPLC tandem mass spectrometry. This is the first study reporting that n-3-NAEs are synthesised from their parent n-3 fatty acids in cancer cells, regardless of tumour type, hormone status or the presence of fatty acid amide hydrolase. This could have important implications for the use of n-3 fatty acids as therapeutic agents in breast and prostate cancers expressing cannabinoid receptors.

  15. Influence of interferon preparations on the proliferative capacity of human and mouse bone marrow cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van 't Hull (Eveline); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M.J. de Vries (Marco); H. Schellekens (Huub)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractThe toxicity of interferon to bone marrow was studied by the use of in vitro colony forming assays for hemopoietic cells. In the same study the relative inhibitory effects of two clinically common interferon preparations, leukocyte and fibroblast interferons, were compared with regard to

  16. Influence of interferon preparations on the proliferative capacity of human and mouse bone marrow cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van 't Hull (Eveline); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M. de Vries (Marco); H. Schellekens (Huub)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractThe toxicity of interferon to bone marrow was studied by the use of in vitro colony forming assays for hemopoietic cells. In the same study the relative inhibitory effects of two clinically common interferon preparations, leukocyte and fibroblast interferons, were compared with regard to

  17. Recombinant mouse interferon-gamma regulation of antibody production.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Interferon-gamma produced in monkey cells by transfection with mouse interferon-gamma cDNA suppressed the mouse in vitro antibody response in a manner similar to that of natural mouse interferon-gamma. Significant suppression was obtained with as little as 1 U of interferon. Recombinant human interferon-gamma produced by cloning in a similar fashion was not suppressive. Both the suppressive and the antiviral activities of recombinant interferon-gamma were neutralized by antibodies to mouse na...

  18. Two new monoclonal antibodies for biochemical and flow cytometric analyses of human interferon regulatory factor-3 activation, turnover, and depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Arjun; Doehle, Brian P; McElrath, M Juliana; Gale, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3) is a master transcription factor that drives the host intracellular innate immune response to virus infection. The importance of IRF-3 in innate immune responses is highlighted by the fact that pathogenic viruses have developed strategies for antagonism of IRF-3. Several tools exist for evaluation of viral regulation of IRF-3 activation and function, but high-quality monoclonal antibodies that mark the differential activation states of human IRF-3 are lacking. To study IRF-3 activation, turnover, and depletion in a high-throughput manner in the context of virus infection, we have developed two new monoclonal antibodies to human IRF-3. These antibodies detect IRF-3 in virus-infected cells in a wide variety of assays and provide a new tool to study virus-host interactions and innate immune signaling.

  19. HIV Blocks Interferon Induction in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages by Dysregulation of TBK1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Andrew N.; Nasr, Najla; Feetham, Alexandra; Galoyan, Ani; Alshehri, Abdullateef A.; Rambukwelle, Dharshini; Botting, Rachel A.; Hiener, Bonnie M.; Diefenbach, Eve; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Kim, Min; Mansell, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are present in the tissues of the anogenital tract, where HIV-1 transmission occurs in almost all cases. These cells are both target cells for HIV-1 and represent the first opportunity for the virus to interfere with innate recognition. Previously we have shown that both cell types fail to produce type I interferons (IFNs) in response to HIV-1 but that, unlike T cells, the virus does not block IFN induction by targeting IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) for cellular degradation. Thus, either HIV-1 inhibits IFN induction by an alternate mechanism or, less likely, these cells fail to sense HIV-1. Here we show that HIV-1 (but not herpes simplex virus 2 [HSV-2] or Sendai virus)-exposed DCs and macrophages fail to induce the expression of all known type I and III IFN genes. These cells do sense the virus, and pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-induced signaling pathways are triggered. The precise stage in the IFN-inducing signaling pathway that HIV-1 targets to block IFN induction was identified; phosphorylation but not K63 polyubiquitination of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) was completely inhibited. Two HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vpr and Vif, were shown to bind to TBK1, and their individual deletion partly restored IFN-β expression. Thus, the inhibition of TBK1 autophosphorylation by binding of these proteins appears to be the principal mechanism by which HIV-1 blocks type I and III IFN induction in myeloid cells. IMPORTANCE Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are key HIV target cells. Therefore, definition of how HIV impairs innate immune responses to initially establish infection is essential to design preventative interventions, especially by restoring initial interferon production. Here we demonstrate how HIV-1 blocks interferon induction by inhibiting the function of a key kinase in the interferon signaling pathway, TBK1, via two different viral accessory proteins. Other viral proteins have been shown to target the

  20. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Trigger Cell Cycle Arrest and Induce Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastoma LA-N-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Wing So

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 (n-3 fatty acids are dietary long-chain fatty acids with an array of health benefits. Previous research has demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effect of n-3 fatty acids on different cancer cell lines in vitro, yet their anti-tumor effects and underlying action mechanisms on human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells have not yet been reported. In this study, we showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA exhibited time- and concentration-dependent anti-proliferative effect on the human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells, but had minimal cytotoxicity on the normal or non-tumorigenic cells, as measured by MTT reduction assay. Mechanistic studies indicated that DHA and EPA triggered G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in LA-N-1 cells, as detected by flow cytometry, which was accompanied by a decrease in the expression of CDK2 and cyclin E proteins. Moreover, DHA and EPA could also induce apoptosis in LA-N-1 cells as revealed by an increase in DNA fragmentation, phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Up-regulation of Bax, activated caspase-3 and caspase-9 proteins, and down-regulation of Bcl-XL protein, might account for the occurrence of apoptotic events. Collectively, our results suggest that the growth-inhibitory effect of DHA and EPA on LA-N-1 cells might be mediated, at least in part, via triggering of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Therefore, DHA and EPA are potential anti-cancer agents which might be used for the adjuvant therapy or combination therapy with the conventional anti-cancer drugs for the treatment of some forms of human neuroblastoma with minimal toxicity.

  1. Roles of interferon-gamma and its target genes in schizophrenia: Proteomics-based reverse genetics from mouse to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Jae; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kwon, Joseph; Joo, Jaesoon; Lee, Sujeong; Nah, Seong-Su; Kim, Il-Chul; Jang, Ik-Soon; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Seung Il; Chung, Joo-Ho; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2012-06-01

    A decreased production of interferon gamma (IFNG) has been observed in acute schizophrenia. In order to explore the possible relationship between IFNG and schizophrenia, we attempted to analyze the differentially expressed proteins in the brains of interferon-gamma knockout (Ifng-KO) mice. Five upregulated and five downregulated proteins were identified with 2D gels and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analyses in Ifng-KO mouse brain. Of the identified proteins, we focused on creatine kinase brain (CKB) and triose phosphate isomerase 1 (TPI1). Consistent with the proteomic data, reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry analyses confirmed that the levels of gene expressions of Ckb and Tpi1 were downregulated and upregulated, respectively. When we analyzed the genetic polymorphisms of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of their human orthologous genes in a Korean population, the promoter SNPs of CKB and TPI1 were weakly associated with schizophrenia. In addition, IFNG polymorphisms were associated with schizophrenia. These results suggest that IFNG and proteins affected by IFNG may play a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  2. Analysis of eight genes modulating interferon gamma and human genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis: a case-control association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoal Eileen G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon gamma is a major macrophage-activating cytokine during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative pathogen of tuberculosis, and its role has been well established in animal models and in humans. This cytokine is produced by activated T helper 1 cells, which can best deal with intracellular pathogens such as M. tuberculosis. Based on the hypothesis that genes which regulate interferon gamma may influence tuberculosis susceptibility, we investigated polymorphisms in eight candidate genes. Methods Fifty-four polymorphisms in eight candidate genes were genotyped in over 800 tuberculosis cases and healthy controls in a population-based case-control association study in a South African population. Genotyping methods used included the SNPlex Genotyping System™, capillary electrophoresis of fluorescently labelled PCR products, TaqMan® SNP genotyping assays or the amplification mutation refraction system. Single polymorphisms as well as haplotypes of the variants were tested for association with TB using statistical analyses. Results A haplotype in interleukin 12B was nominally associated with tuberculosis (p = 0.02, but after permutation testing, done to assess the significance for the entire analysis, this was not globally significant. In addition a novel allele was found for the interleukin 12B D5S2941 microsatellite. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of using larger sample sizes when attempting validation of previously reported genetic associations. Initial studies may be false positives or may propose a stronger genetic effect than subsequently found to be the case.

  3. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jennifer L

    2016-02-02

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids.

  4. Effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on human brain morphology and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Dienke J.; Montfort, van Simone J.T.; Oranje, Bob; Durston, Sarah; Smeets, P.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Public opinion and media coverage suggest that there are benefits of long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) intake on brain functioning. However, it is an open question whether this is indeed the case. Therefore, we reviewed the evidence for effects of ω-3 LC-PUFA on human brain morp

  5. Histamine and histamine-receptor antagonists modify gene expression and biosynthesis of interferon gamma in peripheral human blood mononuclear cells and in CD19-depleted cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horváth, B V; Szalai, C; Mándi, Y; László, V; Radvány, Z; Darvas, Z; Falus, A

    1999-01-01

    The effect of histamine and histamine antagonists was examined on gene expression and biosynthesis of bacterial endotoxin (LPS) induced interferon gamma (IFNgamma) both in human peripheral mononuclear cells (PMBC) and in T-cell enriched fractions. We found, that histamine inhibited the LPS induced t

  6. Constitutive expression of interferon-induced human MxA protein in transgenic tobacco plants does not confer resistance to a variety of RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, M.; Prins, M.; Ponten, A.; Goldbach, R.W.; Haller, O.; Zeltz, P.

    2000-01-01

    MxA is a key component in the interferon-induced antiviral defense in humans. After viral infections, MxA is rapidly induced and accumulates in the cytoplasm. The multiplication of many RNA viruses,including all bunyaviruses tested so far, is inhibited by MxA. These findings prompted us to express

  7. Constitutive expression of interferon-induced human MxA protein in transgenic tobacco plants does not confer resistance to a variety of RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, M.; Prins, M.; Ponten, A.; Goldbach, R.W.; Haller, O.; Zeltz, P.

    2000-01-01

    MxA is a key component in the interferon-induced antiviral defense in humans. After viral infections, MxA is rapidly induced and accumulates in the cytoplasm. The multiplication of many RNA viruses,including all bunyaviruses tested so far, is inhibited by MxA. These findings prompted us to express M

  8. The structure of a thirty-six kilobase region of the human chromosome including the fibroblast interferon gene IFN-β.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Gross; U. Mayr; W. Bruns; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); H.H.M. Dahl; J.A. Collins (John)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractThe isolation of a human genomic cosmid hybrid containing the interferon beta gene has recently been reported (Gross et al., 1981). This hybrid was mapped using single and double digests and cross-hybridisation with the sub-cloned EcoRI and BgIII fragments. Purified fragments and subclon

  9. Alpha-interferon induces enhanced expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-microglobulin in vivo and in vitro in various subsets of human lymphoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Larsen, J K; Plesner, T

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cloned alpha-interferon (alpha-IFN) on the in vitro and in vivo expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-m) on subpopulations of human lymphoid cells was studied by flow cytometry. Mononuclear cells isolated from patients and cell cultures were labelled...

  10. CONSTRUCTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE RECOMBINANT OF THE AAV VECTOR AND HUMAN INTERFERON-GAMMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To construct and identify further a recombinant of Adeno-associated virus and interferon-gamma for gene therapy, the full-length IFN-γcDNA containing signal peptide was amplified by PCR, and then cloned into the pUC18. After screening, the fragment from the positive clone was then subcloned into pwpl9. After the correct recombinant was identified by digestion with SacI and BamHI, it was transfected into lympho- cyte cell line H9 mediated by calcium phosphate, and the expression of IFN-γ was detected by RT-PCR and ELISA. The result showed that the IFN-y were expressed in the H9 cells transfected with pwp/IFN-y. The so constructed recombinant plasmid pwpl9/IFN-y containing the full-length IFN-y gene was expressed in mam- malian cells.

  11. HCV Infection Induces Autocrine Interferon Signaling by Human Liver Endothelial Cell and Release of Exosomes, Which Inhibits Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Silvia; Kriss, Michael; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Stone, Amy E.L.; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mitchell, Angela; Khetani, Salman R.; Yamane, Daisuke; Stoddard, Mark; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Edwards, Michael G.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Gale, Michael; Shah, Vijay H.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) make up a large proportion of the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. LSECs are involved in induction of immune tolerance, but little is known about their functions during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods Primary human LSECs (HLSECs) and immortalized liver endothelial cells (TMNK-1) were exposed to various forms of HCV, including full-length transmitted/founder virus, sucrose-purified Japanese Fulminant Hepatitis-1 (JFH-1), a virus encoding a luciferase reporter, and the HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. Cells were analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence, immunohistochemical, and PCR assays. Results HLSECs internalized HCV, independent of cell–cell contacts; HCV RNA was translated but not replicated. Through pattern recognition receptors (TLR7 and retinoic acid inducible gene 1), HCV RNA induced consistent and broad transcription of multiple interferons (IFNs); supernatants from primary HLSECs transfected with HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules increased induction of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes in HLSECs. Recombinant type I and type III IFNs strongly up-regulated HLSEC transcription of interferon λ 3 (IFNL3) and viperin (RSAD2), which inhibit replication of HCV. Compared to CD8+ T cells, HLSECs suppressed HCV replication within Huh7.5.1 cells, also inducing IFN-stimulated genes in co-culture. Conditioned media from IFN-stimulated HLSECs induced expression of antiviral genes by uninfected primary human hepatocytes. Exosomes, derived from HLSECs following stimulation with either type I or type III IFNs, controlled HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Cultured HLSECs produce factors that mediate immunity against HCV. HLSECs induce self-amplifying IFN-mediated responses and release of exosomes with antiviral activity. PMID:25447848

  12. Shape-dependent regulation of proliferation in normal and malignant human cells and its alteration by interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesh, D.A.; Greene, J.J.

    1986-06-01

    The relationship between cell morphology, proliferation, and contact inhibition was studied in normal and malignant human cells which varied in their sensitivity to contact inhibition. Their ability to proliferate was examined under conditions where the cells were constrained into different shapes by plating onto plastic surfaces coated with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) can precisely vary the shape of cells without toxicity. Cell proliferation was quantitated by cell counts and labeling indices were determined by autoradiography. The normal JHU-1 foreskin fibroblasts and IMR-90 lung fibroblasts exhibited contact-inhibited growth with a saturation density of 2.9 X 10(5) and 2.0 X 10(5) cells/cm2, respectively. These cells also exhibited stringent dependency on cell shape with a mitotic index of less than 3% at poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) concentrations at which the cells were rounded versus a labeling index of 75-90% when the cells were flat. The malignant bladder carcinoma line RT-4 exhibited partial contact-inhibited growth. Its dependency on cell shape was less stringent than that of normal cells with a mitotic index of 37-40% when rounded and 79% when flat. The malignant fibrosarcoma line, HT1080, was not contact inhibited and was entirely shape independent with a mitotic index of 70-90% regardless of cell shape. Treatment of HT1080 cells with low concentration of human fibroblast interferon (less than 40 units/ml) restored shape-dependent proliferation while having little effect on normal cells. Subantiproliferative doses of interferon were also shown to restore contact-inhibited proliferation control to malignant cells previously lacking it.

  13. Omega-3 fatty acids (ῳ-3 fatty acids) in epilepsy: animal models and human clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGiorgio, Christopher M; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-10-01

    There is growing interest in alternative and nutritional therapies for drug resistant epilepsy. ῳ-3 fatty acids such as fish or krill oil are widely available supplements used to lower triglycerides and enhance cardiovascular health. ῳ-3 fatty acids have been studied extensively in animal models of epilepsy. Yet, evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials in epilepsy is at an early stage. This report focuses on the key ῳ-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, their incorporation into the lipid bilayer, modulation of ion channels, and mechanisms of action in reducing excitability within the central nervous system. This paper presents pre-clinical evidence from mouse, rat, and canine models, and reports the efficacy of n-3 fatty acids in randomized controlled clinical trials. An English language search of PubMed and Google scholar for the years 1981-2016 was performed for animal studies and human randomized controlled clinical trials. Expert commentary: Basic science and animal models provide a cogent rationale and substantial evidence for a role of ῳ-3 fatty acids in reducing seizures. Results in humans are limited. Recent Phase II RCT evidence suggests that low to moderate dose of ῳ-3 fatty acids reduce seizures; however, larger multicenter randomized trials are needed to confirm or refute the evidence. The safety, health effects, low cost and ease of use make ῳ-3 fatty acids an intriguing alternative therapy for drug resistant epilepsy. Though safety of profile is excellent, the human data is not yet sufficient to support efficacy in drug resistant epilepsy at this time.

  14. Results of space experiment program "interferon"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tálas, Margarita; Bátkai, László; Stöger, Ivana; Nagy, Károly; Hiros, László; Konstantinova, Irina; Rykova, Marina; Mozgovaya, Irina; Guseva, Olga; Kozharinov, Valerii

    The results of the biological space experiment "Interferon" performed by two international cosmonaut teams (26 May 1980, and 16 May 1981) aboard space laboratory Solyut-6 are reported: (1) Human lymphocytes separated from blood of healthy donors and placed into "Interferon I" equipment could be kept for 7 days in suspension culture under spaceflight conditons. Interferon production could be induced in human lymphocytes by preparations of different origin: virus, synthetic polyribonucleotides, bacterial protein and plant pigment. An increased lymphocyte interferon production in space laboratory compared to ground control was observed. (2) Human interferon preparations and interferon inducers placed in space laboratory at room temperature for 7 days maintained their biological activity. (3) A decrease of induced interferon production and natural killer activity of lymphocytes isolated from peripheral blood of cosmonauts was observed on the 1st day on Earth after 7-days spaceflight.

  15. Human endogenous retrovirus expression is inversely related with the up-regulation of interferon-inducible genes in the skin of patients with lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Marcelle Almeida de Sousa; Gavioli, Camila Fátima Biancardi; Pereira, Nátalli Zanete; de Carvalho, Gabriel Costa; Domingues, Rosana; Aoki, Valéria; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2015-04-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a common inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Reports of a common transactivation of quiescent human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) support the connection of viruses to the disease. HERVs are ancient retroviral sequences in the human genome and their transcription is often deregulated in cancer and autoimmune diseases. We explored the transcriptional activity of HERV sequences as well as the antiviral restriction factor and interferon-inducible genes in the skin from LP patients and healthy control (HC) donors. The study included 13 skin biopsies from patients with LP and 12 controls. Real-time PCR assay identified significant decrease in the HERV-K gag and env mRNA expression levels in LP subjects, when compared to control group. The expressions of HERV-K18 and HERV-W env were also inhibited in the skin of LP patients. We observed a strong correlation between HERV-K gag with other HERV sequences, regardless the down-modulation of transcripts levels in LP group. In contrast, a significant up-regulation of the cytidine deaminase APOBEC 3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing), and the GTPase MxA (Myxovirus resistance A) mRNA expression level was identified in the LP skin specimens. Other transcript expressions, such as the master regulator of type I interferon-dependent immune responses, STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and IRF-7 (interferon regulatory factor 7), IFN-β and the inflammassome NALP3, had increased levels in LP, when compared to HC group. Our study suggests that interferon-inducible factors, in addition to their role in innate immunity against exogenous pathogens, contribute to the immune control of HERVs. Evaluation of the balance between HERV and interferon-inducible factor expression could possibly contribute to surveillance of inflammatory/malignant status of skin diseases.

  16. A low omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA) diet increases omega-3 (n-3) long chain PUFA status in plasma phospholipids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, K E; Lau, A; Mantzioris, E; Gibson, R A; Ramsden, C E; Muhlhausler, B S

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of reducing the dietary linoleic acid (LA) intake from ~5% to PUFA (LCPUFA) status in humans. Thirty-six participants followed a PUFA content of plasma and erythrocyte phospholipids were significantly reduced after the low LA diet phase (P<0.001). The n-3 LCPUFA content of plasma phospholipids was significantly increased after the low LA diet compared to baseline (6.22% vs. 5.53%, P<0.001). These data demonstrate that reducing LA intake for 4 weeks increases n-3 LCPUFA status in humans in the absence of increased n-3 LCPUFA intake.

  17. Tumour necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma and substance P are novel modulators of extrapituitary prolactin expression in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Ewan A; Vidali, Silvia; Pigat, Natascha; Funk, Wolfgang; Lisztes, Erika; Bíró, Tamás; Goffin, Vincent; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Human scalp skin and hair follicles (HFs) are extra-pituitary sources of prolactin (PRL). However, the intracutaneous regulation of PRL remains poorly understood. Therefore we investigated whether well-recognized regulators of pituitary PRL expression, which also impact on human skin physiology and pathology, regulate expression of PRL and its receptor (PRLR) in situ. This was studied in serum-free organ cultures of microdissected human scalp HFs and skin, i.e. excluding pituitary, neural and vascular inputs. Prolactin expression was confirmed at the gene and protein level in human truncal skin, where its expression significantly increased (p = 0.049) during organ culture. There was, however, no evidence of PRL secretion into the culture medium as measured by ELISA. PRL immunoreactivity (IR) in female human epidermis was decreased by substance P (p = 0.009), while neither the classical pituitary PRL inhibitor, dopamine, nor corticotropin-releasing hormone significantly modulated PRL IR in HFs or skin respectively. Interferon (IFN) γ increased PRL IR in the epithelium of human HFs (p = 0.044) while tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α decreased both PRL and PRLR IR. This study identifies substance P, TNFα and IFNγ as novel modulators of PRL and PRLR expression in human skin, and suggests that intracutaneous PRL expression is not under dopaminergic control. Given the importance of PRL in human hair growth regulation and its possible role in the pathogenesis of several common skin diseases, targeting intracutaneous PRL production via these newly identified regulatory pathways may point towards novel therapeutic options for inflammatory dermatoses.

  18. Demonstration of luteotrophic responses of human recombinant gamma interferon in porcine corpora lutea using an in-vivo microdialysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, B S; Pedina, J; Steiner, A; Wuttke, W

    1997-01-01

    Conceptuses from several mammalian species prior to implantation secrete proteins belonging to the family of interferons. The main species of interferons known to be secreted by the pig blastocyst is interferon gamma (IFNgamma), the precise role of which is unclear. We decided to explore its effects on corpus luteum (CL) function using the novel microdialysis technique in vivo. Six cycling miniature pigs were monitored for estrus by daily plasma progesterone analysis and visual symptoms. On day nine of the cycle (day zero being the day of ovulation) the animals underwent surgery, and microdialysis tubing (vitafiber, Amicon U.S.A, cut off mol. wt. 1 million) were implanted in 17 corpora lutea. The inlets and outlets of all tubings were exteriorized and the entry and exit points of tubings in the CLs sealed with tissue glue. The afferent extension tubings were connected to a fraction collector and the system was continuously flushed with Ringer at a flow rate of 2.4 ml/h. After an initial flushout phase of 8 h, fractions were collected every half hour over 3 days. On days 10, 11 and 12 post estrus 12 CLs were stimulated for 4 h with 10(-7) M, 2 x 10(7) M and 4 x 10(-7) M human recombinant IFNgamma (Pharma Biotechnologie) respectively. Simultaneously, fractions were also collected from the remaining five unstimulated corpora lutea which served as controls. Progesterone concentrations in the dialysates were estimated by a sensitive enzymeimmunoassay (EIA). A significant increase (P < 0.01) in progesterone release was observed in all 3 days following stimulation. The progesterone increase was more marked on the first day of stimulation (1 x 10[-7] M) with the hormone levels rising further even after the end of stimulation. The overall increase in progesterone concentration was 2-fold on day 10 in comparison to 15-30% on subsequent days even though IFN concentrations for stimulation were 2- and 4-fold higher. In the unstimulated CLs, a gradual decline (P < 0.01) in

  19. Biomarkers of fish oil omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids intake in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Veronica; Barazzoni, Rocco; Singer, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    A biomarker is a measured characteristic that may be used as an indicator of some biological state or condition. In health and disease, biomarkers have been used not only for clinical diagnosis purposes but also as tools to assess effectiveness of a nutrition or drug intervention. When considering nutrition studies, evaluating the appropriate biomarker is a useful tool to assess compliance and incidence of a particular dietary component in the biochemistry of the organism. Fish oil is rich in ω-3 fatty acids that have well-known beneficial effects on human health mainly through its anti-inflammatory properties. It has been widely use to improve health and as a nutrition supplement in different pathological conditions such as cardiovascular, neurological, and critically ill related diseases. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid levels present in different biological moieties (plasma, cellular membranes, adipose tissue, etc) are the best biomarkers of fish oil intake. Each biological source of fatty acids has its own advantages and disadvantages, thus which biomarker to choose and where to measure it requires a comprehension of the objectives of the investigation. In this article we will review key facts about fish oil intake biomarkers to evaluate how components of a specific diet could be monitored and identified in biological samples. Having an accurate assessment of nutrition patterns could provide effective targets for intervention aimed at modifying eating habits and lifestyle towards the improvement of health.

  20. The Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Production and Cell Migration in Human Immune Cells: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Shinto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In multiple sclerosis (MS, compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity contributes to inflammatory T cell migration into the central nervous system. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 is associated with BBB disruption and subsequent T cell migration into the CNS. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on MMP-9 levels and T cell migration. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy controls were pretreated with two types of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Cell supernatants were used to determine MMP-9 protein and activity levels. Jurkat cells were pretreated with EPA and DHA and were added to fibronectin-coated transwells to measure T cell migration. EPA and DHA significantly decreased MMP-9 protein levels, MMP-9 activity, and significantly inhibited human T cell migration. The data suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may benefit patients with multiple sclerosis by modulating immune cell production of MMP-9.

  1. Differential regulation of type I interferon and epidermal growth factor pathways by a human Respirovirus virulence factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Caignard

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of paramyxoviruses are responsible for acute respiratory infections in children, elderly and immuno-compromised individuals, resulting in airway inflammation and exacerbation of chronic diseases like asthma. To understand the molecular pathogenesis of these infections, we searched for cellular targets of the virulence protein C of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (hPIV3-C. We found that hPIV3-C interacts directly through its C-terminal domain with STAT1 and GRB2, whereas C proteins from measles or Nipah viruses failed to do so. Binding to STAT1 explains the previously reported capacity of hPIV3-C to block type I interferon signaling, but the interaction with GRB2 was unexpected. This adaptor protein bridges Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF receptor to MAPK/ERK pathway, a signaling cascade recently found to be involved in airway inflammatory response. We report that either hPIV3 infection or transient expression of hPIV3-C both increase cellular response to EGF, as assessed by Elk1 transactivation and phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, 40S ribosomal subunit protein S6 and translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. Furthermore, inhibition of MAPK/ERK pathway with U0126 prevented viral protein expression in infected cells. Altogether, our data provide molecular basis to explain the role of hPIV3-C as a virulence factor and determinant of pathogenesis and demonstrate that Paramyxoviridae have evolved a single virulence factor to block type I interferon signaling and to boost simultaneous cellular response to growth factors.

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis Is Resistant to Inclusion Ubiquitination and Associated Host Defense in Gamma Interferon-Primed Human Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Arun K.; Piro, Anthony S.; Finethy, Ryan; Espenschied, Scott T.; Brown, Hannah E.; Giebel, Amanda M.; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Nelson, David E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induces cell-autonomous immunity to combat infections with intracellular pathogens, such as the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. The present study demonstrates that IFN-γ-primed human cells ubiquitinate and eliminate intracellular Chlamydia-containing vacuoles, so-called inclusions. We previously described how IFN-γ-inducible immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) employ ubiquitin systems to mark inclusions for destruction in mouse cells and, furthermore, showed that the rodent pathogen Chlamydia muridarum blocks ubiquitination of its inclusions by interfering with mouse IRG function. Here, we report that ubiquitination of inclusions in human cells is independent of IRG and thus distinct from the murine pathway. We show that C. muridarum is susceptible to inclusion ubiquitination in human cells, while the closely related human pathogen C. trachomatis is resistant. C. muridarum, but not C. trachomatis, inclusions attract several markers of cell-autonomous immunity, including the ubiquitin-binding protein p62, the ubiquitin-like protein LC3, and guanylate-binding protein 1. Consequently, we find that IFN-γ priming of human epithelial cells triggers the elimination of C. muridarum, but not C. trachomatis, inclusions. This newly described defense pathway is independent of indole-2,3-dioxygenase, a known IFN-γ-inducible anti-Chlamydia resistance factor. Collectively, our observations indicate that C. trachomatis evolved mechanisms to avoid a human-specific, ubiquitin-mediated response as part of its unique adaptation to its human host. PMID:27965446

  3. The P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G reduces serum human interferon-γ in a humanized mouse model of graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, N J; Belfiore, L; Ly, D; Adhikary, S R; Fuller, S J; Varikatt, W; Sanderson-Smith, M L; Sluyter, V; Alexander, S I; Sluyter, R; Watson, D

    2017-10-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major problem after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, a curative therapy for haematological malignancies. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated P2X7 receptor channel in allogeneic mouse models of GVHD. In this study, injection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) into immunodeficient non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency-interleukin (NOD-SCID-IL)-2Rγ(null) (NSG) mice established a humanized mouse model of GVHD. This model was used to study the effect of P2X7 blockade in this disease. From five weeks post-PBMC injection, humanized mice exhibited clinical signs and histopathology characteristic of GVHD. The P2X7 antagonist, Brilliant Blue G (BBG), blocked ATP-induced cation uptake into both murine and human cells in vitro. Injection of BBG (50 mg/kg) into NSG mice did not affect engraftment of human leucocytes (predominantly T cells), or the clinical score and survival of mice. In contrast, BBG injection reduced circulating human interferon (IFN)-γ significantly, which was produced by human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. BBG also reduced human T cell infiltration and apoptosis in target organs of GVHD. In conclusion, the P2X7 antagonist BBG reduced circulating IFN-γ in a humanized mouse model of GVHD supporting a potential role for P2X7 to alter the pathology of this disease in humans. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  4. Omega documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

  5. Omega documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, R.J.; Dye, R.E.; Giles, P.C.; Kimlinger, J.R.; Perkins, S.T.; Plechaty, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    OMEGA is a CRAY I computer program that controls nine codes used by LLNL Physical Data Group for: 1) updating the libraries of evaluated data maintained by the group (UPDATE); 2) calculating average values of energy deposited in secondary particles and residual nuclei (ENDEP); 3) checking the libraries for internal consistency, especially for energy conservation (GAMCHK); 4) producing listings, indexes and plots of the library data (UTILITY); 5) producing calculational constants such as group averaged cross sections and transfer matrices for diffusion and Sn transport codes (CLYDE); 6) producing and updating standard files of the calculational constants used by LLNL Sn and diffusion transport codes (NDFL); 7) producing calculational constants for Monte Carlo transport codes that use group-averaged cross sections and continuous energy for particles (CTART); 8) producing and updating standard files used by the LLNL Monte Carlo transport codes (TRTL); and 9) producing standard files used by the LANL pointwise Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (MCPOINT). The first four of these functions and codes deal with the libraries of evaluated data and the last five with various aspects of producing calculational constants for use by transport codes. In 1970 a series, called PD memos, of internal and informal memoranda was begun. These were intended to be circulated among the group for comment and then to provide documentation for later reference whenever questions arose about the subject matter of the memos. They have served this purpose and now will be drawn upon as source material for this more comprehensive report that deals with most of the matters covered in those memos.

  6. Type I Interferons Regulate Immune Responses in Humans with Blood-Stage Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H.; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Boyle, Glen M.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Loughland, Jessica R.; Burel, Julie; Doolan, Denise L.; Haque, Ashraful; McCarthy, James S.; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The development of immunoregulatory networks is important to prevent disease. However, these same networks allow pathogens to persist and reduce vaccine efficacy. Here, we identify type I interferons (IFNs) as important regulators in developing anti-parasitic immunity in healthy volunteers infected for the first time with Plasmodium falciparum. Type I IFNs suppressed innate immune cell function and parasitic-specific CD4+ T cell IFNγ production, and they promoted the development of parasitic-specific IL-10-producing Th1 (Tr1) cells. Type I IFN-dependent, parasite-specific IL-10 production was also observed in P. falciparum malaria patients in the field following chemoprophylaxis. Parasite-induced IL-10 suppressed inflammatory cytokine production, and IL-10 levels after drug treatment were positively associated with parasite burdens before anti-parasitic drug administration. These findings have important implications for understanding the development of host immune responses following blood-stage P. falciparum infection, and they identify type I IFNs and related signaling pathways as potential targets for therapies or vaccine efficacy improvement. PMID:27705789

  7. Type I Interferons as Regulators of Human Antigen Presenting Cell Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Gessani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are pleiotropic cytokines, initially described for their antiviral activity. These cytokines exhibit a long record of clinical use in patients with some types of cancer, viral infections and chronic inflammatory diseases. It is now well established that IFN action mostly relies on their ability to modulate host innate and adaptive immune responses. Work in recent years has begun to elucidate the mechanisms by which type I IFNs modify the immune response, and this is now recognized to be due to effects on multiple cell types, including monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs, NK cells, T and B lymphocytes. An ensemble of results from both animal models and in vitro studies emphasized the key role of type I IFNs in the development and function of DCs, suggesting the existence of a natural alliance between these cytokines and DCs in linking innate to adaptive immunity. The identification of IFN signatures in DCs and their dysregulation under pathological conditions will therefore be pivotal to decipher the complexity of this DC-IFN interaction and to better exploit the therapeutic potential of these cells.

  8. Novel avian influenza A (H7N9 virus induces impaired interferon responses in human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veera Arilahti

    Full Text Available In March 2013 a new avian influenza A(H7N9 virus emerged in China and infected humans with a case fatality rate of over 30%. Like the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, H7N9 virus is causing severe respiratory distress syndrome in most patients. Based on genetic analysis this avian influenza A virus shows to some extent adaptation to mammalian host. In the present study, we analyzed the activation of innate immune responses by this novel H7N9 influenza A virus and compared these responses to those induced by the avian H5N1 and seasonal H3N2 viruses in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We observed that in H7N9 virus-infected cells, interferon (IFN responses were weak although the virus replicated as well as the H5N1 and H3N2 viruses in moDCs. H7N9 virus-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained at a significantly lower level as compared to H5N1 virus-induced "cytokine storm" seen in human moDCs. However, the H7N9 virus was extremely sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-β in pretreated cells. Our data indicates that different highly pathogenic avian viruses may show considerable differences in their ability to induce host antiviral responses in human primary cell models such as moDCs. The unexpected appearance of the novel H7N9 virus clearly emphasizes the importance of the global influenza surveillance system. It is, however, equally important to systematically characterize in normal human cells the replication capacity of the new viruses and their ability to induce and respond to natural antiviral substances such as IFNs.

  9. A protective lipidomic biosignature associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio in fat-1 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Astarita

    Full Text Available A balanced omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA ratio has been linked to health benefits and the prevention of many chronic diseases. Current dietary intervention studies with different sources of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 lack appropriate control diets and carry many other confounding factors derived from genetic and environmental variability. In our study, we used the fat-1 transgenic mouse model as a proxy for long-term omega-3 supplementation to determine, in a well-controlled manner, the molecular phenotype associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio. The fat-1 mouse can convert omega-6 to omega-3 PUFAs, which protect against a wide variety of diseases including chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Both wild-type (WT and fat-1 mice were subjected to an identical diet containing 10% corn oil, which has a high omega-6 content similar to that of the Western diet, for a six-month duration. We used a multi-platform lipidomic approach to compare the plasma lipidome between fat-1 and WT mice. In fat-1 mice, an unbiased profiling showed a significant increase in the levels of unesterified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, EPA-containing cholesteryl ester, and omega-3 lysophosphospholipids. The increase in omega-3 lipids is accompanied by a significant reduction in omega-6 unesterified docosapentaenoic acid (omega-6 DPA and DPA-containing cholesteryl ester as well as omega-6 phospholipids and triacylglycerides. Targeted lipidomics profiling highlighted a remarkable increase in EPA-derived diols and epoxides formed via the cytochrome P450 (CYP450 pathway in the plasma of fat-1 mice compared with WT mice. Integration of the results of untargeted and targeted analyses has identified a lipidomic biosignature that may underlie the healthful phenotype associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio, and can potentially be used as a circulating biomarker for monitoring the health status and the efficacy of omega-3 intervention in humans.

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of ...

  11. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant ...

  12. Enhanced human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 expression and neuropathogenesis in knockout mice lacking Type I interferon responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongxia; Sharer, Leroy R; Chao, Wei; Gu, Chao-Jiang; Borjabad, Alejandra; Hadas, Eran; Kelschenbach, Jennifer; Ichiyama, Koji; Do, Meilan; Potash, Mary Jane; Volsky, David J

    2014-01-01

    The roles of Type I interferon (IFN) in human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) neuropathogenesis are poorly understood; both protective and deleterious effects of IFN signaling have been described. We used genetically modified mice deficient in the Type I IFN receptor (IFNRKO) to analyze the progress of HIV-1 brain infection and neuropathogenesis in the absence of IFN signaling. IFNRKO and wild-type (WT) mice on the 129xSv/Ev or C57BL/6 strain backgrounds were infected systemically with EcoHIV, a chimeric HIV-1 that productively infects mice. IFNRKO mice showed higher HIV-1 expression in spleen and peritoneal macrophages and greater virus infiltration into the brain compared to WT mice. Neuropathogenesis was studied by histopathological, immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and polymerase chain reaction analyses of brain tissues after the virus was inoculated into the brain by stereotaxic intracerebral injection. Both IFNRKO and WT mice showed readily detectable HIV-1 and brain lesions, including microglial activation, astrocytosis, and increased expression of genes coding for inflammatory cytokines and chemokines typical of human HIV-1 brain disease. Parameters of HIV-1 neuropathogenesis, including HIV-1 expression in microglia/macrophages, were significantly greater in IFNRKO than in WT mice. Our results show unequivocally that Type I IFN signaling and responses limit HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis in the brains of mice.

  13. Human gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor exert a synergistic blockade on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Alonso, M A; Carrasco, L

    1989-03-01

    The replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is not inhibited in either HeLa or HEp-2 cells treated with human alpha interferon (HuIFN-alpha), particularly when high multiplicities of infection are used. However, HuIFN-gamma partially inhibits HSV-1 translation in HEp-2 cells infected at low multiplicities. Under these conditions, the transcription of genes alpha 22, TK, and gamma 0 is greatly diminished. The combined addition of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and HuIFN-gamma to HEp-2 cells exerts a synergistic inhibition of HSV-1 translation. Cells treated with both cytokines continue synthesizing cellular proteins, even 20 h after HSV-1 infection. As little as 10 U of IFN-gamma per ml blocked HSV-1 DNA replication, provided that TNF was also present in the medium. Analyses of HSV-1 gene transcription suggest that the action of both TNF and IFN-gamma blocked a step that comes at or prior to early HSV-1 gene expression. This early step in HSV-1 replication inhibited by TNF and IFN-gamma occurs after virus attachment and entry into cells, since the internalization of radioactive HSV-1 virion particles was not blocked by the presence of the two cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the synergistic action of TNF plus IFN-gamma affects a step in HSV-1 replication that comes after virus entry but before or at the transcription of immediate-early genes.

  14. Enhanced expression in vivo of HLA-ABC antigens and beta 2-microglobulin on human lymphoid cells induced by human interferon-alpha in patients with lung cancer. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens prior to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K

    1985-01-01

    The effect of cloned human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on the expression of HLA-ABC antigens (HLA-ABC) and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) on human peripheral lymphoid cells in vivo was studied by cytofluorometry using monoclonal antibodies and fluorescein-labelled rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin...

  15. Gene Knockdown in Human Rhinovirus 1B Using 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs Results in the Reactivation of the Interferon Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guang Cheng; Zhang, Qing; Pang, Li Li; Li, Dan Di; Jin, Miao; Li, Hui Ying; Xu, Zi Qian; Kong, Xiang Yu; Wang, Hong; Lu, Shan; Duan, Zhao Jun

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the knockdown efficiency of 2'-O-methylated (2'-OMe)-modified small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) on human rhinovirus 1B (HRV1B) replication and the interferon response. Thus, 24 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs were designed to target HRV1B. The RNA levels of HRV1B, Toll-like receptor 3, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, retinoic acid inducible gene-I, and interferons were determined in HRV1B-infected HeLa and BEAS-2B epithelial cells transfected with 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs. The results revealed that all 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs interfered with the replication of HRV1B in a cell-specific and transfection efficiency-dependent manner. Viral activation of Toll-like receptor 3, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, retinoic acid inducible gene-I, and the interferon response was detected. In conclusion, the 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs used in this study could interfere with HRV1B replication, possibly leading to the reactivation of the interferon response.

  16. Induction of a type I interferon signature in normal human monocytes by gadolinium-based contrast agents: comparison of linear and macrocyclic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermuth, P J; Jimenez, S A

    2014-01-01

    The gadolinium-based contrast agent (GdBCA) Omniscan activates human macrophages through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-7 signalling. To explore the mechanisms responsible we compared the ability of linear and macrocyclic GdBCA to induce a type I interferon signature and a proinflammatory/profibrotic phenotype in normal human monocytes in vitro. Expression of genes associated with type I interferon signalling and inflammation and production of their corresponding proteins were determined. Both linear and macrocyclic GdBCA stimulated expression of multiple type I interferon-regulated genes and the expression of numerous chemokines, cytokines and growth factors in normal human peripheral blood monocytes. There was no correlation between the magnitude of the measured response and the Gd chelate used. To explore the mechanisms responsible for GdBCA induction of fibrosis in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in vitro, normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with GdBCA-treated monocyte culture supernatants and the effects on profibrotic gene expression were examined. Supernatants from monocytes exposed to all GdBCA stimulated types I and III collagen, fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in normal dermal fibroblasts. The results indicate that the monocyte activation induced by GdBCA may be the initial step in the development of GdBCA associated fibrosis in NSF.

  17. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-07-29

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits.

  18. Regulation of type I-interferon responses in the human epidermal melanocyte cell line SKMEL infected by the Ross River alphavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Mohamad; Thon-Hon, Vincent Gérard; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine; Martinez, Audrey; Gasque, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells and with emerging innate immune functions including the expression of antiviral interferon-type I cytokines. We herein ascertained the susceptibility of the human melanocytes to Ross River alphavirus (RRV) infection and analyzed the subsequent immune responses. We demonstrated for the first time that (1) SKMEL-28 melanocyte cell line was susceptible to RRV infection and displaying major cytopathic activities and (2) RRV interfered with the interferon-type I response by altering nuclear translocation of pSTAT1 and pSTAT2 in infected SKMEL-28. These results suggest that the human melanoma cell line SKMEL-28 is a valuable model to analyze the mechanisms involved in severe skin manifestations and melanocyte's immunity at the portal of entry of major infection by arboviruses.

  19. Interferons and interferon regulatory factors in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Rénia, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most serious infectious diseases in humans and responsible for approximately 500 million clinical cases and 500 thousand deaths annually. Acquired adaptive immune responses control parasite replication and infection-induced pathologies. Most infections are clinically silent which reflects on the ability of adaptive immune mechanisms to prevent the disease. However, a minority of these can become severe and life-threatening, manifesting a range of overlapping syndromes of complex origins which could be induced by uncontrolled immune responses. Major players of the innate and adaptive responses are interferons. Here, we review their roles and the signaling pathways involved in their production and protection against infection and induced immunopathologies.

  20. Expression, purification and characterization of the interferon-inducible, antiviral and tumour-suppressor protein, human RNase L

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ankush Gupta; Pramod C Rath

    2012-03-01

    The interferon (IFN)-inducible, 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A)-dependent ribonuclease L (RNase L) plays key role in antiviral defense of mammalian cells. Induction by IFN and activation by double-stranded RNA lead to 2-5A cofactor synthesis, which activates RNase L by causing its dimerization. Active RNase L degrades single-stranded viral as well as cellular RNAs causing apoptosis of virus-infected cells. Earlier, we had reported that expression of recombinant human RNase L caused RNA-degradation and cell-growth inhibition in E. coli without the need for exogenous 2-5A. Expression of human RNase L in E. coli usually leads to problems of leaky expression, low yield and degradation of the recombinant protein, which demands number of chromatographic steps for its subsequent purification thereby, compromising its biochemical activity. Here, we report a convenient protocol for expression of full-length, soluble and biochemically active recombinant human RNase L as GST-R Nase L fusion protein from E. coli utilizing a single-step affinity purification with an appreciable yield of the highly purified protein. Recombinant R Nase L was characterized by SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting and MALDI-TOF analysis. A semi-quantitative agarose-gel-based ribonuclease assay was developed for measuring its 2-5A-dependent R Nase L activity against cellular large rRNAs as substrates. The optimized expression conditions minimized degradation of the protein, making it a convenient method for purification of R Nase L, which can be utilized to study effects of various agents on the R Nase L activity and its protein–protein interactions.

