WorldWideScience

Sample records for human integument volunteers

  1. From frog integument to human skin: dermatological perspectives from frog skin biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Iain S; Roubos, Eric W; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Vaudry, Hubert; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Pattwell, David M; Maderson, Paul F A; Paus, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    For over a century, frogs have been studied across various scientific fields, including physiology, embryology, neuroscience, (neuro)endocrinology, ecology, genetics, behavioural science, evolution, drug development, and conservation biology. In some cases, frog skin has proven very successful as a research model, for example aiding in the study of ion transport through tight epithelia, where it has served as a model for the vertebrate distal renal tubule and mammalian epithelia. However, it has rarely been considered in comparative studies involving human skin. Yet, despite certain notable adaptations that have enabled frogs to survive in both aquatic and terrestrial environments, frog skin has many features in common with human skin. Here we present a comprehensive overview of frog (and toad) skin ontogeny, anatomy, cytology, neuroendocrinology and immunology, with special attention to its unique adaptations as well as to its similarities with the mammalian integument, including human skin. We hope to provide a valuable reference point and a source of inspiration for both amphibian investigators and mammalian researchers studying the structural and functional properties of the largest organ of the vertebrate body.

  2. Volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, Lesley; Handy, Femida; Cnaan, Ram A

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a burgeoning interest in the study of volunteering, and the number of publications devoted to volunteering has grown exponentially. In this chapter, we examine emerging theories and new directions in volunteering research. First, we discuss multi-level perspectives that try to understand volunteering in complex interaction with the organizational and institutional context. Next, we present process-oriented approaches that focus on the experience of volunteeri...

  3. Distally lobed integuments in some Angiosperm ovules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heel, van W.A.

    1970-01-01

    In this treatise ‘De l’Ovule’ Warming (1878) remarked that although the borders of the integuments grow uniformly, very rarely a division into lobes can be observed. He mentioned Symplocarpus foetida (inner integument four-lobed), Lagarosiphon schweinfurthii (outer integument four- or five-lobed)

  4. Distally lobed integuments in some Angiosperm ovules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heel, van W.A.

    1970-01-01

    In this treatise ‘De l’Ovule’ Warming (1878) remarked that although the borders of the integuments grow uniformly, very rarely a division into lobes can be observed. He mentioned Symplocarpus foetida (inner integument four-lobed), Lagarosiphon schweinfurthii (outer integument four- or five-lobed) an

  5. Human volunteer study with PGME: Eye irritation during vapour exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmen, H.H.; Muijser, H.; Arts, J.H.E.; Prinsen, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the possible occurrence of eye irritation and subjective symptoms in human volunteers exposed to propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME) vapour at concentrations of 0, 100 and 150 ppm. Testing was conducted in 12 healthy male volunteers using a repeated

  6. Human volunteer study with PGME: Eye irritation during vapour exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmen, H.H.; Muijser, H.; Arts, J.H.E.; Prinsen, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the possible occurrence of eye irritation and subjective symptoms in human volunteers exposed to propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME) vapour at concentrations of 0, 100 and 150 ppm. Testing was conducted in 12 healthy male volunteers using a repeated

  7. Dermal absorption of chlorpyrifos in human volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuling, W.J.; Ravensberg, L.C.; Roza, L.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The methods and results are described of a study on the dermal absorption of chlorpyrifos (CPF) in humans established via urinary excretion of the metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP). Methods: Two dermal, single, doses of CPF were applied in two study groups (A and B) each

  8. EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE ON PLASMA GLUCOSE LEVEL IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Kumar Chakraborty; Mrigendranath Gantait; Biswapati Mukherjee

    2006-01-01

    Objective To observe the changes of plasma glucose level (PGL) in human volunteers after acupuncture. Methods Seventy-seven human volunteers were taken up from the acupuncture clinic. All of pletion of acupuncture. All cases were at four hours abstinence from food before doing acupuncture. Results Plasma glucose level varied 5 mg% or more in 62 cases (80.51%) and only those were considered for computation. PGL increased in cases who had generally plasma glucose level below 90 mg% before acupuncture;and PGL decreased in cases who had plasma glucose 90 mg% or above. In 10 control cases there was no variation of the considerable level of 5 mg% in any case. Conclusion Bi-directional variation of PGL after acupuncture indicates that acupuncture can be used to maintain optimum PGL through endogenous mechanism,suggesting that it is applicable in controlling hyperglycemia in diabetes mellitus patients.

  9. The headache-inducing effect of cilostazol in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, S; Kruuse, Christina; Petersen, K.A.;

    2006-01-01

    healthy volunteers were included in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study. Placebo or cilostazol (200 mg p.o.) was administered on two separate study days. Headache was scored on a verbal rating scale (0-10) and mechanical pain thresholds were measured with von Frey hairs. The median peak headache...... score 0-16 h postdose was 0 (range 0-2) after placebo and 3.5 (range 0-7) after cilostazol (P = 0.003). The median headache curve peaked at 6-9 h postdose. The headaches induced were usually bilateral and pulsating. Nausea occurred in two volunteers, photo- and phonophobia were not seen. Two volunteers...

  10. The porcine ear skin as a model system for the human integument: influence of storage conditions on basic features of epidermis structure and function--a histological and histochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, W; Zschemisch, N H; Godynicki, S

    2003-01-01

    Based on careful tissue processing, detailed structural analysis, and histochemical as well as cytophotometrical evaluation of the epidermis, the study presents data with respect to changes of tissue integrity during two storing modes (room temperature and 4 degrees C) and various storage times of the porcine auricle. Structural degeneration was first noted in the barrier region of the epidermis from where such changes spread, independent of storage conditions, from small horizontal necrotic islands and continuously with increasing storage time. The histochemical results corroborated these observations, emphasizing, however, that the lower epidermal layers seemed intact for a longer time period than the upper layers. Cytophotometrical evaluation of histochemical stainings showed, with regard to the enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, that oxidative metabolism was negatively affected in the early stages of storage, whereas epidermal lipids (neutral fats, glycolipids) remained relatively stable, even during storage at room temperature. In conclusion, it was obvious that the barrier region is the most sensitive element of the porcine ear epidermis. Taking into consideration that this part of the epidermis is most important for permeation studies, it seems reasonable to avoid any storage of porcine auricles at room temperature, and to use only auricles that have been stored at 4 degrees C for not more than 4 to 6 hours, immediately after delivery from the slaughter-house. In this way better tissue preservation can be achieved, whereby the use of shinkage-free water-soluble plastic embedding would generally improve the histological control of structural integrity, and the application of an easy to handle enzyme histochemical procedure (e.g. succinate dehydrogenase demonstration) to unfixed fresh-frozen sections would help to control basic aspects of tissue functions. The results are discussed in relation to the use of porcine integument as a model in human dermatological

  11. Hospital volunteerism as human resource solution: Motivation for both volunteers and the public health sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guinevere M. Lourens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A volunteer programme with 50 registered volunteers was established in 2007 at a secondary-level public, semi-rural regional hospital in the Cape Winelands, South Africa. This was a rapid response to the extensive renovations and system changes brought about by the hospital revitalisation initiated in 2006 and the resultant expanded services, which required additional human resources. This study describes the hospital volunteer programme and provides hospital administrators with practical planning guidance for hospital volunteer programme implementation.Purpose: The purpose of this study is to (1 describe the outcomes of the hospital volunteer programme implementation intervention and (2 to make sound recommendations for volunteer programme implementation.Methodology and approach: A qualitative case-study methodology was employed using purposive sampling as a technique. Participants were recruited from a public hospital in the Western Cape. A case-study design was applied to explore the hospital volunteer programme implementation. In-depth interviews and a focus group discussion with thematic content analysis of transcripts as well as document reviews were conducted to conclude the study during 2015. The key participants were individually interviewed and included two members of the hospital management, two volunteers and one volunteer coordinator. A focus group discussion consisting of three volunteers was also conducted.Findings: The findings of this study indicate that a volunteer programme can meet needs and be a motivational force for both the individual volunteer and the organisation. However, it requires co-ordination and some secure funding to remain sustainable. Such a programme holds huge benefits in terms of human resource supplementation, organisational development, as well as the possibility of gainful employment for the previously unemployed.Practical implications: In practice, a health service contemplating a volunteer

  12. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3... General Prohibitions § 261.3 Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program..., intimidating, or intentionally interfering with any Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program...

  13. A Human Volunteer Study to Determine the Prebiotic Effects of Lactulose Powder on Human Colonic Microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The prebiotic effects of lactulose were monitored in a human feeding study. Prebiotics are dietary carbohydrates that have a selective microbial metabolism in the gut, directed towards bacteria seen as beneficial, examples being bifidobacteria and/or lactobacilli. The study was conducted in a double blind, placebo controlled manner. A dose of 10 g per day, half the pharmacological dose, was fed to 10 healthy adult volunteers. In parallel, 10 persons were fed a placebo (glucose/lactose). Both ...

  14. Antioxidant Capacity of Plasma after Pomegranate Intake in Human Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajimahmoodi Mannan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary antioxidants including phenolic compounds are believed to be effective nutrients in the prevention of oxidative stress related disease. Pomegranate has been used for centuries in ancient cultures for its medicinal purpose and is widely acknowledged for antioxidant properties. The present study was designed to assess the effect of pomegranate fresh fruit consumption on the plasma antioxidant capacity. Thirty healthy volunteers were recruited for the study. Volunteers were randomly divided into three groups (pomegranate, vitamin E and water consumption. Blood samples were collected, after at least 12 hours overnight fast, the day before beginning supplementation period and the day after supplementation had finished. Total antioxidant capacity measurement by FRAP method and clinical laboratory test were performed for all volunteers in two selected times. The obtained data revealed that consumption of 100 grams pomegranate and vitamin E per day for ten days resulted in a significant rise (14.05%, 8.28% plasma antioxidant capacity respectively, but this difference was not significant for water group.

  15. Experimental rhinovirus infection in human volunteers exposed to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, F.W.; Dubovi, E.J.; Harder, S.; Seal, E. Jr.; Graham, D.

    1988-05-01

    We studied 24 young adult male volunteers experimentally inoculated with type 39 rhinovirus to determine whether the course of viral infection was modified by exposure to moderate levels of ozone (0.3 ppm for 6 h per day) over the 5 days after virus inoculation. No differences in rhinovirus titers in nasal secretions, recruitment of neutrophils into nasal secretions, levels of interferon in nasal lavage fluid, in vitro lymphocyte proliferative responses to rhinovirus antigen, or levels of convalescent serum neutralizing antibody to type 39 rhinovirus were demonstrated in relation to ozone exposure. The level and pattern of ozone exposure used in this experiment had no demonstrable adverse effects on the immune responses necessary to limit and terminate rhinovirus infection of the upper respiratory tract.

  16. Analysis of rear-end impact response using mathematical human modeling and volunteer tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Ono, K.; Kaneoka, K.

    2001-01-01

    At TNO multi-directional mathematical human body models have been developed. The objective of this study was to simulate the rigid seat and standard seat JARI rear-impact sled tests using the MADYMO 50th percentile male model. The head and neck response of this human model and the volunteers were co

  17. Oxygen challenge magnetic resonance imaging in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Krishna A; Moreton, Fiona C; Santosh, Celestine; Lopez, Rosario; Brennan, David; Schwarzbauer, Christian; Goutcher, Colin; O'Hare, Kevin; Macrae, I Mhairi; Muir, Keith W

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen challenge imaging involves transient hyperoxia applied during deoxyhaemoglobin sensitive (T2*-weighted) magnetic resonance imaging and has the potential to detect changes in brain oxygen extraction. In order to develop optimal practical protocols for oxygen challenge imaging, we investigated the influence of oxygen concentration, cerebral blood flow change, pattern of oxygen administration and field strength on T2*-weighted signal. Eight healthy volunteers underwent multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging including oxygen challenge imaging and arterial spin labelling using two oxygen concentrations (target FiO2 of 100 and 60%) administered consecutively (two-stage challenge) at both 1.5T and 3T. There was a greater signal increase in grey matter compared to white matter during oxygen challenge (p challenge imaging. Reductions in cerebral blood flow did not obscure the T2*-weighted signal increases. In conclusion, the optimal protocol for further study should utilise target FiO2 = 100% during a single oxygen challenge. Imaging at both 1.5T and 3T is clinically feasible.

  18. Mathematical Model for Hemodynamicand Hormonal Effects of Human Ghrelin in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha.T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamicand hormonal effects of human ghrelin in healthy volunteers.To investigate hemodynamic and hormonaleffects of ghrelin, a novel growth hormone (GH-releasing peptide, we gave six healthy men an intravenousbolus of human ghrelin or placebo and vice versa1–2 wk apart in a randomized fashion. Ghrelin elicited amarked increase in circulating GH . The elevation ofGH lasted longer than 60 min after the bolus injection.Injection of ghrelin significantly decreased mean arterialpressure without a significant changein heart rate .In summary, human ghrelin elicited a potent, longlastingGH release and had beneficial hemodynamic effectsvia reducing cardiac afterload and increasing cardiac outputwithout an increase in heart rate. Thus, the purpose of thisstudy was to investigate hemodynamic and hormonaleffects of intravenous ghrelin in healthy volunteers. This paper discussed the constant stress level of healthy volunteers with times to damage of stress effect andrecoveries

  19. Survival function Of Realization process for Hemodynamic and hormonal effects of human GH in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha.T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic and hormonal effects of human ghrelin in healthy volunteers. To investigate hemodynamic and hormonal effects of ghrelin, a novel growth hormone (GH-releasing peptide, we gave six healthy men an intravenous bolus of human ghrelin or placebo and vice versa 1–2 wk apart in a randomized fashion. Ghrelin elicited a marked increase in circulating GH. The elevation of GH lasted longer than 60 min after the bolus injection. Injection of ghrelin significantly decreased mean arterial pressure without a significant change in heart rate .In summary, human ghrelin elicited a potent, long lasting GH release and had beneficial hemodynamic effects via reducing cardiac after load and increasing cardiac output without an increase in heart rate. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate hemodynamic and hormonal effects of intravenous ghrelin in healthy volunteers. This paper discussed the constant stress level of healthy volunteers with times to damage of stress effect and recoveries

  20. Repeated dose pharmacokinetics of pancopride in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salva, P; Costa, J; Pérez-Campos, A; Martínez-Tobed, A

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of pancopride after repeated oral dose administration of 20 mg pancopride in tablet form once a day for 5 d in 12 healthy male volunteers. Plasma levels were measured by HPLC using a solid phase extraction method and automated injection. The minimum quantification limit of pancopride in plasma was 2 ng mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) after the first dose was 92.5 +/- 41.5 ng ML-1 and tmax was 1.7 +/- 0.9 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 14.3 +/- 6.9 h. The area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC) was 997 +/- 396 ng h mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) at steady state (day 5) was 101.8 +/- 36.9 ng mL-1 and tmax was 2.2 +/- 1.2 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 16.3 +/- 2.7 h and the minimum plasma concentration (Cssmin) was 16.6 +/- 6.9 ng mL-1. The area under the concentration-time curve during the dosing interval (AUCss tau) was 995 +/- 389 ng h mL-1. The average plasma concentration at steady state (Cssav) was 43.3 +/- 16.1 ng mL-1 and the experimental accumulation ratio (RAUC) was 1.34 +/- 0.19, whereas the mean theoretical value (R) was 1.40 +/- 0.29. The results obtained showed a good correlation between the experimental plasma levels and the expected values calculated using a repeated dose two-compartment model assessed by means of the Akaike value. It is concluded that the pharmacokinetics of pancopride are not modified after repeated dose administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Rule-guided human classification of Volunteered Geographic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed Loai; Falomir, Zoe; Schmid, Falko; Freksa, Christian

    2017-05-01

    During the last decade, web technologies and location sensing devices have evolved generating a form of crowdsourcing known as Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI). VGI acted as a platform of spatial data collection, in particular, when a group of public participants are involved in collaborative mapping activities: they work together to collect, share, and use information about geographic features. VGI exploits participants' local knowledge to produce rich data sources. However, the resulting data inherits problematic data classification. In VGI projects, the challenges of data classification are due to the following: (i) data is likely prone to subjective classification, (ii) remote contributions and flexible contribution mechanisms in most projects, and (iii) the uncertainty of spatial data and non-strict definitions of geographic features. These factors lead to various forms of problematic classification: inconsistent, incomplete, and imprecise data classification. This research addresses classification appropriateness. Whether the classification of an entity is appropriate or inappropriate is related to quantitative and/or qualitative observations. Small differences between observations may be not recognizable particularly for non-expert participants. Hence, in this paper, the problem is tackled by developing a rule-guided classification approach. This approach exploits data mining techniques of Association Classification (AC) to extract descriptive (qualitative) rules of specific geographic features. The rules are extracted based on the investigation of qualitative topological relations between target features and their context. Afterwards, the extracted rules are used to develop a recommendation system able to guide participants to the most appropriate classification. The approach proposes two scenarios to guide participants towards enhancing the quality of data classification. An empirical study is conducted to investigate the classification of grass

  2. Effects of midazolam on cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, A.; Juge, O.; Morel, D.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of intravenously administered midazolam on cerebral blood flow were evaluated in eight healthy volunteers using the /sup 133/Xe inhalation technique. Six minutes after an intravenous dose of 0.15 mg/kg midazolam, the cerebral blood flow decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) from a value of 40.6 +/- 3.3 to a value of 27.0 +/- 5.0 ml . 100 g-1 . min-1. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) increased from 2.8 +/- 0.2 to 3.9 to 0.6 mmHg/(ml . 100 g-1 . min-1)(P less than 0.001). Mean arterial blood pressure decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) from 117 +/- 8 to 109 +/- 9 mmHg and arterial carbon dioxide tension increased from 33.9 +/- 2.3 to 38.6 +/- 3.2 mmHg (P less than 0.05). Arterial oxygen tension remained stable throughout the study, 484 +/- 95 mmHg before the administration of midazolam and 453 +/- 76 mmHg after. All the subjects slept after the injection of the drug and had anterograde amnesia of 24.5 +/- 5 min. The decrease in mean arterial blood pressure was probably not important since it remained in the physiologic range for cerebral blood flow autoregulation. The increase in arterial carbon dioxide tension observed after the midazolam injection may have partially counteracted the effect of this new benzodiazepine on cerebral blood flow. Our data suggest that midazolam might be a safe agent to use for the induction of anethesia in neurosurgical patients with intracranial hypertension.

  3. The skin: The many functions of fish integument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Diane G.; Farrell, Anthony P.

    2011-01-01

    The integument or skin is the envelope that not only separates and protects a fish from its environment, but also provides the means through which most contacts with the outer world are made. It is a large organ and is continuous with the linings of all body openings, and also covers the fins. Fish integument is a multifunctional organ, and its components may serve important roles in protection, communication, sensory perception, locomotion, respiration, ion regulation, excretion, and thermal regulation.

  4. Evo-Devo of Amniote Integuments and Appendages

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ping; Hou, Lianhai; Plikus, Maksim; Hughes, Michael; Scehnet, Jeffrey; Suksaweang, Sanong; Widelitz, Randall B.; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Integuments form the boundary between an organism and the environment. The evolution of novel developmental mechanisms in integuments and appendages allows animals to live in diverse ecological environments. Here we focus on amniotes. The major achievement for reptile skin is an adaptation to the land with the formation of a successful barrier. The stratum corneum enables this barrier to prevent water loss from the skin and allowed amphibian/reptile ancestors to go onto the land. Overlapping ...

  5. Histological study of white rhinoceros integument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plochocki, Jeffrey H; Ruiz, Saul; Rodriguez-Sosa, José R; Hall, Margaret I

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report findings from a microscopic analysis of the white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) integumentary ultrastructure. Skin samples from the cheek, shoulder, flank and rump were taken from a 46-year-old female southern white rhinoceros and examined using H&E and elastic histological stains. The epidermis was thickest in the flank (1.003 mm) followed by the rump, cheek and shoulder. The stratum corneum comprised more than half the epidermal thickness. Numerous melanin granules were found in the basal and spinosum layers. The epidermal-dermal junction was characterized by abundant papillary folds increasing surface contact between integument layers. Most of the dermal thickness consisted of organized collagen bundles with scattered elastic fibers. Collagen fiber bundles were thickest in the flank (210.9 μm) followed by shoulder, rump and cheek. Simple coiled sweat glands were present in the dermis, but hair and sebaceous glands were absent. Together, these data suggest the white rhinoceros has a unique integumentary system among large terrestrial herbivores.

  6. Wood smoke in a controlled exposure experiment with human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddervold, I S; Bønløkke, J H; Mølhave, L; Massling, A; Jensen, B; Grønborg, T K; Bossi, R; Forchhammer, L; Kjærgaard, S K; Sigsgaard, T

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to wood smoke in the general population is increasing and concurrently, also our awareness. This article describes a wood-smoke generating system for studying human exposure to wood smoke and symptoms related to this exposure. Twenty nonsmoking atopic human participants with normal lung function and normal bronchial reactivity were randomly exposed for 3 h at three different exposure conditions; clean filtered air (control exposure) and wood smoke with a characteristic particulate matter (PM) concentration of 200 µg/m³ (low) and 400 µg/m³ (high) under controlled environmental conditions. The range for PM₂.₅ load observed for single experiments was 165-303 µg/m³ for the low exposure and 205-662 µg/m³ for the high exposure, whereas particle loads during clean air exposure most often were below the detection limit (humans. The knowledge gained in this study on subjective-rated symptoms may be important for understanding human response to wood-smoke exposure.

  7. Wood smoke in a controlled exposure experiment with human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Mølhave, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to wood smoke in the general population is increasing and concurrently, also our awareness. This article describes a wood-smoke generating system for studying human exposure to wood smoke and symptoms related to this exposure. Twenty nonsmoking atopic human participants with normal lung...... function and normal bronchial reactivity were randomly exposed for 3h at three different exposure conditions; clean filtered air (control exposure) and wood smoke with a characteristic particulate matter (PM) concentration of 200 µg/m3 (low) and 400 µg/m3 (high) under controlled environmental conditions.......0007), “irritative body perceptions” (p = 0.0127), “psychological/neurological effects” (p = 0.0075) and “weak inflammatory responses” (p = 0.0003). Furthermore, significant effects (p = 0.0192) on self-reported general mucosa irritation were found. In conclusion, exposure to wood smoke affected symptom rating...

  8. Assessing the Metabolic Effects of Aromatherapy in Human Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatherapy, a form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM that uses essential oils through inhalation, is believed to enhance physical and spiritual conditions. Although clinical studies suggest that the use of essential oils may have therapeutic potential, evidence for the efficacy of aromatherapy in treating medical conditions remains poor, with a particular lack of studies employing rigorous analytical methods that capture its identifiable impact on human biology. Here, we report a comprehensive metabolomics study that reveals metabolic changes in people after exposed to aroma inhalation for 10 continuous days. In this study, the metabolic alterations in urine of 31 females with mild anxiety symptoms exposed to aerial diffusion of aromas were measured by GC-TOF-MS and UPLC-Q-TOF-MS analyses. A significant alteration of metabolic profile in subjects responsive to essential oil was found, which is characterized by the increased levels of arginine, homocysteine, and betaine, as well as decreased levels of alcohols, carbohydrates, and organic acids in urine. Notably, the metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and gut microbial metabolism were significantly altered. This study demonstrates that the metabolomics approach can capture the subtle metabolic changes resulting from exposure to essential oils, which may lead to an improved mechanistic understanding of aromatherapy.

  9. Transport of Exogenous Organic Substances by Invertebrate Integuments: The Field Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomme, Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    Transport, organic substances, monosaccharides, amino acids, marine invertebrates, integument, DOM, marine animals, L-alanine, D-glucos......Transport, organic substances, monosaccharides, amino acids, marine invertebrates, integument, DOM, marine animals, L-alanine, D-glucos...

  10. Immunomodulating Activity of Agaricus brasiliensis KA21 in Mice and in Human Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed studies on murine models and human volunteers to examine the immunoenhancing effects of the naturally outdoor-cultivated fruit body of Agaricus brasiliensis KA21 (i.e. Agaricus blazei. Antitumor, leukocyte-enhancing, hepatopathy-alleviating and endotoxin shock-alleviating effects were found in mice. In the human study, percentage body fat, percentage visceral fat, blood cholesterol level and blood glucose level were decreased, and natural killer cell activity was increased. Taken together, the results strongly suggest that the A. brasiliensis fruit body is useful as a health-promoting food.

  11. Evo-Devo of amniote integuments and appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Hou, Lianhai; Plikus, Maksim; Hughes, Michael; Scehnet, Jeffrey; Suksaweang, Sanong; Widelitz, Randall; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Integuments form the boundary between an organism and the environment. The evolution of novel developmental mechanisms in integuments and appendages allows animals to live in diverse ecological environments. Here we focus on amniotes. The major achievement for reptile skin is an adaptation to the land with the formation of a successful barrier. The stratum corneum enables this barrier to prevent water loss from the skin and allowed amphibian / reptile ancestors to go onto the land. Overlapping scales and production of beta-keratins provide strong protection. Epidermal invagination led to the formation of avian feather and mammalian hair follicles in the dermis. Both adopted a proximal - distal growth mode which maintains endothermy. Feathers form hierarchical branches which produce the vane that makes flight possible. Recent discoveries of feathered dinosaurs in China inspire new thinking on the origin of feathers. In the laboratory, epithelial - mesenchymal recombinations and molecular mis-expressions were carried out to test the plasticity of epithelial organ formation. We review the work on the transformation of scales into feathers, conversion between barbs and rachis and the production of "chicken teeth". In mammals, tilting the balance of the BMP pathway in K14 noggin transgenic mice alters the number, size and phenotypes of different ectodermal organs, making investigators rethink the distinction between morpho-regulation and pathological changes. Models on the evolution of feathers and hairs from reptile integuments are discussed. A hypothetical Evo-Devo space where diverse integument appendages can be placed according to complex phenotypes and novel developmental mechanisms is presented.

  12. Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B(1) pharmacokinetics in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubert, Carole; Mata, John; Bench, Graham; Dashwood, Roderick; Pereira, Cliff; Tracewell, William; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Williams, David; Bailey, George

    2009-12-01

    Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans, where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB(1). However, neither AFB(1) pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted an unblinded crossover study to establish AFB(1) pharmacokinetic parameters among four human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla cotreatment in three of those volunteers. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an Institutional Review Board-approved dose of 14C-AFB(1) (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 mL water, followed by normal eating and drinking after 2 hours. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hours, and 14C- AFB(1) equivalents were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla or CHL, respectively. Protocols were repeated thrice for each volunteer. The study revealed rapid human AFB(1) uptake (plasma k(a), 5.05 + or - 1.10 h(-1); T(max), 1.0 hour) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hours) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB(1) absorption and reduced Cmax and AUCs (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB(1) pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

  13. In vivo evaluation of limonene-based transdermal therapeutic system of nicorandil in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaiah, Y S R; Chandrasekhar, D V; Rama, B; Jayaram, B; Satyanarayana, V; Al-Saidan, S M

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) gel drug reservoir system prepared with 70:30 v/v ethanol-water solvent system containing 6% w/w of limonene was effective in promoting the in vitro transdermal delivery of nicorandil. The objective of the present study was to fabricate and evaluate a limonene-based transdermal therapeutic system (TTS) for its ability to provide the desired steady-state plasma concentration of nicorandil in human volunteers. The in vitro permeation of nicorandil from a limonene-based HPMC gel drug reservoir was studied across excised rat skin (control), EVA2825 membrane, adhesive-coated EVA2825 membrane and adhesive-coated EVA2825 membrane-excised rat skin composite to account for their effect on the desired flux of nicorandil. The flux of nicorandil from the limonene-based HMPC drug reservoir across EVA2825 membrane decreased to 215.8 +/- 9.7 microg/cm(2).h when compared to that obtained from control, indicating that EVA2825 was effective as a rate-controlling membrane. The further decrease in nicorandil flux across adhesive-coated EVA2825 membrane and adhesive-coated EVA2825 membrane-excised rat skin composite showed that the adhesive coat and skin also controlled the in vitro transdermal delivery. The limonene-based drug reservoir was sandwiched between adhesive-coated EVA2825-release liner composite and a backing membrane. The resultant sandwich was heat-sealed as circle-shaped patch (20 cm(2)), trimmed and subjected to in vivo evaluation in human volunteers against immediate-release tablets of nicorandil (reference formulation). The fabricated limonene-based TTS of nicorandil provided a steady-state plasma concentration of 21.3 ng/ml up to 24 h in healthy human volunteers. It was concluded that the limonene-based TTS of nicorandil provided the desired plasma concentration of the drug for the predetermined period of time with minimal fluctuations and improved bioavailability.

  14. Experimental infection of human volunteers with Haemophilus ducreyi: fifteen years of clinical data and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Diane M; Ofner, Susan; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, which facilitates transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. To better understand the biology of H. ducreyi, we developed a human inoculation model. In the present article, we describe clinical outcomes for 267 volunteers who were infected with H. ducreyi. There was a relationship between papule formation and estimated delivered dose. The outcome (either pustule formation or resolution) of infected sites for a given subject was not independent; the most important determinants of pustule formation were sex and host effects. When 41 subjects were infected a second time, their outcomes segregated toward their initial outcome, confirming the host effect. Subjects with pustules developed local symptoms that required withdrawal from the study after a mean of 8.6 days. There were 191 volunteers who had tissue biopsy performed, 173 of whom were available for follow-up analysis; 28 (16.2%) of these developed hypertrophic scars, but the model was otherwise safe. Mutant-parent trials confirmed key features in H. ducreyi pathogenesis, and the model has provided an opportunity to study differential human susceptibility to a bacterial infection.

  15. A human volunteer study to assess the impact of confectionery sweeteners on the gut microbiota composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beards, Emma; Tuohy, Kieran; Gibson, Glenn

    2010-09-01

    Sweeteners are being sourced to lower the energetic value of confectionery including chocolates. Some, especially non-digestible carbohydrates, may possess other benefits for human health upon their fermentation by the colonic microbiota. The present study assessed non-digestible carbohydrate sweeteners, selected for use in low-energy chocolates, for their ability to beneficially modulate faecal bacterial profiles in human volunteers. Forty volunteers consumed a test chocolate (low-energy or experimental chocolate) containing 22.8 g of maltitol (MTL), MTL and polydextrose (PDX), or MTL and resistant starch for fourteen consecutive days. The dose of the test chocolates was doubled every 2 weeks over a 6-week period. Numbers of faecal bifidobacteria significantly increased with all the three test treatments. Chocolate containing the PDX blend also significantly increased faecal lactobacilli (P = 0.00 001) after the 6 weeks. The PDX blend also showed significant increases in faecal propionate and butyrate (P = 0.002 and 0.006, respectively). All the test chocolates were well tolerated with no significant change in bowel habit or intestinal symptoms even at a daily dose of 45.6 g of non-digestible carbohydrate sweetener. This is of importance not only for giving manufacturers a sugar replacement that can reduce energetic content, but also for providing a well-tolerated means of delivering high levels of non-digestible carbohydrates into the colon, bringing about improvements in the biomarkers of gut health.

  16. Head excursion of restrained human volunteers and hybrid III dummies in steady state rollover tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Edward; Hare, Barry; Hughes, Raymond; Lewis, Lance; Iiyama, Hiroshi; Curzon, Anne; Cooper, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    Seatbelts provide substantial benefits in rollover crashes, yet occupants still receive head and neck injuries from contacting the vehicle roof interior when the roof exterior strikes the ground. Prior research has evaluated rollover restraint performance utilizing anthropomorphic test devices (dummies), but little dynamic testing has been done with human volunteers to learn how they move during rollovers. In this study, the vertical excursion of the head of restrained dummies and human subjects was measured in a vehicle being rotated about its longitudinal roll axis at roll rates from 180-to-360 deg/sec and under static inversion conditions. The vehicle's restraint design was the commonly used 3-point seatbelt with continuous loop webbing and a sliding latch plate. This paper presents an analysis of the observed occupant motion and provides a comparison of dummy and human motion under similar test conditions. Thirty-five tests (eighteen static and seventeen dynamic) were completed using two different sizes of dummies and human subjects in both near and far-side roll directions. The research indicates that far-side rollovers cause the restrained test subjects to have greater head excursion than near-side rollovers, and that static inversion testing underestimates head excursion for far-side occupants. Human vertical head excursion of up to 200 mm was found at a roll rate of 220 deg/sec. Humans exhibit greater variability in head excursion in comparison to dummies. Transfer of seatbelt webbing through the latch plate did not correlate directly with differences in head excursion.

  17. Fetal alcohol exposure and development of the integument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhurst WD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available William D Longhurst,1 Jordan Ernst,2 Larry Burd3 1Center for Emergency Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USA; 3Department of Pediatrics, North Dakota Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Center, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USA Background: The physiology of fetal alcohol exposure changes across gestation. Early in pregnancy placental, fetal, and amniotic fluid concentrations of alcohol exposure are equivalent. Beginning in mid-pregnancy, the maturing fetal epidermis adds keratins which decrease permeability resulting in development of a barrier between fetal circulation and the amniotic fluid. Barrier function development is essential for viability in late pregnancy and in the extra-uterine environment. In this paper we provide a selected review of the effects of barrier function on fetal alcohol exposure. Methods: We utilized a search of PubMed and Google for all years in all languages for MeSH on Demand terms: alcohol drinking, amnion, amniotic fluid, epidermis, ethanol, female, fetal development, fetus, humans, keratins, permeability, and pregnancy. We also reviewed the reference lists of relevant papers and hand-searched reference lists of textbooks for additional references. Results: By 30 gestational weeks, development of barrier function alters the pathophysiology of ethanol dispersion between the fetus and amniotic fluid. Firstly, increases in the effectiveness of barrier function decreases the rate of diffusion of alcohol from fetal circulation across fetal skin into the amniotic fluid. This reduces the volume of alcohol entering the amniotic fluid. Secondly, barrier function increases the duration of fetal exposure by decreasing the rate of alcohol diffusion from amniotic fluid back into fetal circulation. Ethanol is then transported into

  18. Integrated Safety Assessment of 2'-O-Methoxyethyl Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotides in NonHuman Primates and Healthy Human Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Stanley T; Baker, Brenda F; Kwoh, T Jesse; Cheng, Wei; Schulz, Dan J; Xia, Shuting; Salgado, Nelson; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Hart, Christopher E; Burel, Sebastien A; Younis, Husam S; Geary, Richard S; Henry, Scott P; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    The common chemical and biological properties of antisense oligonucleotides provide the opportunity to identify and characterize chemical class effects across species. The chemical class that has proven to be the most versatile and best characterized is the 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. In this report we present an integrated safety assessment of data obtained from controlled dose-ranging studies in nonhuman primates (macaques) and healthy human volunteers for 12 unique 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotides. Safety was assessed by the incidence of safety signals in standardized laboratory tests for kidney and liver function, hematology, and complement activation; as well as by the mean test results as a function of dose level over time. At high doses a number of toxicities were observed in nonhuman primates. However, no class safety effects were identified in healthy human volunteers from this integrated data analysis. Effects on complement in nonhuman primates were not observed in humans. Nonhuman primates predicted safe doses in humans, but over predicted risk of complement activation and effects on platelets. Although limited to a single chemical class, comparisons from this analysis are considered valid and accurate based on the carefully controlled setting for the specified study populations and within the total exposures studied.

  19. Evaluation of Head and Brain Injury Risk Functions Using Sub-Injurious Human Volunteer Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Erin J; Gabler, Lee F; McGhee, James S; Olszko, Ardyn V; Chancey, V Carol; Crandall, Jeff R; Panzer, Matthew B

    2017-08-15

    Risk assessment models are developed to estimate the probability of brain injury during head impact using mechanical response variables such as head kinematics and brain tissue deformation. Existing injury risk functions have been developed using different datasets based on human volunteer and scaled animal injury responses to impact. However, many of these functions have not been independently evaluated with respect to laboratory-controlled human response data. In this study, the specificity of 14 existing brain injury risk functions was assessed by evaluating their ability to correctly predict non-injurious response using previously conducted sled tests with well-instrumented human research volunteers. Six degrees-of-freedom head kinematics data were obtained for 335 sled tests involving subjects in frontal, lateral, and oblique sled conditions up to 16 Gs peak sled acceleration. A review of the medical reports associated with each individual test indicated no clinical diagnosis of mild or moderate brain injury in any of the cases evaluated. Kinematic-based head and brain injury risk probabilities were calculated directly from the kinematic data, while strain-based risks were determined through finite element model simulation of the 335 tests. Several injury risk functions substantially over predict the likelihood of concussion and diffuse axonal injury; proposed maximum principal strain-based injury risk functions predicted nearly 80 concussions and 14 cases of severe diffuse axonal injury out of the 335 non-injurious cases. This work is an important first step in assessing the efficacy of existing brain risk functions and highlights the need for more predictive injury assessment models.

  20. Effect of Tamarindus indica. L on the bioavailability of ibuprofen in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garba, M; Yakasai, I A; Bakare, M T; Munir, H Y

    2003-01-01

    The influence of Tamarindus indica L fruit extract incorporated in a traditional meal on the bioavailability of Ibuprofen tablets 400 mg dose when given concurrently was studied in 6 healthy human volunteers. There was a statistically significant increase in the plasma levels of Ibuprofen and its metabolites hydroxy-ibuprofen and carboxy-ibuprofen respectively, when the meal containing Tamarindus indica fruit extract was administered with the ibuprofen tablets than when taken under fasting state or with the meal without the fruit extract. The C(max), AUC(0-6 hr) and Ka for ibuprofen increased from 38 +/- 0.70 microg/ml to 42 +/- 0.98 microg/ml (p > 0.05); and 28.03 +/- 2.40 microg/ml x hr to 56.51 +/- 0.16 microg/ml x hr (p Tamarindus indica L. fruit extract significantly increased the bioavailability of Ibuprofen.

  1. Controlled exposures of human volunteers to sulfate aerosols. Health effects and aerosol characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avol, E L; Jones, M P; Bailey, R M; Chang, N M; Kleinman, M T; Linn, W S; Bell, K A; Hackney, J D

    1979-08-01

    Our laboratory has undertaken the study of possible acute adverse health effects of sulfate aerosols through controlled exposures of volunteer human subjects. Both healthy and asthmatic adult men were exposed for 2-hour periods (with intermittent exercise) to ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid of particle size distributions and concentrations intended to simulate "worst case" exposures during Los Angeles smog episodes. Lung function tests were performed by the subjects on entering and before exiting from a carefully controlled environmental chamber. Subject symptoms were evluated in a standardized manner. Aerosol concentrations and size distributions were determined by an on-line computer/aerometric monitoring system; gravimetric and chemical analyses were performed on impactor and total filter samples after test exposures. We found little or no evidence of adverse health effects from 2-hour multiple-day exposures to any of the compounds at "worst case" ambient concentrations.

  2. The lipolytic effect of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor activation in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, C A; Kendall, M J; Maxwell, S; Hughes, B

    1993-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of activation beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors on the process of lipolysis in human volunteers. Ten male subjects underwent a single-blind randomized cross-over trial using infusions of terbutaline (a specific beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist), xamoterol (a partial beta 1-agonist with beta 2-adrenoceptor blocking activity) and saline (placebo control). The effect of these infusions on plasma potassium, glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) (total and individual) and insulin levels was studied. 2. Terbutaline infusion induced a significant rise in plasma glucose and a fall in plasma potassium in keeping with its beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulant properties. Xamoterol infusion had no significant effect on these values. Terbutaline infusion caused a greater rise in total and individual FFA than xamoterol, but both effects were significantly different from placebo. 3. The possible reasons for these results and their implications on the beta-adrenergic control of lipolysis are discussed. PMID:8383517

  3. Pain sensation and nociceptive reflex excitability in surgical patients and human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Erichsen, C J; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A

    1992-01-01

    Pain threshold, nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) threshold and responses to suprathreshold stimulation were investigated in 15 female patients (mean age 32 yr (range 22-48 yr)) before and 68 (range 48-96) h after gynaecological laparotomy. Control measurements were performed in 17 healthy human...... volunteers (five males, age 30 yr (range 24-41 yr)). In the surgical patients, pain threshold decreased and pain to suprathreshold stimulation increased significantly (P = 0.006 and P = 0.04, respectively) from before to after surgery. A corresponding trend was demonstrated in neurophysiological measurements......, although the decrease in NFR threshold and increase in NFR amplitude to suprathreshold stimulation were not significant (P = 0.08 and P = 0.24, respectively). The correlations between the relative change in pain and reflex thresholds, and time from surgery, were statistically significant (pain threshold...

  4. Dexamethasone prolongs local analgesia after subcutaneous infiltration of bupivacaine microcapsules in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Werner, Mads U; Lacouture, Peter G;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The addition of small amounts of dexamethasone to extended-release formulations of bupivacaine in microcapsules has been found to prolong local analgesia in experimental studies, but no clinical data are available. METHODS: In a double-blinded study, 12 healthy male volunteers were...... randomized to receive simultaneous subcutaneous injections of bupivacaine microcapsules with dexamethasone and bupivacaine microcapsules without dexamethasone in each calf. Local analgesia was assessed with a validated human pain model; main parameters evaluated were thermal, mechanical, and pain detection...... curve [AUC]) were considered best estimate of analgesia. Safety evaluations were performed daily for the first week and at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 6 months after injection. RESULTS: The addition of dexamethasone significantly prolonged local analgesia of bupivacaine microcapsules without influence...

  5. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London Leslie

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter.

  6. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a) a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b) an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c) application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter. PMID:20718963

  7. Expression of the Flp proteins by Haemophilus ducreyi is necessary for virulence in human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwickl Beth W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease chancroid, contains a flp (fimbria like protein operon that encodes proteins predicted to contribute to adherence and pathogenesis. H. ducreyi mutants that lack expression of Flp1 and Flp2 or TadA, which has homology to NTPases of type IV secretion systems, have decreased abilities to attach to and form microcolonies on human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF. A tadA mutant is attenuated in its ability to cause disease in human volunteers and in the temperature dependent rabbit model, but a flp1flp2 mutant is virulent in rabbits. Whether a flp deletion mutant would cause disease in humans is not clear. Results We constructed 35000HPΔflp1-3, a deletion mutant that lacks expression of all three Flp proteins but has an intact tad secretion system. 35000HPΔflp1-3 was impaired in its ability to form microcolonies and to attach to HFF in vitro when compared to its parent (35000HP. Complementation of the mutant with flp1-3 in trans restored the parental phenotype. To test whether expression of Flp1-3 was necessary for virulence in humans, ten healthy adult volunteers were experimentally infected with a fixed dose of 35000HP (ranging from 54 to 67 CFU on one arm and three doses of 35000HPΔflp1-3 (ranging from 63 to 961 CFU on the other arm. The overall papule formation rate for the parent was 80% (95% confidence interval, CI, 55.2%-99.9% and for the mutant was 70.0% (95% CI, 50.5%-89.5% (P = 0.52. Mutant papules were significantly smaller (mean, 11.2 mm2 than were parent papules (21.8 mm2 24 h after inoculation (P = 0.018. The overall pustule formation rates were 46.7% (95% CI 23.7-69.7% at 30 parent sites and 6.7% (95% CI, 0.1-19.1% at 30 mutant sites (P = 0.001. Conclusion These data suggest that production and secretion of the Flp proteins contributes to microcolony formation and attachment to HFF cells in vitro. Expression of flp1-3 is also necessary for H

  8. The vaccination of human beings with a live avirulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi: a new series of volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Menezes

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Five human volunteers were vaccinated with a live avirulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and followed-up for one year. Except for a few cases of questionable results presented by only one Laboratory, ali the other clinicai, parasitological and serological tests remained negative during that period.

  9. Analysis of human exhaled breath in a population of young volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarić Božidarka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in human breath can provide information about the current physiological state of an individual, such as clinical conditions and exposure to exogenous pollutants. The blood-borne VOCs present in exhaled breath offer the possibility of exploring physiological and pathological processes in a noninvasive way. However, the field of exhaled breath analysis is still in its infancy. We undertook this study in order to define interindividual variation and common compounds in breath VOCs of 48 young human volunteers. Alveolar breath samples were analyzed by automated thermal desorption, gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (FID and electron capture detector (ECD using SUPELCO standards with 66 compounds. Predominant compounds in the alveolar breath of analyzed subjects are ethylbenzene, 1-ethyl-4-methylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (over 50% of the subjects. Isopropyl alcohol, propylene, acetone, ethanol were found as well. We detected substituted compounds in exhaled breath. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172001

  10. Exceptional preservation and the fossil record of tetrapod integument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Chad M; Hudson, Leah; Watts, Taylor; Garza, Hector; Clarke, Julia A

    2017-09-13

    The fossil record of exceptionally preserved soft tissues in Konservat-Lagerstätten provides rare yet significant insight into past behaviours and ecologies. Such deposits are known to occur in bursts rather than evenly through time, but reasons for this pattern and implications for the origins of novel structures remain unclear. Previous assessments of these records focused on marine environments preserving chemically heterogeneous tissues from across animals. Here, we investigate the preservation of skin and keratinous integumentary structures in land-dwelling vertebrates (tetrapods) through time, and in distinct terrestrial and marine depositional environments. We also evaluate previously proposed biotic and abiotic controls on the distribution of 143 tetrapod Konservat-Lagerstätten from the Permian to the Pleistocene in a multivariate framework. Gap analyses taking into account sampling intensity and distribution indicate that feathers probably evolved close to their first appearance in the fossil record. By contrast, hair and archosaur filaments are weakly sampled (five times less common than feathers), and their origins may significantly pre-date earliest known occurrences in the fossil record. This work suggests that among-integument variation in preservation can bias the reconstructed first origins of integumentary novelties and has implications for predicting where, and in what depositional environments, to expect further discoveries of exquisitely preserved tetrapod integument. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Wasted Resources: Volunteers and Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    included using proven human resource management techniques, to include screening and providing handbooks of what to expect before volunteers are...the relief & recovery stages.  Operates volunteer centers to serve as clearing houses for relief teams. American Radio Relay League ( ARRL ...cellular and other infrastructure-dependent systems.  ARRL volunteers act as communications volunteers with local public safety organizations. In

  12. DNA repair enhancement of aqueous extracts of Uncaria tomentosa in a human volunteer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Y; Li, L; Holmgren, K; Pero, R W

    2001-07-01

    The Uncaria tomentosa water extracts (C-Med-100) have been shown to enhance DNA repair, mitogenic response and leukocyte recovery after chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in vivo. In this study, the effect of C-Med-100 supplement was evaluated in a human volunteer study. Twelve apparently healthy adults working in the same environment were randomly assigned into 3 groups with age and gender matched. One group was daily supplemented with a 250 mg tablet containing an aqueous extract of Uncaria tomentosa of C-Med-100, and another group with a 350 mg tablet, for 8 consecutive weeks. DNA repair after induction of DNA damage by a standard dose of hydrogen peroxide was measured 3 times before supplement and 3 times after the supplement for the last 3 weeks of the 8 week-supplement period. There were no drug-related toxic responses to C-Med-100 supplement when judged in terms of clinical symptoms, serum clinical chemistry, whole blood analysis and leukocyte differential counts. There was a statistically significant decrease of DNA damage and a concomitant increase of DNA repair in the supplement groups (250 and 350 mg/day) when compared with non-supplemented controls (p < 0.05). There was also an increased tendency of PHA induced lymphocyte proliferation in the treatment groups. Taken together, this trial has confirmed the earlier results obtained in the rat model when estimating DNA repair enhancement by C-Med-100.

  13. A Haemophilus ducreyi CpxR deletion mutant is virulent in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Dodd, Dana; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Janowicz, Diane M; Spinola, Stanley M; Hansen, Eric J

    2011-06-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a homolog of the CpxRA 2-component signal transduction system, which controls the cell envelope stress response system in other gram-negative bacteria and regulates some important H. ducreyi virulence factors. A H. ducreyi cpxR mutant was compared with its parent for virulence in the human challenge model of experimental chancroid. The pustule formation rate in 5 volunteers was 33% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3%-65.3%) at 15 parent sites and 40% (95% CI, 18.1%-61.9%) at 15 mutant sites (P = .35). Thus, the cpxR mutant was not attenuated for virulence. Inactivation of the H. ducreyi cpxR gene did not reduce the ability of this mutant to express certain proven virulence factors, including the DsrA serum resistance protein and the LspA2 protein, which inhibits phagocytosis. These results expand our understanding of the involvement of the CpxRA system in regulating virulence expression in H. ducreyi.

