WorldWideScience

Sample records for human interest story

  1. Telling the Human Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  2. Twins' injuries: genetic and environmental risks / twin research reports / human interest stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nancy L

    2011-04-01

    The relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to unintentional injuries are of interest to families with young twins. A recent study found that childhood injuries are explained mostly by child-specific environmental factors. Next, twin research reviews of the association between periodontal disease and cancer, secular trends in gestational age and birthweight, and language development in hearing and deaf co-twins are also summarized. Interesting reports of newborn twins, twin-like relationships, twin interactions and missed twin relationships are presented.

  3. Stories and Interests in Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froud, Julie; Nilsson, Adriana; Moran, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The financial crisis can be understood in many different terms. In this article, it is analyzed in terms of the unfolding of a series of elite narratives that shaped the agenda of regulation before the crisis, that were damaged by the crisis, and that were then reframed and recounted again...... in the wake of the crisis. The form of these stories differs in subtle ways by jurisdiction, and thus the fate of postcrisis regulatory practice likewise differs....

  4. Regaining our humanity through story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Mackenzie, Elizabeth; Sierpina, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this issue of Innovations in Integrative Healthcare Education, we are departing from our usual format of spotlighting specific projects or programs in lieu of presenting a more extended piece by MacKenzie on relationship-centered care and narrative medicine. The importance of these topics cannot be overestimated in their role of humanizing the healthcare encounter, improving self-awareness of the practitioner, and creating a space in which the patient feels deeply listened to. A commentary by Dr Michelle Sierpina is also included in this special section to put into context the power of narrative in medicine and in patients' lives. Her recent PhD focused on the power of life stories told by seniors; that research and training enables her to provide a broad and scholarly review of the power of story in relation to MacKenzie's article. In the medical school at University of Texas Medical Branch, we send out first-year medical students in the first couple of months of the first semester to patients' homes to just get their story, not a medical history, as part of a required course on the practice of medicine. Many students find this immensely anxiety provoking, due to the lack of structure and familiar context. However, ultimately they find an opportunity to encounter a real person in a nonclinical setting. A scoring rubric based on the construction and quality of a short story allows us to grade the students objectively. However, a most interesting finding, which we expect to present at the Ottawa Conference in Australia next spring, is the process of personal transformation that such story writing has for students. This is also reported by MacKenzie in her article and in Sierpina's accompanying commentary. The importance of capturing and understanding the patient's story is also a major focus in nurse practitioner programs across the United States, where the art of listening and the importance of patient narratives have long been emphasized. In an integrative

  5. Rangifer and human interests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Anderson

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews biological and anthropological literatute on wild and tame Rangifer to demonstrate the powerful effect that this species has had on the imaginations of biologists, social scientists and local hunters. Through identifying a general 'human interest' in Rangifer, the author argues that there is great potential for these three communities to work together. To demonstrate this idea, the paper reviews several examples of successful and unsuccessful 'alliances' between local peoples and both natural and social scientists which have had a fundamental impact upon the history of these sciences. The paper examines recent theorerical models which suggest that human action is a major factor in the behaviour and ecology of the animals. The paper also analyses the ideas of many indigenous people for whom there is no categorical difference between semi-domesticated, semi-sedentary and migratory Rangifer through comparison with many 'anomalous' texts in English and Russian language wildlife biology. By reviewing the history of scholarly interest in Rangifer, the author argues that contemporary models of Rangifer behaviour and identity could be 'revitalised' and 'recalibrated' through the establishment of that dialogue between scientists and local peoples which so characterised the 19th century. Such a dialogue, it is argued, would help mediate many of the political conflicts now appearing in those districts where Rangifer migrate.

  6. COMMUNICATIVE INTERACTION ACTIVITIES USING HUMAN INTEREST STORIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Shunling

    1983-01-01

    @@ As an EFL teacher actively engaged in promoting communicative approach in teaching post-intermediate students I have been all the time aware of the risks involved in classroom discussion and debate in the target language. Despite elaborate preparations on thepart of both teacher and students and numerous encouraging cues from the teacher to induce an adequate interaction during the session, the end product is anything but satisfactory: few more able students may hog the show for a few minutes while the rest clamp up, then stony silence dominates and the teacher has recourse to monologue.

  7. Using the Branching Story Approach to Motivate Students’ Interest in Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan ALDURABY

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This action research was to answer the pedagogical question: How effective can a branching story approach be as a motivational tool for elementary reading instruction? A branching story was created with hyperlinks built into a Powerpoint story. The young readers could interact with options at different turning points of the story, which activated the readers’ curiosity, and promoted their decision making and thinking skills. The study was carried out in an all girl school, Saudi Arabia. A class of 20 fourth-graders participated in the study. For data collection and analyses, the students were assigned into four groups based on their previous reading achievements and interests. Students’ responses to comprehension questions were tabulated. The unit-end survey results were analyzed. A majority of the participating students overwhelmingly enjoyed the experience.

  8. Human Interest or Hard Numbers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Asmus Leth

    2017-01-01

    The abundance of quantitative performance information has motivated multiple studies about how citizens make sense of “hard” performance data. However, research in psychology emphasizes that episodic information (e.g., case stories) often leaves a greater mark on citizens. This contradiction is t...

  9. The effects of human interest framing in television news coverage of medical advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2013-01-01

    The last few decades have witnessed the increasing dissemination of information on medical advances such as new medical treatments and prevention/diagnosis technologies through television news. To engage lay audiences with complex information, medical journalists often personalize news stories about medical advances by exemplifying individual patients and their personal experiences. This study investigates the effects of this journalistic technique, which is referred to as human interest framing, on audiences. The results of an experiment provide empirical evidence that the human interest framing of medical news stories can increase audiences' involvement in those stories and facilitate their positive perception of medical advances.

  10. The Human Transcriptome: An Unfinished Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Pertea

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent technological advances, the study of the human transcriptome is still in its early stages. Here we provide an overview of the complex human transcriptomic landscape, present the bioinformatics challenges posed by the vast quantities of transcriptomic data, and discuss some of the studies that have tried to determine how much of the human genome is transcribed. Recent evidence has suggested that more than 90% of the human genome is transcribed into RNA. However, this view has been strongly contested by groups of scientists who argued that many of the observed transcripts are simply the result of transcriptional noise. In this review, we conclude that the full extent of transcription remains an open question that will not be fully addressed until we decipher the complete range and biological diversity of the transcribed genomic sequences.

  11. Paradigm Lost: The Human Chromosome Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Lawrence; Blystone, Robert V.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses whether the discovery in 1956 that humans have a chromosome number of 46, as opposed to 47 or 48 as previously thought, fits into a paradigm shift of the Kuhnian type. Concludes that Kuhn probably would not have considered the chromosome number shift to be large enough to be a focus for one of his paradigms. (AIM)

  12. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical "big data" sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover power-law scaling associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk ...

  13. The human story of Crew 173- capturing a Mars analog mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Niamh; Musilova, Michaela; Pons Lorente, Arnau; Sisaid, Idriss; Naor, Roy; Blake, Richard

    2017-04-01

    An international crew of six scientists, engineers, artists and entrepreneurs with different space specialisations were selected by the Mars Society to take part in a Martian simulation in January 2017. An ambitious outreach and media strategy was developed, aimed at communicating the benefits of missions to Mars to the public and to capture the public's interest by telling the human story of the crew's mission. Entitled Crew 173 Team PRIMA, they entered the Mars Desert Research Station in the Utah Desert and conducted research in 3D printing, hydroponics, geology and astronomy. Both the scientific and community experience of this mission was documented through still image, video, audio, diary and daily journalling by the resident artist of the mission, Niamh Shaw. The full experience of the crew was documented (before, during and after the expedition), to capture each individual experience of the crew and the human experience of isolation of future human space missions.

  14. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical ``Big Data'' sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction.

  15. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical “Big Data” sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction. PMID:24326949

  16. Socially anxious people reveal more personal information with virtual counselors that talk about themselves using intimate human back stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sin-Hwa; Gratch, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our findings from research designed to explore the effect of virtual human counselors' self-disclosure using intimate human back stories on real human clients' social responses in psychological counseling sessions. To investigate this subject, we designed an experiment involving two conditions of the counselors' self-disclosure: human back stories and computer back stories. We then measured socially anxious users' verbal self-disclosure. The results demonstrated that highly anxious users revealed personal information more than less anxious users when they interacted with virtual counselors who disclosed intimate information about themselves using human back stories. Furthermore, we found that greater inclination toward facilitated self-disclosure from highly anxious users following interaction with virtual counselors who employed human back stories rather than computer back stories. In addition, a further analysis of socially anxious users' feelings of rapport demonstrated that virtual counselors elicited more rapport with highly anxious users than less anxious users when interacting with counselors who employed human back stories. This outcome was not found in the users' interactions with counselors who employed computer back stories.

  17. Towards a Pedagogy of Listening: Teaching and Learning from Life Stories of Human Rights Violations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Bronwen E.; Sonntag, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    In response to the task of designing curriculum that helps youth engage thoughtfully with digital stories of human rights violations, the authors articulate the central tenets of a pedagogy of listening that draws upon elements of oral history, concepts of witnessing and testimony, the work on listening of Dewey, Freire and Rinaldi and the…

  18. Plutonium stories. [Stories of subjects of Department of Energy human experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presented here are thumbnail sketches of six people who received injections of plutonium in an Atomic Energy Commission experiment, presumably designed to assess the biological effects of radiation on the human body. The information was drawn from a copyrighted series in the Albuquerque Tribune, a newspaper that counts Los Alamos within its circulation area. Eighteen subjects were involved in this plutonium experiment. They received their injections at the Manhattan Project hospital in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and at prestigious teaching hospitals--the University of California Hospital in San Francisco, Billings Hospital at the University of Chicago, and Strong Memorial Hospital at the University of Rochester.

  19. Weblog patterns and modeling human dynamics with decaying interest

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jin-Li

    2010-01-01

    Web log is the fourth network exchange way following Email, BBS and MSN. Most bloggers began to write blogs with great interest, over time their interest gradually achieves a balance. In order to describe the phenomenon that people's interest in something gradually decays and achieves the balance, we first propose a model and give a rigorous analysis on it. This model describes interested in attenuation, and it reflects that people's interest in something is getting more stable after a long period of time. Our analysis indicates that the arrival-time interval distribution of the model is a mixed distribution with exponential and power-law feature. Secondly, we collect blogs in ScienceNet.cn and present an empirical study of blog arrival-time interval distribution. These empirical results verify the model, providing evidence for a new class of phenomena in human dynamics. The empirical results agree with the analytical result well, obeying an approximately mixed form. In human dynamics there are other distribu...

  20. Generation of Variations on Theme Music Based on Impressions of Story Scenes Considering Human's Feeling of Music and Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenkichi Ishizuka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a system which generates variations on theme music fitting to story scenes represented by texts and/or pictures. Inputs to the present system are original theme music and numerical information on given story scenes. The present system varies melodies, tempos, tones, tonalities, and accompaniments of given theme music based on impressions of story scenes. Genetic algorithms (GAs using modular neural network (MNN models as fitness functions are applied to music generation in order to reflect user's feeling of music and stories. The present system adjusts MNN models for each user on line. This paper also describes the evaluation experiments to confirm whether the generated variations on theme music reflect impressions of story scenes appropriately or not.

  1. Storying stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, A.A.; Lyons, A.C.; Pearson, A.S.; van der Geest, S.; Haan, J.; Meulenberg, F.; Smyth, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In many countries courses on Literature and Medicine (LitMed) are part of the medical curriculum, to develop and teach knowledge and skills in the area of Medical Humanities. We describe a LitMed course designed to encourage medical students at a university medical center to incorporate the biopsych

  2. Weblog patterns and human dynamics with decreasing interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.-L.; Fan, C.; Guo, Z.-H.

    2011-06-01

    In order to describe the phenomenon that people's interest in doing something always keep high in the beginning while gradually decreases until reaching the balance, a model which describes the attenuation of interest is proposed to reflect the fact that people's interest becomes more stable after a long time. We give a rigorous analysis on this model by non-homogeneous Poisson processes. Our analysis indicates that the interval distribution of arrival-time is a mixed distribution with exponential and power-law feature, which is a power law with an exponential cutoff. After that, we collect blogs in ScienceNet.cn and carry on empirical study on the interarrival time distribution. The empirical results agree well with the theoretical analysis, obeying a special power law with the exponential cutoff, that is, a special kind of Gamma distribution. These empirical results verify the model by providing an evidence for a new class of phenomena in human dynamics. It can be concluded that besides power-law distributions, there are other distributions in human dynamics. These findings demonstrate the variety of human behavior dynamics.

  3. The story of the body and the story of the person: towards an ethics of representing human bodies and body-parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilan, Y Michael

    2005-01-01

    Western culture has a few traditions of representing the human body - among them mortuary art (gisants), the freak show, the culture of the relics, renaissance art and pre-modern and modern anatomy. A historical analysis in the spirit of Norbert Elias is offered with regard to body - person relationship in anatomy. Modern anatomy is characterized by separating the story of the person from the story of the body, a strategy that is incompatible with the bio-psycho-social paradigm of clinical medicine. The paper discusses different aspects of the above traditions and how they might bear on this conflict and on contemporary bioethics and bedside practice.

  4. The Story of Human, from Authority to Salvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Khoshaghani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available  The discussion of the human authority and his abuse of the authority are one of the main teachings of Testamaents and so Christian thinker. Of these, Irenaeus and Tertullian –of first church fathers-both regard the human authority as a necessity in the human creation for his achievement of the perfection. But the human doesn’t use his authority correctly and cause his sin. Although Irenaeus attends to the inhibitor concept of sin, sometimes believes in its positive function and regards it as a means of the human experience and the distinction of good and evil. But unlike Irenaeus, Tertullian haven’t believed in this metamorphic concept of sin, and believes that the sin leads to death and the fall of human, like Adam and Even Fall rejected from heaven. unlike Tertullian, Irenaeus regards Adam and Even sin due to their disability in beginning of the creation and interprets their Fall as driving of their arrival to world for being likeness of God, and no obstacle of the perfection path. However, in Irenaeus and Tertullian soteriology, the human authority isn’t enough, but the presence of Father, Son and Spirit is necessary in the salvation and perfection process.

  5. The Story of Human, from Authority to Salvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Khoshaghani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The discussion of the human authority and his abuse of the authority are one of the main teachings of Testamaents and so Christian thinker. Of these, Irenaeus and Tertullian –of first church fathers-both regard the human authority as a necessity in the human creation for his achievement of the perfection. But the human doesn’t use his authority correctly and cause his sin. Although Irenaeus attends to the inhibitor concept of sin, sometimes believes in its positive function and regards it as a means of the human experience and the distinction of good and evil. But unlike Irenaeus, Tertullian haven’t believed in this metamorphic concept of sin, and believes that the sin leads to death and the fall of human, like Adam and Even Fall rejected from heaven. unlike Tertullian, Irenaeus regards Adam and Even sin due to their disability in beginning of the creation and interprets their Fall as driving of their arrival to world for being likeness of God, and no obstacle of the perfection path. However, in Irenaeus and Tertullian soteriology, the human authority isn’t enough, but the presence of Father, Son and Spirit is necessary in the salvation and perfection process.

  6. Pavlovian conditioning of sexual interests in human males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalumière, M L; Quinsey, V L

    1998-06-01

    Pavlovian conditioning of the human male sexual response may be involved in the ontogenetic development of sexual interests and may be responsible for individual differences. We attempted to demonstrate Pavlovian conditioning of sexual interests in a nonclinical sample of adult males. Ten participants were exposed to 11 pairings of a slide of a moderately attractive, partially nude female adult (TARGET) and a highly arousing videotape depiction of heterosexual sexual interactions (US). Ten other participants were exposed to 11 presentations of the TARGET alone. Participants exposed to the TARGET-US contingency showed a 10% relative increase in sexual arousal to the TARGET; participants exposed to the TARGET-ALONE contingency showed an 11% relative decrease in sexual arousal to the TARGET. This group difference is interpreted as resulting from both conditioning and habituation.

  7. On Becoming Better Human Beings: Six Stories to Live by

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wivestad, Stein M.

    2013-01-01

    What are the conditions required for becoming better human beings? What are our limitations and possibilities? I understand "becoming better" as a combined improvement process bringing persons "up from" a negative condition and "up to" a positive one. Today there is a tendency to understand improvement in a one-sided way as a movement up to the…

  8. Untold stories: the human face of poverty dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Key Points • Life histories offer an important window for policy makers, and should be brought to the policy table much more frequently. • Life histories show the human face of chronic poverty. Such vignettes provide concrete examples of poverty traps – such as insecurity, social discrimination a...... have ambivalent effects. • Whilst life histories are not representative, they highlight key themes and processes which are ‘typical’ of individuals with similar sets of sociobiographical characteristics who live in similar social, economic and political circumstances....

  9. Creative stories: Modelling the principal components of human creativity over texts in a storytelling game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonis Koukourikos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of effectively applying techniques for fostering creativity in educational settings is – by nature – multifaceted and not straightforward, as it pertains to several fields such as cognitive theory and psychology. Furthermore, the quantification of the impact of different activities on creativity is a challenging and not yet thoroughly investigated task. In this paper, we present the process of applying the Semantic Lateral Thinking technique for fostering creativity in Creative Stories, a digital storytelling game, via the introduction of the appropriate stimuli in the game’s flow. Furthermore, we present a formalization for a person’s creativity as a derivative of his/her creations within the game, by transitioning from traditional computational creativity metrics over the produced stories to a space that adheres to the core principles of creativity as perceived by humans.

  10. The Human Story at the Intersection of Ethics, Aesthetics and Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Judith F.

    2005-01-01

    Murals tell specific stories, but, because they are created from many specific stories, they also tell a common story, a story of the things that connect people to each other. In this way, muralism is an antidote for the hatred and disconnectedness in society. Moral education is participatory. It is a creative, critical and analytical process.…

  11. Policy stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Carina Bregnholm; Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard

    planning and execution and of event outcomes beyond the narrow confines of bed nights and legacies. Second, we introduce policies as an entry point to unlock discussions and manifestations of value and futures which connect to AWG. In order to exemplify the workings of the AWG event in these domains, we...... present three central policy stories from the field. The stories tell of how the event was first interested, then activated and finally evaluated. Besides adding a new understanding to policy-driven events as a locus of value creation, we also argue that the AWG 2016 offer speculative bets for new...

  12. Interests of 5th through 10th Grade Students toward Human Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten, Sinan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the middle and high school students' interests towards the subjects of human biology, specifically, "Human Health and Nutrition" and "Human Body and Organs." The study also investigated sources of their interests and factors that impact their interests, namely people that they interact and courses that…

  13. The milk of human kindness: the story of the Mothers Milk Bank at Austin

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson-Clay Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Increased scientific study of human milk and awareness of the special nutritional needs of the premature infant have stimulated interest in human donor milk banking. Yet only three donor human milk banks existed in the United States in 1998. Having observed better outcomes in human milk-fed neonatal intensive care patients, two neonatologists in Austin, Texas, founded The Mothers Milk Bank at Austin (MMBA). Since opening in 1999, the MMBA has expanded rapidly as the result of careful...

  14. Space Exploration as a Human Enterprise: The Scientific Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl

    1973-01-01

    Presents examples which illustrate the importance of space exploration in diverse aspects of scientific knowledge. Indicates that human beings are today not wise enough to anticipate the practical benefits of planetary studies. (CC)

  15. Patenting human pluripotent cells: balancing commercial, academic and ethical interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, G; Morrison, M

    2010-01-01

    The article addresses the issue of the ethics of patenting in human embryonic stem (hES) cells. The current stance of the European Patent Office in citing moral objections to patents on hES cells and the monopolistic scope of the Wisconsin Research Alumni Fund/Geron patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office represent twin obstacles to achieving an ethical balance in patent rights in this field. The particular issues and strategies around granting patents on hES cells can be better understood by placing them in the context of the biotechnology industry and its role in the global bioeconomy. Some possible avenues of redress are considered based on the potential to open up cell pluripotency as new terrain for intellectual property offered by new technological breakthroughs such as induced pluripotent cells. Any changes in patent law should be accompanied by increased collaboration through devices such as patent pools.

  16. The milk of human kindness: the story of the Mothers Milk Bank at Austin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson-Clay Barbara

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increased scientific study of human milk and awareness of the special nutritional needs of the premature infant have stimulated interest in human donor milk banking. Yet only three donor human milk banks existed in the United States in 1998. Having observed better outcomes in human milk-fed neonatal intensive care patients, two neonatologists in Austin, Texas, founded The Mothers Milk Bank at Austin (MMBA. Since opening in 1999, the MMBA has expanded rapidly as the result of careful planning, innovative procedures, fiscal stability, and widespread community support. The non-profit organizational structure, diversity and progressive vision of the board of directors and staff, and creative on-going public relations efforts have contributed to the success of the project. The MMBA demonstrates a model for 21st century milk banking.

  17. Wind power effects on human interests. A synthesis report; Vindkraftens paaverkan paa maenniskors intressen. En syntesrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson Ryberg, Johanna [Naturvaardsverket, Stockholm (Sweden); Bluhm, Goesta [Karolinska institutet, Miljoemedicin, Stockholm (Sweden); Bolin, Karl [KTH, Kungliga Tekniska Hoegskolan, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    2012-05-15

    The aim of the project Wind power Effects on Human Interests is to describe, analyse and value research on how wind power may affect human interests, and to present: 'what we can say based on what we know today'. The report addresses managers, officials, wind power projectors and also the general public. Research on how wind power may affect health, economy and businesses, and the landscape is analyzed. The process of gaining approval for wind power connected to above mentioned interests is also studied and valued.

  18. German medical students' interest in and knowledge about human sexuality in 1972 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Daniel; Jopt, Konstantin; Nieder, Timo O; Briken, Peer

    2014-08-01

    During the 1970s, a growing number of medical schools began to recognize the importance of medical education concerning human sexuality. Currently, most medical schools provide at least some instruction in human sexuality. In light of this development, the present study aimed to compare the interest in and knowledge about human sexuality of medical students from two different time periods. The answers to a self-constructed questionnaire of 236 students in 1972 were compared with those of 259 students in 2012. Students were asked whether they were interested in education regarding human sexuality and which specific topics they felt should be included in the medical curriculum. The students' knowledge in the following domains was assessed: sexual development, sexual behavior, sexual physiology and psychology, and sexual medicine. The two cohorts were compared with regard to those specific sexuality-related topics in which the students were most and least interested in. Furthermore, the number of correct responses to the knowledge questions was compared. While in 1972, 99.2% of the students were interested in medical education about human sexuality, in 2012, 80.3% showed an interest. The connection of disorders from different medical disciplines with sexuality was rated as most interesting by both the students from 1972 and 2012. Medical students from 2012 gave 50.3% correct answers to the knowledge questions, whereas students from 1972 correctly answered 46.3% of the questions. Although interest in education concerning human sexuality has decreased, the majority of students view it as an important topic. Nevertheless, medical students still lack knowledge about important aspects of human sexuality (e.g., psychosexual development and relative safety of different contraceptives). Therefore, more time should be dedicated to education concerning human sexuality and its cultural, societal, and health aspects in particular. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  19. Identifying and managing conflicts between forest conservation and other human interests in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemela, J.; Young, J.; Alard, D.; Askasibar, M.; Henle, K.; Johnson, R.; Kurttila, M.; Larsson, T.B.; Matouch, S.; Nowicki, P.L.; Paiva, R.Q.; Portoghesi, L.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Stevenson, A.; Tartes, U.; Watt, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, circumstances where various human activities and interests clash with the conservation of forest biodiversity are examined, with particular focus on the drivers behind the conflicts. After identifying past and current human-related threats potentially leading to conflicts in forests,

  20. Revisiting Science in Culture: Science as Story Telling and Story Revising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grobstein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Both science itself, and the human culture of which it is a part, would benefit from a story of science that encourages wider engagement with and participation in the processes of scientific exploration. Such a story, based on a close analysis of scientific method, is presented here. It is the story of science as story telling and story revising. The story of science as story suggests that science can and should serve three distinctive functions for humanity: providing stories that may increase (but never guarantee human well-being, serving as a supportive nexus for human exploration and story telling in general, and exemplifying a commitment to skepticism and a resulting open-ended and continuing exploration of what might yet be. Some practical considerations that would further the development and acceptance of such a story of science as a widely shared nexus of human activity are described.

  1. SHORT STORIES IN THE BALKANS AND CONTEMPORARYSHORT STORIES IN THE WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Softic - Gasal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of selected short stories in the Balkan countries, as well as contemporary short stories of the world, will show us that the key themes of those stories are very similar to the short stories written during the period of transition in Bosnia and Herzegovina (1995-2010. For example, the story of the Soul Operation by an Iranian writer Mohsen Mahmalbafa, The Falcons by a Dutch writer Kader Abdolaha and On the Kitchen Stairs by a Polish writer Witold Gombrowic zinter connect with short stories by authors from Bosnia and Herzegovina, such as The Secret of Raspberry jam by Karim Zaimović or The Devilish work of Zoran Riđanović. A common thread manifests itself in the aforementioned stories, more specifically, a common theme which focuses on the need for eradication of the seeds of submission and compliance with the political system. Most authors focus on their domestic political systems; however, some portray and analyze systems in other countries as they see it, such as a Dutch narrator who focuses on a potential threat of infringement of human freedom. Moreover, Bellow Hubei by an Argentinian writer Anhelika Gorodis her underlines the importance of humanization within a political order. Faruk Šehić examines the political system in Bosnia and Herzegovina from a slightly different perspective. His collection of stories Under Pressure emphases the issue of pressure in the above war model of short stories in Bosnia and Herzegovina. These stories are the product of pressure and anxiety, with intent to latently promote new ways of spiritual survival, directly relating to the concept and the theme of the story The Past Age Man by Christian Karlson Stead. Further analysis of the alienation theme singled out short stories in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Plants are Something Else by Alma Lazarevska and Dialogues by Lamija Begagić, and pointed out their connection with some recent international short stories such as The Last Defence by

  2. Humanism and values in the medical short stories of Arthur Conan Doyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, A E; Key, J D

    1992-05-01

    In 1894 Arthur Conan Doyle published 15 medical short stories under the title of Round the Red Lamp, a red lamp being the symbol for a physician's office in Victorian England. These 19th-century vignettes do not indulge in scientific descriptions of diseases, their processes, or their treatment. Instead, they are based upon the effects of illness on the lives, sentiments, and emotions of the afflicted, their families, and their physicians. The stories are suffused with romance and humor. Conan Doyle's medical fiction of almost 100 years ago constitutes a superbly written and engaging collection that ranges from the comic to the pathetic. They contain universal themes that are especially appropriate today when humanistic elements are being usurped by rampant technology in both medical education and medical practice. These tales can make a significant contribution in related seminars for both students and practitioners.

  3. Is the HM story only a "remote memory"? Some facts about hippocampus and memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deweer, B; Pillon, B; Pochon, J B; Dubois, B

    2001-12-14

    In this review, we argue that a number of current data support the notion that the hippocampal formations play an important role in episodic memory in humans. We will focus on data gathered from three topics within this field: (1) the neuropsychological study of memory in degenerative diseases, which provides striking dissociations of processes, as a function of the location of cerebral lesions and of their functional consequences; (2) the description of patients' memory difficulties after unilateral medial temporal lobectomy. Given the visuo-verbal dissociation, we may anticipate that the study of the effects of such lesions may help in the understanding of the role of the hippocampus in memory, in terms of: (i) the stage of memory processing where the hippocampus is really involved (encoding, consolidation and/or retrieval); (ii) the specificity of the impairments as a function of the nature (verbal vs. visuo-spatial) of the to-be-remembered material; (3) recent evidence from imaging studies: (i) the morphological approach, which provides interesting information with the study of correlations between the volumes of diverse cerebral regions-particularly the volume of the hippocampus-and episodic memory performance and other cognitive measures; (ii) metabolic studies, using PET scan, which were first designed for correlational analyses between performance in episodic memory tasks and glucose utilization at rest in diverse regions of interest, such as the hippocampal formations; (iii) activation studies with PET and functional MRI, which are actually more straightforward, since they allow correlations between the metabolism in regions of interest and performance on line (e.g. during encoding or retrieval of information). In our view, inasmuch as such different approaches-degenerative diseases, lesions or imagery-provide convergent information, they give renewed weight to the notion according to which the hippocampal formations are critically concerned in episodic

  4. Who reads love stories

    OpenAIRE

    Бочарова, Оксана

    1998-01-01

    Growth of the Russian book market is in the first place linked to reorientation of publishing to readers' interests and demand, and dissemination of mass and popular literature. The task of this paper is to define the place of love stories in the hierarchy of readers' interests, characterise their readers, and describe the location of these books in the mass culture space as well as the very motivation of taking up love stories. During seven or eight years in the Russian book market, this gen...

  5. Human Vision System’s Region of Interest Based Video Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Asha

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available While watching a video human visual system gives more attention on the foreground objects than background objects. That is to say, human vision system pays more attention to region of interest, such as the human faces in the video content. Most of the video encoders compress video by considering every part of the video frames with equal importance. So the video size could not be reduced to maintain quality. The proposed system can detect the foreground and it can allocate different bit rates for different regions. By doing this the video quality can be maintained and the size can be reduced up to 40%.

  6. When do Stories Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelman, Andrew; Basbøll, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    -enough established that they have the potential to indicate problems with a new model). We develop these ideas through considering two well-known examples from the work of Karl Weick and Robert Axelrod, and we discuss why transparent sourcing (in the case of Axelrod) makes a story a more effective research tool......Storytelling has long been recognized as central to human cognition and communication. Here we explore a more active role of stories in social science research, not merely to illustrate concepts but also to develop new ideas and evaluate hypotheses, for example, in deciding that a research method...... is effective. We see stories as central to engagement with the development and evaluation of theories, and we argue that for a story to be useful in this way, it should be anomalous (representing aspects of life that are not well explained by existing models) and immutable (with details that are well...

  7. Webcam Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clidas, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Stories, steeped in science content and full of specific information, can be brought into schools and homes through the power of live video streaming. Video streaming refers to the process of viewing video over the internet. These videos may be live (webcam feeds) or recorded. These stories are engaging and inspiring. They offer opportunities to…

  8. Hunting Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Frank

    Eleven stories describe traditional practices and true adventures of the Tlingit hunters of Southeast Alaska. The stories are accompanied by learning activities and discussion questions for students and are arranged under the headings of bear, mountain goat and deer, and seal and sea lion. Topics include hunting weapons and strategies, bravery,…

  9. Webcam Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clidas, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Stories, steeped in science content and full of specific information, can be brought into schools and homes through the power of live video streaming. Video streaming refers to the process of viewing video over the internet. These videos may be live (webcam feeds) or recorded. These stories are engaging and inspiring. They offer opportunities to…

  10. Human interest meets biodiversity hotspots: A new systematic approach for urban ecosystem conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasada, Minoru; Matsuba, Misako; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Creating a win-win relationship between biodiversity and human well-being is one of the major current challenges for environmental policy. One way to approach this challenge is to identify sites with both high biodiversity and high human interest in urban areas. Here, we propose a new systematic approach to identify such sites by using land prices and biodiversity indexes for butterflies and birds from a nationwide perspective. As a result, we found sites that are valuable to humans and to other organisms, including national red-list species, and they are located in sites with cultural heritages and near seaside. By referencing the habitat features and landscape characteristics of these sites, we can establish high quality environments that provide a benefit to both humans and biodiversity in urban landscapes. PMID:28235020

  11. Earth Expeditions: Telling the stories of eight NASA field campaigns by focusing on the human side of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Earth Right Now communication team kicked off an ambitious multimedia campaign in March 2016 to tell the stories of eight major field campaigns studying regions of critical change from the land, sea and air. Earth Expeditions focused on the human side of science, with live reporting from the field, behind-the-scenes images and videos, and extended storytelling over a six-month period. We reported from Greenland to Namibia, from the eastern United States to the South Pacific. Expedition scientists explored ice sheets, air quality, coral reefs, boreal forests, marine ecosystems and greenhouse gases. All the while the campaign communications team was generating everything from blog posts and social media shareables, to Facebook Live events and a NASA TV series. We also participated in community outreach events and pursued traditional media opportunities. A massive undertaking, we will share lessons learned, best practices for social media and some of our favorite moments when science communication touched our audience's lives.

  12. Putting Stories in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Mindi

    2012-01-01

    A very successful preschool project the author did at Ohio State University's Schoenbaum Family Center combined students' interest in storytelling, drama, and multiple literacies. For this particular project, a classic children's fairy tale was used, though the project is easily adaptable for other stories, texts, content, and age levels. In this…

  13. [Fictions and stories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, H

    1995-12-01

    A short and interesting work, where the author of "The secret tooth", exposes some opinions about fiction and story, words he considers should not be opposed, but really on the contrary, be harmonized to contribute with their alliance for personal joy of readers. Writers like Joyce, Caillois, Updike, and others, are quoted for renewing texts with reports referred to Dentistry.

  14. The State of Humanities in Post-Apartheid South Africa--A Quantitative Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, V.; Yu, K.

    2010-01-01

    This article depicts the state of Humanities in post-apartheid South Africa by examining HEMIS enrolment and graduation data from 1999 to 2007. It demonstrates that although the decline in student enrolment and graduation in Humanities has not been severe; read in the context of substantial growth of all other disciplines, Humanities is in a…

  15. Theoretical Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Serisier

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of Clare Hemmings, Why Stories Matter: The Political Grammar of Feminist Theory (Duke 2011 and Janet Halley & Andrew Parker (eds. After Sex? On Writing Since Queer Theory (Duke 2011.

  16. Data Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watts, Laura; Nafus, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    ‘Big Data’ rises and accumulates today from so much of our activity, off and online, that our lives seem almost suffused by ‘The Cloud’. But perhaps data might be otherwise? In this collection, Laura Watts and Dawn Nafus, two ethnographers, bring together stories from different data sites: from...... the marine energy industry, and from the Quantified Self movement. These Data Stories speak, not of clouds, but of transformations: in things, in energy, and in experience....

  17. Data Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watts, Laura; Nafus, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    ‘Big Data’ rises and accumulates today from so much of our activity, off and online, that our lives seem almost suffused by ‘The Cloud’. But perhaps data might be otherwise? In this collection, Laura Watts and Dawn Nafus, two ethnographers, bring together stories from different data sites: from...... the marine energy industry, and from the Quantified Self movement. These Data Stories speak, not of clouds, but of transformations: in things, in energy, and in experience....

  18. “All men were born in Jerusalem”. Mith and gospel in the stories about the origen of humans among the toba (Qom of the Argentinian Chaco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Carmen Tola

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Parallelisms between stories of biblical inspiration and myths that describe the origins of the human beings, their corporal transformations and the differences between diverse types of beings can be found in contemporary narrations of the Toba people (Qom of the Argentinean Gran Chaco. Events described in the Bible are usually spun with elements of the mythical past of Toba people, therefore generating a biblical reading of the indigenous past and new readings on the human origins, of the differences between beings and of the importance of the body in the constitution of human specificity. This paper examines some of these narrations where myths and Biblical stories are interlaced giving rise to new notions of body and person.

  19. Humanities: The Unexpected Success Story of the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Humanities within universities faced challenges in the latter half of the twentieth century as their value in the modern world was questioned. This paper argues that there is strong potential for the humanities to thrive in the twenty-first century university sector. It outlines some of the managerial implications necessary to ensure that this…

  20. Probing the human brain with stimulating electrodes: the story of Roberts Bartholow's (1874) experiment on Mary Rafferty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lauren Julius; Almerigi, Jason B

    2009-06-01

    Roberts Bartholow's 1874 experiment on Mary Rafferty is widely cited as the first demonstration, by direct application of stimulating electrodes, of the motor excitability of the human cerebral cortex. The many accounts of the experiment, however, leave certain questions and details unexamined or unresolved, especially about Bartholow's goals, the nature and quality of the evidence, and the experiment's role in the history of theory and research on localisation of function. In this article, we try to fill these gaps and to tell the full story. We describe Bartholow's career up to 1874, review the theoretical and empirical background for the experiment, and present Bartholow's own account of the experiment as well as those of his supporters and critics. We then present our own analysis, assess the experiment's influence on contemporaneous scientific opinion about cortical excitability, and trace its citation record into our own time. We also review and assess ethical criticisms of Bartholow and their effects on his career, and we close by discussing the role we think the experiment deserves to play in the history of theory and research on cortical excitability.