  1. Interferon-γ differentially modulates the impact of tumor necrosis factor-α on human endometrial stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratte, Julia; Oemus, Anne; Zygmunt, Marek; Fluhr, Herbert

    2015-09-01

    The pro-inflammatory T helper (Th)-1 cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), are immunological factors relevant at the feto-maternal interface and involved in the pathophysiology of implantation disorders. The synergistic action of the two cytokines has been described with regard to apoptotic cell death and inflammatory responses in different cell types, but little is known regarding the human endometrium. Therefore, we examined the interaction of TNF-α and IFN-γ in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs). ESCs were isolated from specimens obtained during hysterectomy and decidualized in vitro. Cells were incubated with TNF-α, IFN-γ or signaling-inhibitor. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1, prolactin (PRL), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein (RANTES) and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 were measured using ELISA and real-time RT-PCR. Nuclear factor of transcription (NF)-κB and its inhibitor (IκBα) were analyzed by in-cell western assay and transcription factor assay. TNF-α inhibited and IFN-γ did not affect the decidualization of ESCs. In contrast, IFN-gamma differentially modulated the stimulating effect of TNF-alpha on cytokines by enhancing IL-6, RANTES and MCP-1 and attenuating LIF mRNA expression. These effects were time- and dose-dependent. IFN-γ had no impact on the initial activation of NF-κB signaling. Histone-deacetylase activity was involved in the modulating effect of IFN-γ on RANTES secretion. These observations showed a distinct pattern of interaction of the Th-1 cytokines, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the human endometrium, which could play an important role in the pathophysiology of implantation disorders.

  2. The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus-1 enhances hepatitis C virus replication through interferon gamma-inducible protein-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Jing

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV is associated with faster progression of liver disease and an increase in HCV persistence. However, the mechanism by which HIV-1 accelerates the progression of HCV liver disease remains unknown. Results HIV-1/HCV co-infection is associated with increased expression of interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. HCV RNA levels were higher in PBMCs of patients with HIV-1/HCV co-infection than in patients with HCV mono-infection. HIV-1 Tat and IP-10 activated HCV replication in a time-dependent manner, and HIV-1 Tat induced IP-10 production. In addition, the effect of HIV-1 Tat on HCV replication was blocked by anti-IP-10 monoclonal antibody, demonstrating that the effect of HIV-1 Tat on HCV replication depends on IP-10. Taken together, these results suggest that HIV-1 Tat protein activates HCV replication by upregulating IP-10 production. Conclusions HIV-1/HCV co-infection is associated with increased expression of IP-10 mRNA and replication of HCV RNA. Furthermore, both HIV-1 Tat and IP-10 activate HCV replication. HIV-1 Tat activates HCV replication by upregulating IP-10 production. These results expand our understanding of HIV-1 in HCV replication and the mechanism involved in the regulation of HCV replication mediated by HIV-1 during co-infection.

  3. Interferon-gamma improves impaired dentinogenic and immunosuppressive functions of irreversible pulpitis-derived human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Soichiro; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Ma, Lan; Tanaka, Yosuke; Tomoda, Erika; Aijima, Reona; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Kukita, Toshio; Shi, Songtao; Nishimura, Fusanori; Yamaza, Takayoshi

    2016-01-18

    Clinically, irreversible pulpitis is treated by the complete removal of pulp tissue followed by replacement with artificial materials. There is considered to be a high potential for autologous transplantation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in endodontic treatment. The usefulness of DPSCs isolated from healthy teeth is limited. However, DPSCs isolated from diseased teeth with irreversible pulpitis (IP-DPSCs) are considered to be suitable for dentin/pulp regeneration. In this study, we examined the stem cell potency of IP-DPSCs. In comparison with healthy DPSCs, IP-DPSCs expressed lower colony-forming capacity, population-doubling rate, cell proliferation, multipotency, in vivo dentin regeneration, and immunosuppressive activity, suggesting that intact IP-DPSCs may be inadequate for dentin/pulp regeneration. Therefore, we attempted to improve the impaired in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro immunosuppressive functions of IP-DPSCs to enable dentin/pulp regeneration. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) treatment enhanced in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro T cell suppression of IP-DPSCs, whereas treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha did not. Therefore, these findings suggest that IFN-γ may be a feasible modulator to improve the functions of impaired IP-DPSCs, suggesting that autologous transplantation of IFN-γ-accelerated IP-DPSCs might be a promising new therapeutic strategy for dentin/pulp tissue engineering in future endodontic treatment.

  4. Evaluation of Adverse Effects of Mutein Forms of Recombinant Human Interferon Alpha-2b in Female Swiss Webster Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rachmawati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We successfully developed recombinant human interferon alpha-2b (rhIFN-α2b and mutein forms through the site-directed mutagenesis technique. The mutein forms were developed by substituting cysteins at positions 2 and 99 with aspartic acids. The potential adverse effects of these rhIFN-α2bs were assessed by acute and subchronic studies. Methods. In the acute study, rhIFN-α2bs were subcutaneously administered to mice at a single dose of 97.5 μg/kg, 975 μg/kg, and 9.75 mg/kg BW and were observed for 14 days. In the subchronic study, single dose of 1.95 μg/kg and 19.5 μg/kg, respectively, was given subcutaneously every 3 days for 45 days. Results. No death as well as abnormality in body weight, behavior, presentation of main organs, and value of plasma SGPT and SGOT was observed. Wild type and mutein rhIFN-α2bs did not show significant adverse effects at dose up to 9.75 mg/kg BW. Administration of these rhIFN-α2bs given repeatedly did not induce any adverse effect. Conclusion. These results suggest that our rhIFN-α2bs are safe. However, further study is still needed to clarify the safety issue before use in clinical trial.

  5. Suppression of Angiogenesis and Therapy of Human Colon Cancer Liver Metastasis by Systemic Administration of Interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutaro Ozawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether systemic administration of interferon-alpha (IFN-α can inhibit liver metastasis produced in nude mice by human colon cancer cells. KM12L4 (IFN-α-sensitive or KM12L4 IFNR (IFN-α-resistant cells were injected into the spleen of nude mice. Seven days later, the mice were treated with subcutaneous (s.c. injections of IFN-α (70,000 units/week at different dosing schedules (1, 2, or 7 times/week. Significant inhibition of tumor growth, vascularization and expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or matrix metal loproteinase9 (MMP-9 mRNA and protein occurred in mice given daily injections of IFN-α. Kinetic analysis of therapy showed that daily s.c. administrations of 10,000 units of IFN-α induced apoptosis in liver metastasis-associated endothelial cells, followed by inhibition of tumor cell division and apoptosis of tumor cells. These data suggest that the antiangiogenic activity of IFN-α-2a depends on frequent administration of the optimal biologic dose.

  6. Interferon alpha2 recombinant and epidermal growth factor modulate proliferation and hypusine synthesis in human epidermoid cancer KB cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraglia, M; Passeggio, A; Beninati, S; Leardi, A; Nicolini, L; Improta, S; Pinto, A; Bianco, A R; Tagliaferri, P; Abbruzzese, A

    1997-06-15

    We previously found that interferon alpha2 recombinant (IFNalpha) increases the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) in the human epidermoid cancer KB cell line. Here we report the effects of IFNalpha and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on KB cell cycle kinetics. IFNalpha (1000 i.u./ml) for 48 h decreased the S-phase fraction and diminished the expression of Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen on KB cells. Incubation of IFNalpha-treated KB cells with 10 nM EGF for 12 h reversed these effects. We then studied several biochemical markers of cell proliferation. Ornithine decarboxylase activity was decreased to about one-tenth by IFNalpha and partly restored by EGF. Hypusine is contained only in eukaryotic initiation factor 5A and its levels are correlated with cell proliferation. IFNalpha decreased hypusine synthesis by 75%; exposure of cells to EGF for 12 h restored hypusine synthesis almost completely. We also studied the effects of IFNalpha on the cytotoxicity of the recombinant toxin TP40, which inhibits elongation factor 2 through EGF-R binding and internalization. IFNalpha greatly enhanced the TP40-induced inhibition of protein synthesis in KB cells. In conclusion, IFNalpha, which affects protein synthesis machinery and increases EGF-R expression, enhances the tumoricidal activity of TP40 and hence could be useful in the setting of anti-cancer therapy.

  7. Interferon-γ induces immunoproteasomes and the presentation of MHC I-associated peptides on human salivary gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano-Garcia, Martha E; Misuno, Kaori; Tran, Simon D; Hu, Shen

    2014-01-01

    A prominent histopathological feature of Sjögren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease, is the presence of lymphocytic infiltrates in the salivary and lachrymal glands. Such infiltrates are comprised of activated lymphocytes and macrophages, and known to produce multiple cytokines including interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). In this study, we have demonstrated that IFN-γ strongly induces the expression of immunoproteasome beta subunits (β1i, β2i and β5i) and immunoproteasome activity but conversely inhibits the expression of proteasome beta subunits (β1, β2 and β5) in human salivary gland (HSG) cells. Mass spectrometric analysis has revealed potential MHC I-associated peptides on the HSG cells, including a tryptic peptide derived from salivary amylase, due to IFN-γ stimulation. These results suggest that IFN-γ induces immunoproteasomes in HSG cells, leading to enhanced presentation of MHC I-associated peptides on cell surface. These peptide-presenting salivary gland cells may be recognized and targeted by auto-reactive T lymphocytes. We have also found that lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, inhibits the expression of β1 subunit in HSG cells and blocks the IFN-γ-induced expression of β1i and immunoproteasome activity. However, the expression of β2i and β5i in HSG cells is not affected by lactacystin. These results may add new insight into the mechanism regarding how lactacystin blocks the action of proteasomes or immunoproteasomes.

  8. Interferon-γ induces immunoproteasomes and the presentation of MHC I-associated peptides on human salivary gland cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha E Arellano-Garcia

    Full Text Available A prominent histopathological feature of Sjögren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease, is the presence of lymphocytic infiltrates in the salivary and lachrymal glands. Such infiltrates are comprised of activated lymphocytes and macrophages, and known to produce multiple cytokines including interferon-gamma (IFN-γ. In this study, we have demonstrated that IFN-γ strongly induces the expression of immunoproteasome beta subunits (β1i, β2i and β5i and immunoproteasome activity but conversely inhibits the expression of proteasome beta subunits (β1, β2 and β5 in human salivary gland (HSG cells. Mass spectrometric analysis has revealed potential MHC I-associated peptides on the HSG cells, including a tryptic peptide derived from salivary amylase, due to IFN-γ stimulation. These results suggest that IFN-γ induces immunoproteasomes in HSG cells, leading to enhanced presentation of MHC I-associated peptides on cell surface. These peptide-presenting salivary gland cells may be recognized and targeted by auto-reactive T lymphocytes. We have also found that lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, inhibits the expression of β1 subunit in HSG cells and blocks the IFN-γ-induced expression of β1i and immunoproteasome activity. However, the expression of β2i and β5i in HSG cells is not affected by lactacystin. These results may add new insight into the mechanism regarding how lactacystin blocks the action of proteasomes or immunoproteasomes.

  9. Immunostimulatory effects of natural human interferon-alpha (huIFN-alpha) on carps Cyprinus carpio L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Hironobu; Chakraborty, Gunimala; Korenaga, Hiroki; Kono, Tomoya; Shivappa, R B; Sakai, Masahiro

    2009-10-15

    Human interferon-alpha (huIFN-alpha) is an important immunomodulatory substance used in the treatment and prevention of numerous infectious and immune-related diseases in animals. However, the immunostimulatory effects of huIFN-alpha in fish remain to be investigated. In the current study, the immune responses of the carp species Cyprinus carpio L. to treatment with huIFN-alpha were analyzed via measurement of superoxide anion production, phagocytic activity and the expression of cytokine genes including interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 10. Low doses of huIFN-alpha were administered orally once a day for 3 days, and sampling was carried out at 1, 3 and 5 days post-treatment. Our results indicate that a low dose of huIFN-alpha significantly increased phagocytic activity and superoxide anion production in the carp kidney. The huIFN-alpha-treated fish also displayed a significant upregulation in cytokine gene expression. The current study demonstrates the stimulatory effects of huIFN-alpha on the carp immune system and highlights the immunomodulatory role of huIFN-alpha in fish.

  10. Differential induction of Toll-like receptors & type 1 interferons by Sabin attenuated & wild type 1 polioviruses in human neuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu C Mohanty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Polioviruses are the causative agent of paralytic poliomyelitis. Attenuated polioviruses (Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine strains do not replicate efficiently in neurons as compared to the wild type polioviruses and therefore do not cause disease. This study was aimed to investigate the differential host immune response to wild type 1 poliovirus (wild PV and Sabin attenuated type 1 poliovirus (Sabin PV in cultured human neuronal cells. Methods: By using flow cytometry and real time PCR methods we examined host innate immune responses and compared the role of toll like receptors (TLRs and cytoplasmic RNA helicases in cultured human neuronal cells (SK-N-SH infected with Sabin PV and wild PV. Results: Human neuronal cells expressed very low levels of TLRs constitutively. Sabin PV infection induced significantly higher expression of TLR3, TLR7 and melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5 (MDA-5 m-RNA in neuronal cells at the beginning of infection (up to 4 h as compared to wild PV. Further, Sabin PV also induced the expression of interferon α/β at early time point of infection. The induced expression of IFN α/β gene by Sabin PV in neuronal cells could be suppressed by inhibiting TLR7. Interpretation & conclusions: Neuronal cell innate immune response to Sabin and wild polioviruses differ significantly for TLR3, TLR7, MDA5 and type 1 interferons. Effects of TLR7 activation and interferon production and Sabin virus replication in neuronal cells need to be actively investigated in future studies.

  11. Shared receptor components but distinct complexes for alpha and beta interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewerenz, M; Mogensen, K E; Uzé, G

    1998-09-25

    The type I interferon family includes 13 alpha, one omega and one beta subtypes recognized by a complex containing the receptor subunits ifnar1 and ifnar2 and their associated Janus tyrosine kinases, Tyk2 and Jak1. To investigate the reported differences in the way that alpha and beta interferons signal through the receptor, we introduced alanine-substitutions in the ifnar2 extracellular domain, and expressed the mutants in U5A cells, lacking endogenous ifnar2. A selection, designed to recover mutants that responded preferentially to alpha or beta interferon yielded three groups: I, neutral; II, sensitive to alpha interferon, partially resistant to beta interferon; III, resistant to alpha interferon, partially sensitive to beta interferon. A mutant clone, TMK, fully resistant to alpha interferon with good sensitivity to beta interferon, was characterized in detail and compared with U5A cells complemented with wild-type ifnar2 and also with Tyk2-deficient 11.1 cells, which exhibit a similar alpha-unresponsive phenotype with a partial beta interferon response. Using anti-receptor antibodies and mutant forms of beta interferon, three distinct modes of ligand interaction could be discerned: (i) alpha interferon with ifnar1 and ifnar2; (ii) beta interferon with ifnar1 and ifnar2; (iii) beta interferon with ifnar2 alone. We conclude that alpha and beta interferons signal differently through their receptors because the two ligand subtypes interact with the receptor subunits ifnar 1 and ifnar2 in entirely different ways.

  12. Chicken interferons, their receptors and interferon-stimulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Kate E; Ward, Alister C; Lowenthal, John W; Bean, Andrew G D

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of pathogenic viruses is a serious issue as they pose a constant threat to both the poultry industry and to human health. To prevent these viral infections an understanding of the host-virus response is critical, especially for the development of novel therapeutics. One approach in the control of viral infections would be to boost the immune response through administration of cytokines, such as interferons. However, the innate immune response in chickens is poorly characterised, particularly concerning the interferon pathway. This review will provide an overview of our current understanding of the interferon system of chickens, including their cognate receptors and known interferon-stimulated gene products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Human pDCs display sex-specific differences in type I interferon subtypes and interferon α/β receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Susanne M; Beisel, Claudia; Sutter, Kathrin; Griesbeck, Morgane; Hildebrandt, Heike; Hagen, Sven H; Dittmer, Ulf; Altfeld, Marcus

    2017-02-01

    The outcomes of many diseases differ between women and men, with women experiencing a higher incidence and more severe pathogenesis of autoimmune and some infectious diseases. It has been suggested that this is partially due to activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), the main producers of interferon (IFN)-α, in response to toll-like receptor (TLR)7 stimulation. We investigated the induction of type I IFN (IFN-I) subtypes upon TLR7 stimulation on isolated pDCs. Our data revealed a sex-specific differential expression of IFN-Is, with pDCs from females showing a significantly higher mRNA expression of all 13 IFN-α subtypes. In addition, pDCs from females had higher levels of IFN-β mRNA after stimulation, indicating that sex differences in IFN-I production by pDCs were mediated by a signaling event upstream of the first loop of IFN-I mRNA transcription. Furthermore, the surface expression levels of the common IFN-α/β receptor subunit 2 were significantly higher on pDCs from females in comparison to males. These data indicate that higher IFN-α production is already established at the mRNA level and propose a contribution of higher IFN-α/β receptor 2 expression on pDCs to the immunological differences in IFN-I production observed between females and males. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Evidence of vitamin D and interferon-β cross-talk in human osteoblasts with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 being dominant over interferon-β in stimulating mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woeckel, V J; Koedam, M; van de Peppel, J; Chiba, H; van der Eerden, B C J; van Leeuwen, J P T M

    2012-09-01

    It is well established that 1α-25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) regulates osteoblast function and stimulates mineralization by human osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to identify processes underlying the 1,25D3 effects on mineralization. We started with gene expression profiling analyses of differentiating human pre-osteoblast treated with 1,25D3. Bioinformatic analyses showed interferon-related and -regulated genes (ISG) to be overrepresented in the set of 1,25D3-regulated genes. 1,25D3 down-regulated ISGs predominantly during the pre-mineralization period. This pointed to an interaction between the vitamin D and IFN signaling cascades in the regulation of osteoblast function. Separately, 1,25D3 enhances while IFNβ inhibits mineralization. Treatment of human osteoblasts with 1,25D3 and IFNβ showed that 1,25D3 completely overrules the IFNβ inhibition of mineralization. This was supported by analyses of extracellular matrix gene expression, showing a dominant effect of 1,25D3 over the inhibitory effect of IFNβ. We identified processes shared by IFNβ- and 1,25D3-mediated signaling by performing gene expression profiling during early osteoblast differentiation. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that genes being correlated or anti-correlated with interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 1 (IFIT1) were associated with osteoblast proliferation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates a cross talk between 1,25D3 and IFNβ in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation/mineralization. The interaction is complex and depends on the process but importantly, 1,25D3 stimulation of mineralization is dominant over the inhibitory effect of IFNβ. These observations are of potential clinical relevance considering the impact of the immune system on bone metabolism in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Human umbilical cord matrix-derived stem cells expressing interferon-β gene inhibit breast cancer cells via apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ching-Ju; Chan, Te-Fu; Chen, Chien-Chung; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Long, Cheng-Yu; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) derived from the umbilical cord matrix have been reported to be used as anti-tumor gene carrier for attenuation of tumor growth, which extends the half-life and lowers the unexpected cytotoxicity of the gene in vivo. Interferon-β (IFNβ) is known to possess robust antitumor effects on different types of cancer cell lines in vitro. The present study was aimed to investigate the anti-tumor effect of IFNβ gene-transfected hUCMSCs (IFNβ-hUCMSCs) on breast cancer cells with emphasis on triple negative breast carcinoma. Our findings revealed that the co-culture of IFNβ-hUCMSCs with the human triple negative breast carcinoma cell lines MDA-MB-231 or Hs578T significantly inhibited growth of both carcinoma cells. In addition, the culture medium conditioned by these cells also significantly suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of both carcinoma cells. Further investigation showed that the suppressed growth and the apoptosis induced by co-culture of IFNβ-hUCMSCs or conditioned medium were abolished by pretreating anti-IFNβ neutralizing antibody. These findings indicate that IFNβ-hUCMSCs triggered cell death of breast carcinoma cells through IFN-β production, thereby induced apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell growth. In conclusion, we demonstrated that IFNβ-hUCMSCs inhibited the growth of breast cancer cells through apoptosis. with potent anti-cancer activity, it represents as an anti-cancer cytotherapeutic modality against breast cancer. PMID:27129156

  16. Dual functions of interferon regulatory factors 7C in Epstein-Barr virus-mediated transformation of human B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhao

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is associated with several human malignancies. Interferon (IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7 has several splicing variants, and at least the major splicing variant (IRF-7A has oncogenic potential and is associated with EBV transformation processes. IRF-7C is an alternative splicing variant with only the DNA-binding domain of IRF-7. Whether IRF-7C is present under physiological conditions and its functions in viral transformation are unknown. In this report, we prove the existence of IRF-7C protein and RNA in certain cells under physiological conditions, and find that high levels of IRF-7C are associated with EBV transformation of human primary B cells in vitro as well as EBV type III latency. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1 stimulates IRF-7C expression in B lymphocytes. IRF-7C has oncogenic potential in rodent cells and partially restores the growth properties of EBV-transformed cells under a growth-inhibition condition. A tumor array experiment has identified six primary tumor specimens with high levels of IRF-7C protein--all of them are lymphomas. Furthermore, we show that the expression of IRF-7C is apparently closely associated with other IRF-7 splicing variants. IRF-7C inhibits the function of IRF-7 in transcriptional regulation of IFN genes. These data suggest that EBV may use splicing variants of IRF-7 for its transformation process in two strategies: to use oncogenic properties of various IRF-7 splicing variants, but use one of its splicing variants (IRF-7C to block the IFN-induction function of IRF-7 that is detrimental for viral transformation. The work provides a novel relation of host/virus interactions, and has expanded our knowledge about IRFs in EBV transformation.

  17. Interferon-¿ and interleukin-4 in human Leishmania donovani infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Kurtzhals, J A; Kharazmi, A

    1993-01-01

    can direct the T cell response into Th1 or Th2 type. If similar mechanisms operate in humans, the outcome of L. donovani infections may depend on the local cytokine environment in which early activation of Leishmania specific T cells takes place. Cytokines secreted by cross-reactive memory T cells...

  18. Human keratinocytes produce the complement inhibitor factor H: synthesis is regulated by interferon-gamma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timar, K.K.; Pasch, M.C.; Bosch, N.H. van den; Jarva, H.; Junnikkala, S.; Meri, S.; Bos, J.D.; Asghar, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Locally synthesized complement is believed to play an important role in host defense and inflammation at organ level. In the epidermis, keratinocytes have so far been shown to synthesize two complement components, C3 and factor B. Here, we studied the synthesis of factor H by human keratinocytes. We

  19. MicroRNA Expression Profiling by Bead Array Technology in Human Tumor Cell Lines Treated with Interferon-Alpha-2a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegrist Fredy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNAs are positive and negative regulators of eukaryotic gene expression that modulate transcript abundance by specific binding to sequence motifs located prevalently in the 3' untranslated regions of target messenger RNAs (mRNA. Interferon-alpha-2a (IFNα induces a large set of protein coding genes mediating antiproliferative and antiviral responses. Here we use a global microarray-based microRNA detection platform to identify genes that are induced by IFNα in hepatoma- or melanoma-derived human tumor cell lines. Despite the enormous differences in expression levels between these models, we were able to identify microRNAs that are upregulated by IFNα in both lines suggesting the possibility that interferon-regulated microRNAs are involved in the transcriptional repression of mRNA relevant to cytokine responses.

  20. Interferon triggers experimental synovitis and may potentiate auto-immune disease in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbach, T O; Moshonov, S; Zor, U; Yaron, M

    1984-09-01

    From these data it appears that IFN is capable of stimulating prostaglandin E and hyaluronic acid production by human synovial fibroblasts in vitro and of initiating an inflammatory reaction in animal joints. In chronic arthritis its production may result from persisting viral or other antigenic stimulation. IFN may enhance the immune response and mediate the inflammatory process in the joint. Its role in the pathogenesis of rheumatic and various other autoimmune diseases is undergoing further study.

  1. Production of interferon-γ by natural killer cells and aging in chronic human schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Speziali

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNG: Aging is associated with several alterations in the phenotype, repertoire and activation status of lymphocytes as well as in the cytokine profile produced by these cells. As a lifelong condition, chronic parasitic diseases such as human schistosomiasis overlaps with the aging process and no systematic study has yet addressed the changes in immune response during infection with Schistosoma mansoni in older individuals.

  2. [Isolation of expressed in E. coli human interferon beta1b (Ser17) by ion-exchange chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, V P; Bezuglov, V V; Bobrov, M Iu; Kostromina, T I; Feofanov, S A; Miroshnikov, A I

    2011-01-01

    A method for isolation of interferon beta1b (Serl7) from inclusion bodies, comprising the steps of solution and reduction of protein from the inclusion bodies, refolding, chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, chromatography on SP-Sepharose, concentrating, desalting and addition of stabilizers. The solution of reduced protein was diluted with pH 8.0 buffer of 50 mM Tris-HCl, 25 microM CuCl2 and 0.5% Twin 20 for refolding. We used gradient of pH (from 9.3 upto 11.3) for elution of interferon-beta from cation-exchange column. We concentrated of eluate and then desalted on the Sephadex G-50 column with 1 mM NaOH. Then the protein solution was neutralized with mannitol and Na-phosphate. Obtained preparation of interferon-beta was pure by gel-electrophoresis and by HPLC analysis, and had practically indentical level of antiproliferative activity with well-known preparation of Betaferone. Thus we show the possibility of isolation and obtaining of pure and active interferone-beta by ion-exchange chromatography in the presence of non-ion detergent Twin 20. We believe this method for interferon betalb preparation is perspective for scaling and using in the develop of industrial technology for production of this preparation.

  3. Interferon-gamma increased epithelial barrier function via upregulating claudin-7 expression in human submandibular gland duct epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ayumi; Takano, Kenichi; Kojima, Takashi; Nomura, Kazuaki; Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are necessary for salivary gland function and may serve as indicators of salivary gland epithelial dysfunction. IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a newly recognized fibro-inflammatory condition which disrupts the TJ associated epithelial barrier. The salivary glands are one of the most frequently involved organs in IgG4-RD, however, changes of the TJ associated epithelial barrier in salivary gland duct epithelium is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of TJs in human submandibular gland ductal epithelial cells (HSDECs) in normal and IgG4-RD. We examined submandibular gland (SMG) tissue from eight control individuals and 22 patients with IgG4-RD and established an HSDEC culture system. Immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) were performed. Claudin-4, claudin-7, occludin, and JAM-A were expressed at the apical side of the duct epithelium in submandibular gland (SMG) tissue and at the cell borders in HSDECs of normal and IgG4-RD. The expression and distribution of TJs in SMG tissue were not different in control individuals and patients with IgG4-RD in vivo and in vitro. Although interferon-gamma (IFNγ) generally disrupts the integrity and function of TJs, as manifested by decreased epithelial barrier function, IFNγ markedly increased the epithelial barrier function of HSDECs via upregulation of claudin-7 expression in HSDECs from patients with IgG4-RD. This is the first report showing an IFNγ-dependent increase in epithelial barrier function in the salivary gland duct epithelium. Our results provide insights into the functional significance of TJs in salivary gland duct epithelium in physiological and pathological conditions, including IgG4-RD.

  4. 1. cap alpha. ,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ inhibits. gamma. -interferon synthesis by normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichel, H.; Koeffler, H.P.; Tobler, A.; Norman, A.W.

    1987-05-01

    1..cap alpha..,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ (1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/), the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D/sub 3/, inhibited synthesis of ..gamma..-interferon (IFN-..gamma..) by phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). A significant reduction of IFN-..gamma.. protein levels in PBL culture medium was achieved with a physiologic 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ concentration, 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ also inhibited accumulation of IFN-..gamma.. mRNA in activated PBLs in a dose-dependent fashion. The ability of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ to modulate IFN-..gamma.. protein synthesis was unaltered in the presence of high concentrations of recombinant human interleukin 2. The suppression of IFN-..gamma.. synthesis by PBLs was specific for 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/; the potencies of other vitamin D/sub 3/ metabolites were correlated with their affinities for the cellular 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ receptor. The time course of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ receptor expression in phytohemagglutinin-activated PBLs was correlated with the time course of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/-mediated inhibition of IFN-..gamma.. synthesis. Finally, the authors examined the effects of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ on the constitutive IFN-..gamma.. production by two human T-lymphocyte lines transformed by human T-lymphotropic virus type I. The cell lines were established from a normal donor (cell line S-LB1) and from a patient with vitamin D-dependent rickets type 2 (cell line Ab-VDR). IFN-..gamma.. synthesis by S-LB1 cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion by 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/, whereas IFN-..gamma.. synthesis by Ab-VDR cells was not altered by 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/. The data presented in this study provide evidence for a role of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ in immunoregulation.

  5. The omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio: health implications

    OpenAIRE

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2010-01-01

    Today, Western diets are characterized by a higher omega-6 and a lower omega-3 fatty acid intake, whereas during the Paleolithic period when human’s genetic profile was established, there was a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Their balance is an important determinant for brain development and in decreasing the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and other autoimmune and possibly neurodegenerative diseases. Both omega-6 and omega-3...

  6. In vitro generation of human cytotoxic lymphocytes by virus. Viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific cell-mediated cytotoxicity without release of interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, P; Sissons, J G; Buchmeier, M J; Oldstone, M B

    1981-09-01

    Purified hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins of measles virus either in soluble form or inserted in artifical membranes bind to human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in a dose-response fashion. Both autologous and heterologous noninfected target cells are lysed in vitro. The expression of CMC is not inhibited by anti-measles virus antibody added to lymphocytes previously exposed to viral glycoproteins. THe killer lymphocytes are Fc receptor positive, both erythrocyte-rosetting and non-erythrocyte-rosetting, as assessed by both positive and negative selection experiments. The induction of nonspecific CMC by viral glycoproteins either in the soluble state or inserted into artificial membranes could be segregated from the CMC associated with whole virions. First, on kinetics studies, purified viral glycoproteins induced CMC more rapidly than did whole virus. Second, viral glycoprotein-produced response occurred in the absence of detectable release of interferon into the culture medium, whereas CMC activity due to whole virions was associated with interferon release. The fact that purified measles virus glycoproteins integrated into artificial membrane bilayers were as efficient as their soluble counterparts in inducing CMC suggests that the hydrophobic portion of the glycoproteins was not involved in the induction and expression of the lytic activity. Purified glycoproteins from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus behave similarly, although this virus is unrelated to measles virus. It is inferred that interferon-independent CMC induced by viral glycoproteins might account for some of the biological reactions occurring early in the control of a viral infection.

  7. [Immunomodulatory treatment with beta-interferon in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and human papillomavirus infection: long-term follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, E; Urgal, A; Córdoba, J; Boldó, A; Marín, M; Sánchez Gutiérrez, M; Molina, J M; Llixiona, J

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of beta-interferon treatment in the management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a selected group of patients. Thirty-nine patients who had histologically proven cervical intraepithelial neoplasia I or II with concurrent HPV infection were administered 27,000,000 IU of intramuscular beta-interferon. Periodical controls were carried out based on Papanicolaou smears and/or colposcopic examination and DNA HPV determination was performed by hybridation test, for a maximum of 8 years' follow-up. An initial complete response rate of 75% was obtained, with a recurrence rate of 25%, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with late manifestation was of higher grade. Treatment interruption due to side-effects was not necessary. Associated viral infections appeared to be a recurrence risk factor, but not smoking or parity. While immunomodulatory treatment with beta-interferon has good long-term results in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia I/II treatment, wider randomized studies are required to obtain conclusive results.

  8. Up-Regulation of CCR5 and CXCR4 Expression on Human Monocytes by Interferon Gamma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆韵; 刘祖强; 陈应华

    2003-01-01

    Chemokine receptors, mainly CCR5 and CXCR4, have been proved to be the important coreceptors in HIV-1 entry.HIV-1 disease progression is, in general, characterized by an initial predominance of CCR5 using macrophage tropic, non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) isolates, switching later to CXCR4 using T-cell tropic, syncytium-inducing (SI) isolates.How this shift occurs and how the shift can be controlled are still unclear.Since patients with rapid decline of T cell counts have constantly high levels of IFN-γ in the sera and lymphoid nodes, we investigated the influence of this cytokine on the expression of the HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 on the cell surfaces of human monocytic cell line U937 and promonocyte NB4.IFN-γ could intensively enhance the expression of both, while a low level of CCR5 expression was detected in two cell lines before stimulation.The results of semiquantitative RT-PCR also confirm the up-regulation.As the newly generated X4-strains have been demonstrated to be insensitive to chemokine in some reports, IFN-γ may play an important role in selecting CXCR4-used strains.

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  10. Recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 2 with mutations in V that permit cellular interferon signaling are not attenuated in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap-Nutt, Anne; D’Angelo, Christopher; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Nolan, Sheila M.; Davis, Stephanie; Wise, Shenelle-Marie; Higgins, Caraline; Bradley, Konrad; Kim, Olivia; Mayor, Reina; Skiadopoulos, Mario H.; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Schmidt, Alexander C.

    2010-01-01

    The HPIV2 V protein inhibits type I interferon (IFN) induction and signaling. To manipulate the V protein, whose coding sequence overlaps that of the polymerase-associated phosphoprotein (P), without altering the P protein, we generated an HPIV2 virus in which P and V are expressed from separate genes (rHPIV2-P+V). rHPIV2-P+V replicated like HPIV2-WT in vitro and in non-human primates. HPIV2-P+V was modified by introducing two separate mutations into the V protein to create rHPIV2-L101E/L102E and rHPIV2-Δ122–127. In contrast to HPIV2-WT, both mutant viruses were unable to degrade STAT2, leaving virus-infected cells susceptible to IFN. Neither mutant, nor HPIV2-WT, induced significant amounts of IFN-β in infected cells. Surprisingly, neither rHPIV2-L101E/L102E nor rHPIV2-Δ122–127 was attenuated in two species of non-human primates. This indicates that loss of HPIV2's ability to inhibit IFN signaling is insufficient to attenuate virus replication in vivo as long as IFN induction is still inhibited. PMID:20667570

  11. Cytokine responses and regulation of interferon-gamma release by human mononuclear cells to Aspergillus fumigatus and other filamentous fungi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warris, A.; Netea, M.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Gaustad, P.; Kullberg, B.J.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Abrahamsen, T.G.

    2005-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the production of proinflammatory cytokines is important in host resistance to invasive aspergillosis. Knowledge of the host response towards other filamentous fungi is scarce, as most studies have focused on Aspergillus fumigatus. In addition, interferon-gamma (IF

  12. Interferon-alpha-2a is a potent inhibitor of hormone secretion by cultured human pituitary adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Hofland (Leo); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); M. Waaijers (Marlijn); J. Zuijderwijk; P. Uitterlinden (Piet); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractInterferon-alpha (IFN alpha) may exert direct inhibitory effects on cell proliferation and on the production of different peptide hormones. We investigated the effect of IFN alpha on hormone production by 15 GH-secreting pituitary adenomas, 4 clinically nonf

  13. The human adenovirus type 5 E1B 55 kDa protein obstructs inhibition of viral replication by type I interferon in normal human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdave S Chahal

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from human adenovirus type 5, which typically lack the E1A and E1B genes, induce robust innate immune responses that limit their therapeutic efficacy. We reported previously that the E1B 55 kDa protein inhibits expression of a set of cellular genes that is highly enriched for those associated with anti-viral defense and immune responses, and includes many interferon-sensitive genes. The sensitivity of replication of E1B 55 kDa null-mutants to exogenous interferon (IFN was therefore examined in normal human fibroblasts and respiratory epithelial cells. Yields of the mutants were reduced at least 500-fold, compared to only 5-fold, for wild-type (WT virus replication. To investigate the mechanistic basis of such inhibition, the accumulation of viral early proteins and genomes was compared by immunoblotting and qPCR, respectively, in WT- and mutant-infected cells in the absence or presence of exogenous IFN. Both the concentration of viral genomes detected during the late phase and the numbers of viral replication centers formed were strongly reduced in IFN-treated cells in the absence of the E1B protein, despite production of similar quantities of viral replication proteins. These defects could not be attributed to degradation of entering viral genomes, induction of apoptosis, or failure to reorganize components of PML nuclear bodies. Nor was assembly of the E1B- and E4 Orf6 protein- E3 ubiquitin ligase required to prevent inhibition of viral replication by IFN. However, by using RT-PCR, the E1B 55 kDa protein was demonstrated to be a potent repressor of expression of IFN-inducible genes in IFN-treated cells. We propose that a primary function of the previously described transcriptional repression activity of the E1B 55 kDa protein is to block expression of IFN- inducible genes, and hence to facilitate formation of viral replication centers and genome replication.

  14. Role of the intracellular domain of the human type I interferon receptor 2 chain (IFNAR2c) in interferon signaling. Expression of IFNAR2c truncation mutants in U5A cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Harde, D; Wagner, T C; Rani, M R; Vogel, D; Colamonici, O; Ransohoff, R M; Majchrzak, B; Fish, E; Perez, H D; Croze, E

    2000-08-01

    A human cell line (U5A) lacking the type I interferon (IFN) receptor chain 2 (IFNAR2c) was used to determine the role of the IFNAR2c cytoplasmic domain in regulating IFN-dependent STAT activation, interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) and c-sis-inducible factor (SIF) complex formation, gene expression, and antiproliferative effects. A panel of U5A cells expressing truncation mutants of IFNAR2c on their cell surface were generated for study. Janus kinase (JAK) activation was detected in all mutant cell lines; however, STAT1 and STAT2 activation was observed only in U5A cells expressing full-length IFNAR2c and IFNAR2c truncated at residue 462 (R2.462). IFNAR2c mutants truncated at residues 417 (R2. 417) and 346 (R2.346) or IFNAR2c mutant lacking tyrosine residues in its cytoplasmic domain (R2.Y-F) render the receptor inactive. A similar pattern was observed for IFN-inducible STAT activation, STAT complex formation, and STAT-DNA binding. Consistent with these data, IFN-inducible gene expression was ablated in U5A, R2.Y-F, R2.417, and R2.346 cell lines. The implications are that tyrosine phosphorylation and the 462-417 region of IFNAR2c are independently obligatory for receptor activation. In addition, the distal 53 amino acids of the intracellular domain of IFNAR2c are not required for IFN-receptor mediated STAT activation, ISFG3 or SIF complex formation, induction of gene expression, and inhibition of thymidine incorporation. These data demonstrate for the first time that both tyrosine phosphorylation and a specific domain of IFNAR2c are required in human cells for IFN-dependent coupling of JAK activation to STAT phosphorylation, gene induction, and antiproliferative effects. In addition, human and murine cells appear to require different regions of the cytoplasmic domain of IFNAR2c for regulation of IFN responses.

  15. [Effects of neuropeptides on interferon production in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul'chikov, A E; Makarenko, A N

    2008-01-01

    The study of an interferon-inducing action of neuropeptides (a cerebrolysin model) on production of interferons by human blood leukocytes has shown that neuropeptides induce gamma-interferon production in the titer 267 IU/ml that determines one of the mechanisms of a neuroimmunocorrecting effect of cerebrolysin (Ebewe, Austria) in many neurological diseases (acute stroke, brain traumas and different neuroinfectious diseases).

  16. Basal buffer systems for a newly glycosylated recombinant human interferon-β with biophysical stability and DoE approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Ah; Song, Kyoung; Lim, Dae Gon; Hada, Shavron; Shin, Young Kee; Shin, Sangmun; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2015-10-12

    The purpose of this study was to develop a basal buffer system for a biobetter version of recombinant human interferon-β 1a (rhIFN-β 1a), termed R27T, to optimize its biophysical stability. The protein was pre-screened in solution as a function of pH (2-11) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). According to the result, its experimental pI and optimal pH range were 5.8 and 3.6-4.4, respectively. Design of experiment (DoE) approach was developed as a practical tool to aid formulation studies as a function of pH (2.9-5.7), buffer (phosphate, acetate, citrate, and histidine), and buffer concentration (20 mM and 50 mM). This method employed a weight-based procedure to interpret complex data sets and to investigate critical key factors representing protein stability. The factors used were Tm, enthalpy, and relative helix contents which were obtained by DSC and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Although the weights changed by three responses, objective functions from a set of experimental designs based on four buffers were highest in 20 mM acetate buffer at pH 3.6 among all 19 scenarios tested. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) was adopted to investigate accelerated storage stability in order to optimize the pH value with susceptible stability since the low pH was not patient-compliant. Interestingly, relative helix contents and storage stability (monomer remaining) increased with pH and was the highest at pH 4.0. On the other hand, relative helix contents and thermodynamic stability decreased at pH 4.2 and 4.4, suggesting protein aggregation issues. Therefore, the optimized basal buffer system for the novel biobetter was proposed to be 20 mM acetate buffer at pH 3.8±0.2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Two essential regulatory elements in the human interferon gamma promoter confer activation specific expression in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penix, L; Weaver, W M; Pang, Y; Young, H A; Wilson, C B

    1993-11-01

    Like interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) is an early response gene in T cells and both are prototypical T helper cell type 1 (Th-1) lymphokines. Yet IL-2 and IFN-gamma production are independently regulated, as demonstrated by their differential expression in certain T cell subsets, suggesting that the regulatory elements in these two genes must differ. To explore this possibility, the 5' flank of the human IFN-gamma gene was analyzed. Expression of IFN-gamma promoter-driven beta-galactosidase reporter constructs containing 538 bp of 5' flank was similar to that by constructs driven by the IL-2 promoter in activated Jurkat T cells; expression nearly as great was observed with the construct containing only 108 bp of IFN-gamma 5' flank. These IFN-gamma promoter constructs faithfully mirrored expression of the endogenous gene, in that expression required activation both with ionomycin and PMA, was inhibited by cyclosporin A, and was not observed in U937 or THP-1 cells. The region between -108 and -40 bp in the IFN-gamma promoter was required for promoter function and contained two elements that are conserved across species. Deletion of 10 bp within either element reduced promoter function by 70%, whereas deletions in nonconserved portions of this region had little effect on promoter function. The distal conserved element (-96 to -80 bp) contained a consensus GATA motif and a potential regulatory motif found in the promoter regions of the GM-CSF and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) genes. Factors binding to this element, including GATA-3, were found in Jurkat nuclear extracts by electromobility shift assays and two of the three complexes observed were altered in response to activation. One or both of these motifs are present in the 5' flank of multiple, other lymphokine genes, including IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, and GM-CSF, but neither is present in the promoter of the IL-2 gene. The proximal conserved element (-73 to -48 bp) shares homology with the NFIL-2

  18. Differential effects of calcineurin inhibitors, tacrolimus and cyclosporin a, on interferon-induced antiviral protein in human hepatocyte cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kumi; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Matsumoto, Azusa; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu; Shibata, Hidetaka; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Ikeda, Masanori; Yamasaki, Hironori; Kato, Nobuyuki; Kanematsu, Takashi; Ishii, Nobuko; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2008-03-01

    The premise of our study is that selective inhibition of interferon (IFN) by calcineurin inhibitors contribute to the increased severity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) posttransplantation. Therefore, we examined the influence of calcineurin inhibitors in the human hepatocyte cell line on IFN-alpha-induced phosphorylation of Janus kinase (Jak) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT), nuclear translocation of IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF-3), IFN-stimulated regulatory element (ISRE)-contained promoter activity, and the expressions of antiviral proteins. Tacrolimus (Tac), but not cyclosporin A (CyA), had an inhibitory effect on IFN-alpha-induced double-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR) in a dose-dependent manner. STAT-1 also acted in a similar fashion to PKR. IFN-alpha combined with Tac attenuated the ISRE-containing promoter gene activity as compared with IFN-alpha alone. In contrast, its expression in pretreated CyA was slightly attenuated. In pretreated Tac, but not CyA, the levels of IFN-alpha-induced tyrosine phosphorylated STAT-1 and -2 were clearly lower than those induced by IFN-alpha alone. Tac and CyA did not decrease the IFN-alpha-induced JAK-1 phosphorylation. The nuclear translocation rate of tyrosine phosphorylated STAT-1 was inhibited by pretreatment of both Tac and CyA by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In an HCV replicon system, pretreated Tac diminished the replication inhibitory effect of IFN-alpha. In this study, we show that calcineurin inhibitors, especially Tac, are the negative regulators of IFN signaling in the hepatocyte; the greatest cause of such inhibition is the phosphorylation disturbance of STAT-1, next to inhibition of the nuclear translocation of STAT-1. In conclusion, disturbance of tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT-1 resulted in diminished ISRE-containing promoter activity and a decline in antiviral protein expression. Moreover, the replication of HCV was activated. This

  19. Interferon-¿- and tumour necrosis factor-a-producing cells in humans who are immune to cutaneous leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Theander, T G; Hviid, L

    1999-01-01

    living in an area without the disease. The production of interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-10 was investigated in culture supernatants, and the cellular sources of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were identified. Cells from individuals with a history of cutaneous...... leishmaniasis produced significantly higher levels of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha than cells from individuals without a history of the disease. Similar levels of IL-10 were found in the two groups. Flow cytometric analysis revealed high numbers of CD3+ cells producing IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, and only a few CD3......+ cells containing IL-10, in the PBMC cultures from the individuals with a history of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Interferon-gamma and TNF-alpha were predominantly produced by CD4+ T cells rather than CD8+ T cells. The results suggest that cellular immunity against cutaneous leishmaniasis is mediated...

  20. Observation of the Decay $\\Omega_{C}^{0}\\$ to $\\Omega^{-}e^{+}\\ nu_{e}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ammar, R; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Li, S Z; Poling, R A; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Jian, L; Saleem, M; Wappler, F; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Wilksen, T; Zoeller, M M; Muramatsu, H; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Dytman, S A; Nam, S; Savinov, V; Chen, S; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Lyon, A L; Park, C S; Park, W; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; Xu, Z; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; McGee, S; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Masek, G; Paar, H P; Mahapatra, R; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Drell, P S; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Valant-Spaight, B L; Viehhauser, G; Warburton, A; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Benslama, K; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Marsh, M A; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W

    2002-01-01

    Using the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have observed the Omega_c (css ground state) in the decay Omega_c -> Omega- e+ nu. We find a signal of 11.4 +- 3.8 (stat) events. The probability that we have observed a background fluctuation is 7.6 x 10-5. We measure BF(Omega_c -> Omega- e+ nu) x sigma(e+ e- -> Omega_c X) = (42.2 +- 14.1 (stat) +- 5.7 (syst)) fb and R = Gamma(Omega_c -> Omega- pi+)/Gamma(Omega_c -> Omega- e+ nu) = 0.41 +- 0.19 (stat) +- 0.04 (syst). This is the first statistically significant observation of an individual decay mode of the Omega_c in e+ e- annhiliation, and the first example of a baryon decaying via beta-emmision, where no quarks from the first generation participate in the reaction.