  14. Nerve compression and pain in human volunteers with narrow vs wide tourniquets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovar, Florian M; Jaindl, Manuela; Oberleitner, Gerhard; Endler, Georg; Breitenseher, Julia; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor; Kutscha-Lissberg, Florian

    2015-05-18

    To assess the clinical effects and the morphological grade of nerve compression. In a prospective single-center randomized, open study we assessed the clinical effects and the morphological grade of nerve compression during 20 min of either a silicon ring (group A) or pneumatic tourniquet (group B) placement variantly on the upper non-dominant limb in 14 healthy human volunteers. Before and during compression, the median and radial nerves were visualized in both groups by 3 Tesla MR imaging, using high resolutional (2.5 mm slice thickness) axial T2-weighted sequences. In group A, Visual analog pain scale was 5.4 ± 2.2 compared to results of group B, 2.9 ± 2.5, showing a significant difference (P = 0.028). FPS levels in group A were 2.6 ± 0.9 compared to levels in group B 1.6 ± 1, showing a significant difference (P = 0.039). Results related to measureable effect on median and radial nerve function were equal in both groups. No undue pressure signs on the skin, redness or nerve damage occurred in either group. There was no significant difference in the diameters of the nerves without and under compression in either group on T2 weighted images. Based on our results, no differences between narrow and wide tourniquets were identified. Silicon ring tourniquets can be regarded as safe for short time application.

  15. Nerve compression and pain in human volunteers with narrow vs wide tourniquets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovar, Florian M; Jaindl, Manuela; Oberleitner, Gerhard; Endler, Georg; Breitenseher, Julia; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor; Kutscha-Lissberg, Florian

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the clinical effects and the morphological grade of nerve compression. METHODS: In a prospective single-center randomized, open study we assessed the clinical effects and the morphological grade of nerve compression during 20 min of either a silicon ring (group A) or pneumatic tourniquet (group B) placement variantly on the upper non-dominant limb in 14 healthy human volunteers. Before and during compression, the median and radial nerves were visualized in both groups by 3 Tesla MR imaging, using high resolutional (2.5 mm slice thickness) axial T2-weighted sequences. RESULTS: In group A, Visual analog pain scale was 5.4 ± 2.2 compared to results of group B, 2.9 ± 2.5, showing a significant difference (P = 0.028). FPS levels in group A were 2.6 ± 0.9 compared to levels in group B 1.6 ± 1, showing a significant difference (P = 0.039). Results related to measureable effect on median and radial nerve function were equal in both groups. No undue pressure signs on the skin, redness or nerve damage occurred in either group. There was no significant difference in the diameters of the nerves without and under compression in either group on T2 weighted images. CONCLUSION: Based on our results, no differences between narrow and wide tourniquets were identified. Silicon ring tourniquets can be regarded as safe for short time application. PMID:25992317

  16. Human Volunteers Receiving Escherichia coli Phage T4 Orally: a Safety Test of Phage Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen healthy adult volunteers received in their drinking water a lower Escherichia coli phage T4 dose (103 PFU/ml), a higher phage dose (105 PFU/ml), and placebo. Fecal coliphage was detected in a dose-dependent way in volunteers orally exposed to phage. All volunteers receiving the higher phage dose showed fecal phage 1 day after exposure; this prevalence was only 50% in subjects receiving the lower phage dose. No fecal phage was detectable a week after a 2-day course of oral phage applic...

  17. Novel encapsulation improves recovery of probiotic strains in fecal samples of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Volker; Waugh, Sheldon; Byrd, Doratha; Simpson, Damion; Ukhanova, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Probiotic supplements can contribute to maintaining health and ameliorating various disease symptoms. Probiotics can be delivered in many forms with crucial differences in their survival during gastrointestinal (GI) passage. Previously, a novel encapsulation, Probiotic Pearls™ Acidophilus, Integrative Therapeutics, LLC, USA (Pearls), was shown to increase survival in vitro after exposure to gastric conditions. Here, we compare fecal recovery in human volunteers consuming Pearls or a conventional hard-shelled gelatin capsule. We performed a randomized double-blinded, two-armed trial, with six healthy subjects in each 12-day study arm. In fecal samples collected at baseline, twice during the intervention period, and after washout, we compared colony counts between the two encapsulation methods. The identity of the colonies was confirmed by colony morphology, strain-specific PCR, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We further performed a comprehensive 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based analysis to identify differential effects on overall microbiota composition. We detected an average log increase in bifidobacteria of 0.152 cfu/g with gelatin and 0.651 cfu/g with Pearls capsules (p > 0.05). Total lactobacilli counts increased in both groups with no difference between the groups. However, the supplemented Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM decreased to baseline levels within 7 days after end of supplementation with gelatin capsules while 3.11 log cfu/g higher counts compared to baseline (p = 0.05) remained for Pearls. Targeted qPCR largely confirmed the trends observed by viable plate counts. Protecting the probiotic strains by Pearls encapsulation results in higher recovery rates of the supplemented lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in fecal samples and increased persistence, suggesting an improved survival and viability that might increase efficacy towards achieving desired health benefits.

  18. Brain targeted transcranial administration of diazepam and shortening of sleep latency in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Pathirana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of medicated oils on scalp had been practiced for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine in diseases associated with the central nervous system. It is possible that the effectiveness of the therapy may be a result of targeted delivery of active compounds to the brain transcranially. Evidence also comes from two previous studies with positive results on brain targeted transcranial delivery of methadone base and diazepam on rat models. Possibility of transcranial drug delivery was investigated in healthy human volunteers using electroencephalography techniques by assessing the ability of transcranially administered diazepam in bringing about β activity in the electroencephalographic wave patterns and shortening of the sleep latency period. Non polar drug molecules dissolved in a non-aqueous sesame oil based vehicle is a significant feature in the transcranial dosage design. The study was under taken in two phases. In the Phase-I study scalp application of a single dose of 2 mg/3 ml of the oil was employed and in the Phase-II study repeat application of three doses 24 h apart were employed. Sleep latency changes were monitored with Multiple Sleep Latency Tests with 5 naps employing the standard electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography electrodes. Sleep onset was identified with the first epoch of any sleep stage non rapid eye movement 1, 2, 3, 4 or rapid eye movement using electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography criteria. In both phases of the study there was significant reduction in the sleep latencies. It was much more pronounced in the Phase-II study. None of the subjects however displayed beta activity in the electroencephalography. Sleep latency reduction following scalp application in both the phases are suggestive of transcranial migration of diazepam molecules to the receptor sites of the nerve tissue of the brain eliciting its pharmacological effect of sedation

  19. Impact of AQP3 inducer treatment on cultured human keratinocytes, ex vivo human skin and volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, N; Gondran, C; Menon, G; Mur, L; Oberto, G; Guerif, Y; Dal Farra, C; Domloge, N

    2011-10-01

    One of the main functions of the skin is to protect the organism against environmental threats, such as thermal stress. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) facilitates water and glycerol transport across cell membranes and therefore regulates osmotic balance in different situations of stress. This mechanism seems to be particularly important for the resistance of different organisms to cold stress. Consequently, we were interested in investigating the effect of cold and osmotic stress on AQP3 expression in normal human keratinocytes. We developed a new active ingredient to stimulate aquaporins in skin and demonstrated the partial restoration of AQP3 expression in keratinocytes transfected with AQP3 siRNA. Moreover, we examined the effect of cold stress on cell morphology and the impact of a pre-treatment with the active ingredient. Our results indicated that induction of AQP3 helped maintain a correct organization of the actin cytoskeleton, preserving cell morphology and preventing cells from rounding. Immunofluorescent staining revealed cytoplasmic localization of AQP3 and its translocation to the cell membrane following osmotic stress. Histological ex vivo studies of skin under different conditions, such as cold environment and tape-stripping, indicated that increase in AQP3 expression appears to be involved in skin protection and showed that the pattern of AQP3 expression was more enhanced in the active ingredient-treated samples. In vivo confocal microscopy by Vivascope showed a generally healthier appearance of the skin in the treated areas. These results attest to the potential value of the active ingredient in optimizing environmental stress resistance and protecting the skin from stratum corneum damage.

  20. Influence of age and previous diet of Anopheles gambiae on the infectivity of natural Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes from human volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Okech, Bernard A.; Louis C Gouagna; Kabiru, Ephantus W; Beier, John C.; Yan, Guiyun; Githure, John I

    2004-01-01

    The effect of age and dietary factors of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) on the infectivity of natural Plasmodium falciparum parasites was studied. Mosquitoes of various ages (1–3, 4–7 and 8–11 day old) and those fed blood (either single or double meals) and sugar meals were experimentally co-infected with P. falciparum gametocytes obtained from different naturally infected human volunteers. On day 7, midguts were examined for oocyst infection to determine whether mosquito age or diets...

  1. Utility of sodium hypochlorite for ultrastructure study of bacterial spore integuments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, L J; Williams, M G

    1966-12-01

    Rode, L. J. (The University of Texas, Austin), and M. Glenn Williams. Utility of sodium hypochlorite for ultrastructure study of bacterial spore integuments. J. Bacteriol. 92:1772-1778. 1966.-Spores of Bacillus megaterium are partially dissolved by sodium hypochlorite. Spore integuments become visible during the dissolution, and ultrastructural features may be detected. Three distinct integument types are described for B. megaterium QM B1551 with the use of this technique. Since a variety of microbial cells are affected by sodium hypochlorite, its use may be applicable to ultrastructure study of cells other than bacterial spores.

  2. The structure of integument and wax glands of Phenacoccus fraxinus (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae)%The structure of integument and wax glands of Phenacoccus fraxinus (Hemiptera:Coccoidea:Pseudococcidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanfeng ZHANG; Yingping XIE; Jiaoliang XUE; Xiaohong FU; Weimin LIU

    2012-01-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy,we studied the structure of the integument and wax glands of the mealybug,Phenacoccus fraxinus Tang (Hemiptera:Coccoidea:Pseudococcidae).We observed the ultrastructure of four wax pores including trilocular,quinquelocular,and multilocular pores as well as tubular ducts,recording characteristics of their structure,size and distribution.We found that that the integument of the mealybug consists of three main layers—the procuticle,epidermis and basement membrane—and four sub-layers of the procuticle—the epicuticle,exocuticle,endocuticle and formation zone.The waxsecreting gland cells were closely arranged in epidermis.All of them were complex and composed of one central cell and two or more lateral cells.These complex cells possess a large common reservoir for collection and storage.Synthesized by the glandular cells,the wax is excreted outside integument through canals.

  3. Establishing the Biodynamics Data Resource (BDR): Human Volunteer Impact Acceleration Research Data in the BDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    experienced pain , the acceleration level was either repeated for reliability or was increased by 1 to 2 Gs. Thus the volunteers stationed at NBDL...Neck Ht Axilla Ht Suprasternale Ht Substernale Ht 10th Rib Ht Waist Ht (Omph) Iliocristale Ht ASIS Ht Trochanterion Ht Gluteal Furrow Ht Tibiale

  4. Dexamethasone prolongs local analgesia after subcutaneous infiltration of bupivacaine microcapsules in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Werner, Mads U; Lacouture, Peter G;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The addition of small amounts of dexamethasone to extended-release formulations of bupivacaine in microcapsules has been found to prolong local analgesia in experimental studies, but no clinical data are available. METHODS: In a double-blinded study, 12 healthy male volunteers were ra...

  5. The effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, J; Friberg, L; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was investigated in ten healthy, alert volunteers. The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. rCBF was measured by 133-Xe inhalation and single photon emission...

  6. Surface structure, model and mechanism of an insect integument adapted to be damaged easily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillard Philippe

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several sawfly larvae of the Tenthredinidae (Hymenoptera are called easy bleeders because their whole body integument, except the head capsule, disrupts very easily at a given spot, under a slight mechanical stress at this spot. The exuding haemolymph droplet acts as a feeding deterrent towards invertebrate predators. The present study aimed to describe the cuticle surface, to consider it from a mechanistic point of view, and to discuss potential consequences of the integument surface in the predator-prey relationships. Results The integument surface of sawfly larvae was investigated by light microscopy (LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM which revealed that the cuticle of easy bleeders was densely covered by what we call "spider-like" microstructures. Such microstructures were not detected in non-easy bleeders. A model by finite elements of the cuticle layer was developed to get an insight into the potential function of the microstructures during easy bleeding. Cuticle parameters (i.e., size of the microstructures and thickness of the epi-versus procuticle were measured on integument sections and used in the model. A shear force applied on the modelled cuticle surface led to higher stress values when microstructures were present, as compared to a plan surface. Furthermore, by measuring the diameter of a water droplet deposited on sawfly larvae, the integument of several sawfly species was determined as hydrophobic (e.g., more than Teflon®, which was related to the sawfly larvae's ability to bleed easily. Conclusion Easy bleeders show spider-like microstructures on their cuticle surface. It is suggested that these microstructures may facilitate integument disruption as well as render the integument hydrophobic. This latter property would allow the exuding haemolymph to be maintained as a droplet at the integument surface.

  7. Immunohistochemical study of subepidermal connective of molluscan integument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Corbetta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sections of integument from gastropod, bivalve and cephalopod species were studied immunohistochemically to determine reactivity to antibody against the type I-like collagen from Sepia cartilage and antibodies against components of the extracellular matrix (ECM of vertebrate connective tissue: type I, III, IV, V, and VI collagens, laminin, nidogen and heparan sulphate. All samples exhibited similar reactivities to the antibodies, although differences in the intensity and localization of the immunostaining were found that were clearly correlated with between-species differences in integumental ultrastructure. These findings indicate that the composition of the integumental ECM is similar in the three classes of molluscs examined and that several types of collagen are present. However molluscan subepidermal connective tissue differs from the ECM of vertebrate dermis: molluscan integumental ECM contains collagens similar to type I, V and VI collagens but has no type III-similar collagen. Furthermore molecules similar to the type IV collagen, laminin, nidogen and heparan sulphate of vertebrates were present ubiquitously in molluscan basement membrane, confirming the statement that the structure and composition of basement membrane have remained constant throughout the evolution of all animal phyla.

  8. The human plasma-metabolome: Reference values in 800 French healthy volunteers; impact of cholesterol, gender and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabado, Séverine; Al-Salameh, Abdallah; Croixmarie, Vincent; Masson, Perrine; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Fève, Bruno; Colle, Romain; Ripoll, Laurent; Walther, Bernard; Boursier-Neyret, Claire; Werner, Erwan; Becquemont, Laurent; Chanson, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches are increasingly used to identify new disease biomarkers, yet normal values of many plasma metabolites remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to define the "normal" metabolome in healthy volunteers. We included 800 French volunteers aged between 18 and 86, equally distributed according to sex, free of any medication and considered healthy on the basis of their medical history, clinical examination and standard laboratory tests. We quantified 185 plasma metabolites, including amino acids, biogenic amines, acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and hexose, using tandem mass spectrometry with the Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ p180 kit. Principal components analysis was applied to identify the main factors responsible for metabolome variability and orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis was employed to confirm the observed patterns and identify pattern-related metabolites. We established a plasma metabolite reference dataset for 144/185 metabolites. Total blood cholesterol, gender and age were identified as the principal factors explaining metabolome variability. High total blood cholesterol levels were associated with higher plasma sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines concentrations. Compared to women, men had higher concentrations of creatinine, branched-chain amino acids and lysophosphatidylcholines, and lower concentrations of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines. Elderly healthy subjects had higher sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines plasma levels than young subjects. We established reference human metabolome values in a large and well-defined population of French healthy volunteers. This study provides an essential baseline for defining the "normal" metabolome and its main sources of variation.

  9. Analysis of the human intestinal microbiota from 92 volunteers after ingestion of identical meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J S; Touyama, M; Kibe, R; Tanaka, Y; Benno, Y; Kobayashi, T; Shimakawa, M; Maruo, T; Toda, T; Matsuda, I; Tagami, H; Matsumoto, M; Seo, G; Chonan, O; Benno, Y

    2013-06-01

    The intestinal microbiota composition of 92 volunteers living in Japan was identified following the consumption of 'identical meals' (1,879 kcal/day) for 3 days. When faecal samples were analysed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism with several primer-restriction enzyme systems and then clustered, the patterns could be divided into 2 clusters. Contribution tests and partition modelling showed that OTU211 of the 35f-MspI system and OTU237 of the 35f-AluI system were key factors in the distribution of these groups. However, significant differences among these groups in terms of body mass index and age were not observed.

  10. Hair as an indicator of the body content of polonium in humans: preliminary results from study of five male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rääf, C L; Holstein, H; Holm, E; Roos, P

    2015-03-01

    The radionuclide (210)Po is of importance from a radiation protection view and has properties that cause special problems when attempting to determine the body content in humans. Estimates have traditionally been made from either urine and/or fecal samples, which require a time-consuming radiochemical preparation before alpha spectrometric determination. In order to find a more simple and less labor intensive method hair has been used as a bioindicator and investigated in this study. The relationship between intake and excretion in hair has been estimated in five volunteers who ingested radioactive polonium ((209)Po as a bio-tracer for (210)Po) in well determined quantities. Four of the volunteers were given 5-10 Bq (209)Po in a single intake (acute intake) and one volunteer has ingested a daily intake of 58.7 mBq (209)Po for a period of 180 d. Human hair was found to reflect the daily clearance of ingested polonium peaking at 0.001-0.01% d(-1) of the ingested amount, thereafter decreasing mono-exponentially, corresponding to a biological half-time of 10-20 days. For the case of protracted intake a mono-exponential build-up was observed with a half-time of 40 ± 5 d. In addition, after cessation of intake, a short-term component (74%) with a biological half-time of 16 ± 4 d, and a long-term component (26%) with a half-time of 93 ± 53 d were observed. It is concluded that hair can be used to detect not only the amount of ingested polonium but also whether the intake was protracted or acute. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interplay between the acute inflammatory response and heart rate variability in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kox, Matthijs; Ramakers, Bart P; Pompe, Jan C; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system and the inflammatory response are intimately linked. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a widely used method to assess cardiac autonomic nervous system activity, and changes in HRV indices may correlate with inflammatory markers. Here, we investigated whether baseline HRV predicts the acute inflammatory response to endotoxin. Second, we investigated whether the magnitude of the inflammatory response correlated with HRV alterations. Forty healthy volunteers received a single intravenous bolus of 2 ng/kg endotoxin (LPS, derived from Escherichia coli O:113). Of these, 12 healthy volunteers were administered LPS again 2 weeks later. Heart rate variability was determined at baseline (just before LPS administration) and hourly thereafter until 8 h after LPS administration. Plasma cytokine levels were determined at various time points. Baseline HRV indices did not correlate with the magnitude of the LPS-induced inflammatory response. Despite large alterations in HRV after LPS administration, the extent of the inflammatory response did not correlate with the magnitude of HRV changes. In subjects who were administered LPS twice, inflammatory cytokines were markedly attenuated after the second LPS administration, whereas LPS-induced HRV alterations were similar. Heart rate variability indices do not predict the acute inflammatory response in a standardized model of systemic inflammation. Although the acute inflammatory response results in HRV changes, no correlations with inflammatory cytokines were observed. Therefore, the magnitude of endotoxemia-related HRV changes does not reflect the extent of the inflammatory response.

  12. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships of cognitive and psychomotor effects of intravenous buprenorphine infusion in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mette L; Sjøgren, Per; Upton, Richard N; Foster, David J R; Bonde, Peter; Graae, Christian; Skram, Ulrik; Stevner, Lene; Christrup, Lona L

    2008-07-01

    The main objective of the present study was to characterize the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship of the effects of buprenorphine on cognitive functioning in healthy volunteers. Twenty-three male volunteers received 0.6 mg buprenorphine as an intravenous infusion over 150 min. The cognitive and psychomotor performance was evaluated before and at various times after drug administration by a test battery consisting of trail-making test for visual information processing, finger-tapping test for psychomotor speed, and continuous reaction time for attention. Non-linear mixed effect modelling was used in the analysis of the PK/PD relationships. Buprenorphine caused significant deficits in cognitive and psychomotor functioning. The time course of cognitive and psychomotor impairment was found to have a slow distribution to the biophase from plasma with PK/PD models involving an effect compartment providing the best descriptions of the time course of the data. The values for half-life of biophase equilibration were consistent between the neuropsychological tests in the range of 66.6-84.9 min. The time to onset and duration of the cognitive and psychomotor impairment of buprenorphine was determined by a slow distribution to the biophase.

  13. Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B1 pharmacokinetics in human volunteers: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubert, C; Mata, J; Bench, G; Dashwood, R; Pereira, C; Tracewell, W; Turteltaub, K; Williams, D; Bailey, G

    2009-04-20

    Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98, 14601-14606 (2001)), where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB{sub 1}. However, neither AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted a small unblinded crossover study to establish AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters in human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla co-treatment on those parameters. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an IRB-approved dose of 14C-AFB{sub 1} (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 ml water, followed by normal eating and drinking after hr 2. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hr, and {sup 14}C-AFB{sub 1} equivalents were determined by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla, or CHL, respectively. All protocols were repeated 3 times for each of three volunteers. The study revealed rapid human AFB{sub 1} uptake (plasma ka 5.05 {+-} 1.10 hr-1, Tmax 1.0 hr) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hr) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB{sub 1} absorption and reduced Cmax and AUC's (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

  14. Effect of Tamarindus indica L. on the bioavailability of aspirin in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, A; Yakasai, I A; Aguye, I A

    1996-01-01

    The influence of Tamarindus indica L. fruit extract incorporated in a traditional meal on the bioavailability of aspirin tablets 600 mg dose was studied in 6 healthy volunteers. There was a statistically significant increase in the plasma levels of aspirin and salicylic acid, respectively, when the meal containing Tamarindus indica fruit extract was administered with the aspirin tablets than when taken under fasting state or with the meal without the fruit extract. The Cmax, AUC0-6h and t1/2 for aspirin increased from 10.04 +/- 0.1 mg/ml to 28.62 +/- 0.21 mg/ml (P Tamarindus indica L. fruit extract significantly increased the bioavailability of aspirin.

  15. Bioavailability of (-)-epicatechin upon intake of chocolate and cocoa in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, S; Osakabe, N; Yasuda, A; Natsume, M; Takizawa, T; Nakamura, T; Terao, J

    2000-11-01

    We evaluated the levels of (-)-epicatechin (EC) and its metabolites in plasma and urine after intake of chocolate or cocoa by male volunteers. EC metabolites were analyzed by HPLC and LC/MS after glucuronidase and/or sulfatase treatment. The maximum levels of total EC metabolites in plasma were reached 2 hours after either chocolate or cocoa intake. Sulfate, glucuronide, and sulfoglucuronide (mixture of sulfate and glucuronide) conjugates of nonmethylated EC were the main metabolites present in plasma rather than methylated forms. Urinary excretion of total EC metabolites within 24 hours after chocolate or cocoa intake was 29.8+/-5.3%'; and 25.3+/-8.1% of total EC intake. EC in chocolate and cocoa was partly absorbed and was found to be present as a component of various conjugates in plasma, and these were rapidly excreted in urine.

  16. Effect of oral spiramycin on the faecal and oral bacteria in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andremont, A; Trancrède, C; Desnottes, J F

    1991-03-01

    Six healthy adult volunteers were treated with 1 g of oral spiramycin twice daily for five days, and their oral and faecal microbial flora were studied. Mean saliva and serum concentrations of the antibiotic never exceeded 2.1 +/- 1.1 mg/l. The number of volunteers whose oral cavity was colonized by Enterobacteriaceae, group D streptococci, staphylococci, and fungi remained unchanged following treatment. The mean count of anaerobic faecal bacteria was 10.3 +/- 0.6 log10 cfu/g initially. This did not change significantly during the treatment, nor did the composition of the predominant anaerobic flora. Mean counts of group D streptococci were 1000 times lower than those of anaerobes before treatment, and also remained unchanged during therapy. No overgrowth of fungi, staphylococci, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was observed. No significant modifications occurred in the mean total count of faecal Enterobacteriaceae (7.9 +/- 0.4 versus 7.4 +/- 1.0 log10 cfu/g of faeces before and during treatment respectively). However, faecal concentrations of highly spiramycin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MIC greater than or equal to 512 mg/l) increased from 4.8 +/- 1.2 to 7.0 +/- 1.8 log10 cfu/g during treatment. The MIC50 value of spiramycin for anaerobes, Enterobacteriaceae, and group D streptococci were 0.125, 64, and 0.5 mg/l respectively before treatment, and these increased to 1024, 512 and 1024 mg/l respectively during treatment. This was attributed to the rise in the faecal concentrations of spiramycin, which reached 689 +/- 48 micrograms/g of faeces on the fifth day of treatment. These concentrations decreased rapidly on cessation of treatment.

  17. Volunteer feedback and perceptions after participation in a phase I, first-in-human Ebola vaccine trial: An anonymous survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayer, Julie-Anne; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Huttner, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The continued participation of volunteers in clinical trials is crucial to advances in healthcare. Few data are available regarding the satisfaction and impressions of healthy volunteers after participation in phase I trials, many of which lead to unexpected adverse events. We report feedback from over 100 adult volunteers who took part in a first-in-human trial conducted in a high-income country testing an experimental Ebola vaccine causing significant reactogenicity, as well as unexpected arthritis in one fifth of participants. The anonymous, internet-based satisfaction survey was sent by email to all participants upon their completion of this one-year trial; it asked 24 questions concerning volunteers’ motivations, impressions of the trial experience, and overall satisfaction. Answers were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of the 115 trial participants, 103 (90%) filled out the survey. Fifty-five respondents (53%) were male. Thirty-five respondents (34%) were healthcare workers, many of whom would deploy to Ebola-affected countries. All respondents cited scientific advancement as their chief motivation for participation, while 100/103 (97%) and 61/103 (59%) reported additional “humanitarian reasons” and potential protection from Ebolavirus, respectively. Although investigators had documented adverse events in 97% of trial participants, only 74 of 103 respondents (72%) recalled experiencing an adverse event. All reported an overall positive experience, and 93/103 (90%) a willingness to participate in future trials. Given the high level of satisfaction, no significant associations could be detected between trial experiences and satisfaction, even among respondents reporting adverse events lasting weeks or months. Despite considerable reactogenicity and unexpected vaccine-related arthritis, all survey respondents reported overall satisfaction. While this trial’s context was unique, the positive feedback is likely due at least in part to the intense

  18. The effect of topical anal captopril on resting anal pressure in healthy volunteers: the first human pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaikin, M; Bashankaev, B; Sands, D; Weiss, E G; Zbar, A; Wexner, S D

    2014-01-01

    Previous laboratory studies have shown that angiotensin II is produced locally in the rat internal anal sphincter causing potent contraction. The aim of this first human study was to evaluate the safety and manometric effects of topical application of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on the resting anal pressure in healthy adult volunteers. Ten volunteers, mean age 32.5 years (range, 19-48 years), underwent anorectal manometric evaluation of the mean anal resting pressure (MRAP) and the length of the high-pressure zone (HPZ) before 20 and 60 min after topical application of captopril (0.28 %) cream. Cardiovascular variables (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and pulse) were measured before and for up to 1 h after cream application. Side effects were recorded. Adverse events and patient comfort after the cream application were evaluated within a 24-h period by completing a questionnaire. There was no significant change overall in MRAP following captopril administration, although in half the patients, there were reductions in MRAP after treatment. Half the patients had a reduction in the mean resting HPZ length; however, there was no overall difference between pre- and post-treatment values. There was no effect on basic cardiovascular parameters and no correlation between manometric and cardiovascular variables. Topical application of captopril cream may result in a reduction in MRAP in volunteers without anorectal disease. Its use is associated with minimal side effects. It may be a new potential therapeutic option in the treatment of anal fissure. Further studies are required to determine the optimal concentration, dose and frequency of application.

  19. The structure of integument and wax glands of Phenacoccus fraxinus (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Xie, Yingping; Xue, Jiaoliang; Fu, Xiaohong; Liu, Weimin

    2012-06-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy, we studied the structure of the integument and wax glands of the mealybug, Phenacoccus fraxinus Tang (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae). We observed the ultrastructure of four wax pores including trilocular, quinquelocular, and multilocular pores as well as tubular ducts, recording characteristics of their structure, size and distribution. We found that that the integument of the mealybug consists of three main layers-the procuticle, epidermis and basement membrane-and four sub-layers of the procuticle-the epicuticle, exocuticle, endocuticle and formation zone. The wax-secreting gland cells were closely arranged in epidermis. All of them were complex and composed of one central cell and two or more lateral cells. These complex cells possess a large common reservoir for collection and storage. Synthesized by the glandular cells, the wax is excreted outside integument through canals.

  20. Case Report: Successful Sporozoite Challenge Model in Human Volunteers with Plasmodium vivax Strain Derived from Human Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    CBC, reticulocyte count, G-6-PD determination, Duffy phenotype, ABO and Rh group typing, hemoglobin electrophoresis and erythrocyte sedimentation...was considered as an exclusion criterion. Tests for hemoglobin , white blood cell count, platelet count, and total bilirubin were performed again on...malaria-naïve volunteers were randomly allocated to Groups A–C and exposed to 3 ± 1, 6 ± 1, and 9 ± 1 bites of Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes infected

  1. A DltA mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi Is partially attenuated in its ability to cause pustules in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Diane; Leduc, Isabelle; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Elkins, Christopher; Spinola, Stanley M

    2006-02-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi produces two outer membrane proteins, called DltA (H. ducreyi lectin A) and DsrA (H. ducreyi serum resistance A), that contribute to the ability of the organism to evade complement-mediated serum killing. In contrast to their isogenic parent strain, 35000HP, the DsrA mutant FX517 exhibits 0% survival in 50% normal human serum and the DltA mutant FX533 exhibits 23% survival. Compared to 35000HP, FX517 does not cause pustule formation in human volunteers. To test whether DltA was required for virulence in humans, seven volunteers were experimentally infected with 35000HP and FX533. Four subjects were inoculated with fixed doses of 35000HP (101 CFU or 130 CFU) at three sites on one arm and escalating doses of FX533 (range, 46 CFU to 915 CFU) at three sites on the other arm. Pustules only developed at mutant-injected sites at doses nearly twofold higher than that of the parent, suggesting that FX533 was partially attenuated. Three subjects were inoculated with similar doses of the parent (67 CFU) and mutant (104 CFU) at three sites. Pustules formed at five of nine parent sites and one of nine mutant sites. Overall, the papule and pustule formation rates for 35000HP and FX533 were similar for the trial. However, for the five subjects who received similar doses of the parent and mutant, pustules developed at 7 of 15 sites (46.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16.9% to 76.5%) inoculated with the parent and at 1 of 15 (6.7%; 95% CI, 0.1% to 18.4%) sites inoculated with the mutant (P = 0.043). We concluded that the DltA mutant was attenuated in its ability to cause disease at doses similar to that of the parent.

  2. Bioequivalence study of two commercial amoxicillin suspension formulations in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gilson C N; Baglie, Sinvaldo; Ruenis, Ana P B; Franco, Luiz M; Cogo, Karina; Oshima-Franco, Yoko; Silva, Paulo; Groppo, Francisco C; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2014-05-01

    To compare the pharmacokinetic profiles and to evaluate the bioequivalence of two commercial amoxicillin suspension formulations (500 mg/5 mL AMOXIL®, reference formulation and AMOXI-PED®, test formulation) in healthy Brazilian volunteers. Under fasting condition, 25 volunteers (13 males and 12 females) were included in this randomized, open-label, two-period crossover (1-week washout interval) bioequivalence study. Blood samples were collected at pre-dose (0 hour) and 0.5, 1, 1.33, 1.66, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after drug ingestion. Pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax, tmax, t1/2, AUC0-tlast, and AUC0-∞) were calculated from plasma concentrations for both formulations in each subject. Arithmetic mean values of the pharmacokinetic parameters were: Cmax = 12.004 (± 2.824) μg×mL-1; tmax = 1.118 (± 0.396) h; t1/2 = 1.226 (± 0.179) h; AUC0-tlast = 29.297 (± 6.007) μg×h×mL-1; and AUC0-∞ = 29.299 (± 6.007) μg×h×mL-1 for reference formulation and Cmax = 11.456 (± 2.825) μg×mL-1; tmax = 1.331 (± 0.509) h; t1/2 = 1.141 (± 0.133) h; AUC0-tlast = 28.672 (± 5.778) μg×h×mL-1; and AUC0-∞ = 28.693 (± 5.796) μg×h×mL-1 for test formulation. The confidence intervals (90% CI) for reference and test formulations were, respectively, 90.74 - 100.46% for Cmax and 93.62 - 103.61% for AUC0-t. Based on the results, both formulations of amoxicillin evaluated in this study were considered bioequivalent according to FDA and ANVISA/Brazil criteria.

  3. Hydroxytyrosol supplementation increases vitamin C levels in vivo. A human volunteer trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lopez-Huertas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxytyrosol (HT is a main phenolic component of olive oil. In this study, we investigated the safety and effects produced by HT purified (99.5% from olive mill waste. HT was administered at a daily dosage of 45 mg for 8 weeks to volunteers with mild hyperlipidemia (n=14. We measured markers of cardiovascular disease risk, enzyme markers of several clinical conditions, hematology, antioxidant parameters, vitamins and minerals at baseline (T0, 4 weeks (T4 and 8 weeks (T8. The values obtained at T4 and T8 were compared with baseline. We found that the HT dose administered was safe and mostly did not influence markers of cardiovascular disease, blood lipids, inflammatory markers, liver or kidney functions and the electrolyte balance. Serum iron levels remained constant but a significant (P<0.05 decrease in ferritin at T4 and T8 was found. Serum folate and red blood cell folate levels were also reduced at T4 and T8. Finally, vitamin C increased by two-fold at T4 and T8 compared with levels at baseline. These results indicate a physiologically relevant antioxidant function for HT through increasing endogenous vitamin C levels.

  4. Effects of melatonin on prepulse inhibition, habituation and sensitization of the human startle reflex in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtinen, Emilia K; Ucar, Ebru; Glenthøj, Birte Y

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex (PPI) is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating, which is demonstrated to be impaired in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, a disruption of the circadian rhythm together with blunted melatonin secretion is regularly found in patients...... with schizophrenia and it is theorized that these may contribute to their attentional deficits. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acute melatonin on healthy human sensorimotor gating. Twenty-one healthy male volunteers were administered melatonin or placebo after which their levels of PPI were...... assessed. Melatonin significantly reduced startle magnitude and ratings of alertness, but did not influence PPI, nor sensitization and habituation. However, when taking baseline scores in consideration, melatonin significantly increased PPI in low scoring individuals while significantly decreasing...

  5. Effects of dynamic exercise on plasma arachidonic acid epoxides and diols in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Rose M; Newman, John W; Pedersen, Theresa L; Ramos, Marisa I; Stebbins, Charles L

    2011-12-01

    Metabolites of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathway may contribute to vasodilation of the vasculature. However, it is not known whether exercise affects their circulating concentrations. The authors determined effects of exercise intensity and duration on plasma concentrations of epoxy and dihydroxy metabolites of arachidonic acid. Their goal was to delineate the threshold workload, optimal workload, and duration required to produce increases in plasma concentrations of these vasoactive substances. Healthy volunteers (N = 14) performed maximal exercise testing on a bicycle ergometer during Visit 1. On separate days, subjects cycled for 20 min at 30%, 60%, and 80% of their maximal exercise intensity. The last day consisted of 40 min of exercise at 60% of maximal exercise intensity. Venous blood was obtained before, during, and after exercise for analysis. Compared with rest, increases were observed during the 80% workload at 20 min postexercise -14,15-DHET (0.77 ± 0.21 vs. 0.93 ± 0.27 nM) - and at 2 min postexercise: 11,12-DHET (0.64 ± 0.22 vs. 0.71 ± 0.24 nM; p < .05). Also compared with rest, 40-min values during the 60% workload were 14,15-DHET 0.79 ± 0.22 vs. 0.91 ± 0.31 nM and at 2 min post 14,15 EET 0.12 ± 0.06 vs. 0.21 ± 0.16 nM (p < .05). Results suggest the CYP metabolites (i.e., DHETs) are released during short-term high-intensity and long-term moderate-intensity exercise.

  6. Selective COX-2 inhibition by a Pterocarpus marsupium extract characterized by pterostilbene, and its activity in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougee, Sander; Faber, Joyce; Sanders, Annemarie; de Jong, Romy B; van den Berg, Wim B; Garssen, Johan; Hoijer, Maarten A; Smit, H Friso

    2005-05-01

    In this study, an extract of Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb. containing pterostilbene has been evaluated for its PGE2-inhibitory activity in LPS-stimulated PBMC. In addition, the COX-1/2 selective inhibitory activity of P. marsupium (PM) extract was investigated. Biological activity, as well as safety of PM extract was evaluated in healthy human volunteers. PM extract, pterostilbene and resveratrol inhibited PGE2 production from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with IC50 values of 3.2 +/- 1.3 microg/mL, 1.0 +/- 0.6 microM and 3.2 +/- 1.4 microM, respectively. When pterostilbene content of PM extract is calculated, PGE2 production inhibition of PM extract is comparable to PGE2 production inhibition of purified pterostilbene. Furthermore, in a COX-1 whole blood assay (WBA) PM extract was not effective while in a COX-2 WBA, PM extract decreased PGE2 production indicating COX-2 specific inhibition. In healthy human volunteers, the oral use of 450 mg PM extract did not decrease PGE2 production ex vivo in a WBA. Pterostilbene levels in serum were increased, but were 5-fold lower than the observed IC50 for PGE2 inhibition in LPS-stimulated PBMC. No changes from base-line of the safety parameters were observed and no extract-related adverse events occurred during the study. In conclusion, this is the first study to describe the selective COX-2 inhibitory activity of a Pterocarpus marsupium extract. Moreover, the PGE2 inhibitory activity of PM extract was related to its pterostilbene content. In humans, 450 mg PM extract resulted in elevated pterostilbene levels in serum, which were below the active concentration observed in vitro. In addition, short-term supplementation of 450 mg PM extract is considered to be a safe dose based on the long history of use, the absence of abnormal blood cell counts and blood chemistry values and the absence of extract-related adverse events. This strongly argues for a dose-finding study of PM extract in humans to

  7. Modeling spatial trajectories in dynamics testing using basis splines: application to tracking human volunteers in low-speed frontal impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Marina A; Reed, Matthew P; Arbogast, Kristy B; Seacrist, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Designing motor vehicle safety systems requires knowledge of whole body kinematics during dynamic loading for occupants of varying size and age, often obtained from sled tests with postmortem human subjects and human volunteers. Recently, we reported pediatric and adult responses in low-speed (<4 g) automotive-like impacts, noting reductions in maximum excursion with increasing age. Since the time-based trajectory shape is also relevant for restraint design, this study quantified the time-series trajectories using basis splines and developed a statistical model for predicting trajectories as a function of body dimension or age. Previously collected trajectories of the head, spine, and pelvis were modeled using cubic basis splines with eight control points. A principal component analysis was conducted on the control points and related to erect seated height using a linear regression model. The resulting statistical model quantified how trajectories became shorter and flatter with increasing body size, corresponding to the validation data-set. Trajectories were then predicted for erect seated heights corresponding to pediatric and adult anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs), thus generating performance criteria for the ATDs based on human response. This statistical model can be used to predict trajectories for a subject of specified anthropometry and utilized in subject-specific computational models of occupant response.

  8. Correlates of Cytochrome P450 1A1 Expression in Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Integument Biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, J.Y.; Wells, R.; Anguilar, A.; Borrell, A.; Tornero, V.; Reijnders, P.J.H.; Moore, M.

    2007-01-01

    Integument biopsy is a nondestructive method for sampling free-ranging cetaceans, which allows for the determination of both contaminant concentrations and biomarker responses. Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression is induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and planar halogenated aromatic

  9. The distally lobed inner integument of Hernandia peltata Meissn. in DC. (Hernandiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heel, van W.A.

    1971-01-01

    A peculiar structural detail, occurring during the development of ovules, seems to have passed almost unnoticed till the present day. It concerns the distal rim of either the outer or the inner integument, which appears to be slightly lobed in the ovules of several unrelated plants. In a recent note

  10. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN Gene Mediates Asymmetric Growth of the Outer Integument of Ovules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiser, J. C.; Robinson-Beers, K.; Gasser, C. S.

    1995-03-01

    Arabidopsis superman (sup, also referred to as floral mutant10) mutants have previously been shown to have flowers with supernumerary stamens and reduced carpels as a result of ectopic expression of the floral homeotic gene APETALA3 (AP3). Here, we report that sup mutations also cause specific alterations in ovule development. Growth of the outer integument of wild-type ovules occurs almost exclusively on the abaxial side of the ovule, resulting in a bilaterally symmetrical hoodlike structure. In contrast, the outer integument of sup mutant ovules grows equally on all sides of the ovule, resulting in a nearly radially symmetrical tubular shape. Thus, one role of SUP is to suppress growth of the outer integument on the adaxial side of the ovule. Genetic analyses showed that the effects of sup mutations on ovule development are independent of the presence or absence of AP3 activity. Thus, SUP acts through different mechanisms in its early role in ensuring proper determination of carpel identity and in its later role in asymmetric suppression of outer integument growth.

  11. Correlates of Cytochrome P450 1A1 Expression in Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Integument Biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, J.Y.; Wells, R.; Anguilar, A.; Borrell, A.; Tornero, V.; Reijnders, P.J.H.; Moore, M.

    2007-01-01

    Integument biopsy is a nondestructive method for sampling free-ranging cetaceans, which allows for the determination of both contaminant concentrations and biomarker responses. Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression is induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and planar halogenated aromatic hydr

  12. Nasal IgA Provides Protection against Human Influenza Challenge in Volunteers with Low Serum Influenza Antibody Titre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Victoria M W; Francis, James N; Anderson, Katie J; Georges, Bertrand; Cope, Alethea V; Tregoning, John S

    2017-01-01

    In spite of there being a number of vaccines, influenza remains a significant global cause of morbidity and mortality. Understanding more about natural and vaccine induced immune protection against influenza infection would help to develop better vaccines. Virus specific IgG is a known correlate of protection, but other factors may help to reduce viral load or disease severity, for example IgA. In the current study we measured influenza specific responses in a controlled human infection model using influenza A/California/2009 (H1N1) as the challenge agent. Volunteers were pre-selected with low haemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titres in order to ensure a higher proportion of infection; this allowed us to explore the role of other immune correlates. In spite of HAI being uniformly low, there were variable levels of H1N1 specific IgG and IgA prior to infection. There was also a range of disease severity in volunteers allowing us to compare whether differences in systemic and local H1N1 specific IgG and IgA prior to infection affected disease outcome. H1N1 specific IgG level before challenge did not correlate with protection, probably due to the pre-screening for individuals with low HAI. However, the length of time infectious virus was recovered from the nose was reduced in patients with higher pre-existing H1N1 influenza specific nasal IgA or serum IgA. Therefore, IgA contributes to protection against influenza and should be targeted in vaccines.

  13. Volunteers - how to motivate and lead them

    OpenAIRE

    Sajo, Elise

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study the leadership of volunteers and its specific characteristics. The motivation of volunteers is studied and also how the leadership of volunteers is implemented in some volunteer organisations operating in Finland. The thesis also presents basic theories in human motivation and leadership styles to help identify suitable methods for the leadership of volunteers. The thesis process was conducted during the spring of 2014 and consisted of two parts. The fir...

  14. The dose-response relation in human volunteers for gastro-intestinal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis PFM; Heijden OG van der; Giessen JWB van der; Havelaar AH; MGB

    1996-01-01

    Published data on infection of human hosts with various protozoa, bacteria, and viruses causing gastro-enteritis are used to establish a quantitative relationship between ingested dose and the risk of infection. For all data sets analysed, this relationship is determined by fitting either an exponen

  15. The dose-response relation in human volunteers for gastro-intestinal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis PFM; van der Heijden OG; van der Giessen JWB; Havelaar AH; MGB

    1996-01-01

    Gepubliceerde gegevens omtrent infectie van humane proefpersonen met pathogene micro-organismen die gastro-enteritis veroorzaken (protozoa, bacterien en virussen), worden gebruikt om een kwantitatieve relatie vast te stellen tussen de ingenomen dosis en het risico op infectie. Voor alle bestudeerde

  16. Humanlike Articulate Robotic Headform to Replace Human Volunteers in Respirator Fit Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    reservoir or scrubbed CO2 in a rebreather.[8] The 1848 US patent[9] for Haslett’s Lung Protector describes the first air purifying respirator...N95 filtering facepiece particulate respirator and a surgical mask during human breathing: two pathways for particle penetration. J. Occup. Environ...Assoc. J, 1983. 44: 720–726. 39. Tuomi, T., Face seal leakage of half-masks and surgical masks. Am. Ind. Hyg. Assoc. J., 1985. 46(6): 308–312. 40

  17. The Influence of Enterococcus faecalis on the Morphology and the Antibody-Binding Capacity of the Intestinal Bacteria of Ten Healthy Human Volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G.; Deddens, B.; Wilkinson, M.; Waaij, D. van der

    1995-01-01

    The influence of Enterococcus faecalis on the morphology of the bacterial cells which make up the gut microflora and on the levels of circulating IgG bound to the gut microflora was assessed. After 29 days of pretreatment monitoring, ten healthy human volunteers ingested 10^7 viable cells of E. faec

  18. A prospective, double-blind, split-subject study on local skin reactions after administration of human menopausal gonadotrophin preparations to healthy female volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odink, J.; Zuiderwijk, P.B.M.; Schoen, E.D.; Gan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate local reactions after the intracutaneous (i.c.) administration of two human menopausal gonadotrophin preparations. For this purpose, 20 healthy female volunteers received six i.c. injections simultaneously, viz. three different batches of both Humegon (Organon,

  19. Systemic and mucosal immune responses to sublingual or intramuscular human papilloma virus antigens in healthy female volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Huo

    Full Text Available The sublingual route has been proposed as a needle-free option to induce systemic and mucosal immune protection against viral infections. In a translational study of systemic and mucosal humoral immune responses to sublingual or systemically administered viral antigens, eighteen healthy female volunteers aged 19-31 years received three immunizations with a quadravalent Human Papilloma Virus vaccine at 0, 4 and 16 weeks as sublingual drops (SL, n = 12 or intramuscular injection (IM, n = 6. IM antigen delivery induced or boosted HPV-specific serum IgG and pseudovirus-neutralizing antibodies, HPV-specific cervical and vaginal IgG, and elicited circulating IgG and IgA antibody secreting cells. SL antigens induced ~38-fold lower serum and ~2-fold lower cervical/vaginal IgG than IM delivery, and induced or boosted serum virus neutralizing antibody in only 3/12 subjects. Neither route reproducibly induced HPV-specific mucosal IgA. Alternative delivery systems and adjuvants will be required to enhance and evaluate immune responses following sublingual immunization in humans.ClinicalTrials.govNCT00949572.

  20. CROSSREACTIVE ANTIBODIES AND MEMORY T CELLS TO HUMAN AND ZOONOTIC INFLUENZA A VIRUSES IN VOLUNTEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Losev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists a real hazard of transferring zoonotic influenza A viruses, either swine, or avian, into human population. In such case, severity of such pandemics depends on the pathogen-specific immunity in the population. Virtual absence of such immunity in humans was declared in the literature. In this work, we assessed systemic, local, and T-cell immunity to potentially pandemic H3N2sw, H5N1, H5N2, H7N3, H7N9 and H2N2 influenza A viruses in a group of healthy adults of different age. Our results indicate that these subjects develop the following immune reactions: (i local (i.e., nasal IgA and cellular (CD4+ and CD8v memory T cells heterosubtypic immunity, in absence of detectable virus-specific serum antibodies to avian influenza A viruses; (ii Local immune responses (as nasal IgA to human A (H2N2 virus which circulated in 1957-1968 were detected both in subjects who could be primed at that time, but also in subjects born after 1968; (iii full-scale systemic and local immunity to potentially pandemic А (H3N2sw swine virus was found in the group. Conclusion. In order of proper epidemiological forecasts and planning appropriate preventive measures for potentially pandemic Influenza A viruses, a regular monitoring of collective immunity should be performed using different adaptive markers. In this respect, any conclusion based on molecular analysis only could lead to considerable mistakes, and should be accomplished by the mentioned immunological studies.

  1. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of opioids in healthy human volunteers. A minireview

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Pain is characterized by its multi-dimensional nature, explaining in part why the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships are not straightforward for analgesics. The first part of this MiniReview gives an overview of PK, PD and PK/PD models, as well as of population approach used in analgesic studies. The second part updates the state-of-the-art in the PK/PD relationship of opioids, focusing on data obtained on experimental human pain models, a useful tool to characterize the PD...

  2. Dexamethasone prolongs local analgesia after subcutaneous infiltration of bupivacaine microcapsules in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Werner, Mads U; Lacouture, Peter G

    2002-01-01

    randomized to receive simultaneous subcutaneous injections of bupivacaine microcapsules with dexamethasone and bupivacaine microcapsules without dexamethasone in each calf. Local analgesia was assessed with a validated human pain model; main parameters evaluated were thermal, mechanical, and pain detection...... thresholds and suprathreshold responses to heat and mechanical stimulation. Measurements were performed every 2 h for the first 8 h and daily for the week after injection. Primary endpoints were evaluation of maximal analgesic effect, time of onset, and duration of analgesia. Summary measures (area under...... curve [AUC]) were considered best estimate of analgesia. Safety evaluations were performed daily for the first week and at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 6 months after injection. RESULTS: The addition of dexamethasone significantly prolonged local analgesia of bupivacaine microcapsules without influence...