  1. 《聊斋志异》狐鬼形象的情趣美%The Beauty of Temperament and Interest of Fox Ghost's Image from Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑春元

    2016-01-01

    Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio is famous for its images of fox ghosts and it has achieved the highest realm of art. The images of fox ghosts have the distinctive artistic charm which is so hard to surpass for all the other similar works in the history. One of the important reasons is the various tem-perament and interest of fox ghosts under the vivid writing of the author. That's the colorful beauty of temperament and interest. The beauty of temperament and interest of fox spirits is shown through the following aspects:frankness、wise schemes、treasures、responses、boudoirs' funny talk and antics. The beauty of tem-perament and interest of ghosts manifests as weirdness、wildness、sarcasm and helping behaviors. The temperament and interest of fox ghost's image enhances this work's entertainment and creates the unique charm of temperament and in-terest、extremely abundant aesthetic glamour and infinite artistic vitality.%《聊斋志异》以写狐写鬼著称,达到最高的艺术境界,所塑造的狐鬼形象具有历史上所有同类作品难以企及的艺术魅力。其重要原因之一,是作者以生花妙笔写出狐鬼形象的多种情趣,使其具有丰富多彩的情趣美。狐精形象的情趣美表现在率真之趣、巧计之趣、宝物之趣、应对之趣、闺房戏语之趣、滑稽行为之趣;鬼形象的情趣美表现在诡异之趣、野性之趣、嘲戏之趣、助人之趣。狐鬼形象的情趣增强了作品的娱乐性,产生了独特的情趣魅力和无比丰富的美感与无穷的艺术生命力。

  2. ROLE PLAYING THE PROBLEM STORY, AN APPROACH TO HUMAN RELATIONS IN THE CLASSROOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHAFTEL, FANNIE R.; SHAFTEL, GEORGE

    AN AID TO THE CLASSROOM TEACHER IN THE TEACHING OF HUMAN RELATIONS IS PRESENTED. SOCIODRAMA, OR ROLE-PLAYING, IS PRIMARILY USEFUL IN SOLVING PROBLEMS INVOLVING RELATIONSHIPS AMONG TWO OR MORE PERSONS. IT THEREFORE PROVIDES A VALUABLE LEARNING EXPERIENCE IN SCHOOLS WHICH ARE CONCERNED WITH THE SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF BOYS AND GIRLS, WITH MORAL AND…

  3. Focal Points on Constructing News Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Yuryevna Ilyinova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The issues stated in the article line with the current interest to pragmatic value of news releases in modern media. The news is thought to be a verbalized focal reflection of some event that was chosen by media professionals for setting the current information agenda. Having generated the opinions on the newsworthiness the authors present a set of values that may be used for measurement of relevance and clarity of an event reflection in the news content with frequency, clarity, predictability, unexpectedness, amplitude, cultural proximity, elite nations, elite people, personification, negativity among them. The novelty of the research is that the newsworthiness is checked with the focus to lexical (thematic representation of the news in a diachronic approach: the empirical base of the research was taken from the archives of UK national and local media sources (18–20th cent. and implied comparison of lexical means that reflected an event itself and some values of human interest potential in the news stories written in defined periods. The article states the trend for dynamics in the way the event is reflected in the news stories – the information core of the story is merged with detailed reporting parts, and their content is conditioned by social and moral values.

  4. Human radiation experiments: The Department of Energy roadmap to the story and the records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The role of the US Government in conducting or sponsoring human radiation experiments has become the subject of public debate. Questions have been raised about the purpose, extent, and health consequences of these studies, and about how subjects were selected. The extent to which subjects provided informed consent is also under scrutiny. To respond to these questions, the Clinton administration has directed the US Department of Energy (DOE), along with other Federal agencies, to retrieve and inventory all records that document human radiation experiments. Many such records are now publicly available and will permit an open accounting and understanding of what took place. This report summarizes the Department`s ongoing search for records about human radiation experiments. It is also a roadmap to the large universe of pertinent DOE information. DOE is working to instill greater openness--consistent with national security and other appropriate considerations--throughout its operations. A key aspect of this effort is opening DOE`s historical records to independent research and analysis.

  5. Two Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lisa

    2000-01-01

    In this article, the mother of 12-year-old son with autism shares two stories that highlight how her son keeps her humble and how asking for help mutually benefits the giver and receiver. It discusses the need to tell people your needs and to invite them to participate in your life. (CR)

  6. Simian virus 40, poliovirus vaccines, and human cancer: research progress versus media and public interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    From 1955 through early 1963, millions of people were inadvertently exposed to simian virus 40 (SV40) as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines; the virus had been present in the monkey kidney cultures used to prepare the vaccines and had escaped detection. SV40 was discovered in 1960 and subsequently eliminated from poliovirus vaccines. This article reviews current knowledge about SV40 and considers public responses to reports in the media. SV40 is a potent tumour virus with broad tissue tropism that induces tumours in rodents and transforms cultured cells from many species. It is also an important laboratory model for basic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. SV40 neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated poliovirus vaccines. There have been many reports of detection of SV40 DNA in human tumours, especially mesotheliomas, brain tumours and osteosarcomas; and DNA sequence analyses have ruled out the possibility that the viral DNA in tumours was due to laboratory contamination or that the virus had been misidentified. However, additional studies are necessary to prove that SV40 is the cause of certain human cancers. A recently published review article evaluated the status of the field and received much media attention. The public response emphasized that there is great interest in the possibility of health risks today from vaccinations received in the past.

  7. Human Resource Management and Digital Companies: Approach and Success Stories from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Jošanov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth of new information and communication technologies on the internet infrastructure brings the role of digital strategy to the highest position in the new economy. New companies need new organization and skills, where the role of strategic human resource management finds new factors for the implementation of the digital strategy. A large list of new jobs and skills is taking place in this new organizational environment. This new approach, based on the digital strategy, is presented on a group of 4 successful companies in Serbia with new communication business infrastructure.

  8. Astronomy through the ages the story of the human attempt to understand the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Sir Robert

    2003-01-01

    From an historical perspective, this text presents an entirely non- mathematical introduction to astronomy from the first endeavours of the ancients to the current developments in research enabled by cutting edge technological advances. Free of mathematics and complex graphs, the book nevertheless explains deep concepts of space and time, of relativity and quantum mechanics, and of origin and nature of the universe. It conveys not only the intrinsic fascination of the subject, but also the human side and the scientific method as practised by Kepler, defined and elucidated by Galileo, and then demonstrated by Newton.

  9. Multi story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, Ho; Stelter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the use of narrative coaching as a powerful tool of co-creation and collaboration of the coach and client that emphasizes values and aspirations. Narrative coaches listen to the stories of lived experience and help clients identify values and skills. Narrative coaching has t...... central foundations which are societal/cultural and learning. The approach consists of the techniques of externalizing conversations and re-authoring and remembering....

  10. From competencies to human interests: ways of knowing and understanding in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K

    2014-07-01

    When considering the teaching and learning of topics of social relevance in medicine, such as professionalism, medical ethics, the doctor-patient relationship, and issues of diversity and social justice, one is tempted to ask, are the ways of knowing in these fields different from that in the biomedical and clinical sciences? Furthermore, given that the competency approach is dominant in medical education, one might also ask, is the competency model truly appropriate for all of the types of knowledge necessary to become a good physician? These questions are not merely academic, for they are at the core of how these subjects are taught, learned, and assessed.The goal of this article is threefold: first, to explore the nature of knowing and the educational goals in different areas of medicine and, in particular, those areas that have social relevance; second, to critically review the concept of competencies when applied to education in these areas; and third, to explore alternative strategies for teaching, learning, and assessment. This discussion reflects a view that the goal of education in areas of social relevance in medicine should be the enhancement of an understanding of-a deep and abiding connection with-the social responsibilities of the physician. Moving beyond competencies, this approach aspires toward the development of practical wisdom (phronesis) which, when embodied in the physician, links the knowledge and skills of the biomedical and clinical sciences with a moral orientation and call to action that addresses human interests in the practice of medicine.

  11. Water Distribution in the Public Interest and the Human Right to Water: Swiss, South African and International Law Compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Rüegger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The legal norms governing the distribution of water are integral to how access to water is determined. This paper analyses the idea that water should be used in the interest of the public from a legal point of view. Taking Swiss and South African law as examples it examines what the notion of 'public interest' actually means. A close look at the notion of 'water distribution in the public interest' reveals important insights: water distribution in the public interest balances a variety of different economic, ecological and social interests. In this process the human right to water is attributed the role as protective shield. Hence its effective implementation is crucial in order to safeguard water for basic human needs. After analysing how Swiss and South African water regimes are currently structured and the role of the public interest clause therein, the paper examines whether the human right to water as conceived in Swiss, South African and international law effectively ensures protection of domestic water users. The paper concludes that this is the case under some, but not all circumstances. Especially the interests of those users whose access to water is not yet sufficient do not always receive adequate legal protection by the respective legal orders. The paper concludes by stressing the necessity to evolve the concept of the human right to water to reach comprehensive protection of basic human needs. Consciousness of the social risks associated with using the human right to water as general placeholder for basic human needs despite its shortcomings will hopefully encourage efforts to establish substantive legal protection.

  12. The Varian story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ray; Morris, Gareth A.

    2015-01-01

    This Perspective offers a personal view of the story of Varian NMR, a courageous initiative that began in the 1950s but came to an abrupt end some 60 years later. Without doubt, Varian leaves behind a priceless legacy, particularly in the field of structural chemistry. The highlights are set out in four main sections, named after the four seasons, but not necessarily in strict chronology. How did the accepted business practices influence the evolution, growth, and eventual demise of this exciting venture? How well did management handle an unconventional group of young scientific entrepreneurs? What does it all mean for the future of magnetic resonance? The subject can be viewed on two different levels, the Varian story itself, and the larger picture - the Silicon Valley phenomenon as a whole, with Varian considered as an interesting microcosm.

  13. Interest towards human, animal and object in children with autism spectrum disorders: an ethological approach at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgeorge, Marine; Bourreau, Yannig; Alavi, Zarrin; Lemonnier, Eric; Tordjman, Sylvie; Deleau, Michel; Hausberger, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterised by attention deficits in communication and social interactions and a lack of interest in people. Data are mostly based on clinical situations. However, recent studies have shown a more mixed situation where children with ASD (ASD children) displayed interest towards humans, in both experimental and natural settings. The aim of this study was to assess the interest of ASD children in a natural standardised home setting. Here, we hypothesised that ASD children would display more interest towards animate stimuli-human and pet-when in the child's home than in the lab experimental setting. We used an ethological approach involving observations, a methodological alternative to lab static techniques, to investigate the behaviour of ninety 6- to 12-year-old ASD and typical development (TD) children. Our results were consistent with those of the literature revealing that the ASD children displayed interest towards animate stimuli as did children with TD children. Interestingly, while the ASD children showed higher interest towards humans, e.g. their parent, than the TD children did, they showed less interest towards pet compared to the TD children. Our results suggested that animals are not inherently easy to decode for ASD children, in contrast with previous experiences where a pet was regarded as a more attractive partner, easier to be understood. At last, the ASD children changed more frequently their focus point than the TD children did. These differences may be explained by the reduced attention skills in ASD or the study's context. To conclude, larger exploratory studies in natural settings conducted beyond ordinary human to human interactions are crucial for better understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved in social interactions in ASD.

  14. Using Story Boxes in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Story boxes and story bags are containers for holding realia that are used to enhance reading and provide a variety of activities for encouraging language acquisition and use. Whatever the packaging, these are good ways to develop students' interest in books. Using realia, or real-life objects, to teach a foreign language is not a novel concept.…

  15. Withholding the Personal Story: Using Theory to Orient Practice in Applied Theatre about HIV and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Helen

    2014-01-01

    When applied theatre is used in service of a health promotion or rights agenda, particular responsibilities come into play. The artist must be able to articulate their theory of change and translate it into action. In this article, I trouble the borderline between an ethical and an exploitative use of story when working to provide opportunities…

  16. Interesting Interest Points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup

    2012-01-01

    on spatial invariance of interest points under changing acquisition parameters by measuring the spatial recall rate. The scope of this paper is to investigate the performance of a number of existing well-established interest point detection methods. Automatic performance evaluation of interest points is hard......Not all interest points are equally interesting. The most valuable interest points lead to optimal performance of the computer vision method in which they are employed. But a measure of this kind will be dependent on the chosen vision application. We propose a more general performance measure based...... position. The LED illumination provides the option for artificially relighting the scene from a range of light directions. This data set has given us the ability to systematically evaluate the performance of a number of interest point detectors. The highlights of the conclusions are that the fixed scale...

  17. Recovering the Human Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco-Paredes Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available I am a practicing infectious diseases clinician that believes that understanding the modern observations of scientific cosmology are fundamental to understanding how we conduct ourselves in our daily lives as citizens of this planet. In addition, having this understanding has assisted me in caring for patients at the edge of their life and to provide compassionate and competent medical care.

  18. THE FORMS AND METHODS OF THE COMIC IN STORIES BY Z. KHAKIMOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Венера Файзиевна Макарова

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the comic part in the Tatar story of the 1980s on the material of the analysis of short stories by young novelist Zulfat Hakim. It is noted that the comic in stories by Z. Khakimov is different with philosophicity. Analysis of the stories allows us to observe the transformation of traditional "household" conflicts into the grotesque model of the reality. In the stories the points of the changing plot collisions become the point of changing forms of laughter: humor becomes a satire or sarcasm, even irony. The irony is mixed with dramatic and tragic motives. There are interesting observations of the functioning in the writer's works such approaches as pastiche, science fiction, illogic, allegory, etc. In particular, on the analysis material of the story "The struggle in the Pacific ocean' it is revealed techniques such as playing with the myth of the man’s heroic struggle with nature, recreation of the grotesque model of the reality, typing of the characters. As a result of the skillful use of similar artistic techniques the comic stories become metatext about human nature in general.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-11-6

  19. Toy Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Anne Jodon; Petersson Brooks, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Toys are considered to be children’s cultural objects, yet when placed in a toy museum context they become a collection for adult viewing. This article uses Kress and van Leeuwens’ concept of ‘semiotic landscape’ wherein the exhibit provides a specific context of communication that becomes...... a mediating device between adults and children. The question then becomes, how does a display of static toys speak to a child’s culture of play? Through interviews with toy museum curators and personal observations it was found that the exhibition was designed to have adults share and reflect stories about...

  20. What interests them in the pictures?--differences in eye-tracking between rhesus monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying-Zhou; Jiang, Hui-Hui; Liu, Ci-Rong; Wang, Jian-Hong; Yu, Cheng-Yang; Carlson, Synnöve; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Saarinen, Veli-Matti; Rizak, Joshua D; Tian, Xiao-Guang; Tan, Hen; Chen, Zhu-Yue; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Hu, Xin-Tian

    2013-10-01

    Studies estimating eye movements have demonstrated that non-human primates have fixation patterns similar to humans at the first sight of a picture. In the current study, three sets of pictures containing monkeys, humans or both were presented to rhesus monkeys and humans. The eye movements on these pictures by the two species were recorded using a Tobii eye-tracking system. We found that monkeys paid more attention to the head and body in pictures containing monkeys, whereas both monkeys and humans paid more attention to the head in pictures containing humans. The humans always concentrated on the eyes and head in all the pictures, indicating the social role of facial cues in society. Although humans paid more attention to the hands than monkeys, both monkeys and humans were interested in the hands and what was being done with them in the pictures. This may suggest the importance and necessity of hands for survival. Finally, monkeys scored lower in eye-tracking when fixating on the pictures, as if they were less interested in looking at the screen than humans. The locations of fixation in monkeys may provide insight into the role of eye movements in an evolutionary context.

  1. Design for Interest: Exploratory Study on a Distinct Positive Emotion in Human-Product Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoon, J.; Desmet, P.M.A.; Van der Helm, A.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the possibilities to design interactions that evoke user interest. On the basis of appraisal theory, it was predicted that interest is evoked by a combined appraisal of novelty complexity and coping potential. Because the role of novelty-complexity is well-documented (i.e. a prod

  2. Non-Linear Interactive Stories in Computer Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø, Olav; Jensen, Ole Guttorm; Kocka, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    The paper introduces non-linear interactive stories (NOLIST) as a means to generate varied and interesting stories for computer games automatically. We give a compact representation of a NOLIST based on the specification of atomic stories, and show how to build an object-oriented Bayesian network...

  3. Characterizing Pairwise Social Relationships Quantitatively: Interest-Oriented Mobility Modeling for Human Contacts in Delay Tolerant Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxu Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human mobility modeling has increasingly drawn the attention of researchers working on wireless mobile networks such as delay tolerant networks (DTNs in the last few years. So far, a number of human mobility models have been proposed to reproduce people’s social relationships, which strongly affect people’s daily life movement behaviors. However, most of them are based on the granularity of community. This paper presents interest-oriented human contacts (IHC mobility model, which can reproduce social relationships on a pairwise granularity. As well, IHC provides two methods to generate input parameters (interest vectors based on the social interaction matrix of target scenarios. By comparing synthetic data generated by IHC with three different real traces, we validate our model as a good approximation for human mobility. Exhaustive experiments are also conducted to show that IHC can predict well the performance of routing protocols.

  4. Toy Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Anne Jodon; Petersson Brooks, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Toys are considered to be children’s cultural objects, yet when placed in a toy museum context they become a collection for adult viewing. This article uses Kress and van Leeuwens’ concept of ‘semiotic landscape’ wherein the exhibit provides a specific context of communication that becomes...... a mediating device between adults and children. The question then becomes, how does a display of static toys speak to a child’s culture of play? Through interviews with toy museum curators and personal observations it was found that the exhibition was designed to have adults share and reflect stories about...... the toys with children. Such activity reflects a representation of toys as collections for adults (child’s perspective) rather than the playthings of children (children’s perspectives). Material culture of children was implicitly represented through playful, sensory, and affective engagement. Key words...

  5. Worldviews in Isan-Thai Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaruwan Thammawat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study aimed to investigate two-fold: To present worldviews in Isan-Thai Stories and to explain the connections between the worldviews and their societal contexts. Approach: Following the methodology of folklore studies, both oral and written versions of Isan-Thai stories were analyzed in order to find out their structures, contents, motifs and contexts. The 76 stories which were chosen fall into five types: Legends, episodes of the Buddha’s birth stories, chakchak wongwong (principalities tales, orphans tales and local heroes stories. The contents of these stories were separated into motifs in order to see the repetitions with other stories. Such repetitions reveal deep structure, appearing in surface structure. Then the repetitive contents were decoded and interpreted to obtain patterns of thoughts and behaviors, in line with Claude Levi-Strauss’ conviction that myths try to convey messages of human mind both universal and cultural specific. Results: As a result the study found that the worldviews in Isan-Thai Stories are of three kinds: Mythic worldview, alternative worldview and new worldview. The essentials of these worldviews show the relationships between the human and nature, the human and the human and the human and society. The thoughts presented are not unitary; they are pluralistic, even within the same story. Thus the worldviews have transformed in accordance with time, space, gender and modes of production. In the food-gathering mode, the mythic worldview emphasizes acceptance of nature’s power which could cause suffering or happiness depending on the attitudes of the humans. In the market or capitalist mode which emphasizes consumerist production, the worldview makes the humans accept money as the highest power on life. Conclusion: Thus, stories present social transformation by changing the actors as well as the methods of communication.

  6. Human Resource Accounting: Interests and Conflicts. A Discussion Paper. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Jens V.; Westphalen, Sven-Age

    This document examines the principles, use, and benefits of human resource accounting (HRA), which uses numerical and nonnumerical data on items such as costs and benefits of training, staff turnover, absenteeism, and the value of employees' knowledge to measure the value of human resources in enterprises. The introduction presents an overview of…

  7. Scheherazade's Secret: The Power of Stories and the Desire to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I use a story to introduce the idea of stories in adult educational practice. Telling stories seems to be as old as human culture. MacIntyre referred to humans as "story-telling animals" (1981: 201). The secret is the ways in which this storytelling capacity can be used in a holistic humanistic pedagogy. Education, the process of…

  8. The Effects of Inflation and Interest Rates on Delay Discounting in Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Kentaro

    2006-01-01

    Interest and inflation rates may be major determinants of delay discounting, but these variables have not been controlled in past experiments because they depend on macroeconomic conditions. This study uses a computer game-like task to investigate the effects of inflation rates on people's subjective valuation of delayed rewards. During the task,…

  9. Kickoffs and Metaphors: Selecting a First Story for the Modern Fiction Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioe, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of the selection of a first short story in a modern fiction class. Proposes that compact stories about memorable protagonists in familiar settings can engage students' interests in first class meetings. Outlines two examples of such stories: Jim Shepard's "Ida" and Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour." (PM)

  10. Animals, Emperors, Senses: Exploring a Story-Based Learning Design in a Museum Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murmann, Mai; Avraamidou, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative case study was to explore the use of stories as tools for learning within formal and informal learning environments. The design was based on three areas of interest: (a) the story as a tool for learning; (b) the student as subjects engaging with the story; and (c) the context in which the story learning activity takes…

  11. Moral Analysis of the Self-interest Human%"经济人"假设的道德分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳之茂

    2001-01-01

    "经济人"范畴对解释入的行为动机、个体之间、个体与群体之间的关系的确提供了一种新的视角,将人对物质利益的追求置于一切目的之上,这无疑是对生命存在之肯定。但"经济人"作为一种从西方移植而来的理论假设,有其存在的限度。本文着重从三个方面对"经济人"做了分析:(1)"经济人"假设的嬗变及其道德风险;(2)我国社会主义市场经济下"经济人"的作用;(3)"经济人"假设中国化。%The theory of self-interest human (homo oeconomicus or economic personality)affords us a new academic angle. Human is not only physical being but also metaphysical be- ing. On the other hand , the theory comes from the West, it should adapt perfectly to our e-cological environment, cultural background, national mentality, etc, all these elementsshould be in a multangular harmony. This paper focuses on 3 important aspects of the self-interest human: 1) the history and moral hazards of self-interest human; 2) the effect ofthe theory under Market Economy; 3) the Chinalization of self-interest human.

  12. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act of 1990 and Assessment for Parenthood: In Whose Best Interests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryburn, Murray; Fleming, Annette

    1993-01-01

    Britain's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act provides for the assessment of adults for parenthood on both medical and social grounds, justified by concern for the welfare of the child. Compares these assessments with those undertaken in the adoption process and questions the utility of such decisions for the welfare of the children involved.…

  13. Gatotkaca Birth Story As A First Step To Introduce Children With Puppets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leocadia Desy Pranatalisa

    2017-02-01

    To introduce the puppets against children, can be done by introducing one puppet stories. The story introduced should also start from scratch a puppet story. It is expected with the introduction of one of the stories of the many stories puppet, can make children interested in puppets and imitating good attitude conveyed in the story. Stories that can be used for the initial introduction of the puppet is a story about the birth of Gatotkaca. This is because many know about the characters Gatotkaca therefore begins with the initial story of his birth. From the story of the birth Gatotkaca there are also many good things delivered and there are also other figures like clown is widely known. It is expected to also be able to facilitate the children to get to know the story because there are already several characters they know.

  14. Telling better stories: strengthening the story in story and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp-Benedict, Eric

    2012-12-01

    The scenarios of the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic and Swart 2000) are both widely cited and widely criticized. This combination of censure and regard reflects their importance, as they provide both a point of reference and a point of departure for those wishing to understand the long-term implications of policies and human activities for the climate and adaptive capacity. The paper by Schweizer and Kriegler in this issue (Schweizer and Kriegler 2012) reports a unique and interesting critique of the SRES scenarios. The authors find several results, including that the path the world may now be on (labeled by them 'coal-powered growth') is under-represented in the SRES scenarios. While such post-hoc critiques are easy to dismiss, Schweizer and Kriegler were careful to use only the information available to the SRES authors, and they applied a technique that (if it had been available) could have been carried out at that time. In this way they demonstrate that not only was coal-powered growth a clearly discernible possible future at the time of the SRES, but variants on the theme dominate the handful of highly consistent and robust scenarios as identified by their method. Their paper is well-timed because a new round of climate scenarios is now under development (Kriegler et al 2012, van Vuuren et al 2012), and it could learn from evaluations of the SRES process and scenarios. Schweizer and Kriegler (2012) construct a consistent scenario logic using a relatively new foresight technique, cross-impact balances (CIB) (Weimer-Jehle 2006). As explained above, to sharpen their critique and properly evaluate the method, they apply CIB to the information that the authors of the SRES had at their disposal at the time they constructed their scenarios. Their study is therefore anachronistic, in that the CIB method was not published when the SRES was released, but historically faithful in that Schweizer and Kriegler limit themselves to the

  15. Teaching reading with stories vs. cognitive hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Fuller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Suggestopedia emphasizes the use of interesting stories as vehicles for teaching classroom material such as reading or arithmetic. Independent support for this notion comes from the work of the author in teaching reading via stories in the Ball-Stick-Bird method. Suggestopedagogiek benadruk die gebruik van interessante stories as boustof by die onderrig van byvoorbeeld lees en wiskunde. Steun vir die sienswyse kom van die skrywer van hierdie artikel waarin die resultate bespreek word van die onderrig van lees met behulp van die "Ball-Stick-Bird"-metode.

  16. [Unknown pathogens from the human oral microflora of interest for otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tets, V V; Tets, G V; Vikina, D S; Vecherovskaia, M F; Kharlamova, V V

    2014-01-01

    The identification of microorganisms from the human oral cavity is a topical problem in many clinical disciplines including otorhinolaryngology. Many bacterial species of oral microbiota are causative agents of ENT diseases, and poor conditions of the oral cavity, unhealthy teeth and gums increase the risk of the spread of infection. The objective of the present study was to distinguish and identify poorly explored and previously unknown aerobic opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms responsible for various ENT disorders. The normal microflora remains to be thoroughly studied with the use of the new culturing techniques that ensure the isolation of pure microbial cultures. The present publication reports for the first time isolation of the stable mixed microbial biofilms formed by unrelated bacterial species and containing the yet unknown microorganisms. The isolated bacteria were identified as previously unknown or poorly unexplored anaerobic opportunistic species capable of inducing ENT pathology; their sensitivity to antibiotics was evaluated.

  17. Story Parsing Grammar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张松懋

    1994-01-01

    Story understanding is one of the important branches of natural language understanding research in AI techniques.A new approach to story understanding is proposed in this paper.The so-called Story Parsing Grammar (SPG) is used to represent the story abstracting processes with different degrees in story understanding,and the story understanding process is converted to the storyn recognizing process done by the syntactic parser of SPG.This kind of story understanding is called story parsing.In this paper,firstly,a survey of story understanding research is given.Secondly,by the classification of various kinds of story structures,the so-called Case Frame Forest (CFF) is proposed to represent the superficial meaning of story.Based on CFF,a high-dimen-sional grammar,called Forest Grammar (FG),is defined.Furthermore,SPG is defined as a subclass of context-sensitive FG.Considering the context-sensitivity of story content,a type of context-sensitive derivation is defined in the definition of SPG.Lastly,data about runtime efficiency of the syntactic parsing algorithm of weak precedence SPG,a subclass of SPG,are given and analysed.

  18. Story Book Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enfield, Mark; Mathew, Eliza

    2012-01-01

    Young children love stories, and teachers love to read stories. Young children also love to explore the motion of objects--they watch tossed balls, observe objects rolling down ramps, and are mesmerized by spinning tops. Yet it can be challenging to integrate these two loves, stories and exploring motion, in one lesson. Furthermore, while children…

  19. The Eviction of the Human from Human Interest: The Case of Mechanically Generated Text and Textual Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Nathan West

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, automation has encroached upon “soft knowledge” fields long considered the exclusive preserve of human agents, particularly in the production and analysis of texts framed in natural language. Like most technological innovations, automation has been embraced with minimal skepticism: mainstream voices have assumed that new technologies, while changing the type of work available, will continue creating new jobs to replace those it renders obsolete, and harsh criticism has been confined mainly to the ideological fringes. There is reason to believe that this optimism is unjustified with respect to the automation of intellectual labor, which may prove to have pernicious consequences both for the market economy and for human values that yield only poorly to abstract calculation.

  20. Weak Precedence Story Parsing Grammar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张松懋

    1995-01-01

    Story understanding is one of the important branches of natural language understanding research in AI techniques.The story understanding approach based on Story Parsing Grammar (SPG) involves that SPG is used to represent different abstracting processes of stories with different levels in story understanding and that the story understanding process is converted to the recognition process of stories using the syntactic parser of SPG.This kind of story understanding is called story parsing.In this paper,firstly a subclass of SPG,called Weak Precedence SPG(WPSPG),is defined.Afterwards the syntactic parsing algorithm of WPSPG is studied.An example of story parsing is also given.

  1. Plutonium Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborg, G. T.

    1981-09-01

    The first nuclear synthesis and identification (i.e., the discovery) of the synthetic transuranium element plutonium (isotope /sup 238/Pu) and the demonstration of its fissionability with slow neutrons (isotope /sup 239/Pu) took place at the University of California, Berkeley, through the use of the 60-inch and 37-inch cyclotrons, in late 1940 and early 1941. This led to the development of industrial scale methods in secret work centered at the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory and the application of these methods to industrial scale production, at manufacturing plants in Tennessee and Washington, during the World War II years 1942 to 1945. The chemical properties of plutonium, needed to devise the procedures for its industrial scale production, were studied by tracer and ultramicrochemical methods during this period on an extraordinarily urgent basis. This work, and subsequent investigations on a worldwide basis, have made the properties of plutonium very well known. Its well studied electronic structure and chemical properties give it a very interesting position in the actinide series of inner transition elements.

  2. Designing a story database for use in automatic story generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oinonen, K.M.; Theune, M.; Nijholt, A.; Uijlings, J.R.R.; Harper, R.; Rauterberg, M.; Combetto, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we propose a model for the representation of stories in a story database. The use of such a database will enable computational story generation systems to learn from previous stories and associated user feedback, in order to create believable stories with dramatic plots that invoke an

  3. Minimalism in the modern short story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Razi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Short story has recently become the focus of attention in the late decades in Iran. The expanding value of writing short story is actually a reasonable outcome of the dominance of minimalism- a movement which is based upon simplicity and shortness. Minimalist writers, leaving out redundant features of narration, mainly focus on essentialities through applying a variety of techniques such as cuttings from the interesting moments of real life, evading introduction, applying inter-referents, choice of words, short stanzas and sentences and so on. Looking upon critic’s opinion about such a tendency over the past and present, this article will come up with a brief explanation of the properties of such stories. Finally a sample story “candles will never go dead” will be analyzed and discussed in the lights of such techniques.

  4. The Story of Chocolate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王希玲

    2004-01-01

    American-made chocolates and cocoa products number in the hundreds1. There hides a fascinating2 story behind this wonderful product. To tell that story and provide a better understanding of the chocolate industry and its long-standing traditions is the purpose of this article. The Story of Chocolate is essentially a layman's3 introduction to the subject. It will provide readers an opportunity to view the industry as a whole4.

  5. My Story: Real Stories of People Living with Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Compartir Real Stories from People living with Thalassemia On this Page Rahul’s Story Aaron’s Story Rahul’s ... is Rahul Kapoor, and I was born with thalassemia, a blood disorder which requires transfusions every other ...

  6. Analyzing Teachers' Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Kainan

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an integrated socio-literal approach as a way to analyze work stories. It uses a case of teachers' stories about the administration as an example. The stories focus on grumbles about various activities of members of the management of a school in a small town. The complaints appear in descriptions of the action, the characters, and, in particular, in the way the story is presented to the audience. The stories present a situation of two opposing groups-the administration and the teachers. The presentation of the stories creates a sense of togetherness among the veterans and new teachers in the staff room, and helps the integration of the new teachers into the staff. The veterans use the stories as an opportunity to express their anger at not having been assigned responsibilities on the one hand and their hopes of such promotion on the other. The stories act as a convenient medium to express criticism without entering into open hostilities. Behind them, a common principle can be discerned- the good of the school. The stories describe the infringement of various aspects of the school's social order, and it is possible to elicit from them what general pattern the teachers want to preserve in the school.

  7. Capitalism and human flourishing? : The strange story of the bias to activity and the downgrading of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWhat interpretation of human flourishing, what ideas of value does capitalism in practice embody and promote? To address this question the paper clarifies first that "capitalism" must be understood as more than merely a system of private property and markets. It contains "the prerogative

  8. Probing the Human Brain with Stimulating Electrodes: The Story of Roberts Bartholow's (1874) Experiment on Mary Rafferty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lauren Julius; Almerigi, Jason B.

    2009-01-01

    Roberts Bartholow's 1874 experiment on Mary Rafferty is widely cited as the first demonstration, by direct application of stimulating electrodes, of the motor excitability of the human cerebral cortex. The many accounts of the experiment, however, leave certain questions and details unexamined or unresolved, especially about Bartholow's goals, the…

  9. Capitalism and human flourishing? : The strange story of the bias to activity and the downgrading of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWhat interpretation of human flourishing, what ideas of value does capitalism in practice embody and promote? To address this question the paper clarifies first that "capitalism" must be understood as more than merely a system of private property and markets. It contains "the prerogative

  10. Prospects for in-depth story understanding by computer

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Erik T.

    1999-01-01

    While much research on the hard problem of in-depth story understanding by computer was performed starting in the 1970s, interest shifted in the 1990s to information extraction and word sense disambiguation. Now that a degree of success has been achieved on these easier problems, I propose it is time to return to in-depth story understanding. In this paper I examine the shift away from story understanding, discuss some of the major problems in building a story understanding system, present so...

  11. When's a story not at story?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva

    the social field. The notion ‘story’ here refers to the telling of what occurred according to the teller, ending with the telling of the punchline (see Sacks, 1974 and 1992, vol II, pp.478-482). ‘Narrative’ refers to a more extended unit of actions including also the participants’ evaluation of the reported...... events (e.g. Labov & Waletzky, 1967; Ochs, 1997). Using oral narratives collected from tourist guides, group discussions, meetings and interviews, it will be shown how stories referring to the same historical event are told almost identically regarding structure, but whose function in context differs....... For example, as presented in this paper, a tourist guide tells the same story about a violent motorcycle gang, part of her ancetdotal reportoire, during two guided tours. The story is fixed in content and structure, but when brought into social interaction with tourists, it becomes part of a broader narrative...

  12. Forming "Connections" and Awakening "Visions": Using Short Story Collections in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesesne, Teri S.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how some recent short story collections written for young adults can make studying the genre exciting and interesting for students. Describes how teachers can awaken new vision within students by using the short story in the literature classroom. Focuses on stories written especially for adolescents. (HB)

  13. Everybody Has a Story III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This is the third book in the series “Everybody Has a Story”. The story behind the idea for these books and their title goes back to The Freedom Writers Diary that came about as the result of the teachings of young teacher at a high school in a socially deprived area in Long Beach near Los Angele...... the participating students as these products might be very personal. And personal it has to be, when you become aware of whom you actually are!....... The teacher, Erin Gruwell, found herself more or less forced to base her teachings on the stories of the living conditions of her students. When she became aware of these stories and managed to relate the content of the curriculum to them, her students started to find interest in the subjects of the school...... – and they began to learn. This book is the result of a Freedom Writer course during the spring-semester 2015. During the course the students were faced with different writing exercises as well as hand-on art-making ranging from drawings to photos. The contents of the book are made anonymous to protect...

  14. Karuk Stories #2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; And Others

    Three illustrated stories from the Karuk Indians of northwestern California are told in free English translation and in Karuk with literal English translation. English and Karuk Unifon alphabet charts are provided. Stories tell of seasonal migration of the mockingbird and the swamp robin, coyote's quest for the sun and how he determined the sun's…

  15. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    by exploring how different types of fragmentation create meanings. This is done by studying the work stories of job and personnel consultants and by drawing on the results of a narrative, ethnographic study of a consultancy. The analysis demonstrates how work stories are social practices negotiated, retold...

  16. Tell Them a Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Maude M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Introduces the work of Eula Lee, a fictional storyteller and the feminist author's alter ego. Encourages teachers at all educational levels to become storytellers for the magic of the story itself, the instructional strength of metaphor, and the personal power of interpretation and presentation. Stresses the stories' ability to reinforce community…

  17. Everybody Has a Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book bears witness of Young peoples lived lives across Europe, Russia and Japan. It contains stories about love, loss of love and loss of loved ones, about dreams of future lives and wonders of lives as such. And it tells stories about bullying, mental illness and simple strives just to be able...

  18. Stories on the go

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karen Hvidtfeldt

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on 1001 Stories of Denmark: an internet site and a mobile app that collects and displays stories and visual material connected to places all over Denmark. This site offers a “social media-like” communication frame with various levels of participation. But in reality, 1001 stor...

  19. Stories on the go

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karen Hvidtfeldt

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on 1001 Stories of Denmark: an internet site and a mobile app that collects and displays stories and visual material connected to places all over Denmark. This site offers a “social media-like” communication frame with various levels of participation. But in reality, 1001 stor...

  20. The story of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Mankiewicz, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Questioning how mathematics has evolved over the centuries and for what reasons; how human endeavour and changes in the way we live have been dependent on mathematics, this book tells the story of the impact this intellectual activity has had across cultures and civilizations. It shows how, far from being just the obsession of an elite group of philosophers, priests and scientists, mathematics has in some shape or other entered every area of human activity. The mysterious tally sticks of prehistoric peoples and the terrestial maps used for trade, exploration and warfare; the perennial fascination with the motions of heavenly bodies and changing perspectives on the art and science of vision; all are testament to a mathematics at the heart of history. The path of this changing discipline is marked by a wealth of images, from medieval manuscripts to the unsettling art of Dali or Duchamp, from the austere beauty of Babylonian clay tablets to the delicate complexity of computer-generated images. The text encompass...

  1. Ethics and experimentation on human subjects in mid-nineteenth-century France: the story of the 1859 syphilis experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracobly, Alex

    2003-01-01

    This article examines a series of experiments involving the deliberate infection of human subjects with syphilis that were performed in Paris in 1859 by Dr. Camille Gibert and Dr. Joseph Alexandre Auzias-Turenne. Using the scientific literature on syphilis, the contemporary reaction in the French medical press to Gibert's and Auzias-Turenne's experiments, and the private papers of Auzias-Turenne, this paper places these experiments within a context of scientific and professional rivalry, and seeks to show how both moral and scientific concerns shaped and limited experimental practices in mid-nineteenth-century France.