  1. Application of interferon modulators to overcome partial resistance of human ovarian cancers to VSV-GP oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dold

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we described an oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus variant pseudotyped with the nonneurotropic glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, VSV-GP, which was highly effective in glioblastoma. Here, we tested its potency for the treatment of ovarian cancer, a leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. Effective oncolytic activity of VSV-GP could be demonstrated in ovarian cancer cell lines and xenografts in mice; however, remission was temporary in most mice. Analysis of the innate immune response revealed that ovarian cancer cell lines were able to respond to and produce type I interferon, inducing an antiviral state upon virus infection. This is in stark contrast to published data for other cancer cell lines, which were mostly found to be interferon incompetent. We showed that in vitro this antiviral state could be reverted by combining VSV-GP with the JAK1/2-inhibitor ruxolitinib. In addition, for the first time, we report the in vivo enhancement of oncolytic virus treatment by ruxolitinib, both in subcutaneous as well as in orthotopic xenograft mouse models, without causing significant additional toxicity. In conclusion, VSV-GP has the potential to be a potent and safe oncolytic virus to treat ovarian cancer, especially when combined with an inhibitor of the interferon response.

  2. Transcriptional expression of type I interferon response genes and stability of housekeeping genes in the human endometrium and endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna L; Knudsen, Ulla B; Munk, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a painful chronic female disease defined by the presence of endometrial tissue implants in ectopic locations. The pathogenesis is much debated, and type I interferons could be involved. The expression of genes of the type I interferon response were profiled by a specific PCR Array...... was suitable for normalization of qRT-PCR studies of eutopic vs. ectopic endometrium. In the endometrial cell lines HEC1A, HEC1B, Ishikawa, and RL95-2, HMBS and HPRT1 were most stably expressed. The interferon-specific PCR Array indicated significantly different expression of the genes BST2, COL16A1, HOXB2......, and ISG20 between the endometrial tissue types. However, by correctly normalized qRT-PCR, levels of BST2, COL16A1, and the highly type I IFN-stimulated genes ISG12A and 6-16 displayed insignificant variations. Conversely, HOXB2 and ISG20 transcriptions were significantly reduced in endometriosis lesions...

  3. Double transgenesis of humanized fat1 and fat2 genes promotes omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids synthesis in a zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shao-Chen; Wang, Hou-Peng; Li, Kuo-Yu; Zhu, Zuo-Yan; Kang, Jing X; Sun, Yong-Hua

    2014-10-01

    Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LC-PUFA), especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are essential nutrients for human health. However, vertebrates, including humans, have lost the abilities to synthesize EPA and DHA de novo, majorly due to the genetic absence of delta-12 desaturase and omega-3 desaturase genes. Fishes, especially those naturally growing marine fish, are major dietary source of EPA and DHA. Because of the severe decline of marine fishery and the decrease in n-3 LC-PUFA content of farmed fishes, it is highly necessary to develop alternative sources of n-3 LC-PUFA. In the present study, we utilized transgenic technology to generate n-3 LC-PUFA-rich fish by using zebrafish as an animal model. Firstly, fat1 was proved to function efficiently in fish culture cells, which showed an effective conversion of n-6 PUFA to n-3 PUFA with the n-6/n-3 ratio that decreased from 7.7 to 1.1. Secondly, expression of fat1 in transgenic zebrafish increased the 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 contents to 1.8- and 2.4-fold, respectively. Third, co-expression of fat2, a fish codon-optimized delta-12 desaturase gene, and fat1 in fish culture cell significantly promoted n-3 PUFA synthesis with the decreased n-6/n-3 ratio from 7.7 to 0.7. Finally, co-expression of fat1 and fat2 in double transgenic zebrafish increased the 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 contents to 1.7- and 2.8-fold, respectively. Overall, we generated two types of transgenic zebrafish rich in endogenous n-3 LC-PUFA, fat1 transgenic zebrafish and fat1/fat2 double transgenic zebrafish. Our results demonstrate that application of transgenic technology of humanized fat1 and fat2 in farmed fishes can largely improve the n-3 LC-PUFA production.

  4. Overproduction, purification and characterization of human interferon alpha2a-human serum albumin fusion protein produced in methilotropic yeast Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningrum, R. A.; Santoso, A.; Herawati, N.

    2017-05-01

    Human interferon alpha2a (hIFNα2a) is a therapeutic protein that used in cancer and hepatitis B/C therapy. The main problem of using hIFNα-2a is its short elimination half life due to its low molecular weight. Development of higher molecular weight protein by albumin fusion technology is a rational strategy to solve the problem. In our previous research we constructed an open reading frame (ORF) encoding hIFNα2a-human serum albumin (HSA) fusion protein that expressed in Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) protease deficient strain SMD1168. This research was performed to overproduce, purify and characterize the fusion protein. To overproduce the protein, cultivation was performed in buffered complex medium containing glyserol (BMGY) for 24 h and protein overproduction was applied in buffered complex medium containing methanol (BMMY) for 48 hours at 30°C. The fusion protein was purified by blue sepharose affinity chromatography. Molecular weight characterization by SDS PAGE corresponds with its theoretical size, 85 kDa. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the fusion protein was recognized by anti hIFNα2 and anti HSA monoclonal antibody as well. Amino acid sequence of the fusion protein was determined by LC MS/MS2 mass spectrometry with trypsin as proteolitic enzyme. There were three fragments that identified as hIFNα2a and seven fragments that identified as HSA. Total identified amino acids were 150 residues with 20% coverage from total residues. To conclude, hIFNα2a-HSA fusion protein was overproduced, purified and characterized. Characterization based on molecular weight, antibody recognition and amino acid sequence confirmed that the fusion protein has correct identity as theoretically thought.

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids status in human subjects estimated using a food frequency questionnaire and plasma phospholipids levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garneau Véronique

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intakes of omega-3 (n-3 fatty acids (FA are associated with several health benefits. The aim of this study was to verify whether intakes of n-3 FA estimated from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ correlate with n-3 FA levels measured in plasma phospholipids (PL. Methods The study sample consisted of 200 French-Canadians men and women aged between 18 to 55 years. Dietary data were collected using a validated FFQ. Fasting blood samples were collected and the plasma PL FA profile was measured by gas chromatography. Results Low intakes of n-3 long-chain FA together with low percentages of n-3 long-chain FA in plasma PL were found in French-Canadian population. Daily intakes of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA were similar between men and women. Yet, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA and total n-3 FA intakes were significantly higher in men compared to women (ALA: 2.28 g and 1.69 g, p n-3 FA: 2.57 g and 1.99 g, p n-3 FA (men: r = 0.47, p  Conclusion Estimated n-3 long-chain FA intake among this young and well-educated French-Canadian population is lower than the recommendations. Further, FFQ data is comparable to plasma PL results to estimate DHA and total n-3 FA status in healthy individuals as well as to evaluate the EPA and DPA status in women. Overall, this FFQ could be used as a simple, low-cost tool in future studies to rank n-3 FA status of individuals.

  6. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 1 protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E L Stone

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs through pattern recognition receptors (PRR. PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV.

  7. Haemophilus ducreyi lipooligosaccharides induce expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase via type I interferons and tumor necrosis factor alpha in human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease. In human inoculation experiments, most volunteers fail to clear the bacteria despite the infiltration of innate and adaptive immune cells to the infected sites. The immunosuppressive protein indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the L-tryptophan-kynurenine metabolic pathway. Tryptophan depletion and tryptophan metabolites contribute to pathogen persistence by inhibiting T cell proliferation, inducing T cell apoptosis, and promoting the expansion of FOXP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. We previously found that FOXP3(+) Treg cells are enriched in experimental lesions and that H. ducreyi induced IDO transcription in dendritic cells (DC) derived from blood of infected volunteers who developed pustules. Here, we showed that enzymatically active IDO was induced in DC by H. ducreyi. Neutralizing antibodies against interferon alpha/beta receptor 2 chain (IFNAR2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibited IDO induction. Inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) also inhibited IDO expression. Neither bacterial contact with nor uptake by DC was required for IDO activation. H. ducreyi culture supernatant and H. ducreyi lipooligosaccharides (LOS) induced IDO expression, which required type I interferons, TNF-α, and the three MAPK (p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal regulated kinase) and NF-κB pathways. In addition, LOS-induced IFN-β activated the JAK-STAT pathway. Blocking the LOS/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway greatly reduced H. ducreyi-induced IDO production. These findings indicate that H. ducreyi-induced IDO expression in DC is largely mediated by LOS via type I interferon- and TNF-α-dependent mechanisms and the MAPK, NF-κB, and JAK-STAT pathways.

  8. Marine lipids and the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Marine lipids are enriched with omega-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Omega-3 fatty acids are important membrane lipids and have many recognized health benefits, the bioavailability of these fatty acids can therefore be important for achieving...... of omega-3 fatty acids has been reported to be affected by several factors; among the important factors were the digestion and absorption processes of omega-3 containing lipids in the gastrointestinal tract. Both lipid structures and food structures can affect the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids....... Human studies have shown that the relative bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil (triglyceride formulation) was similar to that from fish, whereas lower relative bioavailability was observed from fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) formulation in comparison with other lipid formulations...

  9. Retina and Omega-3

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Querques; Raimondo Forte; Souied, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, several epidemiological studies based on food frequency questionnaires suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could have a protective role in reducing the onset and progression of retinal diseases. The retina has a high concentration of omega-3, particularly DHA, which optimizes fluidity of photoreceptor membranes, retinal integrity, and visual function. Furthermore, many studies demonstrated that DHA has a protective, for example antiapoptotic, role in the ret...

  10. The omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio: health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, Western diets are characterized by a higher omega-6 and a lower omega-3 fatty acid intake, whereas during the Paleolithic period when human’s genetic profile was established, there was a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Their balance is an important determinant for brain development and in decreasing the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and other autoimmune and possibly neurodegenerative diseases. Both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids influence gene expression. Because of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in their metabolic pathways, blood levels of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids are determined by both endogenous metabolism and dietary intake making the need of balanced dietary intake essential for health and disease prevention. Whether an omega-6/omega-3 ratio of 3:1 to 4:1 could prevent the pathogenesis of many diseases induced by today’s Western diets (AFSSA, 2010, a target of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment, and genetics. A target of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio of 1:1 to 2:1 appears to be consistent with studies on evolutionary aspects of diet, neurodevelopment and genetics. A balanced ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is important for health and in the prevention of CHD and possibly other chronic diseases.

  11. Interferon-¿ and interleukin-4 production by human T cells recognizing Leishmania donovani antigens separated by SDS-PAGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrenscheer, J; Kemp, M; Kurtzhals, J A

    1995-01-01

    of proliferation and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals who had recovered from visceral leishmaniasis caused by L. donovani. The release of interleukin-4 (IL-4) by PBMC stimulated with the isolated L. donovani antigen fractions...... was measured after treatment with phorbol-myristate-acetate and ionomycin. The cells proliferated in response to all protein fractions with molecular weights in the range 12 kDa to 85 kDa. In general, IFN-gamma was secreted in response to stimulation with all the protein fractions, whereas IL-4 production...

  12. Production of interferon-¿ and interleukin-4 by human T cells recognizing Leishmania lipophosphoglycan-associated protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Kurtzhals, J A; Christensen, C B

    1993-01-01

    infections. LPGAP induced vigorous proliferation and production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by the cells. In addition PBMC incubated with LPGAP released interleukin-4 (IL-4) after pulsing with ionomycin and phorbol myristate acetate. Single cells were isolated from LPGAP-stimulated cell lines...... and expanded as T-cell clones. LPGAP-reactive T-cell clones were activated by crude preparations of both promastigotes and axenic grown amastigote-like parasites. Among 9 CD4+ T-cell clones recognizing LPGAP, cells secreting predominantly IFN-gamma as well as cells secreting predominantly IL-4 were identified...

  13. Interferon-alpha mediates restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 replication in primary human macrophages at an early stage of replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Cheney

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNα and β are induced directly in response to viral infection, resulting in an antiviral state for the cell. In vitro studies have shown that IFNα is a potent inhibitor of viral replication; however, its role in HIV-1 infection is incompletely understood. In this study we describe the ability of IFNα to restrict HIV-1 infection in primary human macrophages in contrast to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Inhibition to HIV-1 replication in cells pretreated with IFNα occurred at an early stage in the virus life cycle. Late viral events such as budding and subsequent rounds of infection were not affected by IFNα treatment. Analysis of early and late HIV-1 reverse transcripts and integrated proviral DNA confirmed an early post entry role for IFNα. First strand cDNA synthesis was slightly reduced but late and integrated products were severely depleted, suggesting that initiation or the nucleic acid intermediates of reverse transcription are targeted. The depletion of integrated provirus is disproportionally greater than that of viral cDNA synthesis suggesting the possibility of a least an additional later target. A role for either cellular protein APOBEC3G or tetherin in this IFNα mediated restriction has been excluded. Vpu, previously shown by others to rescue a viral budding restriction by tetherin, could not overcome this IFNα induced effect. Determining both the viral determinants and cellular proteins involved may lead to novel therapeutic approaches. Our results add to the understanding of HIV-1 restriction by IFNα.

  14. Diverse intracellular pathogens activate type III interferon expression from peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M; Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    Type I interferon responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of type I interferons. The mechanisms controlling type I interferon-independent responses are undefined. We found that RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) induce type III interferon expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate expression of type I and type III interferons. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site of initiation of type III interferon expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust type III interferon responses in human cells. These findings highlight the importance of different intracellular organelles in specific innate immune responses.

  15. Bi-phasic effect of interferon (IFN)-alpha: IFN-alpha up- and down-regulates interleukin-4 signaling in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten Wessel; Sommer, Viveca Horst; Woetmann, Anders

    2003-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta is produced by virally infected cells and is believed to play an important role in early phases of the innate immune response. In addition, IFN-alpha/beta inhibits interleukin (IL)-4 signaling in B cells and monocytes, suggesting that IFN-alpha/beta (like IFN-gamma) is......Interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta is produced by virally infected cells and is believed to play an important role in early phases of the innate immune response. In addition, IFN-alpha/beta inhibits interleukin (IL)-4 signaling in B cells and monocytes, suggesting that IFN-alpha/beta (like IFN......-gamma) is a Th1 cytokine. Here, we study cross-talk between IFN-alpha and IL-4 in human T cells. As expected, stimulation with IFN-alpha for 12-24 h inhibits IL-4 signaling. Surprisingly, however, IFN-alpha has the opposite effect on IL-4 signaling at earlier time points (up to 6 h). Thus, IFN-alpha enhances IL...

  16. Expression, purification and characterization of the recombinant kringle 2 and kringle 3 domains of human plasminogen and analysis of their binding affinity for omega-aminocarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, D; Schaller, J; Ochensberger, B; Rickli, E E

    1994-01-15

    The kringle 2 (E161T/C162S/EEE[K2HPg/C169S]TT) and the kringle 3 (TYQ[K3HPg]DS) domains of human plasminogen (HPg) were expressed in Escherichia coli in an expression vector with the phage T5 promotor/operator element N250PSN250P29 and the cDNA sequence for a hexahistidine tail to facilitate the isolation of the recombinant protein. A coagulation factor Xa (FXa)-sensitive cleavage site was introduced to remove the N-terminal histidine tag. In r-K2, mutations E161T and C162S were introduced to enhance the FXa cleavage yield and C169S to replace the cysteine residue, participating in the inter-kringle disulfide bridge between kringles 2 and 3. Recombinant proteins were isolated by affinity chromatography on Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid/agarose and refolded under denaturing and reducing conditions followed by a non-denaturing and oxidising environment. The free thiol group in position 297 in r-K3 was selectively alkylated with iodoacetamide. The hexahistidine tail was successfully removed with FXa. The N-terminal sequence, the amino acid composition and the molecular mass analyses are in agreement with the expected data. The correct arrangement of the disulfide bonds was verified by sequence analysis of the corresponding thermolytic and subtilisin fragments. r-K2 exhibits weak binding to lysine-Bio-Gel. The weak binding affinity of r-K2 for omega-aminocarboxylic acids is confirmed by intrinsic fluorescence titration with 6-aminohexanoic acid (NH2C5COOH) indicating a Kd of approximately 401 microM. In contrast, r-K3 seems to be devoid of a binding affinity for omega-aminocarboxylic acids. Considering earlier determined Kd values of kringle 1, kringle 4 and kringle 5, the binding affinity of HPg kringle domains for NH2C5COOH is proposed to decrease in the following order, kringle 1 > kringle 4 > kringle 5 > kringle 2 > kringle 3.

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids modulate Weibel-Palade body degranulation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement in PMA-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgin-Maunder, Corinna S; Brooks, Peter R; Russell, Fraser D

    2013-11-08

    Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) produce cardiovascular benefits by improving endothelial function. Endothelial cells store von Willebrand factor (vWF) in cytoplasmic Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs). We examined whether LC n-3 PUFAs regulate WPB degranulation using cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were incubated with or without 75 or 120 µM docosahexaenoic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid for 5 days at 37 °C. WPB degranulation was stimulated using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and this was assessed by immunocytochemical staining for vWF. Actin reorganization was determined using phalloidin-TRITC staining. We found that PMA stimulated WPB degranulation, and that this was significantly reduced by prior incubation of cells with LC n-3 PUFAs. In these cells, WPBs had rounded rather than rod-shaped morphology and localized to the perinuclear region, suggesting interference with cytoskeletal remodeling that is necessary for complete WPB degranulation. In line with this, actin rearrangement was altered in cells containing perinuclear WPBs, where cells exhibited a thickened actin rim in the absence of prominent cytoplasmic stress fibers. These findings indicate that LC n-3 PUFAs provide some protection against WBP degranulation, and may contribute to an improved understanding of the anti-thrombotic effects previously attributed to LC n-3 PUFAs.

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Modulate Weibel-Palade Body Degranulation and Actin Cytoskeleton Rearrangement in PMA-Stimulated Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna S. Bürgin-Maunder

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs produce cardiovascular benefits by improving endothelial function. Endothelial cells store von Willebrand factor (vWF in cytoplasmic Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs. We examined whether LC n-3 PUFAs regulate WPB degranulation using cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. HUVECs were incubated with or without 75 or 120 µM docosahexaenoic acid or eicosapentaenoic acid for 5 days at 37 °C. WPB degranulation was stimulated using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and this was assessed by immunocytochemical staining for vWF. Actin reorganization was determined using phalloidin-TRITC staining. We found that PMA stimulated WPB degranulation, and that this was significantly reduced by prior incubation of cells with LC n-3 PUFAs. In these cells, WPBs had rounded rather than rod-shaped morphology and localized to the perinuclear region, suggesting interference with cytoskeletal remodeling that is necessary for complete WPB degranulation. In line with this, actin rearrangement was altered in cells containing perinuclear WPBs, where cells exhibited a thickened actin rim in the absence of prominent cytoplasmic stress fibers. These findings indicate that LC n-3 PUFAs provide some protection against WBP degranulation, and may contribute to an improved understanding of the anti-thrombotic effects previously attributed to LC n-3 PUFAs.

  19. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDiego, Marta L; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J

    2016-11-01

    Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus. Influenza A and B viruses are one of the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans, causing 1 billion infections and between 300,000 and 500,000 deaths annually. Influenza virus surveillance to identify new mutations in the NS1 protein affecting innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of

  20. Evidence for the decay B0 --> omega omega and search for B0 --> omega phi

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Dey, B; Gary, J W; Long, O; Campagnari, C; Sevilla, M Franco; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Lockman, W S; Vazquez, W Panduro; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Miyashita, T S; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Pushpawela, B G; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Martellotti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Vetere, M Lo; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Ahmed, H; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Bougher, J; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Schubert, K R; Barlow, R J; Lafferty, G D; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Chrzaszcz, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Piredda, G; Buenger, C; Dittrich, S; Gruenberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Vasseur, G; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindemann, D; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wang, W F; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Ziegler, V; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; De Mori, F; Filippi, A; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lueck, T; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2013-01-01

    We describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states omega omega and omega phi with 471 x 10^6 B Bbar pairs produced in e+ e- annihilation at sqrt(s) = 10.58 GeV using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We measure the branching fraction B(B0 --> omega omega) = (1.2 +- 0.3 +0.3-0.2) x 10^-6, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic, corresponding to a significance of 4.4 standard deviations. We also determine the upper limit B(B0 --> omega phi) omega omega, and an improvement of the upper limit for the decay B0 --> omega phi.

  1. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Bethany A; Powers, Linda S; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A; Monick, Martha M; Maury, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks.

  2. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A Rhein

    Full Text Available Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks.

  3. The $\\Omega_{M}-\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ Constraint from CNOC Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Carlberg, R G; Ellingson, E; Morris, S L; Lin, H; Sawicki, M; Patton, D; Wirth, G; Abraham, R; Gravel, P; Pritchet, C J; Smecker-Hane, T A; Schade, D J; Hartwick, F D A; Hesser, J E; Hutchings, J B; Oke, J B

    1998-01-01

    The CNOC redshift survey of galaxy clusters measures Omega_M from Omega_e(z)= M/L x j/\\rho_c which can be applied on a cluster-by-cluster basis. The mass-to-light ratios, M/L, are estimated from rich galaxy clusters, corrected to the field population over the 0.18 to 0.55 redshift range. Since the luminosity density depends on cosmological volumes, the resulting Omega_e(z) has a strong dependence on cosmology which allows us to place the results in the Omega_M-Omega_Lambda plane. The resulting Omega_M declines if Omega_Lambda>0 and we find that Omega_Lambda<1.5.

  4. Recent advances in the field of omega-3-lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    During the last 15-20 years the use of fish and algae oils for human applications has received increasing attention from academia, industry and consumers. This is due to the fact that a growing body of evidence supports that marine omega-3 lipids have a wide range of health beneficial effects......, and at the same time the intake of these healthy lipids is far below the recommendable level in many parts of the world. This presentation will provide a brief overview of recent advances in the body of knowledge about the health benefits of omega-3 lipids. For many years fish oil produced from wild fish has been...... the most important source of marine omega-3 fatty acids. However, the production of fish oil has been stable during the last decade. Therefore, to meet the increased demand for omega-3 lipids new sources are available. The presentation will discuss possible future sources of omega-3 lipids for human...

  5. MiR-122 directly inhibits human papillomavirus E6 gene and enhances interferon signaling through blocking suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 in SiHa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junming; Ji, Yuting; Li, Aimei; Zhang, Qingmeng; Song, Wuqi; Li, Yujun; Huang, Hongxin; Qian, Jun; Zhai, Aixia; Yu, Xin; Zhao, Jinyun; Shang, Qinglong; Wei, Lanlan; Zhang, Fengmin

    2014-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection is considered as one of the significant causes of human cervical cancer. The expression of the viral oncogenes like E6 and E7 play an important role in the development of the cancer. MiR-122 has been reported to exhibit a strong relationship with hepatitis viruses and take part in several tumor development, while the effects of miR-122 on HPV infection and the HPV viral oncogenes expression still remain unexplored. In this study, using RNAhybrid software, the potential binding sites between miR-122 and HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNAs were identified. Over and loss of miR-122 function showed that miR-122 could directly bind with HPV16 E6 mRNA and significantly inhibit its expression in SiHa cells, which was further confirmed by constructing the miR-122-E6-mu to eliminate the miR-122 binding effects with E6. The increase of the expression of type I interferon (IFN) and its classical effective molecules and the phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT1) protein indicated that miR-122 might enhance type I interferon in cervical carcinoma cells, which explained the significant reduction of HPV16 E7 and E6*I mRNA expression. This might be due to the binding between miR-122 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) mRNA, which is the suppressor of interferon signaling pathway. Moreover, it was identified that the miR-122 binding position was nt359-nt375 in SOCS1 mRNA. Taken together, this study indicated that HPV16 could be effectively inhibited by miR-122 through both direct binding with E6 mRNA and promoting SOCS1-dependent IFN signaling pathway. Thus, miR-122 may serve as a new therapeutic option for inhibiting HPV infection.

  6. MiR-122 directly inhibits human papillomavirus E6 gene and enhances interferon signaling through blocking suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 in SiHa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junming He

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus (HPV 16 infection is considered as one of the significant causes of human cervical cancer. The expression of the viral oncogenes like E6 and E7 play an important role in the development of the cancer. MiR-122 has been reported to exhibit a strong relationship with hepatitis viruses and take part in several tumor development, while the effects of miR-122 on HPV infection and the HPV viral oncogenes expression still remain unexplored. In this study, using RNAhybrid software, the potential binding sites between miR-122 and HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNAs were identified. Over and loss of miR-122 function showed that miR-122 could directly bind with HPV16 E6 mRNA and significantly inhibit its expression in SiHa cells, which was further confirmed by constructing the miR-122-E6-mu to eliminate the miR-122 binding effects with E6. The increase of the expression of type I interferon (IFN and its classical effective molecules and the phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT1 protein indicated that miR-122 might enhance type I interferon in cervical carcinoma cells, which explained the significant reduction of HPV16 E7 and E6*I mRNA expression. This might be due to the binding between miR-122 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1 mRNA, which is the suppressor of interferon signaling pathway. Moreover, it was identified that the miR-122 binding position was nt359-nt375 in SOCS1 mRNA. Taken together, this study indicated that HPV16 could be effectively inhibited by miR-122 through both direct binding with E6 mRNA and promoting SOCS1-dependent IFN signaling pathway. Thus, miR-122 may serve as a new therapeutic option for inhibiting HPV infection.

  7. Omega-3 Fatty Acids during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY S HARE W ITH W OMEN OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS DURING PREGNANCY During pregnancy, your ... the foods you eat and vitamins you take. Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3s) are an important ...

  8. Interferon-¿ production by human T cells and natural killer cells in vitro in response to antigens from the two intracellular pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Hviid, L; Kharazmi, A

    1997-01-01

    protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and Leishmania antigens. It was found that IFN-gamma was produced in response to both PPD and Leishmania stimulant by T cells in the cultures. Activation of IFN-gamma producing natural killer (NK) cells was demonstrated only in some cultures, and only......Acquired resistance to both mycobacteria and Leishmania is primarily mediated by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), which triggers mechanisms leading to the death of the microorganism in macrophages. In this study, cell activation and IFN-gamma production was investigated in human peripheral blood...... mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals previously sensitized to tuberculin and without known exposure to Leishmania parasites. Immune staining for intracellular IFN-gamma and surface markers allowed flow cytometric identification of the cellular sources of IFN-gamma in cell cultures incubated with purified...

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil lower anxiety, improve cognitive functions and reduce spontaneous locomotor activity in a non-human primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinot, Nina; Jouin, Mélanie; Lhomme-Duchadeuil, Adrien; Guesnet, Philippe; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Aujard, Fabienne; Pifferi, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are major components of brain cells membranes. ω3 PUFA-deficient rodents exhibit severe cognitive impairments (learning, memory) that have been linked to alteration of brain glucose utilization or to changes in neurotransmission processes. ω3 PUFA supplementation has been shown to lower anxiety and to improve several cognitive parameters in rodents, while very few data are available in primates. In humans, little is known about the association between anxiety and ω3 fatty acids supplementation and data are divergent about their impact on cognitive functions. Therefore, the development of nutritional studies in non-human primates is needed to disclose whether a long-term supplementation with long-chain ω3 PUFA has an impact on behavioural and cognitive parameters, differently or not from rodents. We address the hypothesis that ω3 PUFA supplementation could lower anxiety and improve cognitive performances of the Grey Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus), a nocturnal Malagasy prosimian primate. Adult male mouse lemurs were fed for 5 months on a control diet or on a diet supplemented with long-chain ω3 PUFA (n = 6 per group). Behavioural, cognitive and motor performances were measured using an open field test to evaluate anxiety, a circular platform test to evaluate reference spatial memory, a spontaneous locomotor activity monitoring and a sensory-motor test. ω3-supplemented animals exhibited lower anxiety level compared to control animals, what was accompanied by better performances in a reference spatial memory task (80% of successful trials vs 35% in controls, pfatty acids may represent a valuable dietary strategy to improve behavioural and cognitive functions.

  10. Inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, induce EMT in human PTC cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Nannan; Gao, Yun; Guan, Haixia; Wu, Dan; Ding, Shuangning; Teng, Weiping; Shan, Zhongyan

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ, promote adverse outcomes in numerous types of cancer; however, their role in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of TNF-α and IFN-γ on the migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the three PTC cell lines, TPC-1, BCPAP and K1. The effect of TNF-α and IFN-γ on cell migration and invasion was assessed by wound-healing and Transwell assays. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of the EMT makers, E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin, were analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunoblot analysis. The wound-healing and Transwell experiments revealed that TNF-α and IFN-γ increased the migratory and invasive behavior of PTC cells (PPTC cells.

  11. OMEGA 3 DAN KECERDASAN ANAK

    OpenAIRE

    Fivi Melva Diana

    2013-01-01

    Kejadian gizi kurangdi Indonesia dari tahun ke tahun masih tinggi . Penyebab fingginya angka kejadiangizi kurang di Indonesia salah satunya diduga karena kurangnya konsumsi makanan sumber omega 3, EPA, DHA hubungan omega 3 dengan kecerdasan anak balita. Oleh sebab itu disarankan satn, untuk perlu dilakukan penelitian lebih lanjut mengenai hubungan konsumsi omega 3 dengan turnbuh-kembang anak, kedua, bagi ibuibu disarankan imtuk memperhatikan konsumsi makanan dari sumber omega 3 guna pengoptim...

  12. High basal expression of interferon-stimulated genes in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B cells contributes to influenza A virus resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai-Giea Seng

    Full Text Available Respiratory epithelial cells play a key role in influenza A virus (IAV pathogenesis and host innate response. Transformed human respiratory cell lines are widely used in the study of IAV-host interactions due to their relative convenience, and inherent difficulties in working with primary cells. Transformed cells, however, may have altered susceptibility to virus infection. Proper characterization of different respiratory cell types in their responses to IAV infection is therefore needed to ensure that the cell line chosen will provide results that are of relevance in vivo. We compared replication kinetics of human H1N1 (A/USSR/77 IAVs in normal primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE and two commonly used respiratory epithelial cell lines namely BEAS-2B and A549 cells. We found that IAV replication was distinctly poor in BEAS-2B cells in comparison with NHBE, A549 and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. IAV resistance in BEAS-2B cells was accompanied by an activated antiviral state with high basal expression of interferon (IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7, stimulator of IFN genes (STING and IFN stimulated genes (ISGs. Treatment of BEAS-2B cells with a pan-Janus-activated-kinase (JAK inhibitor decreased IRF-7 and ISG expression and resulted in increased IAV replication. Therefore, the use of highly resistant BEAS-2B cells in IAV infection may not reflect the cytopathogenicity of IAV in human epithelial cells in vivo.

  13. Intake of Fish and Omega-3 (n-3) Fatty Acids: Effect on Humans During Actual and Simulated Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Zwart, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    Space flight has many negative effects on human physiology, including bone and muscle loss. Bone and muscle are two systems that are positively affected by dietary intake of fish and n-3 fatty acids. The mechanism is likely to be related to inhibition by n-3 fatty acids of inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF) and thus inhibition of downstream NF-kB activation. We have documented this effect in a 3-dimensional cell culture model, where NF-kB activation in osteoclasts was inhibited by eicosapentaenoic acid, an n-3 fatty acid. We have also indentified that NF-kB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Space Shuttle crews. We found that after Shuttle flights of 2 wk, expression of the protein p65 (evidence of NF-kB activation) was increased at landing (P less than 0.001). When evaluating the effects of n-3 fatty acid intake on bone breakdown after 60 d of bed rest (a weightlessness analog). We found that after 60 d of bed rest, greater intake of n-3 fatty acids was associated with less N-telopeptide excretion (Pearson r = -0.62, P less than 0.05). We also evaluated the relationship of fish intake and bone loss in astronauts after 4 to 6 mo missions on the International Space Station. Higher consumption of fish during flight was associated with higher bone mineral density (Pearson r = 0.46, P less than 0.05). Together, these findings provide evidence of the cellular mechanism by which n-3 fatty acids can inhibit bone loss, and preliminary human evidence of the potential for n-3 fatty acids to counteract bone loss associated with space flight. This study was supported by the NASA Human Research Program.

  14. Intake of Fish and Omega-3 (N-3) Fatty Acid: Effect on Humans during Actual and Simulated Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has many negative effects on human physiology, including bone and muscle loss. These are some of the systems on which intakes of fish and n-3 fatty acids have positive effects. These effects are likely to occur through inhibition of inflammatory cytokines (such as TNFalpha) and thus inhibition of downstream NF-KB activation. We documented this effect in a 3D cell culture model, where NF-KB activation in osteoclasts was inhibited by eicosapentaenoic acid, an n-3 fatty acid. We have extended these studies and report here (a) NF-KB expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Space Shuttle crews on 2-wk missions, (b) the effects of n-3 fatty acid intake after 60 d of bed rest (a weightlessness analog), and (c) the effects of fish intake in astronauts after 4 to 6 mo on the International Space Station. After Shuttle flights of 2 wk, NFKB p65 expression at landing was increased (P less than 0.001). After 60 d of bed rest, higher intake of n-3 fatty acids was associated with less N-telopeptide excretion (Pearson r = -0.62, P less than 0.05). Higher consumption of fish during flight was associated with higher bone mineral density (Pearson r = -0.46, P less than 0.05). Together with our earlier findings, these data provide mechanistic cellular and preliminary human evidence of the potential for n-3 fatty acids to counteract bone loss associated with spaceflight. This study was supported by the NASA Human Research Program.

  15. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    The Omega spectrometer which came into action during the year. An array of optical spark chambers can be seen withdrawn from the magnet aperture. In the 'igloo' above the magnet is located the Plumbicon camera system which collects information from the spark chambers.

  16. Continued Elevation of Interleukin-18 and Interferon-γ After Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy and Clinical Failure in a Diverse Multicountry Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagopal, Ashwin; Gupte, Nikhil; Shivakoti, Rupak; Cox, Andrea L.; Yang, Wei-Teng; Berendes, Sima; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Santos, Breno; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Tripathy, Srikanth; Riviere, Cynthia; Lama, Javier R.; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Semba, Richard D.; Hakim, James; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Sanne, Ian; Asmuth, David; Campbell, Thomas; Bollinger, Robert C.; Gupta, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Background. We assessed immune activation after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation to understand clinical failure in diverse settings. Methods. We performed a case-control study in ACTG Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource-Limited Settings (PEARLS). Cases were defined as incident World Health Organization Stage 3 or 4 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease or death, analyzed from ART weeks 24 (ART24) to 96. Controls were randomly selected. Interleukin (IL)-6, interferon (IFN)-γ-inducible protein-10, IL-18, tumor necrosis factor-α, IFN-γ, and soluble CD14 (sCD14) were measured pre-ART and at ART24 in plasma. Continued elevation was defined by thresholds set by highest pre-ART quartiles (>Q3). Incident risk ratios (IRRs) for clinical progression were estimated by Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, treatment, country, time-updated CD4+ T-cell count, HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA), and prevalent tuberculosis. Results. Among 99 cases and 234 controls, median baseline CD4+ T-cell count was 181 cells/µL, and HIV RNA was 5.05 log10 cp/mL. Clinical failure was independently associated with continued elevations of IL-18 (IRR, 3.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27–7.20), sCD14 (IRR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.02–4.62), and IFN-γ (IRR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01–0.61). Among 276 of 333 (83%) who were virologically suppressed at ART24, IFN-γ was associated with protection from failure, but the association with sCD14 was attenuated. Conclusions. Continued IL-18 and sCD14 elevations were associated with clinical ART failure. Interferon-γ levels may reflect preserved immune function.

  17. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan C. Vesa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents some general facts about omega-3 fatty acids and their role in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for the human body. Their beneficial effects in the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been known for decades. Since then, several epidemiological and interventional trials showed the value of omega-3 acids in the treatment of certain diseases. Most of them revealed the protective role of omega-3 fatty acids on heart and cardiac functions. However, some of these studies couldn?t demonstrate a positive association between fish oils and preventing cardiac events. The major cardiologic societies from European Union and United States of America recommend omega-3 fatty acids as supplements for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their mechanisms of action on apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in humans: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscarsson, Jan; Hurt-Camejo, Eva

    2017-08-10

    Epidemiological and genetic studies suggest that elevated triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein levels in the circulation increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Prescription formulations of omega-3 fatty acids (OM3FAs), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), reduce plasma TG levels and are approved for the treatment of patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Many preclinical studies have investigated the TG-lowering mechanisms of action of OM3FAs, but less is known from clinical studies. We conducted a review, using systematic methodology, of studies in humans assessing the mechanisms of action of EPA and DHA on apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, including TG-rich lipoproteins and low-density lipoproteins (LDLs). A systematic search of PubMed retrieved 55 articles, of which 30 were used in the review; 35 additional arrticles were also included. In humans, dietary DHA is retroconverted to EPA, while production of DHA from EPA is not observed. Dietary DHA is preferentially esterified into TGs, while EPA is more evenly esterified into TGs, cholesterol esters and phospholipids. The preferential esterification of DHA into TGs likely explains the higher turnover of DHA than EPA in plasma. The main effects of both EPA and DHA are decreased fasting and postprandial serum TG levels, through reduction of hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG production. The exact mechanism for reduced VLDL production is not clear but does not include retention of lipids in the liver; rather, increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation is likely. The postprandial reduction in TG levels is caused by increased lipoprotein lipase activity and reduced serum VLDL-TG concentrations, resulting in enhanced chylomicron clearance. Overall, no clear differences between the effects of EPA and DHA on TG levels, or on turnover of TG-rich lipoproteins, have been observed. Effects on LDL are complex and may be influenced by genetics, such as APOE genotype. EPA and

  19. Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil lower anxiety, improve cognitive functions and reduce spontaneous locomotor activity in a non-human primate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Vinot

    Full Text Available Omega-3 (ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA are major components of brain cells membranes. ω3 PUFA-deficient rodents exhibit severe cognitive impairments (learning, memory that have been linked to alteration of brain glucose utilization or to changes in neurotransmission processes. ω3 PUFA supplementation has been shown to lower anxiety and to improve several cognitive parameters in rodents, while very few data are available in primates. In humans, little is known about the association between anxiety and ω3 fatty acids supplementation and data are divergent about their impact on cognitive functions. Therefore, the development of nutritional studies in non-human primates is needed to disclose whether a long-term supplementation with long-chain ω3 PUFA has an impact on behavioural and cognitive parameters, differently or not from rodents. We address the hypothesis that ω3 PUFA supplementation could lower anxiety and improve cognitive performances of the Grey Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus, a nocturnal Malagasy prosimian primate. Adult male mouse lemurs were fed for 5 months on a control diet or on a diet supplemented with long-chain ω3 PUFA (n = 6 per group. Behavioural, cognitive and motor performances were measured using an open field test to evaluate anxiety, a circular platform test to evaluate reference spatial memory, a spontaneous locomotor activity monitoring and a sensory-motor test. ω3-supplemented animals exhibited lower anxiety level compared to control animals, what was accompanied by better performances in a reference spatial memory task (80% of successful trials vs 35% in controls, p<0.05, while the spontaneous locomotor activity was reduced by 31% in ω3-supplemented animals (p<0.001, a parameter that can be linked with lowered anxiety. The long-term dietary ω3 PUFA supplementation positively impacts on anxiety and cognitive performances in the adult mouse lemur. The supplementation of human food with ω3 fatty

  20. Products from human mast cell line cells enhance the production of interferon-γ by CD8+ and CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pater-Huijsen, Francina L; De Riemer, Mariëlle J; Reijneke, Richard M R; Pompen, Marjolein; Lutter, René; Jansen, Henk M; Out, Theo A

    2002-01-01

    In patients with allergic asthma, T-cell cytokines are implicated in the regulation of the local inflammation in the airways. The ability of sensitized mast cells to release mediators and cytokines early upon allergen stimulation makes them important candidates for local immunoregulation. We have studied the effects of human mast cells on T cells with the use of the human mast cell line HMC-1. We showed that activated human mast cells or their soluble products induced and enhanced the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production by T cells up to about 60-fold. The production of interleukin (IL)-4 was hardly affected and that of IL-5 was slightly enhanced. The enhancement of IFN-γ production was induced both in polyclonal CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones. Further characterization of the factors involved demonstrated a molecular mass above 30 000. Our results implicate that by this mechanism mast cells may account for a negative feedback system locally down-regulating allergen-induced T helper 2 responses via IFN-γ production by the T cells. PMID:11972627

  1. Cut, copy, move, delete: The study of human interferon genes reveal multiple mechanisms underlying their evolution in amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Christopher D; Pestka, Sidney

    2015-12-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are rapidly evolving cytokines released when viral infections are detected in cells. Previous research suggests that genes encoding IFNs and their receptors duplicated extensively throughout vertebrate evolution. We present molecular genetic evidence that supports the use of nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) to expand select IFN genes during amniote evolution. The duplication of long regions of genome (encompassing at least one functional IFN gene) followed by the insertion of this genome fragment near its parent's location, is commonly observed in many amniote genomes. Duplicates inserted away from duplication hotspots are not as frequently perturbed with new duplicates, and tend to survive long periods of evolution, sometimes becoming new IFN subtypes. Although most duplicates are inserted parallel to and near the original sequence, the insertion of the Kelch-like 9 gene within the Type I IFN locus of placental mammals promoted antiparallel insertion of gene duplicates between the Kelch-like 9 and IFN-ε loci. Genetic exchange between highly similar Type I gene duplicates as well as between Type III IFN gene duplicates homogenized their diversification. Oddly, Type III IFN genes migrated long distances throughout the genome more frequently than did Type I IFN genes. The inter-chromosomal movement of Type I IFN genes in amniotes correlated with complete intron loss in their gene structure, and repeatedly occurred with occasional Type III IFN genes.

  2. Comparing WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ with $\\Sigma^0_2$ induction

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Let WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ be the statement that the ordinal number $\\omega^\\omega$ is well ordered. WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ has occurred several times in the reverse-mathematical literature. The purpose of this expository note is to discuss the place of WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ within the standard hierarchy of subsystems of second-order arithmetic. We prove that WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ is implied by I$\\Sigma^0_2$ and independent of B$\\Sigma^0_2$. We also prove that WO$(\\omega^\\omega)$ and B$\\Sigma^0_2$ toge...

  3. Effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on human brain morphology and function: What is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Dienke J; van Montfort, Simone J T; Oranje, Bob; Durston, Sarah; Smeets, Paul A M

    2016-03-01

    Public opinion and media coverage suggest that there are benefits of long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) intake on brain functioning. However, it is an open question whether this is indeed the case. Therefore, we reviewed the evidence for effects of ω-3 LC-PUFA on human brain morphology and function. We included studies on (1) naturalistic long-term ω-3 LC-PUFA intake during life (2) the effects of short-term ω-3 LC-PUFA supplementation in healthy subjects and (3) the effects of ω-3 LC-PUFA supplementation as alternative or add-on treatment for psychiatric or neurological disorders. To date, 24 studies have been published on the effect of ω-3 LC-PUFA on brain function and structure. Findings from naturalistic studies and clinical trials in healthy individuals indicate that ω-3 LC-PUFA intake may be associated with increased functional activation of the prefrontal cortex in children, and greater gray matter volume and white matter integrity during aging. However, most naturalistic studies were cross-sectional or did not find any effect on cognition. As such, it is hard to estimate the magnitude of any beneficial effects. Furthermore, there is only limited evidence to support that ω-3 LC-PUFA supplementation is beneficial in brain disorders, such as Alzheimer's Disease, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder and schizophrenia. Overall, the literature suggests that sensitivity to supplementation may vary over development, and as a consequence of brain disorders. The biological mechanisms underlying any (beneficial) effects ω-3 LC-PUFAs on the brain are currently unknown and need to be investigated.