  3. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of opioids in healthy human volunteers. a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing Lorenzini, Kuntheavy; Daali, Youssef; Dayer, Pierre; Desmeules, Jules

    2012-03-01

    Pain is characterized by its multi-dimensional nature, explaining in part why the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships are not straightforward for analgesics. The first part of this MiniReview gives an overview of PK, PD and PK/PD models, as well as of population approach used in analgesic studies. The second part updates the state-of-the-art in the PK/PD relationship of opioids, focusing on data obtained on experimental human pain models, a useful tool to characterize the PD of analgesics. For the so-called weak opioids such as codeine, experimental human studies showed that analgesia relies mainly upon biotransformation into morphine. However, the time-course of plasma concentrations of morphine did not always reflect the time-course of effects, the major site of action being the central nervous system. For tramadol, a correlation has been observed between the analgesic response and the PK of the (+)R-O-demethyl-tramadol metabolite. For 'stronger' opioids such as oxycodone, studies assessing the PK/PD of oxycodone suggested that active metabolite oxymorphone also strongly contributes to the analgesia and that analgesia may also be partially related through an action to peripherally located κ-opioid receptors. Different models have been proposed to describe the time-course of buprenorphine. An effect-compartment model was adopted to describe the PK/PD of morphine and its active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G). A longer blood-effect site equilibration half-life t(1/2) k(e0) was observed for M6G, suggesting a longer onset of action. The studies assessing the PK/PD of fentanyl and its derivatives showed a short t(1/2) k(e0) for analgesia, between 0.2 and 9 min., reflecting a short onset of effect. In conclusion, depending on the speed of transfer between the plasma and the effect site as well as the participation of active metabolites, the time-course of the analgesic effects can be close to the plasma concentrations (alfentanil and

  4. A carnosine intervention study in overweight human volunteers: bioavailability and reactive carbonyl species sequestering effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzoni, Luca; de Courten, Barbora; Garzon, Davide; Altomare, Alessandra; Marinello, Cristina; Jakubova, Michaela; Vallova, Silvia; Krumpolec, Patrik; Carini, Marina; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    Carnosine is a natural dipeptide able to react with reactive carbonyl species, which have been recently associated with the onset and progression of several human diseases. Herein, we report an intervention study in overweight individuals. Carnosine (2 g/day) was orally administered for twelve weeks in order to evaluate its bioavailability and metabolic fate. Two carnosine adducts were detected in the urine samples of all subjects. Such adducts are generated from a reaction with acrolein, which is one of the most toxic and reactive compounds among reactive carbonyl species. However, neither carnosine nor adducts have been detected in plasma. Urinary excretion of adducts and carnosine showed a positive correlation although a high variability of individual response to carnosine supplementation was observed. Interestingly, treated subjects showed a significant decrease in the percentage of excreted adducts in reduced form, accompanied by a significant increase of the urinary excretion of both carnosine and carnosine-acrolein adducts. Altogether, data suggest that acrolein is entrapped in vivo by carnosine although the response to its supplementation is possibly influenced by individual diversities in terms of carnosine dietary intake, metabolism and basal production of reactive carbonyl species.

  5. Neck posture and muscle activity are different when upside down: a human volunteer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Robyn S; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Street, John; Cripton, Peter A; Siegmund, Gunter P

    2013-11-15

    Rollover crashes are dynamic and complex events in which head impacts with the roof can cause catastrophic neck injuries. Ex vivo and computational models are valuable in understanding, and ultimately preventing, these injuries. Although neck posture and muscle activity influence the resulting injury, there is currently no in vivo data describing these parameters immediately prior to a head-first impact. The specific objectives of this study were to determine the in vivo neck vertebral alignment and muscle activation levels when upside down, a condition that occurs during a rollover. Eleven human subjects (6F, 5M) were tested while seated upright and inverted in a custom-built apparatus. Vertebral alignment was measured using fluoroscopy and muscle activity was recorded using surface and indwelling electrodes in eight superficial and deep neck muscles. In vivo vertebral alignment and muscle activation levels differed between the upright and inverted conditions. When inverted and relaxed, the neck was more lordotic, C1 was aligned posterior to C7, the Frankfort plane was extended, and the activity of six muscles increased compared to upright and relaxed. When inverted subjects were asked to look forward to eliminate head extension, flexor muscle activity increased, C7 was more flexed, and C1 was aligned anterior to C7 versus upright and relaxed. Combined with the large inter-subject variability observed, these findings indicate that cadaveric or computational models designed to study injuries and prevention devices while inverted need to consider a variety of postures and muscle conditions to be relevant to the in vivo situation.

  6. Orally given gastroprotective capsaicin does not modify aspirin-induced platelet aggregation in healthy male volunteers (human phase I examination).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, B; Papp, J; Mozsik, Gy; Szolcsanyi, J; Keszthelyi, Zs; Juricskay, I; Toth, K; Habon, Tamas

    2014-12-01

    Capsaicin is a well-known component of red pepper. Recent studies have shown that capsaicin could prevent gastric ulcer provoked by various NSAID-s like acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Primary objective of this human clinical phase I trial was to investigate whether two different doses of capsaicin co-administered with ASA could alter the inhibitory effect of ASA on platelet aggregation. 15 healthy male subjects were involved in the study and treated orally with 400 μg capsaicin, 800 μg capsaicin, 500 mg ASA, 400 μg capsaicin+500 mg ASA and 800 μg capsaicin+500 mg ASA. Blood was drawn before and 1, 2, 6 and 24 hours after the drug administration. After that epinephrine induced platelet aggregation was measured by optical aggregometry. Between treatments, volunteers had a 6-day wash-out period. Our results showed that capsaicin had no effect on platelet aggregation, while as expected, ASA monotherapy resulted in a significant and clinically effective platelet aggregation inhibition (p ≤ 0.001). The combined ASA-capsaicin therapies reached equivalent effectiveness in platelet aggregation inhibition as ASA monotherapy. Our investigation proved that capsaicin did not influence the inhibitory effect of ASA on platelet aggregation, thus the capsaicin-ASA treatment would combine the antiplatelet effect of ASA with the possible gastroprotection of capsaicin.

  7. A combined stress hormone infusion decreases in vivo protein synthesis in human T lymphocytes in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, A; Essén, P; McNurlan, M A; Ringdén, O; Garlick, P J; Wernerman, J

    2001-11-01

    In vivo protein synthesis decreases in mononuclear cells following a combined stress hormone infusion given to healthy volunteers as a human trauma model. Here, the purpose was to further investigate this finding and to measure in vivo protein synthesis in isolated T lymphocytes. Furthermore, the effects of stress hormones on the lymphocyte subpopulations and mononuclear cells, characterized by flow cytometry and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced and unstimulated proliferative responses in vitro, were elucidated. Healthy volunteers (n = 16) were randomized into 2 groups to receive either a stress hormone or a saline infusion for 6 hours. In vivo protein synthesis was studied before and after the treatment by measuring the incorporation of stable isotopically-labeled phenylalanine into lymphocyte and mononuclear cell proteins. Protein synthesis decreased after stress hormone infusion in both cell populations: in T lymphocytes from 13.0% +/- 0.7%/d (mean +/- SD) to 8.6% +/- 2.1%/d (P <.01) and in mononuclear cells from 13.3% +/- 1.2%/d to 6.3 +/- 2.0%/d (P <.001). No change in proliferative responsiveness in vitro was observed. The stress hormone infusion produced a decrease in the percentage of T helper CD3/CD4 from 41% to 18% (P <.001), T cytotoxic CD3/CD8 from 27% to 15% (P <.001), as well as total T CD3 cells from 69% to 35% (P <.001). There was an increase in the percentage of natural killer (NK) cells CD16/CD56 from 17% to 55% (P <.001). Determination of phenotypes expressed on activated T lymphocytes showed that CD3/HLA-DR was unchanged and CD3/CD25 decreased from 14% to 7% (P <.01) in the stress hormone group. The study showed that the decrease of in vivo protein synthesis was 34% in T lymphocytes as compared with 53% in mononuclear cells, when determined immediately after a 6-hour stress hormone infusion. This change was associated with a pronounced decrease in all lymphocyte subpopulations, except for the NK cells, which increased substantially.

  8. {sup 18}F-Alfatide II PET/CT in healthy human volunteers and patients with brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chunjing; Mi, Baoming; Wan, Weixing [Affiliated Hospital of Jiangnan University (Wuxi No. 4 People' s Hospital), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi (China); Pan, Donghui; Xu, Yuping; Yang, Min [Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi (China); Lang, Lixin; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We report the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of an integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} specific PET tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-E[PEG{sub 4}-c(RGDfk)]{sub 2} (denoted as {sup 18}F-Alfatide II). We also assessed the value of {sup 18}F-Alfatide II in patients with brain metastases. A series of torso (from the skull to the thigh) static images were acquired in five healthy volunteers (3 M, 2 F) at 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after injection of {sup 18}F-Alfatide II (257 ± 48 MBq). Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn manually, and the time-activity curves (TACs) were obtained for major organs. Nine patients with brain metastases were examined by static PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG (5.55 MBq/kg) and {sup 18}F-Alfatide II. Injection of {sup 18}F-Alfatide II was well tolerated in all healthy volunteers, with no serious tracer-related adverse events found. {sup 18}F-Alfatide II showed rapid clearance from the blood pool and kidneys. The total effective dose equivalent (EDE) and effective dose (ED) were 0.0277 ± 0.003 mSv/MBq and 0.0198 ± 0.002 mSv/MBq, respectively. The organs with the highest absorbed dose were the kidneys and the spleen. Nine patients with 20 brain metastatic lesions identified by MRI and/or CT were enrolled in this study. All 20 brain lesions were visualized by {sup 18}F-Alfatide II PET, while only ten lesions were visualized by {sup 18}F-FDG, and 13 by CT. F-Alfatide II is a safe PET tracer with a favorable dosimetry profile. The observed ED suggests that {sup 18}F-Alfatide II is feasible for human studies. {sup 18}F-Alfatide II has potential value in finding brain metastases of different cancers as a biomarker of angiogenesis. (orig.)

  9. Ethosomes for skin delivery of ammonium glycyrrhizinate: in vitro percutaneous permeation through human skin and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity on human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Donatella; Lucania, Giuseppe; Mardente, Domenico; Alhaique, Franco; Fresta, Massimo

    2005-08-18

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of various ethosomal suspensions made up of water, phospholipids and ethanol at various concentrations for their potential application in dermal administration of ammonium glycyrrhizinate, a useful drug for the treatment of various inflammatory-based skin diseases. Physicochemical characterization of ethosomes was carried out by photon correlation spectroscopy and freeze fracture electron microscopy. The percutaneous permeation of ammonium glycyrrhizinate/ethosomes was evaluated in vitro through human stratum corneum and epidermis membranes by using Franz's cells and compared with the permeation profiles of drug solutions either in water or in a water-ethanol mixture. Reflectance spectrophotometry was used as a non-invasive technique to evaluate the carrier toxicity, the drug permeation and the anti-inflammatory activity of ammonium glycyrrhizinate in a model of skin erythema in vivo on human volunteers. Ethosomal suspensions had mean sizes ranging from 350 nm to 100 nm as a function of ethanol and lecithin quantities, i.e., high amounts of ethanol and a low lecithin concentration provided ethosome suspensions with a mean size of approximately 100 nm and a narrow size distribution. In vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out by using an ethosome formulation made up of ethanol 45% (v/v) and lecithin 2% (w/v). The ethosome suspension showed a very good skin tolerability in human volunteers, also when applied for a long period (48 h). Ethosomes elicited an increase of the in vitro percutaneous permeation of both methylnicotinate and ammonium glycyrrhizinate. Ethosomes were able to significantly enhance the anti-inflammatory activity of ammonium glycyrrhizinate compared to the ethanolic or aqueous solutions of this drug. Some in vivo experiments also showed the ability of ethosome to ensure a skin accumulation and a sustained release of the ammonium glycyrrhizinate.

  10. Determination of Mirtazapine in Human Plasma by HPLC-MS and Bioavailability of Newly Developed Mirtazapine Tablets in Healthy Volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIRong-shan; DINGLi; JIANLong-hai; XIAOHong

    2004-01-01

    Aim To estabhsh a sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for determination of mirtazapine in human plasma and evaluation of its relative bioavailabihty. Methods After being alkalized by 25% ammonia, mirtazapine in the plasma was extracted with n-hexane. Desloratadine was used as internal standard (IS). Solutes were separated on a C18 column with a mobile phase of methanol-ammonium acetate buffer (pH3.5) (75:25). The flow rate of the mobile phase was 1 mL·min-1. Detection was performed on an electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometer and operated in selected ion monitoring (SIM) and positive-ionization mode using target ionsat m/z 266.2 for mirtazapine and m/z 311.2 for the IS. The fragmentor voltage was 90 V. A randomized cross-over study was performed in 20 healthy volunteers. In the two study periods, twenty healthy Chinese male subjects received a single oral dose of mirtazapine 30 mg. Results The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.3-200 ng·mL-1. The limit of quantitation was 0.1 ng·mL-1. The paramneters for mirtazapine test tablet and reference tablet were as follows.. T1/2 ( 24.7±4.1 ) and (23.6±4.3) h, Tmax (1.6±0.8) and (1.5±0.8) h, Cmax (95.9±29.8) and (91.9±26.7) ng·mL-1, respectively. Conclusion The estabhshed HPLC-MS method is rapid, sensitive and specific for the detemtination of mirtazapine in human plasma. The relative bioavailability was 100.0%±10.8%.

  11. A First-in-Human Study To Assess the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Cytomegalovirus in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Kiran; Segal, Florencia Pereyra; Feire, Adam; Magnusson, Baldur; Rondon, Juan C; Vemula, Janardhana; Yu, Jing; Pang, Yinuo; Pertel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause significant disease in immunocompromised patients and treatment options are limited by toxicities. CSJ148 is a combination of two anti-HCMV human monoclonal antibodies (LJP538 and LJP539) that bind to and inhibit the function of viral HCMV glycoprotein B (gB) and the pentameric complex, consisting of glycoproteins gH, gL, UL128, UL130, and UL131. Here, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous dose of LJP538 or LJP539 or their combination in healthy volunteers. Adverse events and laboratory abnormalities occurred sporadically with similar incidence between antibody and placebo groups and without any apparent relationship to dose. No subject who received antibody developed a hypersensitivity, infusion-related reaction or anti-drug antibodies. After intravenous administration, both LJP538 and LJP539 demonstrated typical human IgG1 pharmacokinetic properties, with slow clearances, limited volumes of distribution, and long terminal half-lives. The pharmacokinetic parameters were linear and dose proportional for both antibodies across the 50-fold range of doses evaluated in the study. There was no apparent impact on pharmacokinetics when the antibodies were administered alone or in combination. CSJ148 and the individual monoclonal antibodies were safe and well tolerated, with pharmacokinetics as expected for human immunoglobulin.

  12. SUPERMAN attenuates positive INNER NO OUTER autoregulation to maintain polar development of Arabidopsis ovule outer integuments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Robert J; Kotow, Louren M; Gasser, Charles S

    2002-09-01

    The outer integument of Arabidopsis ovules exhibits marked polarity in its development, growing extensively from the abaxial side, but only to a very limited extent from the adaxial side of the ovule. Mutations in two genes affect this asymmetric growth. In strong inner no outer (ino) mutants outer integument growth is eliminated, whereas in superman (sup) mutants integument growth on the adaxial side is nearly equal to wild-type growth on the abaxial side. Through complementation and reporter gene analysis, a region of INO 5'-flanking sequences was identified that contains sufficient information for appropriate expression of INO. Using this INO promoter (P-INO) we show that INO acts as a positive regulator of transcription from P-INO, but is not sufficient for de novo initiation of transcription in other plant parts. Protein fusions demonstrate nuclear localization of INO, consistent with a proposed role as a transcription factor for this member of the YABBY protein family. Through its ability to inhibit expression of the endogenous INO gene and transgenes driven by P-INO, SUP is shown to be a negative regulator of INO transcription. Substitution of another YABBY protein coding region (CRABS CLAW) for INO overcomes this negative regulation, indicating that SUP suppresses INO transcription through attenuation of the INO positive autoregulatory loop.

  13. Integument cell gelatinisation-the fate of the integumentary cells in Hieracium and Pilosella (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płachno, Bartosz J; Świątek, Piotr; Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, Małgorzata; Szeląg, Zbigniew; Stolarczyk, Piotr

    2017-05-15

    Members of the genera Hieracium and Pilosella are model plants that are used to study the mechanisms of apomixis. In order to have a proper understanding of apomixis, knowledge about the relationship between the maternal tissue and the gametophyte is needed. In the genus Pilosella, previous authors have described the specific process of the "liquefaction" of the integument cells that surround the embryo sac. However, these observations were based on data only at the light microscopy level. The main aim of our paper was to investigate the changes in the integument cells at the ultrastructural level in Pilosella officinarum and Hieracium alpinum. We found that the integument peri-endothelial zone in both species consisted of mucilage cells. The mucilage was deposited as a thick layer between the plasma membrane and the cell wall. The mucilage pushed the protoplast to the centre of the cell, and cytoplasmic bridges connected the protoplast to the plasmodesmata through the mucilage layers. Moreover, an elongation of the plasmodesmata was observed in the mucilage cells. The protoplasts had an irregular shape and were finally degenerated. After the cell wall breakdown of the mucilage cells, lysigenous cavities that were filled with mucilage were formed.

  14. Deciphering principles of morphogenesis from temporal and spatial patterns on the integument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Lai, Yung-Chih; Figueroa, Seth; Yang, Tian; Widelitz, Randall B; Kobielak, Krzysztof; Nie, Qing; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2015-01-01

    How tissue patterns form in development and regeneration is a fundamental issue remaining to be fully understood. The integument often forms repetitive units in space (periodic patterning) and time (cyclic renewal), such as feathers and hairs. Integument patterns are visible and experimentally manipulatable, helping us reveal pattern formative processes. Variability is seen in regional phenotypic specificities and temporal cycling at different physiological stages. Here we show some cellular / molecular bases revealed by analyzing integument patterns. 1) Localized cellular activity (proliferation, rearrangement, apoptosis, differentiation) transforms prototypic organ primordia into specific shapes. Combinatorial positioning of different localized activity zones generates diverse and complex organ forms. 2) Competitive equilibrium between activators and inhibitors regulates stem cells through cyclic quiescence and activation. Dynamic interactions between stem cells and their adjacent niche regulate regenerative behavior, modulated by multi-layers of macro-environmental factors (dermis, body hormone status and external environment). Genomics studies may reveal how positional information of localized cellular activity is stored. In vivo skin imaging and lineage tracing unveils new insights into stem cell plasticity. Principles of self-assembly obtained from the integumentary organ model can be applied to help restore damaged patterns during regenerative wound healing and for tissue engineering to rebuild tissues. PMID:25858668

  15. The Contribution of Social Resources To Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John; Musick, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Outlines a theory of how social capital contributes to volunteering, hypothesizing that social capital has a stronger effect on volunteering among people with more human capital and socioeconomic status. Specifies a test (of the effects) of social capital on volunteering and discusses the findings (of the test) in detail. (CMK)

  16. Volunteers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Richard; Johnson, Judith

    The results of nine studies evaluating the effectiveness of volunteer programs in the schools were reviewed in an attempt to answer three questions: What is the value of volunteers to schools? Why do people volunteer to work in classrooms? What is the effect of volunteering on the volunteer? The studies involved were originally intended to…

  17. A physiological study of integument secretions in the marine polychaete Eulalia viridis and their potential biotechnological value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patrícia Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in marine bioproducts, especially in those with life improving potential to humans. Marine invertebrates, in particular, possess particular interest due to their high diversity, abundance and ecological importance. However, the physiology of such a wide and diverse group of organisms is far from understood. Marine annelids, in particular (Class Polychaeta, are of especial interest, in large part owing to their ecological representativity and easy handling. Still only few studies have been focusing on physiological traits of the polychaeta that may relate to the production of bioproducts of potential biotechnological applications. The secretion of substances by polychaetes is acknowledged to relate primarily with locomotion and feeding, but also thought to have an important role in egg protection, prevention against infection and even as defence mechanisms against possible predators. As such, the present work aims at identifying, isolating and analysing the nature of integumentary secretions of E. viridis, a common intertidal worm of rocky shores. Histological analyses revealed a more complex microanatomy of the skin than it could be anticipated. Several cell types were identified in the integument, each bearing different functions such as structural support, pigmentation and sensorial, to which is added secretion as one of the most important roles. Due to the great complexity of the integument, the identification of the chemical nature of all types of secretions is particularly challenging. However, more detailed histochemical analyses and electron microscopy enabled the identification of different secretory cells and their chemical nature and role. The analyses was complemented by protein isolation from mucous and homogenates trough SDS-PAGE. Extracts revealed, for instance, that peptidic substances produced by the skin are potentially biocidal, as assessed through the Microtox Assay. Overall, the results enhance the

  18. Hair as an indicator of the body content of polonium in humans: Preliminary results from study of five male volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rääf, C.L.; Holstein, H.; Holm, E.

    2015-01-01

    -consuming radiochemical preparation before alpha spectrometric determination. In order to find a more simple and less labor intensive method hair has been used as a bioindicator and investigated in this study. The relationship between intake and excretion in hair has been estimated in five volunteers who ingested...

  19. Comparative pharmacokinetics between a microdose and therapeutic dose for clarithromycin, sumatriptan, propafenone, paracetamol (acetaminophen), and phenobarbital in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, Graham; Shishikura, Yoko; Jochemsen, Roeline; Weaver, Richard John; Gesson, Charlotte; Brian Houston, J; Oosterhuis, Berend; Bjerrum, Ole J; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Alder, Jane; Rowland, Malcolm; Garner, Colin

    2011-06-14

    A clinical study was conducted to assess the ability of a microdose (100 μg) to predict the human pharmacokinetics (PK) following a therapeutic dose of clarithromycin, sumatriptan, propafenone, paracetamol (acetaminophen) and phenobarbital, both within the study and by reference to the existing literature on these compounds and to explore the source of any nonlinearity if seen. For each drug, 6 healthy male volunteers were dosed with 100 μg (14)C-labelled compound. For clarithromycin, sumatriptan, and propafenone this labelled dose was administered alone, i.e. as a microdose, orally and intravenously (iv) and as an iv tracer dose concomitantly with an oral non-labelled therapeutic dose, in a 3-way cross over design. The oral therapeutic doses were 250, 50, and 150 mg, respectively. Paracetamol was given as the labelled microdose orally and iv using a 2-way cross over design, whereas phenobarbital was given only as the microdose orally. Plasma concentrations of total (14)C and parent drug were measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) or HPLC followed by AMS. Plasma concentrations following non-(14)C-labelled oral therapeutic doses were measured using either HPLC-electrochemical detection (clarithromycin) or HPLC-UV (sumatriptan, propafenone). For all five drugs an oral microdose predicted reasonably well the PK, including the shape of the plasma profile, following an oral therapeutic dose. For clarithromycin, sumatriptan, and propafenone, one parameter, oral bioavailability, was marginally outside of the normally acceptable 2-fold prediction interval around the mean therapeutic dose value. For clarithromycin, sumatriptan and propafenone, data obtained from an oral and iv microdose were compared within the same cohort of subjects used in the study, as well as those reported in the literature. For paracetamol (oral and iv) and phenobarbital (oral), microdose data were compared with those reported in the literature only. Where 100 μg iv (14)C-doses were

  20. Nanosizing of a poorly soluble drug: technique optimization, factorial analysis, and pharmacokinetic study in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed I

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Elsayed,1 Aly Ahmed Abdelbary,1 Ahmed Hassen Elshafeey1,21Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, ON, CanadaContext: Diacerein (DCN has low aqueous solubility (3.197 mg/L and, consequently, low oral bioavailability (35%–56%. To increase both the solubility and dissolution rate of DCN while maintaining its crystalline nature, high pressure homogenization was used but with only a few homogenization cycles preceded by a simple bottom-up technique.Methods: The nanosuspensions of DCN were prepared using a combined bottom-up/top-down technique. Different surfactants – polyvinyl alcohol, sodium deoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate – with different concentrations were used for the stabilization of the nanosuspensions. Full factorial experimental design was employed to investigate the influence of formulation variables on nanosuspension characteristics using Design-Expert® Software. Particle size (PS, zeta potential, saturation solubility, in vitro dissolution, and drug crystallinity were studied. Moreover, the in vivo performance of the optimized formula was assessed by bioavailability determination in healthy human volunteers.Results: The concentration of surfactant had a significant effect on both the PS and polydispersity index values. The 1% surfactant concentration showed the lowest PS and polydispersity index values compared with other concentrations. Both type and concentration of surfactant had significant effects on the zeta potential. Formula F8 (containing 1% sodium deoxycholate and Formula F12 (containing 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate had the highest desirability values (0.952 and 0.927, respectively. Hence, they were selected for further characterization. The saturated solubility and mean dissolution time, in the case of F8 and F12, were significantly higher than the coarse drug

  1. Why Volunteer? Understanding Motivations for Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clare

    2010-01-01

    The profile of volunteering in English Higher Education (HE) has been enhanced in recent years through various initiatives that have not only funded activities, but have sought to expand the range of volunteering opportunities available to students and recognise the contribution that volunteering can make to students' employability. This expansion…

  2. Volunteering and Volunteers: Benefit-Cost Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Femida; Mook, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the phenomenon of volunteering from a benefit-cost perspective. Both the individual making a decision to volunteer and the organization making a decision to use volunteer labor face benefits and costs of their actions, yet these costs and benefits almost always remain unarticulated, perhaps because the common perception of…

  3. Pain perception in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Susanne; Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Werner, Mads U

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to study the relationship between pain perception and cytokine release during systemic inflammation. We present a randomized crossover trial in healthy volunteers (n = 17) in 37 individual trials. Systemic inflammation was induced by an i.v. bolus of Escherichia coli LPS (2 ng/kg) on two...... in healthy human volunteers leads to reduction in pain pressure threshold and an increase in pain perception to heat stimuli, supporting a relationship between acute systemic inflammation and pain perception....

  4. Expression of the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins by Haemophilus ducreyi is required for virulence in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Latimer, Jo L; Deng, Kaiping; Hansen, Eric J; Spinola, Stanley M

    2004-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi colocalizes with polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages and evades phagocytosis during experimental infection of human volunteers. H. ducreyi contains two genes, lspA1 and lspA2, which encode predicted proteins of 456 and 543 kDa, respectively. Compared to its wild-type parent, an lspA1 lspA2 double mutant does not inhibit phagocytosis by macrophage and myelocytic cell lines in vitro and is attenuated in an experimental rabbit model of chancroid. To test whether expression of LspA1 and LspA2 was necessary for virulence in humans, six volunteers were experimentally infected. Each volunteer was inoculated with three doses (ranging from 85 to 112 CFU) of the parent (35000HP) in one arm and three doses (ranging from 60 to 822 CFU) of the mutant (35000HP Omega 12) in the other arm. The papule formation rates were 88% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 76.8 to 99.9%) at 18 parent sites and 72% (95% CI, 44.4 to 99.9%) at 18 mutant sites (P = 0.19). However, papules were significantly smaller at mutant sites (mean size, 24.8 mm(2)) than at parent sites (mean size, 39.1 mm(2)) 24 h after inoculation (P = 0.0002). The pustule formation rates were 44% (95% CI, 5.8 to 77.6%) at parent sites and 0% (95% CI, 0 to 39.4%) at mutant sites (P = 0.009). With the caveat that biosafety regulations preclude testing of a complemented mutant in human subjects, these results indicate that expression of LspA1 and LspA2 facilitates the ability of H. ducreyi to initiate disease and to progress to pustule formation in humans.

  5. Clonally related methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus), human volunteers, and a bayfront cetacean rehabilitation facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hower, Suzanne; Phillips, Matthew C; Brodsky, Micah; Dameron, Adrienne; Tamargo, Manuel A; Salazar, Norma C; Jackson, Charlene R; Barrett, John B; Davidson, Maureen; Davis, Johnnie; Mukherjee, Sampa; Ewing, Ruth Y; Gidley, Maribeth L; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Johns, Lisa; Johnson, Frank E; Adebanjo, Olufunmilola; Plano, Lisa R W

    2013-05-01

    In May of 2011, a live mass stranding of 26 short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) occurred in the lower Florida Keys. Five surviving whales were transferred from the original stranding site to a nearby marine mammal rehabilitation facility where they were constantly attended to by a team of volunteers. Bacteria cultured during the routine clinical care of the whales and necropsy of a deceased whale included methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA). In order to investigate potential sources or reservoirs of MSSA and MRSA, samples were obtained from human volunteers, whales, seawater, and sand from multiple sites at the facility, nearby recreational beaches, and a canal. Samples were collected on 3 days. The second collection day was 2 weeks after the first, and the third collection day was 2 months after the last animal was removed from the facility. MRSA and MSSA were isolated on each day from the facility when animals and volunteers were present. MSSA was found at an adjacent beach on all three collection days. Isolates were characterized by utilizing a combination of quantitative real-time PCR to determine the presence of mecA and genes associated with virulence, staphylococcal protein A typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing, multilocus sequence typing, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Using these methods, clonally related MRSA were isolated from multiple environmental locations as well as from humans and animals. Non-identical but genetically similar MSSA and MRSA were also identified from distinct sources within this sample pool. PFGE indicated that the majority of MRSA isolates were clonally related to the prototype human strain USA300. These studies support the notion that S. aureus may be shed into an environment by humans or pilot whales and subsequently colonize or infect exposed new hosts.

  6. Becoming an Older Volunteer: A Grounded Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Witucki Brown

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This Grounded Theory study describes the process by which older persons “become” volunteers. Forty interviews of older persons who volunteered for Habitat for Humanity were subjected to secondary content analysis to uncover the process of “becoming” a volunteer. “Helping out” (core category for older volunteers occurs within the context of “continuity”, “commitment” and “connection” which provide motivation for volunteering. When a need arises, older volunteers “help out” physically and financially as health and resources permit. Benefits described as “blessings” of volunteering become motivators for future volunteering. Findings suggest that older volunteering is a developmental process and learned behavior which should be fostered in older persons by personally inviting them to volunteer. Intergenerational volunteering projects will allow older persons to pass on knowledge and skills and provide positive role modeling for younger volunteers.

  7. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Koksunan, Sarawut [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya [National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Prachasupap, Apichai [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); Ono, Ken-ichiro [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Yasuha [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  8. Skin Irritation to Glass Wool or Continuous Glass Filaments as Observed by a Patch Test among Human Japanese Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    TSUNODA, Masashi; KIDO, Takamasa; MOGI, Sachiyo; SUGIURA, Yumiko; MIYAJIMA, Eriko; KUDO, Yuichiro; KUMAZAWA, Tatenao; AIZAWA, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Glass wool and continuous glass filaments have been used in industry. We examined the irritability of those among Japanese. A patch test was performed on 43 volunteers for the followings: glass wool for non-residential use with and without a urea-modified phenolic resin binder, that for residential use with and without the binder, and continuous glass filaments with diameters of 4, 7, 9, and 13 µm. Materials were applied to an upper arm of each volunteer for 24 h. The skin was observed at 1 and 24 h after the removal. At 1 h after removal, slight erythema was observed on the skin of a woman after the exposure to glass wool for residential use without the binder. Erythema was observed on the skin of another woman at 1 h after a 24-h exposure to glass wool for non-residential use without the binder. There were no reactions at 24 h after the removal. The low reactions in the patch test suggested that the irritability caused by glass wool, irrespective of a resin component, could be induced mechanically, and that the irritability caused by continuous glass filaments with resin could be slight and either mechanical or chemical. PMID:25070402

  9. Skin irritation to glass wool or continuous glass filaments as observed by a patch test among human Japanese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Masashi; Kido, Takamasa; Mogi, Sachiyo; Sugiura, Yumiko; Miyajima, Eriko; Kudo, Yuichiro; Kumazawa, Tatenao; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Glass wool and continuous glass filaments have been used in industry. We examined the irritability of those among Japanese. A patch test was performed on 43 volunteers for the followings: glass wool for non-residential use with and without a urea-modified phenolic resin binder, that for residential use with and without the binder, and continuous glass filaments with diameters of 4, 7, 9, and 13 µm. Materials were applied to an upper arm of each volunteer for 24 h. The skin was observed at 1 and 24 h after the removal. At 1 h after removal, slight erythema was observed on the skin of a woman after the exposure to glass wool for residential use without the binder. Erythema was observed on the skin of another woman at 1 h after a 24-h exposure to glass wool for non-residential use without the binder. There were no reactions at 24 h after the removal. The low reactions in the patch test suggested that the irritability caused by glass wool, irrespective of a resin component, could be induced mechanically, and that the irritability caused by continuous glass filaments with resin could be slight and either mechanical or chemical.

  10. Effects of cocoa extract and dark chocolate on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in human endothelial cells and healthy volunteers--a nutrigenomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ingrid A L; Persson, Karin; Hägg, Staffan; Andersson, Rolf G G

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cocoa from the bean of Theobroma cacao L. has beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if cocoa extract and dark chocolate influence angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) in human endothelial cells (in vitro) and in healthy volunteers (in vivo). ACE activity was analyzed with a commercial radioenzymatic assay and measured in human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) after 10 minutes of incubation with cocoa extract. NO was measured after 24 hours of incubation. ACE activity and NO were measured at baseline and after 30, 60, and 180 minutes in 16 healthy volunteers after a single intake of 75 g of dark chocolate containing 72% cocoa. Significant inhibition of ACE activity (P < 0.01) and significant increase of NO (P < 0.001) were seen in HUVEC. In the study subjects, a significant inhibition of ACE activity (mean 18%) 3 hours after intake of dark chocolate was seen, but no significant change in NO was seen. According to ACE genotype, significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen after 3 hours in individuals with genotype insertion/insertion and deletion/deletion (mean 21% and 28%, respectively). Data suggest that intake of dark chocolate containing high amount of cocoa inhibits ACE activity in vitro and in vivo.

  11. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of 14C/13C-labeled ortho-phenylphenol formation following dermal application to human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timchalk, C; Selim, S; Sangha, G; Bartels, M J

    1998-08-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of uniformly labeled 14C/13C-ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) were followed in six human male volunteers given a single 8 h dermal dose of 6 microg OPP/kg body weight formulated as a 0.4% (w/v) solution in isopropyl alcohol. The application site was covered with a non-occlusive dome allowing free movement of air, but preventing the loss of radioactivity due to physical contact. At 8 h post-exposure the non-occlusive dome was removed, the dose site was wiped with isopropyl alcohol containing swabs and the skin surface repeatedly stripped with tape. Blood specimens, urine, and feces were collected from each volunteer over a 5 day post-exposure period and were analyzed for radioactivity and metabolites (urine only). 2. Following dermal application, peak plasma levels of radioactivity were obtained within 4 h post-exposure and rapidly declined with virtually all of the absorbed dose rapidly excreted into the urine within 24 h post-exposure. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the time-course of OPP absorption and clearance in male human volunteers. Approximately 43% of the dermally applied dose was absorbed through the skin with an average absorption half-life of 10 h. Once absorbed the renal clearance of OPP was rapid with an average half-life of 0.8 h. The rate limiting step for renal clearance was the relatively slower rate of dermal absorption; therefore the pharmacokinetics of OPP in humans was described by a 'flip-flop' single compartment model. Overall, the pharmacokinetics were similar between individuals, and the model parameters were in excellent agreement with the experimental data. 3. Approximately 73% of the total urinary radioactivity was accounted for as free OPP, OPP-sulfate and OPP-glucuronide conjugates. The sulfate conjugate was the major metabolite (approximately 69%). Therefore, total urinary OPP equivalents (acid-labile conjugates+free OPP) can be used to estimate the systemically absorbed

  12. Inhibition of NF-κB activation and MMP-9 secretion by plasma of human volunteers after ingestion of maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol

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    Ďuračková Zdeňka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract French maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol® displays a variety of anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. Aim of this study was to determine whether human plasma after oral intake of Pycnogenol contains sufficient concentrations of active principles to inhibit key mediators of inflammation. Blood samples from seven healthy volunteers were obtained before and after five days administration of 200 mg Pycnogenol per day. Plasma samples statistically significantly inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 release from human monocytes and NF-κB activation. Thus, we provide evidence that bioavailable active principles of Pycnogenol exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibition of proinflammatory gene expression which is consistent with documented clinical observations. We suggest that our ex vivo method is suitable to substantiate molecular pharmacological mechanisms of complex plant extracts in a more focussed and rational way compared to in vitro studies by taking into account the processes of absorption and metabolism.

  13. Assessment of genetic damage in peripheral blood of human volunteers exposed (whole-body) to a 200 muT, 60 Hz magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Genevieve C; McNamee, James P; Marro, Leonora; Bellier, Pascale V; Prato, Frank S; Thomas, Alex W

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the extent of damage in nucleated cells in peripheral blood of healthy human volunteers exposed to a whole-body 60 Hz, 200 microT magnetic field. In this study, 10 male and 10 female healthy human volunteers received a 4 h whole-body exposure to a 200 microT, 60 Hz magnetic field. In addition, five males and five females were treated in a similar fashion, but were exposed to sham conditions. For each subject, a blood sample was obtained prior to the exposure period and aliquots were used as negative- (pre-exposure) and positive- [1.5 Gray (Gy) (60)Cobalt ((60)Co) gamma-irradiation] controls. At the end of the 4 h exposure period, a second blood sample was obtained. The extent of DNA damage was assessed in peripheral human blood leukocytes from all samples using the alkaline comet assay. To detect possible clastogenic effects, the incidence of micronuclei was assessed in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. There was no evidence of either increased DNA damage, as indicated by the alkaline comet assay, or increased incidence of micronuclei (MN) in the magnetic field exposed group. However, an in vitro exposure of 1.5 Gy gamma-irradiation caused a significant increase in both DNA damage and MN induction. This study found no evidence that an acute, whole-body exposure to a 200 microT, 60 Hz magnetic field for 4 hours could cause DNA damage in human blood.

  14. Hesperidin displays relevant role in the nutrigenomic effect of orange juice on blood leukocytes in human volunteers: a randomized controlled cross-over study.

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    Dragan Milenkovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed, in healthy, middle-aged, moderately overweight men, that orange juice decreases diastolic blood pressure and significantly improves postprandial microvascular endothelial reactivity and that hesperidin could be causally linked to the observed beneficial effect of orange juice. The objective was to determine the effect of chronic consumption of orange juice on the gene expression profile of leukocytes in healthy volunteers and to assess to what extent hesperidin is involved in the effect of orange juice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Volunteers were included in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. Throughout three 4-week periods, volunteers consumed daily: 500 ml orange juice, 500 ml control drink plus hesperidin or 500 ml control drink and placebo. Blood samplings were performed on 10 overnight-fasted subjects after the 4-week treatment period. Global gene expression profiles were determined using human whole genome cDNA microarrays. Both orange juice and hesperidin consumption significantly affected leukocyte gene expression. Orange juice consumption induced changes in expression of, 3,422 genes, while hesperidin intake modulated the expression of 1,819 genes. Between the orange juice and hesperidin consumption groups, 1,582 regulated genes were in common. Many of these genes are implicated in chemotaxis, adhesion, infiltration and lipid transport, which is suggestive of lower recruitment and infiltration of circulating cells to vascular wall and lower lipid accumulation. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that regular consumption of orange juice for 4 weeks alters leukocyte gene expression to an anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic profile, and hesperidin displays a relevant role in the genomic effect of this beverage. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00983086.

  15. Research on Integument Tapetum of Higher Plants%高等植物珠被绒毡层的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 郑彩霞

    2012-01-01

    There is a great significance for revealing the plant gametophytic development regulation mechanism to carry out the research on the tapetum, which is recognized as the "nursing organization" of sporophyte generation turning to the gametophyte generation. There are some researches on the development process of the anther tapetum, whereas the research on the integument tapetum is relatively insufficient. The relevant researches in Compositae, Bupleurum, Plantago major and Stylosanthes indicate that the structure of integument tapetum is more complex than anther's one because of its complex development process and structure. The developmental patterns of the integument tapetum are different in various plants. There are two types of integument tapetums include single integument tapetum and bitegmic tapetum; the abnormal growth of the integument tapetum will lead to the ovule abortion. The research of integument tapetum for woody plants is lags behind, and the one for gymnosperm is few in the domestic and foreign reports.%绒毡层是植物孢子体向配子体世代转换的“哺乳组织”,其研究对于揭示植物配子体发育的调控机制具有重要意义.对花药绒毡层的发育过程已有一些研究,而对珠被绒毡层的研究积累相对较薄弱.对菊科(Compositae)、柴胡(Bupleurum)、大车前(Plantago major)、柱花草(Stylosanthes)等草本植物的研究表明,因珠被发育过程和结构复杂,珠被绒毡层结构也较花药绒毡层复杂,其发育模式因植物不同而异,有单珠被绒毡层和双珠被绒毡层两种类型;珠被绒毡层异常生长会导致胚珠败育.木本植物珠被绒毡层,特别是裸子植物的珠被绒毡层在国内外的研究报道不多.

  16. Antagonism of entomopathogenic fungi by Bacillus spp. associated with the integument of cicadellids and delphacids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Andrea; López, Silvina; Aulicino, Mónica; de Remes-Lenicov, Ana María; Balatti, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi are potential tools to biocontrol cicadellids and delphacids, two groups of insects that cause extensive damage to agricultural crops. However, bacteria living on the host cuticle may inhibit fungal growth. In the present work, following the molecular characterization of 10 strains of Bacillus isolated from the integument of cicadellids and delphacids, we selected isolates of the fungi Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae that are resistant to the antimicrobials secreted by these bacterial strains. The antagonistic activity of the 10 bacterial isolates belonging to the genus Bacillus (i.e., B. amyloliquefaciens, B. pumilus, and B. subtilis) against 41 isolates of Bea. bassiana and 20 isolates of M. anisopliae was investigated in vitro on tryptic soy agar using the central disk test. With this approach, isolates of Bea. bassiana and M. anisopliae resistant to antagonistic bacteria were identified that can be further developed as biological control agents.

  17. Moisture harvesting and water transport through specialized micro-structures on the integument of lizards

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    Philipp Comanns

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Several lizard species that live in arid areas have developed special abilities to collect water with their bodies' surfaces and to ingest the so collected moisture. This is called rain- or moisture-harvesting. The water can originate from air humidity, fog, dew, rain or even from humid soil. The integument (i.e., the skin plus skin derivatives such as scales has developed features so that the water spreads and is soaked into a capillary system in between the reptiles' scales. Within this capillary system the water is transported to the mouth where it is ingested. We have investigated three different lizard species which have developed the ability for moisture harvesting independently, viz. the Australian thorny devil (Moloch horridus, the Arabian toadhead agama (Phrynocephalus arabicus and the Texas horned lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum. All three lizards have a honeycomb like micro ornamentation on the outer surface of the scales and a complex capillary system in between the scales. By investigation of individual scales and by producing and characterising polymer replicas of the reptiles' integuments, we found that the honeycomb like structures render the surface superhydrophilic, most likely by holding a water film physically stable. Furthermore, the condensation of air humidity is improved on this surface by about 100% in comparison to unstructured surfaces. This allows the animals to collect moisture with their entire body surface. The collected water is transported into the capillary system. For Phrynosoma cornutum we found the interesting effect that, in contrast to the other two investigated species, the water flow in the capillary system is not uniform but directed to the mouth. Taken together we found that the micro ornamentation yields a superhydrophilic surface, and the semi-tubular capillaries allow for an efficient passive – and for Phrynosoma directed – transport of water.

  18. Role played by CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T Cells in suppression of host responses to Haemophilus ducreyi during experimental infection of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Racz, Paul; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2010-06-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease. Among human volunteers, the majority of experimentally infected individuals fail to clear the infection and form pustules. Here, we investigated the role played by CD4(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in the formation of pustules. In pustules, there was a significant enrichment of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) T cells, compared with that in peripheral blood. The majority of lesional FOXP3(+) T cells were CD4(+), CD25(+), CD127(lo/-), and CTLA-4(+). FOXP3(+) T cells were found throughout pustules but were most abundant at their base. Significantly fewer lesional CD4(+)FOXP3(+) T cells expressed interferon gamma, compared with lesional CD4(+)FOXP3(-) effector T cells. Depletion of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from the peripheral blood of infected and uninfected volunteers significantly enhanced proliferation of H. ducreyi-reactive CD4(+) T cells. Our results indicate that the population of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(lo/-)FOXP3(+) T(reg) cells are expanded at H. ducreyi-infected sites and that these cells may play a role in suppressing the host immune response to the bacterium.

  19. Targeted and Untargeted Metabolomics to Explore the Bioavailability of the Secoiridoids from a Seed/Fruit Extract (Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl in Human Healthy Volunteers: A Preliminary Study

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    Rocío García-Villalba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The bark, seeds, fruits and leaves of the genus Fraxinus (Oleaceae which contain a wide range of phytochemicals, mostly secoiridoid glucosides, have been widely used in folk medicine against a number of ailments, yet little is known about the metabolism and uptake of the major Fraxinus components. The aim of this work was to advance in the knowledge on the bioavailability of the secoiridoids present in a Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl seed/fruit extract using both targeted and untargeted metabolomic analyses. Plasma and urine samples from nine healthy volunteers were taken at specific time intervals following the intake of the extract and analyzed by UPLC-ESI-QTOF. Predicted metabolites such as tyrosol and ligstroside-aglycone glucuronides and sulfates were detected at low intensity. These compounds reached peak plasma levels 2 h after the intake and exhibited high variability among the participants. The ligstroside-aglycone conjugates may be considered as potential biomarkers of the Fraxinus secoiridoids intake. Using the untargeted approach we additionally detected phenolic conjugates identified as ferulic acid and caffeic acid sulfates, as well as hydroxybenzyl and hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde sulfate derivatives which support further metabolism of the secoiridoids by phase I and (or microbial enzymes. Overall, the results of this study suggest low uptake of intact secoiridoids from a Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl extract in healthy human volunteers and metabolic conversion by esterases, glycosidases, and phase II sulfo- and glucuronosyl transferases to form smaller conjugated derivatives.

  20. No Effects of Acute Exposure to Wi-Fi Electromagnetic Fields on Spontaneous EEG Activity and Psychomotor Vigilance in Healthy Human Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentai, Norbert; Csathó, Árpád; Trunk, Attila; Fiocchi, Serena; Parazzini, Marta; Ravazzani, Paolo; Thuróczy, György; Hernádi, István

    2015-12-01

    Mobile equipment use of wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi) signal modulation has increased exponentially in the past few decades. However, there is inconclusive scientific evidence concerning the potential risks associated with the energy deposition in the brain from Wi-Fi and whether Wi-Fi electromagnetism interacts with cognitive function. In this study we investigated possible neurocognitive effects caused by Wi-Fi exposure. First, we constructed a Wi-Fi exposure system from commercial parts. Dosimetry was first assessed by free space radiofrequency field measurements. The experimental exposure system was then modeled based on real geometry and physical characteristics. Specific absorption rate (SAR) calculations were performed using a whole-body, realistic human voxel model with values corresponding to conventional everyday Wi-Fi exposure (peak SAR10g level was 99.22 mW/kg with 1 W output power and 100% duty cycle). Then, in two provocation experiments involving healthy human volunteers we tested for two hypotheses: 1. Whether a 60 min long 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi exposure affects the spectral power of spontaneous awake electroencephalographic (sEEG) activity (N = 25); and 2. Whether similar Wi-Fi exposure modulates the sustained attention measured by reaction time in a computerized psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) (N = 19). EEG data were recorded at midline electrode sites while volunteers watched a silent documentary. In the PVT task, button press reaction time was recorded. No measurable effects of acute Wi-Fi exposure were found on spectral power of sEEG or reaction time in the psychomotor vigilance test. These results indicate that a single, 60 min Wi-Fi exposure does not alter human oscillatory brain function or objective measures of sustained attention.

  1. GABAergic modulation in central sensitization in humans: a randomized placebo-controlled pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study comparing clobazam with clonazepam in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Marie; Matthey, Alain; Daali, Youssef; Poncet, Antoine; Vuilleumier, Pascal; Vuillemier, Pascal; Curatolo, Michele; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Desmeules, Jules

    2015-03-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors (GAMs) acting at specific subtypes of GABAA receptors effectively restore compromised spinal pain control in rodents. Studies addressing a similar antihyperalgesic effect in humans are sparse and are hampered by sedative effects of nonselective GAMs available for use in humans. We present results from a randomized controlled double-blind crossover study in 25 healthy volunteers, which addressed potential antihyperalgesic actions of clobazam (CBZ) and clonazepam (CLN) at mildly sedating equianticonvulsive doses. Clobazam was chosen because of its relatively low sedative properties and CLN because of its use in neuropathic pain. Tolterodine (TLT) was used as an active placebo. The primary outcome parameter was a change in the area of cutaneous UVB irradiation-induced secondary hyperalgesia (ASH), which was monitored for 8 hours after drug application. Sedative effects were assessed in parallel to antihyperalgesia. Compared with TLT, recovery from hyperalgesia was significantly faster in the CBZ and CLN groups (P = 0.009). At the time point of maximum effect, the rate of recovery from hyperalgesia was accelerated by CBZ and CLN, relative to placebo by 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8-30.5), P = 0.040, and 28.6% (95% CI 4.5-52.6), P = 0.022, respectively. Active compounds induced stronger sedation than placebo, but these differences disappeared 8 hours after drug application. We demonstrate here that GAMs effectively reduce central sensitization in healthy volunteers. These results provide proof-of-principle evidence supporting efficacy of GAMs as antihyperalgesic agents in humans and should stimulate further research on compounds with improved subtype specificity.