  2. The Power of Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Don; Fox, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    A major knowledge-sharing issue that is the source of many project problems: how to communicate our intentions so that the information received is the same as the information given. One answer is conversation-the back-and-forth of statement, question, and response that gradually brings talkers and listeners to a shared understanding. Stories also offer a way to share knowledge effectively. While the story teller's intent and the listener's interpretation will not be identical, a good story reliably communicates essential knowledge so it is not only understood but absorbed and embraced. Narrative is one of the oldest knowledge-transfer systems in the world. Religion knows it. Politicians know it. Fairytales know it. Now, knowledge management practitioners are coming to know it, too. But why are stories such a powerful knowledge-transfer tool? And what kinds of knowledge do they transfer? Joseph Campbell, the mythologist, defined stories as serving four major functions: the mystical, the cosmological, the sociological, and the pedagogical. The mystical function of narrative lies in its ability to open up emotional realization that often connects with a transcendent idea such as love or forgiveness. He calls this realization "mystical" because it connects the self with the universal. What Campbell calls the cosmological function of stories relates the self to the outside world, focusing on action, on understanding cause and effect and our role in it. For the cosmological function of stories "to be up to date and really to work in the minds of people who are living in the modern scientific world," Campbell notes, "it must incorporate the modern scientific world." We must continually tell stories that demonstrate our current vision of the world. The sociological function of stories, Campbell explains, helps maintain and validate the social order of a society. Stories pass on information about power relationships, taboos, laws, and the inner workings of communities

  3. Stories on Research, Research on Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine; Mougenot, Catherine; Fleury, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with a group of researchers involved in Participatory Action Research projects on biodiversity and who volunteered to take part in a "storytelling" experiment. Their "stories" were used to describe this new type of research collective comprising various partners, including researchers and managers, focused on obtaining directly…

  4. Stories on the go

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karen Hvidtfeldt

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on 1001 Stories of Denmark: an internet site and a mobile app that collects and displays stories and visual material connected to places all over Denmark. This site offers a “social media-like” communication frame with various levels of participation. But in reality, 1001...... and affective narratives. I argue that these videos and stories demonstrate the potential of mobile and digital cultural heritage sites; however, it requires strategic initiatives and long-term engagement from museums and cultural institutions to create and maintain the level of the dialogue and participation....

  5. The Disarming Seduction of Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Pat C., II

    2001-01-01

    Contends that essays are the proper rhetorical domain of stories, the place where stories most naturally belong when they are being used for the development and enlargement of ideas. Notes that stories are so powerful and distracting that when used together to make a familiar story, they can divert attention away from the essay's idea. Concludes…

  6. Stories in the Cloth: Art Therapy and Narrative Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlock, Lisa Raye

    2016-01-01

    In this article I weave together the relevance of narrative textile work in therapeutic and human rights contexts; showcase Common Threads, an international nonprofit that uses story cloths with survivors of gender-based violence; outline a master's level art therapy course in story cloths; and relate how textiles helped build a sibling…

  7. Stories in the Cloth: Art Therapy and Narrative Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlock, Lisa Raye

    2016-01-01

    In this article I weave together the relevance of narrative textile work in therapeutic and human rights contexts; showcase Common Threads, an international nonprofit that uses story cloths with survivors of gender-based violence; outline a master's level art therapy course in story cloths; and relate how textiles helped build a sibling…

  8. The value of radiocarbon analysis in determining the forensic interest of human skeletal remains found in unusual circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Puentes, Katerina; Soares, António Monge; Santos, Agostinho; Magalhães, Teresa

    2012-02-01

    The case under analysis refers to the remains of a young adult female found in a shallow grave during the construction work of a hospital in Northern Portugal. The forensic interest of the finding could not be ruled out since distinguishing features pointing to an archaeological grave were lacking. For example, absence of archaeological artefacts could not establish its forensic significance with certainty, together with the absence of modern objects, such as remnants of clothing or personal objects. In addition, although the remains were badly preserved, the condition may not have resulted from a long post-depositional period, but instead could be explained by the geology of the site and the presence of plant roots. The radiocarbon analysis of the remains was meant to establish the death of the individual to before or after the mid-1950s, from comparison with bomb-curve content values. A value of 0.9789 ± 0.0044 for F(14)C (pmC = 97.19 ± 0.44% Modern or Δ(14)C = -28.1 ± 4.4‰) was obtained, which placed the death of the individual in the pre-mod-1950s period. This report illustrates the use of radiocarbon analysis in establishing whether the human remains are contemporary or not and describes evidence for what appears to be an historic clandestine grave. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many ... effects of the disorder. How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? Video of How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? A ...

  10. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick ... Clinical Research Trials and You The Basics Finding a Clinical Trial List of Registries Personal Stories For ...

  11. Building our stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Tourism transforms people and places. New stakeholders are emerging, landscapes of power are shifting, and lines of responsibilities are being redrawn. Everyday stories of coping, success, empowerment, nurturing, relationship building and activism are important tools for reflection and learning...

  12. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  13. Stories Under Your Feet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riesto, Svava; Støvring, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Review of the new Købmagergade design by Karres et Brandts and Polyform. The article discusses the new design, its uses and story-telling, seen in relation to the "urban space boom" in Copenhagen of the early 2000nds.......Review of the new Købmagergade design by Karres et Brandts and Polyform. The article discusses the new design, its uses and story-telling, seen in relation to the "urban space boom" in Copenhagen of the early 2000nds....

  14. Creating stories for learning about the neonatal care experience through the eyes of student nurses: An interpretive, narrative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Storytelling is an increasingly well recognised and valued platform to learn about the human experience within healthcare. Little is known however about how stories can enhance understanding in neonatal care, a specialised field offering rich opportunities for learning. This study focuses on the creation of stories based on the experiences of student nurses to inform teaching and learning strategies in the neonatal field. The study aimed to create stories from the narratives of student nurses working within the neonatal field and identify what key themes for learning emerged in order to develop a storytelling resource to share experiences with their peers. An interpretive, constructivist approach was used to collect, analyse and create stories from student nurse's experiences, in line with narrative inquiry. Six pre-registration children's nursing students were selected by purposive sampling. Interviews were undertaken within six weeks following placement completion in an agreed location. Narratives were obtained by semi-structured interviews. Narrative analysis and core story creation was undertaken to construct stories and key learning themes emerged which provided the pedagogical basis for subsequent digital resource development. Key themes emerged relating to the insight and observances of student nurses and the neonatal journey they had experienced, including the nature of neonatal care, experiences of the neonate and parents, the environment and their own learning transition. Preliminary peer evaluation of the storytelling resource revealed storytelling as an interesting and novel approach to teaching & learning, learning from ones' peers, preparation for practice and a valuable insight into a new specialist area. The study has value to teaching and learning by enabling an appreciation of how narrative can be used to portray the experiences of learners. Findings also support an approach to analysing narrative to create stories for learning and inform

  15. Embedding With Scientists Results In Better Understanding Of How Science Is Really Done, More Human Stories, And More Effective Communication About Controversial Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.

    2015-12-01

    Until recently much science communication focused on press conferences and results, "Eureka"-moments issued from podiums. Recent documentaries, however, such as PARTICLE FEVER and THE YEAR OF PLUTO go behind the scenes to show long years of effort, and occasional failures, revealing a more honest—and more engaging—picture of how science is actually done. Audiences respond when researchers show a more human face, and candid moments of stress and exhaustion as well as exhilaration make eventual results more meaningful. This presentation will offer evidence that this approach is also effective on contested topics such as climate change, where long-term relationships between journalists and researchers can help structure communications that avoid distracting controversies. A cameraman spends a full week with ornithologist George Divoky on remote Cooper Island, Alaska: the resulting video podcast informs a stage play in London, and George goes on the road with POLAR-PALOOZA across America and internationally, sharing stories about the birds he studies and the polar bears he has to increasingly avoid, as climate change brings them onshore in search of food. POLAR-PALOOZA also introduced Richard Alley and other Arctic and Antarctic scientists to a team of producers and directors, resulting in a 3-part PBS series and museum outreach that is able to present climate change science in an authoritative and apolitical way. That leads, in turn, to leading researchers including video and more visually-dynamic approaches in communicating their work to the public. An upcoming public television series, THE CROWD & THE CLOUD, will devote one program to insights about climate change gained over decades of interaction between producers and scientists. Many mainstream media outlets have cut back on science coverage and released their dedicated "beat" reporters. However a wealth of new channels offer venues for this approach, and falling prices for high quality cameras and editing

  16. At the Very Root of the Development of Interest: Using Human Body Contexts to Improve Women's Emotional Engagement in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire-Duquette, Geneviève; Charland, Patrick; Riopel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In physics, women find contexts concerning human biology, medical applications, or natural phenomena highly relevant (Hoffmann, 2002), and the rareness or absence of these in physics curricula may make it more difficult for women to develop and maintain their interest in physics. To date, research in physics education addressing student's…

  17. Using stories to disseminate research: the attributes of representative stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, John F

    2007-11-01

    When researchers communicate their findings to patients, clinicians, policy-makers, or media, they may find it helpful to supplement quantitative data with stories about individuals who represent themes in their research. Whether such stories are gathered during the research itself or identified from other sources, researchers must develop strategies for assessing their representativeness. This paper proposes 5 attributes of representative stories: (1) expression of important themes in the research, (2) explicit location in the "distribution" of stories that exemplify the theme, (3) verifiability, (4) acknowledgment of uncertainty, and (5) compelling narration. This paper summarizes research on substance abuse among physicians, and uses these 5 attributes to assess the representativeness of a published case report and a fictional short story about addicted physicians. While neither story is fully representative of the research, the process of evaluating these stories illustrates an approach to identifying representative stories for use in disseminating research.

  18. Automatic Story Segmentation for TV News Video Using Multiple Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Émilie Dumont

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While video content is often stored in rather large files or broadcasted in continuous streams, users are often interested in retrieving only a particular passage on a topic of interest to them. It is, therefore, necessary to split video documents or streams into shorter segments corresponding to appropriate retrieval units. We propose here a method for the automatic segmentation of TV news videos into stories. A-multiple-descriptor based segmentation approach is proposed. The selected multimodal features are complementary and give good insights about story boundaries. Once extracted, these features are expanded with a local temporal context and combined by an early fusion process. The story boundaries are then predicted using machine learning techniques. We investigate the system by experiments conducted using TRECVID 2003 data and protocol of the story boundary detection task, and we show that the proposed approach outperforms the state-of-the-art methods while requiring a very small amount of manual annotation.

  19. Reading, Writing, and Mystery Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Sylvia M.

    1983-01-01

    Assesses students' responses to and production of story conventions in detective or mystery stories and explores students' responses to literature as potential connections between comprehending and composing text. (MM)

  20. Recension: Mao - The Unknown Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Anmeldelse - kritisk! - til Sveriges førende Kinatidsskrift af Jung Chang & Jon Halliday's sensationelle "Mao - the Unknown Story".......Anmeldelse - kritisk! - til Sveriges førende Kinatidsskrift af Jung Chang & Jon Halliday's sensationelle "Mao - the Unknown Story"....

  1. Pollyvocal: Short Stories

    OpenAIRE

    washington, gene

    2013-01-01

    Most fiction writers write (or attempt to write) in a univocal voice (or "style"). Hemingway's voice differs from Faulkner's, Carver's from Fitzgerald's and so on. Difference, it seems fair to say, helps to establish their identity. By contrast, this collection of stories embodies an attempt, over the last 55 years or so, to write in the polyvocal. One can see this "attempt" as an "interruption" of the old by the start of something "new." The voice of each story, with the exception of #1, int...

  2. The perfect shape spiral stories

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    This book uses the spiral shape as a key to a multitude of strange and seemingly disparate stories about art, nature, science, mathematics, and the human endeavour. In a way, the book is itself organized as a spiral, with almost disconnected chapters circling around and closing in on the common theme. A particular strength of the book is its extremely cross-disciplinary nature - everything is fun, and everything is connected! At the same time, the author puts great emphasis on mathematical and scientific correctness, in contrast, perhaps, with some earlier books on spirals. Subjects include the mathematical properties of spirals, sea shells, sun flowers, Greek architecture, air ships, the history of mathematics, spiral galaxies, the anatomy of the human hand, the art of prehistoric Europe, Alfred Hitchcock, and spider webs, to name a few.

  3. Sophie's story: writing missing journeys

    OpenAIRE

    Parr, Hester; Stevenson, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    'Sophie’s story' is a creative rendition of an interview narrative gathered in a research project on missing people. The paper explains why Sophie’s story was written and details the wider intention to provide new narrative resources for police officer training, families of missing people and returned missing people. We contextualize this cultural intervention with an argument about the transformative potential of writing trauma stories. It is suggested that trauma stories produce difficult a...

  4. Love story under the H-bomb shadow

    CERN Document Server

    Filipchuk, K E

    2013-01-01

    The physics is created by human beings with all weaknesses of human nature. This story caught our attention since it demonstrates how fragile the human destiny is and even genius cannot find freedom and preserve human dignity in the face of the totalitarian state.

  5. Disney stories getting to digital

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Newton

    2012-01-01

    Highlights how technological innovation made Disney's characters and stories more engaging for audiences Explores how Disney uses contemporary gaming and online environments to create interactive stories Presents an insider's look at the creation process for their digital games, including The Lion King Animated Story Book, Disney Blast and Toontown

  6. Preschoolers' Quarantining of Fantasy Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richert, Rebekah A.; Smith, Erin I.

    2011-01-01

    Preschool-aged children are exposed to fantasy stories with the expectation that they will learn messages in those stories that are applied to real-world situations. We examined children's transfer from fantastical and real stories. Over the course of 2 studies, 3 1/2- to 5 1/2-year-old children were less likely to transfer problem solutions from…

  7. Story Telling and Educational Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Terry

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author first places story telling in context within the broad range of effort associated with case study methods. Then, the author discusses aspects of fieldwork which underlie story telling, first moves, key questions, tricks, listening, looking and synthesis. The author concludes with evaluative criteria for story telling and…

  8. Storytelling? Everyone Has a Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    School librarians can assume an important role in preserving and perpetuating the oral tradition. The same skills and techniques when telling a personal story can be transmitted to telling various kinds of stories from literature and history. For school librarians to be successful storytellers, they need to select stories that they like and enjoy…

  9. Reporting science and conflicts of interest in the lay press.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Forthright reporting of financial ties and conflicts of interest of researchers is associated with public trust in and esteem for the scientific enterprise. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched Lexis/Nexis Academic News for the top news stories in science published in 2004 and 2005. We conducted a content analysis of 1152 newspaper stories. Funders of the research were identified in 38% of stories, financial ties of the researchers were reported in 11% of stories, and 5% reported financial ties of sources quoted. Of 73 stories not reporting on financial ties, 27% had financial ties publicly disclosed in scholarly journals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because science journalists often did not report conflict of interest information, adherence to gold-standard recommendations for science journalism was low. Journalists work under many different constraints, but nonetheless news reports of scientific research were incomplete, potentially eroding public trust in science.

  10. Hmong story cloths

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arkenberg, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

      The Hmong, a nomadic and agrarian people, may date back 5,000 years. Today there are about 150,000 Hmong in the United States, where their story cloths and embroidered items often appear in craft shows and exhibitions...

  11. Blue Willow Story Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  12. How Stories From Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Minnie

    Four simple "how" stories from Alaskan legend are presented in large type and amply illustrated. In "How the Caribou Lost His Teeth", Siqpik's only son is eaten by the sharp-toothed caribou, so Siqpik feeds the animal sour berries to make his teeth fall out. "How the Loon Got His Spots" relates how the raven paints…

  13. Gamers Telling Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtslund, Anne-Mette Bech

    2010-01-01

    of Warcraft , make sense of their gaming experience, and how they build and uphold a community identity by telling stories online. I argue that in studying and conceptualizing these types of texts through the proposed theoretical framework, we can gain insights into the process of the formation of meaning...

  14. Teaching Science through Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Children find comfort in stories. They are familiar, accessible and entertaining. By teaching science through narratives, we can provide that same comfort and access to scientific content to children of all ages. In this article, I will discuss how, through the use of narratives in science instruction, we can provide students with a deeper…

  15. Personal Digital Video Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Henningsen, Birgitte Sølbeck; Louw, Arnt Vestergaard

    2016-01-01

    agenda focusing on video productions in combination with digital storytelling, followed by a presentation of the digital storytelling features. The paper concludes with a suggestion to initiate research in what is identified as Personal Digital Video (PDV) Stories within longitudinal settings, while...

  16. Stories Under Your Feet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riesto, Svava; Støvring, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Review of the new Købmagergade design by Karres et Brandts and Polyform. The article discusses the new design, its uses and story-telling, seen in relation to the "urban space boom" in Copenhagen of the early 2000nds....

  17. New Suburban Stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dines, M.; Vermeulen, T.J.V.

    2013-01-01

    Exploring fiction, film and art from across the USA, South America, Asia, Europe and Australia, New Suburban Stories brings together new research from leading international scholars to examine cultural representations of the suburbs, home to a rapidly increasing proportion of the world's population.

  18. Postcolonial Entanglements: Unruling Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I use Donna Haraway's philosophy to think about postcolonial encounters between different species. I follow entangled stories of the deer/settler-child figure to trouble colonialisms and untangle the histories and trajectories that we inhabit with other species through colonial histories. I shy away from generalizations and…

  19. How's Your Story Arsenal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Coleen

    1992-01-01

    Principals who wax eloquent over learning outcomes or socioeconomic factors are bound to bore their audiences. This article suggests ways to put zip into speeches and illustrate important points. Story and anecdotal material ranges from "the community leader who taught for a day" to "the worst child abuse case." All highlight people trying to…

  20. Teaching Ethics: Telling Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Ann

    1995-01-01

    In order to develop moral literacy, nursing students should be exposed to both rules- and justice-based ethics and to a feminist care perspective. They can learn to analyze and understand ethical dilemmas and to tell their own stories in order to identify the influences on their decision making. (SK)

  1. The Story of Iyal

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-08-24

    In this podcast, a mother tells her compelling story about a family living with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.  Created: 8/24/2009 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 8/24/2009.

  2. Telling the patient's story: using theatre training to improve case presentation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Rachel R; Rian, Johanna D; Gregory, Jeremy K; Bostwick, J Michael; Barrett Birk, Candace; Chalfant, Louise; Scanlon, Paul D; Hall-Flavin, Daniel K

    2011-06-01

    A medical student's ability to present a case history is a critical skill that is difficult to teach. Case histories presented without theatrical engagement may fail to catch the attention of their intended recipients. More engaging presentations incorporate 'stage presence', eye contact, vocal inflection, interesting detail and succinct, well organised performances. They convey stories effectively without wasting time. To address the didactic challenge for instructing future doctors in how to 'act', the Mayo Medical School and The Mayo Clinic Center for Humanities in Medicine partnered with the Guthrie Theater to pilot the programme 'Telling the Patient's Story'. Guthrie teaching artists taught storytelling skills to medical students through improvisation, writing, movement and acting exercises. Mayo Clinic doctors participated and provided students with feedback on presentations and stories from their own experiences in patient care. The course's primary objective was to build students' confidence and expertise in storytelling. These skills were then applied to presenting cases and communicating with patients in a fresher, more engaging way. This paper outlines the instructional activities as aligned with course objectives. Progress was tracked by comparing pre-course and post-course surveys from the seven participating students. All agreed that the theatrical techniques were effective teaching methods. Moreover, this project can serve as an innovative model for how arts and humanities professionals can be incorporated for teaching and professional development initiatives at all levels of medical education.

  3. Making working in retailing interesting: A study of human resource management practices in Danish grocery retail chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Buck, Nuka

    In this paper we investigate the human resource management practices of five Danish grocery retail chains from the perspective of both retailers and employees. We present an analytical framework for analysing the social and institutional context of Danish retailing and interpret our case study...

  4. Making working in retailing interesting: A study of human resource management practices in Danish grocery retail chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Buck, Nuka

    In this paper we investigate the human resource management practices of five Danish grocery retail chains from the perspective of both retailers and employees. We present an analytical framework for analysing the social and institutional context of Danish retailing and interpret our case study...

  5. Gender Interest Differences with Multimedia Learning Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passig, David; Levin, Haya

    1999-01-01

    This study of 90 kindergarten children examined gender differences in learning interest from different designs of multimedia interfaces. Results indicate a significant difference between boys and girls in the influence of the design of interactive multimedia stories on time on task and on level of satisfaction with the interfaces. (Author/LRW)

  6. MR-based automatic delineation of volumes of interest in human brain PET images using probability maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karina; Hasselbalch, Steen G.;

    2005-01-01

    delineation of the VOI set. The approach was also shown to work equally well in individuals with pronounced cerebral atrophy. Probability-map-based automatic delineation of VOIs is a fast, objective, reproducible, and safe way to assess regional brain values from PET or SPECT scans. In addition, the method......The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an observer-independent approach for automatic generation of volume-of-interest (VOI) brain templates to be used in emission tomography studies of the brain. The method utilizes a VOI probability map created on the basis of a database of several...... subjects' MR-images, where VOI sets have been defined manually. High-resolution structural MR-images and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding PET-images (in terms of (18)F-altanserin binding) from 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment were included for the analysis. A template including...

  7. Gypsy stories: Narrative as a teaching stratagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čvorović Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the performance of narratives as adaptive cultural beha­viors among Gypsies in Mačva county, western Serbia. Storytelling is a universal activity and may well be oldest of the arts. It has always provided a vehicle for the expression of ideas, particularly in societies relying on oral tradition. Gypsies are present in Serbia since the Middle Ages, living within a larger Serbian culture as a minority group. Mačva, an agriculturally rich county in western Serbia, is a place where local Gypsy traditions are still alive and which help distinguish between Gypsy subgroups and the larger Serbian society. The stories analyzed are part of a collec­tion made from several different Gypsy groups exhibiting varying degrees of influence from Serbian culture. Gypsies in Serbia have no written literature, but possess a rich and varied storytelling tradition delivered by word of mouth through the generations. Their stories bear testimony to the evolutionarily important mecha­nisms employed by Gypsies to make their way in the world. Gypsy stories concern many aspects of the relationship between themselves and other social groups, both in the past and the present. At the same time, the stories deal with universal adaptive problems, such as origin/ethnicity, kinship and mate acquisition. By applying the concepts and folk knowledge from their own culture, Gypsies have managed to provide for themselves the guidelines to overcome these problems within a par­ticular environment. Thus it is that these stories reflect both human universals and cultural peculiarities - by utilization of localized cultural solutions to adaptive problems. The success Gypsies have achieved in surviving harassment, and their ability to sustain themselves and their cultures despite social rejection can be attributed, in part, to the power of the traditional stories to influence the behavior of those who hear them. For the Gypsies, telling and listening to the stories

  8. The Story of the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Outreach

    2003-01-01

    These pages were extracted from the 2003 CMS Experiment Brochure. These pages explain the story of our universe and how it was formed over time. All explanations are coupled with simple colorful illustrations, one per sheet. Each can be used as an individual teaching aid or together as a set. Topics covered: - Quantum Gravity Era- Grand Unification Era - Electro Weak Era - Protons and Neutrons Formation- Nuclei formation- Atoms and Light Era - Galaxy Formation - Today Humans wondering where this all came from- The Size of Things - Instruments and the observables- Particles (Leptons & Quarks) -Forces - Interactions: coupling of forces to matter - Short history and new frontiers - Unification of forces - Summary (includes timeline of theories/discoveries)

  9. The human heart and the circulatory system as an interesting interdisciplinary topic in lessons of physics and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volná, M.; Látal, F.; Kubínek, R.; Richterek, L.

    2014-01-01

    Many topics which are closely related can be found in the national curriculum of the Czech Republic for physics and biology. One of them is the heart and the circulatory system in the human body. This topic was examined cross curriculum, a teaching module was created and the topic was chosen for our research. The task was to determine if the students of bachelor study are aware of connections between physics and biology within this topic and whether we can help them effectively to describe the corresponding physics phenomena in the human body connected, for example, with a heart attack or with the measurement of blood pressure. In this paper, the heart and the circulatory system are presented as suitable topics for an interdisciplinary teaching module which includes both theoretical and experimental parts. The module was evaluated by a group of first-year undergraduate students of physics at the Faculty of Science, Palacký University. The acquired knowledge was compared with another control group through a test. The highest efficiency of the module was evaluated on the basis of questions that covered the calculation problems.

  10. Integrating temporal and spatial scales: Human structural network motifs across age and region-of-interest size

    CERN Document Server

    Echtermeyer, Christoph; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Mohr, Harald; Uhlhaas, Peter J; Kaiser, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Human brain networks can be characterized at different temporal or spatial scales given by the age of the subject or the spatial resolution of the neuroimaging method. Integration of data across scales can only be successful if the combined networks show a similar architecture. One way to compare networks is to look at spatial features, based on fibre length, and topological features of individual nodes where outlier nodes form single node motifs whose frequency yields a fingerprint of the network. Here, we observe how characteristic single node motifs change over age (12-23 years) and network size (414, 813, and 1615 nodes) for diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) structural connectivity in healthy human subjects. First, we find the number and diversity of motifs in a network to be strongly correlated. Second, comparing different scales, the number and diversity of motifs varied across the temporal (subject age) and spatial (network resolution) scale: certain motifs might only occur at one spatial scale or for a c...

  11. Stories from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Julie; Pokhrel, Kabi

    2011-11-01

    "Stories From the Field" is a series of short profiles of tobacco control programs and their leaders, showcasing promising technical assistance and training models in Louisiana, Puerto Rico, the Cherokee Nation, West Virginia, the Pacific Islands, and the Virgin Islands. The series illuminates key themes of collaboration with diverse stakeholders, elimination of health disparities, building tobacco control coalitions, engaging youth to reduce commercial tobacco use, sustaining tobacco control efforts, and the use of the media to raise public awareness that are highlighted in the Health Promotion Practice Supplement Theme Issue, Training and Technical Assistance: Lessons Learned to Sustain Social Norm Changes in Tobacco Control. Common tobacco control strategies bind the stories together. Local knowledge, coalition building, community involvement, innovative partnerships, and educational outreach are at the core of all of these tobacco control projects.

  12. Teddy Bear Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Caldas-Coulthardt, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a semiotic analysis of a key cultural artefact, the teddy bear. After introducing the iconography of the teddy bear, it analyses different kinds of stories to show how teddy bears are endowed with meaning in everyday life: stories from children's books, reminiscenses by adults...... about their childhood teddy bears, and children's accounts of what they do with teddy bears, both written for school and told 'out of school', The chapter sees teddy bears as artefacts that provide a cultural channeling for the child's need of a transitional object and argues that the meanings of teddy...... bears have traditionally centred on interpersonal relations within the nuclear family, but have recently been institutionalized and commercialized....

  13. STORIES – A POWERFUL TOOL IN TRIBAL LITERATURE, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO HOW MARTEN GOT HIS SPOTS: AND OTHER KOOTENAI INDIAN STORIES

    OpenAIRE

    J. Sripadmadevi

    2013-01-01

    Since time immemorial, stories hold prime place in the process of individuation. The art of story-telling is as old as human civilization. And the world of Tribe is of no exception. Many of the rural and tribal societies are oral in nature. Their history is not written but orally transmitted from one generation to another, in the form of poetry, songs, proverbs, stories, narrative dances and various rituals. Their historical and cultural information are passed on through some of these means. ...

  14. An Airmans Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    would have worldwide civil implications as well. Civil aviation, Wall Street and the agricultural community are just a sample of orga- nizations...questionable. Not coincidently, civil aircraft, Wall Street and the agriculture community face the same dire impacts if civil cyberspace is unavailable as well...4 | Air & Space Power Journal An Airman’s Story General John E. Hyten, USAF Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed or implied in the Journal

  15. Investigating media stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Stuart

    2008-08-01

    Perceived lapses of fact or emphasis in popular science coverage in the media can irritate active researchers: concern for establishing facts and details of scientific arguments can override appreciation of the value of a good popular story in the press. A programme to educate early-career astronomers about the different goals and priorities of the wider media is equipping research stars of the future to get their messages across.

  16. Storie di genere, storie di partito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bellè

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lo studio delle narrazioni di genere all'interno di questo tipo di organizzazione desta inoltre un particolare interesse anche in ragione della sottorappresentazione delle donne nella sfera della politica. Si tratta di un deficit democratico che coinvolge i sistemi politici moderni nel loro complesso, ma che interessa l'Italia con una particolare gravità ed evidenza. La questione della sottorappresentazione politica delle donne è stata sinora affrontata prevalentemente in termini tecnico-legali (politiche di pari opportunità ed azione positiva, o di teoria politica (la dicotomia pubblico-maschile e privato-femminile come fondamento del contratto sessuale della politica. Mancano invece contributi che guardino ai partiti come organizzazioni largamente responsabili dei processi di selezione e promozione delle carriere politiche, dunque come luoghi di quotidiana produzione di pratiche e culture di genere, più o meno egualitarie o, viceversa, discriminatorie. Sulla base di tale vuoto di ricerca e riflessione, il presente articolo si propone di mettere in luce le pratiche e le culture di genere che emergono dai racconti di uomini e donne all'interno di due organizzazioni partitiche, una di destra e una di sinistra, situate nel contesto territoriale della provincia di Trento. La ricerca è stata condotta attraverso lo strumento dell'intervista semi-strutturata, coinvolgendo quattro donne e quattro uomini, divisi per coppie di età (un uomo ed una donna giovani ed un uomo ed una donna da lungo presenti nel partito, accostabili per quanto concerne ruolo e posizione nelle organizzazioni partitiche considerate. L'attenzione analitica si è concentrata sulla costruzione del genere di uomini e donne intervistati/e, intesa sia come dimensione ed esperienza individuale (le storie di genere dei/lle singoli/e, sia come dimensione organizzativa più ampia (le storie di genere delle organizzazioni, narrate dalle diverse voci. Un'ulteriore dimensione analitica

  17. Game story space of professional sports: Australian rules football

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley, Dilan Patrick; Reagan, Andrew J.; Mitchell, Lewis; Danforth, Christopher M.; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2016-05-01

    Sports are spontaneous generators of stories. Through skill and chance, the script of each game is dynamically written in real time by players acting out possible trajectories allowed by a sport's rules. By properly characterizing a given sport's ecology of "game stories," we are able to capture the sport's capacity for unfolding interesting narratives, in part by contrasting them with random walks. Here we explore the game story space afforded by a data set of 1310 Australian Football League (AFL) score lines. We find that AFL games exhibit a continuous spectrum of stories rather than distinct clusters. We show how coarse graining reveals identifiable motifs ranging from last-minute comeback wins to one-sided blowouts. Through an extensive comparison with biased random walks, we show that real AFL games deliver a broader array of motifs than null models, and we provide consequent insights into the narrative appeal of real games.

  18. The game story space of professional sports: Australian Rules Football

    CERN Document Server

    Kiley, D P; Mitchell, L; Danforth, C M; Dodds, P S

    2015-01-01

    Sports are spontaneous generators of stories. Through skill and chance, the script of each game is dynamically written in real time by players acting out possible trajectories allowed by a sport's rules. By properly characterizing a given sport's ecology of `game stories', we are able to capture the sport's capacity for unfolding interesting narratives, in part by contrasting them with random walks. Here, we explore the game story space afforded by a data set of 1,310 Australian Football League (AFL) score lines. We find that AFL games exhibit a continuous spectrum of stories and show how coarse-graining reveals identifiable motifs ranging from last minute comeback wins to one-sided blowouts. Through an extensive comparison with a random walk null model, we show that AFL games are superdiffusive and deliver a much broader array of motifs, and we provide consequent insights into the narrative appeal of real games.

  19. Decision story strategy: a practical approach for teaching decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D L; Hamrick, M H; Anspaugh, D J

    1981-12-01

    Teachers are usually very enthusiastic in their evaluations of decision stories. Decision Story Strategies offer a change of pace, promote student involvement and stimulate creative thinking, problem solving and everpresent creative teaching-learning opportunities. The real-life problems presented within the structure of a decision story provide meaningful learning opportunities for students. Students begin to think in a broader perspective when considering other points of view and information sources. The Decision Story Strategy used with the Decision-Making Model provides a powerful tool for health educators to develop skills for making and evaluating decisions in an interesting and meaningful context. It may not be a panacea for all health educators, but is an effective strategy for the teacher concerned with developing independent decision makers. Most importantly, students are provided opportunities to solve their present problems as well as develop decision-making skills for the future.

  20. Game story space of professional sports: Australian rules football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley, Dilan Patrick; Reagan, Andrew J; Mitchell, Lewis; Danforth, Christopher M; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2016-05-01

    Sports are spontaneous generators of stories. Through skill and chance, the script of each game is dynamically written in real time by players acting out possible trajectories allowed by a sport's rules. By properly characterizing a given sport's ecology of "game stories," we are able to capture the sport's capacity for unfolding interesting narratives, in part by contrasting them with random walks. Here we explore the game story space afforded by a data set of 1310 Australian Football League (AFL) score lines. We find that AFL games exhibit a continuous spectrum of stories rather than distinct clusters. We show how coarse graining reveals identifiable motifs ranging from last-minute comeback wins to one-sided blowouts. Through an extensive comparison with biased random walks, we show that real AFL games deliver a broader array of motifs than null models, and we provide consequent insights into the narrative appeal of real games.

  1. Story-telling, Earth-Sciences and Geoethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohle, Martin; Sibilla, Anna; Graells, Robert Casals i.

    2015-04-01

    People are engineers, even the artist. People like stories, even the engineers. Engineering shapes the intersections of humans and their environments including with the geosphere. Geoethics considers values upon which to base practices how to intersect the geosphere. Story-telling is a skilful human practice to describe perception of values in different contexts to influence their application. Traditional earth-centric narrations of rural communities have been lost in the global urbanisation process. These former-time narrations related to the "sacrum" - matters not possible to be explained with reasoning. Science and technology, industrialisation and global urbanisation require an other kind of earth-centric story-telling. Now at the fringe of the Anthropocene, humans can base their earth-centricity on knowledge and scientific thinking. We argue that modern story-telling about the functioning of Earth's systems and the impact of humankind's activities on these systems is needed, also in particular because citizens rarely can notice how the geosphere intersects with their daily dealings; putting weather and disasters aside. Modern earth-centric story-telling would offer citizens opportunities to develop informed position towards humankind's place within earth-systems. We argue that such "earth-science story-lines" should be part of the public discourse to engage citizens who have more or less "expert-knowledge". Understanding the functioning of the Earth is needed for economy and values suitable for an anthropophil society. Multi-faceted discussion of anthropogenic global change and geoengineering took off recently; emerging from discussions about weather and hazard mitigation. Going beyond that example; we illustrate opportunities for rich story-telling on intersections of humans' activities and the geosphere. These 'modern narrations' can weave science, demographics, linguistics and cultural histories into earth-centric stories around daily dealings of citizens

  2. I know my story and I know your story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Dorthe Kirkegaard; Pillemer, David B

    2016-01-01

    . Emotion ratings of both personal and vicarious life story chapters were related to personality traits and self-esteem, although relations were more consistent for personal chapters. CONCLUSION: Personal and vicarious life stories share important similarities. Mental models of other people include...... vicarious life stories that serve to expand the self as well as facilitate understanding of others. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  3. The psychology of telling murder stories: do we think in scripts, exemplars, or prototypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Richard L; Richmond, Tracey L; Seib, Hope M; Rauch, Shannon M; Hackney, Amy A

    2002-01-01

    According to the story model of Pennington and Hastie, jurors collect information at trial and modify it with general knowledge to create case stories. Schank and Ableson argue that human memory is organized to tell and understand stories. However, Finkel and Groscup questioned the use of manipulated, experimenter-constructed narratives to demonstrate the existence of multiple prototypical crime stories. We interviewed 76 jury eligible, death qualified citizens and asked them to imagine a first-degree murder scenario, describing the events that led to the killing. We coded the presence of dichotomous variables in the resulting stories and identified at least three shared story prototypes using cluster and profile analysis. We conclude that people do not store crime stories as simple prototypes and comment on the implications of this finding for legal decision-making.