  4. Human tear film and meibum. Very long chain wax esters and (O-acyl)-omega-hydroxy fatty acids of meibum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butovich, Igor A.; Wojtowicz, Jadwiga C.; Molai, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Human meibum was targetly analyzed for the presence of intact wax esters (WEs) and related compounds by means of reverse-phase HPLC in combination with ion trap mass spectrometry. The major detected WEs were based on C18:n (n = 1–4) unsaturated FAs ranking in the following order of abundance: C18:1>C18:2>C18:3>C18:4. The major fatty alcohols (FAls) found in WE were of saturated nature and varied from C18:0 to C28:0. The three most abundant species were C18:1-FA esters of C24:0, C25:0, and C26:0-FAl. Typically, a major compound based on C18:1-FA and a saturated FAl was accompanied by a few related compounds based on a C18:2, C18:3, and C18:4-FA. Contrary to previous reports, no epoxy-WEs or epoxy-FAs were detected in fresh and 1-year-old meibum samples. More than 20 (O-acyl)-ω-hydroxy-FAs (OAHFAs) were observed. The main detected OAHFAs were based on very long-chain ω-hydroxy-FA (C30:1, C32:1, and C34:1) acylated through their ω-hydroxyls by a C18:1-FA. Due to their amphiphilic anionogenic nature, OAHFAs may be responsible for stabilization of the tear film lipid layer by creating an interface between the vast pool of strictly nonpolar lipids of meibum (WEs, cholesteryl esters, etc.) and the aqueous subphase beneath it, a role previously attributed to phospholipids. PMID:19535818

  5. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    This review details the specific needs of women for omega-3 fatty acids, including alpha linoleic acid (ALA) and the very long chain fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Omega-3 fatty acid (dietary or in capsules) ensures that a woman's adipose tissue contains a reserve of these fatty acids for the developing fetus and the breast-fed newborn infant. This ensures the optimal cerebral and cognitive development of the infant. The presence of large quantities of EPA and DHA in the diet slightly lengthens pregnancy, and improves its quality. Human milk contains both ALA and DHA, unlike that of other mammals. Conditions such as diabetes can alter the fatty acid profile of mother's milk, while certain diets, like those of vegetarians, vegans, or even macrobiotic diets, can have the same effect, if they do not include seafood. ALA, DHA and EPA, are important for preventing ischemic cardiovascular disease in women of all ages. Omega-3 fatty acids can help to prevent the development of certain cancers, particularly those of the breast and colon, and possibly of the uterus and the skin, and are likely to reduce the risk of postpartum depression, manic-depressive psychosis, dementias (Alzheimer's disease and others), hypertension, toxemia, diabetes and, to a certain extend, age-related macular degeneration. Omega-3 fatty acids could play a positive role in the prevention of menstrual syndrome and postmenopausal hot flushes. The normal western diet contains little ALA (less than 50% of the RDA). The only adequate sources are rapeseed oil (canola), walnuts and so-called "omega-3" eggs (similar to wild-type or Cretan eggs). The amounts of EPA and DHA in the diet vary greatly from person to person. The only good sources are fish and seafood, together with "omega-3" eggs.

  6. 肠道病毒71型抵抗Ⅰ型干扰素诱导的抗病毒作用%Human enterovirus 71 ( EV71 ) resisted type I interferon induced antiviral effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔雨; 宋娟; 宋芹芹; 孙鹏; 甘星; 李公启; 王克霞; 韩俊

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究肠道病毒71型(EV71)抵抗Ⅰ型干扰素(interferon,IFN)诱导的抗病毒作用.方法 将1000 U/ml的Ⅰ型干扰素(α,β)加入HeLa细胞后,去除上清中的干扰素,感染带有GFP的重组单纯疱疹病毒(HSV-1)和EV71,观察GFP的表达和PCR检测HSV-1核酸,判断Ⅰ型干扰素对HSV-1的作用.通过RT-PCR方法检测EV71 2A基因的表达从而判断EV71病毒的复制能力.结果 Ⅰ型干扰素(α,β)诱导HeLa细胞产生抗病毒蛋白而有效地抑制重组HSV-1 GFP的表达和核酸扩增.而EV71 2A的RT-PCR结果证实EV71可在Ⅰ型干扰素(α,β)作用后的HeLa细胞中有效增殖.结论 Ⅰ型干扰素(a,β)诱导产生抗病毒蛋白;EV71可在Ⅰ型干扰素(α,β)诱导产生抗病毒蛋白的HeLa细胞中有效增殖.%Objective To investigate human enterovirus 71 (EV71) resistance to type Ⅰ interferon induced antiviral effect.Methods After type Ⅰ interferons (α,β ) were incubated with HeLa cells,recombinant type Ⅰ herpes simple virus ( HSV-1 ) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) was inoculated onto the HeLa cells.HSV-1 proliferation was observed by GFP expression and PCR.After EV71 was inoculated onto HeLa cells incubated with the same quantity of interferon,proliferation of EV71 were detected by RTPCR of 2A gene. Results Recombinant HSV-1 GFP expression and viral DNA replication obviously decreased in HeLa cells incubated with type Ⅰ interferon (α,β).However,EV71 effectively proliferated in the interferon irritated HeLa cell by RT-PCR.Conclusion HeLa cell irritated by type Ⅰ interferon (α,β) produced antiviral substance that inhibits HSV-1 proliferation.EV71 resisted the antiviral substance induced by type Ⅰ interferon and could significantly replicate in the HeLa cells.

  7. miR-9 modulates the expression of interferon-regulated genes and MHC class I molecules in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fei; Zhao, Zun-Lan; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Fan, Quan-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Shi, Jun-Wen; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Rao-Ying [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Liu, Wei [Institute of Comparative Medicine and Laboratory Animal Center, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Zhang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Yong-Liang [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Xu, Kang, E-mail: xukang1995@yahoo.com [Department of General Surgery, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Yao, Kai-Tai, E-mail: Yaokaitai@yahoo.com.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Xiao, Dong, E-mail: Xiao_d@hotmail.com [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Institute of Comparative Medicine and Laboratory Animal Center, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-9 can negatively or positively modulate interferon-induced gene expression. ► miR-9 can up-regulate major histocompatibility complex class I molecule expression. ► miR-9 can down-regulate the expression of interleukin-related genes. -- Abstract: The functions of miR-9 in some cancers are recently implicated in regulating proliferation, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, and tumor angiogenesis, etc. miR-9 is commonly down-regulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but the exact roles of miR-9 dysregulation in the pathogenesis of NPC remains unclear. Therefore, we firstly used miR-9-expressing CNE2 cells to determine the effects of miR-9 overexpression on global gene expression profile by microarray analysis. Microarray-based gene expression data unexpectedly demonstrated a significant number of up- or down-regulated immune- and inflammation-related genes, including many well-known interferon (IFN)-induced genes (e.g., IFI44L, PSMB8, IRF5, PSMB10, IFI27, PSB9{sub H}UMAN, IFIT2, TRAIL, IFIT1, PSB8{sub H}UMAN, IRF1, B2M and GBP1), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules (e.g., HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-F and HLA-H) and interleukin (IL)-related genes (e.g., IL20RB, GALT, IL7, IL1B, IL11, IL1F8, IL1A, IL6 and IL7R), which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-9 with the miRNA mimics significantly up- or down-regulated the expression of above-mentioned IFN-inducible genes, MHC class I molecules and IL-related genes; on the contrary, miR-9 inhibition by anti-miR-9 inhibitor in CNE2 and 5–8F cells correspondingly decreased or increased the aforementioned immune- and inflammation-related genes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that miR-9 can modulate the expression of IFN-induced genes and MHC class I molecules in human cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of miR-9 in linking inflammation and cancer, which remains to be fully characterized.

  8. A human herpesvirus miRNA attenuates interferon signaling and contributes to maintenance of viral latency by targeting IKKε

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deguang Liang; Yuan Gao; Xianzhi Lin; Zhiheng He; Qinglan Zhao; Qiang Deng; Ke Lan

    2011-01-01

    Type I interferon(IFN)signaling is the principal response mediating antiviral innate immunity. IFN transcription is dependent upon the activation of transcription factors IRF3/IRF7 and NF-KB. Many viral proteins have been shown as being capable of interfering with IFN signaling to facilitate evasion from the host innate immune response.Here, we report that a viral miRNA, miR-K12-11, encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus(KSHV)is critical for the modulation of IFN signaling and acts through targeting 1-kappa-B kinase epsilon(IKKε). Ectopic expression of miR-K12-11 resulted in decreased IKKε expression, while inhibition of miR-K12-11 was found to restore IKKE expression in KSHV-infected cells. Importantly, expression of milk-K12-I1 attenuated IFN signaling by decreasing IKKε-mediated IRF3/IRF7 phosphorylation and by inhibiting the activation of IKKE-dependent IFN stimulating genes(ISGs), allowing miR-K12-11 suppression of antiviral immunity. Our data suggest that IKKE targeting by miR-K12-11 is an important strategy utilized by KSHV to modulate IFN signaling during the KSHV lifecycle, especially in latency. We also demonstrated that IKKE was able to enhance KSHV reactivation synergistically with the treatment of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. Moreover, inhibition of miR-K12-11enhanced KSHV reactivation induced by vesicular stomatitis virus infection. Taken together, our findings also suggest that miR-K12-11 can contribute to maintenance of KSHV latency by targeting IKKE.

  9. Ectoine and hydroxyectoine inhibit thermal-induced aggregation and increase thermostability of recombinant human interferon Alfa2b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmannejad, Faranak; Nafissi-Varcheh, Nastaran

    2017-01-15

    This study is to investigate whether ectoines (ectoine and hydroxyectoine) can reduce aggregation of rhIFNα2b in aqueous solutions on thermal stress. The effect of thermal stress condition on the stability was therefore investigated using size exclusion-high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC), different spectroscopic measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), electrophoresis, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). All experiments were performed in a sodium phosphate buffer system (100mM, pH7). The protein samples (100μg/ml) were incubated at 50°C for 14days in the absence or presence (1, 10, 20, and 100mM) of ectoines. In summary, thermal-induced aggregation was reduced in the presence of ectoines, regardless of the ectoines concentration in different periods of incubation time by analyzing with SE-HPLC and turbidity measurement. The inhibitory effect of ectoines on the aggregation was shown by other techniques used. The optimal ectoines concentration was 10mM for aggregation reduction, so samples containing of 10mM of ectoines were selected for further evaluation. Secondary structural and conformational stability increased in presence of ectoines as measured by far-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. DSC showed slight increase in Tm of interferon in the presence of ectoines. Hydroxyectoine had superior protein-stabilizing properties than ectoine. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that ectoine and hydroxyectoine are highly effective excipients which can significantly reduce the thermal-induced aggregation of rhIFNα2b at low concentration.

  10. Interactive Effects of Immunoglobulin Gamma and Human Leucocyte Antigen Genotypes on Response to Interferon Based Therapy of Hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howayda E. Gomaa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: We examined the role that immunoglobulin GM 23 and KM allotypes—genetic markers of γ and κ chains, respectively—play in response to treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egyptian patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 120 persons who had responded to HCV treatment and 125 with persistent HCV infection were genotyped for the presence of GM23 and KM determinants. HLA –C genotyping was also done. RESULTS: Association of GM 23+ and KM3 was significantly associated with non response to treatment (P < 0.0001. Individuals who lacked this GM genotype (but were positive for KM1,2 and 3 were likely to respond to treatment (P=0.045. Association of heterozygous GM23 (+/- with KM 1,2 and 3 or KM3 alone was significantly associated with SVR (P = 0.001 and (P = 0.0001 respectively. Particular combinations of HLA and GM genotypes were associated significantly with the response to HCV treatment. The combination of HLAC2C2 and GM23+ was associated with persistence of infection (P = 0.027 while the association of HLAC2C2 and heterozygous GM23+/- was associated with SVR (P = 0.001.The association of HLAC1C1 and heterozygous GM23+/- was significantly associated with SVR (P = 0.001 and also subjects with HLA C1/C2 and heterozygous GM23+/- were likely to respond to treatment (P = 0.003 while subjects with HLA C1/C2 and GM23+ show tendency to resist to treatment (P = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Our results didn’t support a role for KM allotypes, GM23 allotype plays a role in the persistence of HCV infection in the presence or absence of KM1,3. Interaction between certain GM and HLA-C genotypes may favor adequate response to interferon based therapies.

  11. Expression of Interferon γ by Decidual Cells and Natural Killer Cells at the Human Implantation Site: Implications for Preeclampsia, Spontaneous Abortion, and Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chie-Pein; Piao, Longzhu; Chen, Xilin; Yu, Jianhua; Masch, Rachel; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J; Huang, S Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Human first-trimester decidual cells (FTDCs) chemoattract CXCR3-expressing circulating CD56(bright)CD16(-) natural killer (NK) cells, which increase uteroplacental blood flow by remodeling spiral arteries and arterioles. This recruitment reflects elevated FTDC expression of NK cell-recruiting induced protein 10 and interferon (IFN)-inducible T-cell-α chemoattractant produced in response to the synergistic effects of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and IFN-γ stimulation. Decidual macrophages express TNF-α, whereas the cellular origin of IFN-γ is unclear. Therefore, this study aims to identify the cell source(s) of IFN-γ in human first trimester decidua. Immunostaining of decidual sections revealed that both FTDCs and decidual NK (dNK) cells express IFN-γ. Although individual dNK cells express higher IFN-γ levels, the more numerous FTDCs account for greater proportion of total IFN-γ immunostaining. Freshly isolated FTDCs express greater IFN-γ staining than dNK cells as measured by flow cytometry, whereas incubation of dNK cells with documented NK cell activators significantly increases IFN-γ above FTDC levels. Confluent FTDCs intrinsically produce, but paradoxically respond to, exogenous IFN-γ.

  12. The Effect of Human Recombinant Interferon Gamma (hrIFN-γ) on hCG Secretion of Trophoblast and Protein Synthesis of Decidual Tissue in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹咏清; 陈幼珍

    1996-01-01

    In this study the effect of human recombinant interferon gamma (hrIFN-γ) on hCG secretion of human first trimester trophoblast and protein synthesis of decidual tissue was investigated in vitro. The results indicated that hrIFN-γ at the doses of 250 U/ml medium and 2500 U/ml medium decreased hCG secretion of trophoblast obviously (P < 0. 0,5, P<0. 01 ) in a dose dependent manner. The effect of hrIFN-γ on protein synthesis at the doses of 10 U to 1,000 U/ml medium inhibited the3 H leucine incorporation obviously. The cpm values between control and experimental groups were significantly different (P <0. 05 ) in a dosedependent manner. Furthermore its inhibitory effect is in a dose-dependent manner and was neutralized by IFN-γ antiserum. The IFN-α at the doses used did not find any effect on protein synthesis in decidual tissue.

  13. [Omega-3 fatty acids in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, Jean-Marie

    2005-02-01

    The brain is one of the organs with the highest level of lipids (fats). Brain lipids, formed of fatty acids, participate in the structure of membranes, for instance 50 % fatty acids are polyunsaturated in the gray matter, 1/3 are of the omega-3 family, and are thus of dietary origin. The omega-3 fatty acids (mainly alpha-linolenic acid, ALA) participated in one of the first experimental demonstration of the effect of dietary substances (nutrients) on the structure and function of the brain. Experiments were first of all carried out on ex vivo cultured brain cells, then on in vivo brain cells (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) from animals fed ALA deficient diet, finally on physicochemical (membrane fluidity), biochemical, physiological, neurosensory (vision an auditory responses), and behavioural or learning parameters. These findings indicated that the nature of polyunsaturated fatty acids (in particular omega-3) present in formula milks for human infants determines to a certain extend the visual, neurological, and intellectual abilities. Thus, in view of these results and of the high polyunsaturated fatty acid content of the brain, it is normal to consider that they could be involved in psychiatric diseases and in the cognitive decline of ageing. Omega-3 fatty acids appear effective in the prevention of stress, however their role as regulator of mood is a matter for discussion. Indeed, they play a role in the prevention of some disorders including depression (especially post partum), as well as in dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. Their role in major depression and bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disease), only poorly documented, is not clearly demonstrated. The intervention of omega-3 in dyslexia, autism, and schizophrenia has been suggested, but it does not necessarily infer a nutritional problems. The respective importance of the vascular system (where the omega-3 are actually active) and the cerebral parenchyma itself, remain to be

  14. Omega-3 fiskeolie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita; Sørensen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Rapport afgrænser sig til evidensbaserede helbredsmæssige gevinster ved et øget indtag af langkædede omega-3, som opnås ved en kost rig på fisk eller som et tilskud af fiskeolier. Der gennemføres en systematisk litteraturgennemgang, som baserer sig på et evidensniveau svarende til styrke A. Det...... betyder, at gennemgangen inkluderer metaanalyser/oversigtsartikler af enten eksperimentelle studier eller observationsstudier, endvidere indgår udvalgte større RCT, som er refereret i meta-analyserne. Sammenfattende findes på baggrund af litteraturgennemgang, at tilskud af omega-3 har effekt på...... hjertesygdom ved at nedsætte mortaliteten. Effekten er mest evident ved personer i særlig risiko for at udvikle hjerte-karsygdom, eller som sekundær/tertiær profylakse. Tilsvarende findes også ved tilskud af omega-3 en forebyggende effekt i forhold til iskæmisk apopleksi. Af mulige virkningsmekanismer viser...

  15. The effects of simvastatin or interferon-α on infectivity of human norovirus using a gnotobiotic pig model for the study of antivirals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwonil Jung

    Full Text Available The lack of an animal model for human norovirus (HuNoV has hindered the development of therapeutic strategies. This study demonstrated that a commonly used cholesterol-lowering statin medication, simvastatin, which increases HuNoV replication in an in vitro replicon system, also enhances HuNoV infectivity in the gnotobiotic (Gn pig model. In contrast, oral treatment with interferon (IFN-α reduces HuNoV infectivity. Young piglets, all with A or H1 histo-blood group antigens on enterocytes, were treated orally with 8 mg/kg/day of simvastatin; 5 days later, the pigs were inoculated orally with a GII.4 HuNoV (HS194/2009/US strain and then treated with simvastatin for 5 more days. Simvastatin induced significantly earlier onset and longer duration of HuNoV fecal shedding in treated pigs, frequently with higher fecal viral titers. Simvastatin impaired poly (I:C-induced IFN-α expression in macrophages or dendritic cells, possibly due to lowered toll-like receptor (TLR 3 expression; however, the mechanisms were not related to interferon regulatory factor 3 or nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway. Thus, the enhanced, earlier infectivity of HuNoV in simvastatin-treated pigs coincided with the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on innate immunity. In contrast to the increased HuNoV shedding that simvastatin induced, viral shedding during the treatment period was reduced or curtailed in the HuNoV-inoculated pigs pre-treated/treated with human IFN-α. Our findings are the first to indicate that IFN-α has potential as antiviral therapy against HuNoV. Based on these intriguing and novel findings using the Gn pig model, we confirmed that HuNoV infectivity is altered by treatment with simvastatin or IFN-α. Collectively, these findings indicate that Gn pigs are a useful model to test immunomodulators or efficacy of antivirals against HuNoV.

  16. Intrahepatic expression of interferon alpha & interferon alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    Egypt. Patients with cirrhosis secondary to chronic HCV infection are at increased risk ... kinases to the Interferon receptors, Type 1 and. Type II. IFN-α and IFN-β have a common receptor .... columns was performed and Mann Whitney Non-.

  17. The Transcription Factor Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 (IRF1) Plays a Key Role in the Terminal Effector Pathways of Human Preterm Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ratana; Tran, Ha Thi; Liong, Stella; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth is the largest single cause of neonatal death and morbidity. By activating cytokine- and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-signaling pathways, infection and/or inflammation are strongly associated with preterm delivery. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) is an important regulator of the inflammatory response. The aims of this study were to establish the effect of 1) labor on IRF1 expression in human fetal membranes and myometrium, 2) prolabor mediators on IRF1 expression and activity, and 3) IRF1 small interfering RNA on the expression of prolabor mediators. IRF1 expression was higher in fetal membranes and myometrium after spontaneous term labor and in preterm fetal membranes with infection. The proinflammatory cytokine IL1B, the bacterial product fsl-1, and viral analog polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly [I:C]) significantly increased IRF1 mRNA expression and transcriptional activity in human primary myometrial cells. In addition, IL1B increased IRF1 activity in primary amnion cells. IRF1 silencing in myometrial cells decreased IL1B-, fsl-1-, and poly (I:C)-induced cytokine (IL6, TNF, IL1B) and chemokine (CXCL8, CCL2) mRNA expression and IL6, CXCL8, and CCL2 release. IL1B-, fsl-1-, and poly (I:C)-induced PTGS2 mRNA expression and IL1B-induced prostaglandin release was also decreased by IRF1 silencing. In conclusion, IRF1 upregulation in fetal membranes and myometrium after term labor indicates a proinflammatory role for IRF1 in human parturition. IRF1 is involved in TLR- and cytokine-mediated signaling in human myometrium. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms associated with inflammation- and infection-associated preterm birth. IRF1 inhibitors as therapeutics for the management of spontaneous preterm birth warrants further investigation. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  18. Ds+ Exclusive Hadronic Decays Involving omega

    OpenAIRE

    The CLEO Collaboration; Ge, J. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Using data collected near the Ds*+ Ds- peak production energy Ecm=4170 MeV by the CLEO-c detector, we search for Ds+ exclusive hadronic decays involving omega. We find B(Ds+ -> pi+ omega) = (0.21 +- 0.09 +- 0.01)%, B(Ds+ -> pi+ pi0 omega) = (2.78 +- 0.65 +- 0.25)%, B(Ds+ -> pi+ pi+ pi- omega) = (1.58 +- 0.45 +- 0.09)%, B(Ds+ -> pi+ eta omega) = (0.85 +- 0.54 +- 0.06)%, B(Ds+ -> K+ omega) K+ pi0 omega) K+ pi+ pi- omega) K+ eta omega)

  19. Human herpesvirus 8 interferon regulatory factor-mediated BH3-only protein inhibition via Bid BH3-B mimicry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Bong Choi

    Full Text Available Viral replication efficiency is in large part governed by the ability of viruses to counteract pro-apoptotic signals induced by infection of host cells. For HHV-8, viral interferon regulatory factor-1 (vIRF-1 contributes to this process in part via inhibitory interactions with BH3-only protein (BOP Bim, recently identified as an interaction partner of vIRF-1. Here we recognize that the Bim-binding domain (BBD of vIRF-1 resembles a region (BH3-B of Bid, another BOP, which interacts intramolecularly with the functional BH3 domain of Bid to inhibit it pro-apoptotic activity. Indeed, vIRF-1 was found to target Bid in addition to Bim and to interact, via its BBD region, with the BH3 domain of each. In functional assays, BBD could substitute for BH3-B in the context of Bid, to suppress Bid-induced apoptosis in a BH3-binding-dependent manner, and vIRF-1 was able to protect transfected cells from apoptosis induced by Bid. While vIRF-1 can mediate nuclear sequestration of Bim, this was not the case for Bid, and inhibition of Bid and Bim by vIRF-1 could occur independently of nuclear localization of the viral protein. Consistent with this finding, direct BBD-dependent inactivation by vIRF-1 of Bid-induced mitochondrial permeabilization was demonstrable in vitro and isolated BBD sequences were also active in this assay. In addition to Bim and Bid BH3 domains, BH3s of BOPs Bik, Bmf, Hrk, and Noxa also were found to bind BBD, while those of both pro- and anti-apoptotic multi-BH domain Bcl-2 proteins were not. Finally, the significance of Bid to virus replication was demonstrated via Bid-depletion in HHV-8 infected cells, which enhanced virus production. Together, our data demonstrate and characterize BH3 targeting and associated inhibition of BOP pro-apoptotic activity by vIRF-1 via Bid BH3-B mimicry, identifying a novel mechanism of viral evasion from host cell defenses.

  20. Immune response in human chromoblastomycosis and eumycetoma - focusing on human interleukin-17A, interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta and human beta-defensin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeyaphan, Charussri; Hau, Carren; Takeoka, Shintaro; Tada, Yayoi; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Sitthinamsuwan, Panitta; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Sasajima, Yuko; Makimura, Koichi; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-07-12

    Knowledge regarding host immune response to chromoblastomycosis and eumycetoma is limited, particularly concerning cytokines and antimicrobial peptides production. This was a retrospective study of 12 paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients diagnosed with chromoblastomycosis or eumycetoma from histological findings and tissue culture. DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from tissues were done to evaluate human interleukin-17A (IL-17A), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and human beta-defensin-2 (HBD-2) expressions. Human beta-actin primer was used for confirming DNA detection, and DNA extracted from psoriasis lesional skin samples was used as positive controls. The twelve paraffin-embedded sections used in this study consisted of five chromoblastomycosis and seven eumycetoma tissues. All PCR reactions showed beta-actin band at 51 bp in all clinical specimens, confirming adequate DNA levels in each reaction. As positive control, the psoriasis skin samples revealed bands for IL-17A at 174 bp, IFN-γ at 273 bp, TNF-α at 360 bp, IL-1β at 276 bp and HBD-2 at 255 bp. For the chromoblastomycosis and eumycetoma tissues, PCR analyses showed IL-17A band at 174 bp in two eumycetoma tissues and HBD-2 band at 255 bp in a chromoblastomycosis tissue. This study demonstrated IL-17A expression in human eumycetoma and HBD-2 expression in human chromoblastomycosis for the first time. However, their role in immune response remains to be elucidated. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. 重组人干扰素α1b喷雾剂皮肤局部药代动力学研究%Study on Skin Region Pharmacokinetics of Recombinant Human Interferon α1b Spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    战大伟; 牛春; 颜克松; 李洁; 徐晨; 刘金毅

    2012-01-01

    To study the skin pharmacokinetics of interferon alb spray, the pharmacokinetics of interferon alb spray on the skin was carried out in the integral, permeable and injured skin of the minipigs. 1, 3, 5, 25 μg/mL of recombinant human interferon alb were consperged onto animal's skin. Skin tissues were shearing and homogenated at 0,1,2,4 h after consperge. The biological activity of interferon alb was measured to show the drug's antiviral effect. The interferon alb was detected in integral skin and achieved to therapeutic concentration in permeable and injured skin of minipigs within 4 h after consperging; the concentrations of interferon alb in tissues were correlated with dosage and time, those differences between groups were significant (P<0. 05). 5 μg/mL interferon alb spray showed antiviral effect on skin region when sprayed every 4 h.%本试验旨在考察重组人干扰素α1b喷雾剂在皮肤应用的局部药代动力学特性,分别在小型猪完整皮肤、通透性增强皮肤和破损皮肤上进行透皮吸收研究.采用1、3、5及25 μg/mL重组人干扰素α1b喷涂于受试部位,在用药后O、1、2、4h分别取用药部位皮肤组织制成匀浆,检测匀浆中干扰素活性.药物可渗透进入小型猪完整皮肤;在小型猪通透性增强和破损皮肤中,用药4h内,药物可达到有效治疗浓度;用药剂量和用药时间与皮肤组织中药物活性相关,不同剂量组间和不同检测时间组间差异显著(P<0.05).5 μg/mL重组人干扰素α1b喷雾剂间隔4h用药可在用药局部起到抗病毒作用.

  2. A New Synthetic Compound, 2-OH, Enhances Interleukin-2 and Interferon-γ Gene Expression in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woan-Fang Tzeng

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new synthetic compound, 6-hydroxy-2-tosylisoquinolin-1(2H-one (2-OH, was selected for immunopharmacological activity tests. The effects of 2-OH on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC proliferation were determined by tritiated thymidine uptake. Compared to phytohemagglutinin (PHA; 5 μg/mL stimulation, 2-OH significantly enhanced PBMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% enhancement activity (EC50 for 2-OH was 4.4±0.1 μM. In addition, effects of 2-OH on interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ production in PBMC were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Results demonstrated that 2-OH stimulated IL-2 and IFN-γ production in PBMC. Data from reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and real-time PCR indicated that IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA expression in PBMC could be induced by 2-OH. Therefore, 2-OH enhanced IL-2 and IFN-γ production in PBMC by modulation their gene expression. We suggest that 2-OH may be an immunomodulatory agent.

  3. Effect of Ureaplasma parvum co-incubation on Chlamydia trachomatis maturation in human epithelial HeLa cells treated with interferon-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Matsuo, Junji; Nakamura, Shinji; Oguri, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-08-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes a sexually transmitted disease. Ureaplasma parvum is commensal in the human genital tract, with a minimal contribution to urogenital infection. We have recently found that U. parvum has a significant effect on the presence of C. trachomatis in the genital tract of healthy women. We therefore assessed the effect of U. parvum co-incubation on C. trachomatis maturation from reticulate bodies (RBs) to elementary bodies (EBs) in HeLa cells in the absence or presence of interferon (IFN)-γ, which is a critical host defense factor. IFN-γ stimulation of viable U. parvum significantly prompted chlamydial growth with an increase in infectious particles, EBs, in HeLa cells. IFN-γ treatment of killed U. parvum had a similar effect on C. trachomatis maturation in HeLa cells. There was no change in expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in cultures of viable or killed U. parvum. We concluded that U. parvum co-incubation by IFN-γ helped C. trachomatis to mature from RBs to EBs in HeLa cells, independent of IDO expression. This suggests a novel survival strategy of C. trachomatis against IFN-γ exposure, prompting secondary infection of the genital mucosa, with possible clinical implications.

  4. Effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma on expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, K Y; Moon, H S; Park, H Y; Lee, T Y; Woo, Y N; Kim, H J; Lee, S J; Kong, G

    2000-10-31

    We have investigated the effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon (INF-gamma), the potent Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-induced cytokines on the production of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and MT1-MMP in high grade human bladder cancer cell lines, T-24, J-82 and HT-1376 cell lines. MMP-2 expression and activity were decreased in T-24 cells treated with both cytokines in a dose dependent manner. However, J-82 cells treated with TNF-alpha and INF-gamma revealed dose dependent increases of MMP-9 expression and activity with similar baseline expression and activity of MMP-2. HT-1376 cells after exposure to TNF-alpha only enhanced the expression and activity of MMP-9. These results indicate that TNF-alpha and INF-gamma could regulate the production of MMP-2 or MMP-9 on bladder cancer cells and their patterns of regulation are cell specific. Furthermore, this diverse response of bladder cancer cells to TNF-alpha and INF-gamma suggests that BCG immunotherapy may enhance the invasiveness of bladder cancer in certain conditions with induction of MMPs.

  5. Downstream mediators of the intratumoral interferon response suppress antitumor immunity, induce gemcitabine resistance and associate with poor survival in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitto, Daniel; Perez, Chelsey; Han, Song; Gonzalo, David H; Pham, Kien; Knowlton, Andrea E; Graves, Christina L; Behrns, Kevin E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Thomas, Ryan M; Liu, Chen; George, Thomas J; Trevino, Jose G; Wallet, Shannon M; Hughes, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    The cancer microenvironment allows tumor cells to evade immune surveillance through a variety of mechanisms. While interferon-γ (IFNγ) is central to effective antitumor immunity, its effects on the microenvironment are not as clear and have in some cancers been shown to induce immune checkpoint ligands. The heterogeneity of these responses to IFNγ remains poorly characterized in desmoplastic malignancies with minimal inflammatory cell infiltration, such as pancreatic cancer (PC). Thus, the IFNγ response within and on key cells of the PC microenvironment was evaluated. IFNγ induced expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II on PC cell lines, primary pancreatic cancer epithelial cells (PPCE) and patient-derived tumor-associated stroma, concomitant with an upregulation of PDL1 in the absence of CD80 and CD86 expression. As expected, IFNγ also induced high levels of CXCL10 from all cell types. In addition, significantly higher levels of CXCL10 were observed in PC specimens compared to those from chronic pancreatitis, whereby intratumoral CXCL10 concentration was an independent predictor of poor survival. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a subset of CXCR3-positive cancer cells in over 90 % of PC specimens, as well as on a subset of cultured PC cell lines and PPCE, whereby exposure to CXCL10 induced resistance to the chemotherapeutic gemcitabine. These findings suggest that IFNγ has multiple effects on many cell types within the PC microenvironment that may lead to immune evasion, chemoresistance and shortened survival.

  6. Antitumor effects of human interferon-alpha 2b secreted by recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine on bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-qing DING; Yan-lan YU; Zhou-jun SHEN; Xie-lai ZHOU; Shan-wen CHEN; Guo-dong LIAO; Yue ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Our objective was to construct a recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guénn vaccine (rBCG) that secretes human interferon-alpha 2b (IFNα-2b) and to study its immunogenicity and in vitro antitumor activity against human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and T5637.Methods:The signal sequence BCG Ag85B and the gene IFNα-2b were amplified from the genome of BCG and human peripheral blood,respectively,by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).The two genes were cloned in Escherichia coli-BCG shuttle-vector pMV261 to obtain a new recombinant plasmid pMV261-Ag85B-IFNα-2b.BCG was transformed with the recombinant plasmid by electroporation and designated rBCG-IFNα-2b.Mononuclear cells were isolated from human peripheral blood (PBMCs) and stimulated with rBCG-IFNα-2b or wild type BCG for 3 d,and then cultured with human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and T5637.Their cytotoxicities were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.Results:BCG was successfully transformed with the recombinant plasmid pMV261-Ag85B-IFNα-2b by electroporation and the recombinant BCG (rBCG-IFNα-2b) was capable of synthesizing and secreting cytokine IFNα-2b.PBMC proliferation was enhanced significantly by rBCG-IFNα-2b,and the cytotoxicity of PBMCs stimulated by rBCG-IFNα-2b to T24 and T5627 was significantly stronger in comparison to wild type BCG.Conclusions:A recombinant BCG,secreting human IFNα-2b (rBCG-IFNα-2b),was constructed successfully and was superior to control wild type BCG in inducing immune responses and enhancing cytotoxicity to human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and T5637.This suggests that rBCG-IFNα-2b could be a promising agent for bladder cancer patients in terms of possible reductions in both clinical dosage and side effects of BCG immunotherapy.d enhancng c

  7. The V protein of Tioman virus is incapable of blocking type I interferon signaling in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Caignard

    Full Text Available The capacity of a virus to cross species barriers is determined by the development of bona fide interactions with cellular components of new hosts, and in particular its ability to block IFN-α/β antiviral signaling. Tioman virus (TioV, a close relative of mumps virus (MuV, has been isolated in giant fruit bats in Southeast Asia. Nipah and Hendra viruses, which are present in the same bat colonies, are highly pathogenic in human. Despite serological evidences of close contacts between TioV and human populations, whether TioV is associated to some human pathology remains undetermined. Here we show that in contrast to the V protein of MuV, the V protein of TioV (TioV-V hardly interacts with human STAT2, does not degrade STAT1, and cannot block IFN-α/β signaling in human cells. In contrast, TioV-V properly binds to human STAT3 and MDA5, and thus interferes with IL-6 signaling and IFN-β promoter induction in human cells. Because STAT2 binding was previously identified as a host restriction factor for some Paramyxoviridae, we established STAT2 sequence from giant fruit bats, and binding to TioV-V was tested. Surprisingly, TioV-V interaction with STAT2 from giant fruit bats is also extremely weak and barely detectable. Altogether, our observations question the capacity of TioV to appropriately control IFN-α/β signaling in both human and giant fruit bats that are considered as its natural host.

  8. The omega-class glutathione transferases: structure, function, and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Philip G

    2011-05-01

    The omega class of glutathione transferases (GSTs) is a relatively ancient member of the cytosolic GST superfamily, and the omega-class GSTs are found in plants, animals, and some microbial species. The omega-class GSTs exhibit the canonical GST fold, but, unlike other GSTs, the omega-class GSTs have a cysteine residue in their active site. Consequently, the omega-class GSTs catalyze a range of thiol transferase and reduction reactions that are not catalyzed by members of the other classes. Human GSTO1-1 can catalyze the reduction of monomethylarsonic acid (V), but this does not appear to be physiologically important in cases of high environmental arsenic exposure. GSTO1-1 also plays an important role in the biotransformation of reactive α-haloketones to nontoxic acetophenones. Genetic variation is common in the omega-class GST genes, and variants that result in deficiency of GSTO1-1 have been characterized. Genetic linkage studies have discovered associations between GSTO genes and the age at onset of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mechanism underlying this association with neurological disease may derive from the capacity of omega-class GSTs to mitigate oxidative stress or their role in activating the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β.

  9. The Omega spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The huge superconducting magnet (3 m inside coil diameter, 2 m gap, 18 kGauss) contains a large number of optical spark chambers partly surrounding a hydrogen target which is hit by the beam entering from behind. The half cylindrical aluminium hut houses eight television cameras viewing the spark chambers from the top. The big gas Cerenkov counter in front of the picture (6 m x 4 m x 3 m) which identifies fast forward particles was constructed at Saclay as a contribution of one of the Omega.

  10. The Omega RICH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebert, H.W. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Beusch, W. (CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Engelfried, J. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Faller, F. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Gerassimov, S.G. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)); Lennert, P. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Martens, K. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Michaels, R. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)); Mueller, U. (Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Univ. Mainz (Germany)); Rieseberg, H. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)); Waelder, G. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Heidelberg (Germany))

    1994-04-01

    A large-aperture RICH for identification of secondary particles is in operation at the Omega spectrometer since 1984. Photons are detected in drift chambers with quartz windows, using TMAE-loaded counting gases. The RICH was used by two experiments, WA69 and WA82, until 1988. It was then equipped with new drift chambers and mirrors and is in use since 1990 mainly for the hyperon beam experiment WA89. The present setup is described in more detail, and efficiencies, resolutions and particle separation achieved are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Interferon-inducible IFI16, a negative regulator of cell growth, down-regulates expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda Li Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased levels of interferon (IFN-inducible IFI16 protein (encoded by the IFI16 gene located at 1q22 in human normal prostate epithelial cells and diploid fibroblasts (HDFs are associated with the onset of cellular senescence. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the IFI16 protein contributes to cellular senescence-associated cell growth arrest remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that increased levels of IFI16 protein in normal HDFs and in HeLa cells negatively regulate the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We optimized conditions for real-time PCR, immunoblotting, and telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assays to detect relatively low levels of hTERT mRNA, protein, and telomerase activity that are found in HDFs. Using the optimized conditions, we report that treatment of HDFs with inhibitors of cell cycle progression, such as aphidicolin or CGK1026, which resulted in reduced steady-state levels of IFI16 mRNA and protein, was associated with increases in hTERT mRNA and protein levels and telomerase activity. In contrast, knockdown of IFI16 expression in cells increased the expression of c-Myc, a positive regulator of hTERT expression. Additionally, over-expression of IFI16 protein in cells inhibited the c-Myc-mediated stimulation of the activity of hTERT-luc-reporter and reduced the steady-state levels of c-Myc and hTERT. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrated that increased levels of IFI16 protein in HDFs down-regulate the expression of hTERT gene. Our observations will serve basis to understand how increased cellular levels of the IFI16 protein may contribute to certain aging-dependent diseases.

  12. Interferon-Inducible IFI16, a Negative Regulator of Cell Growth, Down-Regulates Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Duan, Xin; Alimirah, Fatouma; Choubey, Divaker

    2010-01-01

    Background Increased levels of interferon (IFN)-inducible IFI16 protein (encoded by the IFI16 gene located at 1q22) in human normal prostate epithelial cells and diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) are associated with the onset of cellular senescence. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the IFI16 protein contributes to cellular senescence-associated cell growth arrest remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that increased levels of IFI16 protein in normal HDFs and in HeLa cells negatively regulate the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We optimized conditions for real-time PCR, immunoblotting, and telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays to detect relatively low levels of hTERT mRNA, protein, and telomerase activity that are found in HDFs. Using the optimized conditions, we report that treatment of HDFs with inhibitors of cell cycle progression, such as aphidicolin or CGK1026, which resulted in reduced steady-state levels of IFI16 mRNA and protein, was associated with increases in hTERT mRNA and protein levels and telomerase activity. In contrast, knockdown of IFI16 expression in cells increased the expression of c-Myc, a positive regulator of hTERT expression. Additionally, over-expression of IFI16 protein in cells inhibited the c-Myc-mediated stimulation of the activity of hTERT-luc-reporter and reduced the steady-state levels of c-Myc and hTERT. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrated that increased levels of IFI16 protein in HDFs down-regulate the expression of hTERT gene. Our observations will serve basis to understand how increased cellular levels of the IFI16 protein may contribute to certain aging-dependent diseases. PMID:20052289

  13. Aedes Aegypti saliva enhances chikungunya virus replication in human skin fibroblasts via inhibition of the type I interferon signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Diop, Fodé; Hamel, Rodolphe; Talignani, Loïc; Ferraris, Pauline; Cornelie, Sylvie; Liegeois, Florian; Thomas, Frédéric; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

    2017-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) transmission occurs through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito which injects virus-containing saliva into the skin of the human host during blood feeding. In the present study, we have determined the effect of Aedes aegypti saliva on CHIKV replication in human skin fibroblasts, a major cell type for viral entry, which mimics the events that occur during natural transmission. A significant increase in the expression of viral transcripts and infectious viral particles was observed in fibroblasts infected with CHIKV in the presence of saliva, as compared with those infected with virus alone. CHIKV-infected human fibroblasts were found to express significantly increased levels of various type I IFN-responsive genes, as demonstrated by specific PCR array analysis. In contrast, the expression of these genes was markedly decreased in cells infected with CHIKV in the presence of mosquito saliva. Moreover, Western blotting analysis revealed that STAT2 and its phosphorylated form were down-regulated in the presence of mosquito saliva. Our data demonstrate for the first time the significance of Aedes aegypti saliva in promoting CHIKV infection via down-regulation of several type I IFN-responsive genes in infected human skin fibroblasts via the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphologies of omega band auroras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Natsuo; Yukimatu, Akira Sessai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Hori, Tomoaki

    2017-08-01

    We examined the morphological signatures of 315 omega band aurora events observed using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm ground-based all-sky imager network over a period of 8 years. We find that omega bands can be classified into the following three subtypes: (1) classical (O-type) omega bands, (2) torch or tongue (T-type) omega bands, and (3) combinations of classical and torch or tongue (O/T-type) omega bands. The statistical results show that T-type bands occur the most frequently (45%), followed by O/T-type bands (35%) and O-type bands (18%). We also examined the morphologies of the omega bands during their formation, from the growth period to the declining period through the maximum period. Interestingly, the omega bands are not stable, but rather exhibit dynamic changes in shape, intensity, and motion. They grow from small-scale bumps (seeds) at the poleward boundary of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, rather than via the rotation or shear motion of preexisting east-west-aligned auroras, and do not exhibit any shear motion during the periods of auroral activity growth. Furthermore, the auroral luminosity is observed to increase during the declining period, and the total time from the start of the growth period to the end of the declining period is found to be about 20 min. Such dynamical signatures may be important in determining the mechanism responsible for omega band formation.

  15. Omega-3 Supplements: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Omega-3 Supplements: In Depth ... JAMA Internal Medicine . 2014;174(3):460-462. Hooper L, Harrison RA, Summerbell CD, et al. Omega ... on November 2, 2012. Kris-Etherton PM, Harris WS, Appel LJ, et al. Fish consumption, fish oil, ...

  16. Interferon-γ-induced upregulation of immunoproteasome subunit assembly overcomes bortezomib resistance in human hematological cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite encouraging results with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, emergence of resistance can limit its efficacy, hence calling for novel strategies to overcome bortezomib-resistance. We previously showed that bortezomib-resistant human leukemia cell lines expressed significantly lower levels of immunoproteasome at the expense of constitutive proteasomes, which harbored point mutations in exon 2 of the PSMB5 gene encoding the β5 subu...

  17. Hypoxia upregulates Bcl-2 expression and suppresses interferon-gamma induced antiangiogenic activity in human tumor derived endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia in solid tumors potentially stimulates angiogenesis by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and upregulating VEGF receptor expression. However, it is unknown whether hypoxia can modulate the effect of anti-angiogenic treatment on tumor-derived endothelium. METHODS: Human tumor-derived endothelial cells (HTDEC) were freshly isolated from surgically removed human colorectal tumors by collagenase\\/DNase digestion and Percol gradient sedimentation. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation, and capillary tube formation was measured using Matrigel. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, and Bcl-2 expression was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Under aerobic culture conditions (5% CO2 plus 21% O2) HTDEC expressed less Bcl-2 and were more susceptible to IFN-gamma-induced apoptosis with significant reductions in both cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, when compared with normal human macrovascular and microvascular EC. Following exposure of HTDEC to hypoxia (5% CO2 plus 2% O2), IFN-gamma-induced cell apoptosis, and antiangiogenic activity (i.e. an inhibition in cell proliferation and capillary tube formation) in HTDEC were markedly attenuated. This finding correlated with hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bcl-2 expression in HTDEC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that hypoxia can protect HTDEC against IFN-gamma-mediated cell death and antiangiogenic activity, and suggest that improvement of tumor oxygenation may potentiate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies specifically targeting the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

  18. Recent advances in the field of omega-3-lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    During the last 15-20 years the use of fish and algae oils for human applications has received increasing attention from academia, industry and consumers. This is due to the fact that a growing body of evidence supports that marine omega-3 lipids have a wide range of health beneficial effects...... consumption. Due to their polyunsaturated nature omega-3 lipids are highly susceptible to lipid oxidation. The last part of the presentation will discuss possible means to prevent or reduce lipid oxidation in omega-3 lipids in dietary supplements and in foods enriched with these healthy lipids. Possible means......, and at the same time the intake of these healthy lipids is far below the recommendable level in many parts of the world. This presentation will provide a brief overview of recent advances in the body of knowledge about the health benefits of omega-3 lipids. For many years fish oil produced from wild fish has been...