  2. Volunteering, income and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detollenaere, Jens; Willems, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Separate literatures have related volunteering to health gains and income gains. We study the association between volunteering, income and health within one statistical framework. A state-of-the-art mediation analysis is conducted on data concerning the health, volunteering and sociodemographic characteristics of 42926 individuals within 29 European countries. We find that volunteering is positively associated to self-rated health. This association is partially mediated by household income. PMID:28273163

  3. Kinetic Modeling of the Tau PET Tracer (18)F-AV-1451 in Human Healthy Volunteers and Alzheimer Disease Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Olivier; Alagille, David; Sanabria, Sandra; Comley, Robert A; Weimer, Robby M; Borroni, Edilio; Mintun, Mark; Seneca, Nicholas; Papin, Caroline; Morley, Thomas; Marek, Ken; Seibyl, John P; Tamagnan, Gilles D; Jennings, Danna

    2017-07-01

    (18)F-AV-1451 is currently the most widely used of several experimental tau PET tracers. The objective of this study was to evaluate (18)F-AV-1451 binding with full kinetic analysis using a metabolite-corrected arterial input function and to compare parameters derived from kinetic analysis with SUV ratio (SUVR) calculated over different imaging time intervals. Methods:(18)F-AV-1451 PET brain imaging was completed in 16 subjects: 4 young healthy volunteers (YHV), 4 aged healthy volunteers (AHV), and 8 Alzheimer disease (AD) subjects. Subjects were imaged for 3.5 h, with arterial blood samples obtained throughout. PET data were analyzed using plasma and reference tissue-based methods to estimate the distribution volume, binding potential (BPND), and SUVR. BPND and SUVR were calculated using the cerebellar cortex as a reference region and were compared across the different methods and across the 3 groups (YHV, AHV, and AD). Results: AD demonstrated increased (18)F-AV-1451 retention compared with YHV and AHV based on both invasive and noninvasive analyses in cortical regions in which paired helical filament tau accumulation is expected in AD. A correlation of R(2) > 0.93 was found between BPND (130 min) and SUVR-1 at all time intervals. Cortical SUVR curves reached a relative plateau around 1.0-1.2 for YHV and AHV by approximately 50 min, but increased in AD by up to approximately 20% at 110-130 min and approximately 30% at 160-180 min relative to 80-100 min. Distribution volume (130 min) was lower by 30%-35% in the YHV than AHV. Conclusion: Our data suggest that although (18)F-AV-1451 SUVR curves do not reach a plateau and are still increasing in AD, an SUVR calculated over an imaging window of 80-100 min (as currently used in clinical studies) provides estimates of paired helical filament tau burden in good correlation with BPND, whereas SUVR sensitivity to regional cerebral blood changes needs further investigation. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and

  4. Intergenerational Transmission of Volunteering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I investigate the strength of intergenerational transmission of volunteering for non-profit associations in The Netherlands. Data from the Family Survey of the Dutch Population 2000 reveal that there are significant relations between current volunteering and parental volunteering in

  5. Intergenerational Transmission of Volunteering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I investigate the strength of intergenerational transmission of volunteering for non-profit associations in The Netherlands. Data from the Family Survey of the Dutch Population 2000 reveal that there are significant relations between current volunteering and parental volunteering in

  6. My Volunteer Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengAi

    2004-01-01

    SEVERAL years ago, I read a notice soliciting volunteer teachers to work in the west.It caught my interest and I clipped it. Upon graduation in August 2000, 1 postponed my graduate stud-ies in sociology and joined the Fudan Team of China Youth Volunteer Aid.My one-year volunteer life began in

  7. The Effect of Chronic Alprazolam Intake on Memory, Attention, and Psychomotor Performance in Healthy Human Male Volunteers

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    Zahid Sadek Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is used as an anxiolytic drug for generalized anxiety disorder and it has been reported to produce sedation and anterograde amnesia. In the current study, we randomly divided 26 healthy male volunteers into two groups: one group taking alprazolam 0.5 mg and the other taking placebo daily for two weeks. We utilized the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB software to assess the chronic effect of alprazolam. We selected Paired Associates Learning (PAL and Delayed Matching to Sample (DMS tests for memory, Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVP for attention, and Choice Reaction Time (CRT for psychomotor performance twice: before starting the treatment and after the completion of the treatment. We found statistically significant impairment of visual memory in one parameter of PAL and three parameters of DMS in alprazolam group. The PAL mean trial to success and total correct matching in 0-second delay, 4-second delay, and all delay situation of DMS were impaired in alprazolam group. RVP total hits after two weeks of alprazolam treatment were improved in alprazolam group. But such differences were not observed in placebo group. In our study, we found that chronic administration of alprazolam affects memory but attentive and psychomotor performance remained unaffected.

  8. Human volunteer study on the inhalational and dermal absorption of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) from the vapour phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Michael; Wrbitzky, Renate; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Schäper, Michael; van Thriel, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) is a versatile organic solvent frequently used for surface cleaning such as paint stripping or graffiti removal. Liquid NMP is rapidly absorbed through the skin but dermal vapour phase absorption might also play an important role for the uptake of the solvent. This particular aspect was investigated in an experimental study with 16 volunteers exposed to 80 mg/m(3) NMP for 8 h under either whole-body, i.e. inhalational plus dermal, or dermal-only conditions. Additionally, the influence of moderate physical workload on the uptake of NMP was studied. The urinary concentrations of NMP and its metabolites 5-hydroxy-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (5-HNMP) and 2-hydroxy-N-methylsuccinimide (2-HMSI) were followed for 48 h and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Percutaneous uptake delayed the elimination peak times and the apparent biological half-lives of NMP and 5-HNMP. Under resting conditions, dermal-only exposure resulted in the elimination of 71 +/- 8 mg NMP equivalents as compared to 169 +/- 15 mg for whole-body exposure. Moderate workload yielded 79 +/- 8 mg NMP (dermal-only) and 238 +/- 18 mg (whole-body). Thus, dermal absorption from the vapour phase may contribute significantly to the total uptake of NMP, e.g. from workplace atmospheres. As the concentration of airborne NMP does not reflect the body dose, biomonitoring should be carried out for surveillance purposes.

  9. Bioequivalence evaluation of two roxithromycin formulations in healthy human volunteers by high performance liquid cromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, M; Ribeiro, W; Ifa, D R; Moares, M E; Moraes, M O; Corrado, A P; De Nucci, G

    1999-01-01

    The bioequivalence of two different formulations containing roxithromycin (SPE-712-1). Oral suspension 300 mg/15 mL as test formulation and Rotram, tablets 300 mg as reference formulation, both by Schering Plough S.A., Brazil) was evaluated in 24 healthy volunteers of both sexes (12 male and 12 female). The study was conducted open with randomized two-period crossover design and a 14-day washout period. Each subject received 300 mg of each roxithromycin formulation. Plasma samples were obtained over a 72-hour interval and roxithromycin concentrations were analyzed by combined LC-MS/MS with positive ion electrospray ionization using selected ion monitoring method. From the plasma roxithromycin concentration vs time curves the following pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained: AUC(0-72 h), AUC(0-infinity), Cmax, t1/2 ratios and tmax individual differences. The 90% for confidence interval (CI) of geometric mean SPE-712-L/Rotram individual percent ratio were 105.0-128.3% for AUC(0-72 h), and 78.4-96.9 for Cmax. Although this 90% CI were marginally outside the interval proposed by the Food and Drug Administration, the probability assessed by the two-one sided West for ratios was included in the 0.8-1.25 interval, as we concluded that SPE-712-L oral suspension formulation was bioequivalent to Rotram tablet formulation for the extent and rate of absorption.

  10. Volunteers in Sport Organizations

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    VESNA CILERDZIC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done in order to describe student’s attitudes on volunteering in sport. The sample consists of 231 students from Serbia, average age 21,06±3,12years. They were from eight colleges and faculties. For nominal and ordinal variables, frequencies were determined. Many of examined students have volunteering experiences. The results confirm that students believe that we live in a society which his generally thought only to its own benefit; they think that volunteering can not solve the problems in society; that people do not have enough experience with volunteering and people do not have time to volunteering; volunteering is for young people; in their family and among friends, there are no volunteers; everyone could be volunteer only if that wishes; do not believe that volunteering is a waste of time and it helps in future career. The prevalent number of students, regardless of the Faculty which they belong, rarely volunteered in areas outside of sport. Results also shows that students from sport faculties have less experience in volunteering in sport than students from other faculties, but this difference is not dramatic.

  11. Respiratory Effects of the Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Peptide and Opioid Receptor Agonist, Cebranopadol, in Healthy Human Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Albert; Boom, Merel; Sarton, Elise; Hay, Justin; Groeneveld, Geert Jan; Neukirchen, Meike; Bothmer, John; Aarts, Leon; Olofsen, Erik

    2017-04-01

    Cebranopadol is a novel strong analgesic that coactivates the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor and classical opioid receptors. There are indications that activation of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor is related to ceiling in respiratory depression. In this phase 1 clinical trial, we performed a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study to quantify cebranopadol's respiratory effects. Twelve healthy male volunteers received 600 μg oral cebranopadol as a single dose. The following main endpoints were obtained at regular time intervals for 10 to 11 h after drug intake: ventilation at an elevated clamped end-tidal pressure of carbon dioxide, pain threshold and tolerance to a transcutaneous electrical stimulus train, and plasma cebranopadol concentrations. The data were analyzed using sigmoid Emax (respiration) and power (antinociception) models. Cebranopadol displayed typical opioid-like effects including miosis, analgesia, and respiratory depression. The blood-effect-site equilibration half-life for respiratory depression and analgesia was 1.2 ± 0.4 h (median ± standard error of the estimate) and 8.1 ± 2.5 h, respectively. The effect-site concentration causing 50% respiratory depression was 62 ± 4 pg/ml; the effect-site concentration causing 25% increase in currents to obtain pain threshold and tolerance was 97 ± 29 pg/ml. The model estimate for minimum ventilation was greater than zero at 4.9 ± 0.7 l/min (95% CI, 3.5 to 6.6 l/min). At the dose tested, cebranopadol produced respiratory depression with an estimate for minimum ventilation greater than 0 l/min. This is a major advantage over full μ-opioid receptor agonists that will produce apnea at high concentrations. Further clinical studies are needed to assess whether such behavior persists at higher doses.

  12. Genetic analysis of ectopic growth suppression during planar growth of integuments mediated by the Arabidopsis AGC protein kinase UNICORN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enugutti Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coordination of growth within a tissue layer is of critical importance for tissue morphogenesis. For example, cells within the epidermis undergo stereotypic cell divisions that are oriented along the plane of the layer (planar growth, thereby propagating the layered epidermal structure. Little is known about the developmental control that regulates such planar growth in plants. Recent evidence suggested that the Arabidopsis AGC VIII protein kinase UNICORN (UCN maintains planar growth by suppressing the formation of ectopic multicellular protrusions in several floral tissues including integuments. In the current model UCN controls this process during integument development by directly interacting with the ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE (ATS protein, a member of the KANADI (KAN family of transcription factors, thereby repressing its activity. Here we report on the further characterization of the UCN mechanism. Results Phenotypic analysis of flowers of ucn-1 plants impaired in floral homeotic gene activity revealed that any of the four floral whorls could produce organs carrying ucn-1 protrusions. The ectopic outgrowths of ucn integuments did not accumulate detectable signals of the auxin and cytokinin reporters DR5rev::GFP and ARR5::GUS, respectively. Furthermore, wild-type and ucn-1 seedlings showed similarly strong callus formation upon in vitro culture on callus-inducing medium. We also show that ovules of ucn-1 plants carrying the dominant ats allele sk21-D exhibited more pronounced protrusion formation. Finally ovules of ucn-1 ett-1 double mutants and ucn-1 ett-1 arf4-1 triple mutants displayed an additive phenotype. Conclusions These data deepen the molecular insight into the UCN-mediated control of planar growth during integument development. The presented evidence indicates that UCN downstream signaling does not involve the control of auxin or cytokinin homeostasis. The results also reveal that UCN interacts with ATS

  13. Validated LC-MS/MS method for quantification of gabapentin in human plasma: application to pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in Korean volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hee; Jhee, Ok-Hwa; Park, Song-Hee; Lee, Jung-Sik; Lee, Min-Ho; Shaw, Leslie M; Kim, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Yong-Seok; Kang, Ju-Seop

    2007-08-01

    A sensitive validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method (LC-MS/MS) for gabapentin (GB) in human plasma has been developed and applied to pharmacokinetic (PK) and bioequivalence (BE) studies in human. In a randomized crossover design with a 1-week period, each subject received a 300 mg GB capsule. The procedure involves a simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile and separated by LC with a Gemini C(18) column using acetonitrile-10 mm ammonium acetate (20:80, v/v, pH 3.2) as mobile phase. The GB and internal standard [(S)-(+)-alpha-aminocyclohexanepropionic acid hydrate] were analyzed using an LC-API 2000 MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The ionization was optimized using ESI(+) and selectivity was achieved using MS/MS analysis, m/z 172.0 --> 154.0 and m/z 172.0 --> 126.0 for GB and IS, respectively. The assay exhibited good linearity over a working range of 20-5000 ng/mL for GB in human plasma with a lower limit of quantitation of 20 ng/mL. No endogenous compounds were found to interfere with the analysis. The accuracy and precision were shown for concentrations over the standard ranges. This method was successfully applied for the PK and BE studies by analysis of blood samples taken up to 36 h after an oral dose of 300 mg of GB in 24 healthy volunteers.

  14. Rapid and Sensitive LC-MS/MS Method for Quantification of Fexofenadine in Human Plasma——Application to a Bioequivalence Study in Chinese Volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Guo-sheng; TENG Le-sheng; WU Yi; TANG Yun-biao; LIU Lan-ying; GU Jing-kai

    2007-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method(LC-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the quantification of fexofenadine in human plasma, to conduct comparative bioavailability studies. Human plasma was extracted with a mixture of dichloromethane-diethyl ether( volume ratio 2:3) in a basic environment and the extract was separated on a C18 column with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-methanol-10 mmol/L amspectrometry in the multiple-reaction-monitoring(MRM) mode. The linearity was within a range of 1-1000 ng/mL.The intra- and inter-day precision were <4.1% and <4.8%, respectively, and the accuracy was in the range of 95.0%-105%. The method was applied to the quantification of fexofenadine human plasma from 20 healthy male Chinese volunteers, according to a single dose, randomized, two-way crossover design with a two-week washout period. The mean values of major pharmacokinetic parameters of ρmax, AUC0-48, AUC0-∞, tmax, and t1/2 were determined from the plasma concentration. The analysis of variance(ANOVA) did not show any significant difference between the two products of fexofenadine and 90% confidence intervals fell within the acceptable range for bioequivalence.

  15. Broad blockade antibody responses in human volunteers after immunization with a multivalent norovirus VLP candidate vaccine: immunological analyses from a phase I clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C Lindesmith

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses (NoVs are the primary cause of acute gastroenteritis and are characterized by antigenic variation between genogroups and genotypes and antigenic drift of strains within the predominant GII.4 genotype. In the context of this diversity, an effective NoV vaccine must elicit broadly protective immunity. We used an antibody (Ab binding blockade assay to measure the potential cross-strain protection provided by a multivalent NoV virus-like particle (VLP candidate vaccine in human volunteers.Sera from ten human volunteers immunized with a multivalent NoV VLP vaccine (genotypes GI.1/GII.4 were analyzed for IgG and Ab blockade of VLP interaction with carbohydrate ligand, a potential correlate of protective immunity to NoV infection and illness. Immunization resulted in rapid rises in IgG and blockade Ab titers against both vaccine components and additional VLPs representing diverse strains and genotypes not represented in the vaccine. Importantly, vaccination induced blockade Ab to two novel GII.4 strains not in circulation at the time of vaccination or sample collection. GII.4 cross-reactive blockade Ab titers were more potent than responses against non-GII.4 VLPs, suggesting that previous exposure history to this dominant circulating genotype may impact the vaccine Ab response. Further, antigenic cartography indicated that vaccination preferentially activated preexisting Ab responses to epitopes associated with GII.4.1997. Study interpretations may be limited by the relevance of the surrogate neutralization assay and the number of immunized participants evaluated.Vaccination with a multivalent NoV VLP vaccine induces a broadly blocking Ab response to multiple epitopes within vaccine and non-vaccine NoV strains and to novel antigenic variants not yet circulating at the time of vaccination. These data reveal new information about complex NoV immune responses to both natural exposure and to vaccination, and support the potential

  16. Haemophilus ducreyi Seeks Alternative Carbon Sources and Adapts to Nutrient Stress and Anaerobiosis during Experimental Infection of Human Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R; Gao, Hongyu; Holley, Concerta L; Munson, Robert S; Liu, Yunlong; Spinola, Stanley M

    2016-05-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid in adults and cutaneous ulcers in children. In humans, H. ducreyi resides in an abscess and must adapt to a variety of stresses. Previous studies (D. Gangaiah, M. Labandeira-Rey, X. Zhang, K. R. Fortney, S. Ellinger, B. Zwickl, B. Baker, Y. Liu, D. M. Janowicz, B. P. Katz, C. A. Brautigam, R. S. Munson, Jr., E. J. Hansen, and S. M. Spinola, mBio 5:e01081-13, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01081-13) suggested that H. ducreyi encounters growth conditions in human lesions resembling those found in stationary phase. However, how H. ducreyi transcriptionally responds to stress during human infection is unknown. Here, we determined the H. ducreyi transcriptome in biopsy specimens of human lesions and compared it to the transcriptomes of bacteria grown to mid-log, transition, and stationary phases. Multidimensional scaling showed that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth. Compared to the inoculum (mid-log-phase bacteria), H. ducreyi harvested from pustules differentially expressed ∼93 genes, of which 62 were upregulated. The upregulated genes encode homologs of proteins involved in nutrient transport, alternative carbon pathways (l-ascorbate utilization and metabolism), growth arrest response, heat shock response, DNA recombination, and anaerobiosis. H. ducreyi upregulated few genes (hgbA, flp-tad, and lspB-lspA2) encoding virulence determinants required for human infection. Most genes regulated by CpxRA, RpoE, Hfq, (p)ppGpp, and DksA, which control the expression of virulence determinants and adaptation to a variety of stresses, were not differentially expressed in vivo, suggesting that these systems are cycling on and off during infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth and that adaptation to nutrient stress and anaerobiosis is crucial for H. ducreyi survival in humans.

  17. Dysregulated immune profiles for skin and dendritic cells are associated with increased host susceptibility to Haemophilus ducreyi infection in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Lang; Li, Xiaoman; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Zhao, Qianqian; Li, Wei; McClintick, Jeanette; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Edenberg, Howard J; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    In experimentally infected human volunteers, the cutaneous immune response to Haemophilus ducreyi is orchestrated by serum, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages, T cells, and myeloid dendritic cells (DC). This response either leads to spontaneous resolution of infection or progresses to pustule formation, which is associated with the failure of phagocytes to ingest the organism and the presence of Th1 and regulatory T cells. In volunteers who are challenged twice, some subjects form at least one pustule twice (PP group), while others have all inoculated sites resolve twice (RR group). Here, we infected PP and RR subjects with H. ducreyi and used microarrays to profile gene expression in infected and wounded skin. The PP and RR groups shared a core response to H. ducreyi. Additional transcripts that signified effective immune function were differentially expressed in RR infected sites, while those that signified a hyperinflammatory, dysregulated response were differentially expressed in PP infected sites. To examine whether DC drove these responses, we profiled gene expression in H. ducreyi-infected and uninfected monocyte-derived DC. Both groups had a common response that was typical of a type 1 DC (DC1) response. RR DC exclusively expressed many additional transcripts indicative of DC1. PP DC exclusively expressed differentially regulated transcripts characteristic of DC1 and regulatory DC. The data suggest that DC from the PP and RR groups respond differentially to H. ducreyi. PP DC may promote a dysregulated T-cell response that contributes to phagocytic failure, while RR DC may promote a Th1 response that facilitates bacterial clearance.

  18. Magnetization transfer in human achilles tendon assessed by a 3D ultrashort echo time sequence. Quantitative examinations in healthy volunteers at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syha, R.; Grosse, U.; Springer, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Martirosian, P.; Schick, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Ketelsen, D.; Claussen, C.D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2011-11-15

    Magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging provides insight into interactions between free and bounded water. Newly developed ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences implemented on whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) scanners allow MTC imaging in tissues with extremely fast signal decay such as tendons. The aim of this study was to develop a technique for the quantification of the MT effect in healthy Achilles tendons in-vivo at 3 Tesla. 16 normal tendons of volunteers with no history of tendinopathy were examined using a 3D-UTE sequence with a rectangular on-resonant excitation pulse and a Fermi-shaped off-resonant MT preparation pulse. The frequency of the MT pulse was varied from 1 to 5 kHz. MT effects were calculated in terms of the MT ratio (MTR) between measurements without and with MT preparation. Direct saturation effects of MT preparation on the signal intensity were evaluated using numerical simulation of Bloch equations. One patient with tendinopathy was examined to exemplarily show changes of MTR under pathologic conditions. Calculation of MTR data was feasible in all examined tendons and showed a decrease from 0.53 {+-} 0.05 to 0.25 {+-} 0.03 (1 kHz to 5 kHz) for healthy volunteers. Evaluation of variation with gender and dominance of ankle revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). In contrast, the patient with confirmed tendinopathy showed MTR values between 0.36 (1 kHz) and 0.19 (5 kHz). MT effects in human Achilles tendons can be reliably assessed in-vivo using a 3D UTE sequence at 3 T. All healthy tendons showed similar MTR values (coefficient of variation 10.0 {+-} 1.2 %). The examined patient showed a clearly different MT effect revealing a changed microstructure in the case of tendinopathy. (orig.)

  19. Daily grazing time as a risk factor for alterations at the hock joint integument in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burow, Elke; Thomsen, Peter Thorup; Rousing, Tine

    2013-01-01

    Structural changes lead to increasing sizes of dairy herds and a reduction in grazing use. Thus, cows spend more time in the barn and become more exposed to the barn environment. The cubicle surface can result in damages of the cows’ hock joint integument. Pasture is generally seen as a beneficial...... environment for cows. We hypothesized that a higher number of daily grazing hours reduce the probability of hock joint alterations in dairy cows from large herds. In total, 3148 lactating cows from 36 grazing and 20 zero-grazing dairy herds, with an average herd size of 173 cows, were assessed individually...... on one randomly selected body side for alterations in hock integument (score 0 for no alterations or hairless areas ,2 cm, 1 for at least one hairless area of >2 cm, 2 for lesion or swelling). The cows were further assessed for lameness and cleanliness. Information on breed, parity and days in milk per...

  20. Oxygen mask related nasal integument and osteocartilagenous disorders in F-16 fighter pilots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rieneke C Schreinemakers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A preliminary survey showed half of the participating Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF F-16 fighter pilots to have nasal integument and osteocartilagenous disorders related to wearing in-flight oxygen masks. AIM: To make an inventory of these disorders and possible associated factors. METHODS: All RNLAF F-16 pilots were requested to fill out a semi-structured questionnaire for a cross-sectional survey. Additionally, one squadron in The Netherlands and pilots in operational theater were asked to participate in a prospective study that required filling out a pain score after each flight. Pilot- and flight-related variables on all participants were collected from the RNLAF database. A linear mixed model was built to identify associated factors with the post-flight pain score. RESULTS: The response rate to the survey was 83%. Ninety of the 108 participants (88%, 6 missing reported tenderness, irritation, pain, erythema, skin lesions, callous skin, or swelling of nasal bridge integument or architecture. Seventy-two participants (71%, 6 missing reported their symptoms to be troublesome after a mean of 6±3 out of 10 flights (0;10, 54 missing. Sixty-six pilots participated in scoring post-flight pain. Pain scores were significantly higher if a participant had ≥3 nasal disorders, after longer than average flights, after flying abroad, and after flying with night vision goggles (respectively +2.7 points, p = 0.003; +0.2 points, p = 0.027; +1.8 points, p = 0.001; +1.2 points p = 0.005. Longer than average NVG flights and more than average NVG hours per annum decreased painscores (respectively -0.8 points, p = 0.017; -0.04 points, p = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of the RNLAF F-16 fighter pilot community has nasal disorders in the contact area of the oxygen mask, including pain. Six pilot- or flight-related characteristics influence the experienced level of pain.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of integument differentially expressed genes in the pigment mutant (quail) during molting of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hongyi; Liu, Chun; Cheng, Tingcai; Li, Qiongyan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    In the silkworm Bombyx mori, pigment mutants with diverse body colors have been maintained throughout domestication for about 5000 years. The silkworm larval body color is formed through the mutual interaction of melanin, ommochromes, pteridines and uric acid. These pigments/compounds are synthesized by the cooperative action of various genes and enzymes. Previous reports showed that melanin, ommochrome and pteridine are increased in silkworm quail (q) mutants. To understand the pigment increase and alterations in pigment synthesis in q mutant, transcriptome profiles of the silkworm integument were investigated at 16 h after head capsule slippage in the fourth molt in q mutants and wild-type (Dazao). Compared to the wild-type, 1161 genes were differentially expressed in the q mutant. Of these modulated genes, 62.4% (725 genes) were upregulated and 37.6% (436 genes) were downregulated in the q mutant. The molecular function of differently expressed genes was analyzed by Blast2GO. The results showed that upregulated genes were mainly involved in protein binding, small molecule binding, transferase activity, nucleic acid binding, specific DNA-binding transcription factor activity and chromatin binding, while exclusively down-expressed genes functioned in oxidoreductase activity, cofactor binding, tetrapyrrole binding, peroxidase activity and pigment binding. We focused on genes related to melanin, pteridine and ommochrome biosynthesis; transport of uric acid; and juvenile hormone metabolism because of their importance in integument coloration during molting. This study identified differently expressed genes implicated in silkworm integument formation and pigmentation using silkworm q mutant. The results estimated the number and types of genes that drive new integument formation.

  2. Haemophilus ducreyi Seeks Alternative Carbon Sources and Adapts to Nutrient Stress and Anaerobiosis during Experimental Infection of Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Baker, Beth; Fortney, Kate R.; Gao, Hongyu; Holley, Concerta L.; Munson, Robert S.; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid in adults and cutaneous ulcers in children. In humans, H. ducreyi resides in an abscess and must adapt to a variety of stresses. Previous studies (D. Gangaiah, M. Labandeira-Rey, X. Zhang, K. R. Fortney, S. Ellinger, B. Zwickl, B. Baker, Y. Liu, D. M. Janowicz, B. P. Katz, C. A. Brautigam, R. S. Munson, Jr., E. J. Hansen, and S. M. Spinola, mBio 5:e01081-13, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01081-13) suggested that H. ducreyi encounters growth conditions in human lesions resembling those found in stationary phase. However, how H. ducreyi transcriptionally responds to stress during human infection is unknown. Here, we determined the H. ducreyi transcriptome in biopsy specimens of human lesions and compared it to the transcriptomes of bacteria grown to mid-log, transition, and stationary phases. Multidimensional scaling showed that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth. Compared to the inoculum (mid-log-phase bacteria), H. ducreyi harvested from pustules differentially expressed ∼93 genes, of which 62 were upregulated. The upregulated genes encode homologs of proteins involved in nutrient transport, alternative carbon pathways (l-ascorbate utilization and metabolism), growth arrest response, heat shock response, DNA recombination, and anaerobiosis. H. ducreyi upregulated few genes (hgbA, flp-tad, and lspB-lspA2) encoding virulence determinants required for human infection. Most genes regulated by CpxRA, RpoE, Hfq, (p)ppGpp, and DksA, which control the expression of virulence determinants and adaptation to a variety of stresses, were not differentially expressed in vivo, suggesting that these systems are cycling on and off during infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the in vivo transcriptome is distinct from those of in vitro growth and that adaptation to nutrient stress and anaerobiosis is crucial for H. ducreyi survival in humans. PMID:26930707

  3. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Modulates Heat Nociception in the Human Brain - An fMRI Study in Healthy Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we record...... cortex. Sumatriptan injection reversed these changes. CONCLUSION: The changes in BOLD-signals in the brain after CGRP infusion suggests that systemic CGRP modulates nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal pain pathways in response to noxious heat stimuli.......BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we recorded...

  4. The Effect of Lactulose on the Composition of the Intestinal Microbiota and Short-chain Fatty Acid Production in Human Volunteers and a Computer-controlled Model of the Proximal Large Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Nuenen, M.H.M.C. van; Heuvel, E.G. van den; Pool, W.; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the in vivo effect of lactulose on faecal parameters with the effect in a dynamic, computer-controlled in vitro model of the proximal large intestine (TIM-2). Faecal samples from 10 human volunteers collected before (non-adapted) and after 1 week of

  5. Expression of OmpP2A and OmpP2B is not required for pustule formation by Haemophilus ducreyi in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Diane; Luke, Nicole R; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Campagnari, Anthony A; Spinola, Stanley M

    2006-03-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi express two porin proteins, termed OmpP2A and OmpP2B. To test whether expression of OmpP2A and OmpP2B was necessary for virulence in humans, eight volunteers were experimentally infected with the parent (35000HP) in one arm and a double OmpP2A OmpP2B mutant (35000HP::P2AB) in the other arm. The pustule formation rates were 58.3% (95% CI, 33.2-83.5%) for the parent and 41.7% (95% CI, 19.3-64.0%) for the mutant (P=0.25). Biopsy of 35000HP and 35000HP::P2AB-infected sites yielded similar amounts of bacteria in quantitative culture. These results indicate that expression of OmpP2A and OmpP2B is not necessary to initiate disease or to progress to pustule formation in humans.

  6. HPLC detection of plasma concentrations of diclofenac in human volunteers administered with povidone-ethylcellulose-based experimental transdermal matrix-type patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, B; Mahapatra, S; Das, S; Roy, G; Dey, S

    2006-06-01

    By developing a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, we estimated the blood concentrations of diclofenac in human volunteers administered with the transdermal patches prepared with povidone-ethylcellulose and oral diclofenac tablets. Drug-excipient interaction studies were done using the FTIR technique. The external morphology of the prepared patch before and after application to human skin was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. FTIR studies revealed that there was no predominant interaction between the drug and polymers. In vivo studies revealed that the average concentrations of drug in plasma were 376, 1562, 2953, 2902, 2864, and 2948 ng/ml after 2, 4, 8, 24, 30, and 48 h from patches each containing 50 mg of diclofenac diethylamine, respectively, and the mean concentrations of drug in plasma after the oral administration of marketed tablet containing 50 mg diclofenac sodium were 383.7, 2569, 3693.5, 162.5, and 55.3 ng/ml at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 30 h after oral administration. Values of Cmax were 3693.5 after oral administration and 2953.8 ng/ml in the case of transdermal application. From this study, we have achieved the sustained blood level of diclofenac from the experimental patches along with an analytical method based on HPLC to determine the diclofenac blood level. Copyright 2006 Prous Science.

  7. Deadly hairs, lethal feathers--convergent evolution of poisonous integument in mammals and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikus, Maksim V; Astrowski, Aliaksandr A

    2014-07-01

    Hairs and feathers are textbook examples of the convergent evolution of the follicular appendage structure between mammals and birds. While broadly recognized for their convergent thermoregulatory, camouflage and sexual display functions, hairs and feathers are rarely thought of as deadly defence tools. Several recent studies, however, show that in some species of mammals and birds, the integument can, in fact, be a de facto lethal weapon. One mammalian example is provided by African crested rats, which seek for and chew on the bark of plants containing the highly potent toxin, ouabain. These rats then coat their fur with ouabain-containing saliva. For efficient toxin retention, the rodents have evolved highly specialized fenestrated and mostly hollow hair shafts that soak up liquids, which essentially function as wicks. On the avian side of the vertebrate integumental variety spectrum, several species of birds of New Guinea have evolved resistance to highly potent batrachotoxins, which they acquire from their insect diet. While the mechanism of bird toxicity remains obscure, in a recently published issue of the journal, Dumbacher and Menon explore the intriguing idea that to achieve efficient storage of batrachotoxins in their skin, some birds exploit the basic permeability barrier function of their epidermis. Batrachotoxins become preferentially sequestered in their epidermis and are then transferred to feathers, likely through the exploitation of specialized avian lipid-storing multigranular body organelles. Here, we discuss wider implications of this intriguing concept.

  8. Humanização e voluntariado: estudo qualitativo em hospitais públicos Humanización y voluntariado: estudio cualitativo en hospitales públicos Humanization and volunteering: a qualitative study in public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cezira Fantini Nogueira-Martins

    2010-10-01

    de Sao Paulo, Sureste de Brasil. La investigación fue realizada en 2008 y 2009. Las entrevistas fueron analizadas según los principios del análisis temático. ANÁLISIS DE RESULTADOS: Cinco temas principales fueron formulados: perfil del voluntario (edad, sexo, grupo de renta; organización del trabajo voluntario (término de compromiso, entrenamiento; relaciones voluntariado-hospital (relación con la dirección del hospital y con los funcionarios; motivación (solidaridad, experiencia anterior con enfermedades propias o de familiares, realización personal, resolución de conflictos y beneficiarios (individual, dual, colectivo; humanización y actividades de los voluntarios (cuidados del paciente, apoyo logístico, apoyo emocional, desarrollo de habilidades de los pacientes, recreación, organización de eventos conmemorativos. CONCLUSIONES: En la actividad desarrollada por los voluntarios hay aspectos positivos (como la contribución para la humanización hospitalaria, así como problemáticos (como la realización de actividades que son atribuciones de funcionarios. Es necesaria atención a la normatización de las actividades voluntarias, especialmente en el cuidado con los pacientes, así como las acciones de valorización del voluntariado en los hospitales e integración de los voluntarios como los grupos de trabajo de humanización.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the profile of volunteers and their work process in hospital humanization. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES: The following instruments were used: a sociodemographic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview, applied to 26 volunteer coordinators and 26 volunteers, who belong to 25 hospitals in the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, between 2008 and 2009. Interviews were analyzed according to thematic analysis principles. ANALYSIS OF RESULTS: Five main themes were identified: volunteer profile (age, sex, level of income; volunteer work organization (volunteer agreement, training; volunteer

  9. Affecting Community Change: Involving "Pro Bono" Professionals as Extension Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Diane T.; Culp, Ken, III

    2013-01-01

    "Pro bono" volunteers provide an effective means for Extension professionals to expand limited financial and human resources. Volunteers recruited from business settings can provide skills, abilities, expertise, leadership, and resources to Extension programs. Allowing professional volunteers to meet their desired leadership goals while…

  10. The Motivation to Volunteer: A Systemic Quality of Life Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shye, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to volunteer motivation research is developed. Instead of asking what motivates the volunteer (accepting "any" conceptual category), we ask to what extent volunteering rewards the individual with each benefit taken from a complete set of possible benefits. As a "complete set of benefits" we use the 16 human functioning modes…

  11. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  12. College Students' Volunteering: Factors Related to Current Volunteering, Volunteer Settings, and Motives for Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Erin W.; Warta, Samantha; Erichsen, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Research has not explored the types of settings that college students prefer to volunteer for and how these settings might be influenced by personal factors (e.g., demographic, academic major, volunteering motivation, religiosity). Students from a Midwestern university (N = 406, 71.9% female) completed a survey that inquired about their…

  13. Quantification of human brain benzodiazepine receptors using [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylflumazenil: a first report in volunteers and epileptic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, Philippe [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Sanabria-Bohorquez, Sandra [Imaging Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, Philadelphia (United States); Bol, Anne; Volder, Anne de; Labar, Daniel [Unite de Tomographie par Positrons, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Rijckevorsel, K. van [Service de Neurologie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Bruxelles (Belgium); Gallez, Bernard [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, CMFA/REMA, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73-40 Avenue Mounier, 1200, Bruxelles (Belgium); Unite de Resonance Magnetique Biomedicale, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2003-12-01

    Fluorine-18 fluoroethylflumazenil ([{sup 18}F]FEF) is a tracer for central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors which is proposed as an alternative to carbon-11 flumazenil for in vivo imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) in humans. In this study, [{sup 18}F]FEF kinetic data were acquired using a 60-min two-injection protocol on three normal subjects and two patients suffering from mesiotemporal epilepsy as demonstrated by abnormal magnetic resonance imaging and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. First, a tracer bolus injection was performed and [{sup 18}F]FEF rapidly distributed in the brain according to the known BZ receptor distribution. Thirty minutes later a displacement injection of 0.01 mg/kg of unlabelled flumazenil was performed. Activity was rapidly displaced from all BZ receptor regions demonstrating the specific binding of [{sup 18}F]FEF. No displacement was observed in the pons. Plasma input function was obtained from arterial blood sampling, and metabolite analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Metabolite quantification revealed a fast decrease in tracer plasma concentration, such that at 5 min post injection about 70% of the total radioactivity in plasma corresponded to [{sup 18}F]FEF, reaching 24% at 30 min post injection. The interactions between [{sup 18}F]FEF and BZ receptors were described using linear compartmental models with plasma input and reference tissue approaches. Binding potential values were in agreement with the known distribution of BZ receptors in human brain. Finally, in two patients with mesiotemporal sclerosis, reduced uptake of [{sup 18}F]FEF was clearly observed in the implicated left hippocampus. (orig.)

  14. Recombinant HPA-1a antibody therapy for treatment of fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: proof of principle in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghevaert, Cedric; Herbert, Nina; Hawkins, Louise; Grehan, Nicola; Cookson, Philip; Garner, Steve F; Crisp-Hihn, Abigail; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Evans, Amanda; Balan, Kottekkattu; Ouwehand, Willem H; Armour, Kathryn L; Clark, Mike R; Williamson, Lorna M

    2013-07-18

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, caused by the maternal generation of antibodies against fetal human platelet antigen-1a (HPA-1a), can result in intracranial hemorrhage and intrauterine death. We have developed a therapeutic human recombinant high-affinity HPA-1a antibody (B2G1Δnab) that competes for binding to the HPA-1a epitope but carries a modified constant region that does not bind to Fcγ receptors. In vitro studies with a range of clinical anti-HPA-1a sera have shown that B2G1Δnab blocks monocyte chemiluminescence by >75%. In this first-in-man study, we demonstrate that HPA-1a1b autologous platelets (matching fetal phenotype) sensitized with B2G1Δnab have the same intravascular survival as unsensitized platelets (190 hours), while platelets sensitized with a destructive immunoglobulin G1 version of the antibody (B2G1) are cleared from the circulation in 2 hours. Mimicking the situation in fetuses receiving B2G1Δnab as therapy, we show that platelets sensitized with a combination of B2G1 (representing destructive HPA-1a antibody) and B2G1Δnab survive 3 times as long in circulation compared with platelets sensitized with B2G1 alone. This confirms the therapeutic potential of B2G1Δnab. The efficient clearance of platelets sensitized with B2G1 also opens up the opportunity to carry out studies of prophylaxis to prevent alloimmunization in HPA-1a-negative mothers.

  15. Psilocybin-induced deficits in automatic and controlled inhibition are attenuated by ketanserin in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quednow, Boris B; Kometer, Michael; Geyer, Mark A; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2012-02-01

    The serotonin-2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and related inhibitory gating and behavioral inhibition deficits of schizophrenia patients. The hallucinogen psilocybin disrupts automatic forms of sensorimotor gating and response inhibition in humans, but it is unclear so far whether the 5-HT(2A)R or 5-HT(1A)R agonist properties of its bioactive metabolite psilocin account for these effects. Thus, we investigated whether psilocybin-induced deficits in automatic and controlled inhibition in healthy humans could be attenuated by the 5-HT(2A/2C)R antagonist ketanserin. A total of 16 healthy participants received placebo, ketanserin (40 mg p.o.), psilocybin (260 μg/kg p.o.), or psilocybin plus ketanserin in a double-blind, randomized, and counterbalanced order. Sensorimotor gating was measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response. The effects on psychopathological core dimensions and behavioral inhibition were assessed by the altered states of consciousness questionnaire (5D-ASC), and the Color-Word Stroop Test. Psilocybin decreased PPI at short lead intervals (30 ms), increased all 5D-ASC scores, and selectively increased errors in the interference condition of the Stroop Test. Stroop interference and Stroop effect of the response latencies were increased under psilocybin as well. Psilocybin-induced alterations were attenuated by ketanserin pretreatment, whereas ketanserin alone had no significant effects. These findings suggest that the disrupting effects of psilocybin on automatic and controlled inhibition processes are attributable to 5-HT(2A)R stimulation. Sensorimotor gating and attentional control deficits of schizophrenia patients might be due to changes within the 5-HT(2A)R system.

  16. From frog integument to human skin: dermatological perspectives from frog skin biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haslam, I.S.; Roubos, E.; Mangoni, M.L.; Yoshizato, K.; Vaudry, H.; Kloepper, J.E.; Pattwell, D.M.; Maderson, P.F.A.; Paus, R.

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, frogs have been studied across various scientific fields, including physiology, embryology, neuroscience, (neuro)endocrinology, ecology, genetics, behavioural science, evolution, drug development, and conservation biology. In some cases, frog skin has proven very successful as a

  17. From frog integument to human skin: dermatological perspectives from frog skin biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haslam, I.S.; Roubos, E.; Mangoni, M.L.; Yoshizato, K.; Vaudry, H.; Kloepper, J.E.; Pattwell, D.M.; Maderson, P.F.A.; Paus, R.

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, frogs have been studied across various scientific fields, including physiology, embryology, neuroscience, (neuro)endocrinology, ecology, genetics, behavioural science, evolution, drug development, and conservation biology. In some cases, frog skin has proven very successful as a

  18. Development of a simple radiant heat induced experimental pain model for evaluation of analgesics in normal healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.U.R Naidu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Human experimental pain models help to understand the mechanism of the painful conditions and can also be adopted to test analgesic efficacy of drugs. In early phases, the clinical development of new analgesics is hindered due to the lack of reliable tests for the experimental pain models. In the present study, we have developed and validated a simple radiant heat pain model which can be used for future screening of various analgesic agents. Materials and Methods : We have standardized the thermal pain model by recording pain threshold and pain tolerance time in seconds at three different intensities and levels in 24 healthy subjects. Reproducibility of the test procedure was evaluated by recording the pain parameters by two observers on three consecutive days. Validity of model was further tested by evaluating the analgesic effect of tramadol. Results and Conclusions : Use of radiant heat pain model with high intensity and short level was found to produce low variability with coefficient of variation less than 5%. Interobserver and interperiod reproducibility was very good as shown by Bland - Altman plot; with most of the values within ± 2SD. Tramadol produced statistically significant increase in pain threshold time. The newly developed pain model produces a type of experimental pain which is responsive to analgesic effects of tramadol at clinically relevant doses.

  19. High-throughput determination of carbocysteine in human plasma by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry: application to a bioequivalence study of two formulations in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hui-Chang; Zhao, Li-zi; Zhong, Guo-ping; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, Bo; Deng, Ying; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Min

    2006-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method to determine carbocysteine in human plasma was developed and fully validated. After methanol-induced protein precipitation of the plasma samples, carbocysteine was subjected to LC/MS/MS analysis using electrospray ionization (ESI). The MS system was operated in the selected ion monitoring (SRM) mode. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Hypurity C18 column (i.d. 2.1 mm x 50 mm, particle size 5 microm). The method had a chromatographic running time of 2.0 min and linear calibration curves over the concentration ranges of 0.1-20 microg/mL for carbocysteine. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of the method was 0.1 microg/mL for carbocysteine. The intra- and inter-day precision was less than 7% for all quality control samples at concentrations of 0.5, 2.0, and 10.0 microg/mL. These results indicate that the method was efficient with a simple preparation procedure and a very short running time (2.0 min) for carbocysteine compared with methods reported in the literature and had high selectivity, acceptable accuracy, precision and sensitivity. The validated LC/MS/MS method has been successfully used to a bioequivalence study of two tablet formulations of carbocysteine in healthy volunteers. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Blanching improves anthocyanin absorption from highbush blueberry ( Vaccinium corymbosum L.) purée in healthy human volunteers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bo', Cristian; Riso, Patrizia; Brambilla, Ada; Gardana, Claudio; Rizzolo, Anna; Simonetti, Paolo; Bertolo, Gianni; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Porrini, Marisa

    2012-09-12

    Blueberries ( Vaccinium corymbosum L.) are rich sources of phenolics and anthocyanins (ACNs). We investigated the absorption of ACNs after consumption of one portion (300 g) of minimally processed blueberry purée (P) obtained from blanched (BL) or unblanched (NB) berries. A repeated-measures, crossover design study was conducted on healthy human volunteers. Blood was drawn between baseline and 24 h after BL-P or NB-P consumption, while urine were collected from the day before the experiment up to 48 h. Total plasma ACN content was not significantly different, while phenolics content was higher in BL-P with respect to NB-P. The maximum ACN absorption in plasma was observed after 1.5 h from the intake of the purées and was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) after the intake of BL-P. Both products increased the excretion of hippuric acid in urine. In conclusion, blanching had no significant effect on total ACN content and enhanced their absorption from minimally processed purées.

  1. A rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for determination of lercanidipine in human plasma and its application in a bioequivalence study in Chinese healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobing; Shi, Fuguo; He, Xiaojing; Jian, Lingyan; Ding, Li

    2016-09-05

    A rapid and highly sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of lercanidipine (LER) in human plasma. The plasma sample was deproteinized with methanol after addition of diazepam (internal standard, IS) and separated on a 38°C Hedera ODS-2 analytical column with a mobile phase of methanol and 5mM ammonium acetate buffer solution containing 0.1% formic acid at an isocratic flow rate of 400μL/min. The detection was performed on an API 4000 tandem mass spectrometer coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) source in positive ESI mode. Quantification was conducted by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of the transitions of m/z 612.2→280.2 for LER and m/z 285.1→193.1 for IS, respectively. The method exhibited high sensitivity (LLOQ of 0.015ng/mL) and good linearity over the concentration range of 0.015-8.0ng/mL. No matrix effect and carry-over effect were observed. The values on both the occasions (intra- and inter-day) were all within 15% at three concentration levels. This robust method was successfully applied in a bioequivalence study to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of LER in 59 healthy male Chinese volunteers after a single oral administration of 10mg LER.

  2. Absorption, metabolism, and antioxidant effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum l.) polyphenols after ingestion of a standardized extract in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U; Jilma-Stohlawetz, Petra; Rios, Jolian; Hingorani, Lal; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2006-11-15

    The intake of polyphenols has been demonstrated to have health-promoting and disease-preventive effects. The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.), which is rich in several polyphenols, has been used for centuries in ancient cultures for its medicinal purposes. The potential health benefits of pomegranate polyphenols have been demonstrated in numerous in vitro studies and in vivo experiments. This study investigated the absorption and antioxidant effects of a standardized extract from pomegranate in healthy human volunteers after the acute consumption of 800 mg of extract. Results indicate that ellagic acid (EA) from the extract is bioavailable, with an observed C(max) of 33 ng/mL at t(max) of 1 h. The plasma metabolites urolithin A, urolithin B, hydroxyl-urolithin A, urolithin A-glucuronide, and dimethyl ellagic acid-glucuronide were identified by HPLC-MS. The antioxidant capacity measured with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay was increased with a maximum effect of 32% after 0.5 h, whereas the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was not affected. The inflammation marker interleukin-6 (IL-6) was not significantly affected after 4 h after the consumption of the extract. Overall, this study demonstrated the absorbability of EA from a pomegranate extract high in ellagitannin content and its ex vivo antioxidant effects.

  3. Determination of risperidone in human plasma by HPLC-MS/MS and its application to a pharmacokinetic study in Chinese volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-zhu HUANG; Jian-zhong SHENTU; Junc-hun CHEN; Jian LIU; Hui-li ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a rapid, specific and sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for determination of risperidone (RIS) in human serum using paroxetine as an internal standard (IS). An Alltima-C 18separation. The analysis was performed by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) method, and the peak area of the m/z 411.3→ 191.1 transition for RIS was measured versus that of the m/z 330.1→192.1 transition for IS to generate the standard curves. The assay linearity of RIS was confirmed over the range 0.25~50.00 ng/ml and the limit of quantitation was 0.05 ng/ml. The linear range corresponds well with the serum concentrations of the analytes obtained in clinical pharmacokinetic studies. Intraday and interday relative standard deviations were 1.85%~9.09% and 1.56%~4.38%, respectively. The recovery of RIS from serum was in the range of 70.20%~84.50%. The method was successfully applied to investigate the bioequivalence between two kinds of tablets (test versus reference products) in 18 healthy male Chinese volunteers. The result suggests that two formulations are bioequivalent.