  4. 'Are We Not Human?' Stories of Stigma, Disability and HIV from Lusaka, Zambia and Their Implications for Access to Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Janet A; Bond, Virginia A; Nixon, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    The advent of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in Southern Africa holds the promise of shifting the experience of HIV toward that of a manageable chronic condition. However, this potential can only be realized when persons living with HIV are able to access services without barriers, which can include stigma. Our qualitative study explored experiences of persons living with disabilities (PWD) in Lusaka, Zambia who became HIV-positive (PWD/HIV+). We conducted interviews with 32 participants (21 PWD/HIV+ and 11 key informants working in the fields of HIV and/or disability). Inductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts was informed by narrative theory. Participants' accounts highlighted the central role of stigma experienced by PWD/HIV+, with stigmatizing attitudes closely linked to prevailing societal assumptions that PWD are asexual. Seeking diagnostic and treatment services for HIV was perceived as evidence of PWD being sexually active. Participants recounted that for PWD/HIV+, stigma was enacted in a variety of settings, including the queue for health services, their interactions with healthcare providers, and within their communities. Stigmatizing accounts told about PWD/HIV+ were described as having important consequences. Not only did participants recount stories of internalized stigma (with its damaging effects on self-perception), but also that negative experiences resulted in some PWD preferring to "die quietly at home" rather than being subjected to the stigmatizing gaze of others when attempting to access life-preserving ART. Participants recounted how experiences of stigma also affected their willingness to continue ART, their willingness to disclose their HIV status to others, as well as their social relations. However, participants also offered counter-stories, actively resisting stigmatizing accounts and portraying themselves as resilient and resourceful social actors. The study highlights a significant barrier to healthcare experienced by PWD

  5. Ghost-Story Telling: Keeping It Appropriate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for telling ghost stories at camp involve considering children's fears at different ages, telling age appropriate stories, determining appropriate times for telling ghost stories, and minimizing fear when a child becomes frightened by a ghost story. Includes tips on the selection, preparation, and presentation of ghost stories. (LP)

  6. Unravelling the mystery of reality : typical Canadian elements in the short stories of Alice Munro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kustec

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary Canadian short story has a specific place among literary genres in Canadian literature. It culminated in the sixties of this century, when the Canadians looked to their literature with greater interest. Canadian short story writers started to write in a different tone, and showed special interest for new themes. After 1960 authors, such as Henry Kreisel, Norman Levine, Anne Hebert, Mavis Gallant, Ethel Wilson, Joyce Marshall, Hugh Hood, Hugh Garner, Margaret Laurence, Audrey Callahan Thomas, Mordecai Richler, and Alice Munro, refused to use the traditional plot, and showed more interest for characterisation. By using a typical Canadian setting, their stories began to reflect social events of their time. A new awareness of identity stepped forward, and above all their stories became a reflection of the diversity of life in all Canadian provinces. The contemporary Canadian short story writers began to overstep the boundaries of their imagination.

  7. Trauma and Narrative Wreckage in the Biblical Story of Hagar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles M. Rix

    2015-01-01

    The story of Hagar (Genesis 16 and 12) figures prominently in Bible's patriarchal narratives of both the elected and rejected with respect to divine promise. As the story of an abused foreign woman cast out into an inhospitable wilderness along with her son, the story raises troubling questions about the portrayal of domestic violence perpetuated by those otherwise celebrated as “faithful” within biblical narratives: Abraham and his wife Sarah. In response to the relative silence on the topic of domestic violence among clergy and leaders of churches, synagogues, and other “sacred spaces”, this paper explores a reading of Hagar's story that reclaims her value as a human being. With the help of post-Shoah reading sensitivities that expose strategies of dehumanization, this reading makes visible the way in which the ancient writer/reactor of Genesis performs as an advocate for Hagar in the face of the abuse heaped upon her. In so doing, Hagar's story is transformed from a narrative about a rejected “other” into one that exposes abuse by the so-called“elected.” Thus read, the story provides support and encouragement for victims in contemporary religious cultures to step forward and tell their stories.

  8. Discovery stories in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Diana Jaleh

    School science has been criticized for its lack of emphasis on the tentative, dynamic nature of science as a process of learning more about our world. This criticism is the guiding force for this present body of work, which focuses on the question: what are the educational benefits for middle school students of reading texts that highlight the process of science in the form of a discovery narrative? This dissertation traces my journey through a review of theoretical perspectives of narrative, an analysis of first-hand accounts of scientific discovery, the complex process of developing age-appropriate, cohesive and engaging science texts for middle school students, and a comparison study (N=209) that seeks to determine the unique benefits of the scientific discovery narrative for the interest in and retained understanding of conceptual information presented in middle school science texts. A total of 209 middle school participants in nine different classrooms from two different schools participated in the experimental study. Each subject read two science texts that differed in topic (the qualities of and uses for radioactive elements and the use of telescopic technology to see planets in space) and genre (the discovery narrative and the "conceptually known exposition" comparison text). The differences between the SDN and CKE versions for each topic were equivalent in all possible ways (initial introduction, overall conceptual accuracy, elements of human interest, coherence and readability level), save for the unique components of the discovery narrative (i.e., love for their work, acknowledgement of the known, identification of the unknown and the explorative or experimental process to discovery). Participants generally chose the discovery narrative version as the more interesting of the two texts. Additional findings from the experimental study suggest that science texts in the form of SDNs elicit greater long-term retention of key conceptual information, especially

  9. Telling Stories and Making Social Relations: Transnational Women's Ways of Belonging in Intercultural Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hakyoon

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how transnational women construct their social relations by telling stories in a lingua franca environment (Firth 1996). My main interest lies in naturally occurring and interactionally achieved stories (Bamberg 2004; Georgakopoulou 2007) told during break time of an adult English as a Second Language (ESL) class in…

  10. The Story of The Story or a Plane Metafiction Ayışığında Çalışkur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilüfer İLHAN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important features of human telling, literary Works an aesthetic one undergoes a transformation through distillation. This aesthetic each term occurs in a different style to the needs of the living age. Since the beginning of the story in the literary genres in the different methods of expression seems to be a kind of renewed. The story began writing in the 1940’s and 1980’s continued to write until the Republican period Haldun Taner of storys narration techniques is one that is rich. Story in the book with the same title was released in 1954 by the Ayışığında Çalışkur story narration of the modern tecnique of the upper metafiction iplemented. With this tecnique the author, story understanding and criticism against him, revealed .

  11. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  12. An International Inquiry: Stories of Poverty--Poverty Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene; Craig, Cheryl J.

    2017-01-01

    This article features an international inquiry of two high-poverty urban schools, one Canadian and one American. The article examines poverty in terms of "small stories" that educators and students live and tell, often on the edges, unheard and unaccounted for in grand narratives. It also expands the story constellations approach to…

  13. An International Inquiry: Stories of Poverty--Poverty Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene; Craig, Cheryl J.

    2017-01-01

    This article features an international inquiry of two high-poverty urban schools, one Canadian and one American. The article examines poverty in terms of "small stories" that educators and students live and tell, often on the edges, unheard and unaccounted for in grand narratives. It also expands the story constellations approach to…

  14. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  16. Story: A Bleeding Watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor bzang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A Bleeding Watermelon was written by Norsang (Nor bzang;b. 1988, a native of Dpa ris (Rab rgyas (Huazangsi 华藏寺 Township, Tianzhu 天祝 Tibetan Autonomous County,Gansu 甘肃 Province. Norsang writes: I heard that a university student opened an elevator door in a campus building still under construction. The elevator shaft was empty and he fell to his death. Many people had questions about his death. This inspired me to write this story.

  17. Telling life stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Jeanne M; Butler, Frieda R

    2009-11-01

    A life review has been demonstrated to be highly beneficial to well or chronically ill older adults, as well as terminally ill older adults. Those living independently indicate feelings of relief and connectivity after telling their stories. Further, terminally ill patients at the end of their lives express feelings of peacefulness at being able to put pieces of their lives together in a meaningful way. It is well known that physicians and nurses have received inadequate training in how to address end-of-life issues. The life review process can be an important strategy for fostering helpful communication between health care professionals and older adults in all phases of health and illness.

  18. Stories in the Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gary

    2017-01-01

    To some degree, comics have always been used to convert data into stories, from ancient Egyptian heiroglyphics to crude biology diagrams in grade-school textbooks. By their very nature, comics communicate through a variety of visualization techniques. Benjamin Bach, who along with his coauthors Nathalie Henry Riche, Sheelagh Carpendale, and Hanspeter Pfister created this issue's Art on Graphics special contribution about the emerging genre of data comics, here talks about their attempts to leverage the massive untapped potential for data-driven comics to explain multiple threads of simultaneous data.

  19. Comparison of region-of-interest analysis and human observers in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease using [99mTc]TRODAT-1 and SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Paul D.; Newberg, Andrew; Plössl, Karl; Mozley, P. David

    2006-02-01

    This study determined the relative accuracy of diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) using SPECT imaging data, comparing a semi-quantitative region-of-interest (ROI) approach and human observers. A set of patients with PD and normal healthy control subjects were studied using the dopamine transporter tracer [99mTc]TRODAT-1 and SPECT. The sample comprised 81 patients (mean age ± SD, 63.4 ± 10.4 years; age range, 39.0-84.2 years) and 94 healthy controls (mean age ± SD, 61.8 ± 11.0 years; age range, 40.9-83.3 years). A standardized template containing six ROIs was transposed onto subregions of the brain, and the ratio of striatal to background ROI values was used as a semi-quantitative outcome measure. All images were used in a human observer study, with four experienced investigators. The data from the observer and ROI studies were analysed using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, where the area under the ROC curve (AUC) indicated the diagnostic accuracy. ROI analysis and human observers gave similar diagnostic performance (mean observer AUC = 0.89, best ROI AUC = 0.90). This suggested that the human observers are visually acquiring similar information from the images that are contained in the semi-quantitative striatal uptake.

  20. Optimizing the operation of the Qingshitan Reservoir in the Lijiang River for multiple human interests and quasi-natural flow maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuwen Chen; Duan Chen; Ruiguang Han; Ruonan Li; Jinfeng Ma; Koen Blanckaert

    2012-01-01

    For reservoir operation,maintaining a quasi-natural flow regime can benefit river ecosystems,but may sacrifice human interests.This study took the Qingshitan Reservoir in the Lijiang River as a case,and developed an optimization model to explore a trade-off solution between social-economic interests and nature flow maintenance on a monthly base.The objective function considered irrigation,cruise navigation and water supply aspects.An index of flow alteration degree was proposed to measure the difference between the regulated discharge and the natural flow.The index was then used as an additional constraint in the model besides the conventional constraints on reservoir safety.During model solving,different criteria were applied to the index,representing various degrees of alteration of the natural flow regime in the river.Through the model,a relationship between social-economic interests and flow alteration degree was established.Finally,a trade-off solution of the reservoir operation was defined that led to a favorable social-economic benefit at an acceptable alteration of the natural flow.

  1. ‘Are We Not Human?’ Stories of Stigma, Disability and HIV from Lusaka, Zambia and Their Implications for Access to Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Janet A.; Bond, Virginia A.; Nixon, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The advent of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in Southern Africa holds the promise of shifting the experience of HIV toward that of a manageable chronic condition. However, this potential can only be realized when persons living with HIV are able to access services without barriers, which can include stigma. Our qualitative study explored experiences of persons living with disabilities (PWD) in Lusaka, Zambia who became HIV-positive (PWD/HIV+). Methods and Findings We conducted interviews with 32 participants (21 PWD/HIV+ and 11 key informants working in the fields of HIV and/or disability). Inductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts was informed by narrative theory. Participants’ accounts highlighted the central role of stigma experienced by PWD/HIV+, with stigmatizing attitudes closely linked to prevailing societal assumptions that PWD are asexual. Seeking diagnostic and treatment services for HIV was perceived as evidence of PWD being sexually active. Participants recounted that for PWD/HIV+, stigma was enacted in a variety of settings, including the queue for health services, their interactions with healthcare providers, and within their communities. Stigmatizing accounts told about PWD/HIV+ were described as having important consequences. Not only did participants recount stories of internalized stigma (with its damaging effects on self-perception), but also that negative experiences resulted in some PWD preferring to “die quietly at home” rather than being subjected to the stigmatizing gaze of others when attempting to access life-preserving ART. Participants recounted how experiences of stigma also affected their willingness to continue ART, their willingness to disclose their HIV status to others, as well as their social relations. However, participants also offered counter-stories, actively resisting stigmatizing accounts and portraying themselves as resilient and resourceful social actors. Conclusions The study highlights a

  2. 'Are We Not Human?' Stories of Stigma, Disability and HIV from Lusaka, Zambia and Their Implications for Access to Health Services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet A Parsons

    Full Text Available The advent of anti-retroviral therapy (ART in Southern Africa holds the promise of shifting the experience of HIV toward that of a manageable chronic condition. However, this potential can only be realized when persons living with HIV are able to access services without barriers, which can include stigma. Our qualitative study explored experiences of persons living with disabilities (PWD in Lusaka, Zambia who became HIV-positive (PWD/HIV+.We conducted interviews with 32 participants (21 PWD/HIV+ and 11 key informants working in the fields of HIV and/or disability. Inductive thematic analysis of interview transcripts was informed by narrative theory. Participants' accounts highlighted the central role of stigma experienced by PWD/HIV+, with stigmatizing attitudes closely linked to prevailing societal assumptions that PWD are asexual. Seeking diagnostic and treatment services for HIV was perceived as evidence of PWD being sexually active. Participants recounted that for PWD/HIV+, stigma was enacted in a variety of settings, including the queue for health services, their interactions with healthcare providers, and within their communities. Stigmatizing accounts told about PWD/HIV+ were described as having important consequences. Not only did participants recount stories of internalized stigma (with its damaging effects on self-perception, but also that negative experiences resulted in some PWD preferring to "die quietly at home" rather than being subjected to the stigmatizing gaze of others when attempting to access life-preserving ART. Participants recounted how experiences of stigma also affected their willingness to continue ART, their willingness to disclose their HIV status to others, as well as their social relations. However, participants also offered counter-stories, actively resisting stigmatizing accounts and portraying themselves as resilient and resourceful social actors.The study highlights a significant barrier to healthcare

  3. From Doctors' Stories to Doctors' Stories, and Back Again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Marcia Day

    2017-03-01

    Stories have always been central to medicine, but during the twentieth century bioscience all but eclipsed narrative's presence in medical practice. In Doctors' Stories, published in 1991, Kathryn Montgomery excavated medicine's narrative foundations and functions to reveal new possibilities for how to conceive and characterize medicine. Physicians' engagement with stories has since flourished, especially through the narrative medicine movement, although in the twenty-first century this has been challenged by the health care industry's business-minded and data-driven clinical systems. But doctors' stories-and Montgomery's text-remain crucial, schooling clinicians in reflection, ethical awareness, and resilience. Physicians who write even short, 55-word reflective stories can hold to humanistic and ethical understandings of patient care and of themselves as healers even as they practice in systematized settings and employ evidence-based expertise. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Ballad of the Huang River and Other Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This book contains three novellas originally written in Chinese by the Qinghai author Jing Shi. The novellas provide a finely textured portrayal of Qinghai rural life in the twentieth century. An introduction and transcribed interview provide context to the stories and their author. From the introduction by Keith Dede: "The wide appeal of Jing Shi's fiction is certainly something he welcomes. As he sees it, literature, at one level, should be entertaining. Stories are a way for people to derive pleasure, enjoy a laugh, and while away some time. But stories are also about communication, about communicating ideas concerning the ironies of life and the trajectory of the human condition. Jing Shi thinks deeply about the people of rural Qinghai, their culture, their predicaments, their hopes, and their tragedies, and his stories communicate his thoughts about these things, but also his deep affection for the people and culture that raised him."

  5. The StorySpinner Sculptural Reader

    OpenAIRE

    Hooper, Clare; Weal, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This demo is of a hypertext reading system called StorySpinner. It follows the sculptural hypertext methodology and has been used as a test bed for experimenting with the authoring of narrative flow in automatically generated stories. Readers are able to select and read one of two available stories. Reading a story involves selecting tarot cards which are mapped to chunks of story text based on possible interpretations of the cards and information concerning current story state.

  6. Relaxation and Visualization Strategies for Story Telling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯灵林

    2012-01-01

    The importance of training students to tell or retell story is self - evident for mastering English language. The following activity introduces relaxation and visualization strategies for story telling.

  7. 'All stories bring hope because stories bring awareness': students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2014-11-10

    Nov 10, 2014 ... ... youth, not only in terms of access to resources and opportunities for schooling and careers, but also in .... which the meaning and ultimate goals of human life ... interest as a tool for engaging 21st century learners ..... the construction of a victim role. ... qualitative paradigm without a pre- and post-design.

  8. Digital Media Stories for Persuasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Digital media story-telling (which enhances traditional oral story-telling with images, music, and text) has been a focus of recent scholarship for its potential to produce numerous educational benefits. Through digital media storytelling, students' imagination, creativity, critical thinking, writing, public speaking, and organizational or…

  9. Digital Media Stories for Persuasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Digital media story-telling (which enhances traditional oral story-telling with images, music, and text) has been a focus of recent scholarship for its potential to produce numerous educational benefits. Through digital media storytelling, students' imagination, creativity, critical thinking, writing, public speaking, and organizational or…

  10. The Not-So-Straight Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Crémieux

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available When his lawnmower breaks down in The Straight Story, Alvin Straight buys a new one and slowly makes his way from Iowa to Wisconsin. The bovine pace of this Midwestern odyssey made it a road movie like no other before, with some interesting encounters, a few laughs, talk of family and death, and a final reunion. Little Miss Sunshine has a similar agenda, with a lot more laughs. Maybe going cross country in an inadequate vehicle should be a genre unto itself, a formula for unassuming philosoph...

  11. Where Did You Come From? Where Will You Go? Human Evolutionary Biology Education and American Students' Academic Interests and Achievements, Professional Goals, and Socioscientific Decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrein, Caitlin M.

    In the United States, there is a national agenda to increase the number of qualified science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM) professionals and a movement to promote science literacy among the general public. This project explores the association between formal human evolutionary biology education (HEB) and high school science class enrollment, academic achievement, interest in a STEM degree program, motivation to pursue a STEM career, and socioscientific decision-making for a sample of students enrolled full-time at Arizona State University. Given a lack of a priori knowledge of these relationships, the Grounded Theory Method was used and was the foundation for a mixed-methods analysis involving qualitative and quantitative data from one-on-one interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, and an online survey. Theory development and hypothesis generation were based on data from 44 students. The survey instrument, developed to test the hypotheses, was completed by 486 undergraduates, age 18--22, who graduated from U.S. public high schools. The results showed that higher exposure to HEB was correlated with greater high school science class enrollment, particularly for advanced biological science classes, and that, for some students, HEB exposure may have influenced their enrollment, because the students found the content interesting and relevant. The results also suggested that students with higher K--12 HEB exposure felt more prepared for undergraduate science coursework. There was a positive correlation between HEB exposure and interest in a STEM degree and an indirect relationship between higher HEB exposure and motivation to pursue a STEM career. Regarding a number of socioscientific issues, including but not limited to climate change, homosexuality, and stem cell research, students' behaviors and decision-making more closely reflected a scientific viewpoint---or less-closely aligned to a religion-based perspective---when students had greater HEB exposure

  12. Entering the Story: Self-Expression through Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Judy

    1994-01-01

    A journalist describes her experiences teaching writing skills at a week-long, high school arts and literary festival on the Crow Reservation and discusses how relating her own story stimulated interest and how a range of activities--walks, readings, discussions, observations and short writings on odd-shaped pieces of paper--lead to final…

  13. Storie italiane : Romantische geschiedcultuur tussen stedelijke traditie en nationaal besef

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrom, Asker Rogier

    2011-01-01

    Storie italiane is about the ‘century of history’ in the ‘land of hundred cities’. During the Romantic era history flourished in Italy as elsewhere in Europe, not only in historiography but especially in literature, painting and music. Pelgrom examines the bloom of historical interest from an unusua

  14. Storie italiane : Romantische geschiedcultuur tussen stedelijke traditie en nationaal besef

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrom, Asker Rogier

    2011-01-01

    Storie italiane is about the ‘century of history’ in the ‘land of hundred cities’. During the Romantic era history flourished in Italy as elsewhere in Europe, not only in historiography but especially in literature, painting and music. Pelgrom examines the bloom of historical interest from an

  15. Storie italiane : Romantische geschiedcultuur tussen stedelijke traditie en nationaal besef

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrom, Asker Rogier

    2011-01-01

    Storie italiane is about the ‘century of history’ in the ‘land of hundred cities’. During the Romantic era history flourished in Italy as elsewhere in Europe, not only in historiography but especially in literature, painting and music. Pelgrom examines the bloom of historical interest from an unusua

  16. Becoming a Teacher: Stories of the First Few Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Colleen; Hansen, Erin; Schulz, Andrew; Stimson, Jeff; Wozniak-Reese, Jill

    2004-01-01

    The need for understanding the issues facing beginning teachers is well documented in the education literature. Within music education, there is also growing interest in the challenges of the first years and the overall life cycle of a music teacher. However, few sources have used the stories of beginning teachers themselves to illustrate the…

  17. MUC1 Story: Great Expectations, Disappointments and the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, Mikhail A; Syrkina, Marina S; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2017-08-17

    In the course of studying human mucin MUC1, an attitude towards this molecule has been changing time and again. Initially, the list of presumable functions of MUC1 was restricted to protecting and lubricating epithelium. To date, it is assumed to play an important role in cell signaling as well as in all stages of oncogenesis, from malignant cell transformation to tumor dissemination. The story of MUC1 is full of hopes and disappointments. However, the scientific interest to MUC1 has never waned, and the more profoundly it has been investigated, the clearer its hidden potential turned to be disclosed. The therapeutic potential of mucin MUC1 has already been noted by various scientific groups at the early stages of research. Over forty years ago the first insights into MUC1 functions became a strong grounds for considering this molecule as potential target for anticancer therapy. Therefore, this direction of research has always been of particular interest and practical importance. More than 200 papers on MUC1 were published in 2016; the majority of them are dedicated to MUC1-related anticancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Here we review the history of MUC1 studies from the very first attempts to reveal its functions to the ongoing renaissance. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. StoryTrek: Experiencing Stories in the Real World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaled, Rilla; Barr, Pippin James; Greenspan, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce StoryTrek, a locative hypernarrative system developed to generate stories based on a reader’s location and specific movements in the real world. This creates, for readers, an interplay between navigation, narrative, and agency, as well as between the fictional and real...... world experience. In early tests we observed the emergence of a number of recurrent themes in participants’ experiences which are characteristic of the StoryTrek system, but which also help us to understand locative media storytelling affordances more generally. In this paper we present the system...

  19. "Divinity" and "Humanity" of the Fine Horse in Daur Folk Story%论达斡尔民间故事中骏马的“神性”与“人性”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉静; 魏强华

    2012-01-01

    在达斡尔民族古老的民间故事里,马被赋予了人格精神和神异品质,既表现了达斡尔人对马在日常生活中的依赖和情感上的依恋,又通过夸张的描写表现了达斡尔人为战胜强大的自然环境和艰险的社会环境产生的朴素而美好的想象。%In the ancient folk story of Daur, hero hunters were always accompanied by fine and brave horses which not only smart and courageous but also had miraculous and peculiar skills such as galloping fast like wind and thunder, going to the heaven and diving into the sea, transforming their appearances, speaking the language of human beings and foreseeing the fu- ture. Moreover, they followed their master to behead the conquer demons and evils, share weal and woe. They were the most loyal partners of their masters' as well as tools for riding and hunting. Horses are endowed with spirits of human beings and magical skills in this kind of ro- mantic artistic expression,which demonstrates not only Daur people' s dependence on horse in daily life and emotional attachment but also through exaggerated description the simplistic and beautiful imagination of Daur people when overcoming powerful natural environment and hard social environment.

  20. Cultivating a Value for Non-Human Interests through the Convergence of Animal Welfare, Animal Rights, and Deep Ecology in Environmental Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Kopnina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available While the original objective of environmental education (EE and education for sustainable development (ESD acquired an awareness of the natural world and its current plight, animal welfare (AW, animal rights (AR, and deep ecology (DE have often been absent within EE and ESD. AW and AR focus their attention on individual animals, while the DE perspective recognizes the intrinsic value of the environment. In this article, we shall discuss how the integration of these three approaches within EE/ESD can and should be improved, with particular reference to the ethical underpinnings of educational scholarship and practice. This article will argue that these three positions are well placed to enhance the democratic practices of EE/ESD through the adoption of an inclusive pluralism that embraces representation of non-human species and recognizes their interests.

  1. A Little Solar Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Bashir

    1997-01-01

    Experiences from use of solar cookers in India and many other places are different. But the story which is based on a field study in Gujarat state of India shows that during last twenty years there has been a tendency that many families do not continue to use their solar cookers. The study shows...... that the tendency is related with the lack of compatibility of this new technology (solar cooker) with the everyday real-life conditions of the families. In principle the findings are supported by an evaluation report on a solar cooker project in Burkina Faso. The conclusion is that the user should be involved...... in the solar cooker technological development process....

  2. Story and Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Waxler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Why should we be concerned about the fate of literature as we move from a book culture to a screen culture in the digital age? Not primarily because we are losing our sense of story, but because we are losing our sense of the central importance of linguistic narrative. There is a difference. The technologies creating the digital revolution seem to devalue language and increasingly to do away with boundaries, celebrating instead speed and boundless exhilaration. The visual trumps the linguistic, the image and the screen trump the word and the book. As a result, we no longer seem to engage deeply with others or ourselves. We are beginning to move, in other words, from “a reading brain” to “a digital brain,” from a brain capable of deep reading and deep thinking to a brain increasingly addled by spectacle and surface sensation. We are losing our standing as “linguistic beings.”

  3. Story and Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Waxler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Why should we be concerned about the fate of literature as we move from a book culture to a screen culture in the digital age? Not primarily because we are losing our sense of story, but because we are losing our sense of the central importance of linguistic narrative. There is a difference. The technologies creating the digital revolution seem to devalue language and increasingly to do away with boundaries, celebrating instead speed and boundless exhilaration. The visual trumps the linguistic, the image and the screen trump the word and the book. As a result, we no longer seem to engage deeply with others or ourselves. We are beginning to move, in other words, from “a reading brain” to “a digital brain,” from a brain capable of deep reading and deep thinking to a brain increasingly addled by spectacle and surface sensation. We are losing our standing as “linguistic beings.”

  4. The Singapore research story

    CERN Document Server

    Teck Seng, Low; Thampuran, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Singapore became independent in 1965, its leaders have invested tremendous efforts and resources to develop its economy in order to create jobs for its people and to support national development. This book describes the challenging journey of Singapore in developing a knowledge-based economy driven by research and innovation and the roles played by research institutes, universities, research manpower and appropriate collaboration between research institutes and industry. The book traces the foundations of Singapore's research story from the time of its independence in 1965 to the present day. Through interviews with the key players and research into the records, the establishment of the key institutes and the roles of a global cast of researchers, scientists and engineers in setting up the R&D infrastructure are outlined. The impact that the concerted efforts of the last 25 years to build up a credible and world-class research capability in Singapore is discussed, as are the tremendous challeng...

  5. THE NECESSITY OF ENSURING PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE MINOR. GUARANTEEING THE BEST INTEREST OF THE CHILD IN TERMS OF THE JURISPRUDENCE OF THE EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMINA ALECA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We can not ignore, concerning the regulation of relationships between parents and children, a real assessment of the child's best interest, this being left to the courts or competent authorities’ decision. An issue that needs to be clarified is the divorce situation, when the court entrusts the child to one of the parents, who prevents the other one to have contact with him. Although the legal text refers only to acts committed after the pronouncement of the sentence of entrusting custody of minor, however the judicial practice stated that it is also about those situations in which these acts are committed before pronouncement of the judicial sentence. In this regard, assessing the child's best interest is also a sensitive issue and extremely important by the fact that the court must maintain a balance between the need to ensure a child's growth and harmonious development and respect for privacy and family, as it is covered in Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, even if it is about the right of the child or of one of his parents.

  6. People and Nature in Asian Stories: Reading and Writing Materials for Eco Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novita Dewi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to make parents/teachers/writers of children literature aware of eco education through stories about people and nature. Written through the eyes of a child, many conservation stories not only empower the young minds, but they also help adults change their attitude to respect environment. The first part of this article examines such environmental stories as fables, folklores, short stories from Asia, while the second part is a project report on writing eco education materials, i.e. a serial of 3 environmental stories for young adults. Using Ecocriticism and Postcolonial perspectives to analyze the stories, the study shows that the narrative strands found in the stories include (1 depletion of the earth and natural resources, (2 people’s greediness, and (3 preservation of the traditional wisdom. Some stories are still anthro­pocentric so as to provide no space to explore fully the human-nature relationship in a balanced way. Although animal stories dominate the narratives, it is the specific and philosophic depiction of place and nature that give the stories Asian characteristics in their shared campaign to save our planet. This study concludes that the call for environmental protection can be done through young adult literature in a non-condescending manner instead of the usual patronizing-colonizing method

  7. Life Stories and Interculturality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toldi Éva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines two short stories: Teréz Müller’s Igaz történet [A True Story] and József Bálint senior’s Imádkozzál és dolgozzál [Pray and Work]. The argument explores the way the texts reflect on shifts in power in the Hungarian region of Vojvodina, and the way power structures define the relationship between majority and minority in a society that undergoes constant and radical changes. Contemporary historical events of the twentieth century, changes, faultlines, traumatic life events and identity shifts emerge as the contexts for these narratives of the daily experiences of a Jewish merchant family and a farmer family respectively. Thus, the two texts analysed are representative works rooted in two fundamentally different social backgrounds. The discourse about the I is always also about the other; the construction of identity is already in itself a dialogic, intercultural act, which makes it an ideal topic for the exploration of the changes and shifts in one’s own and the other’s cultural identity. Translational processes of transmission are also required for the narration of traumatic experiences. Teréz Müller was the grandmother of the Serbian writer Aleksandar Tišma. Her book is not primarily a document of their relationship; however, it does throw light on diverse background events of the writer’s life and oeuvre. Comparing the experiences of identity in the autobiographical novel of Aleksandar Tišma and the recollections of his grandmother reveals geocultural characteristics of their intercultural life experiences.

  8. Automated Reasoning Across Tactical Stories to Derive Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wesley Regian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Military Analogical Reasoning System (MARS is a performance support system and decision aid for commanders in Tactical Operations Centers. MARS enhances and supports the innate human ability for using stories to reason about tactical goals, plans, situations, and outcomes. The system operates by comparing many instances of stored tactical stories, determining which have analogous situations and lessons learned, and then returning a description of the lessons learned. The description of the lessons learned is at a level of abstraction that can be generalized to an appropriate range of tactical situations. The machine-understandable story representation is based on a military operations data model and associated tactical situation ontology. Thus each story can be thought of, and reasoned about, as an instance of an unfolding tactical situation. The analogical reasoning algorithm is based on Gentner's Structure Mapping Theory. Consider the following two stories. In the first, a U.S. platoon in Viet Nam diverts around a minefield and subsequently comes under ambush from a large hill overlooking their new position. In the second, a U.S. task force in Iraq diverts around a biochemical hazard and subsequently comes under ambush from the roof of an abandoned building. MARS recognizes these stories as analogical, and derives the following abstraction: When enemy-placed obstacles force us into an unplanned route, beware of ambush from elevation or concealment. In this paper we describe the MARS interface, military operations data model, tactical situation ontology, and analogical reasoning algorithm.

  9. Narrative Comprehension and Story Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehwish Zahoor

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Every text has an underlying structure which has a vital contribution in making it a meaningful whole. Awareness of a text’s structure therefore is significant in developing an overall sense of the text. Story grammar offers a simple and effective framework to analyze a coherent structure in narrative texts, hence is assumed to facilitate the comprehension of narratives. The research has been designed to be a descriptive study, with the objective to explain and illustrate how story grammar functions in constructing and decoding meanings in a narrative text, and, to highlight its scope in pedagogy. A short story text has been randomly selected from the short story collection in the English text book by Punjab text book board for Intermediate level. A three stepped comprehensive analysis of the sample text has been done by implementing the selected story grammar model. It has been found that story grammar helped in deriving coherent structure and meanings from the selected short story text; hence it has pedagogical implications in developing narrative comprehension.

  10. SAGA: A DSL for Story Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Beyak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Video game development is currently a very labour-intensive endeavour. Furthermore it involves multi-disciplinary teams of artistic content creators and programmers, whose typical working patterns are not easily meshed. SAGA is our first effort at augmenting the productivity of such teams. Already convinced of the benefits of DSLs, we set out to analyze the domains present in games in order to find out which would be most amenable to the DSL approach. Based on previous work, we thus sought those sub-parts that already had a partially established vocabulary and at the same time could be well modeled using classical computer science structures. We settled on the 'story' aspect of video games as the best candidate domain, which can be modeled using state transition systems. As we are working with a specific company as the ultimate customer for this work, an additional requirement was that our DSL should produce code that can be used within a pre-existing framework. We developed a full system (SAGA comprised of a parser for a human-friendly language for 'story events', an internal representation of design patterns for implementing object-oriented state-transitions systems, an instantiator for these patterns for a specific 'story', and three renderers (for C++, C# and Java for the instantiated abstract code.

  11. Introducing Interactive Technology--"Toy Story 3"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    "To infinity and beyond!" is the catchphrase of Buzz Lightyear, Universe Protection Unit space ranger, a character in the Disney/Pixar "Toy Story" franchise. The three films in the franchise--"Toy Story," 1993; "Toy Story 2," 1999; and "Toy Story 3," 2010--incorporate an innovative blend of many different genres, having spun off video games and…

  12. Stories of Experience and Narrative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, F. Michael; Clandinin, D. Jean

    1990-01-01

    Surveys forms of narrative inquiry in educational studies. Outlines certain criteria, methods, and writing forms. Describes them in terms of beginning the story, living the story, and selecting stories to construct and reconstruct narrative plots. Describes two-part research agenda for curriculum and studies flowing from stories of experience and…

  13. Scripting History: The Genre of Desegregation Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesley, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that desegregation stories form a subset of the school story genre. In drawing upon school story traditions, desegregation stories offer some unexpected and politically contentious solutions to the problems of segregated schooling, including queer friendships and critiques of classroom pedagogy. Nevertheless, the resolution of…

  14. Analysis of The Story of An Hour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹玉琴

    2014-01-01

    By reading the short story The Story of An Hour written by Kate Chopin, we tried to probe the story better by analyz-ing five characters, plots of the story and rhetorical devices, such as irony and symbolism. With originality and profound mean-ings, the novel about the small theme of family life had a wide variety of social significance.

  15. Co-Story-ing: Collaborative Story Writing with Children Who Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, Dale-Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This article offers a guide for using collaborative story writing (co-story-ing), an assessment technique as well as a therapeutic intervention for children who demonstrate fears, extreme shyness and difficulty in establishing relationships. Co-story-ing draws from Gardner's Mutual Story Telling Technique. Co-story-ing guides clients as they…

  16. Autobiographical Memory Sharing in Everyday Life: Characteristics of a Good Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jacqueline M.; Bluck, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Storytelling is a ubiquitous human activity that occurs across the lifespan as part of everyday life. Studies from three disparate literatures suggest that older adults (as compared to younger adults) are (a) less likely to recall story details, (b) more likely to go off-target when sharing stories, and, in contrast, (c) more likely to receive…

  17. Body, Mind, Spirit: Twelve Juicy Stories of Transformation from Yoga Practice in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this inquiry is to explore university students' stories of transformation from the practice of integral yoga in an undergraduate course exploring human biology, health, and spirituality. The stories of participants give evidence for successful educational performance when yoga and meditation are combined with academic learning in…

  18. Autobiographical Memory Sharing in Everyday Life: Characteristics of a Good Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jacqueline M.; Bluck, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Storytelling is a ubiquitous human activity that occurs across the lifespan as part of everyday life. Studies from three disparate literatures suggest that older adults (as compared to younger adults) are (a) less likely to recall story details, (b) more likely to go off-target when sharing stories, and, in contrast, (c) more likely to receive…

  19. Writing Stories to Enhance Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Stephen M.; Tomas, Louisa; Tones, Megan

    2011-03-01

    In response to international concerns about scientific literacy and students' waning interest in school science, this study investigated the effects of a science-writing project about the socioscientific issue (SSI) of biosecurity on the development of students' scientific literacy. Students generated two BioStories each that merged scientific information with the narrative storylines in the project. The study was conducted in two phases. In the exploratory phase, a qualitative case study of a sixth-grade class involving classroom observations and interviews informed the design of the second, confirmatory phase of the study, which was conducted at a different school. This phase involved a mixed methods approach featuring a quasi-experimental design with two classes of Australian middle school students (i.e., sixth grade, 11 years of age, n = 55). The results support the argument that writing the sequence of stories helped the students become more familiar with biosecurity issues, develop a deeper understanding of related biological concepts, and improve their interest in science. On the basis of these findings, teachers should be encouraged to engage their students in the practice of writing about SSI in a way that integrates scientific information into narrative storylines. Extending the practice to older students and exploring additional issues related to writing about SSI are recommended for further research.

  20. DIGITAL STORYTELLING: Kizoa, Animoto, and Photo Story 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin YEE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Educators know that students create better projects when they are personally invested in the material (Brookhart, Bronowicz 2003; McInerney 2008; Braxton 2008. The rewards are particularly significant when students can exercise some degree of creativity in the process of developing their projects (Su 2009. Possibly this is a result of engaging both hemispheres of the brain (Tatar 2009, or otherwise simply a reflection of the human preference to employ creativity in any endeavor, including “work” related ones.One tried-and-true avenue for creative expression is through the use of stories or narratives. Simply including a narrative component may provide enough creative ammunition for students to feel that a particular assignment can be more interesting (Clark 2010, if their work is to be wrapped around a narrative format, such as a short story in favor of an essay or formal writing. But there are numerous free technology tools available today that take the process one step further, by injecting different editing options and high-end production values. Students do not merely assemble a story in words. They can now do it primarily with images, and many of the slideshow services online allow for text captions, dynamic transitions, special effects, and relevant animations. Students become videographers and directors as much as they function as storytellers. The slideshow builders thus do a better job than “old fashioned” essay/short story assignments at meeting the need of 21st century students, many of whom arrive at institutions of higher learning with at least an already-ingrained interest in such tools, if not explicit experience.Kizoa (www.kizoa.com offers a simple menu-driven, Flash-based interface for users to craft slideshows with uploaded images, added text, transitions, animations, special effects, and music selected from their limited online repository or uploaded in mp3 format. Users drag images and any desired effects onto a

  1. A Painting Tells Its Story

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Separated parts of an ancient Chinese painting to be displayed together Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao told a story about a famous Chinese painting Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains at a press conference after the Third Session of the

  2. Transmedia storytelling on travel stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Baltar Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Travel stories form part of a great tradition inside Western Culture which has served historically to describe, to understand and to imagine other cul - tures and communities, far or near, being constituted into a real narra - tive genre. This type of story has been and is a reflection of the perception of the world based on the imaginary worlds created by the travelling narrators. How do modern authors of travel stories take advantage of the opportunities offered by transmedia storytelling? The present article explores the potential of these types of stories as a privileged object of study for transmedia storytelling studies, from the analysis of a sample of 80 narrative productions based on experiences of travel and presented in diverse editions of the Festival Le Grand Bivouac (France. It also shows the existence of a new contemporary trend inside this narrative form that transcends its literary nature.