  19. Assessment of essential fatty acid and omega 3-fatty acid status by measurement of erythrocyte 20 : 3 omega 9 (Mead acid), 22 : 5 omega 6/20 : 4 omega 6 and 22 : 5 omega 6/22 : 6 omega 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Martini, IA; Woltil, HA; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    2002-01-01

    Background. Early suspicion of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) or omega3-deficiency may rather focus on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or long-chain PUFA (LCP) analyses than clinical symptoms. We determined cut-off values for biochemical EFAD, omega3-and omega3/22:6omega3 [docosahexaenoic

  20. Assessment of essential fatty acid and omega 3-fatty acid status by measurement of erythrocyte 20 : 3 omega 9 (Mead acid), 22 : 5 omega 6/20 : 4 omega 6 and 22 : 5 omega 6/22 : 6 omega 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Martini, IA; Woltil, HA; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ

    2002-01-01

    Background. Early suspicion of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) or omega3-deficiency may rather focus on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or long-chain PUFA (LCP) analyses than clinical symptoms. We determined cut-off values for biochemical EFAD, omega3-and omega3/22:6omega3 [docosahexaenoic

  1. Two recombinant human interferon-beta 1a pharmaceutical preparations produce a similar transcriptional response determined using whole genome microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prync, A E Sterin; Yankilevich, P; Barrero, P R; Bello, R; Marangunich, L; Vidal, A; Criscuolo, M; Benasayag, L; Famulari, A L; Domínguez, R O; Kauffman, M A; Diez, R A

    2008-02-01

    Recombinant human interferon-beta (IFN-b) is a well-established treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). The regulatory process for marketing authorization of biosimilars is currently under debate in certain countries. In the EU, EMEA has clearly defined the process including overarching and product-specific guidelines, which includes clinical testing. Biosimilarity needs to be based on comparability criteria, including at least molecular characterization, biological activity relevant for the therapeutic effect and relative bioavailability ("bioequivalence"). In the case of such complex diseases as MS, where the effect of treatment is not so directly measurable, in vitro tools can provide additional data to support comparability. Genomic microarrays assays might be useful to compare multisource biopharmaceuticals. The aim of the present study was to compare the pharmacodynamic genomic effects (in terms of transcriptional regulation) of two recombinant human IFN-I(2)1a preparations on lymphocytes of multiple sclerosis patients using a whole genome microarray assay. We performed an ex vivo whole genome expression profiling of the effect of two preparations of IFN-I(2)1a on non-adherent mononuclears from five relapsing-remitting MS patients analyzing microarrays (CodeLink Human Whole Genome). Patients blood was drawn, PBMCs isolated and cultured in three different conditions: culture medium (control), 1,000 U/ml of IFN-I(2)1a (BLA- (STOFERON, Bio Sidus) and 1,000 U/ml of IFN-I(2)1a (REBIF, Serono) RNA was purified from non-adherent cells (mostly lymphocytes), amplified and hybridized. Raw data were generated by CodeLink proprietary software. Data normalization, quality control and analysis of differential gene expression between treatments were done using linear model for microarray data. Functional annotation analysis of IFN-I(2)1a MS treatment transcription was done using DAVID. Out of the approximately 45,000 human sequences examined, no evidence of differential

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeromson, Stewart; Gallagher, Iain J; Galloway, Stuart D R; Hamilton, D Lee

    2015-11-19

    Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle.

  3. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Jeromson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle.

  4. Immunotherapy against Metastatic Melanoma with Human iPS Cell-Derived Myeloid Cell Lines Producing Type I Interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Azusa; Fukushima, Satoshi; Nakahara, Satoshi; Kubo, Yosuke; Tokuzumi, Aki; Yamashita, Junji; Aoi, Jun; Haruta, Miwa; Senju, Satoru; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, immunotherapy for advanced melanoma has been gaining increased attention. The efficacy of anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 antibodies, anti-programmed cell death 1 antibodies, and the BRAF(V600E) kinase inhibitor has been proven in metastatic melanoma. At the same time, adoptive cell transfer has significant effects against metastatic melanoma; however, it is difficult to apply on a broad scale because of the problems related to cell preparation. To overcome these problems, we developed immune cell therapy using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The benefit of our method is that a large number of cells can be readily obtained. We focused on macrophages for immune cell therapy because macrophage infiltration is frequently observed in solid cancers. In this study, the efficacy of human iPS cell-derived myeloid cell lines (iPS-ML) genetically modified to express type I IFNs against human melanoma cells was examined. The morphology, phagocytic ability, and surface markers of iPS-ML were similar to those of macrophages. The iPS-ML that express type I IFNs (iPS-ML-IFN) showed significant effects in inhibiting the growth of disseminated human melanoma cells in SCID mice. The infiltration of iPS-ML into the tumor nests was confirmed immunohistologically. The iPS-ML-IFNs increased the expression of CD169, a marker of M1 macrophages that can activate antitumor immunity. The iPS-ML-IFNs could infiltrate into tumor tissue and exert anticancer effects in the local tumor tissue. In conclusion, this method will provide a new therapeutic modality for metastatic melanoma.

  5. Enhancing effect of tazarotene on the HLA-DR expression of cultured human keratinocytes induced by interferon-gamma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-gan; TAN Sheng-shun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of tazarotene on the expression of HLA-DR induced by IFN-γ. Methods: (1) Keratinocytes from normal human skin were cultured in vitro;(2) Tazarotene, IFN-γ and the combination of the two compounds were incubated with the keratinocytes in medium, respectively. The expression of HLA-DR in keratinocytes was determined using immunocytochemistry techniques at 24h after incubation. Results: (1) There was rare expression of HLA-DR in normal human keratinocytes; (2) 10-6mol/L tazarotene failed to induce the expression of HLA-DR in keratinocytes at 24h after incubation; (3) 500 U/ml IFN-γ obviously induced the HLA-DR expression in keratinocytes at 24h after treatment; (4) After 24h, 10-7-10-5 mol/L tazarotene had a significantly enhancing effect on the expression of HLA-DR induced by IFN-γ (P<0.005). Conclusion: Tazarotene up-regulates the expression of HLA-DR in keratinocytes cultured in vitro when combined with IFN-γ . Therefore, the reduction of HLA-DR positive keratinocytes in psoriatic lesions may be attributed to not direct interaction of tazarotene in combination with IFN-γ but other pathways.

  6. Interferon-α enhances sensitivity of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells to doxorubicin by p53-dependent apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-wei YUAN; Xiao-feng ZHU; Xiu-fang HUANG; Pu-yi SHENG; Ai-shan HE; Zi-bo YANG; Rong DENG; Gong-kan FENG; Wei-ming LIAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To determine whether intefferon-α (IFNα) can enhance doxorubicin sensitivity in osteosarcoma cells and its molecular mechanism. Methods:Cell viability was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Apoptosis was studied using Flow cytometry analysis,Hoechst33258 staining,DNA fragmentation assay,as well as the activation of caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Protein expression was detected by Western blotting. The dependence of p53 was determined using p53-siRNA transfection. Results:IFNα increased doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity to a much greater degree through apoptosis in human osteosarcoma p53-wild U2OS cells,but not p53-mutant MG63 cells. IFNoα markedly upregulated p53,Bax,Mdm2,and p21,downregulated Bcl-2,and activated caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in response to doxorubicin in U2OS cells. Moreover,the siRNA-mediated silencing of p53 significantly reduced the IFNoα/doxorubicin combination-induced cytotoxicity and PARP cleavage. Conclusion:IFNtx enhances the sensitivity of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells to doxorubicin by p53-dependent apoptosis. The proper combination with IFNα and conventional chemotherapeutic agents may be a rational strategy for improving the treatment of osteosarcoma with functional p53.

  7. Multiple Functional Domains and Complexes of the Two Nonstructural Proteins of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Contribute to Interferon Suppression and Cellular Location▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedan, Samer; Andrews, Joel; Majumdar, Tanmay; Musiyenko, Alla; Barik, Sailen

    2011-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a major cause of severe respiratory diseases, efficiently suppresses cellular innate immunity, represented by type I interferon (IFN), using its two unique nonstructural proteins, NS1 and NS2. In a search for their mechanism, NS1 was previously shown to decrease levels of TRAF3 and IKKε, whereas NS2 interacted with RIG-I and decreased TRAF3 and STAT2. Here, we report on the interaction, cellular localization, and functional domains of these two proteins. We show that recombinant NS1 and NS2, expressed in lung epithelial A549 cells, can form homo- as well as heteromers. Interestingly, when expressed alone, substantial amounts of NS1 and NS2 localized to the nuclei and to the mitochondria, respectively. However, when coexpressed with NS2, as in RSV infection, NS1 could be detected in the mitochondria as well, suggesting that the NS1-NS2 heteromer localizes to the mitochondria. The C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence, DLNP, common to both NS1 and NS2, was required for some functions, but not all, whereas only the NS1 N-terminal region was important for IKKε reduction. Finally, NS1 and NS2 both interacted specifically with host microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B). The contribution of MAP1B in NS1 function was not tested, but in NS2 it was essential for STAT2 destruction, suggesting a role of the novel DLNP motif in protein-protein interaction and IFN suppression. PMID:21795342

  8. Interleukin-1 and interferon-γ orchestrate β-glucan-activated human dendritic cell programming via IκB-ζ modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Marco; Dzutsev, Amiran K; Li, Hongchuan; Riteau, Nicolas; Gerosa, Franca; Shenderov, Kevin; Winkler-Pickett, Robin; Provezza, Lisa; Riboldi, Elena; Leighty, Robert M; Orr, Selinda J; Steinhagen, Folkert; Wewers, Mark D; Sher, Alan; Anderson, Stephen K; Goldszmid, Romina; McVicar, Daniel W; Lyakh, Lyudmila; Trinchieri, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of microbial components via innate receptors including the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1, together with the inflammatory environment, programs dendritic cells (DCs) to orchestrate the magnitude and type of adaptive immune responses. The exposure to β-glucan, a known Dectin-1 agonist and component of fungi, yeasts, and certain immune support supplements, activates DCs to induce T helper (Th)17 cells that are essential against fungal pathogens and extracellular bacteria but may trigger inflammatory pathology or autoimmune diseases. However, the exact mechanisms of DC programming by β-glucan have not yet been fully elucidated. Using a gene expression/perturbation approach, we demonstrate that in human DCs β-glucan transcriptionally activates via an interleukin (IL)-1- and inflammasome-mediated positive feedback late-induced genes that bridge innate and adaptive immunity. We report that in addition to its known ability to directly prime T cells toward the Th17 lineage, IL-1 by promoting the transcriptional cofactor inhibitor of κB-ζ (IκB-ζ) also programs β-glucan-exposed DCs to express cell adhesion and migration mediators, antimicrobial molecules, and Th17-polarizing factors. Interferon (IFN)-γ interferes with the IL-1/IκB-ζ axis in β-glucan-activated DCs and promotes T cell-mediated immune responses with increased release of IFN-γ and IL-22, and diminished production of IL-17. Thus, our results identify IL-1 and IFN-γ as regulators of DC programming by β-glucan. These molecular networks provide new insights into the regulation of the Th17 response as well as new targets for the modulation of immune responses to β-glucan-containing microorganisms.

  9. Association of interferon lambda-1 with herpes simplex viruses-1 and -2, Epstein-Barr virus, and human cytomegalovirus in chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzammil; Jayanthi, D; Faizuddin, Mohamed; Noor Ahamadi, H M

    2017-05-01

    Periodontal tissues facilitate the homing of herpes viruses that elicit the immune-inflammatory response releasing the interferons (IFN). IFN lambda-1 (λ1) can suppress the replication of viruses, and induces the antiviral mechanism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between IFN-λ1 and periodontal herpes viruses in the immunoregulation of chronic periodontal disease. The cross-sectional study design included 30 chronic periodontitis patients with a mean age of 42.30 ± 8.63 years. Gingival crevicular fluid collected was assessed for IFN-λ1 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and four herpes viruses were detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction technique. IFN-λ1 levels were compared between virus-positive and -negative patients for individual and total viruses. Fifty per cent (n = 15) of patients were positive for the four herpes viruses together; 50% (n = 15), 30% (n = 9), 26.7% (n = 8), and 40% (n = 12) were positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1, Epstein-Barr virus, HSV-2, and human cytomegalovirus, respectively. The mean concentrations of IFN-λ1 in virus-positive patients (14.38 ± 13.95) were lower than those of virus-negative patients (228.26 ± 215.35). INF-λ1 levels in individual virus groups were also lower in virus-positive patients compared to virus-negative patients, with P < 0.001. These results suggest that IFN-λ1 could have antiviral and therapeutic value against the viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Production of aggregation prone human interferon gamma and its mutant in highly soluble and biologically active form by SUMO fusion technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tileva, M; Krachmarova, E; Ivanov, I; Maskos, K; Nacheva, G

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli expression system is a preferable choice for production of recombinant proteins. A disadvantage of this system is the target protein aggregation in "inclusion bodies" (IBs) that further requires solubilisation and refolding, which is crucial for the properties and the yield of the final product. In order to prevent aggregation, SUMO fusion tag technology has been successfully applied for expression of eukaryotic proteins, including human interferon gamma (hIFNγ) that was reported, however, with no satisfactory biological activity. We modified this methodology for expression and purification of both the wild type hIFNγ and an extremely prone to aggregation mutant hIFNγ-K88Q, whose recovery from IBs showed to be ineffective upon numerous conditions. By expression of the N-terminal His-SUMO fusion proteins in the E. coli strain BL21(DE3)pG-KJE8, co-expressing two chaperone systems, at 24 °C a significant increase in solubility of both target proteins (1.5-fold for hIFNγ and 8-fold for K88Q) was achieved. Two-step chromatography (affinity and ion-exchange) with on-dialysis His-SUMO-tag cleavage was applied for protein purification that yielded 6.0-7.0mg/g wet biomass for both proteins with >95% purity and native N-termini. The optimised protocol led to increased yields from 5.5 times for hIFNγ up to 100 times for K88Q in comparison to their isolation from IBs. Purified hIFNγ showed preserved thermal stability and antiproliferative activity corresponding to that of the native reference sample (3 × 10(7)IU/mg). The developed methodology represents an optimised procedure that can be successfully applied for large scale expression and purification of aggregation-prone proteins in soluble native form.

  11. COMBINATION OF γ-INTERFERON WITH TRAIL AND CISPLATIN OR ETOPOSIDE INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELL LINE SH-SY5Y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-xia Tong; Chun-wei Lu; Ji-hong Zhang; Li Ma; Jin-hua Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of γ-interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), and cisplatin or etoposide induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y and its possible molecular mechanisms.Methods The expressions of Caspase 8 mRNA and protein were detected with RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The effects of IFNγ, TRAIL, IFNγ + TRAIL, IFNγ + Caspase 8 inhibitor + TRAIL, IFNγ + cisplatin + TRAIL, and IFNγ + etoposide + TRAIL on the growth and apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells were detected with the methods of MTT and flow cytometry. The relative Caspase 8 activity was measured with colorimetric assay.Results Caspase 8 was undetectable in SH-SY5Y cells but an increased expression of Caspase 8 mRNA and protein was found after treatment with IFNγ. SH-SY5Y cells themselves were not sensitive to TRAIL, but those expressing Caspase 8 after treatment with IFNγ were. The killing effect of TRAIL on SH-SY5 Y cells expressing Caspase 8 was depressed by Caspase 8 inhibitor. Cisplatin and etoposide could enhance the sensitivity of TRAIL on SH-SY5Y cells. The relative Caspase 8 activity of SH-SY5Y cells in IFNγ + TRAIL group was significantly higher than those of control group, IFNγ group, TRAIL group, and inhibitor group (P <0.01). There was no significant difference among IFNγ + TRAIL group, IFNγ + cisplatin + TRAIL group, and IFNγ + etoposide + TRAIL group.Conclusions IFNγ could sensitize SH-SY5Y cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and this may be realized by the up-regulation of Caspase 8. Cisplatin and etoposide could enhance the killing effect of TRAIL on SH-SY5Y cells.

  12. Outcomes of Interferon/Ribavirin Therapy in Patients with HCV Defined by Expression of Plasma Soluble Human Leukocyte Antigen-G but Not IL-37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shi-xiong; Ma, Jian-bo; Hu, Yao-ren; Hu, Ai-rong; Shen, Qiang; Gao, Guo-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to life-threatening complications worldwide. Immunomodulation signals the response to virus clearance. The immune-suppressive molecule human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) has been shown to function in inhibiting both innate and adaptive immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of HLA-G and IL-37 in sustained virological response (SVR) and non-SVR HCV-positive patients before and after complete treatment with a combination of pegylated interferon (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV). Material/Methods Our study included 132 chronic hepatitis C patents who received combined therapy with IFN-α and RBV. Both SVR and non-SVR patients were included. The end-of-treatment response was defined as undetectable HCV RNA at week 48. Patients with end-of-treatment response were detected by HCV RNA at 24 weeks after therapy. The expression levels of HLA-G and IL-37 at the end and 24 weeks after treatment were detected by ELISA. Results Plasma HLA-G and IL-37 were significantly increased in HCV-infected patients compared with healthy individuals before treatment. Furthermore, HLA-G in SVR patients was noticeably decreased after treatment, while HLA-G in non-SVR patients had no changes after treatment. Additionally, both in SVR and non-SVR patients, the expression of IL-37 was remarkably reduced compared with baseline after treatment. Conclusions These findings suggest that elevation of HLA-G and IL-37 in HCV may play an important role in response to combined therapy with IFN-α and RBV. Monitoring the expression of HLA-G during therapy could contribute to adjusting the treatment program of HCV-infected patients. PMID:27112970

  13. Differential Roles for the Interferon-inducible IFI16 and AIM2 Innate Immune Sensors for Cytosolic DNA in Cellular Senescence of Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xin; Ponomareva, Larissa; Veeranki, Sudhakar; Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Dickerson, Eric; Choubey, Divaker

    2011-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-inducible IFI16 and AIM2 proteins act as innate immune sensors for cytosolic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Upon sensing dsDNA, the IFI16 protein induces the expression of IFN-β whereas the AIM2 protein forms an inflammasome, which promotes the secretion of IL-1β. Given that the knockdown of IFI16 expression in human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) delays the onset of cellular senescence, we investigated the potential roles for the IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in cellular senescence. We found that increased IFI16 protein levels in old (versus young) HDFs were associated with the induction of IFN-β. In contrast, increased levels of the AIM2 protein in the senescent (versus old) HDFs were associated with increased production of IL-1β. The knockdown of type I IFN-receptor subunit-α, which reduced the basal levels of the IFI16, but not the AIM2, protein delayed the onset of cellular senescence. Accordingly, increased constitutive levels of IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) HDFs were associated with the activation of the IFN-signaling and increased levels of IL-1β. The IFN-β treatment of the young HDFs, which induced the expression of IFI16 and AIM2 proteins, activated a DNA-damage response and also increased basal levels of IL-1β. Interestingly, the knockdown of AIM2 expression in HDFs increased the basal levels of IFI16 protein and activated the IFN-signaling. In contrast, the knockdown of the IFI16 expression in HDFs decreased the basal and dsDNA-induced activation of the IFN-signaling. Collectively, our observations demonstrate differential roles for the IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in cellular senescence and associated secretory phenotype. PMID:21471287

  14. Anti-hepatitis B virus activity and mechanisms of recombinant human serum albumin-interferon-alpha-2b fusion protein in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingfa, Xu; Qinglin, Fan; Hui, Huang; Canjun, Wang; Wei, Wei; Lihua, Song

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the anti-hepatitis B virus (anti-HBV) effects and mechanisms of recombinant human serum albumin-interferon-alpha-2b fusion protein (rHSA-IFNalpha-2b) in vitro and in vivo. The inhibiting effects on HBV replication were examined in the HepG2 2.2.15 cell line and in ducks, and the expressions of signal transducers and transactivator 1 (STAT1), IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1) were investigated by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. In vitro,at concentrations from 0.075 to 1.2 nmol/l, rHSA-IFNalpha-2b inhibited the releases of extracellular hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and HBV DNA in a dose-dependent manner; rHSA- IFNalpha-2b also increased the levels of STAT1, ISGF3 and OAS1. In vivo, rHSA-IFNalpha-2b reduced the levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) DNA in the sera of DHBV-infected ducks. We provide the first evidence that rHSA-IFNalpha-2b significantly inhibits HBV replication in HepG2 2.2.15 cells and in ducks, and that the antiviral effect of rHSA-IFNalpha-2b in vivo is more potent than that of IFNalpha-2b. The anti-HBV mechanism probably operates by triggering the JAK-STAT signaling pathway and increasing the expression of OAS1. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Responsiveness of cytogenetically discrete human myeloma cell lines to lenalidomide: lack of correlation with cereblon and interferon regulatory factor 4 expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Alexandra J; Walters, Denise K; Kumar, Shaji K; Vincent Rajkumar, S; Jelinek, Diane F

    2013-12-01

    The introduction of novel immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) has dramatically improved the survival of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). While it has been shown that patients with specific cytogenetic subtypes, namely t(4;14), have the best outcomes when treated with bortezomib-based regimens, the relationship between cytogenetic subtypes and response to IMiDs remains unclear. Using DNA synthesis assays, we investigated the relationship between cytogenetic subtype and lenalidomide response in a representative panel of human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs). We examined HMCL protein expression levels of the lenalidomide target cereblon (CRBN) and its downstream target interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4), which have previously been shown to be predictive of lenalidomide response in HMCLs. Our results reveal that lenalidomide response did not correlate with specific cytogenetic translocations. There were distinct groups of lenalidomide-responsive and non-responsive HMCLs, as defined by inhibition of cellular proliferation; notably, all of the hyperdiploid HMCLs fell into the latter category. Repeated dosing of lenalidomide significantly lowered the IC50 of the responsive HMCL ALMC-1 (IC50 = 2.6 μm vs. 0.005 μm, P 0.05). Moreover, no association was found between lenalidomide responsiveness and CRBN and IRF4 expression. Our data indicate that lenalidomide sensitivity is independent of cytogenetic subtype in HMCLs. While CRBN and IRF4 have been shown to be associated with response to lenalidomide in patients, these findings do not translate back to HMCLs, which could be attributable to factors present in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  16. Dynamics of cervical langerhans cell counts in the course of HPV-positive CIN treatment with the use of human recombinant interferon gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, M; Bieda, T; Bobek, M; Zrubek, H

    2005-01-01

    Langerhans cells play a pivotal role as professional antigens presenting cells in cervical epithelium, thus changes in their density or/and function may profoundly influence the proper activation of the afferent arm of immune response in cases of HPV-related intraepithelial lesions. Assessment of intraepithelial Langerhans cell count changes in CIN I/CIN II after human recombinant interferon gamma (IFNgamma) application and correlation with clinical outcome. The present study is a part of prospective trial on IFNgamma application in the treatment of CIN I/CINII associated with high-risk HPV infection. Seventeen subjects underwent uniform IFNgamma treatment (four intracervical injections in a two-day interval for a total dose of 6,000,000 IU). Langerhans cells were stained within cervical punch biopsy specimens with the use of polyclonal anti-S-100 antibody according to the three-step indirect peroxidase protocol, and their mean count calculated for the following groups: before IFNgamma treatment launching, immediately after completion of the treatment, and after two months of follow-up. The analysis revealed a rapid and significant increase in Lagerhans' cell count immediately after treatment completion (21.17/mm2 and 25.94/mm2, respectively, at p = 0.019) which further increased in the group of complete response (in 9 subjects; 32.22/mm2). After transient elevation of the Langerhans' cell count it returned to a level even lower than initially in the non-responder group (4 subjects; 20.25/mm2). Our data strongly support the observation from static studies suggesting that regression of HPV-related cervical lesions is associated with increased density of epithelial Langerhans cells.

  17. A trial with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine and human interferon-α in cats naturally infected with feline leukaemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuetzer, Bianca; Brunner, Konstanze; Lutz, Hans; Hartmann, Katrin

    2013-08-01

    Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection is still one of the leading causes of infection-related deaths in domestic cats. Treatment with various drugs has been attempted, but none has resulted in cure or complete virus elimination. Human interferon-α2a (huIFN-α2a) and 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) have been proven to decrease antigenaemia in cats infected experimentally with FeLV. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of huIFN-α2a, AZT and a combination of both drugs in cats infected naturally with FeLV in a placebo-controlled double-blinded trial. Fourty-four FeLV-infected cats in which free FeLV p27 antigen was detected in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were included in the study. Cats were assigned to one of four treatment groups that received either high dose huIFN-α2a (10(5) IU/kg q24h; 12 cats), AZT (5 mg/kg q12h; 10 cats, both of these treatments (12 cats) or placebo (10 cats). All cats were treated for 6 weeks. Clinical variables, including stomatitis, and laboratory parameters, such as CD4(+) and CD8(+) counts and serum FeLV p 27 antigen concentration, were recorded throughout the treatment period. No significant difference among the groups was observed during the treatment period for any of the parameters. Aside from anaemia in one cat treated with AZT, no adverse effects were observed. It was not possible to demonstrate efficacy of huIFN-α2a or AZT alone or together in cats infected naturally with FeLV when given according to this regimen for 6 weeks; however, no notable side effects were detected.

  18. Interferon Gamma-1b Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon gamma-1b injection is used to reduce the frequency and severity of serious infections in people with ... with severe, malignant osteopetrosis (an inherited bone disease). Interferon gamma-1b is in a class of medications called ...

  19. Indirect radioimmunoassay for interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, S.F.; Schoub, B.D. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Virology); Chiu, M.N.; Crespi, M. (National Institute for Virology, Johannesburg (South Africa))

    1982-10-01

    An indirect radioimmunoassay for testing the antiviral activity of interferon (IFN) is described. Vero cells are seeded in microtitre plates, treated with appropriate dilutions of interferon and challenged with Sindbis virus. Viral yield is measured using specific antibody and radiolabelled protein A. The assay is able to detect IFN levels of 5 international units (I.U.)/ml, has a high degree of reproducibility, and could be easily adapted to various cell and virus combinations. This microsystem is technically simple, allows testing of small volumes of test material, and eliminates subjectivity in reading of endpoints.

  20. Potential Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homer S. Black

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Considerable circumstantial evidence has accrued from both experimental animal and human clinical studies that support a role for omega-3 fatty acids (FA in the prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Direct evidence from animal studies has shown that omega-3 FA inhibit ultraviolet radiation (UVR induced carcinogenic expression. In contrast, increasing levels of dietary omega-6 FA increase UVR carcinogenic expression, with respect to a shorter tumor latent period and increased tumor multiplicity. Both omega-6 and omega-3 FA are essential FA, necessary for normal growth and maintenance of health and although these two classes of FA exhibit only minor structural differences, these differences cause them to act significantly differently in the body. Omega-6 and omega-3 FA, metabolized through the lipoxygenase (LOX and cyclooxygenase (COX pathways, lead to differential metabolites that are influential in inflammatory and immune responses involved in carcinogenesis. Clinical studies have shown that omega-3 FA ingestion protects against UVR-induced genotoxicity, raises the UVR-mediated erythema threshold, reduces the level of pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in UVR-irradiated human skin, and appears to protect human skin from UVR-induced immune-suppression. Thus, there is considerable evidence that omega-3 FA supplementation might be beneficial in reducing the occurrence of NMSC, especially in those individuals who are at highest risk.

  1. Potential Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Homer S; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2016-02-04

    Considerable circumstantial evidence has accrued from both experimental animal and human clinical studies that support a role for omega-3 fatty acids (FA) in the prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Direct evidence from animal studies has shown that omega-3 FA inhibit ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induced carcinogenic expression. In contrast, increasing levels of dietary omega-6 FA increase UVR carcinogenic expression, with respect to a shorter tumor latent period and increased tumor multiplicity. Both omega-6 and omega-3 FA are essential FA, necessary for normal growth and maintenance of health and although these two classes of FA exhibit only minor structural differences, these differences cause them to act significantly differently in the body. Omega-6 and omega-3 FA, metabolized through the lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways, lead to differential metabolites that are influential in inflammatory and immune responses involved in carcinogenesis. Clinical studies have shown that omega-3 FA ingestion protects against UVR-induced genotoxicity, raises the UVR-mediated erythema threshold, reduces the level of pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive prostaglandin E2 (PGE₂) in UVR-irradiated human skin, and appears to protect human skin from UVR-induced immune-suppression. Thus, there is considerable evidence that omega-3 FA supplementation might be beneficial in reducing the occurrence of NMSC, especially in those individuals who are at highest risk.

  2. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon alfa-2b injection is used to treat a number of conditions.Interferon alfa-2b injection is used alone or in ... Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL; a slow-growing blood cancer). Interferon alfa-2b is in a class of medications ...

  3. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ-mediated retinal ganglion cell death in human tyrosinase T cell receptor transgenic mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Husain

    Full Text Available We have recently demonstrated the characterization of human tyrosinase TCR bearing h3T-A2 transgenic mouse model, which exhibits spontaneous autoimmune vitiligo and retinal dysfunction. The purpose of current study was to determine the role of T cells and IFN-γ in retina dysfunction and retinal ganglion cell (RGC death using this model. RGC function was measured by pattern electroretinograms (ERGs in response to contrast reversal of patterned visual stimuli. RGCs were visualized by fluorogold retrograde-labeling. Expression of CD3, IFN-γ, GFAP, and caspases was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. All functional and structural changes were measured in 12-month-old h3T-A2 mice and compared with age-matched HLA-A2 wild-type mice. Both pattern-ERGs (42%, p = 0.03 and RGC numbers (37%, p = 0.0001 were reduced in h3T-A2 mice when compared with wild-type mice. The level of CD3 expression was increased in h3T-A2 mice (h3T-A2: 174 ± 27% vs. HLA-A2: 100%; p = 0.04. The levels of effector cytokine IFN-γ were also increased significantly in h3T-A2 mice (h3T-A2: 189 ± 11% vs. HLA-A2: 100%; p = 0.023. Both CD3 and IFN-γ immunostaining were increased in nerve fiber (NF and RGC layers of h3T-A2 mice. In addition, we have seen a robust increase in GFAP staining in h3T-A2 mice (mainly localized to NF layer, which was substantially reduced in IFN-γ ((-/- knockout h3T-A2 mice. We also have seen an up-regulation of caspase-3 and -9 in h3T-A2 mice. Based on our data we conclude that h3T-A2 transgenic mice exhibit visual defects that are mostly associated with the inner retinal layers and RGC function. This novel h3T-A2 transgenic mouse model provides opportunity to understand RGC pathology and test neuroprotective strategies to rescue RGCs.

  4. Structure and polymorphism of the human gene for the interferon-induced p78 protein (MX1): evidence of association with alopecia areata in the Down syndrome region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazi-Ahnini, R; di Giovine, F S; McDonagh, A J; Messenger, A G; Amadou, C; Cox, A; Duff, G W; Cork, M J

    2000-06-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterised by patchy hair loss with T cell infiltration of hair follicles. AA occurs in approximately 0.1% of the general population, but this is increased to 9% in Down syndrome (DS). DS is associated with an additional copy (full or partial) of chromosome 21, and the DS region may potentially include genes involved in the pathogenesis of AA. MX1 is the gene encoding the interferon-induced p78 protein (MxA). MxA protein confers resistance to influenza viruses, and we have previously shown that MxA protein is strongly expressed in lesional anagen hair bulbs from patients with AA but not in normal follicles. We therefore studied the possible involvement of MX1 in the pathogenesis of AA. To establish markers in the MX1 region which could be screened by PCR-based methods, we defined the human MX1 exon/intron organisation and screened the exons and the introns by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis. We found that the MX1 gene contains 17 exons extending over 33 kb. The size and sequence of the region from exon 6 to exon 16 are highly conserved between human and mouse. Screening of 4747 bp within the MX1 gene revealed four single nucleotide polymorphisms in intron 6. These polymorphisms are concentrated within 147 bp and show strong linkage disequilibrium. In a case-control association study for the MX1 (+9959) polymorphism in 165 AA patients and 510 controls we found a significant association of this marker with AA (odds ratio 1.79, 95% CI 1.21-2.66, chi2 = 8.464, P = 0.0036). The risk of disease was greater for patchy AA (mild disease) and with early age at onset (odds ratio 2.34, 95% CI 1.24-4.43, P = 0.0072), providing new evidence of genetic heterogeneity in AA. Our demonstration of genetic association between the MX1 gene and disease supports the hypothesis that this is a new candidate gene in AA.

  5. Androgen receptors and hormone sensitivity of a human prostatic cancer cell line (PC-3) are modulated by natural beta-interferon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Sica (G.); G. Dell'Acqua (G.); F. Iacopino (F.); A. Fattorossi (A.); P. Marchetti (P.); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); M. Pavone-Macaluso (M.)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen recptors are expressed at a low level in the cell line PC-3, which does not respond to either androgens or antiandrogens. If these cells are exposed to natural beta-interferon (β-IFN) a reduction in cell growth and an increase in androgen receptors, evaluated by both biochemical

  6. Interferon-β is a potent inhibitor of cell growth and cortisol production in vitro and sensitizes human adrenocortical carcinoma cells to mitotane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); G. Vitale (Giovanni); R.A. Feelders (Richard); M. Waaijers (Marlijn); D. Sprij-Mooij (Diana); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); E.J. Speel (Ernst-Jan); J. Hofland (Johannes); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); L.J. Hofland (Leo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAdrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive tumor with very poor prognosis. Novel medical treatment opportunities are required. We investigated the effects of interferon-β (IFN-β), alone or in combination with mitotane, on cell growth and cortisol secretion in primary cultures of 13

  7. Androgen receptors and hormone sensitivity of a human prostatic cancer cell line (PC-3) are modulated by natural beta-interferon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Sica (G.); G. Dell'Acqua (G.); F. Iacopino (F.); A. Fattorossi (A.); P. Marchetti (P.); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); M. Pavone-Macaluso (M.)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen recptors are expressed at a low level in the cell line PC-3, which does not respond to either androgens or antiandrogens. If these cells are exposed to natural beta-interferon (β-IFN) a reduction in cell growth and an increase in androgen receptors, evaluated by both biochemical

  8. [Interferon alpha antibodies show no cross reactions with typical autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görg, S; Klouche, M; Wilhelm, D; Kirchner, H

    1993-04-01

    Patients treated with natural human interferon alpha develop anti-interferon antibodies (IFN-AB) only in very rare cases. By contrast, patients with autoimmune disorders are able to generate high-titered IFN-AB against endogenous interferon alpha. One explanation for the development of auto-IFN-AB could be cross-reactivity with typical autoimmune antigens. We investigated the cross-reactivity of 3 high-titered IgG IFN-AB of female autoimmune patients (aged 32, 36, 74 years; two severe cases of SLE, one case of autoimmune thyroiditis) as well as 25 low-titered natural IgM IFN-AB of healthy blood donors (aged 19-48 years). Typical autoimmune antigens including dsDNA, ENA, as well as natural interferon beta and recombinant interferon gamma are not able to inhibit binding of IFN-AB to interferon alpha in an ELISA test system. Preincubation of sera containing either dsDNA antibodies (dsDNA-AB) (24 patients), thyroid peroxidase (TPO-AB) (9 patients) or thyroglobulin (TG-AB) (12 patients) with interferon alpha resulted in no change in the respective autoantibody titer. These data suggest that there is no cross-reactivity between IFN-alpha-AB and dsDNA-AB, TPO-AB or TG-AB. Thus, an explanation for the occurrence of IFN-AB in autoimmune disorders cannot be found in a cross-reaction between interferon alpha with typical autoimmune antigens.

  9. Living with omega-3: new materialism and enduring concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahamsson, S.; Bertoni, F.; Mol, A.; Ibáñez Martín, R.

    2015-01-01

    In the early 21st century quite a few social scientists and scholars in the humanities are arguing that we should pay more attention to things material. For, as they say, not only humans act but so, too, do materials. Joining this discussion, in this paper we will use the case of omega-3 fatty acids

  10. Interferon impedes an early step of hepatitis delta virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziying Han

    Full Text Available Hepatitis delta virus (HDV infects hepatocytes, the major cell type of the liver. Infection of the liver may be either transient or chronic. The prognosis for patients with chronic HDV infection is poor, with a high risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The best antiviral therapy is weekly administration for at least one year of high doses of interferon alpha. This efficacy of interferon therapy has been puzzling in that HDV replication in transfected cell lines is reported as insensitive to administration of interferon alpha or gamma. Similarly, this study shows that even when an interferon response was induced by transfection of poly(IC into a cell line, HDV RNA accumulation was only modestly inhibited. However, when the HDV replication was initiated by infection of primary human hepatocytes, simultaneous addition of interferons alpha or gamma at 600 units/ml, a concentration comparable to that achieved in treated patients, the subsequent HDV RNA accumulation was inhibited by at least 80%. These interferon treatments were shown to produce significant time-dependent increases of host response proteins such as for Stat-1, phosphoStat-1, Mx1/2/3 and PKR, and yet interferon pretreatment of hepatocytes did not confer an increased inhibition of HDV replication over interferon treatment at the time of (or after infection. These and other data support the interpretation that interferon action against HDV replication can occur and is largely mediated at the level of entry into primary human hepatocytes. Thus in vivo, the success of long-term interferon therapy for chronic HDV, may likewise involve blocking HDV spread by interfering with the initiation of productive infection of naïve hepatocytes.

  11. Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids in health and disease: Part 1--cardiovascular disease and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Fereidoon; Miraliakbari, Homan

    2004-01-01

    The omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids have a wide range of beneficial effects in several human health conditions. Animal and in vitro studies have indicated that omega-3 fatty acids affect blood lipid profiles, cardiovascular health, membrane lipid composition, eicosanoid biosynthesis, cell signaling cascades, and gene expression. Findings from epidemiological studies suggest that intake of omega-3 fatty acids from natural sources or supplements may influence the onset and progression of several disease states, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. This review highlights some recent research findings that help advance our understanding of how omega-3 fatty acids influence cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  12. Characterization of omega-3 tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestland, Tina Lien; Jacobsen, Øyvind; Sande, Sverre Arne; Myrset, Astrid Hilde; Klaveness, Jo

    2016-04-15

    Omega-3 nutraceuticals are extensively used as health supplements worldwide. Various administration forms for delivery of omega-3 are available. However, the niche omega-3 tablets have so far remained unexplored. In this work tablets containing 25-40% (w/w) omega-3 oil as triglycerides or ethyl esters were prepared utilizing a direct compaction grade powder with β-cyclodextrin as encapsulating agent. It was found that powders with up to 35% (w/w) triglyceride oil and 30% (w/w) ethyl ester oil, respectively, can be directly compressed into tablets of excellent quality. Physical properties of omega-3 containing powders and tablets are described. The powder X-ray diffractograms of the powders and crushed tablets show evidence of the formation of new crystalline phases not present in β-cyclodextrin. In addition, (1)H NMR data suggest that the ethyl esters form inclusion complexes with β-cyclodextrin. Compaction of other, commercially available, omega-3 powders was performed as a comparison and deemed unsuccessful.

  13. Neuromyelitis optica-like pathology is dependent on type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Asgari, Nasrin; Owens, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is an antibody-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Reports have suggested that interferon beta which is beneficial for multiple sclerosis, exacerbates neuromyelitis optica. Our aim was to determine whether type I interferon plays a role in the formation of neuromyelitis optica lesions. Immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was injected intracerebrally with human complement to type I interferon receptor deficient and wildtype mice. Loss of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein was reduced in type I interferon receptor deficient mice brain. Our findings suggest that type I interferon signaling contributes to neuromyelitis optica pathogenesis.

  14. Activation of Innate Immunity in Healthy Macaca mulatta Macaques by a Single Subcutaneous Dose of GMP CpG 7909: Safety Data and Interferon-Inducible Protein-10 Kinetics for Humans and Macaques▿

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, V. Ann; McGrath, Shannon; Krieg, Arthur M.; Larson, Noelle S.; Angov, Evelina; Smith, Christopher L.; Brewer, Thomas G; Heppner, D. Gray

    2007-01-01

    Following a demonstration that mouse-optimized cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides stimulated innate immune protection against intracellular pathogens, we tested the ability of CpG 7909, a primate-optimized Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, to stimulate rhesus macaques to produce interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), a biomarker of immune activation. This study was performed prior to a similar trial with humans in order to facilitate the development of CpG 7909 a...

  15. Omega, the final multiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, T. N.

    2008-12-01

    The application of optimisation theory to vegetation processes has rarely extended beyond the context of diurnal to intra-annual gas exchange of individual leaves and crowns. One reason is that the Lagrange multipliers in the leaf-scale solutions, which are marginal products for allocatable photosynthetic resource inputs (water and nitrogen), are mysterious in origin, and their numerical values are difficult to measure -- let alone to predict or interpret in concrete physiological or ecological terms. These difficulties disappear, however, when the optimisation paradigm itself is extended to encompass carbon allocation and growth at the lifespan scale. The trajectories of leaf (and canopy) level marginal products are then implicit in the trajectory of plant and stand structure predicted by optimal carbon allocation. Furthermore, because the input and product are the same resource -- carbon -- in the whole plant optimisation, the product in one time step defines the input constraint, and hence implicitly the marginal product for carbon, in the next time step. This effectively converts the problem from a constrained optimisation of a definite integral, in which the multipliers are undetermined, to an unconstrained maximisation of a state, in which the multipliers are all implicit. This talk will explore how the marginal products for photosynthetic inputs as well as the marginal product for carbon -- i.e., the 'final multiplier,' omega -- are predicted to vary over time and in relation to environmental change during tree growth.

  16. Comparison of Serum Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA and Core Antigen Levels in Patients Coinfected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and HCV and Treated with Interferon plus Ribavirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivert, A.; Payan, C.; Morand, P.; Fafi-Kremer, S.; Deshayes, J.; Carrat, F.; Pol, S.; Cacoub, P.; Perronne, C.; Lunel, F.

    2006-01-01

    Trak-C (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics) is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based method capable of quantifying hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen (CA) in serum and could be an alternative to molecular detection and quantification of HCV RNA. We have evaluated the Trak-C assay in comparison with an HCV RNA quantitative assay (Versant HCV v3.0; Bayer Diagnostics) in the follow-up of 348 treated, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients included in the ANRS HC02 RIBAVIC trial. ANRS HC02 RIBAVIC is a therapeutic, multicenter, randomized protocol comparing the efficacy of alpha interferon 2b (IFN-α2b) (3 million units three times a week)-ribavirin (800 mg/day) to that of pegylated IFN-α2b (1.5 μg/kg of body weight/week)-ribavirin (800 mg/day) during 48 weeks of treatment of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients naïve to HCV treatment. Patients were assessed for virological analysis at day 0 and weeks 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72. Correlation of HCV RNA and HCV CA at the initiation of treatment was excellent (r = 0.92). HCV RNA and CA kinetics were similar during follow-up of HCV treatment from day 0 to week 72 whatever the group of response and genotype. The positive and negative predictive values of response to the treatment at week 4 were 59 and 94%, respectively, for HCV RNA load reduction of >2 log and 54 and 94%, respectively, for HCV CA below the threshold value (4.18 log10 pg/ml · 104). Trak-C, a new assay able to quantify CA in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, correlates well with quantitative HCV RNA assays and is cheaper and easier to perform than molecular technology. HCV CA could be a valuable alternative test for therapeutic follow-up of coinfected patients treated with IFN plus ribavirin in developing countries. PMID:16455894

  17. Alpha Interferon Inhibits Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) Reactivation in Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cells and Reduces HHV-8 Load in Cultured Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, Paolo; Carlini, Francesca; Stürzl, Michael; Rimessi, Paola; Superti, Fabiana; Franco, Marina; Melucci-Vigo, Gianna; Cafaro, Aurelio; Goletti, Delia; Sgadari, Cecilia; Butto’, Stefano; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Chiozzini, Chiara; Barresi, Caterina; Tinari, Antonella; Bonaccorsi, Angela; Capobianchi, Maria R.; Giuliani, Massimo; di Carlo, Aldo; Andreoni, Massimo; Rezza, Giovanni; Ensoli, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Infection by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with the development of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). Since regression of KS can be achieved by treatment of the patients with alpha interferon (IFN-α), we analyzed the effects of IFN-α or anti-IFN-α antibodies (Ab) on HHV-8 latently infected primary effusion lymphoma-derived cell lines (BCBL-1 and BC-1) and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with all forms of KS and from at-risk subjects. IFN-α inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the amplification of HHV-8 DNA in BCBL-1 cells induced to lytic infection with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA). This effect was associated with the inhibition of the expression of HHV-8 nut-1 and kaposin genes that are induced early and several hours, respectively, after TPA treatment. In addition, IFN-α inhibited virus production and/or release from BCBL-1 cells. Inhibition of nut-1 and kaposin genes by IFN-α was also observed in BC-1 cells induced with n-butyrate. Conversely, the addition of anti-IFN-α Ab to TPA-induced BCBL-1 cells resulted in a larger number of mature enveloped particles and in a more extensive cytopathic effect due to the neutralization of the endogenous IFN produced by these cells. IFN was also produced by cultured PBMC from HHV-8-infected individuals, and this was associated with a loss of viral DNA during culture. However, the addition of anti-IFN-α Ab or anti-type I IFN receptor Ab promoted the maintenance of HHV-8 DNA in these cells that was associated with the detection of the latency-associated kaposin RNA. Finally, the addition of IFN-α reduced the HHV-8 load in PBMC. Thus, IFN-α appears to have inhibitory effects on HHV-8 persistent infection of PBMC. These results suggest that, in addition to inhibiting the expression of angiogenic factors that are key to KS development, IFN-α may induce KS regression by reducing the HHV-8 load and/or inhibiting virus reactivation. PMID:10196299

  18. MHC2TA mRNA levels and human herpesvirus 6 in multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon beta along two-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominguez-Mozo Maria Inmaculada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In previous studies we found that MHC2TA +1614 genotype frequency was very different when MS patients with and without human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 in serum samples were compared; a different clinical behavior was also described. The purpose of the study was: 1. To evaluate if MHC2TA expression in MS patients was influenced by interferon beta (IFN-beta treatment. 2. To study MHC2TA expression in MS patients with and without minor allele C. 3. To analyze the relation between MHC2TA mRNA levels and HHV-6 active infection in MS patients. Methods Blood and serum samples of 154 MS patients were collected in five programmed visits: basal (prior to beginning IFN-beta treatment, six, twelve, eighteen and twenty-four months later. HHV-6 in serum and MHC2TA mRNA levels were evaluated by PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against IFN-beta were analyzed by the cytopathic effect assay. Results We found that MHC2TA mRNA levels were significantly lower among MS patients with HHV-6 active infection at the basal visit (without treatment than in those MS patients without HHV-6 active infection at the basal visit (p = 0.012; in all the positive samples we only found variant A. Furthermore, 58/99 (58.6% MS patients without HHV-6 along the five programmed visits and an increase of MHC2TA expression after two-years of IFN-beta treatment were clinical responders vs. 5/21 (23.8% among those MS patients with HHV-6 and a decrease of MHC2TA mRNA levels along the two-years with IFN-beta treatment (p = 0.004; no differences were found between patients with and without NAbs. Conclusions MHC2TA mRNA levels could be decreased by the active replication of HHV-6; the absence of HHV-6 in serum and the increase of MHC2TA expression could be further studied as markers of good clinical response to IFN-beta treatment.