  4. Human Dosimetry and Preliminary Tumor Distribution of 18F-Fluoropaclitaxel in Healthy Volunteers and Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients Using PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdziel, Karen A.; Kalen, Joseph D.; Hirsch, Jerry I.; Wilson, John D.; Bear, Harry D.; Logan, Jean; McCumisky, James; Moorman-Sykes, Kathy; Adler, Stephen; Choyke, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    18F-fluoropaclitaxel is a radiolabeled form of paclitaxel, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Preclinical data suggest that 18F-fluoropaclitaxel may be a reasonable surrogate for measuring the uptake of paclitaxel. As a substrate of P-glycoprotein, a drug efflux pump associated with multidrug resistance, 18F-fluoropaclitaxel may also be useful in identifying multidrug resistance and predicting tumor response for drugs other than paclitaxel. Methods After informed consent was obtained, 3 healthy volunteers and 3 patients with untreated breast cancer (neoadjuvant chemotherapy candidates, tumor size > 2 cm) received an intravenous infusion of 18F-fluoropaclitaxel and then underwent PET/CT. Healthy volunteers underwent serial whole-body imaging over an approximately 3-h interval, and organ 18F residence times were determined from the time–activity curves uncorrected for decay to determine dosimetry. Radiation dose estimates were calculated using OLINDA/EXM software. For breast cancer patients, dynamic imaging of the primary tumor was performed for 60 min, followed by static whole-body scans at 1 and 2 h after injection. Results Dosimetry calculations showed that the gallbladder received the highest dose (229.50 μGy/MBq [0.849 rad/mCi]), followed by the small and large intestines (161.26 μGy/MBq [0.597 rad/mCi] and 184.59 μGy/MBq [0.683 rad/mCi]). The resultant effective dose was 28.79 μGy/MBq (0.107 rem/mCi). At approximately 1 h after injection, an average of 42% of the decay-corrected activity was in the gastrointestinal system, with a mean of 0.01% in the tumor. All 3 breast cancer patients showed retention of 18F-fluoropaclitaxel and ultimately demonstrated a complete pathologic response (no invasive cancer in the breast or axillary nodes) to chemotherapy that included a taxane (either paclitaxel or docetaxel) at surgical resection. The tumor-to-background ratio increased with time to a maximum of 7.7 at 20 min. Conclusion This study demonstrates the

  5. Human Dosimetry and Preliminary Tumor Distribution of (superscript)18F-Fluoropaclitaxel in Healthy Volunteers and Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients Using PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdziel, K.A.; Logan, J.; Kurdziel, K.A.; Kalen, J.D.; Hirsch, J.I.; Wilson, J.D.; Bear, H.D.; Logan, J.; McCumisky, J.; Moorman-Sykes, K.; Adler, S.; Choyke, P.L.

    2011-08-17

    {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel is a radiolabeled form of paclitaxel, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Preclinical data suggest that {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel may be a reasonable surrogate for measuring the uptake of paclitaxel. As a substrate of P-glycoprotein, a drug efflux pump associated with multidrug resistance, {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel may also be useful in identifying multidrug resistance and predicting tumor response for drugs other than paclitaxel. After informed consent was obtained, 3 healthy volunteers and 3 patients with untreated breast cancer (neoadjuvant chemotherapy candidates, tumor size > 2 cm) received an intravenous infusion of {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel and then underwent PET/CT. Healthy volunteers underwent serial whole-body imaging over an approximately 3-h interval, and organ {sup 18}F residence times were determined from the time-activity curves uncorrected for decay to determine dosimetry. Radiation dose estimates were calculated using OLINDA/EXM software. For breast cancer patients, dynamic imaging of the primary tumor was performed for 60 min, followed by static whole-body scans at 1 and 2 h after injection. Dosimetry calculations showed that the gallbladder received the highest dose (229.50 {mu}Gy/MBq [0.849 rad/mCi]), followed by the small and large intestines (161.26 {mu}Gy/MBq [0.597 rad/mCi] and 184.59 {mu}Gy/MBq [0.683 rad/mCi]). The resultant effective dose was 28.79 {mu}Gy/MBq (0.107 rem/mCi). At approximately 1 h after injection, an average of 42% of the decay-corrected activity was in the gastrointestinal system, with a mean of 0.01% in the tumor. All 3 breast cancer patients showed retention of {sup 18}F-fluoropaclitaxel and ultimately demonstrated a complete pathologic response (no invasive cancer in the breast or axillary nodes) to chemotherapy that included a taxane (either paclitaxel or docetaxel) at surgical resection. The tumor-to-background ratio increased with time to a maximum of 7.7 at 20 min. This study

  6. A new arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase in silkworm (Bombyx mori) affects integument pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yaohang; Li, Jiaorong; Zhao, Tianfu; Li, Guannan; Zhu, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Dopamine is a precursor for melanin synthesis. Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) is involved in the melatonin formation in insects because it could catalyze the transformation from dopamine to dopamine-N-acetyldopamine. In this study, we identified a new AANAT gene in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) and assessed its role in the silkworm. The cDNA of this gene encodes 233 amino acids that shares 57 % amino acid identity with the Bm-iAANAT protein. We thus refer to this gene as Bm-iAANAT2. To investigate the role of Bm-iAANAT2, we constructed a transgenic interference system using a 3xp3 promoter to suppress the expression of Bm-iAANAT2 in the silkworm. We observed that melanin deposition occurs in the head and integument in transgenic lines. To verify the melanism pattern, dopamine content and the enzyme activity of AANAT were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We found that an increase in dopamine levels affects melanism patterns on the heads of transgenic B. mori. A reduction in the enzyme activity of AANAT leads to changes in dopamine levels. We analyzed the expression of the Bm-iAANAT2 genes by qPCR and found that the expression of Bm-iAANAT2 gene is significantly lower in transgenic lines. Our results lead us to conclude that Bm-iAANAT2 is a new arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene in the silkworm and is involved in the metabolism of the dopamine to avoid the generation of melanin.

  7. My volunteer work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫子辰

    2015-01-01

    <正>As we all know,being a volunteer can help us learn many things,such as new skills,staying active,improving our social skills,accumulating work experience,making new friends with those who have the same topic,helping us grow more rapidly...I can still recall the days when I worked as a volunteer in a hospital in my city.The unforgetable experience was not only a volunteer work,but also a small society to me.It was in the summer vocation after high school entrance examination,when I had nothing to do but to play computer

  8. Discovering University Student Human Resources, Devel-oping Museum Volunteer Teams%发掘大学生人力资源发展博物馆志愿队伍

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛暖珠; 蓝韶清

    2014-01-01

    随着社会的进步和文博事业的发展,志愿者队伍建设成为博物馆一项重要的工作。高校博物馆作为博物馆界中特殊一族,它们隶属高校的背景特点为其发展大学生志愿者提供了得天独厚的优越条件。本文探讨了高校博物馆发掘大学生人力资源、发展博物馆志愿队伍的意义,并结合广东中医药博物馆志愿者队伍建设的实际,交流了开展志愿者工作的经验和建设志愿者队伍的体会。%With social progress and the development of culture and museum cause, the construction of volunteer teams has be-come an important task of museums. University museums, as a special group in the museum circle, their university background has provided advantaged favorable conditions for their develop-ment of university student volunteers. This paper explored the significance of discovering university student human resources for university museums and developing museum volunteer teams, and combined with the practical situation of volunteer team con-struction in Guangdong Museum of Traditional Chinese Medicine, we introduced our experience of volunteer work and volunteer team construction.

  9. Volunteering, Happiness and Public Policy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Is the activity of volunteering something that benefits the volunteer as well as the recipient of the volunteer's activities? We analyze this relationship and apply matching estimators to the large- scale British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) data set to estimate the causal impact of volunteering on happiness. We take into account personality traits that could jointly determine volunteering behaviour and happiness. We find that the causal impact of volunteering on happiness is positive and in...

  10. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design. The roles of Fc receptor-mediated protective antibody responses are gaining more attention due to their potential contribution to the low-level protection against HIV-1 infection that they provided in the RV144 trial. At the same time, information about hMabs from other human HIV vaccine studies is very limited. In the current study, both immune sera and monoclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans showed not only high-level ADCC and ADCP activities but also cross-subtype ADCC and ADCP activities when a polyvalent DNA prime-protein boost

  11. The Effective Volunteer Teacher

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides information for volunteer teachers of adults and older youth on how to conduct an effective presentation. Topics include focus of presentation, characteristics of the learners, teaching methods, visual aides and evaluations.

  12. NASTEP Volunteer Request (CSA) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Allows users to add themselves to a Service Area wide ?volunteer for emergency duty? list (was created after Gulf Coast Hurricanes). Approval and email by managers,...

  13. The White Lion Volunteer Program in South Africa: A Study of Volunteer Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boretti Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volunteer tourists are motivated to participate in volunteer programs due to their need to ‘do something different’, ‘see another culture’ and ‘to escape’, amongst others. The research aims to determine the internal and external factors that motivate individuals to participate in the Tsau! Global White Lion Protection Trust’s (GWLPT volunteer program. Maslow’s theory of human motivation and Frankl’s study of human behaviour are used to explore intrinsic factors whereas extrinsic or macro environmental factors of influence are also investigated. A mixed method approach with focus group discussions and an online survey is followed. A background to the volunteer program is presented with the activities available to volunteers. The key findings indicate that most volunteers are young females that volunteer for a minimum of two weeks; are internally motivated to ‘give back and be useful’ and ‘to work with the white lions’ for the purpose of self-actualisation. External motivation is mainly social in terms of concern about the well-being of the lions, and South Africa being an economically affordable destination. The GWLPT strives to fulfil the needs of volunteers, especially intrinsic needs associated with self-actualisation and self-transcendence.

  14. Institutional Facilitation in Sustained Volunteering among Older Adult Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyan; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Songiee

    2009-01-01

    As more nonprofit organizations rely on older adult volunteers to provide services, it is important to retain volunteers for an extended period of time to ensure service quality and the beneficial outcomes of volunteering. Nonprofit organizations are positioned to facilitate older adult volunteers' role performance. Based on an institutional…

  15. Integument and defence in larva and prepupa of a sawfly living on a semi-aquatic plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boevé, Jean-Luc; Voigt, Dagmar; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2013-01-01

    The larvae of the sawfly Rhadinoceraea micans live and feed on a semi-aquatic plant, Iris pseudacorus, and their integument is strongly hydrophobic. The hydrophobicity is part of a chemical defence strategy, easy bleeding, also known from congeners. The prepupae burrow into the soil where they form a cocoon in which they pupate, thus implying different micro-environmental conditions. The cuticle structure and wetting defensive effectiveness of R. micans were compared between larvae and prepupae. The two stages were similarly well defended against attacking ants by the bleeding of a deterrent hemolymph, whereas they were dissimilar in the cuticle surface that presented sculptures and wax crystals at the larval stage only. The integument of prepupae was less structured, and hydrophilic. Larvae of R. micans exhibit, among sawflies, an exceptional cuticle structuring and we assume that they occupy this particular niche of a semi-aquatic environment to avoid encounters with ground-dwelling predators whereas prepupae may benefit from the chemical defence acquired at larval stage.

  16. Prevalence of the genus Cladosporium on the integument of leaf-cutting ants characterized by 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, A P M; Ferro, M; Rodrigues, A; Bacci, M; Nagamoto, N S; Forti, L C; Pagnocca, F C

    2016-09-01

    The relationship of attine ants with their mutualistic fungus and other microorganisms has been studied during the last two centuries. However, previous studies about the diversity of fungi in the ants' microenvironment are based mostly on culture-dependent approaches, lacking a broad characterization of the fungal ant-associated community. Here, we analysed the fungal diversity found on the integument of Atta capiguara and Atta laevigata alate ants using 454 pyrosequencing. We obtained 35,453 ITS reads grouped into 99 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). Data analysis revealed that A. capiguara drones had the highest diversity of MOTUs. Besides the occurrence of several uncultured fungi, the mycobiota analysis revealed that the most abundant taxa were the Cladosporium-complex, Cryptococcus laurentii and Epicoccum sp. Taxa in the genus Cladosporium were predominant in all samples, comprising 67.9 % of all reads. The remarkable presence of the genus Cladosporium on the integument of leaf-cutting ants alates from distinct ant species suggests that this fungus is favored in this microenvironment.

  17. Volunteering and Organizational Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lars Skov; Rosdahl, David

    2008-01-01

    members' interests, while others act to help other people in need. Under the heading of ‘voluntary' we include everything from the local church choir, Greenpeace, political parties, unions, hunters' association, nursing homes, to homeless shelters, football clubs and so on. In other words, we all have...... by trained staff at The Survey Department of The Danish National Institute of Social Research. The pre-coded questionnaire applied, was constructed in accordance with the Johns Hopkins manual. A comparison of the characteristics of the 2,319 persons in the data set used for the analysis in this paper...... volunteering within the three major welfare fields: social service, health, and education. It could be argued that this is a more heterogeneous type of volunteering, because some volunteers work in ‘service organizations' aiming at particular client groups (battered women, homeless, elderly people etc.) while...

  18. Be a Volunteer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴世纪

    2016-01-01

    I’m writing to recommend myself as a volunteer for"Help You Know More about Lianyungang".I’m a student in Class 1,Grade 7.I like English and I’m good at it.I am also good at sports.I am good with my classmates and teachers.I have plenty of free time after school.I also know Lianyungang well.I’d like to be a volunteer because it’s a good chance for me to help others.I can help the tourists

  19. Sporozoite immunization of human volunteers under mefloquine prophylaxis is safe, immunogenic and protective: a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijker, Else M; Schats, Remko; Obiero, Joshua M; Behet, Marije C; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Graumans, Wouter; van Lieshout, Lisette; Bastiaens, Guido J H; Teelen, Karina; Hermsen, Cornelus C; Scholzen, Anja; Visser, Leo G; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Immunization of healthy volunteers with chloroquine ChemoProphylaxis and Sporozoites (CPS-CQ) efficiently and reproducibly induces dose-dependent and long-lasting protection against homologous Plasmodium falciparum challenge. Here, we studied whether chloroquine can be replaced by mefloquine, which is the only other licensed anti-malarial chemoprophylactic drug that does not affect pre-erythrocytic stages, exposure to which is considered essential for induction of protection by CPS immunization. In a double blind randomized controlled clinical trial, volunteers under either chloroquine prophylaxis (CPS-CQ, n = 5) or mefloquine prophylaxis (CPS-MQ, n = 10) received three sub-optimal CPS immunizations by bites from eight P. falciparum infected mosquitoes each, at monthly intervals. Four control volunteers received mefloquine prophylaxis and bites from uninfected mosquitoes. CPS-MQ immunization is safe and equally potent compared to CPS-CQ inducing protection in 7/10 (70%) versus 3/5 (60%) volunteers, respectively. Furthermore, specific antibody levels and cellular immune memory responses were comparable between both groups. We therefore conclude that mefloquine and chloroquine are equally effective in CPS-induced immune responses and protection. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01422954.

  20. Sporozoite Immunization of Human Volunteers under Mefloquine Prophylaxis Is Safe, Immunogenic and Protective: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, E.M.; Schats, R.; Obiero, J.M.; Behet, M.C.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Vegte-Bolmer, M. van de; Graumans, W.; Lieshout, L. van; Bastiaens, G.J.H.; Teelen, K.; Hermsen, C.C.; Scholzen, A.; Visser, L.G.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    Immunization of healthy volunteers with chloroquine ChemoProphylaxis and Sporozoites (CPS-CQ) efficiently and reproducibly induces dose-dependent and long-lasting protection against homologous Plasmodium falciparum challenge. Here, we studied whether chloroquine can be replaced by mefloquine, which

  1. Sporozoite immunization of human volunteers under mefloquine prophylaxis is safe, immunogenic and protective: a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else M Bijker

    Full Text Available Immunization of healthy volunteers with chloroquine ChemoProphylaxis and Sporozoites (CPS-CQ efficiently and reproducibly induces dose-dependent and long-lasting protection against homologous Plasmodium falciparum challenge. Here, we studied whether chloroquine can be replaced by mefloquine, which is the only other licensed anti-malarial chemoprophylactic drug that does not affect pre-erythrocytic stages, exposure to which is considered essential for induction of protection by CPS immunization. In a double blind randomized controlled clinical trial, volunteers under either chloroquine prophylaxis (CPS-CQ, n = 5 or mefloquine prophylaxis (CPS-MQ, n = 10 received three sub-optimal CPS immunizations by bites from eight P. falciparum infected mosquitoes each, at monthly intervals. Four control volunteers received mefloquine prophylaxis and bites from uninfected mosquitoes. CPS-MQ immunization is safe and equally potent compared to CPS-CQ inducing protection in 7/10 (70% versus 3/5 (60% volunteers, respectively. Furthermore, specific antibody levels and cellular immune memory responses were comparable between both groups. We therefore conclude that mefloquine and chloroquine are equally effective in CPS-induced immune responses and protection. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01422954.

  2. Comparison of the sensory threshold in healthy human volunteers with the sensory nerve response of the rat in vitro hindlimb skin and saphenous nerve preparation on cutaneous electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, R M; Urban, L A; Dray, A; Smith, P J

    1995-08-01

    We report a comparative study of stimulation thresholds of cutaneous fibres of the rat in vitro skin and saphenous nerve preparation with psychophysical measurements of sensibility to cutaneous electrical stimulation in human volunteers. The same clinical diagnostic stimulator and modified skin electrodes were used in both animal and human experiments. Axons were recruited by increasing the stimulus strength, and correlation was made between the stimulus intensity required for unit activation and their conduction velocities. The findings suggest that an initial "tingling" sensation is due to recruitment of A beta fibres and that later sharp "pricking" occurs with recruitment of A delta fibres.

  3. Osmolality and respiratory regulation in humans: respiratory compensation for hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is absent after infusion of hypertonic saline in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Vibeke; Brudin, Lars; Rundgren, Mats; Irestedt, Lars

    2014-10-01

    Several animal studies show that changes in plasma osmolality may influence ventilation. Respiratory depression caused by increased plasma osmolality is interpreted as inhibition of water-dependent thermoregulation because conservation of body fluid predominates at the cost of increased core temperature. Respiratory alkalosis, on the other hand, is associated with a decrease in plasma osmolality and strong ion difference (SID) during human pregnancy. We investigated the hypothesis that osmolality would influence ventilation, so that increased osmolality will decrease ventilation and decreased osmolality will stimulate ventilation in both men and women. Our study participants were healthy volunteers of both sexes (ASA physical status I). Ten men (mean 28 years; range 20-40) and 9 women (mean 33 years; range 22-43) were included. All women participated in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Hyperosmolality was induced by IV infusion of hypertonic saline 3%, and hypoosmolality by drinking tap water. Arterial blood samples were collected for analysis of electrolytes, osmolality, and blood gases. Sensitivity to CO2 was determined by rebreathing tests performed before and after the fluid-loading procedures. Infusion of hypertonic saline caused hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with decreased SID in all subjects. Analysis of pooled data showed absence of respiratory compensation. Baseline arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) mean (SD) 37.8 (2.9) mm Hg remained unaltered, with lowest PaCO2 37.8 (2.9) mm Hg after 100 minutes, P = 0.70, causing a decrease in pH from mean (SD) 7.42 (0.02) to 7.38 (0.02), P acidosis was also observed during water loading. Pooled results show that PaCO2 decreased from 38.2 (3.3) mm Hg at baseline to 35.7 (2.8) mm Hg after 80 minutes of drinking water, P = 0.002, and pH remained unaltered: pH 7.43 (0.02) at baseline to pH 7.42 (0.02), P = 0.14, mean difference (confidence interval) = pH -0.007 (-0.017 to 0.003). Our results indicate

  4. Subanesthetic concentration of sevoflurane increases regional cerebral blood flow more, but regional cerebral blood volume less, than subanesthetic concentration of isoflurane in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, I H; Kolbitsch, C; Hörmann, C; Schocke, M; Felber, S; Zschiegner, F; Hinteregger, M; Kremser, C; Pfeiffer, K P; Benzer, A

    2001-10-01

    Both sevoflurane and isoflurane are used in moderate concentrations in neuroanesthesia practice. The limiting factors for using higher concentrations of inhalational anesthetics in patients undergoing neurosurgery are the agents' effects on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). In particular, an increase in CBV, which is a key determinant of intracranial pressure, may add to the neurosurgical patient's perioperative risk. To compare the effects of a subanesthetic concentration (0.4 minimum alveolar concentration) of sevoflurane or isoflurane on regional CBF (rCBF), regional CBV (rCBV) and regional mean transit time (rMTT), contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging perfusion measurements were made in spontaneously breathing human volunteers. Absolute changes in rCBF, regional CBV, and rMTT during administration of either drug in regions of interest outlined bilaterally in white and grey matter were nonparametrically (Mann-Whitney test) analyzed. Sevoflurane increased rCBF in practically all regions (absolute change, 4.44 +/- 2.87 to 61.54 +/- 2.39 mL/100g per minute) more than isoflurane did (absolute change, 12.91 +/- 2.52 to 52.67 +/- 3.32 mL/100g per minute), which decreased frontal, parietal, and white matter rCBF (absolute change, -1.12 +/- 0.59 to -14.69 +/- 3.03 mL/100g per minute). Regional CBV was higher in most regions during isoflurane administration (absolute change, 0.75 +/- 0.03 to 4.92 +/- 0.16 mL/100g) than during sevoflurane administration (absolute change, 0.05 +/- 0.14 to 3.57 +/- 0.14 mL/100g). Regional mean transit time was decreased by sevoflurane (absolute change, -0.18 +/- 0.05 to -0.60 +/- 0.04 s) but increased by isoflurane (absolute change, 0.19 +/- 0.03 to 0.69 +/- 0.04 s). In summary, regional CBV was significantly lower during sevoflurane than during isoflurane administration, although sevoflurane increased rCBF more than isoflurane, which even decreased rCBF in some regions. For sevoflurane and, even more

  5. Volunteers who care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeroen Devilee

    2008-01-01

    Original title: Vrijwillig verzorgd. Everyone knows them: volunteers from churches and other civil-society organisations who visit the chronically sick, lonely elderly and other people in need. This service is provided from a wide array of organisations. Unfortunately, it is by no means always clea

  6. Making room for volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    2012-01-01

    that is singleminded in its instrumental pursuit of victory can thus be less effective than one that is more accommodating- a campaign that makes room for volunteers by accepting that, unlike staffers, they come to politics with a different perspective and conception of what is and ought to be going on....

  7. Volunters for Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Jane Kahan

    1983-01-01

    Describes "volunteers for schools," a new concept of community involvement based on changing educational needs. Explains the need for community education programs to encourage community involvement in education and the benefits that can result from increased community involvement in elementary-secondary schools. Notes key elements of…

  8. Call for volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory for organizing the two exceptional Open days.CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory’s personnel to help with the organisation of these two exceptional Open Days, for the visits of CERN personnel and their families on the Saturday and above all for the major public Open Day on the Sunday. As for the 50th anniversary in 2004, the success of the Open Days will depend on a large number of volunteers. All those working for CERN as well as retired members of the personnel can contribute to making this event a success. Many guides will be needed at the LHC points, for the activities at the surface and to man the reception and information points. The aim of these major Open Days is to give the local populations the opportunity to discover the fruits of almost 20 years of work carried out at CERN. We are hoping for some 2000 volunteers for the two Open Days, on the Saturday from 9 a.m. to ...

  9. Retired RNs: perceptions of volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca-Bates, Katherine C; Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was done to explore the perceptions of volunteering among retired registered nurses (RNs) in Kansas. Participants were volunteers in formal nursing roles or were using their nursing knowledge and experience in non-nursing roles, such as church work. Regardless of the type of volunteer position, retired RNs reported that they use what they have learned as nurses when they volunteer. Volunteering benefits include enhanced self-worth, intellectual stimulation, reduced social isolation, and opportunities to help others. Increased paperwork, new technology, difficulty finding nursing-specific volunteer opportunities, resistance from health care organizations, and a lack of respect for what these nurses know are challenges and barriers to volunteering. Retired RNs have accumulated years of clinical nursing experience and can be helpful to employed nurses. Health care organizations should launch targeted efforts to recruit and utilize retired RN volunteers. Health care professionals who care for older adults should recommend volunteering as a healthful endeavor.

  10. SIFAT KIMIA SELAI BUAH NAGA, KOMPOSISI MIKROFLORA DAN PROFIL SCFA FESES RELAWAN [Chemical Properties of Drugon Fruit Jam, Microflora Composition and SCFA Profile of Human Volunteer Faecal

    OpenAIRE

    Nurhayati; Gama Kusuma; Maryanto

    2015-01-01

    Dragon fruit contains oligosaccharides, Including prebiotic ingredients, that are namely raffinose, stachyose, and fructo-oligosaccharides. The heat treatment process like jam producing can affect the functional properties of a food material. The aim of the research wereto know the effect of jam processing on chemical properties, and their prebiotic properties. Evaluation of the prebiotic properties was conducted by in vivo method i.e. probiotic and enterobacteria population of volunteers fae...

  11. Average absorption cross-section of the human body measured at 1-12 GHz in a reverberant chamber: results of a human volunteer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flintoft, I. D.; Robinson, M. P.; Melia, G. C. R.; Marvin, A. C.; Dawson, J. F.

    2014-07-01

    The electromagnetic absorption cross-section (ACS) averaged over polarization and angle-of-incidence of 60 ungrounded adult subjects was measured at microwave frequencies of 1-12 GHz in a reverberation chamber. Average ACS is important in non-ionizing dosimetry and exposure studies, and is closely related to the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBSAR). The average ACS was measured with a statistical uncertainty of less than 3% and high frequency resolution for individuals with a range of body shapes and sizes allowing the statistical distribution of WBSAR over a real population with individual internal and external morphologies to be determined. The average ACS of all subjects was found to vary from 0.15 to 0.4 m2 for an individual subject it falls with frequency over 1-6 GHz, and then rises slowly over the 6-12 GHz range in which few other studies have been conducted. Average ACS and WBSAR are then used as a surrogate for worst-case ACS/WBSAR, in order to study their variability across a real population compared to literature results from simulations using numerical phantoms with a limited range of anatomies. Correlations with body morphological parameters such as height, mass and waist circumference have been investigated: the strongest correlation is with body surface area (BSA) at all frequencies above 1 GHz, however direct proportionality to BSA is not established until above 5 GHz. When the average ACS is normalized to the BSA, the resulting absorption efficiency shows a negative correlation with the estimated thickness of subcutaneous body fat. Surrogate models and statistical analysis of the measurement data are presented and compared to similar models from the literature. The overall dispersion of measured average WBSAR of the sample of the UK population studied is consistent with the dispersion of simulated worst-case WBSAR across multiple numerical phantom families. The statistical results obtained allow the calibration of human exposure

  12. Average absorption cross-section of the human body measured at 1-12 GHz in a reverberant chamber: results of a human volunteer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flintoft, I D; Robinson, M P; Melia, G C R; Marvin, A C; Dawson, J F

    2014-07-07

    The electromagnetic absorption cross-section (ACS) averaged over polarization and angle-of-incidence of 60 ungrounded adult subjects was measured at microwave frequencies of 1-12 GHz in a reverberation chamber. Average ACS is important in non-ionizing dosimetry and exposure studies, and is closely related to the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBSAR). The average ACS was measured with a statistical uncertainty of less than 3% and high frequency resolution for individuals with a range of body shapes and sizes allowing the statistical distribution of WBSAR over a real population with individual internal and external morphologies to be determined. The average ACS of all subjects was found to vary from 0.15 to 0.4 m(2); for an individual subject it falls with frequency over 1-6 GHz, and then rises slowly over the 6-12 GHz range in which few other studies have been conducted. Average ACS and WBSAR are then used as a surrogate for worst-case ACS/WBSAR, in order to study their variability across a real population compared to literature results from simulations using numerical phantoms with a limited range of anatomies. Correlations with body morphological parameters such as height, mass and waist circumference have been investigated: the strongest correlation is with body surface area (BSA) at all frequencies above 1 GHz, however direct proportionality to BSA is not established until above 5 GHz. When the average ACS is normalized to the BSA, the resulting absorption efficiency shows a negative correlation with the estimated thickness of subcutaneous body fat. Surrogate models and statistical analysis of the measurement data are presented and compared to similar models from the literature. The overall dispersion of measured average WBSAR of the sample of the UK population studied is consistent with the dispersion of simulated worst-case WBSAR across multiple numerical phantom families. The statistical results obtained allow the calibration of human

  13. Simultaneous quantification of linezolid, tinidazole, norfloxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and gatifloxacin in human plasma for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Sally A

    2013-12-01

    Linezolid may be administered in combination with norfloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and tinidazole for the treatment of various infections, such as urinary and respiratory tract infections, to improve the efficacy of the treatment or to reduce the duration of therapy. Knowledge of the antibiotic plasma concentrations combined with bacterial susceptibility evaluated in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration would optimize treatment efficacy while limiting the risk of dose-related adverse effects and avoiding suboptimal concentrations. A new high-performance liquid chromatography assay method was developed and validated for determination of the above-mentioned drugs in small samples of human plasma. After protein precipitation with acetonitrile:methanol (1:1, vol/vol), satisfactory separation was achieved on a Hypersil BDS C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) using a mobile phase comprising 20 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate-2 hydrate (pH = 3.2) and acetonitrile at a ratio of 75:25, vol/vol; the elution was isocratic at ambient temperature with a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min. The ultraviolet detector was set at 260 nm. The validated method was applied to assay real plasma samples used for pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic drug monitoring of the selected drugs. The assay method described was found to be rapid, sensitive, reproducible, precise, and accurate. Linearity was demonstrated over the concentration ranges as follows: 0.1-30 μg/mL for linezolid and tinidazole; 0.05-5 μg/mL for norfloxacin; and 0.1-10 μg/mL for moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and gatifloxacin (mean r = 0.9999, n = 12). The observed within- and between-day assay precisions were within 12.5%, whereas accuracy ranged between 92.0% and 112% for all the analytes. The lower limit of quantification was 0.1 μg/mL for all the analytes except norfloxacin which was 0.05 μg/mL. This assay method was valid within a wide range of plasma concentrations and may be proposed as a suitable

  14. Volunteering and the State

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Franz; Halla, Martin; Pruckner, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the capability of the state to affect the individual’s decision to work for free. For this purpose we combine individual-level data from the European and World Values Survey with macroeconomic and political variables for OECD member countries. Empirically we identify three channels for crowding out of voluntary labor. Firstly, an increase in public social expenditure decreases the probability that the individual will volunteer (fiscal crowding out). Secondly, a political c...

  15. First evidence of reproductive adaptation to "island effect" of a dwarf Cretaceous Romanian titanosaur, with embryonic integument in ovo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Grellet-Tinner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Cretaceous vertebrate assemblages of Romania are famous for geographically endemic dwarfed dinosaur taxa. We report the first complete egg clutches of a dwarf lithostrotian titanosaur, from Toteşti, Romania, and its reproductive adaptation to the "island effect". METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: The egg clutches were discovered in sequential sedimentary layers of the Maastrichtian Sânpetru Formation, Toteşti. The occurrence of 11 homogenous clutches in successive strata suggests philopatry by the same dinosaur species, which laid clutches averaging four ∼12 cm diameters eggs. The eggs and eggshells display numerous characters shared with the positively identified material from egg-bearing level 4 of the Auca Mahuevo (Patagonia, Argentina nemegtosaurid lithostrotian nesting site. Microscopic embryonic integument with bacterial evidences was recovered in one egg. The millimeter-size embryonic integument displays micron size dermal papillae implying an early embryological stage at the time of death, likely corresponding to early organogenesis before the skeleton formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The shared oological characters between the Haţeg specimens and their mainland relatives suggest a highly conservative reproductive template, while the nest decrease in egg numbers per clutch may reflect an adaptive trait to a smaller body size due to the "island effect". The combined presence of the lithostrotian egg and its embryo in the Early Cretaceous Gobi coupled with the oological similarities between the Haţeg and Auca Mahuevo oological material evidence that several titanosaur species migrated from Gondwana through the Haţeg Island before or during the Aptian/Albian. It also suggests that this island might have had episodic land bridges with the rest of the European archipelago and Asia deep into the Cretaceous.

  16. Special Report: Volunteers in Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Noel

    1976-01-01

    Many New York librarians view volunteers as a serious job threat; their unions back them in their opposition to volunteers; and some administrators are afraid to launch volunteer programs during the budget crunch because of their probably adverse effect on staff morale. (Author)

  17. Recruiting and Supporting Latino Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Beverly B.

    This booklet is intended to help volunteer recruiters better understand characteristics of the Latino community that might impact volunteering. It also suggests strategies or steps to use in successfully recruiting and supporting Latino volunteers. Information is based on a study of Latinos and volunteerism conducted in Oregon in 1999. The…

  18. Enhancing Leadership Skills in Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Landry L.; Boyd, Barry

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how professionals leading volunteers can purposefully work toward developing the "leadership identity" of individual volunteers. These concepts and the application of them are presented in the context of Cooperative Extension volunteer groups. Specific methods of developing the leadership identity and capacity of individual…

  19. Recruiting and Supporting Latino Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Beverly B.

    This booklet is intended to help volunteer recruiters better understand characteristics of the Latino community that might impact volunteering. It also suggests strategies or steps to use in successfully recruiting and supporting Latino volunteers. Information is based on a study of Latinos and volunteerism conducted in Oregon in 1999. The…

  20. Volunteers in the experience economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Sune Klok

    2012-01-01

    and discussed. The Questions addressed is how to enlist, motivate and reward volunteers a long the way and how to manage and guide volunteers. Furthermore what kind of special relationship does the volunteer have in the making of the experience design and in the experience of that design. This paper combines......The use of volunteers is becoming more visible and important in the experience economy also in the light of the financial crisis. From a management perspective within both public and private organizations the use of volunteers is an important element partly because they strengthen the brand...... economy volunteers create a new set of dimensions, because they shift between being part of the experience producer and being one of the experience consumers. Volunteers are becoming increasingly more important in the experience economy as they contribute to the overall experience for users or customers...

  1. Volunteer Team Management

    OpenAIRE

    Monych, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looked into volunteer team management in a project in AIESEC in Finland through the action research method. AIESEC in Finland is a non-profit non-government organization with a purpose of “peace and fulfilment of humankinds potential” through development of the youth’s future leadership. AIESEC was not a commissioning party; the project was the basis for the thesis without the supervision of the company. The thesis is based on a project that the author was in charge of, in ...

  2. [Effect of Bacillus natto-fermented product (BIOZYME) on blood alcohol, aldehyde concentrations after whisky drinking in human volunteers, and acute toxicity of acetaldehyde in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, H; Yatagai, C; Wada, H; Yoshida, E; Maruyama, M

    1995-04-01

    Effects of Bacillus natto-fermented product (BIOZYME) on blood alcohol and aldehyde concentrations after drinking whisky (corresponding to 30-65 ml ethanol) were studied in 21 healthy volunteers. When 100 ml of BIOZYME was orally administrated to the volunteers before drinking whisky, the time delay of both blood factors to attain maximum concentrations were observed. The maximum decrease in blood alcohol and aldehyde concentrations were about 23% and 45% (p whisky. The aldehyde lowering effect of BIOZYME was continued for at least 4 hr after whisky drinking. Concentration of the breath alcohol was also sharply decreased by BIOZYME administration. The breath alcohol concentration in the administered group (0.18 +/- 0.11 mg/l) was found to be lowered about 44% than that of the control group (0.32 +/- 0.11 mg/l) (p whisky. In acute toxicity experiments of aldehyde in mice (12 mmol AcH/mg), BIOZYME showed the survival effect as with alpha-D-Ala (134% increase of the living, at 40 min after i.p. administration) (p < 0.005, n = 22). These findings reveal the Bacillus natto produced BIOZYME as a reasonable, safety and useful anti-hangover agent.

  3. Development of a classification rule for four clinical therapeutic psychotropic drug classes with EEG power-spectrum variables of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, W M; Fichte, K; Itil, T M; Kubicki, S

    1979-01-01

    An objective rule for the classification of psychotropic substances has been developed. Classification is based on data from five basic studies simultaneously designed and performed and involving 75 healthy volunteers who ingested 20 different psychotropic drugs and 5 placebos in single oral dosages. Each volunteer took one psychostimulant, one antidepressant, one neuroleptic, one minor tranquilizer and one placebo in a double-blind Latin square cross-over design. The variables were 6 frequency bands, based on power spectrum estimates and determined by factor analysis, plus total power in the 1.5-30.0 Hz range. An objective classification rule was established by multi-group (5 groups) linear discriminant analysis. Reclassification of the substances by the new rule yielded correct results for 17 out of 20 psychotropic drugs and 4 out of 5 placebos. Of placebos from various studies not used for the establishment of the classification rule, 7/9 were classified correctly. The validity of the rule for other classes of substances will have to be verified in independent studies.

  4. The consideration of emotional intelligence abilities in event volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Andam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of emotional intelligence abilities is one of the new subjects and important in human behavior studies. According to this matter, purpose of this research is consideration of emotional intelligence abilities in public sport events volunteers in 2011. For this purpose, Bradbury and Cruise's standard questionnaire was completed by present volunteers in event (n=80. The results indicated that 4 levels of emotional intelligence in volunteers are higher than expectational average significantly (p<0.01. Also, priority of emotional intelligence abilities indicated that self-awareness is first priority and social awareness, relationship management and self-management are second, third and fourth priorities in volunteers. Finally, in the basis of parameter, results stated that there is no difference between male and female volunteers emotional intelligence in first Olympia of public sport. According to results of present research and advantages of attention to emotional intelligence and human behavior in organizations, it recommended sport events managers to be more sensitive relative to human behavior abilities in human behavior abilities in human resource (volunteers under his management. At least, result of this meditation in student's sport is recruitment and development of motivated volunteers for continuous attendance in sport events.

  5. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement.

  6. Comment on the Nanoparticle Conclusions in Crüts et al. (2008, "Exposure to diesel exhaust induces changes in EEG in human volunteers"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Christopher M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent publication in this journal reported interesting changes in electroencephalographic (EEG waves that occurred in 10 young, male volunteers following inhalation for one hour of elevated levels of diesel-engine exhaust fumes 1. The authors then proposed a chain of causal events that they hypothesized underlay their observed EEG changes. Their reasoning linked the observed results to nanoparticles in diesel-engine exhaust (DEE, and went on to suggest that associations between changes in ambient particulate matter (PM levels and changes in health statistics might be due to the effects of diesel-engine exhaust (DEE nanoparticles on EEG. We suggest that the extrapolations of the Crüts et al. EEG findings to casual mechanisms about how ambient levels of DEE particulate might affect electrical signals in the brain, and subsequently to how DEE particulate might alter disease risk, are premature.

  7. Effects of short term changes in the blood glucose level on the autofluorescence lifetime of the human retina in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Matthias; Nagel, Edgar; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Schramm, Stefan; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) provides in vivo metabolic mapping of the ocular fundus. Changes in FLIO have been found in e.g. diabetes patients. The influence of short term metabolic changes caused by blood glucose level changes on is unknown. Aim of this work is the detection of short-term changes in fundus autofluorescence lifetime during an oral glucose tolerance test. Methods: FLIO was performed in 10 healthy volunteers (29+/-4 years, fasting for 12h) using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (30° fundus, 34μm resolution, excitation with 473nm diode laser with 70 ps pulses at 80 MHz repetition rate, detection in two spectral channels 500-560nm (ch1) and 560-720nm (ch2) using the timecorrelated single photon counting method). The blood glucose level (BGL) was measured by an Accu-Chek® Aviva self-monitoring device. Before and after a glucose drink (300ml solution, containing 75g of glucose (Accu-Chek® Dextrose O.G.T.), BGL and FLIO were measured every 15min. The FLIMX software package was applied to compute the average fluorescence lifetime τ on the inner ring of the ETDRS grid using a modified 3-exponential approach. Results: The results are given as mean +/- standard deviation over all volunteers in ch1. Baseline measurement: BGL: 5.3+/-0.4 mmol/l, τ1: 49+/-6ps. A significant reduction (α=5% Wilcoxon rank-sum test) in τ1 is detected after 15min (BGL: 8.4+/-1.1 mmol/l, τ1: 44+/-5ps) and after 90min (BGL: 6.3+/-1.4 mmol/l, τ1: 41+/-5ps). Results of ch2 show smaller reductions in the fluorescence lifetimes over time.

  8. Motivational aspects of sport volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Mičinec, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Title: The motivational aspects of sport volunteerism. Objectives: The main aim of this bachelor work is to find out motivational aspects of sport volunteers, who have taken part in sport event. Methods: In this thesis was used quality method to get informations - specifically it was a structure interview with associated questions. Results: It was find out that it is appropriate to get those volunteers with inner motivation. These volunteers do not need to be so much motivated by external mot...

  9. What Makes Them Pay? Values of Volunteer Tourists Working for Sea Turtle Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lisa M.; Smith, Christy

    2006-07-01

    As charismatic mega-fauna, sea turtles attract many volunteers to conservation programs. This article examines the ways in which volunteers value sea turtles, in the specific context of volunteers working with the Caribbean Conservation Corporation, at Tortuguero, Costa Rica. The complexity of volunteer values is explored using a qualitative approach. In-depth interviews with 31 volunteers were conducted in July of 1999 and 2000. Interviews probed, among other things, interest in sea turtles and their conservation, motives for participating, and the most gratifying parts of their volunteer experience. Results show that volunteers hold multiple and complex values for sea turtles, but particular values dominate. Results have implications for understanding human-environment relations and the emerging study of volunteer tourism. There are also management implications for volunteer programs hoping to attract participants.

  10. Age and motives for volunteering: testing hypotheses derived from socioemotional selectivity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Morris A; Schultz, Amy

    2003-06-01

    Following a meta-analysis of the relations between age and volunteer motives (career, understanding, enhancement, protective, making friends, social, and values), the authors tested hypotheses derived from socioemotional selectivity theory regarding the effects of age on these volunteer motives. The Volunteer Functions Inventory was completed by 523 volunteers from 2 affiliates of the International Habitat for Humanity. Multiple regression analyses revealed, as predicted, that as age increases, career and understanding volunteer motivation decrease and social volunteer motivation increases. Contrary to expectations, age did not contribute to the prediction of enhancement, protective, and values volunteer motivations and the relation between age and making friends volunteer motivation was nonlinear. The results were discussed in the context of age-differential and age-similarity perspectives on volunteer motivation.

  11. Psychosocial Differences between Elderly Volunteers and Non-Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K.I.; Linn, Margaret W.

    1980-01-01

    Volunteer workers over sixty-five were compared to retired elderly who did not engage in work activity. Volunteers had significantly higher degree of life satisfaction, stronger will to live, and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization. No differences were found on demographics or background. (Author)

  12. Morphological alterations in the synganglion and integument of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks exposed to aqueous extracts of neem leaves (Azadirachta indica A. JUSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedio, R N; Nunes, P H; Anholeto, L A; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2014-12-01

    Currently, the necessity of controlling infestation by ticks, especially by Rhipicephalus sanguineus, has led researchers and public health managers around the world to search for new and more efficient control methods. This way, we can highlight neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) leaf, bark, and seed extracts, which have been very effective on tick control, and moreover causing less damage to the environment and to the host. This study showed the potential of neem as a control method for R. sanguineus through morphological and morphometric evaluation of the integument and synganglion of females, in semiengorged stage. To attain this, routine techniques of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and morphometry of the cuticle and subcuticle of the integument were applied. Expressive morphological alterations were observed in both organs, presenting a dose-dependent effect. Integument epithelial cells and nerve cells of the synganglion showed signs of cell vacuolation, dilated intercellular boundaries, and cellular disorganization, alterations not previously reported in studies with neem. In addition, variations in subcuticle thickness were also observed. In general, the effects of neem are multiple, and affect the morphology and physiology of target animals in various ways. The results presented in this work are the first evidence of its effects in the coating and nervous system of ticks, thus allowing an indication of neem aqueous extracts as a potential control method of the brown dog tick and opening new perspectives on acaricide use. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Volunteering for charity: pride, respect, and the commitment of volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boezeman, Edwin J; Ellemers, Naomi

    2007-05-01

    This study builds upon and extends the social-identity-based model of cooperation with the organization (T. R. Tyler, 1999; T. R. Tyler & S. L. Blader, 2000) to examine commitment and cooperative intent among fundraising volunteers. In Study 1, structural equation modeling indicated that pride and respect related to the intent to remain a volunteer with an organization, and that this relation was mediated primarily by normative organizational commitment. In Study 2, structural equation modeling indicated that the perceived importance of volunteer work was related to pride, that perceived organizational support related to the experience of respect, and that pride and respect mediated the relation between perceived importance and support on the one hand and organizational commitment on the other. Overall, the results suggest that volunteer organizations may do well to implement pride and respect in their volunteer policy, for instance to address the reliability problem (J. L. Pearce, 1993).

  14. To volunteer or not to volunteer? A cross-country study of volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Sardinha, Boguslawa Maria Barszczak; Pires, Cesaltina Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    Comunicação apresentada em 5th Annal Meeting of the Portuguese Economic Journal - Aveiro, 8-9 July 2011 This paper uses data from the 4th wave of the European Values Survey (EVS) to inves- tigate the factors that in uence the decision to participate in volunteering activities, con- sidering both volunteering in general as well as volunteering in particular types of activities. Like previous studies we include several socioeconomic and demographic variables. However our study al...

  15. Effects of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on lipolysis rate, lipid oxidation and adipose tissue signalling in human volunteers: a randomised clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Thomas S; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Kampmann, Ulla; Pedersen, Steen B; Nielsen, Thomas S; Johannsen, Mogens; Svart, Mads V; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the role of lipolysis in hypoglycaemia and define the underlying intracellular mechanisms. Nine healthy volunteers were randomised to treatment order of three different treatments (crossover design). Treatments were: (1) saline control; (2) hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH; i.v. bolus of 0.1 U/kg insulin); and (3) hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemia (HE; i.v. bolus of 0.1 U/kg insulin and 20% glucose). Inclusion criteria were that volunteers were healthy, aged >18 years, had a BMI between 19 and 26 kg/m(2), and provided both written and oral informed consent. Exclusion criteria were the presence of a known chronic disease (including diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, ischaemic heart disease and cardiac arrhythmias) and regular use of prescription medication. The data was collected at the medical research facilities at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The primary outcome was palmitic acid flux. Participants were blinded to intervention order, but caregivers were not. Adrenaline (epinephrine) and glucagon concentrations were higher during HH than during both HE and control treatments. NEFA levels and lipid oxidation rates (determined by indirect calorimetry) returned to control levels after 105 min. Palmitate flux was increased to control levels during HH (p = NS) and was more than twofold higher than during HE (overall mean difference between HH vs HE, 114 [95% CI 64, 165 μmol/min]; p adipose tissue biopsies, we found elevated levels of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and perilipin-1 phosphorylation 30 min after insulin injection during HH compared with both control and HE. There were no changes in the levels of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) or G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) proteins. Insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR were unaffected by hypoglycaemia. Expression of the G0S2 gene increased during HE and HH compared with control, without changes in ATGL

  16. The fallacy of the Good Samaritan: Volunteering as a weird way of making money

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores individual motives for volunteering: The analysis is based on the interpretation of volunteering as a consumption good (consumption model) or as a mean to increase individual’s own human capital (investment model). We present an econometric framework taking into account self selection into volunteering and simultaneity between the volunteering decision and the determination of income in order to test these two models and to identify the underlying motives. We find strong s...

  17. Managing Library Volunteers, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driggers, Preston; Dumas, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Volunteers are essential to a successful library program--and at a time when deep budget cuts are the norm, there are many libraries that depend on the help of dedicated volunteers, who do everything from shelving books to covering the phones. Whether these are friends, trustees, or community members, managing them effectively is the key to…

  18. My Days as a Volunteer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾晓玲; 杨梦倩; 许文侠; 陈丽敏; 陈丽琼; 陈昊; 李雯

    2009-01-01

    Volunteer, a word derived from Latin, carries the meaning of "will". A volunteer is someone who works for a community or for the benefit of environment. There are various forms of voluntary work including "serving food at the local homeless shelter,

  19. SIFAT KIMIA SELAI BUAH NAGA, KOMPOSISI MIKROFLORA DAN PROFIL SCFA FESES RELAWAN [Chemical Properties of Drugon Fruit Jam, Microflora Composition and SCFA Profile of Human Volunteer Faecal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dragon fruit contains oligosaccharides, Including prebiotic ingredients, that are namely raffinose, stachyose, and fructo-oligosaccharides. The heat treatment process like jam producing can affect the functional properties of a food material. The aim of the research wereto know the effect of jam processing on chemical properties, and their prebiotic properties. Evaluation of the prebiotic properties was conducted by in vivo method i.e. probiotic and enterobacteria population of volunteers faecal (microflora composition, prebiotic index (PI value and Short Chain Fatty Acid (SCFA profile. The result showed that the processing of dragon fruit into jams decreased water content, β-sianin and dissolved particles but increased the Insoluble Indigestible Fraction (IIF. The PI value of dragon fruit jam were 1.70 for white dragon jam and 1.18 for red dragon fruit. The jam processing decreased PI value up to 0.49 (red dragon fruit jam and 0.54 (white dragon fruit jam. The fresh dragon fruit and the jam produced short chain fatty acid (SCFA i.e. acetic and propionic acid. It can be concluded that prebiotic properties of white dragon fruit better than red dragon fruit.