  3. A true case story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Bjørg Walker

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism is not generally recognized as a condition which can be bio-medically influenced. As of today, there are no biomarkers for autism that are recognized by traditional medicine. Treating autism medically is a difficult and hopeless task according to official guidelines (even though it is seldom written in official documents. Parents of many children who have or had an ASD diagnosis have witnessed significant improvements in their children after dietary interventions as well as after interventions with vitamins, minerals and biogene substances which can be bought over the counter. The parents of individual children are their best observers. With a high degree of certainty, they are able to see which substances improve or weaken their children. Their observations are usually accurate, but their rationale for why is often wrong. Observations from parents can often be of greater importance for the child than advice from so called experts. This is a true story about a girl whose parents lost contact with her when she was only 6 months old. In her first 14 days she lost her ability to roll over, to babble and make sounds. She did not look at her parents any more – just stared up at the roof. At 9 months she did not respond to words such as, ‘look at mommy’. Through the parents own experiences with her older siblings and 4 months of frantic searching for a diet that would agree with the child, she made a remarkable journey from 10 months of age to 18 months. There is one thing worth mentioning – she refused to eat solid food throughout this time. The story does not end there. Today she is 12 years old and has had to be regulated with diet and biogene substances every day since she was 4 years old. During the last 5 months she has shown more stability and can even go a day or two without biogene substances as long as she keeps to her dietary plan. If you had just met her and spent a day with her, you would never know.

  4. Stories, Action and Ethics in Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg

    2017-01-01

    ” action distorts the normal. Like a Picasso the normal is twisted, deconstructed and reassembled into something unique and different. Secondly, storytelling emphasizes human plurality, which implies that others are recognized as unique and different. Thirdly, storytelling emphasizes our responsibility...... for the world and our worldly becoming. These three areas serve as important signposts for reworking management students’ stories. They have consequences for the design of teaching practices for enhancing morality. These concern both managements students’ work of the self on the self and in regard how...

  5. Personalisation: A Theoretical Possibility to Reinvigorate Children's Interest in Storybook Reading and Facilitate Greater Book Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucirkova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2010s, there has been a proliferation of new platforms for children's stories (e.g. storybook apps or iBooks), but not necessarily greater diversity of story content or children's greater interest in reading. This article argues for a new approach to address the apparent paradox of a wider availability of children's literature…

  6. A Story of Large Land Owners and Math Skills: Inequality and Human Capital Formation in the Long-Run Development, 1820-2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baten, J.; Juif, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    We create a new dataset to test the influence of land inequality on long-run human capital formation in a global cross-country study and assess the importance of land inequality relative to income inequality. Our results show that early land inequality has a detrimental influence on math and science

  7. A Story of Large Land Owners and Math Skills: Inequality and Human Capital Formation in the Long-Run Development, 1820-2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baten, J.; Juif, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    We create a new dataset to test the influence of land inequality on long-run human capital formation in a global cross-country study and assess the importance of land inequality relative to income inequality. Our results show that early land inequality has a detrimental influence on math and science

  8. Testosterone reactivity and identification with a perpetrator or a victim in a story are associated with attraction to violence-related cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weierstall, Roland; Moran, James; Giebel, Gilda; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recent field research has demonstrated that an attraction to aggressive behavior and cruelty is common among combatants and perpetrators involved in organized violence. The biological basis of this appetitive perception of aggression in humans has to date not been studied. We examined testosterone as a potential hormonal moderator during induction of specifically appetitive aggressive behavior in the laboratory. To activate physiological responding related to appetitive aggression, 145 university students (72 women) listened to tape recordings of variants of a violent story. The perspective of the listener in the story was randomized between subjects. Participants were required to either identify as perpetrator, neutral observer, or victim. We assessed changes in saliva testosterone in response to the story. Subsequently, a series of pictorial stimuli (IAPS) with different valence ratings was presented and participants determined the length of viewing time with a button click. This viewing time for negative IAPS was assessed as a dependent variable indicating level of interest in violent scenes. Men identified themselves with the perpetrator more than women irrespective of the particular perspective presented by the story. Men who responded with an increase in saliva testosterone when adopting the perpetrator perspective chose to view the negative IAPS pictures for longer intervals than participants in other conditions or those who did not exhibit a release in testosterone. Testosterone moderates attraction to cruel and violent cues in men, as indicated by extended deliberate viewing of violence cues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Truth or story or true story? The self in the interview situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia Gheorghiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is a methodological inquiry into how individuals present themselves and picture their identity in the life-story interview situation and which are the settings which have a say in this presentation. In order to achieve my goal, I resort to life story interviews that I conducted with students coming from different parts of Romania to study in Bucharest. I pay close attention to how they order the events in their lives, what are the most common themes that appear in their discourse. I am particularly interested in scripts they employ and how the content of their narratives is a matter of co-authorship between the person telling the story and the one listening to it – interaction based on mutually understood knowledge of what the student experience means. In the light of the popularity narrative methods have in the social sciences, I address the problem of what kind of account social scientists actually obtain when conducting research based on narrative methods. I argue that this knowledge is situational and constructed in the interaction between narrator and interviewer.

  10. Captured ‘Realities’ of Human Trafficking: Analysis of photographs illustrating stories on trafficking into the sex industry in Serbian media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Krsmanovic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Past research has looked at how the media frames human trafficking, but has seldom included analysis of visual representations. To bridge this gap, this paper scrutinises stereotypical representations of persons trafficked into the sex industry in photographs published in Serbian online media from 2011 to 2014. To uncover characteristics of dominant tropes in this sample, a method of semiotic analysis is applied. The analysis argues that images are dominated by portrayals of trafficked persons that fit into one of two frames: powerless victim or unworthy prostitute. Male figures are rarely presented in these photographs, but when present, they are shown to hurt or control the women depicted alongside them. Chains, padlocks, barcodes, whip marks, and other symbols associated with slavery are present to a lesser extent. However, they testify to the tendency to link human trafficking to slavery and to use the moral potential of the anti-slavery rhetoric. Photographs are too easily seen as authentic, factual transcripts of reality. This paper suggests that these images tell us more about societal fear of insecurity, ideas about gender, erotic obsessions and morality than about human trafficking itself. It also argues that the meaning of trafficking is shaped by the deeply embedded codes of patriarchy and hidden misogyny present in Serbian society.

  11. The archetypal criticism of "Hooshroba Castle" story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Moshydy

    2017-04-01

    .“Universal archetypes are the collective unconscious and are inherited from our ancestors” (Cuddon, 1380: 39. The basic fact of life archetype such as birth, growing up, love, family and tribal life, death ...at the same concepts as the archetype known myths. Elements such as death and rebirth, hero's journey, an old wise man, anima and animus, shadow. The archetypal criticism based on inter-textuality to look at the literature and a relationship based on dialogue among literary works have been written based on archetypes believes. "Zat os-Sovar Castle" storyis one of the most mysterious talesof Masnavi and it is more mysteriously unfinished. Checking archetypal story of "Zat os-Sovar Castle"shows that archetype in this story has a special place. The story begins with the heroes of the adventure trip which is known archetypes. The old wise man in the form of three characters, namely the father, the old man will appear enlightened and king China. King of China's daughter the owner image of the beautiful castle, man is a manifestation of the female psyche Anima they say. Shadow of the dark side of the human psyche and the origin of evil traits, in the second brother to be seen and adverse effects on the soul leaves his. Mask or persona archetype also is seen in the behavior of the king of China When unaware that his show and the secret are their spiritual brothers. The loss of brothers and another brother replacing the frequently happens in the story, reminiscent of the archetype of death and rebirth is and in the end, according to the story's elements and characters, the myth of the creation of the first man to be seen. By analyzing this archetype can be hidden concepts in this part of the Masnavi and realized similar literary works and the benefit.

  12. Long-Term English Learners Writing Their Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, C. Lynn

    2008-01-01

    High school teacher C. Lynn Jacobs noted that the long-term English language learners in her class had improved in reading comprehension but still lacked writing skills. Inspired by a state humanities project, she worked with the students to publish a collection of stories and poems. Writing about their lives provided the motivation, and writing…

  13. Mirror Neurons, the Development of Empathy, and Digital Story Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of work in media education, religious education, concerns about digital cultures' impact on human relationality, and the possible role that mirror neurons might play in the development of empathy. Digital story telling--particularly as embodied in the work of the Center for Digital Storytelling…

  14. Mirror Neurons, the Development of Empathy, and Digital Story Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of work in media education, religious education, concerns about digital cultures' impact on human relationality, and the possible role that mirror neurons might play in the development of empathy. Digital story telling--particularly as embodied in the work of the Center for Digital Storytelling…

  15. The Story of Azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banić Tomišić, Z.

    2011-12-01

    the negotiations and signing of a contract between PLIVA, Croatian pharmaceutical company, the patent holder, and Pfizer, one of the world largest pharmaceutical companies in the field of proprietary research. The dihydrate form of azithromycin is also discussed. The azithromycin (i.e. Sumamed and Zithromax story, which dates from the second half of the last century, can be considered as the first and foremost example of successful knowledge and technology transfer in Croatia ever. On their web pages, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO reports the PLIVA azithromycin story as a case study and excellent example of proactive licensing strategy. For the discovery of azithromycin, in addition to receiving numerous awards, in the year 2000, PLIVA's scientists D. Sc. S. Đokić and M. Sc. G. Kobrehel, together with the representatives from the US-based Pfizer, were granted the honorable titles of "Heroes of Chemistry 2000" by the American Chemical Society (ACS, a non-profit association of American chemists and chemical engineers, and the largest association of scientists in the world. This high award is rightly taken to be also recognition of the achievement of PLIVA's entire team working on azithromycin. The success of azithromycin has placed PLIVA among the few pharmaceutical companies in the world that have developed their own blockbuster drug, and has entitled Croatia to join a small group of nations that have developed a new antibiotic.

  16. Creation Stories: Myths about the Origin of Money

    OpenAIRE

    Desan, Christine

    2013-01-01

    A myth about the origins of money has long organized modern approaches to the medium. According to that creation story, money is the natural product of human exchange. It can be analogized to a commodity like silver that comes to hand out of the decentralized activity of trading or a convention like language that arises out of a consensus about the value of an item. But if we consider clues about money’s origins and extrapolate from its continuing practice, another story comes into focus. It ...

  17. Effects of Story Marketing and Travel Involvement on Tourist Behavioral Intention in the Tourism Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Min Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Story marketing has been widely applied to modern societies. As a matter of fact, attraction is a critical part of tourism for any visitor attractions throughout the world. A visitor attraction requires sufficient attraction to appeal to customers’ interests. Story marketing is currently the most popular marketing strategy. The success of using stories in visitor attractions as a marketing tactic for tourism attraction lies in the fact that story-telling is able to best attract people. Both adults and children love listening to stories, which can lead a way to people’s hearts and stories are also the best strategy for communication with others. Aimed at visitors to the Wushe Township as the research participants, a total of 500 copies of questionnaires were distributed, and 287 valid ones retrieved, with a retrieval rate of 57%. The research results show: (1 a significantly positive effect of story marketing on travel involvement; (2 a notably positive effect of travel involvement on behavioral intention; (3 remarkably positive effect of story marketing on behavioral intention.

  18. Judeo-Spanish expressions in life stories of Greek survivors of the Shoah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Pinto-Abecasis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available

    What is the role of Judeo-Spanish expressions in the life stories written by Ladino-speaking Holocaust survivors? To what extent do the Judeo-Spanish language and expressions determine the center of gravity of the stories? And why do the tellers of the stories choose to incorporate Judeo-Spanish expressions into their Hebrew-written life stories? These are some of the central questions addressed in the present paper, which suggests that the purpose of incorporating Judeo-Spanish to these stories is to render them more powerful and to make the Judeo-Spanish experience more accessible to those who are not part of it. It is interesting to note that it is the very fact that Judeo-Spanish was a minority language in the extermination camps which makes the life stories of its speakers who survived particularly forceful. The Judeo-Spanish language preserved in their memory, which became an “informal language” in the camps, acquires a new vitality in their life stories. We center our discussion on the autobiographies of Greek survivors and on testimonies gathered in interviews with those survivors. We examine the incorporation of Judeo-Spanish expressions to their life stories and the references to the status of the Judeo-Spanish language during the Holocaust.

  19. The Harvard angiogenesis story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joan W

    2014-01-01

    I shall discuss the work of researchers at Harvard Medical School who came together in the early 1990s. Scattered across various Harvard-affiliated hospitals and research centers, these individuals were unified by their interest in ocular neovascularization. Together and separately, they investigated models of ocular neovascularization, exploring tumor angiogenesis in eye development and disease.

  20. The Story of Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Ruth Kearney

    A variety of creative activities to stimulate elementary school children's curiosity and interest in the substance and structure of American English are listed in this paper. Over half of the 37 suggested activities refer to "Words, Words, Words" by Mary O'Neill and "The Language Book" by Franklyn Folsom. The other suggestions utilize additional…

  1. Presenting Data And Telling Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, Philip; Wayne, Andrew; Tildsley, Kevin M.; Wilkinson, Tim; Prieto, Diego Fernandez

    2013-12-01

    Earth observation data are now readily available at a range of scales and becoming increasingly familiar to the general public. Observations built up over several decades enable us to show long-term change and tell increasingly complex stories about the Earth and other planets. Data visualisation and computer graphics can help present these stories to a non-specialist public audience. In addition to high visual quality and clear design, we have found it useful to present data within its geographical and scientific context, in natural colour, in a realistic and immersive environment, using familiar visual and physical metaphors. The internet increasingly allows direct communication with the public and this places renewed emphasis on basics such as good story-telling. Examples are shown of work in television, print and digital media, and from ESA's Earth observation and planetary exploration programmes.

  2. The novel as short story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Schlueter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent history, the novel has been thought of and defined primarily as a long prose narrative. However, this has not been the case historically, as the original meaning of "novel" was for "a piece of news" or "a short story or novella." Returning to this original definition, I propose a new way of viewing the work known contemporarily as the novel as a collection, or sequence, of united short stories rather than a single indivisible work, with the component short stories or novellas comprising the sequence renamed as "novels." A brief examination of several classic works traditionally considered novels serves to illustrate how this change in definition will affect reading.

  3. Mystery in Sepedi detective stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Mojalefa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to illustrate the importance of the concept “mystery” in the classification of Sepedi detective stories. Mystery is therefore first defined, and then some rules governing how mystery is created and sustained in a narrative are reviewed. Examples are given of how the writers of Sepedi detective stories mislead their readers in order to create mystery. Mystery is then examined according to five of its constituent elements, namely the real character of the detective, the name of the criminal, the identity of the victim, the evidence that reveals the mystery in the end, and the investigation that reveals the mystery. Each category is explored by citing relevant examples from Sepedi detective stories.

  4. UNDER THE SHADOW: A STORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huatse Gyal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A short story: All through my schooling in Amdo, I admired the 'selfless soldiers' in the many stories that we were taught – stories that originated in the Chinese Communist revolution, and were supposed to provide the foundation for our new society, since the 1950s. Our heroes were modest, self-sacrificing, and thought only of the greater good of those around them. Comrade Lei Feng was one of those we admired most, especially in elementary school. At recess, the boys ran around with make-believe guns, pretending to be the exemplary and selfless soldiers we kept hearing about, willing to die because our country told us we should. ...

  5. A story-based approach to teaching English : a classroom experience

    OpenAIRE

    Illán Martínez, Begoña

    2008-01-01

    To learn a second language using stories can be one more tool to reach the curriculum goals. Stories can be used to arouse interest and increase motivation among students who are learning a second language. This article deals with a personal experience on how to use stories as additional material to the text book when teaching English as a second language. For this purpose, I will describe the problem encountered in the classroom, my proposal to improve the situation, based on authors who pro...

  6. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... King's Speech" In some ways the most important aspect of humans as a group is ... destroy that ability you destroy one of the most important things about us. I think it revealed ...

  7. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Search the NIH Website NIH Employee Intranet Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services ...

  8. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with other people, which often affects a person’s quality of life. Dennis Drayna, Ph.D., an intramural ... Maryland 20892 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Back to Top

  9. Hidden Stories, Toxic Stories, Healing Stories: The Power of Narrative in Peace and Reconciliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Marks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on narrative is more than simply listening to (more or less nice stories. There are stories that are hidden between the lines; these need to be noticed and retrieved. There are stories that can be toxic to be exposed to; these need to be coped with and conceived. But there may be stories that have a healing quality, too—stories that can contribute to peace and reconciliation. These three possible qualities of narratives are the focus of the following paper, which was delivered in October 2008, at the launch of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. The lecture was based on his interdisciplinary research project "Geschichte und Erinnerung" [History and Memory, www.geschichte-erinnerung.de] in which interviews with Nazi followers, bystanders, and perpetrators were conducted and analysed. Marks presented one of the key findings of this research—shame—and its effect on what the interviewees recounted, as well as its relevance for National Socialism and present-day German society.

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 312 ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  11. Constructing leadership identities through stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann, Søren; Hersted, Lone

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the construction of leadership identities through stories found in four narrative interviews from a qualitative study and leadership development project based on social constructionism and action learning. We argue that leadership development and the construction of leadership...... narrative interviews about their challenges as leaders? In addition, how do these discursive constructions restrict or enable new perspectives, other voices, and the possibilities for learning and change? Our analysis identified traces of both modern and postmodern leadership discourses. We suggest...... that the concept of coauthoring is useful in developing leadership and leadership identities through reflexive dialogs and emerging stories....

  12. Origins the scientific story of creation

    CERN Document Server

    Baggott, Jim

    2015-01-01

    What is the nature of the material world? How does it work? What is the universe and how was it formed? What is life? Where do we come from and how did we evolve? How and why do we think? What does it mean to be human? How do we know? There are many different versions of our creation story. This book tells the version according to modern science. It is a unique account, starting at the Big Bang and travelling right up to the emergence of humans as conscious intelligent beings, 13.8 billion years later. Chapter by chapter, it sets out the current state of scientific knowledge: the origins of space and time; energy, mass, and light; galaxies, stars, and our sun; the habitable earth, and complex life itself. Drawing together the physical and biological sciences, Baggott recounts what we currently know of our history, highlighting the questions science has yet to answer.

  13. What a Story! Sharing Stories for Effective Learning and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Luis A.

    2008-01-01

    Adult learning theory and practice supports the common sense approach that lasting learning takes place when the learners have both a cognitive and emotional experience with the topic at hand. While learning is a complex individual process, it needs to be meaningful, familiar, and challenging in order for each person to learn. Story telling on…

  14. The Analysis of the Story of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m Rouhani

    2012-09-01

    The story of Sheikhe Sanan is the longest and most famous story in Manteghol Tayr and it is always considered by researchers of Manteghol Tayr. This story has ups and downs which make possible a Greimasian analysis. Such analysis not only shows the integrity and coherence of the story but also shows the capacities of this model for analyzing the structure of Persian old tales.

  15. Archrtypal Analysis of Bijan and Manije Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Jafari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Manije and Bijan story, a poem by a great poet, Firdausi Tousi, like his other stories in Shahname is a story which can be analyzed by archetyoal approach. According to this approach, this story can be considered as the individuation of here of this story, Bijan, who voluntarily enters into the individuation and psychological growth by being called. In his perfection cycle which is started and in Iran, by the trickery of evil wise old (gorgin, Bijan meets his Anima of unconscious. Bijan, who lived in Ashkanian era as some researchers believe, is one of the prime characters in Shahnameh. From mythical point of view, Bijan story, which is known as one of ancient myths, is the indicator of feminine society in Iran. Bijan story, like Bahram Chobin, Rustam and Sohrab, Ardeshir Babakan, and Rustam and Esfandiar, is an independent story added to Shahnameh. The comparison of Bijan story with other stories of Shahnameh represents this issue that Ferdowsi composed Bijan story in his youth and just after Daghighi’s death. Because Bijan story, like most other stories of Shahnameh and other myths, has a quite symbolic structure and motifs, Jung archetypal point of view is helpful to discover a lot of mysteries. In the present article, Bijan story is analyzed from Jung’s archetypal point of view. According to this theory, there are a lot of symbols, motifs and archetypes in this story. There is a united structure in every story formed base on its plot thus, to discover the structure of a symbolic story is an important act.   The symbolic motif of Bijan story is reaching the perfection and the story structure is completely commensurate with this motif the move is started from Iran, which is the indicator of Bijan story’s consciousness, then the hero after getting individual experience in land of unconscious, Turan, comes back to Iran. Bijan voluntary goes on a dangerous and symbolic way as the hero. Actually he is the portrayal

  16. A Short Story with Long Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Norma F.

    1972-01-01

    After reading a short story, a sixth grade class became involved in an avid discussion, a debate, and dramatic play - all based on the short story. A vast amount of learning had taken place through the study of a single short story. (Author/DR)

  17. The Subversion of Metaphysical Detective Story

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马雪晴

    2015-01-01

    Featured unexpected ending,unique approaches, subversion of the rules of traditional detective story,and unique themes,metaphysical detective story is quite different from these traditional ones.These character were clearly showed in Death and Compass.In this article,metaphysical features of the story are analyzed and the theme was discussed.

  18. Organic Chemistry Trivia: A Way to Interest Nonchemistry Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    The use of in-class stories is an excellent way to keep a class interested in subject matter. Many organic chemistry classes are populated by nonchemistry majors, such as pre-med, pre-pharm, and biology students. Trivia questions are presented that are designed to show how organic chemistry is an important subject to students regardless of their…

  19. Promoting Interest in Plant Biology with Biographies of Plant Hunters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daisey, Peggy

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of biographical stories to promote student interest in plant biology. Discusses plant hunters of various time periods, including ancient, middle ages, renaissance, colonial Americas, and 18th and 19th centuries; women plant hunters of the 1800s and early 1900s; and modern plant hunters. Discusses classroom strategies for the…

  20. Organic Chemistry Trivia: A Way to Interest Nonchemistry Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    The use of in-class stories is an excellent way to keep a class interested in subject matter. Many organic chemistry classes are populated by nonchemistry majors, such as pre-med, pre-pharm, and biology students. Trivia questions are presented that are designed to show how organic chemistry is an important subject to students regardless of their…

  1. Archrtypal Analysis of Bijan and Manije Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Jafari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Manije and Bijan story, a poem by a great poet, Firdausi Tousi, like his other stories in Shahname is a story which can be analyzed by archetyoal approach. According to this approach, this story can be considered as the individuation of here of this story, Bijan, who voluntarily enters into the individuation and psychological growth by being called. In his perfection cycle which is started and in Iran, by the trickery of evil wise old (gorgin, Bijan meets his Anima of unconscious. Bijan, who lived in Ashkanian era as some researchers believe, is one of the prime characters in Shahnameh. From mythical point of view, Bijan story, which is known as one of ancient myths, is the indicator of feminine society in Iran. Bijan story, like Bahram Chobin, Rustam and Sohrab, Ardeshir Babakan, and Rustam and Esfandiar, is an independent story added to Shahnameh. The comparison of Bijan story with other stories of Shahnameh represents this issue that Ferdowsi composed Bijan story in his youth and just after Daghighi’s death. Because Bijan story, like most other stories of Shahnameh and other myths, has a quite symbolic structure and motifs, Jung archetypal point of view is helpful to discover a lot of mysteries. In the present article, Bijan story is analyzed from Jung’s archetypal point of view. According to this theory, there are a lot of symbols, motifs and archetypes in this story. There is a united structure in every story formed base on its plot thus, to discover the structure of a symbolic story is an important act.   The symbolic motif of Bijan story is reaching the perfection and the story structure is completely commensurate with this motif the move is started from Iran, which is the indicator of Bijan story’s consciousness, then the hero after getting individual experience in land of unconscious, Turan, comes back to Iran. Bijan voluntary goes on a dangerous and symbolic way as the hero. Actually he is the portrayal of a part of

  2. Telling Stories of Career Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Mary; Watson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In the field of career development, there is an acknowledged relationship between career assessment and career counseling. Traditional career assessment and more recent narrative approaches to career counseling are perceived as having an uneasy relationship because of their different philosophical bases. A sustainable future story for the field…

  3. Jane Addams, Stories, and Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    Early twentieth-century social activist Jane Addams is best known for her work at Hull House, the settlement house she founded with Ellen Gates Starr in 1889. Adams was also a pacifist, storyteller, writer and philosopher. Through her actions, stories, and writing, Addams modeled a philosophy of democracy-in-action based in imagination and…

  4. Melting Pots: Family Stories & Recipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Judith Eichler

    Discussing the different ways people (including Chinese, Greek, African-American, English, and Cuban) celebrate with food, this book presents a brief account of various celebrations followed by a short story involving each celebration. Celebrations discussed in the book are family parties, birthday parties, school parties, surprise parties, and…

  5. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My World From the Label to the Table! Food Labels Tell the Story! What is in food? Food provides your body with all of the ... your food choices. Nutrition Facts—the Labels on Food Products Beginning in 1994, the US government began ...

  6. Teaching about Consumerism through Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Kay Parks

    2010-01-01

    One of the best methods in the English language arts classroom is to educate students through the world of stories. The beauty of storytelling is that it often has a more powerful impact on young adults than a didactic lecture or a textbook chapter. Many times students would say that they internalize a message much more willingly through reading a…

  7. Learning through Dramatic Story Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, Evie

    2012-01-01

    The use of story with dramatic presentation approaches produces an engaging and powerful instructional choice for today's adult ESL educators. Two engaging and timed-tested approaches are Reader's Theater and Tableau Vivant. Both provide English language learners with content tailored to their abilities in addition to numerable opportunities to…

  8. Jane Addams, Stories, and Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    Early twentieth-century social activist Jane Addams is best known for her work at Hull House, the settlement house she founded with Ellen Gates Starr in 1889. Adams was also a pacifist, storyteller, writer and philosopher. Through her actions, stories, and writing, Addams modeled a philosophy of democracy-in-action based in imagination and…

  9. The Story of the Neutrino

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekaran, G

    2016-01-01

    This is an elementary review of the history and physics of neutrinos. The story of the discovery of neutrino mass through neutrino oscillations is described in some detail. Experiments on solar neutrinos and atmospheric neutrinos played an important part. Recent advances are summarized and future developments are indicated.

  10. Misidentifications in Pirandello's plays and short stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Kilcline, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Luigi Pirandello was an Italian playwright, novelist, short story writer, poet, and one of the leading dramatists of the twentieth century. Pirandello used his plays and short stories to express his life philosophy which included the irony and bitterness of self-deception. In his works, his characters possess highly complex personalities, portrayed by ongoing and overlapping conflicts between illusion and reality. These manifestations of double personalities and confusion between imagination and reality are today known as psychopathological phenomena, classified as both delusional misidentification and reduplication syndromes. Here, individuals misidentify and reduplicate places, people, or events. These delusional syndromes (Capgras, Frégoli, intermetamorphosis, syndrome of subjective doubles) occur primarily in psychiatric illnesses (i.e. schizophrenia) and organic illnesses (i.e. right hemispheric stroke). For Pirandello, reality was highly subjective in all humans. However, misidentification and reduplication syndromes can manifest when this subjectivity gets out of control. With his works, Pirandello made philosophical concepts which had previously only been discussed by intellectuals available to a much larger audience. Pirandello continued to elaborate upon this concept of mutable ego, established by Blaise Pascal in the 1600s and carried on by the French psychologist Alfred Binet. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... aspect of humans as a group is their ability to communicate, and if you destroy that ability you destroy one of the most important things ... with Us Contact Us Bookmark & Share Email Updates Social Media & Outreach Twitter Facebook YouTube Footer NIH Home ...

  12. Education Technology Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Darrell M.; Bleiberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology are enabling dramatic changes in education content, delivery, and accessibility. Throughout history, new technologies have facilitated the exponential growth of human knowledge. In the early twentieth century, the focus was on the use of radios in education. But since then, innovators have seen technology as a way to improve…

  13. Historical short stories as nature of science instruction in secondary science classrooms: Science teachers' implementation and students' reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Smith, Jennifer Ann

    This study explores the use of historical short stories as nature of science (NOS) instruction in thirteen secondary science classes. The stories focus on the development of science ideas and include statements and questions to draw students' and teachers' attention to key NOS ideas and misconceptions. This study used mixed methods to examine how teachers implement the stories, factors influencing teachers' implementation, the impact on students' NOS understanding, students' interest in the stories and factors correlated with their interest. Teachers' implementation decisions were influenced by their NOS understanding, curricula, time constraints, perceptions of student ability and resistance, and student goals. Teachers implementing stories at a high-level of effectiveness were more likely to make instructional decisions to mitigate constraints from the school environment and students. High-level implementers frequently referred to their learning goals for students as a rationale for implementing the stories even when facing constraints. Teachers implementing at a low-level of effectiveness were more likely to express that constraints inhibited effective implementation. Teachers at all levels of implementation expressed concern regarding the length of the stories and time required to fully implement the stories. Additionally, teachers at all levels of implementation expressed a desire for additional resources regarding effective story implementation and reading strategies. Evidence exists that the stories can be used to improve students' NOS understanding. However, under what conditions the stories are effective is still unclear. Students reported finding the stories more interesting than textbook readings and many students enjoyed learning about scientists and the development of science idea. Students' interest in the stories is correlated with their attitudes towards reading, views of effective science learning, attributions of academic success, and interest in

  14. Whose stories? Whose place? : place politics and the politics of place stories in Tromsø's Olympic debate

    OpenAIRE

    Kielland, Ingrid Marie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The dissertation explores the relevance and potential of approaching place politics through personal and collective stories about place. It is based on a case study of a local debate over a controversial project to bid for the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in Tromsø, Northern Norway. The dissertation contributes to developing Doreen Massey´s work on the politics of a relational sense of place by looking at how interests and identities, propinquities and connectivities are negotiated a...

  15. Life Is a Story:An Interpretation of John Barth's "Life-story"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红霞

    2008-01-01

    From some post-modernists' view, life has become a fictional existence in which language, rather than present, operates human experiences. Through analyzing John Barth's essay "Life-story" and the motif of "literature of exhaustion",this paper examines how this is true. Meanwhile, by relating to structuralism and Deconstruction, this paper also points out since the meaning of language lies only in the never-ending postponement of the signified, the meaning of life can only be, found in the perpetual motion of itself. Therefore, life is more often uncertain, ambiguous and unintelligible.

  16. Social Criticism on Works of Contemporary Women Story Writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Mahmoodi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Goldmann's genetic structuralism approach is one of the literary critique approaches and believes that the literary text are derived from the ideology governing the classes of society, and focuses on study of stories and their structures to know the social structures. A review of the changes made in the themes and subjects of the works of the Iranian story writers that most of them are from the middle class of society, indicates the growth of awareness and understanding of Iranian women about their identity and individuality and the achievement of conditions beyond what they are. Although in popular stories, most Iranian female storytellers are still interested in the reproduction of traditional gender stereotypes, but female storywriters in the field of transcendental literature have entered the changes made in their cognitive realm to the actions of characters of their stories. This reveals that they seek to understand their own self and place in the world around them. Love and loneliness resulted by the confrontation between men and women are a common theme in these works that have been narrated on the various issues arising from the family and social relationships of women.

  17. Fifteen minute stories about training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Catherine; Wiener, Jan; Tserashchuk, Alena; Tsivinsky, Vladimir; Volodina, Elena; Alexandrova, Natalia L

    2011-11-01

    This panel presentation at the Journal's conference in St Petersburg responded to the conference theme of 'Ancestors in Personal, Professional and Social History' by relating it to the experience of training and being trained on the IAAP 'router' programme in Russia. The two organizers of the programme (JW and CC) have worked in Russia for over 12 years, bringing analysts from Britain to Moscow and St Petersburg on a 'shuttle' basis as supervisors and personal analysts. A few months after handing over the router programme in December 2010 to the Russian colleagues they had trained, they invited four analysts, three Russian and one Belarusian, to tell a short personal story about their training, linking it to the theme of 'the Ancestors'. The resulting four stories are very different but complement each other, using imagery to illustrate issues concerning both value and ambivalence. JW and CC jointly wrote their story about the programme in response to the four stories, reflecting on some of their themes and from them, giving consideration to the flexibility and limits of such a model of cross-cultural training. Themes in the stories included the possibility of mutual adaptation to another culture without losing tradition and identity; moving on from doctrinaire Soviet attitudes in education to embrace 'not knowing'; both organizers and routers learning from mistakes and from joint experience without guilt or shame; the need to protect reflective space amidst the constraints of time and geography. All Russian and UK contributors could finally acknowledge their shared luck to find themselves in the right place at the right time to respond to the collective revival of psychoanalytic practice in Russia.

  18. The Realistic Meaning of Literature from Zweig's The Story of Chess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱丹

    2016-01-01

    Literature on sports is to manifest human physical activities.Great novels and short stories on sports are intended to celebrate hu-man spirits and power,to reflect historical background and real life and to express writers'thoughts and feelings.Austrian novelist Zweig's The Story of Chess is such a strong voice of anti-Fasist that displays the metaphor between an amateur chess player and a world champion,indicates the writer's complaints against Nazi's infringement of human nature.The narrator interprets the relationship between "emptiness"and existence from the aspect of ultimate care of humans and discovers profound relation between sports and human society.

  19. Interest rate derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Mikkel

    This Ph.D. thesis consists of four self-contained essays on valuation of interest rate derivatives. In particular derivatives related to management of interest rate risk care are considered.......This Ph.D. thesis consists of four self-contained essays on valuation of interest rate derivatives. In particular derivatives related to management of interest rate risk care are considered....

  20. Improving rural newspaper coverage of nutrition stories: an educational assessment of editors' attitudes and learning needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothwehr, Faryle; Chrisman, Matthew; Andsager, Julie L

    2014-11-01

    Local newspapers are an important source of information for rural residents but often lack accurate or helpful nutrition-related information. To improve the quantity and quality of nutrition stories in rural, local newspapers, it is important to understand the perspective of editors. An online survey of 51 rural Midwest editors was conducted to assess attitudes toward writing nutrition stories, sources of information, perceived challenges, and interest in learning more about writing such stories. Of respondents, 49% were female, and 63% had at least a 4-year college degree. Through a mix of closed- and open-ended questions, the majority indicated positive attitudes toward nutrition stories, were confident in their abilities to write them, and expressed interest in learning more. Challenges cited include lack of print space, small staff, lack of specific requests from readers for nutrition stories, and the need to avoid offending local agricultural businesses. Results should be useful in planning an educational intervention for editors. Meanwhile, public health practitioners should provide concise press releases to their local newspapers about their activities. Also, greater expressions of appreciation from public health professionals and other readers may lead to higher prioritization of nutrition-related stories, and ultimately to an environment more supportive of healthy eating.

  1. Improving Rural Newspaper Coverage of Nutrition Stories: An Educational Assessment of Editors’ Attitudes and Learning Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothwehr, Faryle; Chrisman, Matthew; Andsager, Julie L.

    2014-01-01

    Local newspapers are an important source of information for rural residents but often lack accurate or helpful nutrition-related information. To improve the quantity and quality of nutrition stories in rural, local newspapers, it is important to understand the perspective of editors. An online survey of 51 rural Midwest editors was conducted to assess attitudes toward writing nutrition stories, sources of information, perceived challenges, and interest in learning more about writing such stories. Of respondents, 49% were female, and 63% had at least a 4-year college degree. Through a mix of closed- and open-ended questions, the majority indicated positive attitudes toward nutrition stories, were confident in their abilities to write them, and expressed interest in learning more. Challenges cited include lack of print space, small staff, lack of specific requests from readers for nutrition stories, and the need to avoid offending local agricultural businesses. Results should be useful in planning an educational intervention for editors. Meanwhile, public health practitioners should provide concise press releases to their local newspapers about their activities. Also, greater expressions of appreciation from public health professionals and other readers may lead to higher prioritization of nutrition-related stories, and ultimately to an environment more supportive of healthy eating. PMID:24648288

  2. A POW'S STORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F. Aquadro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the interest of authenticity, editing has been kept to a bare minimum. This narrative thusappears in virtually its original form, as written in secret, under difficult conditions. Terminologyis often in the vernacular. Details of regiments, titles and place names may also have beenchanged in the interim. Editor.I was serving with the 4th Brigade, Signallers Company, in No. 1 Platoon attached to the U.M.R., Infantry of the 2nd SA Division, Garrison of Tobruk since March, 1942, until the 18th June, 1942, when Rommel made his last main assault on Tobruk, and the same day we were besieged, besieged for three days. On the 21st of June, our C.O. General Klopper of Tobruk surrendered to the Germans unconditionally. That Sunday morning of the 21st of June, we were ordered to destroy all the equipment we had, which we did thoroughly. At about 9 p.m. German Panzer Units rushed upon us, where we were holding a line on the central perimeter, and from there I was taken prisoner. I had a small valice packed with a change of clothing and shaving outfit, the remainder of my possessions I burnt. We were all lined up in three's about one thousand of us with not many German guards with automatic guns, and in the blistering heat we were marched from the perimeter to the aerodrome a distance of six miles. On this aerodome about 25 000 prisoners were massed including officers, everybody mixed. The same day each prisoner was issued with 1 WB. of water, 1 tin of our bully and two biscuits for the day. It is terribly hot and we have no shelter at all. We slept there in the open that night. 