  19. Invasive Surgery Impairs the Regulatory Function of Human CD56 bright Natural Killer Cells in Response to Staphylococcus aureus. Suppression of Interferon-γ Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Reinhardt

    Full Text Available Major surgery increases the risk for infectious complications due to the development of immunosuppression. CD56 bright NK cells play a key role in the defense against bacterial infections through the release of Interferon (IFN γ upon stimulation with monocyte-derived Interleukin (IL 12. We investigated whether invasive visceral surgery interferes with the IFN-γ synthesis of human NK cells in response to Staphylococcus aureus. In a prospective pilot study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were isolated from 53 patients before and 1 to 7 d after elective visceral surgery. The release of IL-12 and IFN-γ from PBMC upon exposure to S. aureus in vitro was quantified. The expression of the IL-12 receptor β1 chain on the surface, the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 4, and the synthesis of IFN-γ on/in individual CD56 bright NK cells were investigated using flow cytometry. The modulatory effect of IL-12 on the S. aureus-induced IFN-γ production in CD56 bright NK cells was analyzed. The IFN-γ secretion from purified CD56 bright NK cells was quantified after stimulation with IL-12 and IL-18. After surgery, CD56 bright NK cells among total PBMC were impaired in the release of IFN-γ for at least 5 d. Likewise, the IL-12-induced release of IFN-γ from purified CD56 bright NK cells was abolished. Upon stimulation with S. aureus, PBMC secreted less IL-12 but supplementation with recombinant IL-12 did not restore the capacity of CD56 bright NK cells to produce IFN-γ. CD56 bright NK cells displayed reduced levels of the IL-12Rβ1 chain whereas the phosphorylation of STAT4, the key transcription factor for the Ifng gene was not diminished. In summary, after invasive visceral surgery, CD56 bright NK cells are impaired in S. aureus-induced IFN-γ production and might contribute to the enhanced susceptibility to opportunistic infections.

  20. On $\\omega_3$-chains in P($\\omega_1$) mod finite

    CERN Document Server

    Irrgang, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    We prove that if there exists a simplified $(\\omega_1,2)$-morass, then there is a ccc forcing which adds an $\\omega_3$-chain in P($\\omega_1$) mod finite and a ccc forcing which adds a family of $\\omega_3$-many strongly almost disjoint functions from $\\omega_1$ to $\\omega$. The idea is to use a finite support iteration of countable forcings which is not linear but three-dimensional.

  1. Potential for Therapy with Immune Interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-30

    identify by block number) Interferons, alpha interferon , gamma interferon, helper T lymphocytes cytotoxic T lymphocytes, T lymphocyte clones, major...with anti-murine interferon alpha serum, or anti-murine interferon gamma serum. Using normal rabbit serum the level of background staining was about 1...hrs is approximately 6%, and 18% contained interferon gamma interferon. When these cells were added to H-2 matched target cells infected with influenza

  2. Hantavirus Regulation of Type I Interferon Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Matthys

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses primarily infect human endothelial cells (ECs and cause two highly lethal human diseases. Early addition of Type I interferon (IFN to ECs blocks hantavirus replication and thus for hantaviruses to be pathogenic they need to prevent early interferon induction. PHV replication is blocked in human ECs, but not inhibited in IFN deficient VeroE6 cells and consistent with this, infecting ECs with PHV results in the early induction of IFNβ and an array of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs. In contrast, ANDV, HTNV, NY-1V and TULV hantaviruses, inhibit early ISG induction and successfully replicate within human ECs. Hantavirus inhibition of IFN responses has been attributed to several viral proteins including regulation by the Gn proteins cytoplasmic tail (Gn-T. The Gn-T interferes with the formation of STING-TBK1-TRAF3 complexes required for IRF3 activation and IFN induction, while the PHV Gn-T fails to alter this complex or regulate IFN induction. These findings indicate that interfering with early IFN induction is necessary for hantaviruses to replicate in human ECs, and suggest that additional determinants are required for hantaviruses to be pathogenic. The mechanism by which Gn-Ts disrupt IFN signaling is likely to reveal potential therapeutic interventions and suggest protein targets for attenuating hantaviruses.

  3. Controlled-release interferon alpha 2b, a new member of the interferon family for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Peter L M; De Bruijne, Joep

    2012-01-01

    Combination therapy with pegylated interferon alpha (Peg-interferon) and ribavirin is currently the cornerstone of antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C. Monotherapy with Peg-interferon still is important for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. With the advent of new therapies, protease inhibitors for chronic hepatitis C and nucleotide inhibitors for chronic hepatitis B, there remains a need for interferon-based therapies. The side effects of Peg-interferon are a main disadvantage and represent a stumbling block for many patients to enter and continue therapy. In this review, the authors will discuss controlled-release interferon alpha 2b (CR2b) (Locteron®, Biolex Therapeutics, Pittsboro, NC, USA), a new slow-release interferon alpha 2b preparation for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis. Other alternative interferons will also be discussed. CR2b is a slow-release microsphere preparation for the administration of plant-derived recombinant human interferon alpha 2b. Compared with Peg-interferon, treatment with CR2b shows less flu-like reactions and less depression, and is at least as effective as conventional Peg-interferon-based therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. CR2b has the added advantage of biweekly instead of once weekly administration. CR2b appears to cause more neutropenia than Peg-interferon alpha 2b. This may be due to higher trough serum levels of CR2b at the end of a dosing interval. The bone marrow effects of CR2b closely resemble those published for the registered Peg-interferon alpha 2a. CR2b appears to have at least comparable efficacy with fewer side effects than current registered Peg-interferons.

  4. [Determination of the species specificity of interferons in the translation of the their mRNA from various cell cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosik, D N; Novokhatskiĭ, A S; Liakh, L A; Khil'ko, S N; Aspetov, R D

    1983-01-01

    Interferons obtained on induction of human lymphocytes with Newcastle viruses and staphylococcal enterotoxin A and diploid fibroblast cells of human embryos with poly (I).poly (C), as well as translation products of interferon mRNA obtained from these cells were analysed serologically. It was shown that the main type of interferon produced by the cells depended on the cell culture and inductor nature. It was defined at the level of the respective gene depression. Effective translation of mRNA of the interferons of the 3 types makes possible production of cDNA and creation of bacterial plasmids coding the genetic information for the synthesis of human interferon.

  5. Growth of human gastric cancer cells in nude mice is delayed by a ketogenic diet supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids and medium-chain triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christoph; Kaemmerer, Ulrike; Illert, Bertram; Muehling, Bettina; Pfetzer, Nadja; Wittig, Rainer; Voelker, Hans Ullrich; Thiede, Arnulf; Coy, Johannes F

    2008-04-30

    Among the most prominent metabolic alterations in cancer cells are the increase in glucose consumption and the conversion of glucose to lactic acid via the reduction of pyruvate even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, may provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies that inhibit tumour growth by administration of a ketogenic diet with average protein but low in carbohydrates and high in fat enriched with omega-3 fatty acids and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). Twenty-four female NMRI nude mice were injected subcutaneously with tumour cells of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line 23132/87. The animals were then randomly split into two feeding groups and fed either a ketogenic diet (KD group; n = 12) or a standard diet (SD group; n = 12) ad libitum. Experiments were ended upon attainment of the target tumor volume of 600 mm3 to 700 mm3. The two diets were compared based on tumour growth and survival time (interval between tumour cell injection and attainment of target tumour volume). The ketogenic diet was well accepted by the KD mice. The tumour growth in the KD group was significantly delayed compared to that in the SD group. Tumours in the KD group reached the target tumour volume at 34.2 +/- 8.5 days versus only 23.3 +/- 3.9 days in the SD group. After day 20, tumours in the KD group grew faster although the differences in mean tumour growth continued significantly. Importantly, they revealed significantly larger necrotic areas than tumours of the SD group and the areas with vital tumour cells appear to have had fewer vessels than tumours of the SD group. Viable tumour cells in the border zone surrounding the necrotic areas of tumours of both groups exhibited a glycolytic phenotype with expression of glucose transporter-1 and transketolase-like 1 enzyme. Application of an unrestricted ketogenic diet enriched with omega-3 fatty acids and MCT delayed tumour growth in a mouse xenograft model. Further

  6. Growth of human gastric cancer cells in nude mice is delayed by a ketogenic diet supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids and medium-chain triglycerides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voelker Hans

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the most prominent metabolic alterations in cancer cells are the increase in glucose consumption and the conversion of glucose to lactic acid via the reduction of pyruvate even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, may provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies that inhibit tumour growth by administration of a ketogenic diet with average protein but low in carbohydrates and high in fat enriched with omega-3 fatty acids and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT. Methods Twenty-four female NMRI nude mice were injected subcutaneously with tumour cells of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line 23132/87. The animals were then randomly split into two feeding groups and fed either a ketogenic diet (KD group; n = 12 or a standard diet (SD group; n = 12 ad libitum. Experiments were ended upon attainment of the target tumor volume of 600 mm3 to 700 mm3. The two diets were compared based on tumour growth and survival time (interval between tumour cell injection and attainment of target tumour volume. Results The ketogenic diet was well accepted by the KD mice. The tumour growth in the KD group was significantly delayed compared to that in the SD group. Tumours in the KD group reached the target tumour volume at 34.2 ± 8.5 days versus only 23.3 ± 3.9 days in the SD group. After day 20, tumours in the KD group grew faster although the differences in mean tumour growth continued significantly. Importantly, they revealed significantly larger necrotic areas than tumours of the SD group and the areas with vital tumour cells appear to have had fewer vessels than tumours of the SD group. Viable tumour cells in the border zone surrounding the necrotic areas of tumours of both groups exhibited a glycolytic phenotype with expression of glucose transporter-1 and transketolase-like 1 enzyme. Conclusion Application of an unrestricted ketogenic diet enriched with omega-3 fatty acids and MCT

  7. Interferon, a growing cytokine family: 50 years of interferon research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K; Wietzerbin, Juana

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of an antiviral state in cells is the defining activity of interferons (IFNs) as well as the property that permitted their discovery in 1957 by Isaacs and Lindenmann. In addition, interferons have other cellular functions that have potential clinical applications. Today, interferons are used for the treatment of a variety of malignancies and viral diseases. The publication of this special issue of Biochimie gives us a great opportunity to review the state of the art in knowledge about interferons and to explore possible future directions. This commentary text will introduce the reviews written by colleagues who are experts in different aspects of interferon research, to mark the 50th anniversary of the discovery of interferon.

  8. Interferon Gamma in Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that is caused by parasites of the Leishmania genus. Leishmania are further classified into several complexes, each of which can engage in distinct interactions with mammalian hosts resulting in differing disease presentations. It is therefore not unexpected that host immune responses to Leishmania are variable. The induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and response to it in these infections has received considerable attention. In this review, we summarize o...

  9. Induction of omega-oxidation of monocarboxylic acids in rats by acetylsalicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, R K; Tonsgard, J H; Getz, G S

    1991-12-01

    The accumulation of dicarboxylic acids, particularly long chain, is a prominent feature of Reye's syndrome and diseases of peroxisomal metabolism. We assessed the omega-oxidation of a spectrum of fatty acids in rats and asked whether pretreatment of rats with aspirin, which is known to predispose children to Reye's syndrome, would affect omega-oxidation of long chain fatty acids. We found that aspirin increased liver free fatty acids and increased the capacity for omega-oxidation three- to sevenfold. Omega-oxidation of long chain substrate was stimulated to a greater degree than medium chain substrate and was apparent within one day of treatment, at serum aspirin concentrations below the therapeutic range in humans. The apparent Km for lauric acid was 0.9 microM and 12 microM for palmitate. We also found a difference in the storage stability of activity toward medium and long chain substrate. Saturating concentrations of palmitate had no effect on the formation of dodecanedioic acid, whereas laurate decreased but never eliminated the omega-oxidation of palmitate. 97% of the total laurate omega-oxidative activity recovered was found in the microsomes, but 32% of palmitate omega-oxidative activity was present in the cytosol. These results demonstrate that aspirin is a potent stimulator of omega-oxidation and suggest that there may be multiple enzymes for omega-oxidation with overlapping substrate specificity.

  10. omega-Helices in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Matsushima, Norio

    2010-05-01

    A modification of the alpha-helix, termed the omega-helix, has four residues in one turn of a helix. We searched the omega-helix in proteins by the HELFIT program which determines the helical parameters-pitch, residues per turn, radius, and handedness-and p = rmsd/(N - 1)(1/2) estimating helical regularity, where "rmsd" is the root mean square deviation from the best fit helix and "N" is helix length. A total of 1,496 regular alpha-helices 6-9 residues long with p < or = 0.10 A were identified from 866 protein chains. The statistical analysis provides a strong evidence that the frequency distribution of helices versus n indicates the bimodality of typical alpha-helix and omega-helix. Sixty-two right handed omega-helices identified (7.2% of proteins) show non-planarity of the peptide groups. There is amino acid preference of Asp and Cys. These observations and analyses insist that the omega-helices occur really in proteins.

  11. The Effect of Low Omega-3/Omega-6 Ratio on Auditory Nerve Conduction in Rat Pups.

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    Saeid Farahani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are determined by their mutual interactions. This interaction extremely affects various functions. Lower consumption of omega-3 during gestation leads to various disorders, even in hearing. We aimed to assess the effect of low omega-3/omega-6 ratios on auditory nerve conduction. In this experimental study, the auditory brainstem response test was performed on 24-day-old rat (n=14. The rats were divided into case (low omega-3/omega-6 ratio during gestation and lactation and control groups. Variables such as P1, P3, and P4 absolute latency period, interpeaks (P3-P4, P1-P3, and P1-P4, and P4/P1 amplitude ratio were measured. We found an increased P4 omega-3/omega-6 ratio in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P0.05.  Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to the P1-P3 interpeak latency (IPL periods (P>0.05; while the P1-P4 and P3-P4 IPLs were significantly increased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05. The P4/P1 amplitude ratio significantly decreased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05. Results confirmed the negative effects of low omega-3/omega-6 ratio on the auditory system and hearing.

  12. The regulation of interferon production by aspirin, other inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase pathway and agents influencing calcium channel flux.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Interferon is a family of potent antiviral agents which can activate macrophages, enhance cell surface markers, or influence antibody production. Three major types of human interferon are known to exist and have been designated interferons alpha, beta, and gamma. Because of its unique antiviral properties and its ability to influence the immune response, interferon has long been considered a potential therapeutic intervention in the treatment of infections and possibly neoplastic diseases. Tw...

  13. Cerebral malaria: gamma-interferon redux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas H Hunt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There are two theories that seek to explain the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, the mechanical obstruction hypothesis and the immunopathology hypothesis. Evidence consistent with both ideas has accumulated from studies of the human disease and experimental models. Thus some combination of these concepts seems necessary to explain the very complex pattern of changes seen in cerebral malaria. The interactions between malaria parasites, erythrocytes, the cerebral microvascular endothelium, brain parenchymal cells, platelets and microparticles need to be considered. One factor that seems able to knit together much of this complexity is the cytokine interferon-gamma. In this review we consider findings from the clinical disease, in vitro models and the murine counterpart of human cerebral malaria in order to evaluate the roles played by interferon-gamma in the pathogenesis of this often fatal and debilitating condition.

  14. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Prevention of Mood and Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuan-Pin; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Pae, Chi-Un

    2015-08-31

    Psychiatric disorders in general, and major depression and anxiety disorders in particular, account for a large burden of disability, morbidity and premature mortality worldwide. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have a range of neurobiological activities in modulation of neurotransmitters, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and neuroplasticity, which could contribute to psychotropic effects. Here we reviewed recent research on the benefits of omega-3 PUFA supplements in prevention against major depression, bipolar disorders, interferon-α-induced depression patients with chronic hepatitis C viral infection, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The biological mechanisms underlying omega-3 PUFAs'psychotropic effects are proposed and reviewed. Nutrition is a modifiable environmental factor that might be important in prevention medicine, which have been applied for many years in the secondary prevention of heart disease with omega-3 PUFAs. This review extends the notion that nutrition in psychiatry is a modifiable environmental factor and calls for more researches on prospective clinical studies to justify the preventive application of omega-3 PUFAs in daily practice.

  15. Observation of chi(c1) Decays into Vector Meson Pairs phi phi, omega omega, and omega phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-01-01

    Using (106 +/- 4) x 10(6) psi(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e(+) e(-) collider, we present the first measurement of decays of chi(c1) to vector meson pairs phi phi, omega omega, and omega phi. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.5) x 10(-4)

  16. Huevos enriquecidos con omega 3

    OpenAIRE

    Viteri, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    El presente trabajo es una contribución al estudio de usos de ingredientes no tradicionales; harina de algas, Macrocystis pyrifera, y la inclusión en raciones para aves de postura destinado a aumentar la concentración de omega 3 del huevo. Objetivo: Evaluar en la alimentación de la gallina la inclusión de harina de alga marina Macrocystis pyrifera con el fin de aumentar el valor de omega 3 en el huevo, y el grado de aceptación de un producto elaborado con el mismo en estudiante...

  17. Local synthesis of interferon-alpha in lupus nephritis is associated with type I interferons signature and LMP7 induction in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Giuseppe; Cafiero, Cesira; Divella, Chiara; Sallustio, Fabio; Gigante, Margherita; Pontrelli, Paola; De Palma, Giuseppe; Rossini, Michele; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2015-03-22

    Type I interferons are pivotal in the activation of autoimmune response in systemic lupus erythematous. However, the pathogenic role of interferon-alpha in patients affected by lupus nephritis remains uncertain. The aim of our study was to investigate the presence of a specific interferon signature in lupus nephritis and the effects of interferon-alpha at renal level. We performed immunohistochemical analysis for MXA-protein and in situ hybridization to detect interferon-alpha signature and production in human lupus nephritis. Through microarray studies, we analyzed the gene expression profile of renal tubular epithelial cells, stimulated with interferon-alpha. We validated microarray results through real-time polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry on renal tubular epithelial cells, and through immunohistochemical analysis and confocal microscopy on renal biopsies. Type I interferons signature was characterized by MXA-specific staining in renal tubular epithelial cells; in addition, in situ hybridization showed that renal tubular epithelial cells were the major producers of interferon-alpha, indicating a potential autocrine effect. Whole-genome expression profile showed interferon-alpha induced up-regulation of genes involved in innate immunity, protein ubiquitination and switching to immunoproteasome. In accordance with the in vitro data, class IV lupus nephritis showed up-regulation of the immunoproteasome subunit LMP7 in tubular epithelial cells associated with type I interferon signature. Our data indicate that type I interferons might have a pathogenic role in lupus nephritis characterized by an autocrine effect of interferon-alpha on renal tubular epithelial cells. Therefore we hypothesize that inhibition of type I interferons might represent a therapeutic target to prevent tubulo-interstitial damage in patients with lupus nephritis.

  18. Hazara virus infection is lethal for adult type I interferon receptor-knockout mice and may act as a surrogate for infection with the human-pathogenic Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowall, Stuart D; Findlay-Wilson, Stephen; Rayner, Emma; Pearson, Geoff; Pickersgill, Janice; Rule, Antony; Merredew, Natasha; Smith, Hazel; Chamberlain, John; Hewson, Roger

    2012-03-01

    Hazara virus (HAZV) is closely related to the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV). HAZV has not been reported to cause human disease; work with infectious material can be carried out at containment level (CL)-2. By contrast, CCHFV causes a haemorrhagic fever in humans and requires CL-4 facilities. A disease model of HAZV infection in mice deficient in the type I interferon receptor is reported in this study. Dose-response effects were seen with higher doses, resulting in a shorter time to death and earlier detection of viral loads in organs. The lowest dose of 10 p.f.u. was still lethal in over 50 % of the mice. Histopathological findings were identified in the liver, spleen and lymph nodes, with changes similar to a recent mouse model of CCHFV infection. The findings demonstrate that inoculation of mice with HAZV may act as a useful surrogate model for the testing of antiviral agents against CCHFV.

  19. Murine gamma interferon fails to inhibit Toxoplasma gondii growth in murine fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, J D; Gonias, S L; Pfefferkorn, E R

    1990-01-01

    Although treatment of human macrophages or fibroblasts with human gamma interferon results in the inhibition of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii, murine gamma interferon stimulated only murine macrophages, not murine fibroblasts, to inhibit T. gondii. This species difference may be important in understanding the control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:2106497

  20. Evolution of Interferons and Interferon Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secombes, Chris J; Zou, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The earliest jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomes) would likely have had interferon (IFN) genes, since they are present in extant cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays) and bony fish (lobe-finned and ray-finned fish, the latter consisting of the chondrostei, holostei, and teleostei), as well as in tetrapods. They are thought to have evolved from a class II helical cytokine ancestor, along with the interleukin (IL)-10 cytokine family. The two rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD) that occurred between invertebrates and vertebrates (1) may have given rise to additional loci, initially containing an IL-10 ancestor and IFN ancestor, which have duplicated further to give rise to the two loci containing the IL-10 family genes, and potentially the IFN type I and IFN type III loci (2). The timing of the divergence of the IFN type II gene from the IL-10 family genes is not clear but was also an early event in vertebrate evolution. Further WGD events at the base of the teleost fish, and in particular teleost lineages (cyprinids, salmonids), have duplicated the loci further, giving rise to additional IFN genes, with tandem gene duplication within a locus a common occurrence. Finally, retrotransposition events have occurred in different vertebrate lineages giving rise to further IFN loci, with large expansions of genes at these loci in some cases. This review will initially explore the likely IFN system present in the earliest Gnathostomes by comparison of the known cartilaginous fish genes with those present in mammals and will then explore the changes that have occurred in gene number/diversification, gene organization, and the encoded proteins during vertebrate evolution.

  1. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon OmegaC* Decaying to OmegaC0 Gamma

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del, P; Amo Sanchez; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo, M; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del, L; Buono; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly-charm baryon OmegaC* (css) in the radiative decay OmegaC0 Gamma, where the OmegaC0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega-pi+, Omega-pi+pi0, Omega-pi+pi-pi+, and Cascade-K-pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb$-1} collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the OmegaC* and the OmegaC0 baryons is measured to be 70.8 +/- 1.0 (stat) +/- 1.1 (syst) MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of OmegaC* and OmegaC0 in e+e- annihilation.

  2. Observation of an excited charm baryon Omega c* decaying to Omega c0gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-12-08

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Omega c* (css) in the radiative decay Omega c0gamma, where the Omega c0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega(-)pi+, Omega(-)pi+pi0, Omega(-)pi+pi(-)pi+, and Xi(-)K(-)pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7 fb(-1) collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Omega c* and the Omega c0 baryons is measured to be 70.8+/-1.0(stat)+/-1.1(syst) MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Omega c* and Omega c0 in e+e(-) annihilation.

  3. Effects of increased human tumor necrosis factor-like molecule 1A expression in peripheral blood of children with acute Guillain-Barre syndrome on interferon-gamma secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libin Yang; Shulei Li; Yan Tana; Shufen Xu; Xiumei Duan; Yanqiu Fang; Lihua Liu; Yuanyuan Che; Lei Liu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Human tumor necrosis factor-like molecule 1A (hTL1A) is a strong T helper cell type 1 (Th1) co-stimulator.Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an autoimmune disorder of the nervous system,which is mediated by Th1 cells.OBJECTIVE:To determine hTL1A expression in peripheral blood T lymphocytes of acute GBS children and the effects of hTL1A on secretion of interferon-γ.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A randomized,controlled,neuroimmunological in vitro study was performed at the Central Laboratory of First Hospital of Jilin University,China from November 2005 to November 2007.MATERIALS:Venous blood samples were obtained from 6 healthy donors,aged 6-12 years (all routine blood examination items were normal),and 6 additional children with acute GBS,aged 6-12years.The GBS children fell itl within 1 week and were not treated with hormones or immunoglobulin.Purified recombinant human soluble tumor necrosis factor-like molecule 1A (rhsTL1A,1 mg/mL,relative molecular mass 22 000,6×His tag,soluble form) was supplied by the Central Laboratory of First Hospital of Jilin University,China.METHODS:Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from healthy donors using the standard Ficoll gradient centrifugation and were incubated in 96-well culture plates.The cells were assigned to the following groups:control (2 μg/mL phytohemagglutinin),2 μg/mL phytohemagglutinin+25,100 and 400 ng/mL rhsTL1A.T cell proliferation was quantified using the tritiated thymidine (~3H-TdR) method.Serum interferon-γ levels in acute GBS children were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).The ratio of hTL1A-positive T cells to CD3-positive T cells in peripheral blood of acute GBS children was determined using flow cytometry.Following in vitro pre-activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by 2 μg/mL phytohemagglutinin,the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 400 ng/mL exogenous rhsTL1A.Finally,peripheral blood mononuclear cell-secreted interferon-γ levels were

  4. The nuclear factor YY1 suppresses the human gamma interferon promoter through two mechanisms: inhibition of AP1 binding and activation of a silencer element.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Our group has previously reported that the nuclear factor Yin-Yang 1 (YY1), a ubiquitous DNA-binding protein, is able to interact with a silencer element (BE) in the gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) promoter region. In this study, we demonstrated that YY1 can directly inhibit the activity of the IFN-gamma promoter by interacting with multiple sites in the promoter. In cotransfection assays, a YY1 expression vector significantly inhibited IFN-gamma promoter activity. Mutation of the YY1 binding si...

  5. Effect of transfection with human interferon-beta gene entrapped in cationic multilamellar liposomes in combination with 5-fluorouracil on the growth of human esophageal cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoo, Hideo; Komura, Sadaaki; Ohishi, Nobuko; Yajima, Haruyoshi; Akiyama, Seiji; Kasai, Yasushi; Ito, Katsuki; Nakao, Akimasa; Yagi, Kunio

    2002-01-01

    When human esophageal cancer cells were transfected with the human interferon-beta (hIFN-beta) gene entrapped in cationic multilamellar liposomes, the growth of all cancer cells tested was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes ranged from 16 to 176 ng plasmid DNA/ml culture medium. Among the 10 cell lines examined, NUEC3, NUEC4, TE-3 and WSSC cell lines were highly susceptible to transfection with this gene entrapped in the liposomes. The IC50 values of the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes with respect to cell growth were positively-correlated with those of exogenous cytokine hIFN-beta, suggesting that the antiproliferative effect of hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes can be mainly ascribed to the function of hIFN-beta produced by cells transfected with the gene. Two days after transfection with the liposome-entrapped gene, the concentration of hIFN-beta secreted into the medium was determined. Even though the level of hIFN-beta observed in the medium was lower than that of the IC50 of exogenously added hIFN-beta, the inhibitory potency of the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes on the cell growth was remarkable. When the esophageal cancer cells were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the presence of a low concentration of liposome-entrapped-gene, the rate of growth inhibition of these cells increased over that caused by either 5-FU or hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes alone. All these data suggest that combination therapy with the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in cationic multilamellar liposomes and the anticancer drug 5-FU would be beneficial for preoperative treatment of carcinoma of the esophagus.

  6. micrOMEGAs: recent developments

    OpenAIRE

    Belanger, G.; Boudjema, F.; Pukhov, A.; Semenov, A.

    2002-01-01

    The program micrOMEGAs that calculates the relic density of the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) in the MSSM is presented. The impact of coannihilation channels and of higher order corrections to Higgs widths is stressed. The dependence on the RGE code used to calculate the soft parameters is also discussed.

  7. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  8. Omega 3 Fatty Acids: Novel Neurotherapeutic Targets for Cognitive Dysfunction in Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöchel, Christian; Voss, Martin; Grüter, Florian; Alves, Gilberto S; Matura, Silke; Sepanski, Beate; Stäblein, Michael; Wenzler, Sofia; Prvulovic, David; Carvalho, André F; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola

    2015-01-01

    An increasing body of evidences from preclinical as well as epidemiological and clinical studies suggest a potential beneficial role of dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids for cognitive functioning. In this narrative review, we will summarize and discuss recent findings from epidemiological, interventional and experimental studies linking dietary consumption of omega-3 fatty acids to cognitive function in healthy adults. Furthermore, affective disorders and schizophrenia (SZ) are characterized by cognitive dysfunction encompassing several domains. Cognitive dysfunction is closely related to impaired functioning and quality of life across these conditions. Therefore, the current review focues on the potential influence of omega-3 fatty acids on cognition in SZ and affective disorders. In sum, current data predominantly from mechanistic models and animal studies suggest that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acid supplementation could lead to improved cognitive functioning in SZ and affective disorders. However, besides its translational promise, evidence for clinical benefits in humans has been mixed. Notwithstanding evidences indicate that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acids may have benefit for affective symptoms in both unipolar and bipolar depression, to date no randomized controlled trial had evaluated omega-3 as cognitive enhancer for mood disorders, while a single published controlled trial suggested no therapeutic benefit for cognitive improvement in SZ. Considering the pleiotropic mechanisms of action of omega-3 fatty acids, the design of well-designed controlled trials of omega-3 supplementation as a novel, domain-specific, target for cognitive impairment in SZ and affective disorders is warranted.

  9. Induced and down-regulated proteins in the human cultured hairy cell leukemia line JOK-1 and the Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Daudi during incubation with interferon-alpha: a kinetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P S; Nielsen, B; Jensen, A W

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of action of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), the effect on cell proliferation and protein synthesis in the human hairy cell leukemia line JOK-1 and the Burkitt's lymphoma cell line Daudi were investigated. While Daudi cells were inhibited in proliferation and in total...... that the changes in JOK-1 cells were only temporary (within 8-16 h) and small to moderate in magnitude (less than four-fold). In Daudi cells, the changes for two of these polypeptides were early (within 2 h), for most of them prolonged (at least 24 h), and for three of them of great magnitude (between 6- and 30...... protein synthesis, no effect was seen on JOK-1 cells. However, high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that four polypeptides were induced in JOK-1 cells after IFN-alpha incubation, while an additional 11 were induced and two down-regulated in Daudi cells. Kinetic studies revealed...

  10. Lassa virus nucleoprotein mutants generated by reverse genetics induce a robust type I interferon response in human dendritic cells and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain; Reynard, Stéphanie; Diancourt, Laure; Caro, Valérie; Tordo, Noel; Bouloy, Michèle

    2011-11-01

    Lassa virus (LASV; Arenaviridae) is responsible for severe hemorrhagic fevers in Africa. LASV nucleoprotein (NP) plays important roles in regulating viral transcription and replication and in inhibiting type I interferon (IFN) production. The NP C-terminal domain contains a 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity involved in suppressing IFN induction. We have established a murine polymerase (Pol) I reverse genetics system for LASV, showing that residues D389 and G392 of NP were critical for LASV viability, while the D389A/G392A and D389T/392A double mutants were severely altered in the ability to suppress IFN in macrophages and dendritic cells. Assessing their attenuation in vivo may open new perspectives in vaccinology.

  11. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha sensitize primarily resistant human endometrial stromal cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluhr, Herbert; Krenzer, Stefanie; Stein, Gerburg M

    2007-01-01

    -mediated signaling during early implantation. Here we show that ESCs are primarily resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis independently of their state of hormonal differentiation. Pre-treatment of ESCs with interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha sensitizes them to become apoptotic upon stimulation......-inhibitory protein (FLIP, CFLAR) expression in ESCs. Additionally, we observed an activation of caspase 3, caspase 8 and caspase 9 upon apoptotic Fas triggering. In summary, we demonstrate that IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha sensitize primarily apoptosis-resistant ESCs to Fas-mediated cell death. This might be due...... to an upregulation of Fas expression, and apoptosis seems to be mediated by active caspase 3, caspase 8 and caspase 9. The observed pro-apoptotic effect of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha on ESCs could play an important role in the modulation of early implantation....

  12. Interferon-γ production by tubulointerstitial human CD56(bright) natural killer cells contributes to renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Becker M P; Wilkinson, Ray; Wang, Xiangju; Kildey, Katrina; Lindner, Mae; Rist, Melissa J; Beagley, Kenneth; Healy, Helen; Kassianos, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a population of lymphoid cells that play a significant role in mediating innate immune responses. Studies in mice suggest a pathological role for NK cells in models of kidney disease. In this study, we characterized the NK cell subsets present in native kidneys of patients with tubulointerstitial fibrosis, the pathological hallmark of chronic kidney disease. Significantly higher numbers of total NK cells (CD3(-)CD56(+)) were detected in renal biopsies with tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with diseased biopsies without fibrosis and healthy kidney tissue using multi-color flow cytometry. At a subset level, both the CD56(dim) NK cell subset and particularly the CD56(bright) NK cell subset were elevated in fibrotic kidney tissue. However, only CD56(bright) NK cells significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function. Expression of the tissue-retention and -activation molecule CD69 on CD56(bright) NK cells was significantly increased in fibrotic biopsy specimens compared with non-fibrotic kidney tissue, indicative of a pathogenic phenotype. Further flow cytometric phenotyping revealed selective co-expression of activating receptor CD335 (NKp46) and differentiation marker CD117 (c-kit) on CD56(bright) NK cells. Multi-color immunofluorescent staining of fibrotic kidney tissue localized the accumulation of NK cells within the tubulointerstitium, with CD56(bright) NK cells (NKp46(+) CD117(+)) identified as the source of pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ within the NK cell compartment. Thus, activated interferon-γ-producing CD56(bright) NK cells are positioned to play a key role in the fibrotic process and progression to chronic kidney disease. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of $\\Omega_b^-(bss)$ and $\\Omega_c^0(css)$ with QCD sum rules

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we calculate the masses and the pole residues of the ${1/2}^+$ heavy baryons $\\Omega_c^0(css)$ and $\\Omega_b^-(bss)$ with the QCD sum rules. The numerical values $M_{\\Omega_c^0}=(2.72\\pm0.18) \\rm{GeV}$ (or $M_{\\Omega_c^0}=(2.71\\pm0.18) \\rm{GeV}$) and $M_{\\Omega_b^-}=(6.13\\pm0.12) \\rm{GeV}$ (or $M_{\\Omega_b^-}=(6.18\\pm0.13) \\rm{GeV}$) are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. On topological groups admitting a base at identity indexed with $\\omega^\\omega$

    OpenAIRE

    Leiderman, Arkady G.; Pestov, Vladimir G.; Tomita, Artur H.

    2015-01-01

    A topological group $G$ is said to have a local $\\omega^\\omega$-base if the neighbourhood system at identity admits a monotone cofinal map from the directed set $\\omega^\\omega$. In particular, every metrizable group is such, but the class of groups with a local $\\omega^\\omega$-base is significantly wider. The aim of this article is to better understand the boundaries of this class, by presenting new examples and counter-examples. Ultraproducts and non-arichimedean ordered fields lead to natur...

  15. Skyddar omega-3 mot demens?

    OpenAIRE

    Söderberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Det finns ett stort intresse för omega-3 idag på grund av dess många hälsogivande egenskaper. Brist på vissa typer av fett i kosten kan vara en viktig faktor för kognitiv nedsättning, demens och Alzheimers sjukdom. Dokosahexaensyra (DHA) är den dominerande omega-3-fettsyran i hjärnan. Det finns många faktorer som förklarar varför fettsyraintaget kan påverka kognitiva funktioner och risken att bli dement. Obduktionsstudier visar att patienter med Alzheimer har mindre mängd DHA i hjärnan än kog...

  16. Readily Available Sources of Long-Chain Omega-3 Oils: Is Farmed Australian Seafood a Better Source of the Good Oil than Wild-Caught Seafood?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Nichols

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Seafood consumption enhances intake of omega-3 long-chain (≥C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids (termed LC omega-3 oils. Humans biosynthesize only small amounts of LC-omega-3, so they are considered semi-essential nutrients in our diet. Concern has been raised that farmed fish now contain lower LC omega-3 content than wild-harvested seafood due to the use of oil blending in diets fed to farmed fish. However, we observed that two major Australian farmed finfish species, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar and barramundi (Lates calcifer, have higher oil and LC omega-3 content than the same or other species from the wild, and remain an excellent means to achieve substantial intake of LC omega-3 oils. Notwithstanding, LC omega-3 oil content has decreased in these two farmed species, due largely to replacing dietary fish oil with poultry oil. For Atlantic salmon, LC omega-3 content decreased ~30%–50% between 2002 and 2013, and the omega-3/omega-6 ratio also decreased (>5:1 to <1:1. Australian consumers increasingly seek their LC omega-3 from supplements, therefore a range of supplement products were compared. The development and future application of oilseeds containing LC omega-3 oils and their incorporation in aquafeeds would allow these health-benefitting oils to be maximized in farmed Australian seafood. Such advances can assist with preventative health care, fisheries management, aquaculture nutrition, an innovative feed/food industry and ultimately towards improved consumer health.

  17. Interferon Induced Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram Kayar, Nuket; Alpay, Nadir; Hamdard, Jamshid; Emegil, Sebnem; Bag Soydas, Rabia; Baysal, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology which involves recurring oral and genital aphthous ulcers and ocular lesions as well as articular, vascular, and nervous system involvement. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is usually seen in viral infections, immune deficiency syndrome, sickle cell anemia, and hyperfiltration and secondary to interferon therapy. Here, we present a case of FSGS identified with kidney biopsy in a patient who had been diagnosed with Behçet's disease and received interferon-alpha treatment for uveitis and presented with acute renal failure and nephrotic syndrome associated with interferon. PMID:27847659

  18. 1-O-alkyl-2-(omega-oxo)acyl-sn-glycerols from shark oil and human milk fat are potential precursors of PAF mimics and GHR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Karsten; Ravandi, A.; Harkewicz, R.;

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the feasibility that peroxidation and lipolysis of 1-O-alkyl-2,3-diacyl-sn-glycerols (DAGE) found in shark liver oil and human milk fat constitutes a potential source of dietary precursors of platelet activating factor (PAF) mimics and of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Purified...... by chromatographic retention time and diagnostic ions by online electrospray mass spectrometry. Core aldehydes of oxidized shark liver oil yielded 23 molecular species of 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycerols with short-chain sn-2 oxoacyl groups, ranging from 4 to 13 carbons, some unsaturated. Autooxidation of human milk fat...

  19. Ribavirin plus interferon versus interferon for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Gluud, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Standard therapy is ribavirin plus pegylated interferon to achieve undetectable level of virus in the blood, but the effect on clinical outcomes is controversial.......Hepatitis C is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Standard therapy is ribavirin plus pegylated interferon to achieve undetectable level of virus in the blood, but the effect on clinical outcomes is controversial....

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, Lalit; Tongia, Sudheer K; Pal, Veerendra S; Agrawal, Rajendra P; Nyati, Prem; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2007-01-01

    Forced swimming test is used to induce a characteristic behavior of immobility in rats, which resembles depression in humans to some extent. We evaluated the effect of omega-3 fatty acids alone as well as compared it with the standard antidepressant therapy with fluoxetine in both acute and chronic studies. In both the studies, rats were divided into 4 groups and subjected to the following drug interventions - Group 1- control: Group 2- fluoxetine in dose of 10 mg/kg subcutaneously 23.5, 5 and 1 h before the test: Group 3- omega-3 fatty acids in dose of 500 mg/kg orally; Group 4- fluoxetine plus omega-3 fatty acids both. In acute study, omega-3 fatty acids were given in single dose 2 h prior to the test while in chronic study omega-3 fatty acids were given daily for a period of 28 days. All animals were subjected to a 15-min pretest followed 24 h later by a 5-min test. A time sampling method was used to score the behavioral activity in each group. The results revealed that in acute study, omega-3 fatty acids do not have any significant effect in forced swimming test. However, in chronic study, omega-3 fatty acids affect the immobility and swimming behavior significantly when compared with control (p climbing behavior and the efficacy of combination of omega-3 fatty acids and fluoxetine is significantly more than that of fluoxetine alone in changing the behavioral activity of rats in forced swimming test. It leads to the conclusion that omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity per se, and the combination of fluoxetine and omega-3 fatty acids has more antidepressant efficacy than fluoxetine alone in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

  1. Hantavirus interferon regulation and virulence determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackow, Erich R; Dalrymple, Nadine A; Cimica, Velasco; Matthys, Valery; Gorbunova, Elena; Gavrilovskaya, Irina

    2014-07-17

    Hantaviruses predominantly replicate in primary human endothelial cells and cause 2 diseases characterized by altered barrier functions of vascular endothelium. Most hantaviruses restrict the early induction of interferon-β (IFNβ) and interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) within human endothelial cells to permit their successful replication. PHV fails to regulate IFN induction within human endothelial cells which self-limits PHV replication and its potential as a human pathogen. These findings, and the altered regulation of endothelial cell barrier functions by pathogenic hantaviruses, suggest that virulence is determined by the ability of hantaviruses to alter key signaling pathways within human endothelial cells. Our findings indicate that the Gn protein from ANDV, but not PHV, inhibits TBK1 directed ISRE, kB and IFNβ induction through virulence determinants in the Gn cytoplasmic tail (GnT) that inhibit TBK1 directed IRF3 phosphorylation. Further studies indicate that in response to hypoxia induced VEGF, ANDV infection enhances the permeability and adherens junction internalization of microvascular and lymphatic endothelial cells. These hypoxia/VEGF directed responses are rapamycin sensitive and directed by mTOR signaling pathways. These results demonstrate the presence of at least two hantavirus virulence determinants that act on endothelial cell signaling pathways: one that regulates antiviral IFN signaling responses, and a second that enhances normal hypoxia-VEGF-mTOR signaling pathways to facilitate endothelial cell permeability. These findings suggest signaling pathways as potential targets for therapeutic regulation of vascular deficits that contribute to hantavirus diseases and viral protein targets for attenuating pathogenic hantaviruses.

  2. Interferon susceptibility of herpes simplex virus strains isolated from patients enrolled in clinical trials.

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, J. A.; Skicki-Mullen, M B; Breinig, M K; Ho, M

    1983-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 strains isolated from patients who had received interferon in a clinical trial were not more resistant to human leukocyte interferon than strains derived from recipients of a placebo. The susceptibility of herpes simplex virus type 2 strains isolated from herpes genitalis was slightly less than that of herpes simplex virus type 1 strains causing herpes genitalis.

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants in edible wild plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2004-01-01

    Human beings evolved on a diet that was balanced in the omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and was high in antioxidants. Edible wild plants provide alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and higher amounts of vitamin E and vitamin C than cultivated plants. In addition to the antioxidant vitamins, edible wild plants are rich in phenols and other compounds that increase their antioxidant capacity. It is therefore important to systematically analyze the total antioxidant capacity of wild plants and promote their commercialization in both developed and developing countries. The diets of Western countries have contained increasingly larger amounts of linoleic acid (LA), which has been promoted for its cholesterol-lowering effect. It is now recognized that dietary LA favors oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and increases platelet response to aggregation. In contrast, ALA intake is associated with inhibitory effects on the clotting activity of platelets, on their response to thrombin, and on the regulation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. In clinical studies, ALA contributed to lowering of blood pressure, and a prospective epidemiological study showed that ALA is inversely related to the risk of coronary heart disease in men. Dietary amounts of LA as well as the ratio of LA to ALA appear to be important for the metabolism of ALA to longer-chain omega-3 PUFAs. Relatively large reserves of LA in body fat. as are found in vegans or in the diet of omnivores in Western societies, would tend to slow down the formation of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from ALA. Therefore, the role of ALA in human nutrition becomes important in terms of long-term dietary intake. One advantage of the consumption of ALA over omega-3 fatty acids from fish is that the problem of insufficient vitamin E intake does not exist with high intake of ALA from plant sources.

  4. Hepatitis B virus polymerase inhibits RIG-I- and Toll-like receptor 3-mediated beta interferon induction in human hepatocytes through interference with interferon regulatory factor 3 activation and dampening of the interaction between TBK1/IKKepsilon and DDX3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shiyan; Chen, Jieliang; Wu, Min; Chen, Hui; Kato, Nobuyuki; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2010-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains one of the most serious health problems worldwide. Whilst studies have shown that HBV impairs interferon (IFN) production from dendritic cells in chronic hepatitis B patients, it remains unknown whether HBV inhibits IFN production in human hepatocytes. Using transient transfection assays in a primary human hepatocyte cell line (PH5CH8), this study demonstrated that HBV polymerase inhibits IFN-beta promoter activity induced by Newcastle disease virus, Sendai virus or poly(I : C) in a dose-dependent manner, whilst ectopic expression of the HBV core and X proteins had no effect on IFN-beta promoter activity. In addition, HBV polymerase blocked cellular IFN-beta expression and consequent antiviral immunity revealed by an infection protection assay. Furthermore, overexpression of key molecules on the IFN-beta induction axis, together with HBV polymerase, resulted in a block of IFN-beta promoter activity triggered by RIG-I, IPS-1, TRIF, TBK1 and IKKepsilon, but not by an IFN regulatory factor 3 dominant-positive mutant (IRF3-5D), suggesting that HBV polymerase prevents IFN-beta expression at the TBK1/IKKepsilon level. Further studies showed that HBV polymerase inhibited phosphorylation, dimerization and nuclear translocation of IRF3, in response to Sendai virus infection. Finally, it was shown that HBV polymerase-mediated dampening of the interaction between TBK1/IKKepsilon and DDX3 may be involved in the inhibitory effect on IFN-beta induction. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel role of HBV polymerase in HBV counteraction of IFN-beta production in human hepatocytes.