  20. Effects of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on lipolysis rate, lipid oxidation and adipose tissue signalling in human volunteers: a randomised clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Thomas Schmidt; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Opstrup, Ulla Kampmann

    2017-01-01

    adipose tissue biopsies, we found elevated levels of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and perilipin-1 phosphorylation 30 min after insulin injection during HH compared with both control and HE. There were no changes in the levels of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), comparative gene identification-58 (CGI...... control; (2) hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH; i.v. bolus of 0.1 U/kg insulin); and (3) hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemia (HE; i.v. bolus of 0.1 U/kg insulin and 20% glucose). Inclusion criteria were that volunteers were healthy, aged >18 years, had a BMI between 19 and 26 kg/m(2), and provided both......-58) or G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) proteins. Insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR were unaffected by hypoglycaemia. Expression of the G0S2 gene increased during HE and HH compared with control, without changes in ATGL (also known as PNPLA2) or CGI-58 (also known as ABHD5) mRNA levels...

  1. Controlled-release effervescent floating matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride: development, optimization and in vitro-in vivo evaluation in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Mina Ibrahim

    2010-02-01

    Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride has a short elimination half-life, a narrow absorption window and is mainly absorbed in proximal areas of GIT. The purpose of this study was to develop a gastroretentive controlled-release drug delivery system with swelling, floating, and adhesive properties. Ten tablet formulations were designed using hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC K15M) and/or sodium alginate (Na alginate) as release-retarding polymer(s) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) or calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) as a gas former. Swelling ability, floating behaviour, adhesion period and drug release studies were conducted in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2) at 37+/-0.5 degrees C. The tablets showed acceptable physicochemical properties. Drug release profiles of all formulae followed non-Fickian diffusion. Statistical analyses of data revealed that tablets containing HPMC K15M (21.42%, w/w), Na alginate (7.14%, w/w) and NaHCO(3) (20%, w/w) (formula F7) or CaCO(3) (20%, w/w) (formula F10) were promising systems exhibiting excellent floating properties, extended adhesion periods and sustained drug release characteristics. Both formulae were stored at 40 degrees C/75% RH for 3months according to ICH guidelines. Formula F10 showed better physical stability. Abdominal X-ray imaging of formula F10, loaded with barium sulfate, in six healthy volunteers revealed a mean gastric retention period of 5.50+/-0.77h.

  2. Single Dose of the CXCR4 Antagonist BL-8040 Induces Rapid Mobilization for the Collection of Human CD34+ Cells in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Michal; Pereg, Yaron; Bulvik, Baruch; Klein, Shiri; Mishalian, Inbal; Wald, Hanna; Eizenberg, Orly; Beider, Katia; Nagler, Arnon; Golan, Rottem; Vainstein, Abi; Aharon, Arnon; Galun, Eithan; Caraco, Yoseph; Or, Reuven; Peled, Amnon

    2017-08-23

    The potential of the high affinity CXCR4 antagonist BL-8040 as a monotherapy mobilizing agent and its derived graft composition and quality were evaluated in a phase I clinical study in healthy volunteers (NCT02073019). The first part of the study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled dose escalation phase. The second part of the study was an open label phase, in which 8 subjects received a single injection of BL-8040 (1mg/kg) and approximately 4hrs later underwent a standard leukapheresis procedure. The engraftment potential of the purified mobilized CD34+ cells was further evaluated by transplanting the cells into NSG immune deficient mice. BL-8040 was found safe and well tolerated at all doses tested (0.5-1 mg/kg). The main treatment related AEs were mild to moderate. Transient injection site and systemic reactions were mitigated by methylprednisolone, paracetamol and promethazine pre-treatment. In the first part of the study BL-8040 triggered rapid and substantial mobilization of WBCs and CD34+ cells in all tested doses. 4hrs post dose, the count rose to a mean of 8, 37, 31 and 35cells/µL (placebo, 0.5, 0.75 and 1mg/kg, respectively). FACS analysis revealed substantial mobilization of immature dendritic, T, B and NK cells. In the second part the mean CD34+/kg collected were 11.6 x106 cells/kg. The graft composition was rich in immune cells. The current data demonstrate that BL-8040 is a safe and effective monotherapy strategy for the collection of large amounts of CD34+ cells and immune cells in a one-day procedure for allogeneic HSPC transplantation. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of a Novel Nonopioid Analgesic, VVZ-149 Injections in Healthy Volunteers: A First-in-Class, First-in-Human Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaeseong; Lee, SeungHwan; Kim, Anhye; Yoon, Jangsoo; Jang, Kyungho; Lee, Doo H; Cho, Sunyoung; Lee, Sang Rim; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Chung, Jae-Yong

    2017-08-16

    VVZ-149, a dual antagonist of GlyT2 and 5HT2 A receptors, is an investigational analgesic with a novel mechanism of action that is currently under early-stage clinical development as an injectable agent for the treatment of postoperative pain. Here, the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of VVZ-149 injections in healthy male volunteers were explored in a randomized, double-blind, single- and multiple-ascending-dose (SAD and MAD, respectively), placebo-controlled clinical study. Subjects randomly received a 4-hour intravenous infusion of 0.25-8 mg/kg VVZ-149 or placebo in the SAD study (n = 46) or a 4-hour intravenous infusion of 4-7 mg/kg VVZ-149 or placebo twice daily for 3 days in the MAD study (n = 20). Serial blood and urine samples were collected for the pharmacokinetic analysis of VVZ-149 and its active metabolite (VVZ-368). Noncompartmental and compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Various dosing scenarios were simulated to identify the adequate dosing regimen for the subsequent trials. Plasma exposure to VVZ-149 and VVZ-368 showed a dose-proportional increase. VVZ-149 did not accumulate in the plasma, whereas the plasma concentration of VVZ-368 increased by 1.23- to 2.49-fold after the fifth and sixth doses, respectively, in the MAD trial. Among the simulated dosing regimens, a loading dose followed by a maintenance dose was found to be an optimal dosing regimen, yielding the effective concentration estimated from animal studies in rat models of neuropathic or inflammatory pain. Single- or multiple-dose administration of VVZ-149 was generally well tolerated. These results showed that 0.5-8 mg/kg VVZ-149 exhibited linear pharmacokinetic characteristics and can be safely administered in further clinical studies. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and effects on human experimental pain of the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor 5 (iGluR5) antagonist LY545694 in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Karin L; Iyengar, Smriti; Chappell, Amy S; Lobo, Evelyn D; Reda, Haatem; Prucka, William R; Verfaille, Steven J

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to establish in healthy volunteers the maximally tolerated multiple dose (MTMD) of the ionotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist LY545694 (part A), and to investigate whether that dose had analgesic or antihyperalgesic effects in the brief thermal stimulation (BTS) pain model (Part B). Part A was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 3 groups of 10 healthy men. To simulate an extended-release formulation, study drug was administered orally over 6hours (12 equally divided aliquots at 30-minute intervals). Part B was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, double-dummy, 3-way crossover study in 27 healthy men. At each of the 3 study periods, subjects received either LY545694 (MTMD; as determined during part A) as a simulated, twice daily extended-release formulation for 4 doses over 3days, gabapentin (600mg 8hours apart; 6 doses over 3days; positive control), or matching placebo. The BTS model was induced twice with a 1-hour interval on each of the 2 study days, before drug administration and at the time of expected peak analgesia of LY545694. Plasma exposure for LY545694 was approximately linear over the 25- to 75-mg dose range. The MTMD of LY545694 was 25mg twice daily. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were significantly smaller after administration of LY545694 and gabapentin compared with placebo (Ppainfulness of skin heating during BTS model induction. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event was dizziness. The results of this study suggest that LY545694 should be explored further as a potential treatment for chronic pain involving neuronal sensitization.

  5. Volunteer Program for the WSIS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    PALEXPO, GENEVA, from 4 - 13 December Are you concerned by the digital divide between the North and the South? Would you like to contribute personally to the success of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), in particular the activities of civil society? Join the team of volunteers and/or offer accommodation to an international volunteer! Contact: Charlotte (Project Coordinator WSIS) Kathy (Volunteer Coordinator) ICVolunteers PO Box 755 - CH-1211 Genève 4 Phone: +41 22 800 1436 - Fax: +41 22 800 14 37 E-mail: charlotte@icvolunteers.org kathy@icvolunteers.org For further information, please consult the website: http://www.icvolunteers.org

  6. The profile of upper integument lip of Baduy and the nearby living Sundanese in South Banten, West Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachman Ardan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Based on the Two Migration Theory and on cultural anthropology, the Baduy is classified as Protomalay and the Sundanese as Deuteromalay. Historically and socioculturally the Baduy is part of the Nearby Living Sundanese (NS who has isolated themselves and settled down in Kanekes. Linguistics and archaeology could not tell whether the culture’s spread was due to a source population’s migrating or to a destination population’s copying the technology and language. Craniofacial anthropometry could resolve this because people’s physiognomy does not change rapidly due to mere migration. Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether the people of Baduy are Protomalay or Deuteromalay based on Profile of Upper Integument Lips (PUIL, which is the size of the angle formed by (sn-Ls line to Frankfurt Horizontal Plane. Angle size < 90º = Procheili, 90º = Orthocheili, and > 90º = Opisthocheili. Lip prominence is strongly influenced by racial and ethnical characteristics, its form is determined especially by genetic factor. Method: Subject sample consisted of 43 Inner Baduys (IB; 92 Outer Baduys (OB; and 135 NS of South Banten were measured using Fasiogoniometer to determine PUIL. Average value data was determined and analyzed by Testing Equal Variances to compare two variances between groups. Result: The result of this study showed that IB, OB as well as NS are Mild Procheili (angle size = 50º–69.9º. PUIL of IB and OB compared to NS are slightly different, however, between IB and OB are similar. Conclusion: Based on the characteristic of PUIL, IB, OB, as well as NS, are classified as Mongoloid subrace, and physically should be classified as Deuteromalay.

  7. Volunteers in the experience economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Sune Klok

    2012-01-01

    The use of volunteers is becoming more visible and important in the experience economy also in the light of the financial crisis. From a management perspective within both public and private organizations the use of volunteers is an important element partly because they strengthen the brand...... and they help in the product development but also because they are seen as a cheap resource. From an employee perspective you often hear that it creates a sense of fear for cuts or loss of professionalism, but can also be seen as a helpful resource and dynamic element in the organization. In the Experience...... economy volunteers create a new set of dimensions, because they shift between being part of the experience producer and being one of the experience consumers. Volunteers are becoming increasingly more important in the experience economy as they contribute to the overall experience for users or customers...

  8. Volunteer Monitoring to Protect Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The involvement of volunteers in ecological monitoring is a realistic, cost-effective, and beneficial way to obtain important information which might otherwise be unavailable due to lack of resources at government agencies.

  9. Impact of multiple genetic polymorphisms on effects of a 4-week blueberry juice intervention on ex vivo induced lymphocytic DNA damage in human volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, L.C.; Boots, A.W.; Boer, de V.C.J.; Maas, L.M.; Pachen, M.F.A.; Gottschalk, W.H.; Ketelslegers, H.B.; Godschalk, R.W.L.; Haenen, R.M.M.; Schooten, F.J.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a decrease in cancer incidence and cardiovascular disease, presumably caused by antioxidants. We designed a human intervention study to assess antioxidative and possible anti-genotoxic properties of fruit-borne antioxidants. We

  10. Impact of multiple genetic polymorphisms on effects of a 4-week blueberry juice intervention on ex vivo induced lymphocytic DNA damage in human volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, L.C.; Boots, A.W.; Boer, de V.C.J.; Maas, L.M.; Pachen, M.F.A.; Gottschalk, W.H.; Ketelslegers, H.B.; Godschalk, R.W.L.; Haenen, R.M.M.; Schooten, F.J.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a decrease in cancer incidence and cardiovascular disease, presumably caused by antioxidants. We designed a human intervention study to assess antioxidative and possible anti-genotoxic properties of fruit-borne antioxidants. We hypothesiz

  11. Effect of food intake and co-administration of placebo self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems on the absorption of cinnarizine in healthy human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Martin Lau; Holm, Rene; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    the stability issue. The two aims for this present study were therefore; i) to investigate if a nutritional drink, Fresubin Energy®, could induce food effect in humans for the poorly soluble compound cinnarizine; and ii) to investigate if co-administration of a self-nano-emulsifying drug delivery systems...... between dosing. The fed state was induced using a nutritional drink (Fresubin Energy®) and gastric emptying was assessed by administration of paracetamol as a marker. The pharmacokinetic analysis showed that the nutritional drink delayed the uptake and increased the fraction of absorbed cinnarizine......, indicative of a food effect on the compound. This was in agreement with a previous dog study and indicates that the nutritional drink can be used for inducing the same level of food effect in humans. Though not statistically significant, the co-administration of SNEDDS exhibited a tendency towards...

  12. A semi-mechanistic model to characterize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of brodalumab in healthy volunteers and subjects with psoriasis in a first-in-human single ascending dose study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinger, David H; Endres, Christopher J; Martin, David A; Gibbs, Megan A

    2014-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling can provide a framework for quantitative "learning and confirming" from studies in all phases of drug development. Brodalumab is a human monoclonal antibody (IgG2 ) targeting the IL-17 receptor A that blocks signaling by cytokines thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis (IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17A/F). We used semi-mechanistic modeling of single dose, first-in-human data to characterize the exposure-response relationship between brodalumab and the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) in a Phase 1 clinical trial. Fifty-seven healthy volunteers and 25 subjects with moderate to severe psoriasis received single intravenous or subcutaneous administration of placebo or brodalumab (7-700 mg). A two-compartment model with parallel linear and nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) elimination pathways described brodalumab PK. The PK-PASI relationship was characterized by linking a signaling compartment with an indirect response model of psoriatic plaques, where signaling suppressed plaque formation. The concentration of half-maximal inhibition IC50 was 2.86 µg/mL (SE: 50%). The endogenous psoriatic plaque formation rate of 0.862 (SE: 40%) PASI units/day was comparable with literature precedent. Despite the small sample size and single administration data, this semi-mechanistic modeling approach provided a quantitative framework to inform design of dose-ranging Phase 2 studies of brodalumab in psoriasis.

  13. An LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination of cefprozil diastereomers in human plasma and its application for the bioequivalence study of two cefprozil tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Ma, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Yanan; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhao, Hongna; Du, Aihua; Yang, Man; Meng, Lingjie; Deng, Ming; Liu, Huichen

    2016-03-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method was developed for the first time and validated for the determination of cefprozil diastereomers in human plasma. The plasma samples were prepared by protein precipitation using acetonitrile. Detection was performed using an electronic spray ion source in the negative ion mode, operating in the multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions m/z 388.0 to m/z 205.0 for cefprozil diastereomers and m/z 346.1 to m/z 268.1 for cephalexin (the internal standard). The calibration curves of cis-cefprozil and trans-cefprozil were linear in the ranges 0.125-16.0 µg/mL and 0.0403-1.72 µg/mL, respectively. The lower limits of quantification of cis- and trans-cefprozil were 0.125 and 0.0403 µg/mL in human plasma, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions of cis- and trans-cefprozil were all bioequivalence study of two cefprozil formulations in 24 healthy Chinese volunteers. The two cefprozil tablets were bioequivalent by measurement of cis-, trans- and total cefprozil. We suggest that the bioequivalence of cefprozil formulations can be evaluated only using cis-cefprozil as the analyte in future studies.

  14. Repellency Effects of Essential Oils of Myrtle (Myrtus Communis, Marigold (Calendula Officinalis Compared with DEET Against Anopheles Stephensi on Human Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khoobdel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria and leishmaniasis are two most significant parasitic diseases which are endemic in Iran. Over the past decades, interest in botanical repellents has increased as a result of safety to human. The comparative effi­cacy of essential oils of two native plants, myrtle (Myrtus communis and marigold (Calendula officinalis collected from natural habitats at southern Iran was compared with DEET as synthetic repellent against Anopheles stephensi on human subjects under laboratory condition. Methods: Essential oils from two species of native plants were obtained by Clevenger-type water distillation. The protec­tion time of DEET, marigold and myrtle was assessed on human subject using screened cage method against An. stephensi. The effective dose of 50% essential oils of two latter species and DEET were determined by modified ASTM method. ED50 and ED90 values and related statistical parameters were calculated by probit analysis. Results: The protection time of 50% essential oils of marigold and myrtle were respectively 2.15 and 4.36 hours com­pared to 6.23 hours for DEET 25%. The median effective dose (ED50 of 50% essential oils was 0.1105 and 0.6034 mg/cm2 respectively in myrtle and marigold. The figure for DEET was 0.0023 mg/cm2.Conclusion: This study exhibited that the repellency of both botanical repellents was generally lower than DEET as a synthetic repellent. However the 50% essential oil of myrtle showed a moderate repellency effects compared to mari­gold against An. stephensi.

  15. Efficacy of soap and water and alcohol-based hand-rub preparations against live H1N1 influenza virus on the hands of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, M Lindsay; Melvani, Sharmila; Druce, Julian; Barr, Ian G; Ballard, Susan A; Johnson, Paul D R; Mastorakos, Tasoula; Birch, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Although pandemic and avian influenza are known to be transmitted via human hands, there are minimal data regarding the effectiveness of routine hand hygiene (HH) protocols against pandemic and avian influenza. Twenty vaccinated, antibody-positive health care workers had their hands contaminated with 1 mL of 10(7) tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)(50)/0.1 mL live human influenza A virus (H1N1; A/New Caledonia/20/99) before undertaking 1 of 5 HH protocols (no HH [control], soap and water hand washing [SW], or use of 1 of 3 alcohol-based hand rubs [61.5% ethanol gel, 70% ethanol plus 0.5% chlorhexidine solution, or 70% isopropanol plus 0.5% chlorhexidine solution]). H1N1 concentrations were assessed before and after each intervention by viral culture and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The natural viability of H1N1 on hands for >60 min without HH was also assessed. There was an immediate reduction in culture-detectable and PCR-detectable H1N1 after brief cutaneous air drying--14 of 20 health care workers had H1N1 detected by means of culture (mean reduction, 10(3-4) TCID(50)/0.1 mL), whereas 6 of 20 had no viable H1N1 recovered; all 20 health care workers had similar changes in PCR test results. Marked antiviral efficacy was noted for all 4 HH protocols, on the basis of culture results (14 of 14 had no culturable H1N1; (Peffective in reducing influenza A virus on human hands, although SW is the most effective intervention. Appropriate HH may be an important public health initiative to reduce pandemic and avian influenza transmission.

  16. Open-label, dose escalation phase I study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of a human monoclonal antibody to Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claribel P; Tummala, Sanjeev; Molrine, Deborah; Davidson, Lisa; Farrell, Richard J; Lembo, Anthony; Hibberd, Patricia L; Lowy, Israel; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2008-06-25

    Recent data suggest that Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is becoming more severe and difficult to treat. Antibody responses to C. difficile toxin A are protective against symptomatic disease and recurrence. We examined the safety and pharmacokinetics (pk) of a novel neutralizing human monoclonal antibody against C. difficile toxin A (CDA1) in healthy adults. Five cohorts with 6 subjects each received a single intravenous infusion of CDA1 at escalating doses of 0.3, 1, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg. Safety evaluations took place on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 post-infusion. Samples for pk analysis were obtained before and after infusion, and at each safety evaluation. Serum CDA1 antibody concentrations and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) titers were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. A noncompartmental model was used for pk analysis. Thirty subjects were enrolled. The median age was 27.5 yrs. There were no serious adverse events (AE) related to CDA1. Twenty-one of the 48 reported non-serious adverse events were possibly related to CDA1, and included transient blood pressure changes requiring no treatment, nasal congestion, headache, abdominal cramps, nausea, and self-limited diarrhea. Serum CDA1 concentrations increased with escalating doses: mean C(max) ranged from 6.82 microg/ml for the 0.3 mg/kg cohort to 511 microg/ml for the 20 mg/kg cohort. The geometric mean values of the half-life of CDA1 ranged between 25.3 and 31.8 days, and the volume of distribution approximated serum. No subject formed detectable HAHA titers. Administration of CDA1 as a single intravenous infusion was safe and well tolerated. C(max) increased proportionally with increasing doses. A randomized study of CDA1 in patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea is underway.

  17. The effects of the preferential 5-HT2A agonist psilocybin on prepulse inhibition of startle in healthy human volunteers depend on interstimulus interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollenweider, Franz X; Csomor, Philipp A; Knappe, Bernhard; Geyer, Mark A; Quednow, Boris B

    2007-09-01

    Schizophrenia patients exhibit impairments in prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response. Hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists are used for animal models of schizophrenia because they mimic some symptoms of schizophrenia in humans and induce PPI deficits in animals. Nevertheless, one report indicates that the 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist psilocybin increases PPI in healthy humans. Hence, we investigated these inconsistent results by assessing the dose-dependent effects of psilocybin on PPI in healthy humans. Sixteen subjects each received placebo or 115, 215, and 315 microg/kg of psilocybin at 4-week intervals in a randomized and counterbalanced order. PPI at 30-, 60-, 120-, 240-, and 2000-ms interstimulus intervals (ISIs) was measured 90 and 165 min after drug intake, coinciding with the peak and post-peak effects of psilocybin. The effects of psilocybin on psychopathological core dimensions and sustained attention were assessed by the Altered States of Consciousness Rating Scale (5D-ASC) and the Frankfurt Attention Inventory (FAIR). Psilocybin dose-dependently reduced PPI at short (30 ms), had no effect at medium (60 ms), and increased PPI at long (120-2000 ms) ISIs, without affecting startle reactivity or habituation. Psilocybin dose-dependently impaired sustained attention and increased all 5D-ASC scores with exception of Auditory Alterations. Moreover, psilocybin-induced impairments in sustained attention performance were positively correlated with reduced PPI at the 30 ms ISI and not with the concomitant increases in PPI observed at long ISIs. These results confirm the psilocybin-induced increase in PPI at long ISIs and reveal that psilocybin also produces a decrease in PPI at short ISIs that is correlated with impaired attention and consistent with deficient PPI in schizophrenia.

  18. Repellency Effects of Essential Oils of Myrtle (Myrtus communis, Marigold (Calendula officinalis Compared with DEET against Anopheles stephensi on Human Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Tavassoli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria and leishmaniasis are two most significant parasitic diseases which are endemic in Iran. Over the past decades, interest in botanical repellents has increased as a result of safety to human. The comparative effi­cacy of essential oils of two native plants, myrtle (Myrtus communis and marigold (Calendula officinalis collected from natural habitats at southern Iran was compared with DEET as synthetic repellent against Anopheles stephensi on human subjects under laboratory condition. Methods:  Essential oils from two species of native plants were obtained by Clevenger-type water distillation. The protec­tion time of DEET, marigold and myrtle was assessed on human subject using screened cage method against An. stephensi. The effective dose of 50% essential oils of two latter species and DEET were determined by modified ASTM method. ED50 and ED90 values and related statistical parameters were calculated by probit analysis.   Results: The protection time of 50% essential oils of marigold and myrtle were respectively 2.15 and 4.36 hours com­pared to 6.23 hours for DEET 25%. The median effective dose (ED50 of 50% essential oils was 0.1105 and 0.6034 mg/cm2 respectively in myrtle and marigold. The figure for DEET was 0.0023 mg/cm2. Conclusion: This study exhibited that the repellency of both botanical repellents was generally lower than DEET as a synthetic repellent. However the 50% essential oil of myrtle showed a moderate repellency effects compared to mari­gold against An. stephensi.

  19. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Devi, R Shobana; Mary, R Regina; Prabhavathi, D; Vidya, R; Mechenro, John; Mahendri, N V; Pugazhendhi, Srinivasan; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S

    2011-12-23

    Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19) years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (10⁹ in 200 ml) for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184) and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections.

  20. Effects of an antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of C-reactive protein synthesis on the endotoxin challenge response in healthy human male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noveck, Robert; Stroes, Erik S G; Flaim, JoAnn D; Baker, Brenda F; Hughes, Steve; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Ridker, Paul M

    2014-07-10

    C-reactive protein (CRP) binds to damaged cells, activates the classical complement pathway, is elevated in multiple inflammatory conditions, and provides prognostic information on risk of future atherosclerotic events. It is controversial, however, as to whether inhibiting CRP synthesis would have any direct anti-inflammatory effects in humans. A placebo-controlled study was used to evaluate the effects of ISIS 329993 (ISIS-CRPR x) on the acute-phase response after endotoxin challenge in 30 evaluable subjects. Healthy adult males were randomly allocated to receive 6 injections over a 22-day period of placebo or active therapy with ISIS 329993 at 400- or 600-mg doses. Eligible subjects were subsequently challenged with a bolus of endotoxin (2 ng/kg). Inflammatory and hematological biomarkers were measured before and serially after the challenge. ISIS-CRPR x was well tolerated with no serious adverse events. Median CRP levels increased more than 50-fold from baseline 24 hours after endotoxin challenge in the placebo group. In contrast, the median increase in CRP levels was attenuated by 37% (400 mg) and 69% (600 mg) in subjects pretreated with ISIS-CRPR x (Pantisense oligonucleotides and provide an investigative tool to further define the role of CRP in human pathological conditions. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabeerdoss Jayakanthan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. Findings 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19 years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (109 in 200 ml for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184 and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Conclusions Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections.

  2. Volunteering among Young People. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mark Hugo; Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet presents information on the frequency of volunteering, trends in volunteering, and the organizations for which young people volunteer, utilizing data from multiple sources. Unlike many surveys, it shows that volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. Findings of the Civic and…

  3. Volunteering Among Young People. CIRCLE Fact Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mark Hugo

    2004-01-01

    Volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. However, measuring volunteer rates among all adults is a difficult task. In recent years, efforts at measuring volunteering have produced widely different estimates, largely because of the methods employed to measure volunteering. For example, the…

  4. Volunteering among High School Students. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet explores volunteering among high school students, ages 16-18. Overall, volunteering among high school students was down slightly in 2006 as compared to 2005. Additional information includes types of volunteer organizations and activities, and ways that high school students become involved in these activities. Volunteer rate vary by…

  5. Exploring Volunteering of Committed Young Catholics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of volunteer levels of Catholics from various World regions who attended an international youth Catholic festival. Volunteering levels, types of volunteering, reason for volunteering, Catholic group membership and pro-social values are analysed. An online survey was administered five months after the Festival to…

  6. Parallel Volunteer Learning during Youth Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmeister, Marilyn K.; Green, Jeremy; Derby, Amy; Bothum, Candi

    2012-01-01

    Lack of time is a hindrance for volunteers to participate in educational opportunities, yet volunteer success in an organization is tied to the orientation and education they receive. Meeting diverse educational needs of volunteers can be a challenge for program managers. Scheduling a Volunteer Learning Track for chaperones that is parallel to a…

  7. Analysis of 21-hydroxy deflazacort in human plasma by UPLC-MS/MS: application to a bioequivalence study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Daxesh P; Sharma, Primal; Patel, Bhargav M; Sanyal, Mallika; Singhal, Puran; Shrivastav, Pranav S

    2013-11-01

    A sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (UPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed for the determination of 21-hydroxy deflazacort in human plasma using betamethasone as the internal standard (IS). After solid-phase extraction from 100 μL human plasma, the analyte and IS were analyzed on Waters Acquity UPLC BEH C18 (50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm) column using acetonitrile-4.0mM ammonium formate, pH 3.5 (90:10, v/v) as the mobile phase. The protonated analyte was quantified by selected reaction monitoring in the positive ionization mode by triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The calibration plots were linear over the concentration range 0.50-500 ng/mL. Intra-batch and inter-batch precision (% CV) and accuracy (%) for five quality control samples ranged within 1.40-4.82% and 98.0-102.0% respectively. The overall mean extraction recovery of 21-hydroxy deflazacort from plasma ranged from 95.3 to 97.3%. Matrix effect was assessed by post-column analyte infusion and the extraction recovery was >95.0% across four quality control levels for the analyte and IS. Stability was evaluated under different conditions like bench top, autosampler, processed sample (at room temperature and in cooling chamber), freeze-thaw and long term stability. The method was applied to support a bioequivalence study of 30 mg deflazacort tablet formulation in 28 healthy subjects. Assay reproducibility was demonstrated by reanalysis of 115 incurred samples.

  8. Personality Traits and Motives for Volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Juzbasic; Tena Vukasovic Hlupic

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the possibility of predicting volunteer motives based on five-factor model of personality in a sample of 159 volunteers from Zagreb, Osijek and Split. Data was collected using IPIP-300 personality questionnaire and Volunteer Functions Inventory. Results indicate that Croatian volunteers are agreeable, conscientious, altruistic, dutiful, and moral persons with artistic interests. Their most salient motives for volunteering are understanding and values. Hierarc...

  9. Ultrastructural changes of the anterior and posterior sternal integument of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber Latr. (Crustacea) during the moult cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A

    1997-02-01

    The ultrastructure of the anterior (ASE) and posterior sternal epithelium (PSE) was investigated during the biphasic moult cycle. During early premoult the sternal epithelial cells increase in size, accumulate huge amounts of glycogen, and increase the abundance of cellular organelles. CaCO(3) deposit formation begins before the secretion of the epicuticle in the anterior sternal integument and continues through the secretion of the first exocuticular layers. The deposition of cuticle is delayed in the ASE until the CaCO(3) deposit is fully resorbed between the anterior and posterior moult. The development of the interstitial network (IN), which enormously increases the basolateral compartment of the plasma membrane, starts at the beginning of the exocuticle deposition. During CaCO(3) deposit formation and resorption the volume fraction of the mitochondria is much larger in the ASE than in the PSE, although the cuticle is secreted faster in the posterior integument. The results suggest that the exocuticular and epicuticular layers are permeable to calcium and probably also carbonate ions; that the IN is required during late premoult, when CaCO(3) deposition is accelerated, but not during early CaCO(3) deposition; and that active mechanisms contribute to transepithelial ion transport during CaCO(3) deposit formation and resorption.

  10. More than Volunteering: Active Citizenship through Youth Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    This pack aims to provide materials to help all those involved in youth volunteering and post-16 citizenship education to ensure that there are some citizenship learning outcomes from these valuable experiences. The pack has been produced by the Post-16 Citizenship Support Programme to help the integration of citizenship education into post-16…

  11. North Central Region 4-H Volunteers: Documenting Their Contributions and Volunteer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nippolt, Pamela Larson; Pleskac, Sue; Schwartz, Vicki; Swanson, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Documenting volunteer contributions strengthens Extension partnerships with volunteers. A team of North Central Region 4-H volunteer specialists collaborated to conduct a study of 4-H volunteer contributions and impacts related to working with youth within the 4-H program. Over three thousand (3,332) 4-H volunteers from throughout the 12-state…

  12. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolite, salicylic acid, in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetic study of Astrix in Korean healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Seo, Kyung Ah; Jung, Eun Ji; Kim, Ho-Sook; Yeo, Chang-Woo; Shon, Ji-Hong; Park, Kyung-Mi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2008-06-01

    The first liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for determination of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) and one of its major metabolites, salicylic acid (SA), in human plasma using simvastatin as an internal standard has been developed and validated. For ASA analysis, a plasma sample containing potassium fluoride was extracted using a mixture of ethyl acetate and diethyl ether in the presence of 0.5% formic acid. SA, a major metabolite of ASA, was extracted from plasma using protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The compounds were separated on a reversed-phase column with an isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid (8:2, v/v). The ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode were m/z 179 --> 137, 137 --> 93 and 435 --> 319 for ASA, SA and IS, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay precision was less than 9.3%, and the accuracy exceeded 86.5%. The lower limits of quantification for ASA and SA were 5 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. The developed assay method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA and SA after single oral administration of Astrix (entero-coated pellet, 100 mg of aspirin) to 10 Korean healthy male volunteers.

  13. Validation of a HPLC-ESI MS/MS method for the determination of clonidine in human plasma and its application in a bioequivalence study in Chinese healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jialang; Chen, Jiangying; Wang, Xueding; Pang, Yin; Bi, Huichang; Huang, Lihui; Zeng, Guixiong; Liao, Xiaoxing; Ma, Zhongfu; Chen, Xiao; Zhong, Guoping; Huang, Min; Zhao, Xianglan

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method to determine clonidine in human plasma was developed and fully validated. Sample preparation was involved an one-step extraction with diethyl ether. Donepezil was employed as the internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on a Hypersil BDS C18 column (i.d. 2.1 × 50 mm, particle size 3μm) with a mobile phase of methanol-water (containing 0.1% formic acid; 60:40, v/v) at a flow rate of 200 μL/min. The peaks were detected by mass spectrometry using the electrospray ion source in selected reaction monitoring mode. The extraction recovery was 72.53-85.25%. The method was found to be linear in a concentration range of 0.02-6.00 ng/mL and the lower limit of quantification was 0.02 ng/mL. The within- and between-batch precisions at three concentrations were 4.33-16.47 and 7.24-17.24% with accuracies of -2.47-10.91 and 1.86-10.19%, respectively. This validated method was successfully used for a bioequivalence study of two clonidine transdermal patches on healthy volunteers. The results suggested that the test formulation of clonidine patch met the regulatory criterion for bioequivalence to the reference formulation, but a larger sample size should be needed for the estimation of bioequivalence.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of single oral dose trazodone : a randomized, two-period, cross-over trial in healthy, adult, human volunteers under fed condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRASHANT eKALE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the bioequivalence of single dose trazodone hydrochloride USP 100 mg tablets administered as an oral dose under fed condition. Methods This study was an open-label, balanced, randomized, two-sequence, two-treatment, two-period, single oral dose, crossover bioequivalence study in healthy, adult, human subjects under fed conditions. After an overnight fast of at least 10 hours, the subjects were served a high fat and high calorie vegetarian breakfast, which they were required to consume within 30 minutes. A single oral dose (100 mg of either the test or the reference product was administered to the subjects. The primary pharmacokinetic parameters, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax and area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0-t and extrapolated to infinity (AUC0- were compared by an analysis of variance using log-transformed data. Bioequivalence was concluded if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs of the adjusted geometric mean (gMean ratios for Cmax and AUC were within the predetermined range of 80%-125%, in accordance with regulatory requirements. Results For the test formulation, the trazodone gMean Cmax was 1480.9 ng/mL (vs. 1520.2 ng/mL for reference, AUC0-t was 18193.0 ng·h/mL (vs. 18209.8 ng·h/mL and AUC0- was 19346.3 ng·h/mL (vs. 19393.4 ng·h/mL. The 90% CIs for the ratio (test/reference were 93.0-102.0% for Cmax, 96.7-103.2% for AUC0-t and 96.1-103.5% for AUC0-. There were no deaths or serious adverse events during the conduct of the study. Conclusion Test product when compared with the Reference product meets the bioequivalence criteria with respect to the rate and extent of absorption of Trazodone under fed condition.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of single oral dose trazodone: a randomized, two-period, cross-over trial in healthy, adult, human volunteers under fed condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Prashant; Agrawal, Yadvendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the bioequivalence of single dose trazodone hydrochloride USP 100 mg tablets administered as an oral dose under fed condition. Methods:This study was an open-label, balanced, randomized, two-sequence, two-treatment, two-period, single oral dose, crossover bioequivalence study in healthy, adult, human subjects under fed conditions. After an overnight fast of at least 10 h, the subjects were served a high fat and high calorie vegetarian breakfast, which they were required to consume within 30 min. A single oral dose (100 mg) of either the test or the reference product was administered to the subjects. The primary pharmacokinetic parameters, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0−t) and extrapolated to infinity (AUC0−∞) were compared by an analysis of variance using log-transformed data. Bioequivalence was concluded if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the adjusted geometric mean (gMean) ratios for Cmax and AUC were within the predetermined range of 80–125%, in accordance with regulatory requirements. Results:For the test formulation, the trazodone gMean Cmax was 1480.9 ng/mL (vs. 1520.2 ng/mL for reference), AUC0−t was 18193.0 ng·h/mL (vs. 18209.8 ng·h/mL) and AUC0−∞ was 19346.3 ng·h/mL (vs. 19393.4 ng·h/mL). The 90% CIs for the ratio (test/reference) were 93.0–102.0% for Cmax, 96.7–103.2% for AUC0−t and 96.1–103.5% for AUC0−∞. There were no deaths or serious adverse events during the conduct of the study. Conclusion:Test product when compared with the Reference product meets the bioequivalence criteria with respect to the extent of absorption of trazodone under fed condition. PMID:26483693

  16. Anti-tumor effects of fusion vaccine prepared by renal cell carcinoma 786-O cell line and peripheral blood dendritic cells of healthy volunteers in vitro and in human immune reconstituted SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi; Liu, Shihui; Mai, Xuancheng; Hu, Zili; Liu, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), as professional antigen presenting cells, play the central role in the process of body initiating the anti-tumor immunity, and the study on DC anti-tumor vaccine has become heated in recent years. In this study, we used polyethylene glycol (PEG) to induce renal cell carcinoma (RCC) 786-O cell line fused with peripheral blood DC of healthy volunteers, and discuss the biological characteristics of fusion vaccine and its anti-tumor effects in vitro and in human immune reconstituted SCID mice model of RCC. The study found that PEG could effectively induce cell fusion, and the expressions of CD86 and HLA-DR in fusion vaccine group were significantly up-regulated compared with the DC control group; the secretion of IL-12 was much higher and longer than that of the control; the functions of dendritic cell-tumor fusion vaccine to stimulate the proliferation of allogenic T lymphocytes and to kill RCC786-O cells in vitro were significantly higher than those of the control group, and after the killing, apoptosis body was observed in the target cells; after the injection of fusion vaccine into human immune reconstituted SCID mice model of RCC786-O via vena caudalis, the volume of mice tumor was reduced significantly, proliferation index of tumor cells decreased obviously compared with that of the control group, and more hemorrhage and putrescence focuses presented, accompanying large quantity of lymphocytes soakage. The results of this experimental study shows that fusion vaccine of RCC786-O cell line and DC can significantly stimulate the proliferation of allogenic T cells and specifically inhibit and kill RCC cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes the DC-RCC786-O fusion vaccine a possible new way of effective RCC immunotherapy.

  17. Enantioselective HPLC-DAD method for the determination of etodolac enantiomers in tablets, human plasma and application to comparative pharmacokinetic study of both enantiomers after a single oral dose to twelve healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewala, Ismail I; Moneeb, Marwa S; Elmongy, Hatem A; Wahbi, Abdel-Aziz M

    2014-12-01

    An enantioselective high performance liquid chromatographic method with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) was developed and validated for the determination of etodolac enantiomers in tablets and human plasma. Enantiomeric separation was achieved on a Kromasil Cellucoat chiral column (250 mm × 4.6mm i.d., 5 µm particle size) using a mobile phase consisting of hexane: isopropanol: triflouroacetic acid (90:10:0.1 v/v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1). The chromatographic system enables the separation of the two enantiomers and the internal standard within a cycle time of 8 min. The resolution between the two enantiomers was 4.25 and the resolution between each enantiomer and the internal standard was more than 2.0. Detection was carried out at 274 nm, and the purity assessment was performed using a photodiode array detector. Solid phase extraction technique using C-18 cartridge was applied to extract the analytes from the plasma samples, and the percentage recovery was more than 95% for the lower quantification limit. The method has been validated with respect to selectivity, linearity, accuracy and precision, robustness, limit of detection and limit of quantification. The validation acceptance criteria were met in all cases. The linearity range for the determination of each enantiomer in human plasma was 0.4-30.0 µg mL(-1) and the limits of quantification of R-etodolac and S-etodolac were 0.20 and 0.19 µg mL(-1), respectively. The validated method was successfully applied to the determination of etodolac enantiomers in tablets and to a comparative pharmacokinetic study of the two enantiomers after the administration of 300 mg single oral dose etodolac racemate tablets to twelve healthy volunteers.

  18. Communicative competence of sport volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Petrenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the level of communicative competence of sport volunteers. Material & Methods: students of Kharkov state academy of physical culture (2–4 courses who are engaged in sports volunteering. The theoretic-methodological analysis of problem is carried out; the technique "Need for communication and achievements", "Self-checking assessment in communication", "Machiavellianism level" is used for studying of indicators of self-assessment. Results: the high level of communicative competence on three indicators is revealed at sport volunteers: need for communication (60,71%, communicative control (57%, Machiavellianism (91% that gives them the chance to come into contacts with people around quickly, to correlate the reactions to behavior of surrounding people and to operate the emotions, at the same time they are inclined to manipulations and demonstration of the strengths at communication with people. Conclusions: the purposeful psychology and pedagogical preparation, which program has to include the communicative block and the block of personal development, is necessary for sport volunteers.

  19. A sensitive LC-MS/MS method for analysis of pericyazine in presence of 7-hydroxypericyazine and pericyazine sulphoxide in human plasma and its application to a comparative bioequivalence study in Chinese healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hua Lin; Deng, Yang; Fang, Ping Fei; Cao, SiSi; Hou, Zhen Yan; Wu, Yan Qin; Chen, Xue Jiao; Yan, Miao; Zhang, BiKui

    2017-02-20

    A robust and highly sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of pericyazine in human plasma. The plasma sample was alkalized with sodium hydroxide solution and handled by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate after adding perphenazine as an internal standard (IS). The analytes were separated on an Ultimate™ AQ-C18 analytical column at 40°C, with a gradient elution consisting of A (aqueous phase: 5mM ammonium acetate buffer solution containing 0.1% formic acid) and B (organic phase: acetonitrile) at a flow rate of 0.350mL/min. The detection was conducted on an API 4000 tandem mass spectrometer coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) source in positive ion mode. The multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions, m/z 366.5>142.4 for pericyazine, m/z 382.5>142.4 for its 7-hydroxy and sulphoxide metabolites and m/z 404.3>171.3 for IS were chosen to achieve high selectivity in the simultaneous analyses. The method exhibited great improvement in sensitivity (LLOQ of 0.021ng/mL) and good linearity over the concentration range of 0.021-9.90ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision, accuracy, and stability results were within the acceptable limits and no matrix effect was observed. This method was successfully applied in a bioequivalence study to evaluate the pharmacokinetics in 20 healthy male Chinese volunteers. Additional exploratory analyses of 7-hydroxy and sulphoxide metabolites of pericyazine in the same samples suggest that the unchanged drug is predominant in the plasma and suitable for the bioequivalence comparison after a single oral administration of 10mg pericyazine.

  20. Quantification of 3α-hydroxytibolone in human plasma by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS: Application in a bioequivalence study in healthy postmenopausal volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Azevedo Portela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, specific and fast method to quantify 3α-hydroxytibolone in human plasma using deuterated 3α-hydroxytibolone (d5 as internal standard is described. The analyte and the internal standard were extracted from plasma (900 μL by liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl ether/hexane (50/50, v/v and ammonium hydroxide (50%. The extracts were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry without derivatization. Chromatography was performed isocratically on a Gemini-NX™ C18 5 μm (150 × 4.6 mm i. d. column. The method had a chromatographic run time of 3.75 min and a linear calibration curve over the range 1–100 ng/mL. The limit of quantification validated was 1 ng/mL. This method was used to assess the bioequivalence between two different tibolone oral formulations: Livolon (1.25 mg tablet provided by Biolab Sanus Farmacêutica (Brazil, as the test formulation, and Libiam™ (1.25 mg tablet produced by Libbs Farmacêutica (Brazil, as the reference formulation. A single 3.75 mg dose of each formulation was administered to 46 postmenopausal female healthy volunteers. The study was conducted in an open, randomized, two-period crossover balanced design with a 2 week washout interval between the doses. The 90% confidence interval for Cmax, AUC(0-last and AUC(0-inf individual test/reference ratios were 97.48–111.51, 95.35–103.20 and 96.42–103.86, respectively. It is concluded that Livolon (1.25 mg tablet is bioequivalent to Libiam™ (1.25 mg tablet, with regards to both rate and extent of absorption.

  1. Towards trusted volunteer grid environments

    CERN Document Server

    Khemakhem, Maher; University, Sousse; Tunisia,; University, Manouba; Tunisia),; 10.5121/ijcnc.2010.2207

    2010-01-01

    Intensive experiences show and confirm that grid environments can be considered as the most promising way to solve several kinds of problems relating either to cooperative work especially where involved collaborators are dispersed geographically or to some very greedy applications which require enough power of computing or/and storage. Such environments can be classified into two categories; first, dedicated grids where the federated computers are solely devoted to a specific work through its end. Second, Volunteer grids where federated computers are not completely devoted to a specific work but instead they can be randomly and intermittently used, at the same time, for any other purpose or they can be connected or disconnected at will by their owners without any prior notification. Each category of grids includes surely several advantages and disadvantages; nevertheless, we think that volunteer grids are very promising and more convenient especially to build a general multipurpose distributed scalable enviro...

  2. Departure Ceremony for Chinese International Friendship Volunteers Held in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An; Xin

    2013-01-01

    <正>The CPAFFC launched the"Program of Chinese International Friendship Volunteers"in 2012.On July 18 this year,it joined with the Program’s organizer,Zhongxie Human Resource Consulting Center(Zhongxie HR),to

  3. Giving and volunteering in the Netherlands : Sociological and psychological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.H.F.P.

    2004-01-01

    Volunteer work, membership of voluntary associations, philanthropy and donation of blood and organs are studied by scholars from a wide range of disciplines. Sociologists and economists assume that good intentions are universal, but that some people have a stock of human and social capital that allo

  4. The Understanding of Volunteer Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Arbuzova, K. I.; Арбузова, К. И.

    2012-01-01

    The article considers the notion of volunteer tourism. The author identifies the main meaning of the term, considers the main problems of volunteer tourism and identifies relevant of volunteer tourism. В статье рассматривается понятие волонтерского туризма. Автор статьи определяет основные значения термина, рассматривает основные проблемы волонтерского туризма и определяет значимость волонтерского туризма....

  5. Engaged anthropology and corporate volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Blahová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present engaged anthropology and its methodological tools with a specific perspective of the research field and the position of the researcher with regard to research subjects. The study focuses on corporate volunteering as one of the forms of collaboration between the non-profit and the private sectors seeking solutions to social problems and community development. Volunteering projects contribute to the interlinking of the knowledge, skills, experience and resources of corporate employees and the representatives of the non-profit or the public sector. It is a part of the philanthropic strategy of companies which are willing to present themselves as entities responsible towards the environment in which they run their business, and towards their employees, partners and customers. Engaged anthropology can bring, through its methodological tools, a new perspective of corporate volunteering. Community-based participatory research on the process of knowledge creation includes all partners on an equal basis and identifies their unique contribution to problem solution and community development.

  6. Nurses' perceptions of hospice palliative care volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Hastings, Emily; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2008-01-01

    A total of 50 nurses (hospital and home care) responded to a survey designed to measure: (1) their attitudes toward, and knowledge of, hospice palliative care volunteers; (2) the types of tasks they felt it was appropriate for volunteers to perform; and (3) how valuable they felt different members of the hospice palliative care team are. In addition, they were asked to respond to some open-ended questions (eg, "Do you feel that it is appropriate for hospice palliative care volunteers to know patient medical information?"). The nurses' responses to the "Attitude/Knowledge" part of the survey revealed that they generally held positive attitudes toward volunteers. The majority of the nurses felt that it was appropriate for volunteers to perform most of the tasks listed, except for hands-on patient care. Nurses rated the value of nurses, family members, doctors, and pharmacists significantly higher than volunteers. Fifty-three percent of the nurses felt that volunteers should know patient medical information, and 77% thought that volunteers should have the opportunity to provide input regarding patient care. Also, 75% of the nurses felt that volunteers made their jobs easier, and 56% felt that volunteers should be included in team meetings. When asked to list the topics covered in a hospice palliative care volunteer training program, 73% of the nurses indicated that they were not sure or did not know what topics were covered, indicating a lack of knowledge regarding volunteer training.

  7. Student Volunteering in English Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clare; Quinn, Jocey

    2010-01-01

    Volunteering in English higher education has come under political scrutiny recently, with strong cross-party support for schemes to promote undergraduate volunteering in particular. Recent targeted initiatives and proposals have sought to strengthen both the role of volunteering in higher education and synergies between higher education and…

  8. 76 FR 20215 - National Volunteer Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... real and lasting impact on the lives of millions of women and men across the globe. Last year, nearly... they see a need. During National Volunteer Week, we celebrate the profound impact of volunteers and... week by volunteering in service projects across our country and pledging to make service a part...

  9. Can micro-volunteering help in Africa?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available is convenient to the micro-volunteer, and in small pieces of time (bitesized). This paper looks at a micro-volunteering project where participants can volunteer for five to ten minutes at a time using a smart phone and assist pupils with their mathematics....