  3. Cognitive Processes in Skimming Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    text. Cognitiv Psychology, 1979, 11, 177-220. Bransford, J. D., & Franks, J. J. The abstraction of linguistic ideas. Cognitive Psychology, 1971, 2, 331...Story structure and recall. Cognitiv Psychology, 1977, 30, 111-151. Marcel, T. The effective visual field and the use of ccntext in fast and slow...limited and resource-liml.ted processes. Cognitiv . Psychology, 1975, .7, 44-64. Olb’n, M. R., Harlow, S. D., & Williams, J. D. An evaluation of M

  4. Another Story of Snow white

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    "白兰氏"杯 2006 广东省中学生英语作文比赛决赛题(初中组)命题作文:你的读者是国际幼儿园的 3- 6 岁的小朋友。实际上, 你的作文是要读给他们听的。内容是鼓励孩子们回家后做一件促进文明保护环境的具体的事。可以包括爱护环境、讲究卫生、节约不浪费资源、爱护小动物、语言和行为文明。文体不限 ( 可以包括倡议书、阐述文、议论文、散文、诗歌、童话等)。自定题目。 My dear children,have you ever heard of the story of Snow White?You are very clever children,I know you must remember the happy ending in the story. The beautiful girl who named Snow White went to live in the palace with her lover. Do you want to know what happend next?listen carefully and I'll tell you the story . It is said ...

  5. The rise of western rationalism: Paul Feyerabend's story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, John

    2016-06-01

    I summarize certain aspects of Paul Feyerabend's account of the development of Western rationalism, show the ways in which that account is supposed to run up against an alternative, that of Karl Popper, and then try to give a preliminary comparison of the two. My interest is primarily in whether what Feyerabend called his 'story' constitutes a possible history of our epistemic concepts and their trajectory. I express some grave reservations about that story, and about Feyerabend's framework, finding Popper's views less problematic here. However, I also suggest that one important aspect of Feyerabend's material, his treatment of religious belief, can be given an interpretation which makes it tenable, and perhaps preferable to a Popperian approach.

  6. Migrant life stories and the Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi

    2013-01-01

    The life stories of migrants are increasingly being told, as part of the work of cultural organizations, and websites are well suited to making such life story projects accessible to the public. However, by using the lives of real people as raw material in a public forum, Web projects raise...... who has openly declared himself an atheist. The article examines his experience of having this somewhat sensitive story made public. The religious aspect inevitably positioned his story in relation to broader political debates about Muslims in Denmark. Since migrants’ stories often touch on highly...... politicized issues, it is crucial that their stories are not co-opted by societal discourses which they do not themselves support....

  7. The design and implementation of a randomized controlled trial of a risk reduction and human immunodeficiency virus prevention videogame intervention in minority adolescents: PlayForward: Elm City Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiellin, Lynn E; Kyriakides, Tassos C; Hieftje, Kimberly D; Pendergrass, Tyra M; Duncan, Lindsay R; Dziura, James D; Sawyer, Benjamin G; Fiellin, David A

    2016-08-01

    To address the need for risk behavior reduction and human immunodeficiency virus prevention interventions that capture adolescents "where they live," we created a tablet-based videogame to teach skills and knowledge and influence psychosocial antecedents for decreasing risk and preventing human immunodeficiency virus infection in minority youth in schools, after-school programs, and summer camps. We developed PlayForward: Elm City Stories over a 2-year period, working with researchers, commercial game designers, and staff and teens from community programs. The videogame PlayForward provides an interactive world where players, using an avatar, "travel" through time, facing challenges such as peer pressure to drink alcohol or engage in risky sexual behaviors. Players experience how their choices affect their future and then are able to go back in time and change their choices, creating different outcomes. A randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of PlayForward. Participants were randomly assigned to play PlayForward or a set of attention/time control games on a tablet at their community-based program. Assessment data were collected during face-to-face study visits and entered into a web-based platform and unique real-time "in-game" PlayForward data were collected as players engaged in the game. The innovative methods of this randomized controlled trial are described. We highlight the logistical issues of conducting a large-scale trial using mobile technology such as the iPad(®), and collecting, transferring, and storing large amounts of in-game data. We outline the methods used to analyze the in-game data alone and in conjunction with standardized assessment data to establish correlations between behaviors during gameplay and those reported in real life. We also describe the use of the in-game data as a measure of fidelity to the intervention. In total, 333 boys and girls, aged 11-14 years, were randomized over a 14-month period: 166 were

  8. Stories of change in drug treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    treatment institution shapes how particular stories make sense of the past, present and future; and (4) storytelling in drug treatment is an interactive achievement. A fine-grained analysis illuminates in particular how some stories on gender and drug use are silenced, while others are encouraged....... The demonstration of how local narrative environments shape stories contributes to the general understanding of interactive storytelling in encounters between professionals and clients in treatment settings....

  9. [Tuberculosis--a neverending story].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieciołowska-Baran, Edyta; Gawlikowska-Sroka, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that over one third of the human population is now exposed or has been exposed in the past to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and new infections occur in the world at a rate of one per second. The history of tuberculosis is long and very interesting, because before the isolation of mycobacteria and the finding of a cure, the disease mercilessly killed thousands of people and deprived doctors of hope. Robert Koch's momentous discovery was a major breakthrough in the fight against tuberculosis. Unfortunately, the disease has never been fully controlled. Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease localized in 90-95% of cases in the lungs, and therefore it is extremely difficult to diagnose unequivocally in paleopathological material. Only the form of osteo-arthritis leaves traces in archaeological material. The earliest evidence of tuberculosis (the location of the spine, Pott's disease) in the form of fossils is dated to before 8000 BC. Another very old trace is considered to be human remains from the Neolithic period (ca 5000 BC), found near Heidelberg, where changes in the thoracic spine are typical for spondylitis in tuberculosa. Constant growth in the incidence of new cases in the world can be observed today. Not everyone infected will develop the full-blown disease. The infection may remain dormant. However, one in ten latent infections will subsequently be activated, leading, if not treated, to the death of almost half of the patients.

  10. Symbolic Values in Steinbeck's Short Stories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱凤英

    2003-01-01

    The essay will analyze the symbols created by Steinbeck and disclose the meaning of the most widely used symbols John Steinbeck resorted toin some of his short stories. These interpretations of the symbols may reveal to readers an utterly different system of values. The author will explore those stories that are relevant from this point of view. This paper will highlight,emphasize and interpret different symbols presented in his stories too. And the author will give a possible way of tackling of Steinbeck short stories.

  11. RE-Powering Success Stories: Green Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    These success stories discuss sites on formerly contaminated lands, landfills, and mine sites that are manufacturing components for renewable energy, either solar panels, wind turbines, or other components.

  12. Evaluation of arboviruses of public health interest in free-living non-human primates (Alouatta spp., Callithrix spp., Sapajus spp.) in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of arboviruses from the Flavivirus genus in asymptomatic free-living non-human primates (NHPs) living in close contact with humans and vectors in the States of Paraná and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. METHODS: NHP sera samples (total n = 80, Alouatta spp. n = 07, Callithrix spp. n = 29 and Sapajus spp. n = 44) were screened for the presence of viral genomes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and 10% ...

  13. Pragmatic Study of Directive Speech Acts in Stories in Alquran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochmat Budi Santosa

    2016-10-01

    principles of the movement of human history. Those principles later we call the laws of God. He continues to invite people to reflect His guidance in life.Keywords: directive speech act, verses of stories, quran

  14. Re-Storying Practice: Using Stories about Students to Advance Mathematics Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta-Irving, Tesha; Redman, Elizabeth; Enyedy, Noel

    2013-01-01

    We apply a literary definition of story (struggle, protagonist, and resolution) to an American primary school teacher's reflections on experimenting with new teaching practices. This definition makes issues of equity explicit and revealed what the teacher saw as possible for changing her practice. By re-storying her stories--offering evidence from…

  15. Getting the story right: making computer-generated stories more entertaining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oinonen, K.M.; Theune, M.; Nijholt, A.; Heylen, D.K.J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe our efforts to increase the entertainment value of the stories generated by our story generation system, the Virtual Storyteller, at the levels of plot creation, discourse generation and spoken language presentation. We also discuss the construction of a story database that

  16. That Was a Good Story! Preliminary Construction of the Perceived Story Quality Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jacqueline M.; Bluck, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a preliminary Perceived Story Quality Index to assess laypersons' views of story quality. Research to date has not employed a standard measure of perceived quality, nor reported whether different lay-raters judge stories similarly. The study involved systematically generating core dimensions of…

  17. III TALLER DE DISCUSIÓN SOBRE RESTITUCIÓN DE RESTOS HUMANOS DE INTERÉS ARQUEOLÓGICO Y BIOANTROPOLÓGICO / III Discussion Workshop on the Return of Human Remains of Archaeological and Bioanthropological Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luz Endere

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presentan los resultados del III Taller de Discusión sobre Restitución de Restos Humanos de Interés Arqueológico llevado a cabo en Junio de 2013 en la ciudad de Olavarría.   Palabras Clave: restos humanos de origen arqueológico, restitución, etica, práctica profesional   Abstract This paper presents the results of the III Discussion Workshop to discuss human remains restitution of archaeological interest, held in June 2013 in the city of Olavarria.   Keywords: human remains from archaeological contexts, restitution, ethics, professional practice.

  18. Understanding Interest Rate Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volker, Desi

    This thesis is the result of my Ph.D. studies at the Department of Finance of the Copenhagen Business School. It consists of three essays covering topics related to the term structure of interest rates, monetary policy and interest rate volatility. The rst essay, \\Monetary Policy Uncertainty...... and Interest Rates", examines the role of monetary policy uncertainty on the term structure of interest rates. The second essay, \\A Regime-Switching A ne Term Structure Model with Stochastic Volatility" (co-authored with Sebastian Fux), investigates the ability of the class of regime switching models...... with and without stochastic volatility to capture the main stylized features of U.S. interest rates. The third essay, \\Variance Risk Premia in the Interest Rate Swap Market", investigates the time-series and cross-sectional properties of the compensation demanded for holding interest rate variance risk. The essays...

  19. STORIES – A POWERFUL TOOL IN TRIBAL LITERATURE, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO HOW MARTEN GOT HIS SPOTS: AND OTHER KOOTENAI INDIAN STORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sripadmadevi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial, stories hold prime place in the process of individuation. The art of story-telling is as old as human civilization. And the world of Tribe is of no exception. Many of the rural and tribal societies are oral in nature. Their history is not written but orally transmitted from one generation to another, in the form of poetry, songs, proverbs, stories, narrative dances and various rituals. Their historical and cultural information are passed on through some of these means. Primarily they used stories for imparting knowledge and courage to the budding generation. Among the array of tribes across the world, the Kootenai people – a particular sect of tribe - today exist in south-eastern British Columbia, Washington State, Idaho and Moutana. For centuries, Kootenai children and adults gathered on cold, dark winter nights to listen and learn from stories. Recorded by their elders and illustrated by Kootenai artists from the Flathead Indian Reservation in western Montana, these Kootenai stories are originally intended to educate young tribal members about their history and culture. The collection of How Marten Got His Spots: and other Kootenai stories packed with morals, in which Marten learns a hard lesson in obedience; Coyote and Trout, in which Coyote learns the consequences of greed; Little Weasel's Dream, in which the child Little Weasel learns the importance of listening to his elders; and Tepee Making, an illustrated lesson in construction. The main focal point of the present paper is to exhibit, how by employing the technique of storytelling, these tribes can communicate and mould their rising generation, with special reference to How Marten Got His Spots: and other Kootenai stories.

  20. Where Did You Come From? Where Will You Go? Human Evolutionary Biology Education and American Students' Academic Interests and Achievements, Professional Goals, and Socioscientific Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrein, Caitlin M.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, there is a national agenda to increase the number of qualified science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM) professionals and a movement to promote science literacy among the general public. This project explores the association between formal human evolutionary biology education (HEB) and high school science class…

  1. "Robinson Crusoe" and the Story of the Novel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Quentin G.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses stories in general, stories in the novel, and "Robinson Crusoe," focusing on what happens in and to narrative--the transformation in the nature of story--that brings the novel into existence. (DD)

  2. "Robinson Crusoe" and the Story of the Novel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Quentin G.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses stories in general, stories in the novel, and "Robinson Crusoe," focusing on what happens in and to narrative--the transformation in the nature of story--that brings the novel into existence. (DD)

  3. ANALYSIS ZHANG AILING’S NOVEL (RED ROSE AND WHITE ROSE IMAGE OF THE CHARACTERS AND STORY PLOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yetty Yetty

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhang Ailing is a heterogeneous novel writer in China literature’s history. Almost of her life,she already wrote so many literature’s works. One of her famous novel is (Red Rose and White Rose.The story is describe the image of main figure’s character and his emotional. Writer wants use thecharacterization, complexity of personality and story plot these three aspect to analysis the novel’sfigure looks, figure character and the story. This novel story is a complication relationship betweenthe man and two women, red roses as her lover and white rose as her wife. About a man that in hisstandard life and emotional condition occur some contradiction. Writer use reference material andtheory of novel writing to analysis Zhang Ailing (Red Rose and White Rose‘s novel. The result of thisanalisys are the most important part in novel’s story is not only about the story plot but also thedescribtion of figure looks and characterization. Zhang Ailing in (Red rose and white rosedescbribtion is very spesific, the story become so interesting because of the Complementary of thefigure looks, figure characterization and story plot, embraced each other, fully reflects the fictionalreality of compromise and frustration.

  4. "No interest in human anatomy as such": Frederic Wood Jones dissects anatomical investigation in the United States in the 1920s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ross L

    2014-03-01

    In 1926, Frederic Wood Jones, professor of Anatomy at the University of Adelaide and a leading figure in the British anatomical world, took a Rockefeller Foundation funded trip to the United States in order to inspect anatomy programmes and medical museums and to meet leading figures in the anatomical and anthropological world. His later reflections paint a picture of a discipline in transition. Physical anthropology and gross anatomy were coming to a crisis point in the United States, increasingly displaced by research in histology, embryology and radiological anatomy. Meanwhile, in Britain and its colonial outposts, anatomists such as Wood Jones were attempting to re-invigorate the discipline in the field, studying biological specimens as functional and active agents in their particular milieus, but with human dissection at the core. Thus, an examination of this trip allows us to see how the interaction between two traditions in anatomy informed the process of the development of human biology in this critical period.

  5. Evaluation of arboviruses of public health interest in free-living non-human primates (Alouatta spp., Callithrix spp., Sapajus spp. in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Carneiro da Rocha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of arboviruses from the Flavivirus genus in asymptomatic free-living non-human primates (NHPs living in close contact with humans and vectors in the States of Paraná and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. METHODS: NHP sera samples (total n = 80, Alouatta spp. n = 07, Callithrix spp. n = 29 and Sapajus spp. n = 44 were screened for the presence of viral genomes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and 10% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis techniques. RESULTS: All of the samples were negative for the Flavivirus genome following the 10% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. CONCLUSIONS: These negative results indicate that the analyzed animals were not infected with arboviruses from the Flavivirus genus and did not represent a risk for viral transmission through vectors during the period in which the samples were collected.

  6. Working with stories in nursing research: procedures used in narrative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the procedures undertaken in a qualitative study that used nurses' stories to examine the influence of Gestalt therapy training on the professional practice of psychiatric nurses. The paper places narrative research methodologies within a nursing context before introducing narrative inquiry, specifically narrative analysis methodology. Procedures used in the study are subsequently described in sufficient detail to serve as a guide for novice researchers interested in undertaking a narrative analysis study. An exemplar of a storied outcome is provided to evidence the product of the narrative analysis research process. The paper concludes with reflections on the importance of articulating the process of narrative analysis as a means of developing interest and competence in narrative research, and using nurses' stories as a means of exploring, understanding, and communicating nursing practice.

  7. Genetic interest assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughney, Erin

    Genetics is becoming increasingly integrated into peoples' lives. Different measures have been taken to try and better genetics education. This thesis examined undergraduate students at the University of North Texas not majoring in the life sciences interest in genetic concepts through the means of a Likert style survey. ANOVA analysis showed there was variation amongst the interest level in different genetic concepts. In addition age and lecture were also analyzed as contributing factors to students' interest. Both age and lecture were evaluated to see if they contributed to the interest of students in genetic concepts and neither showed statistical significance. The Genetic Interest Assessment (GIA) serves to help mediate the gap between genetic curriculum and students' interest.

  8. AMIDST: Attracting Minorities to Geosciences Through Involved Digital Story Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A.; Ohler, J.; Cooper, C.; McDermott, M.; Heinrich, J.; Johnson, R.; Leeper, L.; Polk, N.; Wimer, T.

    2009-12-01

    Attracting Minorities to Geosciences Through Involved Digital Story Telling (AMIDST) is a project funded by the Geoscience Directorate of the National Science Foundation through their program entitled Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in Geosciences. This project centers around the idea of integrating place-based geoscience education with culturally sensitive digital story telling, to engage and attract Alaska’s native and rural children from grades 3 through 5 to geosciences. In Spring 2008 we brought together a team 2 native elders, a group of scientists and technicians, an evaluator, 2 teachers and their 24 third grade students from Fairbanks (interior Alaska) to create computer-based digital stories around the geoscience themes of permafrost, and forest fires. These two to four minutes digital narratives consisted of a series of images accompanied by music and a voice-over narration by the children. In Fall 2008 we worked with a similar group from Nome (coastal town in western Alaska). The geoscience themes were climate change, and gold in Alaska. This time the students used the same kind of “green screen” editing so prevalent in science fiction movies. Students enacted and recorded their stories in front of a green screen and in post-production replaced the green background with photos, drawings and scientific illustrations related to their stories. Evaluation involved pre and post project tests for all participants, mid-term individual interviews and exit-interviews of selected participants. Project final assessment results from an independent education evaluator showed that both students and teachers improved their geo science content knowledge about permafrost, forest fires, gold mining, and sea ice changes. Teachers and students went through a very steep learning curve and gained experience and new understanding in digital storytelling in the context of geologic phenomena of local interest. Children took pride in being creators, directors and

  9. Murder on the Einstein express and other stories

    CERN Document Server

    Šiljak, Harun

    2016-01-01

    This collection of stories touches upon many genres: Normed Trek is a clever and witty Alice-in-Wonderland-type narrative set in the realm of mathematical analysis, The Cantor Trilogy is a dystopia about the consequences of relying upon computer-based mathematical proofs, In Search of Future Time bears the flavor of Tales from Arabian Nights set in the future, and – last but not least - Murder on the Einstein Express is a short, non-technical primer on probabilities and modern classical physics, disguised as a detective story. Written primarily for an audience with some background or a strong interest in mathematics, physics and computer science (in particular artificial intelligence), these stories explore the boundaries between science and fiction in a refreshingly unconventional fashion. In the Afterthoughts the author provides some further insights and annotations. Harun Šiljak got his BoEE and MoEE degrees at the Department of Control and Electronics, University of Sarajevo and his PhD in Signal Proce...

  10. Humorous "Era" stories from the Arilje region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Desanka P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses humorous stories collected in the village of Brekovo near Arilje; the stories were created in the first half of the 20th century and noted down by Momčilo Jovanović, a villager from Brekovo. Later on, in the 1980's, the stories were passed down to the author of this paper. These narrations are mostly short stories and anecdotes; in a very realistic fashion, the stories depict life and culture of the Dinaric race from old Vlah - Zlatibor cultural area, namely, the type of person also known as "Era", well-known for its wittiness, smartness and wisdom. Based on the analysis of seven Era-stories, the author identified the social and cultural values highlighted in the stories (such as attitudes toward authorities intergenerational relationship, status of women, power relations between townsmen and peasants, propensity toward justice and truth. In summary, the stories document the mutual influence between traditional culture and the Era personality in this particular rural region; therefore, they could contribute to studies on character traits of the inhabitants in a given area of western Serbia.

  11. Stories and the Development of Virtue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willows, Adam M.

    2017-01-01

    From folk tales to movies, stories possess features which naturally suit them to contribute to the growth of virtue. In this article I show that the fictional exemplars help the learner to grasp the moral importance of internal states and resolves a tension between existing kinds of exemplars discussed by virtue ethicists. Stories also increase…

  12. Stories to Be Read Aloud (Booksearch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    English Journal, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presents junior and senior high school teachers' suggestions for short stories to read aloud in a single class period, including "The Laughing Man" (J. D. Salinger), "A & P" (John Updike), "Epicac" (Kurt Vonnegut), "The Story of an Hour" (Kate Chopin), and "The Yellow Wallpaper" (Charlotte Perkins Gilman). (MM)

  13. Stories to Be Read Aloud (Booksearch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    English Journal, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presents junior and senior high school teachers' suggestions for short stories to read aloud in a single class period, including "The Laughing Man" (J. D. Salinger), "A & P" (John Updike), "Epicac" (Kurt Vonnegut), "The Story of an Hour" (Kate Chopin), and "The Yellow Wallpaper" (Charlotte…

  14. Story Map: How to Improve Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidekli, Sabri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of written expression studies is to have students explain their knowledge, feelings, ideas and imaginations in a correct and effective manner. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of story map on story writing skills of first grade teacher candidates who study at the Department of Elementary Education. The…

  15. Bilingual Folk Stories in the ESL Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynham, Mike

    1986-01-01

    Describes a method of drawing on the students' own knowledge and resources in developing language teaching materials. Discusses the use of folk stories as a source of reading materials and examines the process of preparing a Mullah Nasreddin story, first told in a classroom discussion, for publication as a bilingual reader. (SED)

  16. Did You Really Read That Short Story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C. D.

    Two studies carried out by James Squire and Jesse Stuart explored processes used in reading the short story, ways of exploring student's processes, possibilities within the short story as a literary genre, and methods teachers can use. Squire's study showed that introspection and retrospection are useful in studying students' reading processes. In…

  17. Rabbi: exploring the inner world through stories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umaschi, M. [MIT Media Lab., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In the oral tradition, stories were told by the elder sages in order to give indirect advice. Today most stories are told in order to entertain. While some research on storytelling systems has focused on drama/theater metaphors and adventure/mystery simulation games, my research emphasizes the counseling and self-awareness possibilities of storytelling.

  18. Telling War Stories: The Things They Carry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Paige; Warren, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This webtext reveals two modern-day methods for soldiers to share their war stories: 1) soldiers sharing their stories with cadets from West Point through a project linking veterans from the Global War on Terror with composition students; and 2) soldiers learning in online composition classrooms designed specifically for them.

  19. Telling Stories: Past and Present Heroes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Colin Bridges

    2007-01-01

    Among the Xhosa tribe in South Africa storytelling is a magnificent art. But these stories are more than mere entertainment. Xhosa scholar Harold Scheub says story-telling for the Xhosa people is "not only a primary means of entertainment and artistic expression in the society, it is also the major educational device." Beyond education, the…

  20. Telling War Stories: The Things They Carry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Paige; Warren, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This webtext reveals two modern-day methods for soldiers to share their war stories: 1) soldiers sharing their stories with cadets from West Point through a project linking veterans from the Global War on Terror with composition students; and 2) soldiers learning in online composition classrooms designed specifically for them.

  1. STORIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    捷伦

    2011-01-01

    Long, long ago, the Greeks and Trojans were enemies. A war started. For ten years the Greek soldiers wanted to take the city of Troy, but they could not, because the walls of the city were strong. Then the Greek made a big wooden house. Twenty hid themselves in ito All the other soldiers went away.

  2. Exploring nurses' storied accounts of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geanellos, R

    1995-06-01

    The learning opportunities presented in nurses' storied accounts of practice are explored. This exploration is achieved through analysis and discussion of three nurse's stories documented in the literature, and uses Benner's (1991) narratives of learning theme as the conceptual framework. The narrative of learning sub themes: being open to experience, liberation, and disillusionment are examined. This examination suggests nurses stories can be used to: discover nursing knowledge, develop shared understandings of what it is to be a nurse, examine nursing's culture and ethics, document interactions for research, teaching and learning, and identify and preserve the practice of nursing. Whereas edited stories from the literature only begin to demonstrate the possibilities for learning that stories offer, through them alternative ways of learning about nursing, exploring nursing practice and developing nursing knowledge are presented.

  3. Beijing Bicycle - Stories from a Transformative Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Mai Corlin

    2012-01-01

    Ideas, words, images and stories travel from west to east – and from east to west. Stories are chosen and retold in different settings and images are reproduced and appropriated into new contexts – and in new times. Cinema, in this case the mainland Chinese, becomes both a space of production...... and a production of space that reveals how transnational and translocal mechanisms affect the cinematic language, transforming the images and stories chosen for the cinematic representation. Wang Xiaoshuai’s Beijing Bicycle (Shiqi Sui de Danche) (2001) is a result of transnational currents weaving the carpet...... relevant in a new context – that of the Chinese mainland society in the 21st century. Doreen Massey (2005: 9) defines space as “a simultaneity of stories-so-far”, a space that is constantly exploding and imploding with the influx of new and old stories. Within this theoretical framework Wang Xiaoshuai...

  4. Dental stories for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Ian W; Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; McKinney, Christy M; Scott, JoAnna M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate caregivers' preference regarding dental stories to prepare children with autism for dental visits. Caregivers of children with autism were allowed use of dental stories available via different media (paper, tablet computer, computer) and image types (comics or drawings, photographs, video). Caregivers completed pre- and postintervention surveys. Fisher's exact tests were used to determine associations between predictive factors and preferences. Forty initial and 16 follow-up surveys were completed. Subjects were primarily male (85%). Mean child age was 6.7 years. Nine (64%) caregivers found the dental story useful for themselves and their child. Two (14%) caregivers found the aid only helpful for themselves. Preferred media type was associated with language understanding (p = .038) and home media preference (p = .002). Practitioners should consider using dental stories to help prepare families and children for dental visits. Individual preferences for dental stories vary; using prior history can aid in selection. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Brodmann's Area Template Based Region of Interest Setting and Probabilistic Pathway Map Generation in Diffusion Tensor Tractography: Application to Arcuate Fasciculus Fiber Tract in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon eLee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to acquire accurate diffusion tensor tractography (DTT results for arcuate fasciculus (AF fiber tract using Brodmann's area (BA template for region of interest (ROI setting. Thirteen healthy subjects were participated in this study. Fractional anisotropy (FA map of each subject was calculated using diffusion tensor data, and T1w template was co-registered to FA map. The BA template was also co-registered using the transformation matrix. The ROIs were drawn in the co-registered BA template, and AF fiber tract was extracted. To generate the probabilistic pathway map, a binary mask image was generated based on the fiber tract image and co-registered to T1w template image. We also measured relative location of the AF fiber tract. The location of the probability pathway map of each subject’s AF fiber tract was well defined in the brain. By using this probabilistic map, the mediolateral position ratio of AF was measured 18%, and the anteroposterior position ratio of AF was measured 35%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the AF fiber tract can be extracted using BA template for ROI setting and probabilistic pathway of fiber tract. Our results and analytical approaches can helpful for accurate fiber tracking and application of perspective clinical researches.

  6. Riot at the calc exam and other mathematically bent stories

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Colin

    2009-01-01

    What's so funny about math? Lots! Especially if you're mathematically bent. In the world of Colin Adams, differential equations bring on tears of laughter. Hollywood producers hire algebraic geometers to punch up a script. In this world, math and humor are synonymous. Riot at the Calc Exam is a proof of this fact. A collection of humorous math stories, this book gives a window into mathematics and the culture of mathematicians. Appropriate for mathematicians, math students, math teachers, lay people with an interest in mathematics, and indeed everyone else. This book is a romp through the wild

  7. What about Metaphors in "The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories" Written by Ernest Hemingway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na'imah

    2015-01-01

    It is discovered plenty of various interesting metaphors in the book of "The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories" which were written by Ernest Hemingway. By the metaphorical expressions, one can describe everything much more expressively, imaginatively, effectively, and poetically. Each of the metaphors has always a specific style and…

  8. Toward Integrated Career Assessment: Using Story to Appraise Career Dispositions and Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Paul J.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the validity of using stories to appraise career dispositions and problems associated with career adaptability. Premedical students (63 women, 37 men) wrote narratives about Thematic Apperception Test cards (TAT) and responded to the Strong Interest Inventory (SII). Independent raters identified identical career adaptability…

  9. What Makes African American Health Disparities Newsworthy? An Experiment among Journalists about Story Framing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnant, Amanda; Oh, Hyun Jee; Caburnay, Charlene A.; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    News stories reporting race-specific health information commonly emphasize disparities between racial groups. But recent research suggests this focus on disparities has unintended effects on African American audiences, generating negative emotions and less interest in preventive behaviors (Nicholson RA, Kreuter MW, Lapka C "et al." Unintended…

  10. My Nine Lives as an Academic: Narratives of Identity Storied by a Platinum-Enhanced Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Laurie L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I describe my experiences 72 hours after I was told I had a life-threatening medical condition. My experience as an autoethnographer and my interest in embodied knowing put a unique spin on the narrative that developed in those three days. What I present here is an autoethnographic story of my experience, which culminated in a…

  11. The Monosodium Glutamate Story: The Commercial Production of MSG and Other Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Addison

    2004-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is both the basis of a trillion dollar worldwide industry and a presence in the diet of a majority of the inhabitants of the world. Some parts of the "story" of MSG that might be of most interest to chemists, chemistry teachers and their students are presented.

  12. Story asides as a useful construct in examining adults' story recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Susan; Alea, Nicole; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline M; Davis, Danielle K

    2016-02-01

    Older adults sometimes exhibit higher levels of off-target verbosity during story recall than do young adults. This appears as the inclusion of extraneous information not directly relevant to the topic. Some production of such material has been clearly related to cognitive decline, particularly older adults' inability to inhibit production of irrelevant information. In tandem, however, research also suggests that some extraneous information is indirectly related to the topic and may reflect age differences in communicative styles. To further elucidate the social-cognitive aspect of this issue, the question of import is: What is the content of the additional information provided by participants during story recall? The present study answers this question. Grounded in the autobiographical memory and life story literatures, we introduce the construct, story asides, and a reliable content-analytic scheme for its assessment. Young and older adults (N = 129) recalled 1 of 2 types of stories: a personal autobiographical memory or an experimenter-generated fictional story. Narratives were reliably coded for story asides. As expected, older adults produced more story asides than young adults only for autobiographical stories. The discussion focuses on the role of story asides in everyday communication including the possibility that they may be a sign of communicative expertise.

  13. The Story of Louis Pasteur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ángel García-Rodríguez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The Story of Louis Pasteur is considered one of the first biopics – term that comes from the association of “biography” and “picture” – in the history of cinema. Directed by William Dieterle in 1936, it was distributed in Spain under the curious name of “La tragedia de Louis Pasteur” (The tragedy of Louis Pasteur. This tragedy is a consequence of the lack of understanding and culture, of the unfairness and ingratitude, which were all magnified in the figure of a man whose banner was the science and, according to him, the well-being of mankind depended on its application. The film is structured into three parts connected to events related to Pasteur´s studies in the field of Microbiology and infectious diseases: Microbial theory about the disease which was present all through the film and the main axe of the plot; studies in anthrax and research into rabies.

  14. The story of Prosenjit Poddar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamonud Modak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of "Tarasoff duty" is familiar to mental health professionals. Entwined with the name of Tarasoff, is that of Prosenjit Poddar, the other important character in the story which led to the courts giving directions for mental health professionals with regard to their duty of warn. Prosenjit Poddar killed Tatiana Tarasoff when his advances toward her were rebuffed. However, the court ruled that the mental health professional who was treating Poddar and was in knowledge of his intentions to harm Tarasoff, did not take adequate measures to warn the potential victim. This led to courts laying statutes for warning the potential victims by mental health professionals when their clients disclose such threats. However, the ruling has been a matter of debate about when to take any threat seriously and how to tread cautiously given the therapist-client privilege. The case of Prosenjit Poddar throws light on complex issues related to balancing confidentiality and potential harm to others.

  15. Community pediatrics: the Rochester story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Robert J; Aligne, C Andrew

    2005-04-01

    There are so many problems facing children today (eg, violence, poor nutrition, substance abuse, teen pregnancy) that conventional medical care can only address a small portion of these concerns. Thus, to be optimally effective, pediatrics needs to be linked to other disciplines and programs that address these issues by using different paradigms. Robert Haggerty, the originator of the term "community pediatrics," reflects on how one can successfully practice community pediatrics in an academic setting and model it for young physicians while also improving the health of children at the community level. Here we tell the story of the years that Haggerty was chief of pediatrics at the University of Rochester and took on the challenge of fulfilling the department's responsibility to all children in the county. Because of his pioneering work, his tenure was heralded as a critical period in the development of the field of community pediatrics.

  16. FWS Interest Simplified

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These boundaries are simplified from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Real Estate Interest data layer containing polygons representing tracts of land (parcels) in...

  17. FWS Interest Simplified

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These boundaries are simplified from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Real Estate Interest data layer containing polygons representing tracts of land (parcels) in...

  18. Interest Rates and Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Coopersmith

    2011-01-01

    A relation between interest rates and inflation is presented using a two component economic model and a simple general principle. Preliminary results indicate a remarkable similarity to classical economic theories, in particular that of Wicksell.

  19. Debenture Interest Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Interest rates to be paid on debentures issued with respect to a loan or mortgage insured by the Federal Housing Commissioner under the provisions of the National...

  20. Story Immersion of Videogames for Youth Health Promotion: A Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Amy Shirong; Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe; Buday, Richard

    2012-06-01

    This article reviews research in the fields of psychology, literature, communication, human-computer interaction, public health, and consumer behavior on narrative and its potential relationships with videogames and story immersion. It also reviews a narrative's role in complementing behavioral change theories and the potential of story immersion for health promotion through videogames. Videogames have potential for health promotion and may be especially promising when attempting to reach youth. An understudied characteristic of videogames is that many contain a narrative, or story. Story immersion (transportation) is a mechanism through which a narrative influences players' cognition, affect, and, potentially, health behavior. Immersion promotes the suspension of disbelief and the reduction of counterarguments, enables the story experience as a personal experience, and creates the player's deep affection for narrative protagonists. Story immersion complements behavioral change theories, including the Theory of Planned Behavior, Social Cognitive Theory, and Self-Determination Theory. Systematic investigations are needed to realize the powerful potential of interactive narratives within theory-driven research.

  1. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of the story are the humanization of meaning, an association with heroes and heroic qualities, the limits of reality and extremes of experience, a sense of wonder, and a contesting of conventions and conventional ideas. The study demonstrates the learning benefits of encouraging a romantic understanding through a story that is structured explicitly around the identified features, in this instance in the context of the production and transmission of alternating current electricity. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of journal entries showed that the group of students who were encouraged to understand the concept of alternating current romantically (the experimental group) became more involved with both the content and the context of the story than a comparison group of students who were taught the concept explicitly, without a context (the control group). The students in the experimental group also performed statistically better on a science-content test taken 1 week and again 8 weeks after the indicated teaching intervention. This finding, along with the content analyses of students' journals, provided evidence of romantic understanding of the science content for those students who listened to the Tesla story.

  2. An early story of Kho Ping Hoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CW Watson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kho Ping Hoo (1926–1994 is the most well-known of all Indonesian writers of popular silat stories, largely set in China, which describe the adventures and romances of legendary heroes famed for their skill in martial arts. It is less well-known that he began his career writing critical stories about socio-economic conditions in the late 50s and early 60s. This paper discusses one of these stories. It places the story in the context of political developments of the time, in particular as they affected the Chinese Indonesian community. The paper argues that this story and one or two others like it come at the end of a tradition of Sino-Indonesian literature which had flourished from the end of the nineteenth century until the mid-1950s. After 1960, Chinese-Indonesian writers cease writing realist fiction of any kind and write either silat stories or romantic stories set in middle class urban environments.

  3. Standard Javanese Causatives in online editorials and short stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Malihah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the distinctive features of the standard Javanese causatives in on-line editorials and short stories. This research is based on written corpus. This written corpus was compiled from articles published in an online newspaper Solo Pos. To analyze the corpus, I have developed a system of manual annotation to identify the features of verb transitivity, the animacy and humanness of the verb, the presence of active, passive and ergative-like clauses and the number of other grammatical and semantic features using a system of tags. Using this annotation, I analyze the data based on dua anlaysis: genre analysis, functional analysis using a quantitative method. The findings show that genre influences the selection of causative types (markers. Also, there exists gawe used as a verb of causation in both editorials and short stories which contradicts to the canonical rule of the Javanese active verb and Malihah’s (2014 findings. The finding also shows that the standard Javanese causative in online editorials and short stories occurs with intransitive verbs. The last finding is that active clause is the relative prominent type of clause which occurs in all marker. In conclusion, the above findings have made contributions to knowledge to Javanese grammar.