  5. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beckwith, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  6. FY14 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, M. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jenei, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Perez, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zylstra, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-13

    In FY14, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 324 target shots in FY14, with 246 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 62 shots using just the EP laser system, and 16 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 31% of the total number of shots (62 OMEGA shots, 42 EP shots) shots supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 69% (200 OMEGA shots and 36 EP shots, including the 16 Joint shots) were dedicated to experiments for High- Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  7. Measurement of exclusive $\\omega$ electroproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Breitweg, J; Derrick, Malcolm; Krakauer, D A; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Pellegrino, A; Repond, J; Stanek, R; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Abbiendi, G; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cara Romeo, G; Castellini, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Laurenti, G; Levi, G; Margotti, A; Massam, Thomas; Nania, R; Palmonari, F; Pesci, A; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zamora-Garcia, Yu E; Zichichi, A; Amelung, C; Bornheim, A; Brock, I; Coboken, K; Crittenden, James Arthur; Deffner, R; Hartmann, H; Heinloth, K; Hilger, E; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Kerger, R; Paul, E; Rautenberg, J; Schnurbusch, H; Stifutkin, A; Tandler, J; Voss, K C; Weber, A; Wieber, H; Bailey, D S; Barret, O; Brook, N H; Foster, B; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; McFall, J D; Rodrigues, E; Scott, J; Tapper, R J; Capua, M; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Jeoung, H Y; Kim, J Y; Lee, J H; Lim, I T; Ma, K J; Pac, M Y; Caldwell, A; Liu, W; Liu, X; Mellado, B; Paganis, S; Sampson, S; Schmidke, W B; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Figiel, J; Klimek, K H; Olkiewicz, K; Piotrzkowski, K; Przybycien, M B; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Bednarek, B; Jelen, K; Kisielewska, D; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, T; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Suszycki, L; Szuba, D; Kotanski, Andrzej; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bienlein, J K; Borras, K; Dannheim, D; Desler, K; Drews, G; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Göttlicher, P; Graciani, R; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hartner, G F; Hasell, D; Hebbel, K; Kasemann, M; Koch, W; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lindemann, L; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Martínez, M; Milite, M; Moritz, M; Notz, D; Pelucchi, F; Petrucci, M C; Rohde, M; Savin, A A; Schneekloth, U; Selonke, F; Sievers, M; Stonjek, S; Wolf, G; Wollmer, U; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Coldewey, C; López-Duran-Viani, A; Meyer, A; Schlenstedt, S; Straub, P B; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Maccarrone, G D; Votano, L; Bamberger, Andreas; Benen, A; Eisenhardt, S; Markun, P; Raach, H; Wölfle, S; Bussey, Peter J; Bell, M; Doyle, A T; Lee, S W; Lupi, A; MacDonald, N; McCance, G J; Saxon, D H; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, Ian O; Waugh, R; Bohnet, I; Gendner, N; Holm, U; Meyer-Larsen, A; Salehi, H; Wick, K; Garfagnini, A; Gialas, I; Gladilin, L K; Kcira, D; Klanner, Robert; Lohrmann, E; Poelz, G; Zetsche, F; Goncalo, R; Long, K R; Miller, D B; Tapper, A D; Walker, R; Mallik, U; Cloth, P; Filges, D; Ishii, T; Kuze, M; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Ahn, S H; Lee, S B; Park, S K; Lim, H; Park, I H; Son, D; Barreiro, F; García, G; Glasman, C; González, O; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Redondo, I; Terron, J; Barbi, M S; Corriveau, F; Hanna, D S; Ochs, A; Padhi, S; Stairs, D G; Wing, M; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Bashkirov, V; Danilov, M V; Dolgoshein, B A; Gladkov, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Suchkov, S; Dementev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Golubkov, Yu A; Katkov, I I; Khein, L A; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Sheheglova, L M; Solomin, A N; Vlasov, N N; Zotkin, S A; Bokel, C; Botje, M; Brümmer, N; Engelen, J; Grijpink, S; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P M; Schagen, S; Van Sighem, A; Tassi, E; Tiecke, H G; Tuning, N; Velthuis, J J; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Kim, C L; Ling, T Y; Boogert, S; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Devenish, R C E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Matsushita, T; Ruske, O; Sutton, M R; Walczak, R; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dosselli, U; Dusini, S; Limentani, S; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Stroili, R; Turcato, M; Voci, C; Adamczyk, L; Iannotti, L; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Saull, P R B; Toothacker, W S; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cormack, C; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Shah, T P; Epperson, D E; Heusch, C A; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Wichmann, R; Williams, D C; Pavel, N; Abramowicz, H; Dagan, S; Kananov, S; Kreisel, A; Levy, A; Abe, T; Fusayasu, T; Umemori, K; Yamashita, T; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Inuzuka, M; Kitamura, S; Nishimura, T; Arneodo, M; Cartiglia, N; Cirio, R; Costa, M; Ferrero, M I; Maselli, S; Monaco, V; Peroni, C; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Dardo, M; Bailey, D C; Fagerstroem, C P; Galea, R; Koop, T; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Orr, R S; Polenz, S; Sabetfakhri, A; Simmons, D; Butterworth, J M; Catterall, C D; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Jones, T W; Lane, J B; West, B J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Grzelak, G; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Smalska, B; Tymieniecka, T; Wróblewski, A K; Zakrzewski, J A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Gadaj, T; Deppe, O; Eisenberg, Y; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Badgett, W F; Chapin, D; Cross, R; Foudas, C; Mattingly, S E K; Reeder, D D; Smith, W H; Vaiciulis, A W; Wildschek, T; Wodarczyk, M; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Hughes, V W; Bhadra, S; Cole, J E; Frisken, W R; Hall-Wilton, R; Khakzad, M; Menary, S R

    2001-01-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of omega mesons, ep -> e omega p, has been studied in the kinematic range 3 pi^+pi^-pi^0. The exclusive (ep -> e omega p) cross section in the above kinematic region is 0.108 +- 0.014(stat.) +- 0.026(syst.) nb. The reaction ep -> e phi p, phi -> pi^+pi^-pi^0, has also been measured. The cross sections, as well as the cross-section ratios omega/rho and omega/phi, are presented as a function of W and Q^2. Thus, for the first time, the properties of omega electroproduction can be compared to those of rho^0, phi and J/psi electroproduction at high W.

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids: a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, G; Franceschi, F; Bibbò, S; Gasbarrini, A

    2014-10-01

    The integrity of gastric barrier derives from the balance between defending and damaging factors. In particular, prostaglandins play a relevant role in the maintenance of gastric homeostasis and prevention of peptic disease, at different levels. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentanoic acid, are the precursors of the third series of prostaglandins (with anti-inflammatory properties), also reducing the formation of the second series of prostaglandins (pro-inflammatory ones). Such a pathophysiological rationale brought to the experimental application, both in animal models and, more recently, in humans, of omega-3 fatty acids against gastrointestinal damage. Omega-3 fatty acids have shown interesting results in preventing different types of gastric damage in mouse models. A large retrospective case-control study on patients taking both anti-thrombotic therapy and eicosapentanoic acid showed (although only at unadjusted analysis) an inverse correlation between consumption of eicosapentanoic acid and gastrointestinal injury. Prospective, well-designed, comparative studies are warranted to clarify if omega-3 fatty acids may represent, or not, a novel resort against gastrointestinal injury.

  9. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenna, J Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku

    2015-01-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are a key component of a life-saving treatment for young children who present with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition in resource limited settings. Increasing recognition of the role of balanced dietary omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids...... with altered PUFA content and looked at the effects on circulating omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status as a measure of overall omega-3 status. Supplemental oral administration of omega-3 DHA or reduction of RUTF omega-6 linoleic acid using high oleic peanuts improved DHA status, whereas increasing omega......-3 alpha-linolenic acid in RUTF did not. The results of these two small studies are consistent with well-established effects in animal studies and highlight the need for basic and operational research to improve fat composition in support of omega-3-specific development in young children as RUTF use...

  10. Motivational factors for consuming omega-3 PUFAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krutulyte, Rasa; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    foods. This paper presents the results of a qualitative pilot study that aimed to explore Danish consumers' motives for choosing omega-3/fish oil enriched products. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) was applied as a theoretical framework to understand the process by which people choose healthy...... to the choice of omega-3/fish oil, whereas perception of omega-3 as an ingredient in selected foods does indeed influence consumers' choice of carrier-ingredient combinations....

  11. Omega-3s in food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take into considera...... into consideration when developing food emulsions enriched with omega-3 oils and examples on how oxidation can be reduced in products such as mayonnaise, spreads, milk, yoghurt are also given....

  12. Motivational factors for consuming omega-3 PUFAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krutulyte, Rasa; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    foods. This paper presents the results of a qualitative pilot study that aimed to explore Danish consumers' motives for choosing omega-3/fish oil enriched products. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) was applied as a theoretical framework to understand the process by which people choose healthy...... to the choice of omega-3/fish oil, whereas perception of omega-3 as an ingredient in selected foods does indeed influence consumers' choice of carrier-ingredient combinations....

  13. Omega-3 fatty acids in health and disease and in growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, A P

    1991-09-01

    Several sources of information suggest that man evolved on a diet with a ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acids of approximately 1 whereas today this ratio is approximately 10:1 to 20-25:1, indicating that Western diets are deficient in omega 3 fatty acids compared with the diet on which humans evolved and their genetic patterns were established. Omega-3 fatty acids increase bleeding time; decrease platelet aggregation, blood viscosity, and fibrinogen; and increase erythrocyte deformability, thus decreasing the tendency to thrombus formation. In no clinical trial, including coronary artery graft surgery, has there been any evidence of increased blood loss due to ingestion of omega 3 fatty acids. Many studies show that the effects of omega 3 fatty acids on serum lipids depend on the type of patient and whether the amount of saturated fatty acids in the diet is held constant. In patients with hyperlipidemia, omega 3 fatty acids decrease low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol if the saturated fatty acid content is decreased, otherwise there is a slight increase, but at high doses (32 g) they lower LDL cholesterol; furthermore, they consistently lower serum triglycerides in normal subjects and in patients with hypertriglyceridemia whereas the effect on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) varies from no effect to slight increases. The discrepancies between animal and human studies most likely are due to differences between animal and human metabolism. In clinical trials eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the form of fish oils along with antirheumatic drugs improve joint pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; have a beneficial effect in patients with ulcerative colitis; and in combination with drugs, improve the skin lesions, lower the hyperlipidemia from etretinates, and decrease the toxicity of cyclosporin in patients with psoriasis. In various animal models omega 3 fatty acids decrease the number and size of tumors and increase the time

  14. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction a...

  15. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection in persons with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection using two interferon-gamma release assays and tuberculin skin test in a low human immunodeficiency virus prevalence, intermediate tuberculosis-burden country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Sy, Cheng-Len; Wu, Kuan-Sheng; Chen, Jui-Kuang; Tsai, Hung-Chin; Chen, Yao-Shen

    2016-10-01

    The risk of tuberculosis (TB) is higher in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and intravenous drug users (IDUs). We determined the prevalence and risk factors of latent TB infection (LTBI) in individuals with or without HIV infection, including IDUs, in a country with a low HIV prevalence, an intermediate TB burden, and a high Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine coverage using two interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) and the tuberculin skin test (TST). For this prospective, cross-sectional study, HIV-infected and -uninfected patients from a regional hospital and medical center in Taiwan were enrolled. Results of the two IGRAs [QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT)] and the TST were compared. Risk factors for positivity were analyzed. We recruited 233 patients [198 (85%) men; mean age, 39.4 years]. Most patients (74%) were BCG vaccinated. The prevalence of LTBI was estimated to be 22.8% by TST, 15.9% by QFT-G, and 20.6% by QFT-GIT. HIV-infected individuals had fewer positive QFT-GIT [7.0% vs. 28.6%, p < 0.001, adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.28, p = 0.05] and TST results, and more indeterminate QFT-G responses (9.3% vs. 0.7%, p = 0.002). Concordance between IGRAs and TST was very poor in HIV-infected patients (κ < 0.05). Independent risk factors for IGRA positivity were increasing age (QFT-G: aOR = 1.98, p = 0.03; QFT-GIT: aOR = 2.00, p = 0.01) and IDUs (aOR = 4.33, p = 0.05 by QFT-G). HIV-infected persons had a significantly lower response to both IGRAs and TST. High discordance was found between the two generations of IGRAs and between IGRAs and TST. Increasing age, a known risk factor for LTBI, was significantly associated with IGRAs, but not with TST. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Omega-3 fatty acids: potential role in the management of early Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jicha, Gregory A.; Markesbery, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for brain growth and development. They play an important role throughout life, as critical modulators of neuronal function and regulation of oxidative stress mechanisms, in brain health and disease. Docosahexanoic acid (DHA), the major omega-3 fatty acid found in neurons, has taken on a central role as a target for therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A plethora of in vitro, animal model, and human data, gathered over the past decade, highlig...

  17. Deregulation of Interferon Signaling in Malignant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas C. Platanias

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are a family of cytokines with potent antiproliferative, antiviral, and immunomodulatory properties. Much has been learned about IFNs and IFN-activated signaling cascades over the last 50 years. Due to their potent antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo, recombinant IFNs have been used extensively over the years, alone or in combination with other drugs, for the treatment of various malignancies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on IFN signaling components and pathways that are deregulated in human malignancies. The relevance of deregulation of IFN signaling pathways in defective innate immune surveillance and tumorigenesis are discussed.

  18. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for cardiovascular diseases: present, past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Tatsuno, Ichiro

    2017-08-01

    Large-scale epidemiological studies on Greenlandic, Canadian and Alaskan Eskimos have examined the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids consumed as part of the diet, and found statistically significant relative reduction in cardiovascular risk in people consuming omega-3 fatty acids. Areas covered: This article reviews studies on omega-3 fatty acids during the last 50 years, and identifies issues relevant to future studies on cardiovascular (CV) risk. Expert commentary: Although a meta-analysis of large-scale prospective cohort studies and randomized studies reported that fish and fish oil consumption reduced coronary heart disease-related mortality and sudden cardiac death, omega-3 fatty acids have not yet been shown to be effective in secondary prevention trials on patients with multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The ongoing long-term CV interventional outcome studies investigate high-dose, prescription-strength omega-3 fatty acids. The results are expected to clarify the potential role of omega-3 fatty acids in reducing CV risk. The anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3 fatty acids are also important. Future clinical trials should also focus on the role of these anti-inflammatory mediators in human arteriosclerotic diseases as well as inflammatory diseases.

  19. The Omega-3 Fatty Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates Inflammatory Mediator Release in Human Alveolar Cells Exposed to Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid of ARDS Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cotogni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study investigated whether the 1 : 2 ω-3/ω-6 ratio may reduce proinflammatory response in human alveolar cells (A549 exposed to an ex vivo inflammatory stimulus (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS patients. Methods. We exposed A549 cells to the BALF collected from 12 ARDS patients. After 18 hours, fatty acids (FA were added as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, ω-3 and arachidonic acid (AA, ω-6 in two ratios (1 : 2 or 1 : 7. 24 hours later, in culture supernatants were evaluated cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 and prostaglandins (PGE2 and PGE3 release. The FA percentage content in A549 membrane phospholipids, content of COX-2, level of PPARγ, and NF-κB binding activity were determined. Results. The 1 : 2 DHA/AA ratio reversed the baseline predominance of ω-6 over ω-3 in the cell membranes (P < 0.001. The proinflammatory cytokine release was reduced by the 1 : 2 ratio (P < 0.01 to <0.001 but was increased by the 1 : 7 ratio (P < 0.01. The 1 : 2 ratio reduced COX-2 and PGE2 (P < 0.001 as well as NF-κB translocation into the nucleus (P < 0.01, while it increased activation of PPARγ and IL-10 release (P < 0.001. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that shifting the FA supply from ω-6 to ω-3 decreased proinflammatory mediator release in human alveolar cells exposed to BALF of ARDS patients.

  20. Hadronic decay properties of newly observed $\\Omega_c$ baryons

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ze; Ye, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Ailin

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic decay widths of the newly observed charmed strange baryons, $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ have been calculated in a $^3P_0$ model. Our results indicate that $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ can be interpreted as the $1P-$wave $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{3}{2}^-)$ or $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{5}{2}^-)$. Though the measured masses of $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ are lower than existed theo...

  1. [Mechanisms underlying interferon-mediated host innate immunity during influenza A virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Chi, Xiaojuan; Bai, Qingling; Chen, Jilong

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus can create acute respiratory infection in humans and animals throughout the world, and it is still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Numerous studies have shown that influenza A virus infection induces rapidly host innate immune response. Influenza A virus triggers the activation of signaling pathways that are dependent on host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including toll like receptors (TLRs) and RIG-I like receptors (RLRs). Using a variety of regulatory mechanisms, these signaling pathways activate downstream transcript factors that control expression of various interferons and cytokines, such as type I and type III interferons. Thus, these interferons stimulate the transcript of relevant interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and expression of the antiviral proteins, which are critical components of host innate immunity. In this review, we will highlight the mechanisms by which influenza A virus infection induces the interferon-mediated host innate immunity.

  2. Universal graphs at $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}$

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Starting from a supercompact cardinal we build a model in which $2^{\\aleph_{\\omega_1}}=2^{\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}}=\\aleph_{\\omega_1+3}$ but there is a jointly universal family of size $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+2}$ of graphs on $\\aleph_{\\omega_1+1}$. The same technique will work for any uncountable cardinal in place of $\\omega_1$.

  3. Clinical effects of viral relapse after interferon plus ribavirin in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, Juan; Alvarez-Pellicer, Julio; Carrero, Ana; Von Wichmann, Miguel A; López-Aldeguer, José; Mallolas, Josep; Galindo, María J; Van Den Eynde, Eva; Téllez, María J; Quereda, Carmen; Tural, Cristina; Sanz, José; Barros, Carlos; Santos, Ignacio; Pulido, Federico; Guardiola, Josep M; Ortega, Enrique; Rubio, Rafael; Jusdado, Juan J; Montes, María L; Gaspar, Gabriel; Barquilla, Elena; Bellón, José M; González-García, Juan

    2013-06-01

    Sustained viral response (SVR) after therapy with interferon-ribavirin (IF-RB) reduces liver-related (LR) complications and mortality in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Here, we assess the impact of end-of-treatment response with subsequent relapse (REL) on LR events (LR death, liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma, or liver transplantation), and liver stiffness (LS) by transient elastography. We analyzed the GESIDA 3603 Cohort (HIV/HCV-co-infected patients treated with IF-RB in 19 centers in Spain). Response to IF-RB was categorized as SVR, REL, and no response (NR). The study started when IF-RB was stopped and ended at death or the last follow-up visit. Multivariate regression analyses were adjusted for age, sex, HIV category of transmission, CDC clinical category, nadir CD4+ cell count, HCV genotype, HCV-RNA viral load, and liver fibrosis. Of 1599 patients included, response was categorized as NR in 765, REL in 250 and SVR in 584. Median follow-up was more than 4 years in each group. Taking the group of patients with NR as reference, we found that the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of liver-related events (liver-related death, liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation) for patients with REL and for patients with SVR were 0.17 (0.05; 0.50) and 0.03 (0; 0.20), respectively. We also found that SVR was followed by less liver stiffness than both REL and NR. However, REL was associated with less liver stiffness than NR. Best outcomes were achieved with an SVR. However, REL was associated with less LR mortality, decompensation, and liver stiffness than NR. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Microarray study reveals that HIV-1 induces rapid type-I interferon-dependent p53 mRNA up-regulation in human primary CD4+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremblay Michel J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with HIV-1 has been shown to alter expression of a large array of host cell genes. However, previous studies aimed at investigating the putative HIV-1-induced modulation of host gene expression have been mostly performed in established human cell lines. To better approximate natural conditions, we monitored gene expression changes in a cell population highly enriched in human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes exposed to HIV-1 using commercial oligonucleotide microarrays from Affymetrix. Results We report here that HIV-1 influences expression of genes related to many important biological processes such as DNA repair, cellular cycle, RNA metabolism and apoptosis. Notably, expression of the p53 tumor suppressor and genes involved in p53 homeostasis such as GADD34 were up-regulated by HIV-1 at the mRNA level. This observation is distinct from the previously reported p53 phosphorylation and stabilization at the protein level, which precedes HIV-1-induced apoptosis. We present evidence that the HIV-1-mediated increase in p53 gene expression is associated with virus-mediated induction of type-I interferon (i.e. IFN-α and IFN-β. Conclusion These observations have important implications for our understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis, particularly in respect to the virus-induced depletion of CD4+ T cells.

  5. Gamma Interferon Secretion by Human Vγ2Vδ2 T Cells after Stimulation with Antibody against the T-Cell Receptor plus the Toll-Like Receptor 2 Agonist Pam3Cys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, Carl O.; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia A.; Cairo, Cristiana; Tikhonov, Illia; Pauza, C. David

    2006-01-01

    Circulating Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell populations in healthy human beings are poised for rapid responses to bacterial or viral pathogens. We asked whether Vγ2Vδ2 T cells use the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family to recognize pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules and to regulate cell functions. Analysis of expanded Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell lines showed the abundant presence of TLR2 mRNA, implying that these receptors are important for cell differentiation or function. However, multiple efforts to detect TLR2 protein on the cell surface or in cytoplasmic compartments gave inconsistent results. Functional assays confirmed that human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells could respond to the TLR2 agonist (S)-(2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl)-N-palmitoyl-(R)-Cys-(S)-Ser(S)-Lys4-OH trihydrochloride (Pam3Cys), but the response required coincident stimulation through the γδ T-cell receptor (TCR). Dually stimulated cells produced higher levels of cytoplasmic or cell-free gamma interferon and showed increased expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein CD107a on the cell surface. A functional TLR2 that requires coincident TCR stimulation may increase the initial potency of Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell responses at the site of infection and promote the rapid development of subsequent acquired antipathogen immunity. PMID:16861636

  6. Gamma interferon secretion by human Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells after stimulation with antibody against the T-cell receptor plus the Toll-Like receptor 2 agonist Pam3Cys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, Carl O; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Propp, Nadia A; Cairo, Cristiana; Tikhonov, Illia; Pauza, C David

    2006-08-01

    Circulating Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell populations in healthy human beings are poised for rapid responses to bacterial or viral pathogens. We asked whether Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells use the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family to recognize pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules and to regulate cell functions. Analysis of expanded Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell lines showed the abundant presence of TLR2 mRNA, implying that these receptors are important for cell differentiation or function. However, multiple efforts to detect TLR2 protein on the cell surface or in cytoplasmic compartments gave inconsistent results. Functional assays confirmed that human Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells could respond to the TLR2 agonist (S)-(2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl)-N-palmitoyl-(R)-Cys-(S)-Ser(S)-Lys4-OH trihydrochloride (Pam3Cys), but the response required coincident stimulation through the gammadelta T-cell receptor (TCR). Dually stimulated cells produced higher levels of cytoplasmic or cell-free gamma interferon and showed increased expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein CD107a on the cell surface. A functional TLR2 that requires coincident TCR stimulation may increase the initial potency of Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell responses at the site of infection and promote the rapid development of subsequent acquired antipathogen immunity.

  7. FY16 LLNL Omega Experimental Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ali, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benstead, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coppari, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eggert, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Erskine, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Panella, A. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hua, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huntington, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jarrott, L. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lazicki, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Millot, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moody, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ping, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rinderknecht, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubery, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sio, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swadling, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wehrenberg, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In FY16, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 430 target shots in FY16, with 304 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, and 126 shots using just the EP laser system. Approximately 21% of the total number of shots (77 OMEGA shots and 14 EP shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 79% (227 OMEGA shots and 112 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy- Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports. In addition to these experiments, LLNL Principal Investigators led a variety of Laboratory Basic Science campaigns using OMEGA and EP, including 81 target shots using just OMEGA and 42 shots using just EP. The highlights of these are also summarized, following the ICF and HED campaigns. Overall, LLNL PIs led a total of 553 shots at LLE in FY 2016. In addition, LLNL PIs also supported 57 NLUF shots on Omega and 31 NLUF shots on EP, in collaboration with the academic community.

  8. Statistical study of auroral omega bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of very few statistical studies on auroral omega bands motivated us to test-use a semi-automatic method for identifying large-scale undulations of the diffuse aurora boundary and to investigate their occurrence. Five identical all-sky cameras with overlapping fields of view provided data for 438 auroral omega-like structures over Fennoscandian Lapland from 1996 to 2007. The results from this set of omega band events agree remarkably well with previous observations of omega band occurrence in magnetic local time (MLT, lifetime, location between the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, as well as current density estimates. The average peak emission height of omega forms corresponds to the estimated precipitation energies of a few keV, which experienced no significant change during the events. Analysis of both local and global magnetic indices demonstrates that omega bands are observed during substorm expansion and recovery phases that are more intense than average substorm expansion and recovery phases in the same region. The omega occurrence with respect to the substorm expansion and recovery phases is in a very good agreement with an earlier observed distribution of fast earthward flows in the plasma sheet during expansion and recovery phases. These findings support the theory that omegas are produced by fast earthward flows and auroral streamers, despite the rarity of good conjugate observations.

  9. Omega-3 fats: Good for your heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fat . We need these fats to build brain cells and for other important functions. Omega-3s help keep your heart healthy and protected against stroke. They also help improve your heart health ...

  10. 1 {\\Omega}-10 k{\\Omega} high precision transportable setup to calibrate multifunction electrical instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Capra, P P

    2015-01-01

    A temperature controlled 1 {\\Omega}-10 k{\\Omega} standard Resistors transportable setup was developed at National Institute of Metrological Research, (INRIM) for the calibration and adjustment of multifunction electrical instruments. The two Standards consist respectively of two 10 {\\Omega} and 100 k{\\Omega} parallel connected resistors nets inserted in a temperature controlled aluminium box. Novelty of the realization is the oil insertion of the 1 {\\Omega} net with its internal connectors lowering the thermo-electromotive forces (emfs) effects. Short and mid-term stabilities of the setup Standards resulted on the order and in some cases better than other top level 1 {\\Omega} and 10 k{\\Omega} commercial Standards. The transport effect turning off the setup temperature control did not cause appreciable measurement deviations on the two Standards. The Standards uncertainties meet those requested by DMMs and MFCs manufacturers to calibrate and adjust these instruments. A test to adjust a multifunction calibrator...

  11. M 54 + Sagittarius = omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Carretta, E; Gratton, R G; Lucatello, S; Bellazzini, M; Catanzaro, G; Leone, F; Momany, Y; Piotto, G; D'Orazi, V

    2010-01-01

    We derive homogeneous abundances of Fe, O, Na and alpha-elements from high resolution FLAMES spectra for 76 red giant stars in NGC 6715 (M 54) and for 25 red giants in the surrounding nucleus of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy. Our main findings are that: (i) we confirm that M 54 shows intrinsic metallicity dispersion, ~0.19 dex r.m.s.; (ii) when the stars of the Sgr nucleus are included, the metallicity distribution strongly resembles that in omega Cen; the relative contribution of the most metal-rich stars is however different in these two objects; (iii) in both GCs there is a very extended Na-O anticorrelation, signature of different stellar generations born within the cluster, and (iv) the metal-poor and metal-rich components in M 54 (and omega Cen) show clearly distinct extension of the Na-O anticorrelation, the most heavily polluted stars being those of the metal-rich component. We propose a tentative scenario for cluster formation that could explain these features. Finally, similarities and differen...

  12. Functional interferon system is required for clearance of lassa virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Poussard, Allison L; Seregin, Alexey V; Walker, Aida G; Smith, Jennifer K; Aronson, Judith F; Smith, Jeanon N; Soong, Lynn; Paessler, Slobodan

    2012-03-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa hemorrhagic fever (LF) in humans, a deadly disease endemic to West Africa that results in 5,000 to 10,000 deaths annually. Here we present results demonstrating that functional type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling is required for efficient control of LASV dissemination and clearance.

  13. Protozoan parasites and type I interferons: a cold case reopened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiting, Daniel P

    2014-10-01

    Protozoan parasites, such as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, trypanosomes, and Leishmania, are a major cause of disease in both humans and other animals, highlighting the need to understand the full spectrum of strategies used by the host immune system to sense and respond to parasite infection. Although type II interferon (IFN-γ) has long been recognized as an essential antiparasite immune effector, much less is known about the role of type I interferons (IFN-α and -β) in host defense, particularly in vivo. Recent studies are reviewed which collectively highlight that type I IFN can be induced in response to parasite infection and influence the outcome of infection.

  14. 重组人干扰素a-1b治疗小儿上呼吸道感染75例疗效观察%Clinical Observation of 75 Cases of Recombinant Human Interferon a-1b Treatment in Children with Upper Respiratory Tract Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊芙蓉

    2014-01-01

    Is caused by a virus infection symptoms we arecommon clinical pediatrics, but now we have not yet developed a very ef ective antiviral drug. Interferon hasfil ed the blank of this item, interferon was confirmed with broad-spectrum anti-virus, anti-tumor and immune regulation function. Recombinant human interferon a-1b isgenetic engineering interferon and an expression of thehealthy human leukocyte derived interferon gene cloning,because of its remarkable curative ef ect, low side ef ect, not easy to produce such antibodies to neutralize theadvantages, in recent years it has gradual y been appliedin clinical. At present, strictly control the use of antibiotics, viral infection, the use of interferon, can reduce the abuse of antibiotics, is widely used in pediatrics. This article reviews the application of interferon in several common disease in pediatrics.%儿科临床中我们常见的感染症状基本都是病毒引起的,但是现在我们还没有研制出非常有效的抗病毒药物。干扰素的问世填补了这一项的空白,干扰素被证实具有广谱抗病毒、抗肿瘤和免疫调节作作用。重组人干扰素a-1b是一种采用健康人白细胞来源的干扰素基因克隆和表达的基因工程干扰素,由于其疗效显著、副作用低、不易产生中和抗体等优点,近年来已逐渐在临床上得到了应用。目前我国严格控制使用抗生素,病毒性感染疾病使用干扰素,可以减少滥用抗生素,在儿科有广泛的应用。本文主要综述干扰素在儿科常见几种病中的应用。

  15. Omega-3s in food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take into considera...... into consideration when developing food emulsions enriched with omega-3 oils and examples on how oxidation can be reduced in products such as mayonnaise, spreads, milk, yoghurt are also given.......There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take...

  16. Effect of omega-3 on auditory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Omega-3 fatty acid have structural and biological roles in the body 's various systems . Numerous studies have tried to research about it. Auditory system is affected a s well. The aim of this article was to review the researches about the effect of omega-3 on auditory system.Methods: We searched Medline , Google Scholar, PubMed, Cochrane Library and SID search engines with the "auditory" and "omega-3" keywords and read textbooks about this subject between 19 70 and 20 13.Conclusion: Both excess and deficient amounts of dietary omega-3 fatty acid can cause harmful effects on fetal and infant growth and development of brain and central nervous system esspesially auditory system. It is important to determine the adequate dosage of omega-3.

  17. Induction of CD3 delta epsilon omega by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A; Neisig, A; Wallin, H

    1993-01-01

    The effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on the synthesis, assembly and processing of the components of the T cell receptor (TcR) was studied with special focus on the CD3 omega chain. Treatment of the human leukemic T cell line Jurkat with PMA increased the synthesis of the Ti alpha, CD......3 gamma and CG3 zeta chains two- to threefold and the synthesis of Ti beta and CD3 delta epsilon omega complexes five- to sevenfold as assessed by metabolic labeling, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by scanning densitometry. The amount...... of TcR complexes expressed on the cell surface was decreased after 16 h of PMA treatment. Based on these results we propose a role of CD3 omega in retention of TcR complexes. From PMA-treated CEM cells more than 50-fold the amount of CD3 delta epsilon omega complexes was immunoprecipitated as compared...

  18. Construction, expression and characterization of human interferon α2b-(G4S)n-thymosin α1 fusion proteins in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Feng Yang; Han-Ying Yuan; Nan-Song Liu; Xiang-Ling Chen; Bu-Yu Gao; Hong Lu; Yu-Yang Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Interferon α2b (IFNα2b) and thymosin α1 (Tα1) exhibit synergic effects in the treatment of hepatitis B and hepatitis C when used together. For developing a fusion protein drug, fusion proteins of IFNα2b and Tα1 linked by different lengths of (G4S)n (n = 1-3) were constructed and expressed in Pichia pastoris.METHODS: Using PCR and molecular clone techniques, the fusion genes of IFNα2b-(G4S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) were constructed and subcloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pPIC9. After transformation of these plasmids into P. pastoris, the expressed fusion proteins IFNα2b-(G4S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) were obtained. These proteins were purified through diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) affinity chromatography and SuperdexTM 75 gel filtration and analyzed by SDSPAGE and Western blot. Antiviral and E-rosette assays were used to investigate the bioactivities of these fusion proteins.RESULTS: DNA sequencing confirmed that the fusion genes of IFNα2b-(G4 S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) were correctly cloned to the pPIC9 vector. The recombinant IFNα2b(G4 S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) fusion proteins expressed in P. pastoris were purified with DEAE and SuperdexTM 75 gel filtration chromatography. The fusion proteins could be observed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with molecular weight (MW) of 23.2, 22.9, and 22.6 ku, respectively, and reacted to the IFNα2b monoclonal antibody and Tα1 polyclonal antibody. The purified fusion proteins exhibit antiviral activity and can enhance the percentage of E-rosette-forming-cell in E-rosette assay.CONCLUSION: The recombinant IFNα2b-(G4S)n-Tα1 (n = 1-3) fusion proteins were successfully expressed in P. pastoris. Purified fusion proteins exhibit both antiviral activity of IFNα2b and immunomodulatory activity of Tα1 in vitro. These results will be the basis for further evaluation of the fusion proteins' function in vivo.

  19. Differential involvement of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors in human interferon-alpha-induced immobility in the mouse forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Shang, Jing; Zhang, Luyong

    2010-01-01

    Although Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha, CAS 9008-11-1) is a powerful drug in treating several viral infections and certain tumors, a considerable amount of neuropsychiatric side-effects such as depression and anxiety are an unavoidable consequence. Combination with the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (CAS 56296-78-7) significantly improved the situation. However, the potential 5-HT(1A) receptor- and 5-HT(1B) receptor-signals involved in the antidepressant effects are still unclear. The effects of 5-HT(1A) receptor- and 5-HT(1B) receptor signals were analyzed by using the mouse forced swimming test (FST), a predictive test of antidepressant-like action. The present results indicated that (1) fluoxetine (administrated intragastrically, 30 mg/kg; not subactive dose: 15 mg/kg) significantly reduced IFN-alpha-induced increase of the immobility time in the forced swimming test; (2) 5-HT(1A) receptor- and 5-HT(1B) receptor ligands alone or in combination had no effects on IFN-alpha-induced increase of the immobility time in the FST; (3) surprisingly, WAY 100635 (5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, 634908-75-1) and 8-OH-DPAT(5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, CAS 78950-78-4) markedly enhanced the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine at the subactive dose (15 mg/kg, i. g.) on the IFN-alpha-treated mice in the FST. Further investigations showed that fluoxetine combined with WAY 100635 and 8-OH-DPAT failed to produce antidepressant effects in the FST. (4) Co-application of CGS 12066A (5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, CAS 109028-09-3) or GR 127935 (5-HT(1B/1D) receptor antagonist, CAS 148642-42-6) with fluoxetine had no synergistic effects on the IFN-alpha-induced increase of immobility time in FST. (5) Interestingly, co-administration of GR 127935, WAY 100635 and fluoxetine significantly reduced the IFN-alpha-induced increase in immobility time of FST, being more effective than co-administration of WAY 100635 and fluoxetine. All results suggest that (1) compared to

  20. Interferon Beta-1a Intramuscular Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon beta-1a intramuscular injection is used to reduce the number of episodes of symptoms and slow ... and problems with vision, speech, and bladder control). Interferon beta-1a is in a class of medications ...

  1. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon beta-1a subcutaneous injection is used to reduce episodes of symptoms and slow the development of ... and problems with vision, speech, and bladder control). Interferon beta-1a is in a class of medications ...

  2. Assembly of the T-cell antigen receptor. Participation of the CD3 omega chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neisig, A; Vangsted, A; Zeuthen, J

    1993-01-01

    The human TCR is composed of the Ti alpha beta heterodimer in association with the CD3 chains CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta 2. Another chain, referred to as CD3 omega, has recently been described in T cells. CD3 omega is an intracellular protein transiently associated with the CD3 complex during...... the assembly of the TCR in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and it is not expressed on the cell surface. The function of CD3 omega is unknown but it has been suggested that it plays an important role in the assembly of the TCR. We have studied the possible function of CD3 omega in the human leukemic T-cell line...... Jurkat and different variants of this cell line. Cells were metabolically labeled, subjected to lysis, immunoprecipitated, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The results indicate that: 1) CD3 omega associates primarily with the CD3 delta epsilon complex; 2) CD3 omega is not associated with single Ti alpha or Ti...

  3. Excited State Mass spectra of doubly heavy baryons $\\Omega_{cc}$, $\\Omega_{bb}$ and $\\Omega_{bc}$

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the mass spectrum of $\\Omega$ baryon with two heavy quarks and one light quark (\\textit{ccs, bbs and bcs}). The main goal of the paper is to calculate the ground state masses and after that, the positive and negative parity excited states masses are also obtained within a Hypercentral Constituent quark model, using coulomb plus linear potential framework. We also added first order correction to the potential. The mass spectra upto 5S for radial excited states and 1P-5P, 1D-4D and 1F-2F states for orbital excited states are computed for $\\Omega_{cc}$, $\\Omega_{bb}$ and $\\Omega_{bc}$ baryons. Our obtained results are compared with other theoretical predictions which could be a useful complementary tool for the interpretation of experimentaly unknown heavy baryon spectra. The Regge trajectory is constructed in both ($n_r$, $M^{2}$) and ($J$, $M^{2}$) planes for $\\Omega_{cc}$,$\\Omega_{bb}$ and $\\Omega_{bc}$ baryons and their slopes and intercepts are also determined. Magnetic moments of doubly heavy $\\...

  4. Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, J; Adams, J; Carr, C; Demos, S; Feit, M; Mehta, N; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; Rubenchik, A; Spaeth, M

    2006-02-08

    The interaction of intense laser light with dielectric materials is a fundamental applied science problem that is becoming increasingly important with the rapid development of ever more powerful lasers. To better understand the behavior of optical components in large fusion-class laser systems, we are systematically studying the interaction of high-fluence, high-power laser light with high-quality optical components, with particular interest on polishing/finishing and stress-induced defects and surface contamination. We focus on obtaining comparable measurements at three different wavelengths, 1{omega} (1053 nm), 2{omega} (527 nm), and 3{omega} (351 nm).

  5. Effect of interferon on the development of Trypanosoma cruzi in tissue culture "Vero" cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Golgher

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented on the effects of interferon on the intracellular stages of T. cruzi in tissue culture "Vero" cells. Interferon was obtained by infecting monolayers of human amniotic cells with inactivated Newcastle disease virus. Interferon has not affected the cell infection by T. cruzi culture infective stages and neither has it prevented the transformation of amastigote into trypomastigote stages.Interferon obtido através da infecção de células amnióticas humanas por vírus inativado da doença de Newcastle foi incapaz de influir sobre a infectividade de formas de cultura do T. cruzi para células "Vero" de cultura de tecido. A transformação amastigota-tripomastigota também não foi afetada pelo interferon.

  6. Interferon-gamma up-regulates a unique set of proteins in human keratinocytes. Molecular cloning and expression of the cDNA encoding the RGD-sequence-containing protein IGUP I-5111

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Leffers, H; Madsen, Peder

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of proliferating and quiescent primary human keratinocytes with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) (100 U/ml, 23.5 h) followed by two-dimensional gel analysis revealed three proteins, IGUP I-3421 (M(r) = 48,200, pI = 6.06); IGUP I-3524 (M(r) = 56,900, pI = 5.92), a protein homologous to peptide......, which migrated with the AMA variant of keratinocyte protein IEF SSP 5111, is novel although it exhibits weak similarity to cytoskeletal proteins. IGUP I-5111 contains the RGD sequence found in many extracellular glycoprotein ligands of the integrin receptor family and it is found at least partially......-cultured, unfractionated psoriatic keratinocytes failed to reveal up-regulation of any of the three IFN-gamma-induced proteins suggesting that the effect of IFN-gamma in vivo may be modulated by the activity of other cytokine(s) or growth factor(s). Psoriatic keratinocytes were equally sensitive to IFN...

  7. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate therapy for chronic hepatitis B in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis B virus-coinfected individuals for whom interferon-alpha and lamivudine therapy have failed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristig, Maria B; Crippin, Jeffrey; Aberg, Judith A; Powderly, William G; Lisker-Melman, Mauricio; Kessels, Lisa; Tebas, Pablo

    2002-12-15

    A significant proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients are coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Currently available treatments for chronic hepatitis B (interferon [IFN]-alpha and lamivudine [3TC]) have limited long-term utility because of side effects or of the development of resistance. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) is a nucleotide analog with excellent activity in vitro against HBV, which is also active against 3TC-resistant HBV variants. In this 24-week pilot study, the anti-HBV activity of TDF was prospectively evaluated in a cohort of 6 HIV coinfected subjects for whom 3TC and IFN therapy had previously failed. At baseline, all patients were taking 3TC or FTC and were hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B e antigen positive; 4 had cirrhosis. Baseline HBV load was 7.95 log(10) copies/mL. By weeks 12 and 24, HBV load had decreased by 3.1 log(10) copies/mL and 4.3 log(10) copies/mL, respectively. There was a transient increase of transaminases after the initiation of treatment. No patient developed HBe antibodies. TDF is a very promising drug for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in HIV-infected individuals.

  8. Characterization of the promoter of the human gene encoding the high-affinity IgG receptor: Transcriptional induction by. gamma. -interferon is mediated through common DNA response elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearse, R.N.; Feinman, R.; Ravetch, J.V. (DeWitt Wallace Research Lab., New York, NY (United States))

    1991-12-15

    Expression of the high-affinity receptor for IgG (Fc{sub {gamma}}RI) is restricted to cells of myeloid lineage and is induced by {gamma}-interferon (IFN-{gamma}) but not by IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. The organization of the human Fc{sub {gamma}}RI gene has been determined and the DNA elements governing its cell type-restricted transcription and IFN-{gamma} induction are reported here. A 39-nucleotide sequence (IFN-{gamma} response region, or GRR) is defined that is both necessary and sufficient for IFN-{gamma} inducibility. Sequence analysis of the GRR reveals the presence of promoter elements initially defined for the major histocompatibility complex class 2 genes: i.e., X, H, and {gamma}-IRE sequences. Comparison of a number of genes whose expression is induced selectively by IFN-{gamma} indicated that the presence of these elements is a general feature of IFN-{gamma}-responsive genes. The studies suggest that the combination of X, H, and {gamma}-IRE elements is a common motif in the pathway of transcriptional induction by this lymphokine.