  10. Improving Wellbeing and Environmental Stewardship Through Volunteering in Nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsher, Robyn; Townsend, Mardie

    2016-03-01

    Environmental volunteering (EV) can provide a unique way to optimise the wellbeing of participants while fostering environmental stewardship. However, the potential of EV to create human health benefits remains an under-researched area. This study provides evidence for improved wellbeing and mood state for 32 participants from diverse backgrounds undertaking EV activities. Most participants also reported improved environmental stewardship with a greatly improved understanding of the environment and the need to conserve it. Other benefits included: 31% of those seeking work obtained it; and 50% joined a volunteer group at program completion. EV provides a unique mechanism to enhance the wellbeing of the participants, while conserving the environment.

  11. Protective Efficacy of Plasmodium vivax Radiation-Attenuated Sporozoites in Colombian Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Vásquez-Jiménez, Juan M; Lopez-Perez, Mary;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunizing human volunteers by mosquito bite with radiation-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites (RAS) results in high-level protection against infection. Only two volunteers have been similarly immunized with P. vivax (Pv) RAS, and both were protected. A phase 2 controlled cl...

  12. [Volunteers and their vulnerability to stress: the impact of personality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Madalena; Afonso, Anabela; Castanheira, Cláudia; Ferreira, Dora; Fernandes, Liliana

    2005-01-01

    Volunteerism assumes a growing importance in the context of health, due to the significant number of practitioners and to the contribution given by the volunteers in the humanization of health care. However, as the continued interaction with the sick person might also originate negative emotions, we looked up in this article to describe the main results about vulnerability to stress in volunteers. The results revealed that 30.00% of volunteers were vulnerable to stress. We also observed that the civil state, socio-economic level and familiar functionality variables revealed to be protectors of the occurrence of stress. On the other side, the predominance of neuroticism as a personality trace was associated to a higher vulnerability to stress.

  13. Cryptosporidium muris: Infectivity and Illness in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; Langer-Curry, Rebecca C.; Lupo, Philip J.; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Although Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis cause the majority of human cryptosporidiosis cases, other Cryptosporidium species are also capable of infecting humans, particularly when individuals are immunocompromised. Ten C. muris cases have been reported, primarily in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients with diarrhea. However, asymptomatic cases were reported in two HIV-negative children, and in another case, age and immune status were not described. This study examines the infectivity of C. muris in six healthy adults. Volunteers were challenged with 105 C. muris oocysts and monitored for 6 weeks for infection and/or illness. All six patients became infected. Two patients experienced a self-limited diarrheal illness. Total oocysts shed during the study ranged from 6.7 × 106 to 4.1 × 108, and the number was slightly higher in volunteers with diarrhea (2.8 × 108) than asymptomatic shedders (4.4 × 107). C. muris-infected subjects shed oocysts longer than occurred with other species studied in healthy volunteers. Three volunteers shed oocysts for 7 months. Physical examinations were normal, with no reported recurrence of diarrhea or other gastrointestinal complaints. Two persistent shedders were treated with nitazoxanide, and the infection was resolved. Thus, healthy adults are susceptible to C. muris, which can cause mild diarrhea and result in persistent, asymptomatic infection. PMID:25311695

  14. Volunteer Tourism in Japan: Its Potential in Transforming “Non-volunteers” to Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Yoda, Mami

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of volunteer tourism to transform “non-volunteers” to volunteers in Japan. Volunteer tourism is defined as travel to a location outside the immediate vicinity of daily life in order to engage in organized volunteer activities. In-depth interviews and a survey were conducted to the employees of Haagen-Dazs Japan, Inc., who participated to volunteer tours to the Kiritappu Wetland Trust in Hokkaido. The study closely examines the motivations of the participants...

  15. An Analysis of volunteer motivation in HIV/AIDS community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... engage in volunteering and factors that maintain volunteer motivation. ... Volunteers were intrinsically motivated and inspired by their religious beliefs ... Volunteers reported drawing satisfaction from the positive impact on the recipient's life.

  16. Towards a sustainable volunteer mobile, online tutoring model for mathematics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Volunteer workers contribute to many aspects of society. There are volunteer organisations which formally assist in many areas such as health, education, housing, safety and security. Virtual volunteering is less common. Virtual volunteering...

  17. Value-Expressive Volunteer Motivation and Volunteering by Older Adults: Relationships With Religiosity and Spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Morris A; O'Rourke, Holly P; Keller, Brian; Johnson, Kathryn A; Enders, Craig

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the interplay among religiosity, spirituality, value-expressive volunteer motivation, and volunteering. We examined religiosity and spirituality as predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering and whether religiosity moderated the relations between (a) spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation and (b) value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering. After applying multiple imputation procedures to data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study among participants 64-67 years old who survived beyond 2004 (N = 8,148), we carried out regression analyses to predict value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering from religiosity and spirituality controlling for demographic variables, physical, emotional, and cognitive health, health risk behaviors, and personality traits. Both religiosity and spirituality were significant (p religiosity were significant (p Religiosity amplified the relation between value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering (p .45). Religiosity may provide the way, and value-expressive volunteer motivation the will, to volunteer. The implications of our findings for the forecasted shortage of older volunteers are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Nasal PMN response to repeated challenge with endotoxin in healthy volunteers**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Rationale: We have employed nasal challenge with Iipopolysaccharid (lPS) followed by nasal lavage (NU to experimentally induce and examine upper airway inflammation in human volunteers.It is unclear however whether adaptation within individuals occurs following repeated ...

  19. The liquid organization of volunteer tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steele, Jessica; Dredge, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from developments in sociology and organizational studies, this paper argues for a new understanding of volunteer tourism as liquid organization. It aims to explore the organization of volunteer tourism using a liquid organization perspective and to better understand the potential...... implications of this liquidity on the responsibility of volunteer tourism organizations to host com- munities. The analysis is based on data collected from 80 volunteer tourism organizations. The findings reveal that the volunteer tourism organizations show characteristics of liquid organiza- tion to varying...... degrees. The significance of the research is to problematize the way in which the institutional characteristics of volunteer tourism are (not) conceptualized in current literature and to introduce liquid organization as a means of reinvigorating debate about responsibility....

  20. 20 CFR 10.730 - What are the conditions of coverage for Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? 10.730 Section... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? (a) Any injury sustained by a volunteer or volunteer leader while he or she is located abroad shall be presumed to...

  1. Post-Event Volunteering Legacy: Did the London 2012 Games Induce a Sustainable Volunteer Engagement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Koutrou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hosting of the London 2012 Olympic Games was seen as an opportunity to harness the enthusiasm of the 70,000 volunteers involved and to provide a post-event volunteer legacy. A total of 77 individuals who had acted as volunteers in London 2012 were contacted approximately four years after the Games and agreed to complete a web-based open-ended survey. The participants were asked to indicate their level of current volunteering engagement and whether volunteering at the Games had an impact on their current volunteering levels. The study found that the London Olympics were the first volunteer experience for most of the volunteers who completed the survey, with the main motivation to volunteer being anything related to the Olympic Games. Just over half of the respondents are currently volunteering. Lack of time is shown to be the main barrier towards further volunteering commitment. Only half of respondents had been contacted by a volunteering scheme after London 2012. The implications of the findings for a potential volunteering legacy are then explored.

  2. The Effect of Volunteer Work on Employability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrovski, Erik

    2017-01-01

    sample of 1,867 individuals of working age. The survey data are linked to administrative registers containing individual-level data on unemployment. A combination of detailed controls, lagged dependent variables, and instrumental variable regression is used to determine cause and effect. Our findings......In addition to benefiting others, volunteer work is argued to supply volunteers themselves with skills, reputation, and social connections that increase overall employability. We test this hypothesized causal link between volunteer work and employability with a high-quality 2012 Danish survey...... show that performing volunteer work does not statistically significantly affect the risk or rate of unemployment for the typical individual on the labour market....

  3. Motivations and Benefits of Student Volunteering: Comparing Regular, Occasional, and Non-Volunteers in Five Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmes targeting student volunteering and service learning are part of encouraging civic behaviour amongst young people. This article reports on a large scale international survey comparing volunteering amongst tertiary students at universities in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. The data revealed high rates of student volunteering and the popularity of occasional or episodic volunteering. There were strong commonalities in student volunteering behaviour, motivations and benefits across the five Western predominately English-speaking countries. Altruism and self-orientated career motivations and benefits were most important to students; however volunteering and non-volunteering students differed in the relative value they attached to volunteering for CV-enhancement and social factors.

  4. A novel, sensitive and selective method of UPLC/MS-MS for rapid simultaneous determination of midodrine and its active metabolite desglymidodrine in human plasma: Application to support bioequivalence study in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Daxesh P; Nair, Sneha; Suhagia, Bhanubhai N; Patel, Bhargav M

    2016-11-30

    A specific, rapid, sensitive and selective ultra-performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry has been developed for the simultaneous determination of midodrine and desglymidodrine in human plasma. The analytes and its deuterated analogs were quantitatively extracted from 100μL of human plasma by solid phase extraction technique. Separation of analytes was achieved on the Waters Acquity UPLC BEH C18 (50×2.1mm, 1.7μm) column using acetonitrile-4.0mM ammonium formate, pH 2.5(90:10, v/v) as mobile phase. The protonated analytes were quantified by selected reaction monitoring in the positive ionization mode by triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The calibration plots were linear over the concentration range of 0.050-50.0ng/mL. The intra-batch and inter-batch precision (%CV) across quality control levels was <4.0 and the% mean relative recovery was ≥96%. Various other parameters like stability in different conditions; matrix effect and reproducibility of the method were performed in accordance with the guidelines specified by the USFDA for bioanalytical method development and validation. The developed method was successfully administered to the pharmacokinetics study of 5 mg midodrine tablet in 12 healthy subjects. Reproducibility of assay was proved by reanalysis of 48 incurred samples.

  5. Motivations and Benefits of Student Volunteering: Comparing Regular, Occasional, and Non-Volunteers in Five Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Smith; Kirsten Holmes; Debbie Haski-Leventhal; Cnaan, Ram A; Femida Handy; Brudney, Jeffrey L

    2010-01-01

    Programmes targeting student volunteering and service learning are part of encouraging civic behaviour amongst young people. This article reports on a large scale international survey comparing volunteering amongst tertiary students at universities in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. The data revealed high rates of student volunteering and the popularity of occasional or episodic volunteering. There were strong commonalities in student volu...

  6. Do monetary rewards undermine intrinsic motivations of volunteers? Some empirical evidence for Italian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorillo, Damiano

    2007-01-01

    Empirical studies show that intrinsic motivations increase the volunteer labour supply. This paper studies how monetary rewards to volunteers affect their intrinsic motivations. Using a sample of Italian volunteers, allowing to distinguish the type of volunteer, the paper shows that monetary rewards (extrinsic motivations) influence positively the choice to donate voluntary hours, while a low intrinsic motivation seems to decrease hours per week. Moreover, monetary rewards increase the hours ...

  7. Do monetary rewards undermine intrinsic motivations of volunteers? Some empirical evidence for Italian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorillo, Damiano

    2007-01-01

    Empirical studies show that intrinsic motivations increase the volunteer labour supply. This paper studies how monetary rewards to volunteers affect their intrinsic motivations. Using a sample of Italian volunteers, allowing to distinguish the type of volunteer, the paper shows that monetary rewards (extrinsic motivations) influence positively the choice to donate voluntary hours, while a low intrinsic motivation seems to decrease hours per week. Moreover, monetary rewards increase the hours ...

  8. The Volunteering Legacy of London 2012 Games. A Pilot Study.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The hosting of the London 2012 Olympic Games was seen as an opportunity to harness the enthusiasm of the 70000 volunteers involved and to provide a volunteer legacy post event. A total of 77 London 2012 volunteers completed a web-based open-ended survey. The participants were asked to indicate their level of current volunteering engagement and whether volunteering at the Games had an impact on their current volunteering levels. The study found that the London Olympics were the first volunteer...

  9. A Guide for Co-ordinators of Volunteers and Volunteer Services in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Janet W., Comp.

    This manual for those responsible for matching teacher requests and student needs to volunteer services is applicable to a variety of school volunteer programs but concentrates on the type of volunteer service which evolved from the Winnetka, Illinois, project in which older citizens in the community form a "talent pool" to work to enrich the…

  10. Cardiopulmonary and metabolic effects of yoga in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    T Satheesh Divya; M T Vijayalakshmi; K Mini; Asish, K.; M. PUSHPALATHA; Varun Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Yoga the spiritual union of mind with the divine intelligence of the universe aims to liberate a human being from conflicts of body–mind duality. Beneficial cardiovascular and pulmonary effects of yoga are in par with aerobic exercise, even amounting to replace the exercise model. We conducted an interventional study in healthy volunteers, to analyze the impact of short-term yoga training on cardiovascular, pulmonary, autonomic function tests, lipid profile, and thyroid function t...

  11. Ultrastructure of Wax-Producing Structures on the Integument of the Melaleuca Psyllid Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), with Honeydew Excretion Behavior in Males and Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Hentz, Matthew; Hall, David G; Shatters, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The melaleuca psyllid, Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), was introduced to Florida as a biological control agent against Melaleuca quinquenervia, an invasive evergreen tree that has invaded large areas of Florida Everglades. Colonies of B. melaleucae nymphs are normally covered by white waxy secretions, and nymphs of various instars produce long bundles of white waxy filaments extending laterally and posteriorly from their abdomen. Scanning electron microscopy of 'naturally waxed' and 'dewaxed' nymphs (cleaned from wax) revealed two types of wax pore plates located dorsally and laterally on the integument of posterior abdominal segments starting with the 4th segment. Type-1 wax pore plates, with raised rim, peripheral groove, slits and pits, produce long ribbons and filaments of waxy secretions that are wound together forming long wax bundles, whereas type-2 wax pore plates, with slits only, produce shorter wax curls. Additionally, in both nymphs and adult females, the circumanal ring contained ornate rows of wax pores that produce wax filaments covering their honeydew excretions. Video recordings with stereomicroscopy showed that adult females produce whitish honeydew balls, powerfully propelled away from their body, probably to get these sticky excretions away from their eggs and newly hatched nymphs. Adult males, however, produce clear droplets of honeydew immediately behind them, simply by bending the posterior end of the abdomen downward. The possible role(s) of waxy secretions by nymphs and adults of B. melaleucae in reducing contamination of their colonies with honeydew, among other possibilities, are discussed.

  12. Corporate volunteering - motivation for voluntary work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Azevedo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, when the welfare state is a responsibility of the entire society, organizations in the private sector assume co-responsibility for social issues. They are also pressured by the challenges presented by technological advances and the globalization , involving new parameters and requirements for quality. In this context, the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (RSC emerges as an option for solutions to the issues related to the company and the whole community. Among the actions of the RSC is the Corporate Volunteering-program, which aims to promote / encourage employes to do voluntary work. A central issue when talking about volunteering is the withdrawal of these (SILVA and FEITOSA, 2002; TEODÓSIO, 1999 and, in accordance with the Community Solidarity (1997, one of the possible causes for the withdrawal is the lack of clarity as to the motives and expectations that lead the person to volunteer themselves. This study uses qualitative research and triangulation of feedback from volunteers, coordinators of volunteers and social organizations, to present a framework from which it is possible to analyze the various motivations for the volunteer work. Key words: Corporate Volunteering program. Volunteering. Corporate social responsibility.

  13. Volunteer map data collection at the USGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, B. Wolf; Poore, Barbara S.; Caro, Holly K.; Matthews, Greg D.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1994, citizen volunteers have helped the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) improve its topographic maps. Through the Earth Science Corps program, citizens were able to "adopt a quad" and collect new information and update existing map features. Until its conclusion in 2001, as many as 300 volunteers annotated paper maps which were incorporated into the USGS topographic-map revision process.

  14. Student Volunteering in England: A Critical Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwen, Jamie; Rannard, Andrea Grace

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the current state of student volunteering in English universities, and show how it contributes to some of the core activities of higher education, including teaching and learning, employability, and public engagement. The paper goes on to describe challenges currently faced by student volunteering,…

  15. Matching Expectations for Successful University Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Megan; Omari, Maryam; MacCallum, Judith; Young, Susan; Walker, Gabrielle; Holmes, Kirsten; Haski-Leventha, Debbie; Scott, Rowena

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of expectation formation and matching for university student volunteers and their hosts. Design/methodology/approach: This research involved a multi-stage data collection process including interviews with student volunteers, and university and host representatives from six…

  16. Training Shelter Volunteers to Teach Dog Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Veronica J.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which training procedures influenced the integrity of behaviorally based dog training implemented by volunteers of an animal shelter. Volunteers were taught to implement discrete-trial obedience training to teach 2 skills (sit and wait) to dogs. Procedural integrity during the baseline and written instructions…

  17. Senior Volunteers: Helping Hands & Willing Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Volunteers and other community-based assistants can relieve some of the financial burden brought on by school-budget cutbacks. This publication describes how enlisting the help of senior volunteers and workers benefits both children and seniors, and it presents some guidelines for implementation of intergeneration programs. The programs provide…

  18. Volunteer Flying Organizations: Law Enforcements Untapped Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    volunteers took on many of the following duties to help enable CAP functions: clerical work , aircraft maintenance , refueling operations, first aid...Highway Patrol, Monterey County Aero Squadron, Lane County Sheriff’s Office, Civil Air Patrol, volunteer flying organizations, law enforcement...5 3. Civil Air Patrol’s Use in Law Enforcement .................................7 D. POTENTIAL EXPLANATIONS AND HYPOTHESES

  19. Meaningful Commitment: Finding Meaning in Volunteer Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Tatjana; Hoof, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that volunteer work is associated with various aspects of meaning making by employing a multi-dimensional model of meaning operationalized by the "Sources of Meaning and Meaning in Life Questionnaire" ("SoMe"). An empirical study comparing 168 volunteers with a representative sample of the general population (N =…

  20. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  1. Skill Development for Volunteering in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Stirling, Christine; Orpin, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the skills required of volunteers in the voluntary sector organisations that operate in three rural Tasmanian communities. It reports how volunteers acquire those skills and reveals the challenges faced by voluntary sector organisations in rural communities whose industries and, following from this, community members have a…

  2. Personality traits of British hospice volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane; Paulovic, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    In total, 120 British female hospice volunteers completed the NEO five-factor inventory (NEO-FFI) of Costa Jr and McCrae. The NEO-FFI measures the so-called big 5 personality traits of neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Compared to both American NEO-FFI norms for adult females and emerging British NEO-FFI norms for adult females, the hospice volunteers scored significantly lower, on average, in neuroticism and significantly higher, on average, in agreeableness and conscientiousness. No significant differences were found on any of the 5 traits between the British female hospice volunteers' scores and the NEO-FFI scores previously collected from a sample of Canadian female hospice palliative care volunteers. Implications for the recruitment of British hospice volunteers are discussed.

  3. Personality Traits and Motives for Volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Juzbasic

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the possibility of predicting volunteer motives based on five-factor model of personality in a sample of 159 volunteers from Zagreb, Osijek and Split. Data was collected using IPIP-300 personality questionnaire and Volunteer Functions Inventory. Results indicate that Croatian volunteers are agreeable, conscientious, altruistic, dutiful, and moral persons with artistic interests. Their most salient motives for volunteering are understanding and values. Hierarchical regression analysis confirmed that the five-factor model personality traits independently predict 17% of protective motive variance, 12% of values motive, 18% of career motive, 10% of understanding motive, and 12% of enhancement motive. Social motive was not explained by personality traits.

  4. Volunteers for Researchers’ Night wanted

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Every year, on the last Friday of September, the European Researchers’ Night (see here) takes place in about 300 cities all over Europe - promoting research in engaging and fun ways for the general public. This year, CERN will be participating once again, hosting dozens of events across the Balexert shopping centre – and we’ll need YOUR help to make the celebration a success.   From film screenings and celebrity Q&A sessions to “Ask a Researcher” and build-your-own LEGO LHC events, this year’s Researchers’ Night is going to be jam-packed! The fun will kick off prior to the night itself with a mock-up of the LHC tunnel installed in the central court of the Balexert shopping centre, 8-12 September*. CERN people will be on hand to speak to shoppers about the LHC, and to encourage them to participate in Researchers’ Night! The CERN organisers are recruiting volunteers and support staff for Researchers’ ...

  5. Organizational Support and Volunteering Benefits for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyan; Choi, Eunhee; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested a theoretical model of volunteering benefits and examined the mechanism through which volunteering benefits older adults. Design and Methods: This is a 2-wave study of 253 older adult volunteers serving in 10 volunteer programs. Older volunteers completed the mailed surveys in 2005 and 2006. Structural equation modeling…

  6. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roles of volunteers. 1217.6 Section 1217.6 Public... VISTA VOLUNTEER LEADER § 1217.6 Roles of volunteers. VISTA volunteer leaders may have the following roles: (a) Primary contact with VISTA volunteers on personal and administrative matters. (b) Aid in...

  7. Top Ten Myths and Realities of Working with Teen Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Kellie

    1998-01-01

    Discusses misconceptions about teen volunteers in public libraries: teens who hang out make good volunteers; teens who apply want to work; parents aren't important; incorporating volunteers is easy; enthusiasm means commitment; volunteers will tell you if they don't enjoy the job; non-performers are easy to fire; teens volunteer because they need…

  8. Program Evaluation of "Young at Heart": Examining Elderly Volunteers' Generativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jean Pearson; Reifman, Alan; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2003-01-01

    Elderly volunteers in the Young at Heart child care program (n=14), Meals on Wheels (n=14), other volunteer activities (n=24), and nonvolunteers (n=49) were compared. Although child-care volunteers were expected to score highest in generativity, volunteers in other activities did, followed by Young at Heart volunteers. (Contains 10 references.)…

  9. Participation of healthy volunteers in research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, F A; Mackay, I R; Fraser, J R

    1989-03-20

    Research that involves healthy normal volunteers frequently is performed. This article examines ethical guide-lines for the recruitment of healthy volunteers in research projects. Ethical decisions on projects that are based on patient-volunteers or healthy normal volunteers should balance the risk to the volunteer and the collective benefit to the community. For healthy normal volunteers that risk should be minimal or trivial. Investigators should follow recruitment practices that avoid approaches to persons who are dependent upon them in some way, and should carry the day-to-day ethical responsibility even after institutional ethical approval has been granted. Pilot studies and self-experimentation readily can transgress ethical guide-lines. Compensation for mishaps or injuries that occur during research in which there is no question of negligence (for example, an unforeseeable reaction in a phase-1 drug trial) is an unresolved issue which should be addressed by the research community. It is recommended that action be taken to ensure that healthy volunteers who participate in approved research have redress in the rare event of an accident, whether this is a result of negligence, chance or misadventure. Hospitals/institutions or other bodies that sponsor research should extend their insurance to cover specifically such unforeseeable events in which there may be liability, and to have the facility for a payment of beneficence in the case of accidents in which liability cannot be established.

  10. Volunteering as a determinant of civil society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Matiychyk

    2016-06-01

    Another prerequisite of volunteerism was the surge of Advantages Revolution in 2013-2014, and after it – the anti-terrorist operation in eastern Ukraine. In 2015 the aid organization in terms of ATO and internally displaced persons has increased directions volunteering. Important indicators of volunteering were high levels of involvement of Ukrainian philanthropy and consequently public confidence in voluntary organizations, qualitative growth of volunteerism, the founders of which were gradually included among the managerial elite Ukraine. At the same time, there are number of problems that discredit the work of volunteers and the idea of volunteering in general, for example, fraud volunteers and fake organizations. Moreover, the increased activity of the volunteer movement was caused by the internal crisis that led to the imbalance of public administration, lack of high-quality management decisions, lack of resource capabilities. Also it was caused by external factors, such as the need to participate in the organization of international events and conduct military operations against separatist groups in eastern Ukraine. So, volunteer activity gradually becomes an effective mechanism of self-organization of citizens.

  11. 'Making a Difference': Volunteer Tourism and Development,

    OpenAIRE

    Butcher, Jim; Smith, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: \\ud \\ud In recent decades there has been a boom in international volunteer tourism, mainly in the form of the growth of gap-year companies offering placements, linked to conservation and community well-being goals. This paper makes two points: firstly, it argues that the growth of volunteer tourism is in part a product of the politics of the current period – the decline of grand narratives and the growth of ‘life political’ alternative forms of agency. Hence volunteer tourism, motiv...

  12. Development and validation of a new method for the quantification of norfloxacin by HPLC-UV and its application to a comparative pharmacokinetic study in human volunteers Desenvolvimento e validação de um método para quantificação de norfloxacino por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência e aplicação a estudo de farmacocinética comparada em voluntários humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo César Galindo Bedor

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The development and validation of a simple and accurate method based on HPLC with ultraviolet detection for the quantification of norfloxacin (NFX in human plasma and its application to a bioequivalence study between two norfloxacin formulations is described. NFX and the internal standard (cyprofloxacin were extracted from plasma using liquid-liquid extraction. Chromatographic separation of norfloxacin, cyprofloxacin and plasma interferents was achieved with a C-18 column and a mobile phase consisting of 20 mM sodium hydrogen phosphate buffer pH 3.0 and acetonitrile (88:12, v/v and quantitation was done at 280 nm. The method was linear from 25 to 3000 ng mL-1 (r² > 0.997578, and norfloxacin and cyprofloxacin had an average recovery from plasma of 93.9% and 91.2% respectively. The RSD of inter-day quality control samples at the lower limit of quantification was less than 15%. After a single oral dose (400 mg of norfloxacin administered to healthy human volunteers using a randomized 2x2 crossover design, pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC0-t, AUC0-¥, Cmax, t1/2 were derived from the plasma concentration curves for both formulations. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the data showed that the two formulations were bioequivalent, while no adverse reactions to the drug were observed.O desenvolvimento e validação de um método simples e preciso por CLAE-UV para quantificação de norfloxacino (NFX em plasma humano e a sua aplicação a um estudo de bioequivalência entre duas formulações são descritos. NFX e o padrão interno (ciprofloxacino, PI foram extraídos do plasma através de extração líquido-líquido. A separação cromatográfica do NFX, do PI e dos interferentes do plasma foi realizada com uma coluna C-18 e fase móvel composta de tampão fosfato de sódio 20 mM pH 3,0 e acetonitrila (88/12, v/v e quantificado em 280 nm. A resposta do detector aos analitos mostrou-se linear entre 25 a 3000 ng mL-1 (r² > 0,997578 e a recuperação média de

  13. Volunteered Geographic Information and Computational Geography: New Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI), one of the most important types of user-generated web content, has been emerging as a new phenomenon. VGI is contributed by numerous volunteers and supported by web 2.0 technologies. This chapter discusses how VGI provides new perspectives for computational geography, a transformed geography based on the use of data-intensive computing and simulations to uncover the underlying mechanisms behind geographic forms and processes. We provide several exemplars of computational geography using OpenStreetMap data and GPS traces to investigate the scaling of geographic space and its implications for human mobility patterns. We illustrate that the field of geography is experiencing a dramatic change and that geoinformatics and computational geography deserve to be clearly distinguished, with the former being a study of engineering and the latter being a science. Keywords geoinformatics, openstreetmap, scaling of geographic space, spatial heterogeneity

  14. Seven characteristics of a successful virtual volunteering platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available characteristics were found to be necessary for platforms which support virtual tutoring to retain their volunteers. It is believed that these seven characteristics apply in general to virtual volunteering and would assist any virtual volunteer organisation...

  15. Impact of volunteer-related and methodology-related factors on the reproducibility of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mil, van Anke C.C.M.; Greyling, Arno; Zock, Peter L.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Hopman, Maria T.; Mensink, Ronald P.; Reesink, Koen D.; Green, Daniel J.; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Thijssen, Dick H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a popular technique to examine endothelial function in humans. Identifying volunteer and methodological factors related to variation in FMD is important to improve measurement accuracy and applicability. Methods: Volunteer-related and me

  16. Impact of volunteer-related and methodology-related factors on the reproducibility of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mil, van Anke C.C.M.; Greyling, Arno; Zock, Peter L.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Hopman, Maria T.; Mensink, Ronald P.; Reesink, Koen D.; Green, Daniel J.; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Thijssen, Dick H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a popular technique to examine endothelial function in humans. Identifying volunteer and methodological factors related to variation in FMD is important to improve measurement accuracy and applicability. Methods: Volunteer-related and

  17. Monitoring and Evaluation of Volunteer Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taplin, Jessica; Dredge, Dianne; Scherrer, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion and commercialisation of the volunteer tourism sector and the potential for negative impacts on host communities have put the sector under increasing scrutiny. Monitoring and evaluation are key aspects of sustainable tourism planning and management, and play important roles...... in the project planning and implementation cycles of volunteer tourism organisations and destination managements. However, they can be both value-laden and politically charged, making an understanding of context, purpose and various approaches to monitoring and evaluation important. Drawing from evaluation...... highlights the important influence of context (the issue the volunteer tourism programme is addressing, the nature of the intervention, the setting, the evaluation context and the decision-making context), and identifies four dimensions of volunteer tourism (stakeholders, organisations, markets...

  18. Volunteering Internationally: Why, Where and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David E; Kelly, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    Oral health volunteers have an important role in addressing oral health care shortages around the world, but to be effective they need to understand and prepare for the challenges of working overseas.

  19. Monitoring and Evaluation of Volunteer Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taplin, Jessica; Dredge, Dianne; Scherrer, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    in the project planning and implementation cycles of volunteer tourism organisations and destination managements. However, they can be both value-laden and politically charged, making an understanding of context, purpose and various approaches to monitoring and evaluation important. Drawing from evaluation......The rapid expansion and commercialisation of the volunteer tourism sector and the potential for negative impacts on host communities have put the sector under increasing scrutiny. Monitoring and evaluation are key aspects of sustainable tourism planning and management, and play important roles...... highlights the important influence of context (the issue the volunteer tourism programme is addressing, the nature of the intervention, the setting, the evaluation context and the decision-making context), and identifies four dimensions of volunteer tourism (stakeholders, organisations, markets...

  20. Measuring the Dollar Value of Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironmonger, Duncan

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of sample surveys to estimate the amount of time spent volunteering. States that it is necessary to estimate the number of hours involved and to establish an appropriate value per hour. (SK)

  1. Acceleration of cutaneous healing by electrical stimulation: degenerate electrical waveform down-regulates inflammation, up-regulates angiogenesis and advances remodeling in temporal punch biopsies in a human volunteer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Anil; Syed, Farhatullah; Perry, Donna; Balamurugan, Vinayagapriya; Colthurst, James; Chaudhry, Iskander H; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2011-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the beneficial effect of a novel electrical stimulation (ES) waveform, degenerate wave (DW) on skin fibroblasts, and now hypothesize that DW can enhance cutaneous wound healing in vivo. Therefore, a punch biopsy was taken from the upper arm of 20 volunteers on day 0 and repeated on day 14 (NSD14). A contralateral upper arm biopsy was taken on day 0 and treated with DW for 14 days prior to a repeat biopsy on day 14 (ESD14). A near-completed inflammatory stage of wound healing in ESD14, compared to NSD14 was demonstrated by up-regulation of interleukin-10 and vasoactive intestinal peptide using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and down-regulation of CD3 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) (p advanced remodeling phase.

  2. Holding on to what you have got: keeping hospice palliative care volunteers volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Jones, Richard

    2013-08-01

    In all, 119 hospice palliative care volunteers from 3 community-based hospice programs completed the Volunteer Retention Questionnaire (VRQ), a 33-item survey designed for this study. The VRQ asks volunteers to rate the importance of each item to their decision to continue volunteering. The items that received the highest mean importance ratings included enjoying the work they do, feeling adequately prepared/trained to perform their role, and learning from their patients' experiences/listening to their patients' life stories. Being recognized (eg, pins for years of service or being profiled in the hospice newsletter), receiving phone calls/cards from their volunteer coordinator on special occasions, and being reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses were among the items that received the lowest mean importance ratings. Suggestions for improving volunteer retention are provided.

  3. Motivations, Death Anxiety, and Empathy in Hospice Volunteers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbay, Meriem; Gay, Marie-Claire; Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the motivations for volunteering of hospice volunteers in France. In addition, their levels of death anxiety and empathy were measured and compared with those of French non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers. Three questionnaires-the Inventory of Motivations for Hospice Palliative Care Volunteerism (IMHPCV), the Templer/McMordie Death Anxiety Scale, and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index-were sent via an Internet link to 2 hospice volunteer associations and to non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers (only the hospice volunteers received the IMHPCV). Altruistic motives had the most influence on the respondents' decision to become a hospice volunteer. French hospice volunteers scored significantly lower on 3 categories of motives on the IMHPCV compared to a sample of Canadian hospice palliative care volunteers (study 2), suggesting that cultural differences may be involved. No significant differences were found in levels of death anxiety or empathy between the 3 groups of respondents of the study.

  4. 盐酸丙酰左卡尼汀片在健康人体中的药代动力学研究%Pharmacokinetics of propionyl levocarnitine hydrochloride in healthy human volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董梅蓉; 肖峰; 吴成义; 魏伟

    2013-01-01

    目的 考察盐酸丙酰左卡尼汀片在健康志愿受试者单次和多次口服给药的药代动力学及进食对其的影响.方法 单次给药时受试者分4组(0.5、1、2g、安慰剂)平行进行,多次给药1组(1g),进食影响2组(餐前给药、餐后给药)交叉进行.采用LC-MS/MS法检测丙酰左卡尼汀、乙酰左卡尼汀、左卡尼汀的浓度,采用DAS2.1.1药代动力学程序估算丙酰左卡尼汀、乙酰左卡尼汀、左卡尼汀药代动力学参数.结果 单次给药3个剂量组(0.5、1、2 g)的主要药动学参数为:丙酰左卡尼汀Cmax:(428.84±165.49)、(489.67±231.73)、(2 202.99±1 373.44)μg·L-1;AUC(0-t):(6 208.91±2 138.44)、(7 248.55±2 557.87)、(14266.30±7386.05)μg·L-1·h-1.空腹和进食后单次给药后丙酰左卡尼汀的Cmax分别为(904.23±868.38)μg·L-1和(326.95±130.97)μg·L-1;AUC(0-t)分别为(8 678.42±2 864.59)μg·L-1·h-1和(4 009.97±1736.10)μg·L-1·h-1.多次给药后丙酰左卡尼汀的 MRT为(15.03±1.28)h;Cmaxss为(778.78±342.05)μg·L-1;Cminss为(245.75±164.40)μg·L-1;AUC(0-t)及AUCbc分别为(7664.89±1 555.36)μg·L-1·h-1和(4 343.95±2 388.05)μg·L-1·h-1,Css为(638.74±129.61)μg·L-1,DF为(84.57±51.25)%.结论 单次和多次口服盐酸丙酰左卡尼汀片后盐酸丙酰左卡尼汀的药代动力学过程基本相似;在0.5~2 g剂量范围内,盐酸丙酰左卡尼汀符合线性动力学特征,多次给药后盐酸丙酰左卡尼汀代谢物在体内无蓄积现象,进食对盐酸丙酰左卡尼汀的药代动力学参数有显著影响.%Objective To evaluate the pharmacokinetics characteristics in healthy Chinese after single and multiple oral dose of propionyl levocarnitine hydrochloride by healthy volunteers on an empty stomach and after eating. Methods Four groups for the single dose( 0. 5, 1,2 g and placebo )were enrolled to do the parallel comparison; 1 group for multiple dose( 1 g )and 2 groups for eating effect( an empty stomach and after eating )to do

  5. Antithrombin III: biodistribution in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knot, E A; de Jong, E; ten Cate, J W; Gie, L K; van Royen, E A

    1987-12-18

    Five healthy volunteers were injected intravenously with 73-90 uCi purified human 131I-Antithrombin III (AT III), specific biological activity 5.6 U/mg. The tracer data were analysed using a three compartment model. The plasma radioactivity half life was 66.2 +/- 1.2 (sem) h, the fractional catabolic rate constant of the plasma pool was 0.025 +/- 0.002 (sem) h-1. These data were comparable with those described in the literature. Because of the difficulty in translating the mathematical analysis of various compartments into the biological model, biodistribution was monitored by a gamma camera linked to a DEC PDP 11/34 computer system. Dynamic and static images were obtained at fixed time intervals following the injection of 131I-AT III. Whole body scanning at intervals between the time of injection (t = 0) and t = 24.5 h showed 131I-AT III distribution over the heart, lungs, liver, spleen and great vessels. Dynamic scanning was performed over the heart, spleen and liver. Overlayed frames in the first ten minutes after the 131I-AT III injection showed the following radioactivity expressed as percentage of the injected dose; 5.9% +/- 0.3 (sem) over the heart, 10.6% +/- 0.9 (sem) over the liver and 1.1% +/- 0.1 (sem) over the spleen. A slower decline of the radioactivity between t = 0 and t = 24 h; (19%) was measured over the liver compared with the radioactivity disappearance over the heart region. This shows, in combination with the fact that the radioactivity disappearance over the heart was identical with the radioactivity decline measured in the plasma samples that retention of 131I-AT III occurred in the liver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Probabilistic Flood Mapping using Volunteered Geographical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, S. J.; Girons Lopez, M.; Seibert, J.; Minsker, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    Flood extent maps are widely used by decision makers and first responders to provide critical information that prevents economic impacts and the loss of human lives. These maps are usually obtained from sensory data and/or hydrologic models, which often have limited coverage in space and time. Recent developments in social media and communication technology have created a wealth of near-real-time, user-generated content during flood events in many urban areas, such as flooded locations, pictures of flooding extent and height, etc. These data could improve decision-making and response operations as events unfold. However, the integration of these data sources has been limited due to the need for methods that can extract and translate the data into useful information for decision-making. This study presents an approach that uses volunteer geographic information (VGI) and non-traditional data sources (i.e., Twitter, Flicker, YouTube, and 911 and 311 calls) to generate/update the flood extent maps in areas where no models and/or gauge data are operational. The approach combines Web-crawling and computer vision techniques to gather information about the location, extent, and water height of the flood from unstructured textual data, images, and videos. These estimates are then used to provide an updated flood extent map for areas surrounding the geo-coordinate of the VGI through the application of a Hydro Growing Region Algorithm (HGRA). HGRA combines hydrologic and image segmentation concepts to estimate a probabilistic flooding extent along the corresponding creeks. Results obtained for a case study in Austin, TX (i.e., 2015 Memorial Day flood) were comparable to those obtained by a calibrated hydrologic model and had good spatial correlation with flooding extents estimated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  7. Characteristics of the Essence of Volunteering in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagurova, Angelina Alexandrovna; Ivanovna, Efremova Galina; Aleksandrovna, Bochkovskaya Irina; Denisenko, Sergey Ivanovich; Valerievich, Tarasov Mihail; Viktorovna, Nekrasova Marina; Potutkova, Svetlana Anatolievna

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the basic ideas of volunteering; it analyzes the data of psychological studies on social activity and it highlights the importance of studying the motivational part of volunteering. The conclusion on structure and content of volunteering is made. Key focus is on the fact that volunteering is of particular importance in the…

  8. Neighbourly Acts--Volunteering, Social Capital and Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jennifer; Bittman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Robert Putnam's view of social capital considers the decline in volunteering as a crisis for democracy. However, data on volunteering in Australia from 1974-1997 indicate that there is likely to be a significant increase in total volunteer hours. Beyond the contribution to democratic society, the values implicit in volunteering increase the…

  9. Neighbourly Acts--Volunteering, Social Capital and Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jennifer; Bittman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Robert Putnam's view of social capital considers the decline in volunteering as a crisis for democracy. However, data on volunteering in Australia from 1974-1997 indicate that there is likely to be a significant increase in total volunteer hours. Beyond the contribution to democratic society, the values implicit in volunteering increase the…

  10. Three-way, three-period, crossover bioequivalence study of single oral dose of three brands of 300 mg phenytoin sodium tablets marketed in India, on healthy Indian human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maulik S Doshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the bioavailability of two brands of phenytoin sodium tablets available in the Indian market using Eptoin TM as the reference. Materials and Methods: A randomized, assessor-blind, three-way crossover design study was carried out over a period of 6 months after approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB. Twenty-two healthy male participants received a single oral 300 mg oral tablet of either of the formulations with a 2-week washout. Blood samples were collected predose and at regular intervals postdose. Plasma phenytoin levels were estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Calculation of C max , AUC 0-t , and AUC 0-∞ was done by the linear trapezoidal rule and 90-110% margin (90% confidence interval (CI was used to assess bioequivalence. Results: Twenty volunteers completed the study. It was seen that the log-transformed values of C max , AUC 0-t , and AUC 0-∞ of the test formulations were not within the specified limits. Conclusion: Bioinequivalence of available phenytoin brands indicates that switching brands could lead to variations in blood concentrations and thus impact safety and efficacy. If a brand switch is done for any reason, stringent drug-level monitoring is advised.

  11. Doomed volunteers: two great political plays from Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Kosok

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Seamus Byrne's Design for a Headstone (1950 and Brian Friel's Volunteers (1975 are some of the most controversial plays in the canon of Irish drama, exceptional in their explicit political implications. Loosely based on the role of the IRA in the Republic, they achieve a high degree of universality in their discussion of such provocative issues as political radicalism, internment, hunger strike, the role of the Church in society, passive resistance vs. active rebellion, justice vs. humanity, and loyalty vs. betrayal. In their tragic endings, both plays reveal a deep pessimism on the part of their authors.

  12. Bioequivalence Study of Atorvastatin Tablets in Healthy Pakistani Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Sohail; Arshad, Usman; Abbass, Nasir; Parvez, Irfan; Abbas, Ghulam; Mahmood, Wajahat

    2015-01-01

    A two way, randomized cross-over bioequivalence study was conducted to analyse the rate and extent of absorption of atorvastatin after a single dose of 80 mg atorvastatin as atorvastatin calcium tablets. The study was carried out using healthy male volunteers (N = 24). A high performance liquid chromatography method was employed to determine the level of drug in human plasma. It was concluded that the test and the reference drug exhibited comparable values of pharmacokinetic parameters. It was also concluded that since there was no significant difference between the rate and extent of absorption of the drug from the test and the reference formulations: these two formulations could thus be declared bioequivalent.

  13. Effect of serotonin on small intestinal contractility in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.B.; Arif, F.; Gregersen, H.

    2008-01-01

    -duodeno-jejunal contractility in healthy human volunteers. Manometric recordings were obtained and the effects of either a standard meal, continuous intravenous infusion of serotonin (20 nmol/kg/min) or intraluminal bolus infusions of graded doses of serotonin (2.5, 25 or 250 nmol) were compared. In addition, platelet......-depleted plasma levels of serotonin, blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram were evaluated. All subjects showed similar results. Intravenous serotonin increased migrating motor complex phase In frequency 3-fold and migrating velocity 2-fold. Intraluminal infusion of serotonin did not change contractile...

  14. Volunteer Computing Experience with ATLAS@Home

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdarios, Claire; The ATLAS collaboration; Cameron, David; Filip\\v{c}i\\v{c}, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a volunteer computing project which allows the public to contribute to computing for the ATLAS experiment through their home or office computers. The project has grown continuously since its creation in mid-2014 and now counts almost 100,000 volunteers. The combined volunteers' resources make up a sizeable fraction of overall resources for ATLAS simulation. This paper takes stock of the experience gained so far and describes the next steps in the evolution of the project. These improvements include running natively on Linux to ease the deployment on for example university clusters, using multiple cores inside one task to reduce the memory requirements and running different types of workload such as event generation. In addition to technical details the success of ATLAS@Home as an outreach tool is evaluated.

  15. Volunteer Computing Experience with ATLAS@Home

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, David; The ATLAS collaboration; Bourdarios, Claire; Lan\\c con, Eric

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a volunteer computing project which allows the public to contribute to computing for the ATLAS experiment through their home or office computers. The project has grown continuously since its creation in mid-2014 and now counts almost 100,000 volunteers. The combined volunteers' resources make up a sizable fraction of overall resources for ATLAS simulation. This paper takes stock of the experience gained so far and describes the next steps in the evolution of the project. These improvements include running natively on Linux to ease the deployment on for example university clusters, using multiple cores inside one job to reduce the memory requirements and running different types of workload such as event generation. In addition to technical details the success of ATLAS@Home as an outreach tool is evaluated.

  16. The relationship between volunteer tourism and development in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Kontogeorgopoulos, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Short-term international voluntary service is frequently linked to development discourse in the literature on volunteer tourism and the marketing materials of organizations that offer short-term volunteer opportunities. This paper explores the relationship between volunteer tourism and development in Thailand, and assesses the role played by development in the motivations and experiences of volunteers. Based on interviews with 55 volunteer tourists in the northern Thai province of Chiang Mai,...

  17. THE STUDY OF SELF-CONCEPT BETWEEN VOLUNTEER AND NON-VOLUNTEER STUDENTS IN SPORT OF UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Andam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding personality characteristics of volunteers are important for their recruitment and retention in sport associations. This study compared self-concept as a personality characteristic between volunteer and non-volunteer students in sport associations. The method of this research was survey and descriptive. The statistical population consisted of volunteer and non-volunteer students in sport associations of Iran universities. Two hundred and fifty two students (120 volunteers and 132 non-volunteers from 10 universities were selected as subjects by using random clustered sampling method. Pyryt and Mandaglio Self Perceived Survey (PMSPS was used to collect the data. The content and face reliability of questionnaire was checked and confirmed. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to test the reliability of the questionnaire (alfa=0.90. Independent t test and U Mann-Whitney test were used for comparison of the factors between volunteers and non-volunteers. Findings of this study indicated that there was a significant difference between volunteer and non-volunteer students in social and athletic self-concept. The mean of scientific and value factors were higher in volunteers than non-volunteers, however, they were not statistically significant. We concluded that the nature of sport (active and sport volunteering (social encourage students who have higher self-concept for volunteering. Moreover, the characteristics of sport associations can increase self-concept in sport volunteers.

  18. Volunteered Cloud Computing for Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. D.; Hao, W.; Chettri, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster management relies increasingly on interpreting earth observations and running numerical models; which require significant computing capacity - usually on short notice and at irregular intervals. Peak computing demand during event detection, hazard assessment, or incident response may exceed agency budgets; however some of it can be met through volunteered computing, which distributes subtasks to participating computers via the Internet. This approach has enabled large projects in mathematics, basic science, and climate research to harness the slack computing capacity of thousands of desktop computers. This capacity is likely to diminish as desktops give way to battery-powered mobile devices (laptops, smartphones, tablets) in the consumer market; but as cloud computing becomes commonplace, it may offer significant slack capacity -- if its users are given an easy, trustworthy mechanism for participating. Such a "volunteered cloud computing" mechanism would also offer several advantages over traditional volunteered computing: tasks distributed within a cloud have fewer bandwidth limitations; granular billing mechanisms allow small slices of "interstitial" computing at no marginal cost; and virtual storage volumes allow in-depth, reversible machine reconfiguration. Volunteered cloud computing is especially suitable for "embarrassingly parallel" tasks, including ones requiring large data volumes: examples in disaster management include near-real-time image interpretation, pattern / trend detection, or large model ensembles. In the context of a major disaster, we estimate that cloud users (if suitably informed) might volunteer hundreds to thousands of CPU cores across a large provider such as Amazon Web Services. To explore this potential, we are building a volunteered cloud computing platform and targeting it to a disaster management context. Using a lightweight, fault-tolerant network protocol, this platform helps cloud users join parallel computing projects

  19. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D. J.; Papa, M. A.; Pletsch, H. J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-09-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722’s pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  20. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bhat, N D R; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Demorest, P B; Fehrmann, H; Freire, P C C; Gonzalez, M E; Hammer, D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Machenschalk, A G Lyne B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Nice, D J; Papa, M A; Pletsch, H J; Prix, R; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. It has now found a 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  1. The effects of neem oil (Azadirachta indica A. JUSS) enriched with different concentrations of azadirachtin on the integument of semi-engorged Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima de Souza, José Ribamar; Remedio, Rafael Neodini; Arnosti, André; de Abreu, Rusleyd Maria Magalhães; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2017-08-01

    Several studies searching for methods to control Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l., (dog tick) infestations have been developed aiming to minimize the damages caused by these ectoparasites to the hosts and the environment, which is harmed by the indiscriminate use of toxic acaricide products. In this scenario, neem oil has been used as a natural alternative against ticks, once this chemical has repellent properties and interferes in the growth regulation of these ectoparasites, inhibiting ecdysis. The present study evaluated the effects of azadirachtin-enriched neem oil on the integument of semi-engorged R.sanguineus s.l., females through morphohistological techniques. The results showed the occurrence of significant morphological and histochemical alterations, mainly in the females exposed to higher concentrations, which demonstrates the dose-dependent action of the chemical. A decrease in the cuticle thickness was observed, as well as a modification in the distribution of the epithelial cells, which displayed pyknotic and fragmented nuclei, and intensely vacuolated cytoplasm, indicating that these cells would be undergoing death processes. These morphological alterations observed in the integument of the females exposed to the azadirachtin-enriched neem oil encourage the use of this chemical as a strategy to control these ectoparasites. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. STRUCTURAL AND CONSTITUENT CHANGES IN INTEGUMENT DURING THE MOLT CYCLE OF CHINESE MITTEN CRAB ERIOCHEIR SINENSIS%中华绒螯蟹蜕皮过程中体壁结构和主要成分的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田志环; 康现江; 焦传珍

    2013-01-01

    The construction and main constituent of the integument of Eriocheir sinensis were studied by the methods of histochemistry and atomic absorption methods. The results showed that the integument of E. sinensis was composed of four sub-layers from the exterior to the interior:an epicuticle, an exocuticle, an endocuticle, and a membranous layer. The carbohydrates were deposited in all sub-layers and the collagen fibers were deposited in all sub-layers except the epicu-ticle. Both carbohydrates and collagen fibers were reabsorbed in premolt stages. The epicuticle and exocuticle were synthesized before molt and the endocuticle and membranous layer were synthesized after molt. The contents of in-tegumental crude protein decreased before molt (D1-D3-4) (P0.05) except a little increase before molt. The contents of Ca2+and Mg2+in premolt D1 stage were significantly lower compared with the in-termolt stage and other stages in premolt (P0.05),只是在蜕皮前稍有上升。Ca2+和 Mg2+含量在蜕皮前D1期显著低于蜕皮间期和蜕皮前其他时期(P0.05)。这些研究结果表明,中华绒螯蟹体壁结构和成分变化与蜕皮周期密切相关。

  3. Pressure pain thresholds in volunteers and herniorrhaphy patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Rosenberg, J; Molke Jensen, F;

    1990-01-01

    Pressure algometry is a method to estimate pressure pain sensitivity in tissues. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reproducibility of pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in the abdominal integument and to evaluate the use of pressure algometry as a measure of wound tenderness following....... In surgical patients a significant decrease in PPT was observed following operation. Morphine 0.07 mg/kg caused a slight but significant increase in PPT. Pressure algometry may be useful to study nociceptive mechanisms and the dynamics of wound pain in surgical patients....