  4. From Rapihwin to Syavash: A Mythological Analysis of Syavash Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    فرزاد قائمی

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the prehistoric cultures, the annual ritual of death and re-birth of the vegetation god is a fundamental myth of the tragic romance about the relationship between the god and the fertility goddess or her human counterpart and her mate: the martyr lord- hero. Such accounts are closely linked with the early man’s thoughts concerning time cycle, the cyclical sequence of the calendar and the belief in the repeatability of the nature’s cycle of death and birth. These narratives have a universal pattern and in Persian epic poetry are connected with the story of Syavash and Sudabeh, primarily originating from the mythological account of the same story. The story is connected with the myth of Rapihwin’s descent into the underground (along with Winter and his role in the preservation of nature, the warmth of waters and the fertility of earth and his subsequent return (along with Spring and rejuvenation of nature. The first part of this pattern is comparable with migration and mortality of Syavash and the second part with the return of Kai Khosrow.

  5. The pig story (tiboi sakkoko Storytelling of kinship, memories of the past, and rights to plots of ancestral land in Mentawai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juniator Tulius

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines some significant elements of the pig story (tiboi sakkoko. This tale contains crucial information about the collective identity, ancestors and historical events affecting particular Mentawai kin-groups. As families do not preserve their culture and traditions in written form, storytellers of kin-groups have narrated the pig story from generation to generation so as to preserve it carefully. In the course of time, storytellers establish particular ways of telling their stories so as to remember the content and plot of the stories easily. Through the pig story, members of kin groups also recollect their ancestral place of origin and plots of ancestral lands. The role of human memory is indispensable to recalling all these important elements. Therefore, this paper analyses memories of the past of different family generations. To achieve its aims, this paper also evaluates the roles of family stories in the culture and traditions of Mentawai society.

  6. How to write a story in English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周冠英

    2015-01-01

    <正>When it comes to writing a story,the first thing that strikes me is fear.Where to start?What is the title of the story?What is it going to be about?After struggling with some monstrous idea of using a first person perspective to tell a story of a horrific murder,I give up before starting to write and resort to my pillow and blanket for warmth and comfort."Not everyone gets to be Dan Brown."I

  7. Ethnographic Stories as Generalizations that Intervene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Brit Ross; Verran, Helen

    2012-01-01

    partners in a development aid project; it tells about the seemingly magic actions of a database used for monitoring. We use the note for discussing why we think it is important, in a situation where ethnographic stories are bought and sold as products, to name some of the ontological commitments that go......In this paper, we show why we think the notion of instrumental ethnography should be revived (compared to Steve Woolgar's 1982 use of the term). We see instrumental ethnography as a particular form of ethnography that recognizes ethnographic stories as agential through their capacity to work...... into the crafting of these stories....

  8. Absurdity in Play, Reality in Life-on The Zoo Story

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fei; CHEN Da

    2015-01-01

    To most contemporary readers and audiences alike, The Zoo Story is an often-forgotten play;however, it is belongs to the category of the classics, which is mind-blowing, interesting and enjoyable. Considered as a representative work of“Theatre of the Absurd”, it explores seriously the significance in humanity’s spiritual, moral, and intellectual life. The failure to communicate is graphically illustrated in the story of Jerry and the Dog, which may happen to almost everyone in the modern society.

  9. Twenty american families' stories of adaptation: adoption of children from Russian and Romanian institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linville, Deanna; Lyness, Anne Prouty

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how 20 families have adapted after adopting children between the ages of 3 and 5 years from eastern European institutions. The researcher visited a Romanian orphanage and then interviewed 20 families about their experiences with the adoption process and with family adaptation postadoption. Several themes emerged from the parents' stories regarding their search for support and resources to aid in parenting their children. Family therapists who are interested in working with families who adopt internationally from institutional settings can learn from the stories of parents.

  10. Social Stories[TM] and Young Children: Strategies for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Cori M.

    2012-01-01

    Social Stories are becoming a popular intervention used to improve the social skills of children with disabilities. This article examines the use of Social Stories with young children with disabilities. Social Stories are described, creation guidelines are recommended, and strategies for Social Story implementation in the classroom are discussed.…

  11. Children's Creative Imagination in Response to Radio and Television Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkenburg, Patti M.; Beentjes, Johannes W. J.

    1997-01-01

    Finds that double presentation of a radio story to children did not result in fewer novel ideas than did a single presentation, thus proving implausible the faulty-memory hypothesis that radio stories elicit more novel responses than television stories because they are less well remembered. Notes that radio stories elicited more novel responses in…

  12. Utilizing verbally told stories for informal knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.G.; Klebl, M.; Buttler, T.

    2011-01-01

    In knowledge management, the act of telling stories is utilized to capture and convey knowledge. Spoken language is the basis for telling stories. Collaborative audio-based storytelling uses the act of verbally telling stories in groups. In this paper, we explore how to utilize verbally told stories

  13. Why Old Testament prophecy is philosophically interesting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    because it introduces interesting questions about divine knowledge, time, and human ..... Barr, J., 1999, The concept of biblical theology: An Old Testament perspective, Fortress. Press ... The Cambridge history of later medieval philosophy, pp.

  14. Theory of mind performance using a story comprehension task in bipolar mania compared to schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossell, Susan L; Van Rheenen, Tamsyn E

    2013-01-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) refers to the ability to understand the mental state of self and others. There is limited research into this topic in bipolar disorder (BD), with no previous study examining ToM in a BD group within a psychotic manic phase. Twenty-eight psychotic manic BD patients were compared with 30 schizophrenia (SCZ) patients and 29 healthy controls (HC). Participants performed a ToM story comprehension task that compared ToM stories and non-ToM stories (which we relabelled non-ToM "semantic" stories). Performance was examined by answering comprehension questions. Both patient groups were equally impaired on their scores for ToM stories (scores BD = 10/24, SCZ = 9/24, HC = 14/24, p < .001). Interestingly, both patient groups showed reduced performance on non-ToM semantic stories (scores BD = 12/24, SCZ = 9/24, HC = 15/24, p < .001); SCZ showed a larger deficit. Reduced ToM performance was correlated with delusion severity in the BD group only. ToM performance was impaired in BD patients experiencing psychotic symptoms. Patient performance was also impaired on the control condition (i.e., non-ToM semantic stories) supporting an additional deficit in semantic processing.

  15. Gaps in Political Interest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robison, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    sought to measure respondents’ general interest in politics by asking them how often they follow public affairs. In this article, we uncover novel sources of measurement error concerning this question. We first show that other nationally representative surveys that frequently use this item deliver......Political interest fundamentally influences political behavior, knowledge, and persuasion (Brady, Verba, & Schlozman, 1995; Delli Carpini & Keeter, 1996; Luskin, 1990; Zukin, Andolina, Keeter, Jenkins, & Delli Carpini, 2006). Since the early 1960s, the American National Election Studies (ANES) has...... drastically higher estimates of mass interest. We then use a survey experiment included on a wave of the ANES’ Evaluating Government and Society Surveys (EGSS) to explore the influence of question order in explaining this systemic gap in survey results. We show that placing batteries of political...

  16. Interests versus morality in politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojčić Mirjana S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this individual project the relationship between interests and moral in politics will be considered, taking into consideration the disintegration of former Yugoslavia and the processes of globalization. The starting thesis of the research is that the main actors of global politics are still guided by the modern principles of real-politics with interests as its basic category and power as its supreme value. In that context the main elements of external politics of USA as the key actor of the processes will be specially considered. In the concluding part of the research author will be argue in favor of the affirmation of a new model of global politics, matching the character and scope of the problems faced by humanity at the turn of the century and the millenium.

  17. SketchStory: telling more engaging stories with data through freeform sketching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bongshin; Kazi, Rubaiat Habib; Smith, Greg

    2013-12-01

    Presenting and communicating insights to an audience-telling a story-is one of the main goals of data exploration. Even though visualization as a storytelling medium has recently begun to gain attention, storytelling is still underexplored in information visualization and little research has been done to help people tell their stories with data. To create a new, more engaging form of storytelling with data, we leverage and extend the narrative storytelling attributes of whiteboard animation with pen and touch interactions. We present SketchStory, a data-enabled digital whiteboard that facilitates the creation of personalized and expressive data charts quickly and easily. SketchStory recognizes a small set of sketch gestures for chart invocation, and automatically completes charts by synthesizing the visuals from the presenter-provided example icon and binding them to the underlying data. Furthermore, SketchStory allows the presenter to move and resize the completed data charts with touch, and filter the underlying data to facilitate interactive exploration. We conducted a controlled experiment for both audiences and presenters to compare SketchStory with a traditional presentation system, Microsoft PowerPoint. Results show that the audience is more engaged by presentations done with SketchStory than PowerPoint. Eighteen out of 24 audience participants preferred SketchStory to PowerPoint. Four out of five presenter participants also favored SketchStory despite the extra effort required for presentation.

  18. Exploring Culture : Exercises, Stories and Synthetic Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A unique training book containing over 100 culture awareness exercises, dialogues, stories incidents and simulations that bring to life Geert Hofstede's five dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: power distance, collectivism versus individualism, femininity versus masculinity, uncertainly avo

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ... later? Sign in to add this video to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to ...

  20. Exploring Culture : Exercises, Stories and Synthetic Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A unique training book containing over 100 culture awareness exercises, dialogues, stories incidents and simulations that bring to life Geert Hofstede's five dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: power distance, collectivism versus individualism, femininity versus masculinity, uncertainly avo

  1. Cultural Trauma and Life Stories / Ene Kõresaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõresaar, Ene

    2007-01-01

    Aili Aarelaid-Tarti 15-aastase uuringu tulemused raamatus "Cultural Trauma and Life Stories", Hesinki, Kikimora Publications, 2006. Uuritud on kolme suurt rahvusgruppi 1940-test tingitud trauma kontekstis: eestlased kodumaal, eestlased eksiilis ja venekeelne rahvusgrupp Eestis postsovetlikus diskursuses

  2. Story Telling in the Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessel, Denise D.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that teachers use gothic tales, Indian legends, and other appealing stories to develop students' schema for the literature they will eventually read. Explains how to use storytelling effectively. (FL)

  3. Cultural Trauma and Life Stories / Ene Kõresaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõresaar, Ene

    2007-01-01

    Aili Aarelaid-Tarti 15-aastase uuringu tulemused raamatus "Cultural Trauma and Life Stories", Hesinki, Kikimora Publications, 2006. Uuritud on kolme suurt rahvusgruppi 1940-test tingitud trauma kontekstis: eestlased kodumaal, eestlased eksiilis ja venekeelne rahvusgrupp Eestis postsovetlikus diskursuses

  4. Achieving continuity: a story of stellar magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael S.

    2010-03-01

    Scientists tell a story of 2,000 years of stellar magnitude research that traces back to Hipparchus. This story of continuity in practices serves an important role in scientific education and outreach. STS scholars point out many ways that stories of continuity, like many narratives about science, are disconnected from practices. Yet the story of continuity in stellar magnitude is a powerful scientific achievement precisely because of its connection to practice. The historical development of star catalogues shows how specific recording practices connected past and present in a useful way. The narrative of continuity in stellar magnitude, however else it might be subject to STS critique of narrative, maintains its power because of its connection to practice. I suggest that more attention be paid to connections between practice and narrative in STS, and in particular to the ways that historical practices sustain narratives by connecting past and present.

  5. Exploring Culture : Exercises, Stories and Synthetic Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A unique training book containing over 100 culture awareness exercises, dialogues, stories incidents and simulations that bring to life Geert Hofstede's five dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: power distance, collectivism versus individualism, femininity versus masculinity, uncertainly

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ... later? Sign in to add this video to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to ...

  7. Telling business stories as fellowship-tales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Robert; Neergaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to explore the “Fellowship-Tale” as an alternative tale type for narrating entrepreneur stories. The authors illustrate this by telling the Pilgrim business story. It is common for the deeds of men who founded businesses to be narrated as heroic entrepreneur stories...... – The research indicates that “fellowship-tales” provide a viable and credible alternative to the fairy-tale rendition common in entrepreneur and business stories. Research limitations/implications – An obvious limitation is that one merely swaps one narrative framework for another, albeit it offers dissenting....../value – A key contribution is to challenge the hegemony of a dominant and embedded social construct allowing new understandings to emerge via a novel combination of research methodologies...

  8. Stories of change in drug treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    Addiction research has demonstrated how recovering individuals need narratives that make sense of past drug use and enable constructions of future, non-addict identities. However, there has not been much investigation into how these recovery narratives actually develop moment-to-moment in drug...... treatment. Building on the sociology of storytelling and ethnographic fieldwork conducted at two drug treatment institutions for young people in Denmark, this article argues that studying stories in the context of their telling brings forth novel insights. Through a narrative analysis of both ‘the whats......’ (story content) and ‘the hows’ (storying process) the article presents four findings: (1) stories of change function locally as an institutional requirement; (2) professional drug treatment providers edit young people's storytelling through different techniques; (3) the narrative environment of the drug...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  11. THE PORTRAYAL OF INDONESIAN IMAGE IN 2007 KOMPAS SELECTED SHORT STORIES: SOCIAL PROBLEMS, CRITICISMS AND HOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akun Akun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Article aimed at exploring social problems reflected in 15 selected short stories printed inKompas during 2007 both explicitly and implicitly. Specifically, this research is focused on themapping of dominant social problems raised by the short stories, the social criticisms strongly voicedby the authors and the hopes of a better situation implicitly reflected in these interesting short stories.This study applies the Defamiliarization Effect promoted by Bertolt Brecht and Negative Dialectics orNegative Knowledge by Theodor Adorno, specifically in analyzing the literary works as a criticismtool. The result of the research shows that phenomena of social problems current lately in Indonesiancontext like identity, poverty, corruption, religious tensions, moral degradation, politics dirtiness,minority group problems, social security, natural disasters and the like are clearly seen and teased inthese writings.

  12. Discussions on the Protection of Human Fetus' Rights and Interests in Medical Tort%浅论医疗侵权行为下的人类胎儿权益保护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟林涛

    2013-01-01

    Common infringement medical behaviors of human fetal rights and interests may be found in the process of pregnancy and childbirth, which mainly embody the following behaviors: misdiagnosis and maltreat-ment, improper delivery, doctors' rambunctious operation and other direct or indirect damages to the fetus' rights and interests. And the protection of human fetus' rights and interests in the above-mentioned medical torts de-pends on different situation:when the fetus is alive after birth, the compensation is claimed for damages to the fe-tus' health;while the fetus is dead after birth or during pregnancy, the compensation is claimed for damages to the health of pregnant women.%常见侵犯人类胎儿权益的医疗行为,可以发生在怀孕期间及分娩过程中,主要表现为误诊误治、分娩方式不当、医生动作粗暴等多种直接或间接损害胎儿健康权或者生命权的行为。上述各种侵权行为下的胎儿权益的保护,因胎儿出生时是活体还是死体以及是否出生而有不同院胎儿出生是活体的,按侵犯胎儿健康权来请求损害赔偿;胎儿出生时是死体或者在孕期内死亡的,按侵犯孕妇的健康权来请求损害赔偿。

  13. Fairytales and Stories in the Waldorf Kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    JANEČKOVÁ, Pavla

    2012-01-01

    The bachelor thesis shows how storytelling is treated in the Waldorf approach to pre-primary education. In the theoretical part, it examines the historical development of stories and tales, the value of their pictorial language and their interpretation. It also discusses the methodological principles used in the Waldorf approach and the guidelines for selecting particular stories. The empirical part focuses on the influence of storytelling on children, namely on the social climate of the clas...

  14. Jan. 25 ( Story of a Girl )

    OpenAIRE

    Ramadan, Hadeel M

    2015-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis explores the possibility to integrate two dimensional drawings with three dimensional animated characters in 3D computer graphics. The goal was to preserve the effects of the cartoonish artistic style and produce a strong emotional and moving story without realistic animation feel. Inspiration of the storyboard was based on a true story from the Arab Spring events that occurred in several Arab countries, I focused my work on the context of Egypt. MFA

  15. Montague Rhodes James, Collected Ghost Stories

    OpenAIRE

    Mantrant, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A biblical scholar, palaeographer and lover of old manuscripts, Montague Rhodes James (1862–1936) published a great many scholarly works, but he is best remembered for his ghost stories, many of which were originally read aloud to friends. One of their distinguishing features is the richness of their antiquarian background and they are usually considered as among the finest achievements in what is sometimes labelled the ‘antiquarian subgenre’ of the ghost story. In his ‘Supernatural Horror in...

  16. Interest Check List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The original edition of the Department of Labor Interest Check List aims at helping students decide what kinds of work they would like and lists activities that are found in a broad range of industries and occupations. The student is advised to read each of approximately 175 items and indicate how he feels about the activity described by placing a…

  17. Spousal Conflicts of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Shana R.

    2005-01-01

    Romantic relationships bud and sometimes bloom in the school district workplace. When those relationships involve a sitting member of a school board or an administrator with responsibility for managing other employees, questions about a conflict of interest will be raised. Most states have laws prohibiting a public official from taking official…

  18. Pronounced Practice & Learners’ Interest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈作棋

    2009-01-01

    <正>The present s tudy presents a detailed report of the project implemented to solve the problem that most of my students don’t like doing the oral practice I assign them to do after class. It is hypothesized that learners’ interest in pronunciation after class will be increased by a better organization in this

  19. The Limerick-Stories of Silvina Ocampo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Biancotto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an interpretation of three paradigmatic stories of the ocampian nonsense in its Lear inflection, “El automóvil”, “Sábanas de tierra” y “La pista de hielo y de fuego”, of the collection entitled Y así sucesivamente (1987. It is known that Silvina Ocampo had read Edward Lear’s literature, although it is not possible to state that she would have wanted to imitate him, to perform a tribute to him nor to write stories like limericks. It is possible, however, to read this stories from the way in which they are intersected by certain characteristics of Lear’s nonsense. The working hypothesis asserts that the ephemeral narrative structure of limerick appears in these stories, detached of the rhyme, and it disrupts the story’s form and permeates it with fugacity and foolishness. So, the reader encounters anomalous stories, with short and rare forms, that seem unfinished. They have minimal plots, in which there isn’t much narration, because one insignificant anecdote takes up the whole story space, like it happens in Lear’s limericks.

  20. Harlequin-Inspired Story-Based Learning: An Educational Innovation for Pediatric Nursing Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alison; Lind, Candace; Ewashen, Carol

    2017-05-01

    Effective communication with patients and families is essential for quality care in the pediatric environment. Despite this, the current structure and content of undergraduate nursing education often contributes to novice RNs feeling unprepared to manage complex pediatric communication situations. By merging the characteristics of the Harlequin persona with the structure of story-based learning, undergraduate students can be introduced to increasingly advanced pediatric communication scenarios in the classroom. Although story-based learning encourages students to identify and address the contextual and emotional elements of a story, the Harlequin encourages educators to challenge assumptions and upset the status quo. Nursing students can develop advanced communication abilities and learn to identify and cope with the emotions and complexities inherent in pediatric practice and communication. Harlequin-inspired story-based learning can enable nurse educators to create interesting, realistic, and challenging pediatric nursing stories designed to push students outside their comfort zones and enhance their advanced pediatric communication abilities. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(5):300-303.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Exploring the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice: stories from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2011-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses interested in extending their interpersonal and psychotherapeutic skills sometimes undertake postgraduate training in gestalt therapy. Little is known about how this new knowledge and psychotherapeutic skill base informs their practice. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that aimed to explore the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice. Within a framework of narrative inquiry, four psychiatric nurses trained in gestalt therapy were invited to tell their stories of training in a gestalt approach to therapy, and recount their experiences of how it influenced their practice. In keeping with narrative analysis methods, the research findings were presented as a collection of four stories. Eight themes were derived from a thematic analysis conducted within and across the four stories. The discussion of the themes encapsulates the similarities and differences across the storied collection, providing a community and cultural context for understanding the individual stories. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Top medical news stories 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Here is our list of the top seven medical news stories for 2015 with special emphasis on the Southwest. 7. Wearable health devices: A wave of wearable computing devices such as Fitbit and UP wristbands have people keeping track of how much they sit, stand, walk, climb stairs and calories they consume (1. These fitness-tracking devices herald a series of devices that will detect and monitor serious diseases. However, these so-called medical-grade wearables require approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a regulatory hurdle avoided by the fitness-tracking devices which will likely slow their introduction. 6. Caitlyn Jenner: Caitlyn Jenner became the most famous transgender woman in the world following an interview published in Vanity Fair (2. The Vanity Fair website saw 11.6 million visits curious about the former Olympic athlete. Though Jenner publicly shared her gender identity, many transgender Americans do not-12% of gender non-conforming adults said they ...

  3. Innovation and social interests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vratuša-Žunjić Vera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on socially and historically structured circumstances surrounding and moral problems involved in the pragmatic definition of innovation as 'novelty proven useful by its users'. Contending conceptions and strategies of innovation of the organization of social relations in dialectical social systems are compared and socially and historically contextualized in the so-called 'transition countries' on the new Eastern border of the European Union. The conclusion is that the cited pragmatic definition of innovation may be misused for an apology of morally dubious new ends and means in the narrow interest of particular groups of users, often at the expense and against the interest of a majority of other individuals and social groups.

  4. Managing conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Robert M; Akins, Cary W; Weisel, Richard D

    2015-04-01

    The more extensive conflict of interest information will permit reviewers and editors to ensure the accuracy, balance,and lack of bias of papers accepted for publication.Therefore, a brief conflict statement will be published on the cover page and a more extensive description will be published at the end of the paper to allow concerned readers to make their own judgments about the quality of the information reported.

  5. Story Telling or Storied Telling? Media's Pedagogical Ability to Shape Narrative as a Form of "Knowing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dean G.

    2007-01-01

    Storytellers know that stories are "formed" in their telling. Stories, whether oral or written, personal or mass communicated, ultimately express the boundaries of their medium (their "embodiment" through mediated forms). Religious Educators must always address the medium as well as the message in any theory of narrative accounting. Media often…

  6. Story Map: un nuovo modo di raccontare storie con le mappe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esri Italia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article concern the latest web applications developed by ESRI calls Story Map. These represent a new way of telling stories and are simple to implement, intuitive, open source and have a varied series of application among which the most important are Map Tour, Storytelling text and legend, , Short list and Swipe.

  7. Gesture Frequency Linked Primarily to Story Length in 4-10-Year Old Children's Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoladis, Elena; Marentette, Paula; Navarro, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that older children gesture more while telling a story than younger children. This increase in gesture use has been attributed to increased story complexity. In adults, both narrative complexity and imagery predict gesture frequency. In this study, we tested the strength of three predictors of children's gesture use in…

  8. Story as History; History as Story in Chimamanda Adichie's Half of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Story as History; History as Story in Chimamanda Adichie's Half of a Yellow Sun. ... of a Yellow Sun in the understanding of the Nigeria/Biafra war of 1967-1970. ... consideration, she ends up producing a work of “faction” in all its materiality.

  9. Cuentos Faciles. Habia una vez.... (Simple Stories. There was a Time....) (Presenting Simple Stories in Spanish.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Nancy; And Others

    For Spanish-speaking children, simple stories in Spanish, told in a natural language suitable for their age, are not only entertaining, but a means of developing vocabulary and concepts. Non-Spanish-speaking children, too, need exposure to more language than they can understand word for word. However, the simple stories for the Spanish speaker…

  10. Comprehension of Short Stories: Effects of Task Instructions on Literary Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kathryn S.; Goldman, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    An important purpose of reading literature is to move beyond the literal text to construct an interpretation of what the text conveys about the human condition and nature of the world. In two experiments, college students with no prior training in literary analysis read a short story and responded to one of four task instructions (plot, ambiguous,…

  11. On the Ability to See Rabbits: Stories Involving a Girl, Her Grandmothers, and Aging Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, I explore a child's experience of engaging with animals, and through animals, humans in her life. For children and adults alike, most of life happens in mundane moments. Yet, bumped along through time and mundane everydayness, we are periodically struck by something. This is a story about a child's experience of…

  12. 论医学人体试验受试者权益的法律保护*%On the Legal Protection for the Rights and Interests of Medical Human Trial Subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹茹; 张雪; 尹梅

    2013-01-01

    Medical human trials have been increasingly becoming legally standardized worldwide, and we are trying to regulate medical human trials by legal means and have made positive exploration in China. But there are still many deficiencies and even legislative blank in the relevant legal system in our country if we want achieve the level which adapts to the development of life science. In this paper, the author starts from the definition and important contents of the rights and interests of medical human trial subjects, briefly introduces advanced foreign legal systems, argues that we should learn from other countries, and puts forward legal countermeasures on the ex-isting problems in our country from the following perspectives: strengthening the supervision of trials; improving economic security;and improving the legislation of human trials, etc..%在世界范围内医学人体试验已经日渐趋于法律规范化,我国也试图通过法律手段来调控医学人体试验并作出了积极的探索。但要达到与生命科学发展相适应的水平,我国的相关法律制度尚存在诸多不足甚至立法空白。从“医学人体试验受试者权益”的概念和其重要内容出发,简要介绍国外较为先进的法律制度,借鉴国际经验从加强试验监管、完善经济保障、健全人体试验立法等角度对我国现存问题提出法律对策。

  13. Extended cleavage specificity of the mast cell chymase from the crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis): an interesting animal model for the analysis of the function of the human mast cell chymase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Michael; Yu, Jing; Boinapally, Vamsi; Ahooghalandari, Parvin; Kervinen, Jukka; Garavilla, Lawrence de; Hellman, Lars

    2012-12-01

    Serine proteases are the major protein constituents within mast cell secretory granules. These proteases are subdivided into chymases and tryptases depending on their primary cleavage specificity. Here, we present the extended cleavage specificity of the macaque mast cell chymase and compare the specificity with human chymase (HC) and dog chymase (DC) that were produced in the same insect cell expression host. The macaque chymase (MC) shows almost identical characteristics as the HC, including both primary and extended cleavage specificities as well as sensitivity to protease inhibitors, whereas the DC differs in several of these characteristics. Although previous studies have shown that mouse mast cell protease-4 (mMCP-4) is similar in its hydrolytic specificity to the HC, mouse mast cells contain several related enzymes. Thus mice may not be the most appropriate model organism for studying HC activity and inhibition. Importantly, macaques express only one chymase and, as primates, are closely related to human general physiology. In addition, the human and macaque enzymes both cleave angiotensin I (Ang I) in the same way, generating primarily angiotensin II (Ang II) and they do not further degrade the peptide like most rodent enzymes do. Both enzymes also cleave two additional potential in vivo substrates, fibronectin and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in a similar way. Given the fact that both HC and MC are encoded by a single gene with high sequence homology and that many physiological processes are similar between these species, the macaque may be a very interesting model to study the physiological role of the chymase and to determine the potency and potential side-effects of various chymase inhibitors designed for therapeutic human use.

  14. Conflicts of interests and its effects on informed content, protection of human subjects in translational medicine%转化医学中利益冲突及其影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关健

    2014-01-01

    Medicine,law and ethics are closely related to each other.Translational medicine is a research model to promote basic research into clinical application rapidly.Its ultimate goal is to promote development of new drug and method as quickly as possible,to improve the level of clinical diagnostics and treatment for health promotion.But some new challenges we have to face in line with accelerating medical research from lab to bedside.There are some potential risk and ethical issues.Among them,conflicts of interest and its affection on implementation of informed consent and protection of human subjects has not been given sufficient attention.The conflict of interest should be managed allows people to exercise their rights as autonomous agents to make their own informed decisions and deter investigators and institutions from having significant conflicts of interest.%医学、法律和伦理是相互伴生的科学.近年来,转化医学的提出及其开展,促进基础研究成果的快速的临床转化和应用,促使研究成果尽快形成市场化的产品,提高医疗诊断水平和促进健康.同时面临一些新的挑战,产生新的伦理问题,并使一些现有伦理问题更为凸显.开展转化医学具有潜在的风险和问题,利益冲突,及其对受试者权益保护和知情同意的潜在影响还没有受到应有的重视,需要伦理委员会加强审核.

  15. Two Interesting Southern Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Two southern objects are studied. The first, the planetary nebula PK 349-01.1, is of interest because it has a chain of jets ejected from the central star. 12C(1-0) observations of the vicinity of this object reveal red- and blue-shifted molecular outflows. The second object is a star formation region consisting of two groups of IR stars. These groups have a trapezium-like configuration. Two stars in one of these groups are associated with a ring-shaped nebulae. This star formation region is associated with a new radial system of dark globules.

  16. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  17. Serving the Public Interest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    system is likely to produce good governance. That is, if benevolent candidates are common, if the president has little discretionary power, and if the public sector is effective. We analyze the role of institutions like investigative media and re-election and show that they can improve or further hamper......We present a model of political selection in which voters elect a president from a set of candidates. We assume that some of the candidates are benevolent and that all voters prefer a benevolent president, i.e. a president who serves the public interest. Yet, political selection may fail in our...

  18. Becoming Part of the Story! Refueling the Interest in Visualization Strategies for Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koning, Bjorn B.; van der Schoot, Menno

    2013-01-01

    Visualizing the events described in a text is crucial for constructing a rich and coherent visuospatial mental representation (i.e., situation model) of the text. According to current reading comprehension theories, the construction of such a situation model likely involves all sensory modalities. However, at present these insights are hardly used…

  19. Application of Nonlinear Elastic Resonance Spectroscopy For Damage Detection In Concrete: An Interesting Story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, Loren W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ten Cate, James A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-28

    Nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy experiments conducted on concrete cores, one chemically and mechanically damaged by alkali-silica reactivity, and one undamaged, show that this material displays highly nonlinear wave behavior, similar to many other damaged materials. They find that the damaged sample responds more nonlinearly, manifested by a larger resonant peak and modulus shift as a function of strain amplitude. The nonlinear response indicates that there is a hysteretic influence in the stress-strain equation of state. Further, as in some other materials, slow dynamics are present. The nonlinear response they observe in concrete is an extremely sensitive indicator of damage. Ultimately, nonlinear wave methods applied to concrete may be used to guide mixing, curing, or other production techniques, in order to develop materials with particular desired qualities such as enhanced strength or chemical resistance, and to be used for damage inspection.

  20. Special Colloquium - "That's the story"

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Please bring along all those interested in this fundamental historical moment, and those also interested in having discussion on nuclear energy and nuclear weapons. Nobel laureate Prof. Roy J. Glauber is the last living scientist from the Theory Division of the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos. His clear, fluent and articulate narration brings first hand information on the life at Los Alamos, the main scientific characters there, the Trinity test of the first ever nuclear explosion, the bombing of Japan and the political aftermath of the project. Glauber's account is documented with audiovisual material recently declassified from the Los Alamos Archive.

  1. PESSIMISM TOWARDS GENDER DECONSTRUCTION IN X: A FABULOUS CHILDS STORY BY LOUIS GOULD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramita Ayuningtyas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Research focuses on Lois Goulds complex position in feminism movements as displayed by the pessimistic tone in one of her works. The primary data for this research were taken from the short story X: A Fabulous Childs Story, published in 1972. The research used qualitative method that lies on library research, and to help analyze the topic, books, websites, and scientific journals were used. Kate Millets concept of an androgyny was also applied in order to study further about the character of X. The result of the discussion shows that even though considered progressive for its era for its effort to deconstruct rigid gender divisions, this short story also comes with an irony with its ending. The ending demonstrates that human beings cannot be free from sex and gender barriers. This result supports the idea that Gould is trapped between the feminist and the antifeminist movement.

  2. Mi'kmaq Night Sky Stories; Patterns of Interconnectiveness, Vitality and Nourishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P.; Bartlett, C.; Marshall, M.; Marshall, A.

    2010-10-01

    This article shares some of the experiences of an integrative science team based at Cape Breton University, Canada. Integrative science is defined as "bringing together Indigenous and Western scientific knowledge and ways of knowing" and the team includes Mi'kmaq Elders and educators, Cheryl Bartlett and her Research Associates. Together we worked to rekindle the Mi'kmaq Sky Story, Muin and the Seven Hunters, to produce a DVD of the story as well as a children's book, and then to share it with people throughout Canada and the world. We offer insights into the manner in which night sky stories engender interconnectiveness and interdependability through their cultural, scientific and ecological teachings and so help to revitalise the culture and the individual by feeding all aspects of the human experience (spiritual, emotional, physical and cognitional). We explore the concept of storywork, with emphasis on the relationship between storyteller and listener as a story is told, as well as considering the multi-layered aspect of Indigenous stories.

  3. The national public's values and interests related to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: A computer content analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; David P. Fan; Roger. Kaye

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the national public's values and interests related to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Computer content analysis was used to analyze more than 23,000 media stories about the refuge from 1995 through 2007. Ten main categories of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge values and interests emerged from the analysis, reflecting a diversity of values,...

  4. Real interest parity decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Luiz Ferreira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the general causes of real interest rate differentials (rids for a sample of emerging markets for the period of January 1996 to August 2007. To this end, two methods are applied. The first consists of breaking the variance of rids down into relative purchasing power pariety and uncovered interest rate parity and shows that inflation differentials are the main source of rids variation; while the second method breaks down the rids and nominal interest rate differentials (nids into nominal and real shocks. Bivariate autoregressive models are estimated under particular identification conditions, having been adequately treated for the identified structural breaks. Impulse response functions and error variance decomposition result in real shocks as being the likely cause of rids.O objetivo deste artigo é investigar as causas gerais dos diferenciais da taxa de juros real (rids para um conjunto de países emergentes, para o período de janeiro de 1996 a agosto de 2007. Para tanto, duas metodologias são aplicadas. A primeira consiste em decompor a variância dos rids entre a paridade do poder de compra relativa e a paridade de juros a descoberto e mostra que os diferenciais de inflação são a fonte predominante da variabilidade dos rids; a segunda decompõe os rids e os diferenciais de juros nominais (nids em choques nominais e reais. Sob certas condições de identificação, modelos autorregressivos bivariados são estimados com tratamento adequado para as quebras estruturais identificadas e as funções de resposta ao impulso e a decomposição da variância dos erros de previsão são obtidas, resultando em evidências favoráveis a que os choques reais são a causa mais provável dos rids.

  5. Challenges of the management of severe hemophilia A with inhibitors: two case reports emphasizing the potential interest of a high-purity human Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate and individually tailored prophylaxis guided by thrombin-generation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Sophie; Crampe, Carine; Dargaud, Yesim; Lavigne-Lissalde, Géraldine; Escuriola-Ettingshausen, Carmen; Tardy, Brigitte; Meley, Roland; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Stephan, Jean L; Berger, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Severe hemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the best strategy of treatment when patients develop inhibitors. The objective is to illustrate the benefit of a high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrate (Octanate) in the management of ITI. We also wanted to raise the potential interest of laboratory assays such as thrombin-generation test (TGT) and epitope mapping. Two patients were treated during ITI, first with a recombinant FVIII and then with plasma-derived factor VIII without success, and, finally, with Octanate. Bypassing agents were used based on the results of TGT. Epitope mapping was performed during ITI therapy. These observations suggest the potential contribution of Octanate in the management of ITI in difficult cases. The use of bypassing agents can be necessary in prophylaxis or to treat bleedings, and may be guided by TGT results. Epitope mapping is used to describe the inhibitor. This article shows a decrease of the inhibitor directed against the C2 domain after initiation of Octanate. A high-purity human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor concentrate (Octanate) may be a valuable therapeutical option for ITI therapy. TGT and epitope mapping could be of help in the management of ITI.

  6. Engaging Texts: Effects of Concreteness on Comprehensibility, Interest, and Recall in Four Text Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoski, Mark; Goetz, Ernest T.; Rodriguez, Maximo

    2000-01-01

    Investigates concreteness as a text feature that engaged undergraduate readers' comprehension, interest, and learning in four text types: persuasion, exposition, literary stories, and narratives. Results show that concrete texts were recalled better than abstract texts, although the magnitude of the advantage varied across text types. Concreteness…

  7. Engaging Texts: Effects of Concreteness on Comprehensibility, Interest, and Recall in Four Text Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoski, Mark; Goetz, Ernest T.; Rodriguez, Maximo

    2000-01-01

    Investigates concreteness as a text feature that engaged undergraduate readers' comprehension, interest, and learning in four text types: persuasion, exposition, literary stories, and narratives. Results show that concrete texts were recalled better than abstract texts, although the magnitude of the advantage varied across text types. Concreteness…

  8. BANKING WITHOUT INTEREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Ilieva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been increased global awareness of Islamic finance. This topic is mainly opened with respect to the great financial crisis that mostly hit the banking system and the financial markets and caused many bank bankruptcies and state interventions. This paper analyzes the basic principles of Islamic banking. The absolute prohibition of receiving and giving interest (Riba and profit-and-loss sharing (PLS paradigms are elaborated in detail; they are primarily based on mudarabah (profit-sharing and musyarakah (joint venture concepts which nowadays are becoming an accepted way of doing business in several Western multinational banks. An overall comparison of the advantages of Islamic vs. conventional banking is also given. Islamic finance technology solutions have matured and they will face various challenges in the following decades, due to conventional banks offering, increasingly, Islamic products. The need for a more comprehensive environment and regulatory framework is emphasized, so that Islamic banking development can be ensured.