  9. Efficient export of human growth hormone, interferon α2b and antibody fragments to the periplasm by the Escherichia coli Tat pathway in the absence of prior disulfide bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanen, Heli I; Walker, Kelly L; Lourdes Velez Suberbie, M; Matos, Cristina F R O; Bönisch, Sarah; Freedman, Robert B; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ruddock, Lloyd W; Robinson, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic proteins are expressed in Escherichia coli and targeted to the periplasm in order to facilitate purification and enable disulfide bond formation. Export is normally achieved by the Sec pathway, which transports proteins through the plasma membrane in a reduced, unfolded state. The Tat pathway is a promising alternative means of export, because it preferentially exports correctly folded proteins; however, the reducing cytoplasm of standard strains has been predicted to preclude export by Tat of proteins that contain disulfide bonds in the native state because, in the reduced state, they are sensed as misfolded and rejected. Here, we have tested a series of disulfide-bond containing biopharmaceuticals for export by the Tat pathway in CyDisCo strains that do enable disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm. We show that interferon α2b, human growth hormone (hGH) and two antibody fragments are exported with high efficiency; surprisingly, however, they are efficiently exported even in the absence of cytoplasmic disulfide formation. The exported proteins acquire disulfide bonds in the periplasm, indicating that the normal disulfide oxidation machinery is able to act on the proteins. Tat-dependent export of hGH proceeds even when the disulfide bonds are removed by substitution of the Cys residues involved, suggesting that these substrates adopt tertiary structures that are accepted as fully-folded by the Tat machinery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. What to Treat with Interferon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Moayed Alavian

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Paucker for the first time in 1962 described that interferon (IFN alpha had an anti-proliferative effect 1. This focused interests on its possible use in treatment of neoplasia. Interferons are naturally occurring proteins with antiviral and antiproliferative properties that help in treatment of cancerous cells. Recently, it has been reported that the expression of IFN-alpha receptors in malignant urothelial cells is significantly higher than in normal urothelial cells. In vitro studies have indicated that IFN-alpha in combination with bacillus Clamette- Guerin (BCG at very low concentrations inhibit the proliferation of human bladder cancerous cells. In vivo studies of intravesical BCG suggest that BCG induces IFN-gamma expression and that the level of induction correlates with clinical response. 2, 3, 4 In stage four of renal cell cancer the responses to cytotoxic chemotherapy generally do not exceed 10% for any regimen and interferon-alpha has been evaluated and approximately a 15% of selected individuals had objective response 5. Other studies have shown that IFN-alpha can produce clinically meaningful tumor regression or disease stabilization in patients with hairy cell leukemia or AIDS- related Kaposi’s sarcoma. In ph-positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, interferon-alpha supplemented with intermittent chemotherapy has been shown to prolong overall survival and delay disease progression compared to patients treated with chemotherapy alone 6. There is enough data regarding the use of IFN-alpha in treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML and Multiple Myeloma (MM 7. Several studies have reported that interferon therapy improves the risk for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and death. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB is the most prevalent cause of chronic liver disease in Iran 8. HBeAg-negative CHB is a potentially severe and progressive and most common form in Mediterranean area. The beneficial effect of IFN-alpha in chronic hepatitis

  11. Combination treatment of human umbilical cord matrix stem cell-based interferon-beta gene therapy and 5-fluorouracil significantly reduces growth of metastatic human breast cancer in SCID mouse lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachakatla, Raja Shekar; Pyle, Marla M; Ayuzawa, Rie; Edwards, Sarah M; Marini, Frank C; Weiss, Mark L; Tamura, Masaaki; Troyer, Deryl

    2008-08-01

    Umbilical cord matrix stem (UCMS) cells that were engineered to express interferon-beta (IFN-beta) were transplanted weekly for three weeks into MDA 231 breast cancer xenografts bearing SCID mice in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The UCMS cells were found within lung tumors but not in other tissues. Although both treatments significantly reduced MDA 231 tumor area in the SCID mouse lungs, the combined treatment resulted in a greater reduction in tumor area than by either treatment used alone. These results indicate that a combination treatment of UCMS-IFN-beta cells and 5-FU is a potentially effective therapeutic procedure for breast cancer.

  12. Inhibitory effect of interferon-gamma on adenovirus replication and late transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistchenko, A S; Diez, R A; Falcoff, R

    1989-06-15

    We have previously shown that human interferon-gamma inhibited adenovirus multiplication in vitro in a dose-dependent fashion. This action was previous to capsid proteins synthesis and did not involve virus adsorption nor penetration. In this report we have analysed viral mRNA levels at early (7 hr post infection (p.i.)) or late (20 hr p.i.) times, as well as DNA replication in Wish cells pretreated with interferon-gamma and infected with adenovirus 5. Controls included untreated cells as well as cells treated with interferon-alpha, to which adenovirus are reported to be resistant. Transcription of adenovirus regions E1, E4, L1 and L2 has been analysed by Northern blot. Adenovirus DNA replication was determined by DNA-DNA hybridization with total adenovirus 2 DNA. We have also searched for adenovirus E1A proteins by immunoblot with a specific monoclonal antibody. Although pretreatment of cells with either interferon-alpha or interferon-gamma resulted in reduced amounts of E1 and E4 mRNA in the early phase of infection (7 hr p.i.), the near complete inhibition of viral DNA and late transcription was only achieved by interferon-gamma. Immunoblot has shown the absence of the 48-kD E1A protein in cells pretreated with interferon-gamma. The lack of this regulatory adenovirus protein may be involved in the inhibitory mechanism of interferon-gamma on adenovirus.

  13. Polar-Direct-Drive Experiments on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk

    2006-06-28

    Polar direct drive (PDD), a promising ignition path for the NIF while the beams are in the indirect-drive configuration, is currently being investigated on the OMEGA laser system by using 40 beams in six rings repointed to more uniformly illuminate the target. The OMEGA experiments are being performed with standard, “warm” targets with and without the use of an equatorial “Saturn-like” toroidally shaped CH ring. Target implosion symmetry is diagnosed with framed x-ray backlighting using additional OMEGA beams and by time-integrated x-ray imaging of the stagnating core.

  14. Interferon-induced Raynaud's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Daniel; Nahir, Abraham Menahem; Hadad, Nuhad

    2002-12-01

    To review the clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of interferon-induced Raynaud's phenomenon. The medical literature was reviewed from 1967 to November 2001 with the assistance of a MEDLINE search using the key words: Raynaud, Interferon, ischemia, thrombosis and necrosis. A qualitative review was performed after the articles were abstracted and the relevant information was summarized. Twenty-four cases of interferon-induced Raynaud's phenomenon (including our patient) are described. Interpheron-alpha was the most common causative agent (14 cases). The symptoms appeared weeks to years after beginning treatment and varied from mild vasospasm to occlusion of digital arteries and tissue necrosis (14 cases), sometimes necessitating finger amputation (6 patients). Digital plethysmography, arteriography and capillaroscopy were valuable diagnostic tools. In 4 cases, cardiac, ophthalmic, or central nervous system drug-induced ischemia accompanied the peripheral Raynaud's phenomenon. Of the 15 cases with a documented outcome, withdrawal of the drug alone resulted in complete (6 patients) or partial (1 patient) recovery. In the others, supportive therapy was needed. The recovery period lasted from 2 weeks to 3 months. In 2 patients, continuation of treatment was possible. Raynaud's phenomenon and related complications must be recognized as possible side effects of interferon therapy. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the drug may prevent unnecessary morbidity and disability. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  15. Omega-6/Omega-3 and PUFA/SFA in Colossoma macropomum Grown in Roraima, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alves Melho Filho

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study was evaluated the fatty acids composition of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum fillet, fish species cultivated in Roraima State, Brazil. For the extraction of tambaqui oil was used Sohxlet device and then it was methylated. The oil  was identified using a gas chromatograph and were identified 24 acids and these were divided into characteristic groups such as: saturated fatty acids (SFA, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and series fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. The ratios obtained were PUFA/SFA and omega-6/omega-3. The results of chromatographic analysis were subjected to tests by variance ANOVA and multiple comparisons of Tukey at 5%. The ratios omega-6/omega-3 and PUFA/SFA showed values ​​of 8.58 and 0.75 respectively.

  16. A study of the lunisolar secular resonance $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$

    CERN Document Server

    Celletti, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of small bodies around the Earth has gained a renewed interest, since the awareness of the problems that space debris can cause in the nearby future. A relevant role in space debris is played by lunisolar secular resonances, which might contribute to an increase of the orbital elements, typically of the eccentricity. We concentrate our attention on the lunisolar secular resonance described by the relation $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$, where $\\omega$ and $\\Omega$ denote the argument of perigee and the longitude of the ascending node of the space debris. We introduce three different models with increasing complexity. We show that the growth in eccentricity, as observed in space debris located in the MEO region at the inclination about equal to $56^\\circ$, can be explained as a natural effect of the secular resonance $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$, while the chaotic variations of the orbital parameters are the result of interaction and overlapping of nearby resonances.

  17. Readily available sources of long-chain omega-3 oils: is farmed Australian seafood a better source of the good oil than wild-caught seafood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Peter D; Glencross, Brett; Petrie, James R; Singh, Surinder P

    2014-03-11

    Seafood consumption enhances intake of omega-3 long-chain (≥C₂₀) polyunsaturated fatty acids (termed LC omega-3 oils). Humans biosynthesize only small amounts of LC-omega-3, so they are considered semi-essential nutrients in our diet. Concern has been raised that farmed fish now contain lower LC omega-3 content than wild-harvested seafood due to the use of oil blending in diets fed to farmed fish. However, we observed that two major Australian farmed finfish species, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and barramundi (Lates calcifer), have higher oil and LC omega-3 content than the same or other species from the wild, and remain an excellent means to achieve substantial intake of LC omega-3 oils. Notwithstanding, LC omega-3 oil content has decreased in these two farmed species, due largely to replacing dietary fish oil with poultry oil. For Atlantic salmon, LC omega-3 content decreased ~30%-50% between 2002 and 2013, and the omega-3/omega-6 ratio also decreased (>5:1 to oils and their incorporation in aquafeeds would allow these health-benefitting oils to be maximized in farmed Australian seafood. Such advances can assist with preventative health care, fisheries management, aquaculture nutrition, an innovative feed/food industry and ultimately towards improved consumer health.

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and their Role in Central Nervous System - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysoczański, Tomasz; Sokoła-Wysoczańska, Ewa; Pękala, Jolanta; Lochyński, Stanisław; Czyż, Katarzyna; Bodkowski, Robert; Herbinger, Grzegorz; Patkowska-Sokoła, Bożena; Librowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are crucial for our health and wellbeing; therefore, they have been widely investigated for their roles in maintaining human health and in disease treatment. Most Western diets include significant amount of saturated and omega-6 fatty acids and insufficient quantity of omega-3; however, the balance between omega-6 and omega-3 PUFA, in particular, is essential for the formation of pro- and anti-inflammatory lipids to promote health and prevent disease. As our daily diet affects our health, this paper draws attention to unique representatives of the omega-3 fatty acid group: alpha-linolenic acid and its derivatives. Recently, this has been shown to be effective in treating and preventing various diseases. It has been confirmed that omega-3 PUFAs may act as therapeutic agents as well and their significant role against inflammatory diseases, such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, has been described. Some of nutritional factors have been described as a significant modifiers, which can influence brain elasticity and thus, effect on central nervous system functioning. Therefore, appropriate dietary management appears to be a non-invasive and effective approach to counteract neurological and cognitive disorders.

  19. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms to produce omega-3 very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yangmin; Wan, Xia; Jiang, Mulan; Hu, Chuanjiong; Hu, Hanhua; Huang, Fenghong

    2014-10-01

    Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have received growing attention due to their significant roles in human health. Currently the main source of these nutritionally and medically important fatty acids is marine fish, which has not met ever-increasing global demand. Microorganisms are an important alternative source also being explored. Although many microorganisms accumulate omega-3 LC-PUFAs naturally, metabolic engineering might still be necessary for significantly improving their yields. Here, we review recent research involving the engineering of microorganisms for production of omega-3 LC-PUFAs, including eicospentaenoic acid and docosohexaenoic acid. Both reconstitution of omega-3 LC-PUFA biosynthetic pathways and modification of existing pathways in microorganisms have demonstrated the potential to produce high levels of omega-3 LC-PUFAs. However, the yields of omega-3 LC-PUFAs in host systems have been substantially limited by potential metabolic bottlenecks, which might be caused partly by inefficient flux of fatty acid intermediates between the acyl-CoA and different lipid class pools. Although fatty acid flux in both native and heterologous microbial hosts might be controlled by several acyltransferases, evidence has suggested that genetic manipulation of one acyltransferase alone could significantly increase the accumulation of LC-PUFAs. The number of oleaginous microorganisms that can be genetically transformed is increasing, which will advance engineering efforts to maximize LC-PUFA yields in microbial strains.

  20. Technological trends and market perspectives for production of microbial oils rich in omega-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, Ana Maria de Oliveira; Mamani, Luis Daniel Goyzueta; Carvalho, Júlio Cesar de; de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2016-08-10

    In recent years, foods that contain omega-3 lipids have emerged as important promoters of human health. These lipids are essential for the functional development of the brain and retina, and reduction of the risk of cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. The global market for omega-3 production, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), saw a large expansion in the last decade due to the increasing use of this lipid as an important component of infant food formulae and supplements. The production of omega-3 lipids from fish and vegetable oil sources has some drawbacks, such as complex purification procedures, unwanted contamination by marine pollutants, reduction or even extinction of several species of fish, and aspects related to sustainability. A promising alternative system for the production of omega-3 lipids is from microbial metabolism of yeast, fungi, or microalgae. The aim of this review is to discuss the various omega-3 sources in the context of the global demand and market potential for these bioactive compounds. To summarize, it is clear that fish and vegetable oil sources will not be sufficient to meet the future needs of the world population. The biotechnological production of single-cell oil comes as a sustainable alternative capable of supplementing the global demand for omega-3, causing less environmental impact.

  1. Effect of dietary selenium and omega-3 fatty acids on muscle composition and quality in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetland Harald

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human health may be improved if dietary intakes of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are increased. Consumption of broiler meat is increasing, and the meat content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are affected by the composition of broiler feed. A two-way analyses of variance was used to study the effect of feed containing omega-3 rich plant oils and selenium enriched yeast on broiler meat composition, antioxidation- and sensory parameters. Four different wheat-based dietary treatments supplemented with 5% rapeseed oil or 4% rapeseed oil plus 1% linseed oil, and either 0.50 mg selenium or 0.84 mg selenium (organic form per kg diet was fed to newly hatched broilers for 22 days. Results The different dietary treatments gave distinct different concentrations of selenium and fatty acids in thigh muscle; one percent linseed oil in the diet increased the concentration of the omega-3 fatty acids 18:3, 20:5 and 22:5, and 0.84 mg selenium per kg diet gave muscle selenium concentration at the same level as is in fish muscle (0.39 mg/kg muscle. The high selenium intake also resulted in increased concentration of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA (20:5, DPA (22:5 and DHA (22:6, thus it may be speculated if high dietary selenium might have a role in increasing the concentration of EPA, DPA and DHA in tissues after intake of plant oils contning omega-3 fatty acids. Conclusion Moderate modifications of broiler feed may give a healthier broiler meat, having increased content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids. High intakes of selenium (organic form may increase the concentration of very long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in muscle.

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids' supplementation in Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canhada, Scheine; Castro, Kamila; Perry, Ingrid Schweigert; Luft, Vivian Cristine

    2017-05-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegeneration disorder characterized by progressive impairments of memory, language, reasoning, and other cognitive functions. Evidence suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may act as a possible protection factor in AD. To evaluate the results available in the literature involving omega-3 fatty acids supplementation and its effect on cognitive function in AD patients. A systematic review of MEDLINE (from PubMed), Excerpta Medica Database, and Cochrane Library databases was conducted according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Inclusion criteria consisted in original intervention studies, controlled by placebo, that assessed the impact of supplementation or dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids on cognitive function, in humans with AD, without limitation for prime date of publication. Initial search resulted in 361 articles. Seven studies fully met the inclusion criteria. Most studies did not find statistically significant results for the omega-3 fatty acids supplementation compared to placebo, and those who show some benefit do it only in a few cognitive assessment scales. However, the effects of omega-3 fatty acids appear to be most effectively demonstrated in patients with very mild AD. The effects of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in mild AD corroborate epidemiological observational studies showing that omega-3 fatty acids may be beneficial in disease onset, when there is slight impairment of brain function. Although some studies have shown changes in scales of cognitive function in more severe cases, they are not enough to support omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in the treatment of AD.

  3. Single point mutations in the helicase domain of the NS3 protein enhance dengue virus replicative capacity in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and circumvent the type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, G F; Strottmann, D M; de Borba, L; Mansur, D S; Zanchin, N I T; Bordignon, J; dos Santos, C N Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease worldwide. The outcome of the infection is determined by the interplay of viral and host factors. In the present study, we evaluated the cellular response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mdDCs) infected with recombinant dengue virus type 1 (DV1) strains carrying a single point mutation in the NS3hel protein (L435S or L480S). Both mutated viruses infect and replicate more efficiently and produce more viral progeny in infected mdDCs compared with the parental, non-mutated virus (vBACDV1). Additionally, global gene expression analysis using cDNA microarrays revealed that the mutated DVs induce the up-regulation of the interferon (IFN) signalling and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) canonical pathways in mdDCs. Pronounced production of type I IFN were detected specifically in mdDCs infected with DV1-NS3hel-mutated virus compared with mdDCs infected with the parental virus. In addition, we showed that the type I IFN produced by mdDCs is able to reduce DV1 infection rates, suggesting that cytokine function is effective but not sufficient to mediate viral clearance of DV1-NS3hel-mutated strains. Our results demonstrate that single point mutations in subdomain 2 have important implications for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of DV1-NS3hel. Although a direct functional connection between the increased ATPase activity and viral replication still requires further studies, these mutations speed up viral RNA replication and are sufficient to enhance viral replicative capacity in human primary cell infection and circumvent type I IFN activity. This information may have particular relevance for attenuated vaccine protocols designed for DV.

  4. A protective lipidomic biosignature associated with a balanced omega-6/omega-3 ratio in fat-1 transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astarita, G.; McKenzie, J.H.; Wang, B.; Strassburg, K.; Doneanu, A.; Johnson, J.; Baker, A.; Hankemeier, T.; Murphy, J.; Vreeken, R.J.; Langridge, J.; Kang, J.X.

    2014-01-01

    A balanced omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio has been linked to health benefits and the prevention of many chronic diseases. Current dietary intervention studies with different sources of omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3) lack appropriate control diets and carry many other confound

  5. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have sugg...

  6. An Increase in the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio Increases the Risk for Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Simopoulos, Artemis P.

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, total fat and saturated fat intake as a percentage of total calories has continuously decreased in Western diets, while the intake of omega-6 fatty acid increased and the omega-3 fatty acid decreased, resulting in a large increase in the omega-6/omega-3 ratio from 1:1 during evolution to 20:1 today or even higher. This change in the composition of fatty acids parallels a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Experimental studies have sugg...

  7. Recombinant human interferon reduces titer of the 1918 pandemic and H5N1 influenza viruses in a guinea pig model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although H5N1 subtype influenza viruses have yet to acquire the ability to transmit efficiently among humans, the geographic expansion, genetic diversity and persistence of H5N1 viruses in birds indicates that pandemic potential of these viruses remains high. Vaccination remains the primary means f...

  8. OMEGA for the Future of Biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    OMEGA: Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae. To develop a photobioreactor (PBR) for growing algae (Oil, food, fertilizer) that does not compete with agriculture for land (deployed offshore), water or fertilizer (uses/treats wastewater).

  9. Lipidomics to Assess Omega 3 Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Visioli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available How can we resolve the conflict between the strong epidemiological evidence pointing to the usefulness of fish—and, thus, omega 3—consumption with the debacle of supplementation trials? One potential explanation is that the null results obtained thus far are the consequences of ill-contrived investigations that do not allow us to conclude on the effects (or lack thereof of omega 3 fatty acid supplementation. One potential solution is through the use of lipidomics, which should prove very useful to screen suitable patients and to correlate plasma (or red blood cells, or whole blood, or phospholipid fatty acid profile with outcomes. This has never been done in omega 3 trials. The wise use of lipidomics should be essential part of future omega 3 trials and would help in untangling this current riddle.

  10. The structure of omega3 food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Loussert, C.; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt

    Fish oil is rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs) which are generally recognized as being beneficial to the health [1]. The addition of fish oil to food products is attractive to both the consumers and the food industry. Indeed, these components will improve nutritional value...... and add product value. Omega-3 PUFAs are rich in double bonds in their fatty acid chains and this attribute renders them highly susceptible to lipid oxidation. Omega-3 PUFAs can be added to food products as neat oil or as a delivery system such as oil-in-water emulsions. In this last configuration...... and the prooxidants. But this protective aspect is a really complex process and it is dependent on the food matrix to which the oil is added [2]. Oxidation is presumed to be initiated at the emulsifier layer, i.e. the interface layer between the oil and water where the oil is most likely to come into contact...

  11. Challenges when developing omega-3 enriched foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JACOBSEN Charlotte

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the polyunsaturated nature of omega-3 fatty acids, lipid oxidation is a major challenge when developing omega-3 enriched foods. In multiphase food systems, several factors can affect lipid oxidation and efficacy of antioxidants, added to prevent lipid oxidation. This review discusses the influence of important factors such as oil quality, delivery systems for omega-3 fatty acids, processing conditions, composition of the food matrix on lipid oxidation in different omega-3 enriched foods (milk, yoghurt, mayonnaise and mayonnaise-based salads, dressing, energy bar and fish paté. Moreover, the effect of different antioxidants (tocopherol, EDTA, lactoferrin, caffeic acid, ascorbic acid, ascorbyl palmitate, propyl gallate, gallic acid, as well as lipophilized antioxidants is compared in different food systems.

  12. Challenges when developing omega-3 enriched foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Due to the polyunsaturated nature of omega-3 fatty acids, lipid oxidation is a major challenge when developing omega-3 enriched foods. In multiphase food systems, several factors can affect lipid oxidation and efficacy of antioxidants, added to prevent lipid oxidation. This review discusses...... the influence of important factors such as oil quality, delivery systems for omega-3 fatty acids, processing conditions, composition of the food matrix on lipid oxidation in different omega-3 enriched foods (milk, yoghurt, mayonnaise and mayonnaise-based salads, dressing, energy bar and fish paté). Moreover......, the effect of different antioxidants (tocopherol, EDTA, lactoferrin, caffeic acid, ascorbic acid, ascorbyl palmitate, propyl gallate, gallic acid, as well as lipophilized antioxidants) is compared in different food systems....

  13. Readily Available Sources of Long-Chain Omega-3 Oils: Is Farmed Australian Seafood a Better Source of the Good Oil than Wild-Caught Seafood?

    OpenAIRE

    Peter D Nichols; Brett Glencross; Petrie, James R.; Surinder P. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Seafood consumption enhances intake of omega-3 long-chain (≥C20) polyunsaturated fatty acids (termed LC omega-3 oils). Humans biosynthesize only small amounts of LC-omega-3, so they are considered semi-essential nutrients in our diet. Concern has been raised that farmed fish now contain lower LC omega-3 content than wild-harvested seafood due to the use of oil blending in diets fed to farmed fish. However, we observed that two major Australian farmed finfish species, Atlantic salmon (Salmo ...

  14. North Pacific Omega Navigation System Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    based upon comparisons with "Loran-C, radar and visual" whose absolute accuracy as references could not be assessed. Similarly, the M/S Nopal Lane...Mellon ..................................... A-82 A5.1.5 M/S Nopal Lane ................... ......... .... .. A-83 A5.1.6 Submarine Omega Performance...From Omega Log of M/S NOPAL LANE .................... A-84 A5-2 Western Airlines Flights - 1978 .......................... A-85 AA-1 Difference Between

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A P; Aggarwal, K K; Zhang, P-Y

    2015-01-01

    Cardioceuticals are nutritional supplements that contain all the essential nutrients including vitamins, minerals, omega-3-fatty acids and other antioxidants like a-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 in the right proportion that provide all round protection to the heart by reducing the most common risks associated with the cardiovascular disease including high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels and factors that contribute to coagulation of blood. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to significantly reduce the risk for sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmias and all-cause mortality in patients with known coronary heart disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are also used to treat hyperlipidemia and hypertension. There are no significant drug interactions with omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends consumption of two servings of fish per week for persons with no history of coronary heart disease and at least one serving of fish daily for those with known coronary heart disease. Approximately 1 g/day of eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid is recommended for cardio protection. Higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids are required to reduce elevated triglyceride levels (2-4 g/day). Modest decreases in blood pressure occur with significantly higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids.

  16. In vitro generation of human cytotoxic lymphocytes by virus. Viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific cell-mediated cytotoxicity without release of interferon

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Purified hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins of measles virus either in soluble form or inserted in artifical membranes bind to human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in a dose-response fashion. Both autologous and heterologous noninfected target cells are lysed in vitro. The expression of CMC is not inhibited by anti-measles virus antibody added to lymphocytes previously exposed to viral glycoproteins. THe killer lymphocytes are Fc receptor positive...

  17. Simultaneous RNA quantification of human and retroviral genomes reveals intact interferon signaling in HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moens Britta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IFN-α contributes extensively to host immune response upon viral infection through antiviral, pro-apoptotic, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Although extensively documented in various types of human cancers and viral infections, controversy exists in the exact mechanism of action of IFN-α in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 retroviral infections. Results IFN-α displayed strong anti-HIV-1 effects in HIV-1/HTLV-1 co-infected MT-4 cells in vitro, demonstrated by the dose-dependent inhibition of the HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect (IC50 = 83.5 IU/ml, p 50 = 1.2 IU/ml, p  Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that both the absence of in vitro antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activity as well as the modest post-transcriptional antiviral activity of IFN-α against HTLV-1, were not due to a cell-intrinsic defect in IFN-α signalisation, but rather represents a retrovirus-specific phenomenon, considering the strong HIV-1 inhibition in co-infected cells.

  18. Dietary omega-3 Fatty acids and psychiatry: mood, behaviour, stress, depression, dementia and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, J M

    2005-01-01

    In view of the high omega-3 poly unsaturated fatty acid content of the brain, it is evident that these fats are involved in brain biochemistry, physiology and functioning; and thus in some neuropsychiatric diseases and in the cognitive decline of ageing. Though omega-3 fatty acids (from fatty fish in the human diet) appear effective in the prevention of stress, their role as regulator of mood and of libido is a matter for discussion pending experimental proof in animal and human models. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids play a role in the prevention of some disorders including depression, as well as in dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. Their direct role in major depression, bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disease) and schizophrenia is not yet established. Their deficiency can prevent the renewal of membranes, and thus accelerate cerebral ageing; none the less, the respective roles of the vascular component on one hand (where the omega-3's are active) and the cerebral parenchyma itself on the other, have not yet been clearly resolved. The role of omega-3 in certain diseases such as dyslexia and autism is suggested. In fact, omega-3 fatty acids participated in the first coherent experimental demonstration of the effect of dietary substances (nutrients) on the structure and function of the brain. Experiments were first of all carried out one x-vivo cultured brain cells (1), then on in vivo brain cells(2), finally on physiochemical, biochemical, physiological, neurosensory, and behavioural parameters (3). These findings indicated that the nature of poly unsaturated fatty acids(in particular omega-3) present in formula milks for infants (both premature and term) determines the visual, cerebral,and intellectual abilities, as described in a recent review (4). Indeed,the insufficient dietary supply of omega-3 fatty acids in today's French and occidental diet raises the problem of how to correct dietary habits so that the consumer will select foods that are genuinely

  19. Activation of innate immunity in healthy Macaca mulatta macaques by a single subcutaneous dose of GMP CpG 7909: safety data and interferon-inducible protein-10 kinetics for humans and macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, V Ann; McGrath, Shannon; Krieg, Arthur M; Larson, Noelle S; Angov, Evelina; Smith, Christopher L; Brewer, Thomas G; Heppner, D Gray

    2008-02-01

    Following a demonstration that mouse-optimized cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides stimulated innate immune protection against intracellular pathogens, we tested the ability of CpG 7909, a primate-optimized Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, to stimulate rhesus macaques to produce interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), a biomarker of immune activation. This study was performed prior to a similar trial with humans in order to facilitate the development of CpG 7909 as an immunomodulator for biodefense. A single subcutaneous dose of clinical-grade CpG 7909 was given to four groups of healthy adult rhesus macaques (0-mg dose [n = 5], 0.75-mg dose [n = 9], 1.5-mg dose [n = 9], and 3.0-mg dose [n = 9]). Directed physical examination findings, clinical laboratory values, and serum IP-10 concentrations were collected at scheduled intervals for 28 days. All three dose levels of CpG 7909 were safe and not associated with significant clinical or laboratory abnormality. The time to peak serum IP-10 concentration was 1.0 days at the 0.75-mg dose and 0.5 days at the 1.5- and 3.0-mg doses. A dose-dependent response was observed for the magnitude and duration of IP-10 concentrations, which remained significantly above baseline for 3 days for the 3.0-mg and 1.5-mg dose groups but above baseline for only 2 days for the 0.75-mg dose group. There were no nonresponders to CpG 7909. These rhesus macaque safety and IP-10 response data closely parallel a subsequent phase 1 human study of subcutaneously administered CpG 7909. A single dose of clinical-grade CpG 7909 induced a rapid, sustained IP-10 response, a biomarker for activation of the innate immune system. Given the similar susceptibilities of humans and rhesus macaques to infectious diseases, the rhesus macaque appears to be a suitable model to evaluate the potential of CpG 7909-mediated innate immune activation to protect humans against pathogens.

  20. Interferon lambda 4 signals via the IFNλ receptor to regulate antiviral activity against HCV and coronaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamming, Ole Jensen; Terczynska-Dyla, Ewa; Vieyres, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    The IFNL4 gene is a recently discovered type III interferon, which in a significant fraction of the human population harbours a frameshift mutation abolishing the IFNλ4 ORF. The expression of IFNλ4 is correlated with both poor spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and poor response...... to treatment with type I interferon. Here, we show that the IFNL4 gene encodes an active type III interferon, named IFNλ4, which signals through the IFNλR1 and IL-10R2 receptor chains. Recombinant IFNλ4 is antiviral against both HCV and coronaviruses at levels comparable to IFNλ3. However, the secretion...

  1. Increased [omega]6-Containing Phospholipids and Primary [omega]6 Oxidation Products in the Brain Tissue of Rats on an [omega]3-Deficient Diet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul H Axelsen; Robert C Murphy; Miki Igarashi; Stanley I Rapoport

    2016-01-01

      Polyunsaturated fatty acyl (PUFA) chains in both the [omega]3 and [omega]6 series are essential for normal animal brain development, and cannot be interconverted to compensate for a dietary deficiency of one or the other...

  2. The effect of interleukin-13 (IL-13 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ on expression of surfactant proteins in adult human alveolar type II cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant proteins are produced predominantly by alveolar type II (ATII cells, and the expression of these proteins can be altered by cytokines and growth factors. Th1/Th2 cytokine imbalance is suggested to be important in the pathogenesis of several adult lung diseases. Recently, we developed a culture system for maintaining differentiated adult human ATII cells. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of IL-13 and IFN-γ on the expression of surfactant proteins in adult human ATII cells in vitro. Additional studies were done with rat ATII cells. Methods Adult human ATII cells were isolated from deidentified organ donors whose lungs were not suitable for transplantation and donated for medical research. The cells were cultured on a mixture of Matrigel and rat-tail collagen for 8 d with differentiation factors and human recombinant IL-13 or IFN-γ. Results IL-13 reduced the mRNA and protein levels of surfactant protein (SP-C, whereas IFN-γ increased the mRNA level of SP-C and proSP-C protein but not mature SP-C. Neither cytokine changed the mRNA level of SP-B but IFN-γ slightly decreased mature SP-B. IFN-γ reduced the level of the active form of cathepsin H. IL-13 also reduced the mRNA and protein levels of SP-D, whereas IFN-γ increased both mRNA and protein levels of SP-D. IL-13 did not alter SP-A, but IFN-γ slightly increased the mRNA levels of SP-A. Conclusions We demonstrated that IL-13 and IFN-γ altered the expression of surfactant proteins in human adult ATII cells in vitro. IL-13 decreased SP-C and SP-D in human ATII cells, whereas IFN-γ had the opposite effect. The protein levels of mature SP-B were decreased by IFN-γ treatment, likely due to the reduction in active form cathpesin H. Similarly, the active form of cathepsin H was relatively insufficient to fully process proSP-C as IFN-γ increased the mRNA levels for SP-C and proSP-C protein, but there was no increase in mature SP-C. These observations

  3. SnapShot: Interferon Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Kwan T; Gale, Michael

    2015-12-17

    Interferons (IFNs) are crucial cytokines of antimicrobial, antitumor, and immunomodulatory activity. The three types of IFN (I, II, and III) are classified by their receptor specificity and sequence homology. IFNs are produced and secreted by cells in response to specific stimuli. Here, we review the subsequent IFN signaling events occurring through unique receptors leading to regulation of gene expression for modulation of innate and adaptive immunity. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF.

  4. Phleboviruses and the Type I Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Deborah Wuerth

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae contains a number of emerging virus species which pose a threat to both human and animal health. Most prominent members include Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV, sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV, Toscana virus (TOSV, Punta Toro virus (PTV, and the two new members severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV and Heartland virus (HRTV. The nonstructural protein NSs is well established as the main phleboviral virulence factor in the mammalian host. NSs acts as antagonist of the antiviral type I interferon (IFN system. Recent progress in the elucidation of the molecular functions of a growing list of NSs proteins highlights the astonishing variety of strategies employed by phleboviruses to evade the IFN system.

  5. Developmentally dependent and different roles of fatty acids OMEGA-6 and OMEGA-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourek, J; Mourek, J

    2011-01-01

    The developmentally-dependent differences in the biological significances and effects of PUFA-OMEGA-6 (namely of arachidonic acid) and PUFA-OMEGA-3 (namely of docosahexaenoic acid) are discussed. The clinical results as well as developmental experiences are indicating a hypothesis of the evolution...

  6. Measurements of B meson decays to (omega)K* and (omega)(rho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; . Wright, D M; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R H; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Y G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn' ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Keith, D W . S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O' Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, H; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va' vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Collaboration, B

    2006-03-14

    The authors describe searches for B meson decays to the charmless vector-vector final states {omega}K* and {omega}{rho} in 89 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV.

  7. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenna, J Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku;

    2015-01-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are a key component of a life-saving treatment for young children who present with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition in resource limited settings. Increasing recognition of the role of balanced dietary omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (P...

  8. Effective action for. omega. -> 3. pi. ,. omega. ->. pi gamma. and rho ->. pi gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golterman, M.F.L.

    1988-10-31

    It is argued that the decay widths for ..omega.. -> 3..pi.., ..omega.. -> ..pi gamma.. and rho -> ..pi gamma.. do not follow from the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten action. An alternative effective action for these decays is constructed and its parameters are fitted to the experimental values of the widths.

  9. Bioengineered Plants Can Be a Useful Source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Amjad Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids have proven to be very essential for human health due to their multiple health benefits. These essential fatty acids (EFAs need to be uptaken through diet because they are unable to be produced by the human body. These are important for skin and hair growth as well as for proper visual, neural, and reproductive functions of the body. These fatty acids are proven to be extremely vital for normal tissue development during pregnancy and infancy. Omega-3 fatty acids can be obtained mainly from two dietary sources: marine and plant oils. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5 n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6 n-3 are the primary marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids. Marine fishes are high in omega-3 fatty acids, yet high consumption of those fishes will cause a shortage of fish stocks existing naturally in the oceans. An alternative source to achieve the recommended daily intake of EFAs is the demand of today. In this review article, an attempt has, therefore, been made to discuss the importance of omega-3 fatty acids and the recent developments in order to produce these fatty acids by the genetic modifications of the plants.

  10. Long-chain omega-3 from low-trophic-level fish provides value to farmed seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibus, Douglas M

    2015-03-01

    Low-trophic-level fish are a crucial source of long-chain (LC) omega-3 fatty acids for farmed fish and humans. Many farm-raised fish species have a clear need for these nutrients. Farmed fish deposit the LC omega-3s in their flesh and transfer them up the food chain. However, the content of LC omega-3s in farm-raised seafood continues to decline, while the content of shorter-chain plant-sourced omega-3s, and pro-inflammtory omega-6s continue to increase. This reduces its nutritional worth. The value of low-trophic-level fish is often viewed merely as its price at the dock. Some reports and metrics steer public attention towards the mass balance between quantities of low-trophic-level fish and farmed seafood. However, the the nutritional value of seafood is more important than its mere quantities. The role of low-trophic-level fish in human nutrition, health, and wellbeing is a fundamental component of its economic value to society.

  11. Are There Changes in the Fatty Acid Profile of Breast Milk with Supplementation of Omega-3 Sources? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Yasmin Notarbartolo di Villarosa do; Marano, Daniele; Silva, Leila Maria Lopes da; Guimarães, Aline Carnevale Lia Dias; Moreira, Maria Elisabeth Lopes

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of supplementation with omega-3 sources on the fatty acid composition of human milk. Methods The review consisted of the search for articles published in PubMed, Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde (Virtual Health Library[VHL]) and Web of Science databases using the following keywords: fatty acids, omega-3, human milk and supplementation; for this purpose, we have used the program of research to integrate the services for the maintenance of autonomy (PRISMA) checklist. The following selection criteria were used: articles in English, Portuguese, Spanish or Italian, published between 2000 and 2015, and about studies performed in humans. We found 710 articles that met the established criteria; however, only 22 of them were selected to be part of this study. Results All studies found a positive relationship between the consumption of omega-3 sources and their concentration in human milk. The differences in the findings are due to the distinct methods used, such as the specific time of the omega-3 supplementation, the type of omega-3 source offered, as well as the sample size. Conclusion Although the studies were different in several methodological aspects, it was possible to observe the importance of omega-3 supplementation during gestation and/or the puerperium. Thieme-Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  12. Observation of B Meson Decays to omegapi+, omegaK+, and omegaK0

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; Le Clerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmücker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; MacKay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dorsten, M P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Bozzi, C; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Grenier, G J; Lee, S J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljevic, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graugès-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Ernst, J A; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-01-01

    We present preliminary measurements of B meson decays to omegapi+, omegaK+, and omegaK0. The data were recorded with the BABAR detector and correspond to 88.9x10^6 BBbar pairs produced in e+e- annihilation at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We find statistically significant signals for all three channels: B(B->omegapi+)=(5.4+/-1.0+/-0.5)x10^-6, B(B->omegaK+)=(5.0+/ -1.0+/-0.4)x10^-6, and B(B->omegaK0)=(5.3^+1.4_-1.2+/-0.5)x10^-6. We also measure time-integrated charge asymmetries A_ch(omegapi+)=0.04+/-0.17+/-0.0 1 and A_ch(omegaK+)=-0.05+/-0.16+/-0.01.

  13. Impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on vascular function and blood pressure: Relevance for cardiovascular outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, G; Catena, C; Novello, M; Bertin, N; Sechi, L A

    2017-03-01

    To overview the effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on blood vessels and blood pressure (BP) and their relevance for cardiovascular prevention. The importance of omega-3 PUFA for the cardiovascular system has come under the spotlight during the last decades. These fatty acids are present in variable amounts in cell membranes of mammal species, and their content affects a variety of cellular functions. Evidence obtained in animal and human studies suggests that omega-3 PUFA affect many steps of the atherosclerotic process. In blood vessels, omega-3 PUFA improve endothelial function; promote vasodilatation through relaxation of smooth muscle cells; exert antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic actions; delay development of plaques and increase their stability; and decrease wall stiffening. Omega-3 PUFA might affect BP, and studies conducted with ambulatory monitoring suggest that supplementation with these fatty acids decreases the average 24-h BP levels. This effect on BP is related to the pretreatment membrane content of omega-3 PUFA, and this might explain some inconsistencies among intervention trials. Meta-analyses indicate that omega-3 PUFA have a mild but significant BP lowering effect. While encouraging results were initially obtained with the use of omega-3 PUFA supplements in secondary prevention trials, meta-analyses have not confirmed the ability of these fatty acids to decrease the risk of coronary heart and cerebrovascular disease. Omega-3 PUFA are associated with significant improvement in vascular function and lowering of BP. However, the evidence currently supporting the role of these fatty acids in cardiovascular prevention is weak and needs further investigation. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  14. 3(omega) Damage: Growth Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, M; Demos, S; Wu, Z-L; Wong, J; Penetrante, B; Hrubesh, L

    2001-02-22

    The design of high power UV laser systems is limited to a large extent by the laser-initiated damage performance of transmissive fused silica optical components. The 3{omega} (i.e., the third harmonic of the primary laser frequency) damage growth mitigation LDRD effort focused on understanding and reducing the rapid growth of laser-initiated surface damage on fused silica optics. Laser-initiated damage can be discussed in terms of two key issues: damage initiated at some type of precursor and rapid damage growth of the damage due to subsequent laser pulses. The objective of the LDRD effort has been the elucidation of laser-induced damage processes in order to quantify and potentially reduce the risk of damage to fused silica surfaces. The emphasis of the first two years of this effort was the characterization and reduction of damage initiation. In spite of significant reductions in the density of damage sites on polished surfaces, statistically some amount of damage initiation should always be expected. The early effort therefore emphasized the development of testing techniques that quantified the statistical nature of damage initiation on optical surfaces. This work led to the development of an optics lifetime modeling strategy that has been adopted by the NIF project to address damage-risk issues. During FY99 interest shifted to the damage growth issue which was the focus of the final year of this project. The impact of the remaining damage sites on laser performance can be minimized if the damage sites did not continue to grow following subsequent illumination. The objectives of the final year of the LDRD effort were to apply a suite of state-of-the-art characterization tools to elucidate the nature of the initiated damage sites, and to identify a method that effectively mitigates further damage growth. Our specific goal is to understand the cause for the rapid growth of damage sites so that we can develop and apply an effective means to mitigate it. The

  15. DMPD: Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979567 Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...orrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. Authors Honda K

  16. Conjugated linoleic acid or omega 3 fatty acids increase mitochondrial biosynthesis and metabolism in skeletal muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan Roger A; Garcia-Smith Randi; Bisoffi Marco; Conn Carole A; Trujillo Kristina A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Polyunsaturated fatty acids are popular dietary supplements advertised to contribute to weight loss by increasing fat metabolism in liver, but the effects on overall muscle metabolism are less established. We evaluated the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) or combination omega 3 on metabolic characteristics in muscle cells. Methods Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells were treated with either DMSO control, or CLA or combination omega 3 for 24 or 48 hours. RNA was determine...

  17. Rare B Meson Decays With Omega Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei; /Colorado U.

    2006-04-24

    Rare charmless hadronic B decays are particularly interesting because of their importance in understanding the CP violation, which is essential to explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe, and of their roles in testing the ''effective'' theory of B physics. The study has been done with the BABAR experiment, which is mainly designed for the study of CP violation in the decays of neutral B mesons, and secondarily for rare processes that become accessible with the high luminosity of the PEP-II B Factory. In a sample of 89 million produced B{bar B} pairs on the BABAR experiment, we observed the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup +} for the first time, made more precise measurements for B{sup +} {yields} {omega}h{sup +} and reported tighter upper limits for B {yields} {omega}K* and B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{rho}{sup 0}.

  18. Immunomodulatory intervention with interferon-γ in Escherichia coli pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaris, Matthew P; Adamis, Theodoros; Pistiki, Aikaterini; Carrer, Dionyssia-Pinelopi; Galani, Irene; Sabracos, Labros; Droggiti, Dionyssia-Irini; Georgitsi, Marianna; Damoraki, Georgia; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Chrisofos, Michael

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the efficacy of recombinant human interferon-γ in experimental pyelonephritis due to Escherichia coli. Pyelonephritis was induced by intrapelvic inoculation of bacteria after ureteral ligation in 38 rabbits assigned to 1 of 3 groups, including group 1-16 controls, group 2-14 rabbits treated with intravenous recombinant human interferon-γ and group 3-8 rabbits treated with intravenous recombinant human interferon-γ plus amikacin. Bacterial counts, cytokines and malondialdehyde were measured in blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated to measure TNFα transcripts, cytokine stimulation and apoptosis. Survival was recorded, and the tissue bacterial load and myeloperoxidase activity were measured after sacrifice. The mortality rate in groups 1, 2 and 3 was 66.7%, 25% and 12.5%, respectively. The circulating bacterial count and tissue bacterial load were less in group 2 than in group 1. Circulating malondialdehyde negatively correlated with the bacterial load of the spleen. Although the number of TNFα transcripts in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells did not differ, peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from group 2 at 48 hours produced much greater concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α after stimulation with Pam3Cys. In parallel, the apoptosis rate of circulating monocytes was increased in group 2 at 48 hours. Lung myeloperoxidase activity at 24 hours, serving as indirect evidence of neutrophil infiltration, was decreased in group 2. Recombinant human interferon-γ administration prolonged survival in rabbits with experimental E. coli urosepsis. Its action was probably related to increased bacterial phagocytosis after modulation of oxidant status and reversal of monocyte immunoparalysis. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF GAMMA-INTERFERON COMBINED WITH 5-FLUOROURACIL OR 5-FLUORO-2'-DEOXYURIDINE ON PROLIFERATION AND ANTIGEN EXPRESSION IN A PANEL OF HUMAN COLORECTAL-CANCER CELL-LINES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAAS, IWHM; BOVEN, E; PINEDO, HM; SCHLUPER, HMM; Haisma, Hidde

    1991-01-01

    Gamma-Interferon (IFN-gamma) and the antimetabolites 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and S-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUdR) were investigated as individual agents and in combination for their in vitro antiproliferative capacity and for their effect on the expression of HLA class-I antigen, carcinoembryonic antig

  20. Reduced bone breakage and increased bone strength in free range laying hens fed omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplemented diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlton, John F; Wilkins, Lindsay J; Toscano, Michael J; Avery, Nick C; Knott, Lynda

    2013-02-01

    The omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are the immediate precursors to a number of important mediators of immunity, inflammation and bone function, with products of omega-6 generally thought to promote inflammation and favour bone resorption. Western diets generally provide a 10 to 20-fold deficit in omega-3 PUFAs compared with omega-6, and this is thought to have contributed to the marked rise in incidence of disorders of modern human societies, such as heart disease, colitis and perhaps osteoporosis. Many of our food production animals, fed on grains rich in omega-6, are also exposed to a dietary deficit in omega-3, with perhaps similar health consequences. Bone fragility due to osteoporotic changes in laying hens is a major economic and welfare problem, with our recent estimates of breakage rates indicating up to 95% of free range hens suffer breaks during lay. Free range hens housed in full scale commercial systems were provided diets supplemented with omega-3 alpha linolenic acid, and the skeletal benefits were investigated by comparison to standard diets rich in omega-6. There was a significant 40-60% reduction in keel bone breakage rate, and a corresponding reduction in breakage severity in the omega-3 supplemented hens. There was significantly greater bone density and bone mineral content, alongside increases in total bone and trabecular volumes. The mechanical properties of the omega-3 supplemented hens were improved, with strength, energy to break and stiffness demonstrating significant increases. Alkaline phosphatase (an osteoblast marker) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (an osteoclast marker) both showed significant incr