  9. Thematic irony in the story of Susanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dichk M. Kanonge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly held that irony features significantly in Susanna. This seemingly plausible hypothesis, however, has not yet been supported by compelling evidence resulting from a systematic analysis of Susanna. This study attempts to fill this gap by investigating the main ironic expressions, words and incidents featuring in Susanna. The approach followed consists of uncovering expressions of irony embedded in the story by paying attention to ironic use of metaphor, ironic use of wordplay, ironic use of rhetorical questions, ironic understatements (e.g. litotes, ironic exaggeration (e.g. hyperbole, ironic use of social conventions and traditions and ironic attribution. It is the contention of this study that Susanna is a thematically ironic story. The use of reversed social conventions is the most powerful and the most abundant expression of irony in the story. This dominant derisive technique is possibly aimed at addressing the irrelevance as well as the abuse of Jewish social conventions in the Second Temple period.

  10. Narrative visualization: telling stories with data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel, Edward; Heer, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Data visualization is regularly promoted for its ability to reveal stories within data, yet these “data stories” differ in important ways from traditional forms of storytelling. Storytellers, especially online journalists, have increasingly been integrating visualizations into their narratives, in some cases allowing the visualization to function in place of a written story. In this paper, we systematically review the design space of this emerging class of visualizations. Drawing on case studies from news media to visualization research, we identify distinct genres of narrative visualization. We characterize these design differences, together with interactivity and messaging, in terms of the balance between the narrative flow intended by the author (imposed by graphical elements and the interface) and story discovery on the part of the reader (often through interactive exploration). Our framework suggests design strategies for narrative visualization, including promising under-explored approaches to journalistic storytelling and educational media.

  11. Stylistic Analysis on Online News Story Comments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pei

    2013-01-01

    This study examines stylistic features of the news story comments from major online news outlets and their possible ef-fects on the evolution of the English language. With a corpus composed of 34 examples drawn from renowned news sites such as The Washington Post, The Economist, Wall Street Journal, CNN and NBC, a detailed analysis on the stylistic features and effects of the news story comments has been conducted for the purpose of discovering possible links between a poster ’s linguistic behav-ior and his thought process. The result shows that interrogative, noun phrase and verb phrase are commonly used in news story comments by virtue of their slightly ostentatious nature. Rhetorical devices such as metaphor, simile and parataxis are frequently employed among comments. And the relationship between a poster’s educational background and his postings is also touched up-on at the end of this study.

  12. Stories and story telling in first-levellanguage learning: a re-evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Blair

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes that in the midst of all our theories on language teaching and language learning, we might have overlooked an age-old tool that has always been at the disposal of mankind; the telling of stories. Attention is drawn to how some have found in stories and story telling a driving force of natural language acquisition, a key that can unlock the intuitive faculties ofthe mind. A case is being made out for the re-instalment of stories and associated activities as a means of real, heart-felt functional communication in a foreign language, rather than through a direct assault on the structure of the language itself. Met hierdie artikel word daar voorgestel dat daar opnuut gekyk moet word na 'n hulpmiddel wat so oud is as die mensheid self en wat nog altyd tot ons beskikking was, naamlik stories en die vertel daarvan. Die aandag word daarop gevestig dat daar persone is wat in stories en die verbale oordrag daarvan 'n stukrag ontdek het tot natuurlike taalvaardigheid, 'n sleutel tot die intultiewe breinfunksies. Daar word 'n saak uitgemaak vir die terugkeer na stories en gepaardgaande aktiwiteite as middel tot 'n egte, diep deurleefde en funksionele wyse van kommunikasie in 'n vreemde taal, eerder as 'n direkte aanslag op die taalstruktuur self.

  13. The Copernican Revolution as Story: an Antidote for Scientific Illiteracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, P. M.

    2005-08-01

    ``When a white-robed scientist, momentarily looking away from his microscope or cyclotron [or telescope], makes some pronouncement for the general public, he may not be understood but at least he is certain to be believed.'' The truth of this opening sentence of Anthony Standen's 1950 book Science is a Sacred Cow, as clear today as it was then, is the motivation for a new astronomy course at Berry College near Atlanta, GA, USA. To non-scientists, science is known by its products, not by what it is: a human progress. For this illiteracy an antidote is offered: the history of astronomy. In this course the story of the Copernican Revolution is told, for within this story the true nature of science can be found in its fullness. For example, Aristotle's uniform circular motion is used to emphasize the role of assumptions, and the occasional value of wrong ideas is evident in Tycho's theory and in Kepler's universe of perfect solids. Tycho's observations of Mars and Kepler's analysis illustrate the interplay of observation, theory, and technology. As a final example, the indirectness and often-unintentional nature of scientific advance can be seen in the work of Copernicus. The roles of personality and the intersections of science and society are themes throughout the course, as are the merging of disparate fields and the power of strong theories. There are other themes (e.g., coherence, the role of mathematics), but the emphasis is on the science and much of the work is quantitative. There is a laboratory component that features observations and experiments, and in order to bring the narrative to life the class spends two weeks in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Italy, touring sites that are relevant to the story of the Copernican Revolution.

  14. Can classic moral stories promote honesty in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; Talwar, Victoria; McCarthy, Anjanie; Ross, Ilana; Evans, Angela; Arruda, Cindy

    2014-08-01

    The classic moral stories have been used extensively to teach children about the consequences of lying and the virtue of honesty. Despite their widespread use, there is no evidence whether these stories actually promote honesty in children. This study compared the effectiveness of four classic moral stories in promoting honesty in 3- to 7-year-olds. Surprisingly, the stories of "Pinocchio" and "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" failed to reduce lying in children. In contrast, the apocryphal story of "George Washington and the Cherry Tree" significantly increased truth telling. Further results suggest that the reason for the difference in honesty-promoting effectiveness between the "George Washington" story and the other stories was that the former emphasizes the positive consequences of honesty, whereas the latter focus on the negative consequences of dishonesty. When the "George Washington" story was altered to focus on the negative consequences of dishonesty, it too failed to promote honesty in children.

  15. Story and Recall in First-Person Shooters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Pinchbeck

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Story has traditionally been seen as something separate to gameplay—frequently relegated to an afterthought or epiphenomenon. Nevertheless, in the FPS genre there has been something of a renaissance in the notion of the story-driven title. Partially, this is due to advances in technology enabling a greater capacity for distributed storytelling and a better integration of story and gameplay. However, what has been underrecognised is the dynamic, epistemological, and psychological impact of story and story elements upon player behaviour. It is argued here that there is evidence that story may have a direct influence upon cognitive operations. Specifically, evidence is presented that it appears to demonstrate that games with highly visible, detailed stories may assist players in recalling and ordering their experiences. If story does, indeed, have a more direct influence, then it is clearly a more powerful and immediate tool in game design than either simply reward system or golden thread.

  16. Quantum ten a story of passion, tragedy, ambition and science

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Sheilla

    2014-01-01

    Jones weaves together the personal and the scientific in a heartwarming -- and heartbreaking -- story of the men who struggled to create quantum physics ... a story of passion, tragedy, ambition and science.

  17. European Success Stories in Industrial Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Esteban, Maria J; Lery, Thibaut; Maday, Yvon

    2011-01-01

    This unique book presents real world success stories of collaboration between mathematicians and industrial partners, showcasing first-hand case studies, and lessons learned from the experiences, technologies, and business challenges that led to the successful development of industrial solutions based on mathematics. It shows the crucial contribution of mathematics to innovation and to the industrial creation of value, and the key position of mathematics in the handling of complex systems, amplifying innovation. Each story describes the challenge that led to the industrial cooperation, how the

  18. Female Entrepreneurship: difficulties reported in life stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Dias Alperstedt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyze the problems detected along the entrepreneurial process, from the life stories of the SEBRAE Award Business woman participants in Santa Catarina state. Therefore, were analyzed the stories of 86 entrepreneurs participating of Prize 2010 edition. These reports were analyzed by interpretation. How to difficulties encountered in the entrepreneurial process are the perceived lack of trust placed in them, as well as the personal, family and business conflict, being the latters conflicting dimensions in the lives of these women as competing for their attention. Are still pointed aspects of business management, and financial issues and market the most serious..

  19. Stories and narratives in early childhood education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline de Fatima dos Santos Morais

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the importance of oral and written narrative for the maintenance of tradition and history of each one of us, in a society that seems to valorize the information more than the stories lived and told. It stresses the need, at school, of the teachers to read stories to children from early childhood education to boys and girls love to the world of literature. The text also contains situations en countered in schools that show the value of reading and the magic that literature provides in the lives of children.

  20. Women stereotypes in Shi Zhecun's short stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenmeier, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses the representation of women in two 1933 short story collections by Shi Zhecun: An Evening of Spring Rain and Exemplary Conduct of Virtuous Women. It discusses how the New Woman image was a site of contestation in Republican China, and argues that Shi Zhecun’s short stories contain four basic stereotypes: the enigmatic woman, the estranged wife, the prostitute, and the inhibited woman. Using these narratives of women and how they were perceived by men, Shi Zhecun deconstructed the New Woman image by subverting the various ways modernity was projected onto women.

  1. More than pretty pictures? How illustrations affect parent-child story reading and children’s story recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Follmer Greenhoot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research showed that story illustrations fail to enhance young preschoolers’ memories when they accompany a pre-recorded story (e.g., Greenhoot & Semb, 2008. In this study we tested whether young children might benefit from illustrations in a more interactive story-reading context. For instance, illustrations might influence parent-child reading interactions, and thus children’s story comprehension and recall. Twenty-six 3.5- to 4.5-year-olds and their primary caregivers were randomly assigned to an Illustrated or Non-Illustrated story-reading condition, and parents were instructed to read or tell the story as they normally would read with their child. Children recalled the story after a distracter and again after one week. Analyses of the story-reading interactions showed that the illustrations prompted more interactive story reading and more parent and child behaviors known to predict improved literacy outcomes. Furthermore,in the first memory interview, children in the Illustrated condition recalled more story events than those in the Non-Illustrated condition. Story reading measures predicted recall, but did not completely account for picture effects. These results suggest that illustrations enhance young preschoolers’ story recall in an interactive story reading context, perhaps because the joint attention established in this context supports children’s processing of the illustrations.

  2. Relating the Story of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Allmer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Abstract: The act and practise of relating is a key element in developing narratives. This essay will explore the interplay and connections between relating and narrating, and the possibilities of producing alternative narratives, independent from hierarchical structures located in linearity, causality and genealogy, by exploring what Gilles Deleuze termed ‘involution,’ as an alternative device of relating. This essay will explore and exemplify this, by focusing on artistic and curatorial strategies of the artist/curators Carson & Miller in the exhibition The Story of Things. This exhibition’s re-organisation of anthropological and ethnographic objects challenges the conventional and traditional representation of such objects in linear and genealogical ways. Curatorial and artistic strategies of display, such as unconventional juxtapositions, slight shifts of the constituent parts of objects, and incongruous combinations of them will be examined. The essay will argue that such strategies are effective in establishing new modes of narrative organisation and new products of combination and juxtaposition.

    Résumé:

     

    L'art et la pratique de lier

  3. Host-Parasite Relationship in Cystic Echinococcosis: An Evolving Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Siracusano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus causes cystic echinococcosis, a neglected infectious disease that constitutes a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite being under constant barrage by the immune system, E. granulosus modulates antiparasite immune responses and persists in the human hosts with detectable humoral and cellular responses against the parasite. In vitro and in vivo immunological approaches, together with molecular biology and immunoproteomic technologies, provided us exciting insights into the mechanisms involved in the initiation of E. granulosus infection and the consequent induction and regulation of the immune response. Although the last decade has clarified many aspects of host-parasite relationship in human cystic echinococcosis, establishing the full mechanisms that cause the disease requires more studies. Here, we review some of the recent developments and discuss new avenues in this evolving story of E. granulosus infection in man.

  4. Continental reach: The Westcoast Energy story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, P. C.

    2002-07-01

    A historical account is given of the spectacular success that was Westcoast Energy Inc., a Canadian natural gas giant that charted a wilderness pipeline from natural gas fields in Canada's sub-arctic solitude. The beginning of the company is traced to an event in 1934 when near the bank of the Pouce Coupe River, close to the Alberta-British Columbia border, Frank McMahon, a solitary wildcatter and the eventual founder of the company, first sighted the fiery inferno of a runaway wildcat well, drilled by geologists of the Imperial Oil Company during their original search for the Canadian petroleum basin's motherlode. It was on this occasion in 1934 that McMahon first conceived a geological profile that connected the gas-bearing sandstone of Pouce Coupe with the reservoir rock of the biggest natural gas field of Alberta, and a pipeline from this sandstone storehouse across the rugged heart of British Columbia to Vancouver, and south into the United States. It took the better part of a quarter century to realize the dream of that pipeline which, in due course, turned out to be only the first step towards reaching the top rank of Canadian corporations in operational and financial terms, and becoming one of only a handful in terms of a story that became a Canadian corporate legend. By chronicling the lives and contributions of the company's founder and senior officials over the years, the book traces the company's meteoric rise from a gleam in its founder's eye to a cautious regional utility, and to the aggressive Canadian adventurer that went on to burst the boundaries of its Pacific Coast world, until the continental reach of its operations and interests run from Canada's Pacific shoreline to its Atlantic basins and Mexico's Campeche Bay to Alaska's Prudhoe Bay. The company's independent existence came to an end in 2002 when Westcoast Energy, by then a $15 billion operation, was acquired by Duke Energy Limited of North

  5. Semi-automatic Story Creation System in Ubiquitous Sensor Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Shohei; Hirano, Yasushi; Kajita, Shoji; Mase, Kenji; Maekawa, Takuya

    This paper proposes an agent system that semi-automatically creates stories about daily events detected by ubiquitous sensors and posts them to a weblog. The story flow is generated from query-answering interaction between sensor room inhabitants and a symbiotic agent. The agent questions the causal relationships among daily events to create the flow of the story. Preliminary experimental results show that the stories created by our system help users understand daily events.

  6. Stories in Games for Health: More Pros or Cons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Moderator Tom; Lu, Amy Shirong; Buday, Richard; Lyons, Elizabeth J; Schell, Jesse; Russoniello, Carmen

    2013-10-01

    There has been a debate about whether entertainment videogames should incorporate story or narrative. A concern has been whether story cut scenes break game immersion, and thereby minimize the fun of gameplay. Alternatively, games for health (G4H) have an agenda that goes beyond just having fun. The possible role of story in G4H has not been thoroughly addressed. We have assembled a group of experts who have worked with stories in G4H, and asked some pointed questions.

  7. Distribution of heating costs in multi-story apartment buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen; Kragh, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    but for heating it is a much more complex issue. For instance, if a pensioner wants or needs a higher indoor temperature the expenses will become disproportionate due to heat transmission through internal walls, floors and ceilings. This is particularly pronounced in well-insulated buildings where the heat loss......Under current rules in the Danish Meter Order at least 40% of the total heating costs in multi-story blocks of flats should be distributed by metering the consumption in individual apartments. This fixed share is the result of a previous study that showed that 40% of the total heating costs were...... used for space heating, 35% for production and heat loss associated with hot water consumption and finally 25% of heat losses in the heating system. It is interesting to investigate whether this distribution remains representative in both existing buildings, where older buildings still dominate...

  8. Improving agile requirements: the Quality User Story framework and tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Garm; Dalpiaz, Fabiano|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369508394; van der Werf, Jan Martijn E. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/36950674X; Brinkkemper, Sjaak|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07500707X

    2016-01-01

    User stories are a widely adopted requirements notation in agile development. Yet, user stories are too often poorly written in practice and exhibit inherent quality defects. Triggered by this observation, we propose the Quality User Story (QUS) framework, a set of 13 quality criteria that user

  9. The Techniques of Joseph's Characterization in "The Story of Joseph"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娟

    2007-01-01

    The Story of Joseph, from his sold to Egypt to his reunion with his family, is one of the longest stories of "The Old Testament". It's a story of a young man's growth which belongs to the fictional tradition of bildungsroman in the West. This paper explores the techniques of Joseph's characterization in the process of Joseph's reunion with his brothers.

  10. Constructing Stories in Kindergarten: Children's Knowledge of Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, Eleni; Kyriakides, Elena; Hadjicharalambous, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of 23 kindergarten children to construct stories drawing upon genre conventions in order to differentiate simple narrative stories, a familiar and often-visited genre in the kindergarten literacy classroom, and humorous stories, familiar to the children's literacy experiences mostly outside official literacy…

  11. Folk Stories and Social Identification in Multilingual Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Angela; Wu, Chao-Jung; Blackledge, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the processes of using folk stories for the teaching of community languages in a UK complementary school. We look at the appropriation of folk stories by teachers to teach young people Mandarin while also considering their possibilities as heritage texts. We consider how the teacher and students use the folk story as…

  12. The Power of Fiction: Reading Stories in Abnormal Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janit, Adrian S.; Hammock, Georgina S.; Richardson, Deborah S.

    2011-01-01

    We compared the instructional efficacy of a narrative text (i.e., a story) and an expository text (i.e., a textbook excerpt). Students enrolled in Abnormal Psychology classes read about the disorder, "dissociative fugue" from a story, a textbook, or both. The story contained literary elements that increased transportation into the story…

  13. Composing Storied Ground: Four Generations of Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, David; Pagnucci, Gian; Wallace, Rob; Stock, Patricia Lambert

    2007-01-01

    Narrative inquiry in English education comes in many shapes and forms--tales of classrooms and communities, didactic argu-stories, postmodern pastiches, open tales with O. Henry endings--but the heart of the enterprise is research in the form of story or, in other words, exploring the world by telling a story about it. In many such tales, all of…

  14. A Developmental Analysis of Story Recall and Comprehension in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Rhonda G.; Johnson, Nancy S.

    1984-01-01

    Examines the role of organization in adults' processing of stories. Canonical stories were better recalled than noncanonical stories by all three age groups (young, middle-aged, and old adults), and a variety of measures indicated that older adults' recall was both quantitatively and qualitatively similar to that of young adults. (SL)

  15. The Water Troll--Story and Lesson. Classroom Corner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Pam; Joy, Flora

    1993-01-01

    This story, intended for classroom presentation, comes with suggested activities (with illustrations) for students to undertake. The story is designed to be initially presented by one storyteller/teacher (with different voices) or by 5-8 students in group tandem style. The story and the activities allow students to develop various oral language…

  16. Natosi: Strong Medicine. Indian Culture Series: Stories of the Blackfeet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roop, Peter

    Part of a series of stories about the Blackfeet Indians, the illustrated story details the capture of the first horses by the Blackfeet. In the story, young Running Crane is allowed to join a party of warriors who raid a Crow camp for horses. Running Crane uses gentleness to capture a black horse but is separated from the raiding party and must…

  17. Stories, Proverbs, and Anecdotes as Scaffolds for Learning Science Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutonyi, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Few research studies in science education have looked at how stories, proverbs, and anecdotes can be used as scaffolds for learning. Stories, proverbs, and anecdotes are cultural tools used in indigenous communities to teach children about their environment. The study draws on Bruner's work and the theory of border crossing to argue that stories,…

  18. [Infectious diseases in the short stories written by Verga and Pirandello].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, G

    2001-06-01

    The author invites to appreciate some short stories by Giovanni Verga and Luigi Pirandello, Italian writers who lived at the turn of the last century. These tales give an interesting description of two infectious diseases (malaria and cholera), and analyze their relationship with the conditions of poverty and ignorance spread across rural areas in Sicily--a region in the South of Italy--at that times.

  19. Youths’ and Adults’ Stories Related to the Background for ADHD Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørg Mari Hannås

    2015-01-01

    In connection with a study relating to the diagnosing of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), youths and adults represent a particularly interesting group, partly because they have lived a relatively long time with the condition but without the diagnosis. In this article, I am focusing particularly on the life stories of youths and adults before they were referred for an ADHD assessment. A narrative analysi...

  20. Stories Behind High IELTS Scores(Ⅰ)——Liu Yuhan's Moderate Mentality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Before having any contact with LIU Yuhan,we were totally surprised by her IELTS score-8.5in Listening,8.5 in Reading.7.5 in Speaking,and 7 in Writing.This excellent score,a total of 8,was achieved by a Grade Two senior middle school student.Interests in hearing her story and her learning methods were highly boosted.

  1. Anatomy of the story: Narratives of mortuary science learners and graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jose Luis

    in a traditional dissertation such as relevant literature and overall study design. Using the human anatomy as a metaphor, study findings are presented through navel, heart, mind, hands, and legs. The study participants represent the navel. A rich description of nine Mortuary Science learners and graduates and their career journey is provided. The heart represents the values that professionals in Mortuary Science seek to instilled in learners and practitioners: empathy, care and respect for the dead, investment and satisfaction with a job well done, confidence, and eagerness to learn. The mind speaks to the critical analysis of the story to dismantle stereotypes held by learners (e.g., performing autopsies and minimum interaction with surviving relatives). The hands mold ideas and values to develop a new identity for the individuals involved. Here the participants identified the need for team development, relational learning, and on-the-job training. Finally, the legs provide mobility to the story to create an impact beyond the story teller and move people to action. This metaphor symbolizes the eagerness and good disposition of the study participants to create legacy to pave the road for the next generation of Mortuary Science professionals. Finally, recommendations for practice, tensions and challenges, ideas for future research, and concluding thoughts are provided.

  2. An Analytic Creativity Assessment Scale for Digital Game Story Design: Construct Validity, Internal Consistency and Interrater Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tsung-Yen; Huang, Yun-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technology has rapidly made digital games a popular entertainment to this digital generation, and thus digital game design received considerable attention in both the game industry and design education. Digital game design involves diverse dimensions in which digital game story design (DGSD) particularly attracts our interest, as the…

  3. Story-Telling for Science: One Scientist's Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Science is the most successful way humans have developed to understand the world, and application of the knowledge gained has been essential in allowing a few million hunter-gatherers become a few billion grower-builders. Yet, at least anecdotally, there is a growing tendency for many people to reject science without knowing what they are rejecting, and the ranks of scientists are thinned by having so many students arrive at our universities neither prepared to study science nor open to the possibility of doing so. This growing gap represents a growing opportunity for scientists to use their expertise in the service of humanity. Based on my experience, the biggest requirement for scientists to do so is simply to engage, but engagement is more successful in teamwork with experienced communicators and unexpected voices, and using narrative and history.

  4. The Role of Allegory (Tamsil in the stories of Mathnavi Ma’navi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mah Nazari

    2014-12-01

    fictional allegory”, since “the vehicle” in Mathnavi Ma’navi is compound and is of allegorical and anecdotal nature and “the tenor” is a logical and compound fact which needs a compound and tangible vehicle in order to be expressed and proved. Fictional allegory is used for typifying a particular class of the society, with special way of thinking and activities. As the majority of the readers are the masses, poets translate the symbols. The interpretation of an allegory is sometimes mentioned in the title of Mowlana’s stories and by interpreting an allegory, Mowlana expresses causality, as we can see in the story of Sheikh Ahmad Khizrawiya: Only when the sweet (Halva seller boy weeps a lot Will the oceans of God’s mercy be brought to the melting pot Tamsil (allegory is a combination of different factors and elements which are formed by the narrative. This narrative is an image of a thought, of a situation, of a message, or of an abstract concept which is formed within the framework of the activities and characters of human beings, animals, plants or even inanimate beings. Although Mowlavi has used a wide variety of literary devices,  with which westerners dealt hundreds of years after him, the diversity of methods, the characterization in the stories of Mathnavi Ma’navi, and also the categorization of such allegorical stories have not been paid much attention in past. Apart from fable, parable, and exemplum which are considered as western types, Mowlavi has used some other methods including report manifestation[1], anthropological allegories, and paradoxical elements to create more allegorical stories. The main characters in some of the allegorical stories are human beings, as in the story of the Old Harper, the Arab Dervish (Sufi and his wife, the man who was tattooed, the man who knocked at the door of a friend, the Grammarian and the Sailor, the deaf man and his sick neighbor, the Arab filling a bag with sand, and the like. As an example, in the story of

  5. ICPD: in whose interest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva, M

    1994-06-01

    The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) is set for September 1994. Arms control and control of military interests are as crucial as population control. The expenditure on the military and arms should go to social measures and true socioeconomic development. Women are leading the movement against war and towards peace. Women make up 70% of current refugees of ethnic conflicts. The conquest of free trade with little or no restriction and globalization trends forces developing countries to accept nonessential luxury items which tend to be irrational, hazardous consumer articles and technologies from industrialized countries. The privileged elite in developing countries and the industrialized countries overconsume, while the basic needs of the poor majority are not being met. The rich view the poor as a global threat and a threat for environmental degradation. They believe that free trade will solve all problems, yet it only marginalizes the poor and the vulnerable. The pattern of overconsumption is the threat. The poor are characterized as demons responsible for the population explosion. Women are angry that population control policies are attempts to control women's fertility. Specifically, most contraceptive technologies and most family planning programs target women. Male responsibility is ignored. Religious fundamentalists tell women not to become pregnant, not to use contraception, and not to seek abortion, yet they allow male sex behavior, e.g., sexual violence. This attitude leaves women vulnerable to unwanted pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases, and AIDS. Developing countries should be concerned about chapter III on Population, Environment, and Development in the ICPD text. Most countries, including India, have formed a consensus on this chapter. The Vatican and some Latin American countries have objections, however. The meeting in Cairo will likely continue to promote the view that the fertility of women in developing

  6. The Story of Story Mill-A Montana Community Working to Restore Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story Mill, a 55-acre site on the outskirts of Bozeman, Montana, has undergone several transformations in recent history. The place is virtually a “mill of stories” with respect to land use, but originally it was a wetland.

  7. Personal Stories: Why Flu Vaccination Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-12-08

    In this podcast, moving personal stories help inform parents about the dangers of flu to children and the benefits of vaccination.  Created: 12/8/2008 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 12/8/2008.

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 5:53 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 59,160 views 5: ... for Excellence 36,049 views 4:48 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  9. A compendium of energy conservation success stories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office/endash/Energy Utilization Research/endash/sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

  10. The Story of a Charter School Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Susan L.; Arguelles, Lourdes

    2001-01-01

    The story of a charter school closure is told from the perspectives of students, parents, teachers, and community members, who felt that the sponsoring district revoked the charter for political reasons despite broad local support. The experience underscores the necessity of publicly subjecting the relationship of the public school system and the…

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 2:20 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 59,013 views 5: ... for Excellence 36,049 views 4:48 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  12. A Compendium of Energy Conservation Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office{endash}Energy Utilization Research{endash}sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

  13. Research, Narrative and Fiction: Conference Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to contribute to the discussion concerning the value and validity of fiction, and arts-based approaches more broadly, as research. I offer this contribution through a narrative: "Conference Story." The narrative involves its characters, in an Oxford pub, debating the merits and otherwise of Peter Clough's (2002)…

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:09 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 59,013 views 5: ... Leaderonomics Media 25,600 views 6:57 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  15. From Storyboard to Story: Animation Content Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Tsai-Yun; Jeng, Tay-Sheng; Chen, Chien-Hsu

    2013-01-01

    This research focused on a new method in the development of animation story content, which could shorten the creation process and arouse new ideas. Two phases of experiments were conducted to explore this reversed model. The first phase is a pretest of participants' creativity, which was a base for further examination the relationship between…

  16. The Spy Story as Modern Tragedy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Supplements the idea of the realistic spy story as reflector of modern problems with a theory of its meaning or a "metaphysics" of the genre. Available from: Thomas L. Erskine, Co-Editor; Literature/Film Quarterly, Salisbury State College, Salisbury, Maryland 21801, Subscription Rates: individuals, $6.00; students, $5.00; single copies, $2.00. (MH)

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ... Canadian Virtual Hospice 3,651 views 4:09 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult ...

  18. ROMANTIC IMAGES IN M. AUEZOV'S STORIES

    OpenAIRE

    Zharylgapov, Zhansaya

    2012-01-01

    The author reveals romantic images creation problems in the early stories of the famous Kazakh writer М. Аuezov, pays special attention to the characteristic peculiarities of romantic manifestation in a main hero portrayal, and traces the typological interconnections of М. Аuezov's Kazakh romantic prose with West-European and Russian romanticism.

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Couple's Story of Living While Dying - Duration: 2:20. HPCancer 7,795 views 2:20 Grief and nurses working in pediatric palliative ... 898 views 6:37 Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 2:29. NINRnews 4,704 views 2:29 Teen ...

  20. Using Stories in English Omani Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Harrasi, Kothar Talib Sulaiman

    2012-01-01

    Learning a FL [foreign language] may be frustrating for some young learners; however, integrating fun in learning would encourage them to develop positive attitudes towards learning a language (Ellis & Brewster, 1991). Stories are an effective and enthusiastic technique in teaching young learners; they inject lots of amusement and help…

  1. Teaching and Learning through Story and Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Suzanne

    1993-01-01

    Reviews "Stories Lives Tell," Carol Witherell and Nel Noddings; and "Turning the Soul," Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon, which include autobiographical accounts of participation in narrative and dialogical activities in formal and extra-school contexts. The books raise questions about the benefits and limitations of this approach for educational…

  2. Leading by Example: A Soldier's Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulls, W. Kenneth, II

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author, an officer in the United States Air Force (USAF), shares some leadership stories from his father's experience in Vietnam and his own experiences in the military. Both the author's corporate and university careers have benefited from the experience he gained in the military, as well as from the lessons shared in his…

  3. The Development of Children's Story Telling Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieiro, Pilar

    To examine the skills and knowledge children use when they develop and tell stories, this study sought to provide an experiential demonstration of how schemata guides comprehension. Subjects were preschool, third-, and fifth-grade children described by their teachers as having average reading comprehension. Each child met with a researcher in an…

  4. Haida Story Telling Time with Activity Folder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Robert

    One in a series of curriculum materials on Southeast Alaska Natives, this booklet contains seven myths and legends from the Haida oral tradition, each accompanied by discussion questions and suggested learning activities. Intended for use in the intermediate grades, the stories are two to four pages long with many Haida words included in the text…

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 2:45 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 58,304 views 5: ... 29. NINRnews 4,704 views 2:29 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  6. The anthrax letters: a medical detective story

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cole, Leonard A

    2003-01-01

    .... Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Cole, Leonard A., 1933The anthrax letters : a medical detective story / Leonard A. Cole. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-309-08881-X - ISBN 0-309-52584-5 (PDF) 1. Bioterrorism- United States. 2. Anthrax- United States. 3. Postal service- United States. 4. Victims of...

  7. A Contemporary Story of School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Priestley, Anna

    2012-01-01

    A review of recent school psychology publications was conducted to discover the espoused theory of contemporary school psychology, as distinct from school psychology practice. We considered that identification of the espoused theory of school psychology, the story of school psychology, would support professional reflection and the identification…

  8. Automated Story Capture From Conversational Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-05

    consider using different types of features besides simple unigrams and bi- grams. In particular, the preponderance of past tense and pronouns in...interview transcripts that were created for purposes other than story extraction. Three examples are transcripts of police interrogations

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 59:01 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 58,634 views 5: ... 37. NYGHNews 1,861 views 6:37 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  10. A Beautiful Screen Tells a Classic Story

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Scenes from Dream of Red Mansions, a masterpiece of classic Chinese literature, have been recreated in stone. Entitled "Stories from Dream of Red Mansions," the new work of fine workmanship took some three years and more than 80,000 working hours to complete. Fifty-two screens are linked to each other. stretching 70 meters in length, 2.3 meters in

  11. My Bar Graph Tells a Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Sue; McMillen, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Connecting stories to qualitative coordinate graphs has been suggested as an effective instructional strategy. Even students who are able to "create" bar graphs may struggle to correctly "interpret" them. Giving children opportunities to work with qualitative graphs can help them develop the skills to interpret, describe, and compare information…

  12. Mathematical Story: A Metaphor for Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietiker, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework for interpreting the content found in mathematics curriculum in order to offer teachers and other mathematics educators comprehensive conceptual tools with which to make curricular decisions. More specifically, it describes a metaphor of "mathematics curriculum as story" and defines and…

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 6:37 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 57,982 views 5: ... 3:34. Nemours 797 views 3:34 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  14. Stories in Different Domains of Child Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjatovic, Dragana

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on the results gained from the research about the perception teachers have about stories. The study was conducted in Sweden and the main purpose was to partially fulfil the requirements for Erasmus Mundus joint degree "International Master of Early Childhood Education and Care". In accordance with previous research…

  15. Beijing Bicycle - Stories from a Transformative Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Mai Corlin

    2012-01-01

    of the global. Beijing Bicycle is thematically similar to Vittorio de Sicas neorealist classic Bicycle Thieves (1948) and Akira Kurosawas filmnoir classic Stray Dog (1949). Both films describe a disillusioned post-war society in an impoverished Italy and a humiliated Japan respectively. The stories told become...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 2:20 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 59,013 views 5: ... 51. WesternReservePBS 5,113 views 54:51 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  17. Seismic Drift Control in soft storied RCC buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Mishra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies Seismic drift demands in RCC Buildings with weak first stories which is very important seeing the present damages all over the World due to earth quake like Kobe and Chi-Chi earth quakes in 1995and 1999 respectively . As we know that in India , Bhuj-Gujrat earth quake on 26th Jan 2001 and Nepal earth quake -2015, were the most destructive events recorded in India and Nepal in terms of deaths and damages to the infrastructure and devastation in the last fifty years., These earthquakes has provides lessons to human society particularly engineers, architects, builders for improving design and planning, practices ,inadequate analysis, design deficiency and even poor quality of construction. It has been observed that the principal reason of failure may be associated to soft stories, floating columns ,mass irregularities and pounding of adjacent structures etc. In this paper focus has been to judge the damages factors which are responsible for the collapse of structure and control measures to be provided for a safe and economic design as per current Indian and foreign codes .An analysis has performed using STAAD-Pro for G+5 multistoried building in different Zones IV and V and drifting results obtained has discussed with respect to safety and damages consideration.

  18. Oral cancer: exploring the stories in United Kingdom newspaper articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, C M; Johnson, I G; Morgan, M Z

    2016-09-09

    Objective Reports suggest that patients with oral cancer delay seeking help because they are unaware of the symptoms. The majority of adults (95%) engage with news reports and 40% read newspapers. Newspaper oral cancer stories may influence awareness and health-seeking behaviour. The aim of this study was to explore how oral cancer is portrayed in UK newspaper print media.Design Qualitative content analysis of articles from ten newspapers with the widest UK print circulation. All articles using the terms 'mouth cancer' and 'oral cancer' over a three year period were retrieved. Duplicates, non-cancer and non-human articles were excluded.Results 239 articles were analysed. Common topics included 'recent research', 'survivor stories', 'health information' and 'celebrity linkage'. Articles were often emotive, featuring smoking, alcohol, sex and celebrity. Articles lacked a proper evidence base and often failed to provide accurate information about signs and symptoms, information about prevention and signposting to treatment.Conclusions Opportunities to save lives are being missed. Further work to improve social responsibility in the media and develop guidance to enhance the quality of information, health reporting and signposting to help are indicated.

  19. The Hadia Story: Digital Storytelling in Election Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Kalnes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital storytelling in election campaigns is a relatively recent phenomenon, which needs to be investigated in order to enhance our understanding of changes and developments in modern political communication. This article is an analysis of how the Norwegian-Pakistani Labour politician, Hadia Tajik, has used digital storytelling to construct her political identity, and a discussion of the consequences of her experiments with this genre. The focus is on the five video stories she released during the 2009 parliamentary election campaign and the reactions they evoked on the net and in the traditional media during the same (time period.During the 2009 electoral campaign Tajik moved from being a relatively unknown politician to becoming a political household name and the only member of the new Parliament with a migrant background. The digital stories were instrumental in this development for numerous reasons, the most important probably being that they gave her prime time television coverage. Norwegian news media have in general been very concerned with Web 2.0 and Tajik’s videos were regarded as an innovative kind of political communication. The videos also functioned as an effective marketing tool on the net. As an integral part of her extensive viral network, they attracted numerous views and they were with a few exceptions met with positive reactions. This was probably due to their relatively high production values and their catch-all communication strategy that downplayed her ethnic, educational and political background and emphasized her universal human qualities.

  20. Stories worth telling: moral experiences of suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Scott J

    2014-01-01

    Moral constructions of suicide are deliberately avoided in contemporary suicidology, yet morality persists, little or imperfectly acknowledged, in its practices and in the policies, discourses, and instruments that it underpins. This study used narrative methodologies to examine the normative force of suicidology and its implications for persons who had engaged in an act of nonfatal suicidal behavior. I interviewed a convenience sample of twelve persons from two inner-urban community mental health centers who were receiving crisis and case management services after a recent act of nonfatal suicidal behavior. Interviews focused on events leading up to and after participants' suicidal behavior; the responses their suicidal behavior generated in others, including family, friends, and the health professionals caring for them; and cultural views of suicide more broadly. Analysis of these interviews revealed that, although participants' narratives were broadly consistent with a number of recognizable, canonical story formats common to our cultural repertoire of stories of suicide, they also revealed important tensions, divisions, conflicts, and challenges to contemporary suicidological discourse and practice. Despite evidence to suggest that biomedical understandings of suicide provided some therapeutic benefit to participants, they did not address important social and moral dimensions of human life or explore their connection to suicidal behavior-aspects of the suicidal event that were critical to its causation and to its retelling and "resolution." The results of this study provide important insights into the moral features of suicidal behavior, the moral and ethical implications of suicide research, and the limitations of moral and ethical discourse in suicidology.