  4. Beliefs about Volunteerism, Volunteering Intention, Volunteering Behavior, and Purpose in Life among Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The relationships among beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, volunteering behavior, and purpose in life were examined in this study. A total of 5,946 participants completed a series of scales, including the Revised Personal Functions of Volunteerism Scale, Volunteering Intention Scale, and Purpose in Life Scale. The results showed that participants whose purpose in life had different levels also had varied prosocial beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, and volunt...

  5. The Invention and Institutionalization of Volunteer Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Håkon; Henriksen, Lars Skov

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and explains differences in governmental implementation strategies of volunteer centers in Norway and Denmark. In the first part, we describe the emergence of centers, focusing on shifting policies and governmental initiatives. The second part aims at explaining the observed...

  6. The Benefits of Volunteering for Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromnick, Rachel; Horowitz, Ava; Shepherd, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Within the current economic climate students are seen as needing more than a degree to succeed in securing graduate employment. One way that students chose to enhance their employability is through engaging in voluntary work. In this empirical study, undergraduate psychology students' reasons for volunteering are explored within the context of…

  7. International Volunteering: Employability, Leadership and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Andrew; Charleston, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of individuals in transition between education and work during international volunteering expeditions. While it was expected that outcomes might include employability enhancement and skill development, the authors aimed to clarify what the main factors were, examine employability…

  8. Dynamics of Volunteering in Older Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hank, Karsten; Erlinghagen, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dynamics of volunteering in the population aged 50 years or older across 11 Continental European countries. Design and Methods: Using longitudinal data from the first 2 waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, we run multivariate regressions on a set of binary-dependent variables indicating…

  9. Volunteers in the Danish Home Guard 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridberg, Torben; Larsen, Mona

    from 2007 to 2011 and 2016. Based on a questionnaire survey, the report paints a picture of who the volunteers are, what motivates them and how they perceive their surrounding environment’s view of them as members of the Home Guard. The report also focuses on the volunteers’ view of the Home Guard...

  10. The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Østergaard; Bendix Kleif, Helle; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’ (NR) was founded in Sweden in 1987 and has, over the years, developed into a Scandinavian concept covering large areas of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. The NR programme is a crime prevention initiative with adults walking the stre......The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’ (NR) was founded in Sweden in 1987 and has, over the years, developed into a Scandinavian concept covering large areas of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. The NR programme is a crime prevention initiative with adults walking...... the streets at night in identifiable ‘uniforms’ in areas with high activity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the NR programme in Denmark based on a volunteer set-up with a less intrusive approach to situational crime prevention than, for instance, hot spot policing. The analyses...... with NR organizations to districts without NR organizations. The results show no difference in the crime rates between Danish postcode districts with and without the NR programme. Hence, we cannot identify positive effects of situational crime prevention when evaluating this Scandinavian volunteer...

  11. Volunteers in the Danish Home Guard 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridberg, Torben; Damgaard, Malene

    This report describes the composition of the Home Guard’s volunteer members and their attitudes to and expectations for the Home Guard. A similar survey was carried out in 2007, and the present report therefore also examines the trends from 2007 to 2011. Among other things, the report shows...

  12. 75 FR 20891 - National Volunteer Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... Americans are answering that call. From mentoring a student and feeding the homeless, to rebuilding after a natural disaster, volunteers are touching lives every day. Social entrepreneurs are pioneering innovative... Administration is committed to ushering in a new era of service and responsibility. We launched United We...

  13. BOINC service for volunteer cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høimyr, N.; Blomer, J.; Buncic, P.; Giovannozzi, M.; Gonzalez, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Jones, P. L.; Karneyeu, A.; Marquina, M. A.; Mcintosh, E.; Segal, B.; Skands, P.; Grey, F.; Lombraña González, D.; Zacharov, I.

    2012-12-01

    Since a couple of years, a team at CERN and partners from the Citizen Cyberscience Centre (CCC) have been working on a project that enables general physics simulation programs to run in a virtual machine on volunteer PCs around the world. The project uses the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) framework. Based on CERNVM and the job management framework Co-Pilot, this project was made available for public beta-testing in August 2011 with Monte Carlo simulations of LHC physics under the name “LHC@home 2.0” and the BOINC project: “Test4Theory”. At the same time, CERN's efforts on Volunteer Computing for LHC machine studies have been intensified; this project has previously been known as LHC@home, and has been running the “Sixtrack” beam dynamics application for the LHC accelerator, using a classic BOINC framework without virtual machines. CERN-IT has set up a BOINC server cluster, and has provided and supported the BOINC infrastructure for both projects. CERN intends to evolve the setup into a generic BOINC application service that will allow scientists and engineers at CERN to profit from volunteer computing. This paper describes the experience with the two different approaches to volunteer computing as well as the status and outlook of a general BOINC service.

  14. Sesame Street Viewing Volunteer Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filep, Robert T.; And Others

    This guide was prepared to aid volunteers working with preschool children who view the television program, "Sesame Street". The suggestions in this booklet grew out of a study called the "Sesame Mother Pilot Project," conducted in 1970-71 by the Institute for Educational Development. This guide is divided into nine main parts:…

  15. Pulsar discovery by global volunteer computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J.M.; Deneva, J.S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D.J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P.B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P.C.C.; Gonzalez, M.E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Jenet, F.A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V.M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D.R.; Lyne, A.G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D.J.; Papa, M.A.; Pletsch, H.J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S.M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.H.; Stappers, B.W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pul

  16. Who will volunteer? Analysing individual and structural factors of volunteering in Swiss sports clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Torsten; Nagel, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses the conditions influencing volunteering in sports clubs. It focuses not only on individual characteristics of volunteers but also on the corresponding structural conditions of sports clubs. It proposes a model of voluntary work in sports clubs based on economic behaviour theory. The influences of both the individual and context levels on the decision to engage in voluntary work are estimated in different multilevel models. Results of these multilevel analyses indicate that volunteering is not just an outcome of individual characteristics such as lower workloads, higher income, children belonging to the sports club, longer club memberships, or a strong commitment to the club. It is also influenced by club-specific structural conditions; volunteering is more probable in rural sports clubs whereas growth-oriented goals in clubs have a destabilising effect.

  17. Effects of a wheat bran extract containing arabinoxylan oligosaccharides on gastrointestinal health parameters in healthy adult human volunteers : a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francois, Isabelle E. J. A.; Lescroart, Olivier; Veraverbeke, Wim S.; Marzorati, Massimo; Possemiers, Sam; Evenepoel, Pieter; Hamer, Henrike; Houben, Els; Windey, Karen; Welling, Gjalt W.; Delcour, Jan A.; Courtin, Christophe M.; Verbeke, Kristin; Broekaert, Willem F.

    2012-01-01

    Wheat bran extract (WBE) is a food-grade soluble fibre preparation that is highly enriched in arabinoxylan oligosaccharides. In this placebo-controlled cross-over human intervention trial, tolerance and effects on colonic protein and carbohydrate fermentation were studied. After a 1-week run-in peri

  18. Comparative bioequivalence study of leflunomide tablets in Indian healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S; Das, A; Ghosh, D; Sarkar, A K; Chattaraj, T K; Pal, T K

    2012-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of teriflunomide [CAS No. 163451-81-8], the metabolite of leflunomide [CAS No. 75706-12-6] has been evaluated in adult human volunteers after oral administration of tablet formulation. However, no published data is available regarding the bioavailability of this in the Indian population. In light of the above, a study was designed to carry out a bioequivalence study of 2 preparations of leflunomide 20 mg in healthy Indian male volunteers.24 healthy male volunteers (age, 25±4.1 years; weight, 57.58±7.01 kg) were enrolled in this study. Each subject received a test and reference formulation in a single dose, fasting 2 period, 2 way crossover study with a wash out period of 4 weeks. Analysis of teriflunomide from plasma samples was done by a simple and sensitive HPLC method using UV detection developed in our laboratory. An analysis of variance was performed on the pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax, AUC0-t, AUC0-∞ using GLM procedures in which sources of variation were subject, formulation, and period.The results indicated that there are no statistically significant differences between the 2 products in either the mean concentration-time profiles or in the obtained pharmacokinetic parameters. 90% confidence limits for the log transformed data of Cmax, AUC0-t, AUC0-∞. were within the acceptable range of 0.80-1.25.The results indicate that the 2 products are bioequivalent in terms of rate and extent of drug absorption. Both the preparations were well tolerated with no adverse reactions throughout the study.

  19. Stress and Burnout: Concerns for the Hospice Volunteer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Hastings, Janice L.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of stress for hospice volunteers are environmental, ideological, and personal. Attention to volunteer stress and burnout involves defining job requirements and responsibilities, frequent communication and feedback, stress management techniques, flexibility in assignments, and opportunities to verbalize emotions. (SK)

  20. Molecular helpers wanted... Call for volunteers!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The Task Force in charge of the organization of the LHC Inauguration is looking for 40 volunteers to support the team of molecular cooks directed by international chef Ettore Bocchia. The "molecular" volunteers will help in the preparation of liquid nitrogen ice-cream. Your help is requested from 12h to 18h on October 21st. Your participation in a general rehearsal on October 20th is also required - (the time of the rehearsal will be communicated at a later moment). Dress code: black pants and shoes, long sleeved white shirt. Do not miss this opportunity to take part in an extraordinary event! For further information and to enrol, contact: mailto:Catherine.Brandt@cern.ch

  1. Exposing the Dark Side, an Exploration of the Influence Social Capital Has upon Parental Sports Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Colin Grant; Holland-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the influence social capital had over parental sports volunteers who are considered to be of paramount importance in the delivery of UK sports initiatives. A review of the relevant literature identifies and discusses the complexities within the debate to define social capital while human and cultural capital emerge as an…

  2. 42 CFR 407.21 - Special enrollment period for volunteers outside the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) ENROLLMENT AND ENTITLEMENT Individual Enrollment and Entitlement for SMI § 407.21 Special enrollment period for volunteers... provided for an individual who does not elect to enroll or to be deemed enrolled in SMI when first...

  3. Exposing the Dark Side, an Exploration of the Influence Social Capital Has upon Parental Sports Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Colin Grant; Holland-Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the influence social capital had over parental sports volunteers who are considered to be of paramount importance in the delivery of UK sports initiatives. A review of the relevant literature identifies and discusses the complexities within the debate to define social capital while human and cultural capital emerge as an…

  4. FAIJU: An Assessment Center for Developing the Skills of Volunteers Working in International Youth Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Tom

    2009-01-01

    The three non-profit student exchange organizations AFS, Experiment and YFU, have been running a special assessment center for the development of skills necessary for volunteers working in international student exchange. This paper presents the goals and intentions behind this tool and also discusses the use of human resource development tools in…

  5. From "Charity" to "Social Enterprise": Managing Volunteers in Public-Serving Nonprofits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappala, Gianni

    2001-01-01

    The changing environment has shifted the model of nonprofit organizations from charity to social enterprise, which emphasizes partnerships with business and government. Approaches to volunteer management, recruitment, retention, and recognition are different in social enterprises, and a move beyond human resource management practices is required.…

  6. The Ecology of Volunteerism among College Women: Identifying Campus Environments That Inform Volunteering Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axlund McBride, RaeLyn; Lott, Joe L.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between campus environments, female college student peer culture, and the tendency to volunteer while in college. The authors used Bronfenbrenner's ecological model of human development (1977, 2005) as a framework to (a) identify one multi-faceted campus environment that is linked to volunteerism among college…

  7. The personality structure of 'normal' volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C J; McLaren, P M; Morrison, P J

    1993-01-01

    The personality structure of 65 volunteers for a Phase 1 drug trial was examined using the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. It revealed a common pattern of high extroversion, low neuroticism and psychoticism. The reasons why the study might attract such people are examined and the structure compared with those that take drugs that might have 'strange or dangerous effects'. The likely forms of bias that this personality structure may bring to the trial are explored. PMID:12959318

  8. Challenges for quality in volunteered geographical information

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available in volunteered geographical information Antony K Cooper1,2, Serena Coetzee3, Iwona Kaczmarek4, Derrick G Kourie2, Adam Iwaniak5 and Tomasz Kubik5 1 Built Environment, CSIR, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa, acooper@csir.co.za 2 Department... of Computer Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0002, South Africa, dkourie@cs.up.ac.za 3 Centre for Geoinformation Science, Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0002, South Africa, serena...

  9. Religion, Inclusive Individualism, and Volunteering in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Storm, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    A well supported finding in social science is that religiosity is associated with pro-social behaviours such as volunteering, but the religious decline in Europe characterising the latter part of the twentieth century has not been accompanied by decline in voluntary participation. This period is also associated with a sharp increase in the moral emphasis on individual autonomy and inclusiveness over social norms and traditions. In this analysis of the European Values Study (2008–2010), I exam...

  10. [Features of emotional stability in volunteers of gerontology programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, V I

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the characteristics of emotional stability in volunteers of gerontology programs (among the students of the Faculty of Psychology), depending on the structure of their life meaning and values, personal factors and professional important qualities. It is shown that the emotional stability of volunteers determines the main directions to explore the potential of the psyche of volunteers; modeling appropriate professiogram; organization of volunteer work in a particular program.

  11. Student Volunteering in China and Canada:Comparative Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Lesley Hustinx; Cnaan, Ram A; Femida Handy

    2012-01-01

    While many of the theoretical frameworks for volunteering have beendeveloped and empirically tested in the West, our understanding of volunteering in non-Western countries, such as China, is relatively limited. Nevertheless, in recent decades enormous efforts have been made by the Chinese government to encourage and support volunteering among its citizens, especially youth. Chinese youth are volunteering in greater numbers in response to these initiatives. Given the strongly state-led nature ...

  12. ATLAS@Home looks for CERN volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a CERN volunteer computing project that runs simulated ATLAS events. As the project ramps up, the project team is looking for CERN volunteers to test the system before planning a bigger promotion for the public.   The ATLAS@home outreach website. ATLAS@Home is a large-scale research project that runs ATLAS experiment simulation software inside virtual machines hosted by volunteer computers. “People from all over the world offer up their computers’ idle time to run simulation programmes to help physicists extract information from the large amount of data collected by the detector,” explains Claire Adam Bourdarios of the ATLAS@Home project. “The ATLAS@Home project aims to extrapolate the Standard Model at a higher energy and explore what new physics may look like. Everything we’re currently running is preparation for next year's run.” ATLAS@Home became an official BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network ...

  13. Weight and Glucose Reduction Observed with a Combination of Nutritional Agents in Rodent Models Does Not Translate to Humans in a Randomized Clinical Trial with Healthy Volunteers and Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Rebecca J.; Paulik, Mark A.; Walker, Ann; Boucheron, Joyce A.; McMullen, Susan L.; Gillmor, Dawn S.; Nunez, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nutritional agents have modest efficacy in reducing weight and blood glucose in animal models and humans, but combinations are less well characterized. GSK2890457 (GSK457) is a combination of 4 nutritional agents, discovered by the systematic assessment of 16 potential components using the diet-induced obese mouse model, which was subsequently evaluated in a human study. Nonclinical Results In the diet-induced obese mouse model, GSK457 (15% w/w in chow) given with a long-acting glucagon-like peptide -1 receptor agonist, exendin-4 AlbudAb, produced weight loss of 30.8% after 28 days of treatment. In db/db mice, a model of diabetes, GSK457 (10% w/w) combined with the exendin-4 AlbudAb reduced glucose by 217 mg/dL and HbA1c by 1.2% after 14 days. Clinical Results GSK457 was evaluated in a 6 week randomized, placebo-controlled study that enrolled healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes to investigate changes in weight and glucose. In healthy subjects, GSK457 well tolerated when titrated up to 40 g/day, and it reduced systemic exposure of metformin by ~ 30%. In subjects with diabetes taking liraglutide 1.8 mg/day, GSK457 did not reduce weight, but it slightly decreased mean glucose by 0.356 mmol/L (95% CI: -1.409, 0.698) and HbAlc by 0.065% (95% CI: -0.495, 0.365), compared to placebo. In subjects with diabetes taking metformin, weight increased in the GSK457-treated group [adjusted mean % increase from baseline: 1.26% (95% CI: -0.24, 2.75)], and mean glucose and HbA1c were decreased slightly compared to placebo [adjusted mean glucose change from baseline: -1.22 mmol/L (95% CI: -2.45, 0.01); adjusted mean HbA1c change from baseline: -0.219% (95% CI: -0.910, 0.472)]. Conclusions Our data demonstrate remarkable effects of GSK457 in rodent models of obesity and diabetes, but a marked lack of translation to humans. Caution should be exercised with nutritional agents when predicting human efficacy from rodent models of obesity and diabetes. Trial

  14. Weight and Glucose Reduction Observed with a Combination of Nutritional Agents in Rodent Models Does Not Translate to Humans in a Randomized Clinical Trial with Healthy Volunteers and Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Hodge

    Full Text Available Nutritional agents have modest efficacy in reducing weight and blood glucose in animal models and humans, but combinations are less well characterized. GSK2890457 (GSK457 is a combination of 4 nutritional agents, discovered by the systematic assessment of 16 potential components using the diet-induced obese mouse model, which was subsequently evaluated in a human study.In the diet-induced obese mouse model, GSK457 (15% w/w in chow given with a long-acting glucagon-like peptide -1 receptor agonist, exendin-4 AlbudAb, produced weight loss of 30.8% after 28 days of treatment. In db/db mice, a model of diabetes, GSK457 (10% w/w combined with the exendin-4 AlbudAb reduced glucose by 217 mg/dL and HbA1c by 1.2% after 14 days.GSK457 was evaluated in a 6 week randomized, placebo-controlled study that enrolled healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes to investigate changes in weight and glucose. In healthy subjects, GSK457 well tolerated when titrated up to 40 g/day, and it reduced systemic exposure of metformin by ~ 30%. In subjects with diabetes taking liraglutide 1.8 mg/day, GSK457 did not reduce weight, but it slightly decreased mean glucose by 0.356 mmol/L (95% CI: -1.409, 0.698 and HbAlc by 0.065% (95% CI: -0.495, 0.365, compared to placebo. In subjects with diabetes taking metformin, weight increased in the GSK457-treated group [adjusted mean % increase from baseline: 1.26% (95% CI: -0.24, 2.75], and mean glucose and HbA1c were decreased slightly compared to placebo [adjusted mean glucose change from baseline: -1.22 mmol/L (95% CI: -2.45, 0.01; adjusted mean HbA1c change from baseline: -0.219% (95% CI: -0.910, 0.472].Our data demonstrate remarkable effects of GSK457 in rodent models of obesity and diabetes, but a marked lack of translation to humans. Caution should be exercised with nutritional agents when predicting human efficacy from rodent models of obesity and diabetes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01725126.

  15. Women Empower Women: Volunteers and Their Clients in Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Liat; Megidna, Hofit

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at examining the relationship between psychological empowerment of women volunteers and their clients in community volunteer projects in Israel. Based on an ecological approach, the study also aimed at examining whether the variables that explain empowerment of women who volunteer also explain empowerment of their clients. The…

  16. Canadian Youth Volunteering Abroad: Rethinking Issues of Power and Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Mai

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of institutions in the ethical engagement of Canadian youth volunteers abroad. In recent years, researchers and practitioners in the international field have questioned the ethics of volunteering as part of development, with scrutiny on who actually benefits from volunteering initiatives. Since the 1960s, over 65,000…

  17. An Evaluation of the Use of Volunteers as Parent Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of trained volunteers in leading parent education programs. Compared volunteer and professionally led groups in an ongoing extension-sponsored parenting program. Urban/rural comparisons were also made. There were no significant differences between volunteer and professionally led groups on child gains or parent…

  18. Will Natural Resources Professionals Volunteer to Teach Youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sanford S.; Finley, James C.; San Julian, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    A unique approach to volunteer marketing research involved a mail survey with natural resources professionals from across Pennsylvania. Previous work identified this group as a source of potential volunteers for the 4-H youth natural resources program. The results give insights into those most likely to volunteer to teach youth through 4-H…

  19. Volunteer Motivations at a National Special Olympics Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Selina; Engelhorn, Rich

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the motivations for people to volunteer with the management and execution of major sporting events is important for the recruitment and retention of the volunteers. This research investigated volunteer motivations at the first National Special Olympics held in Ames, Iowa, USA in July 2006. A total of 289 participants completed the 28…

  20. The impact of volunteering in hospice palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of hospice palliative care work on volunteers' lives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 direct-patient care volunteers. More than half of the volunteers became involved in hospice palliative care because of their own experiences with family members and/or friends who have died. Most of the volunteers reported that they were different now or had changed in some way since they have been volunteering (e.g., they had grown in some way, have learned how to keep things in perspective). In addition, most of the volunteers felt that their outlook on life had changed since they started volunteering (e.g., they were more accepting of death, and they learned the importance of living one day at a time). Volunteers reported doing a number of different things to prevent compassion fatigue or burnout (e.g., reading a book, listening to music, talking to others, and taking time off from volunteering). Most of the volunteers said that they would tell anyone who might be thinking of volunteering in hospice palliative care that it is a very rewarding activity and/or that they should try it. Finally, many of the volunteers offered suggestions for doing things differently in their programs.

  1. The Impact of Various Personal and Social Characteristics on Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Philip; Black, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of Australian Community Survey data (n=6,242) identified three categories of volunteer involvement: assisting those who need help, serving the wider community, and being involved in volunteer groups. Volunteers in each category had different characteristics. Key influences were having resources to contribute, existence of recruitment…

  2. Motivations of Volunteer Leaders in an Extension Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Lisa T.; Cornell, Carol E.; Traywick, LaVona; Felix, Holly C.; Phillips, Martha

    2015-01-01

    This article describes findings from a qualitative study of volunteer leaders in the StrongWomen strength training program in Arkansas. The study explored reasons volunteers initially agreed to serve, perceptions of volunteer role, and motivations for continuing to lead strength training groups long-term. Findings suggest a combination of factors…

  3. Assessing Changes in Virginia Master Gardener Volunteer Management

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, Sheri T.

    1999-01-01

    ASSESSING CHANGES IN VIRGINIA MASTER GARDENER VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT Sheri T. Dorn ABSTRACT Master Gardener (MG) volunteers are nonpaid, education partners with Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE). VCE MGs have assisted Extension agents in meeting VCE's educational goals and mission by following the Sustainable Landscape Management educational program objectives within the VCE Plan of Work. Local MG volunteer programs must be managed appropriately so that vol...

  4. Classroom Volunteers: Uh-Oh! or Right On!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Joanne C.

    Noting that volunteer programs succeed only with careful forethought and maintenance, this book is designed to provide information necessary to create and operate a successful volunteer program in an elementary school setting. Steps in thinking about volunteers in innovative ways, recruitment, training, maintaining program effectiveness, and…

  5. An Evaluation of the Use of Volunteers as Parent Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of trained volunteers in leading parent education programs. Compared volunteer and professionally led groups in an ongoing extension-sponsored parenting program. Urban/rural comparisons were also made. There were no significant differences between volunteer and professionally led groups on child gains or parent…

  6. Plasmodium vivax sporozoite challenge in malaria-naive and semi-immune Colombian volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Arévalo-Herrera

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been recently achieved in the development of Plasmodium vivax challenge infections in humans, which are essential for vaccine and drug testing. With the goal of accelerating clinical development of malaria vaccines, the outcome of infections experimentally induced in naïve and semi-immune volunteers by infected mosquito bites was compared.Seven malaria-naïve and nine semi-immune Colombian adults (n = 16 were subjected to the bites of 2-4 P. vivax sporozoite-infected Anopheles mosquitoes. Parasitemia levels, malaria clinical manifestations, and immune responses were assessed and compared.All volunteers developed infections as confirmed by microscopy and RT-qPCR. No significant difference in the pre-patent period (mean 12.5 and 12.8 days for malaria-naïve and malaria-exposed, respectively was observed but naïve volunteers developed classical malaria signs and symptoms, while semi-immune volunteers displayed minor or no symptoms at the day of diagnosis. A malaria-naïve volunteer developed a transient low submicroscopic parasitemia that cured spontaneously. Infection induced an increase in specific antibody levels in both groups.Sporozoite infectious challenge was safe and reproducible in semi-immune and naïve volunteers. This model will provide information for simultaneous comparison of the protective efficacy of P. vivax vaccines in naïve and semi-immune volunteers under controlled conditions and would accelerate P. vivax vaccine development.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01585077.

  7. Impact of volunteer-related and methodology-related factors on the reproducibility of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation: analysis of 672 individual repeated measurements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mil, A.C.C.M. van; Greyling, A.; Zock, P.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Mensink, R.P.; Reesink, K.D.; Green, D.J.; Ghiadoni, L.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a popular technique to examine endothelial function in humans. Identifying volunteer and methodological factors related to variation in FMD is important to improve measurement accuracy and applicability. METHODS: Volunteer-related and

  8. UPLC-MS/MS assay for the simultaneous quantification of carvedilol and its active metabolite 4'-hydroxyphenyl carvedilol in human plasma to support a bioequivalence study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Daxesh P; Sharma, Primal; Sanyal, Mallika; Singhal, Puran; Shrivastav, Pranav S

    2013-08-01

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of carvedilol and its pharmacologically active metabolite 4'-hydroxyphenyl carvedilol in human plasma using their deuterated internal standards (IS). Samples were prepared by solid-phase extraction using 100 μL human plasma. Chromatographic separation of analytes was achieved on UPLC C18 (50 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 µm) column using acetonitrile-4.0 mM ammonium formate, pH 3.0 adjusted with 0.1% formic acid (78:22, v/v) as the mobile phase. The multiple reaction monitoring transitions for both the analytes and IS were monitored in the positive electrospray ionization mode. The method was validated over a concentration range of 0.05-50 ng/mL for carvedilol and 0.01-10 ng/mL for 4'-hydroxyphenyl carvedilol. Intra- and inter-batch precision (% CV) and accuracy for the analytes varied from 0.74 to 3.88 and 96.4 to 103.3% respectively. Matrix effect was assessed by post-column analyte infusion and by calculation of precision values (coefficient of variation) in the measurement of the slope of calibration curves from eight plasma batches. The assay recovery was within 94-99% for both the analytes and IS. The method was successfully applied to support a bioequivalence study of 12.5 mg carvedilol tablets in 34 healthy subjects.

  9. Modelling of volunteer satisfaction and intention to remain in community service: A stepwise approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hazlin; Wahid, Sharifah Norhuda Syed; Jais, Mohammad; Ridzuan, Arifi

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain the most significant model of volunteer satisfaction and intention to remain in community service by using a stepwise approach. Currently, Malaysians, young and old are showing more interests in involving themselves in community service projects, either locally or internationally. This positive movement of serving the needy is somehow being halted by the lack of human and financial resources. Therefore, the trend today sees organizers of such projects depend heavily on voluntary supports as they enable project managers to add and to expand the quantity and diversity of services offered without exhausting the minimal budget available. Volunteers are considered a valuable commodity as the available pool of volunteers may be declining due to various reasons which include the volunteer satisfaction. In tandem with the existing situation, a selected sample of 215 diploma students from one of the public universities in Malaysia, who have been involved in at least one community service project, agreed that everybody should have a volunteering intention in helping others. The findings revealed that the most significant model obtained contains two factors that contributed towards intention to remain in community service; work assignment and organizational support, with work assignment becoming the most significant factor. Further research on the differences of intention to remain in community service between students' stream and gender would be conducted to contribute to the body of knowledge.

  10. Valuing volunteers: the impact of volunteerism on hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, Renee Brent; Fottler, Myron D; Unruh, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Volunteers have been present in health care settings for centuries. However, there is little empirical evidence regarding the impact that volunteers make on hospital performance. Since the 1990s, hospitals in the United States have had a great deal of pressure to produce high-quality care at minimum expense. These pressures have enhanced the benefits of using volunteers in a hospital setting. This study utilized multiple regression analysis to explore the impact of the use of volunteers and the level of professionalism of volunteer programs on cost effectiveness and patient satisfaction in hospitals. Hospitals throughout the state of Florida were invited to participate in the study by completing a brief questionnaire about their volunteer programs. Performance indicators of volunteer cost savings and patient satisfaction scores for 50 Florida hospitals were analyzed using data sets from the American Hospital Association and Agency for Health Care Administration along with data obtained from a questionnaire. Results indicate that the use of volunteers offers significant cost savings to hospitals and enhances patient satisfaction scores. Larger volunteer programs appear to enhance patient satisfaction while containing costs. Future research opportunities related to the impact of volunteers and volunteer professionalism on other hospital performance measures are suggested.

  11. The stingy hour: how accounting for time affects volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Sanford E; Pfeffer, Jeffrey

    2010-04-01

    These studies examined how the practice of accounting for one's time-so that work can be billed or charged to specific clients or projects-affects the decision to allocate time to volunteer activities. Using longitudinal data collected from law students transitioning to their first jobs, Study 1 showed that exposure to billing time diminished individuals' willingness to volunteer, even after controlling for attitudes about volunteering held before entering the workforce as well as the individual's specific opportunity costs of volunteering time. Studies 2-5 experimentally manipulated billing time and confirmed its causal effect on individuals' willingness to volunteer and actual volunteering behavior. Study 5 showed that the effect of exposure to billing time on volunteering occurred above and beyond any effects on general self-efficacy or self-determination. Individual differences moderated the effects of billing, such that people who did not value money as much were less affected.

  12. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David A

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  13. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  14. Shirodhara : A psycho-physiological profile in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana D Dhuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shirodhara is a classical and a well-established ayurvedic procedure of slowly and steadily dripping medicated oil or other liquids on the forehead. This procedure induces a relaxed state of awareness that results in a dynamic psycho-somatic balance. Objectives: The objective of the study is to evaluate the psychological and physiological effects of Shirodhara in healthy volunteers by monitoring the rating of mood and levels of stress, electrocardiogram (ECG, electroencephalogram (EEG, and selected biochemical markers of stress. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the human pharmacology laboratory. The study design was open labeled, comparing the baseline variables with values after Shirodhara. The subjects (n = 16 chosen were healthy human volunteers who gave an informed consent. Shirodhara was preceded by Abhyanga - whole body massage. The Shirodhara method was standardized for rate of dripping with peristaltic pump and temperature was controlled with a thermostat. Mood and stress levels were assessed by validated rating scales. The pre- and post-Shirodhara ECG and EEG records were evaluated. Results: Student′s paired "t" test was applied to the means + SE of the variables to calculate statistical significance at P <0.05. There was a significant improvement in mood scores and the level of stress (P <0.001. These changes were accompanied by significant decrease in rate of breathing and reduction in diastolic blood pressure along with reduction in heart rate. The relaxed alert state, after Shirodhara, was co-related with an increase in alfa rhythm in EEG. Conclusion : A standardized Shirodhara leads to a state of alert calmness similar to the relaxation response observed in meditation. The clinical benefits observed with Shirodhara in anxiety neurosis, hypertension, and stress aggravation due to chronic degenerative diseases could be mediated through these adaptive physiological effects.

  15. Volunteer kinematics and reaction in lateral emergency maneuver tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooij, L van; Elrofai, H; Philippens, M M G M; Daanen, H A M

    2013-11-01

    It is important to understand human kinematics and muscle activation patterns in emergency maneuvers for the design of safety systems and for the further development of human models. The objective of this study was to quantify kinematic behavior and muscle activation in simulated steering tests in several realistic conditions. In total 108 tests were performed with 10 volunteers undergoing purely lateral maneuvers at 5 m/s^2 deceleration or simulated lane change maneuvers at 5 m/s^2 peak acceleration and peak yaw velocity of 25 °/s. Test subjects were seated on a rigid seat and restrained by a 4-point belt with retractor. Driver subjects were instructed to be relaxed or braced and to hold the steering wheel while passenger subjects were instructed to put their hands on their thighs. Subjects were instrumented with photo markers that were tracked with 3D high- speed stereo cameras and with electromyography (EMG) electrodes on 8 muscles. Corridors of head displacement, pitch and roll and displacement of T1, shoulder, elbow, hand and knee were created representing mean response and standard deviation of all subjects. In lane change tests for the passenger configuration significant differences were observed in mean peak of head left lateral displacement between the relaxed and the braced volunteers, i.e. 171 mm (σ=58, n=21) versus 121 mm (σ=46, n=17), respectively. Sitting in a relaxed position led to significantly lower muscle activity of the neck muscles. It was concluded that significantly more upper body motion and lower muscle activity was observed for relaxed subjects than for braced subjects.

  16. Volunteering as a means to an equal end? The impact of a social justice function on intention to volunteer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiranek, Patrick; Kals, Elisabeth; Humm, Julia Sophia; Strubel, Isabel Theresia; Wehner, Theo

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we combined components of the theory of planned behavior and the functional approach to predict the social sector volunteering intention of nonvolunteers (N = 513). Moreover, we added a new other-oriented "social justice function" to the Volunteer Functions Inventory of Clary and colleagues (1998), which contains mainly self-oriented functions. We distinguished the social justice function from the other five measured volunteer functions in confirmatory factor analysis, and showed its incremental validity in predicting intention to volunteer beyond established constructs such as self-efficacy, subjective norm, and the five volunteer functions. This study suggests that emphasizing potential social justice improvements by means of volunteering may attract new volunteers.

  17. Α quantitative investigation of personality and psychological characteristics on volunteers in the humanitarian non government organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouliou F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the heart of volunteerism, as derived from the literature review, the protection of human dignity is identified, since through volunteerism the image of the self is reflected. However, little is known today about the personality characteristics of volunteers at a quantitative level. Most studies around volunteerism focus mostly on a more qualitative and theoretical approach of volunteerism. Aim: The present study was designed to investigate specific psychological characteristics of the personality (altruism, happiness, narcissism, religiousness and the overall family environment which are associated with volunteerism in primary nursing services. More specifically, it was attempted to: a compare the volunteers and non volunteers groups as far as the specific characteristics are concerned, b correlate the individual subscale of each variable both for the whole sample and for each group separately. Methods: The study sample was decided to consist of 121 people who came from two main sources: a volunteers in the nursing section of the Humanitarian NGO of the Hellenic Red Cross and b non- volunteers, members of the healthy population of the wider area of health. The volunteers group consisted of 63 people (52.1%, while the control group consisted of 58 people (47.9% who reported that they had never been involved in volunteerism. The data collection was conducted through a written questionnaire filled at a place and time chosen by the participants. The tools used were: a A questionnaire of sociodemographic characteristics, b The Altruism subscale, c The Subjective Happiness Scale, d The Narcissistic Personality Scale and e The Scale for measuring the Family Environment. Results: From the statistical analysis it was shown that the two groups differentiated quite significantly concerning altruism (P=0.000. Also, they were significantly differentiated concerning narcissism (P=0.012 and moral and religious emphasis of the family environment

  18. Volunteer Functions Inventory: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Gema; Sauto, Verónica; Vecina, María L; Pérez, Alfonso

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this research study was to conduct a systematic review of the research on volunteers using Clary et al.’s VFI (1998). A total of 48 research studies including 67 independent samples met eligibility criteria. The total sample of the studies analyzed ranged from 20375 to 21988 participants, depending on the motivation analyzed. The results show that the Values factor obtained the highest mean score, both overall and in each type of volunteering, whereas the lowest scores were for the Career and Enhancement factors. Studies conducted with samples with a mean age under 40 years obtain higher scores on Career and Understanding scales when compared to studies in older samples. The group of studies with less than 50% women yield higher mean scores on the Social scale than studies with more than 50% women in the sample. All the scales show reliability coefficients between .78 and .84. Only eight of the articles provide data on the reliability of the scale with a mean value of .90. Of the 26 studies that performed factor analysis, 18 confirmed the original structure of six factors.

  19. Evolutionary stability in the asymmetric volunteer's dilemma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhou He

    Full Text Available It is often assumed that in public goods games, contributors are either strong or weak players and each individual has an equal probability of exhibiting cooperation. It is difficult to explain why the public good is produced by strong individuals in some cooperation systems, and by weak individuals in others. Viewing the asymmetric volunteer's dilemma game as an evolutionary game, we find that whether the strong or the weak players produce the public good depends on the initial condition (i.e., phenotype or initial strategy of individuals. These different evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS associated with different initial conditions, can be interpreted as the production modes of public goods of different cooperation systems. A further analysis revealed that the strong player adopts a pure strategy but mixed strategies for the weak players to produce the public good, and that the probability of volunteering by weak players decreases with increasing group size or decreasing cost-benefit ratio. Our model shows that the defection probability of a "strong" player is greater than the "weak" players in the model of Diekmann (1993. This contradicts Selten's (1980 model that public goods can only be produced by a strong player, is not an evolutionarily stable strategy, and will therefore disappear over evolutionary time. Our public good model with ESS has thus extended previous interpretations that the public good can only be produced by strong players in an asymmetric game.

  20. Growing Your Career through Volunteering and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, C. A.; Meth, C.

    2007-12-01

    From giving your first paper at a scientific meeting to chairing committees that make multi-million dollar decisions, scientific organizations provide critical opportunities for growing your career. Many organizations support student activities by providing travel grants and fellowships - an important first step towards joining the larger scientific community. Beyond these standard opportunities, organizations also provide opportunities for students interested in gaining leadership experience, a skill not typically acquired in graduate science programs. For example, the Consortium for Leadership's Schlanger Ocean Drilling Fellowship provides research funds to graduate students, but also introduces the fellows to the communication skills needed to become successful members of their scientific community. Beyond student opportunities, volunteering provides mid-career and established scientists further experience in leadership. Opportunities exist in advising government science policy, guiding large-scale research programs, organizing large scientific meetings, and serving on non-profit boards. The variety of volunteer and leadership opportunities that are available give scientists at all stages of their career a chance to expand and diversify their experience, leading to new successes.

  1. 2008 LHC Open Days Training for volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Information and training sessions are being organised for Open Day volunteers. The Open Days Organising Committee is offering information and training sessions every Thursday in March from 2.00 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. in the Main Building Auditorium. The first session will be on Thursday 6 March. It is important that volunteers attend these sessions to familiarise themselves with the practical arrangements for the two Open Days and with the main messages to be conveyed to the general public in order to make the event a success. General information will be given out at each session, followed by information on a specific theme. The sessions will be organised as follows: 2.00 - 2.45 p.m. : first part - general information 2.45 - 3.30 p.m. : second part - specific information * 6 March - specific theme "How to answer questions about the fears surrounding the LHC" * A different theme will be addressed at each session. The themes of subsequent sessions (13 , 20, 27 March and 3 Ap...

  2. BOINC service for volunteer cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Høimyr, N; Buncic, P; Giovannozzi, M; Gonzalez, A; Harutyunyan, A; Jones, P L; Karneyeu, A; Marquina, M A; Mcintosh, E; Segal, B; Skands, P; Grey, F; Lombraña González, D; Zacharov, I; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2012-01-01

    Since a couple of years, a team at CERN and partners from the Citizen Cyberscience Centre (CCC) have been working on a project that enables general physics simulation programs to run in a virtual machine on volunteer PCs around the world. The project uses the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) framework. Based on CERNVM and the job management framework Co-Pilot, this project was made available for public beta-testing in August 2011 with Monte Carlo simulations of LHC physics under the name "LHC@home 2.0" and the BOINC project: "Test4Theory". At the same time, CERN's efforts on Volunteer Computing for LHC machine studies have been intensified; this project has previously been known as LHC@home, and has been running the "Sixtrack" beam dynamics application for the LHC accelerator, using a classic BOINC framework without virtual machines. CERN-IT has set up a BOINC server cluster, and has provided and supported the BOINC infrastructure for both projects. CERN intends to evolve the setup i...

  3. Uses and biases of volunteer water quality data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loperfido, J.V.; Beyer, P.; Just, C.L.; Schnoor, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    State water quality monitoring has been augmented by volunteer monitoring programs throughout the United States. Although a significant effort has been put forth by volunteers, questions remain as to whether volunteer data are accurate and can be used by regulators. In this study, typical volunteer water quality measurements from laboratory and environmental samples in Iowa were analyzed for error and bias. Volunteer measurements of nitrate+nitrite were significantly lower (about 2-fold) than concentrations determined via standard methods in both laboratory-prepared and environmental samples. Total reactive phosphorus concentrations analyzed by volunteers were similar to measurements determined via standard methods in laboratory-prepared samples and environmental samples, but were statistically lower than the actual concentration in four of the five laboratory-prepared samples. Volunteer water quality measurements were successful in identifying and classifying most of the waters which violate United States Environmental Protection Agency recommended water quality criteria for total nitrogen (66%) and for total phosphorus (52%) with the accuracy improving when accounting for error and biases in the volunteer data. An understanding of the error and bias in volunteer water quality measurements can allow regulators to incorporate volunteer water quality data into total maximum daily load planning or state water quality reporting. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. Do monetary rewards crowd out intrinsic motivations of volunteers? Some empirical evidence for Italian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano Fiorillo

    2009-01-01

    The paper studies the determinants of regular volunteering departing from previous literature on extrinsic and intrinsic motivations. It contributes to the literature investigating the role of monetary rewards to influence intrinsic motivation. Using a simple framework that allows me to study the effect of monetary rewards on intrinsic motivation, the paper shows, controlling for endogenous bias, that monetary rewards crowd-out intrinsic motivation.

  5. Do monetary rewards crowd out intrinsic motivations of volunteers? Some empirical evidence for Italian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano Fiorillo

    2009-01-01

    The paper studies the determinants of regular volunteering departing from previous literature on extrinsic and intrinsic motivations. It contributes to the literature investigating the role of monetary rewards to influence intrinsic motivation. Using a simple framework that allows me to study the effect of monetary rewards on intrinsic motivation, the paper shows, controlling for endogenous bias, that monetary rewards crowd-out intrinsic motivation.

  6. Volunteer bias in medical education research: an empirical study of over three decades of longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Clara A; Hojat, Mohammadreza; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2007-08-01

    The issue of whether medical education research outcomes can be biased by students' refusal to allow their data to be used in outcomes research should be empirically addressed to assure the validity of research findings. Given that institutions are expected to document the outcomes of their educational programmes, evaluations of clinical performance subsequent to medical school are crucial, but are often incomplete when graduates decline to permit data collection. This study aimed to examine the demographic and performance differences between research volunteers and others. A total of 7415 doctors graduated from Jefferson Medical College between 1970 and 2004; 75% (n = 5575) agreed to participate in medical education research by granting written permission for the collection of data from their postgraduate training directors on their behalf (research volunteers); 20% (n = 1489) refused to grant such permission (non-volunteers), and 5% (n = 351) did not return the permission form (non-respondents). This prospective longitudinal study compared research volunteers, non-volunteers and non-respondents on gender, ethnicity, performance measures prior to, during and after medical school, scores on medical licensing examinations, and board certification status. Doctors who granted permission (volunteers) generally performed better during and after medical school. In addition, they scored higher on medical licensing examinations and had a higher certification rate. Women and members of ethnic minority groups were less likely to grant permission. The study raises questions about the validity of research findings as a result of volunteerism in medical education research. The implications for guidelines regarding the protection of human subjects in medical education research, and for educational outcomes, are discussed.

  7. Safety, Immunogenicity, and Protective Efficacy of Intradermal Immunization with Aseptic, Purified, Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Volunteers Under Chloroquine Prophylaxis : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.H. Baestians (Guido); M.P.A. van Meer (Maurits); A. Scholzen (Anja); J.M. Obiero (Joshua); M. Vatanshenassan (Mansoureh); T. van Grinsven (Tim); B.K.L. Sim (B. Kim Lee); P.F. Billingsley (Peter); E.R. James (Eric); A. Gunasekera (Anusha); E.M. Bijker (Else); G-J. van Gemert (Geert-Jan); M. van de Vegte-Bolmer (Magda); W. Graumans (Wouter); C.C. Hermsen (Cornelus); Q. de Mast (Quirijn); A.J.A.M. van der Ven (André); S.L. Hoffman (Stephen); R.W. Sauerwein (Robert)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractImmunization of volunteers under chloroquine prophylaxis by bites of *Plasmodium falciparum* sporozoite (PfSPZ)–infected mosquitoes induces > 90% protection against controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). We studied intradermal immunization with cryopreserved, infectious PfSPZ in

  8. A randomized controlled trial to promote volunteering in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Lisa M; Wolff, Julia K; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Wurm, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    Volunteering is presumed to confer health benefits, but interventions to encourage older adults to volunteer are sparse. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial with 280 community-dwelling older German adults was conducted to test the effects of a theory-based social-cognitive intervention against a passive waiting-list control group and an active control intervention designed to motivate physical activity. Self-reports of weekly volunteering minutes were assessed at baseline (5 weeks before the intervention) as well as 2 and 6 weeks after the intervention. Participants in the treatment group increased their weekly volunteering minutes to a greater extent than participants in the control groups 6 weeks after the intervention. We conclude that a single, face-to-face group session can increase volunteering among older community-dwelling adults. However, the effects need some time to unfold because changes in volunteering were not apparent 2 weeks after the intervention.

  9. Does volunteering moderate the relation between functional limitations and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Morris A; August, Kristin J; Rook, Karen S; Newsom, Jason T

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that functional limitations increase, and organizational volunteering decreases, the risk of mortality in later life. However, scant attention has been paid to investigating the joint effect of functional limitations and organizational volunteering on mortality. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that volunteering moderates the relation between functional limitations and risk of mortality. This prospective study used baseline survey data from a representative sample of 916 non-institutionalized adults 65 years old and older who lived in the continental United States. Data on mortality were extracted six years later from the National Death Index. Survival analyses revealed that functional limitations were associated with an increased risk of dying only among participants who never or almost never volunteered, suggesting that volunteering buffers the association between functional limitations and mortality. We conclude that although it may be more difficult for older adults with functional limitations to volunteer, they may receive important benefits from doing so.

  10. The role of nonprofessional volunteers in a Suicide Prevention Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, S M; Farberow, N L; Litman, R E; Shneidman, E S

    1968-08-01

    The procedures in the selection, training and supervision of 10 nonprofessional volunteers, to provide direct therapeutic crisis services to patients in a Suicide Prevention Center are described. One year's experience indicates a high degree of proficiency achieved by the volunteer in the handling of suicidal crises. The volunteers' reactions to the program are reported. Significant problems for the agency emerged in reference to precipitous increase in size of staff communication, and for the volunteer, in stimulation of problems of identity and selfconcept. The comments are limited to agency situations involving the use of nonprofessional volunteers in regular collaboration with a professional staff. Other models, such as entirely volunteer staffed groups, must be evaluated separately.

  11. Why do people volunteer for community first responder groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Vernon-Evans, Alix

    2013-03-01

    There is a growing number of community first responder (CFR) groups in the UK who provide emergency care in their local communities. To understand why people volunteer for, and continue to be active in CFR groups. Qualitative study, using focus groups of CFRs. Five focus groups were conducted, with a total of 35 participants. Ideas of altruism and a sense of community were found to be important to volunteers, though motives were complex and individual. Many volunteers had some sort of prior experience relevant to the CFR role, either as health professionals or first-aiders. Though volunteers' motives had some commonalities with the limited literature, there were issues that were unique to the CFR context. The flexibility and autonomy of CFR volunteering was particularly attractive to volunteers. It remains to be seen how sustainable the CFR model is.

  12. Healthy volunteers can be phenotyped using cutaneous sensitization pain models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads U Werner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human experimental pain models leading to development of secondary hyperalgesia are used to estimate efficacy of analgesics and antihyperalgesics. The ability to develop an area of secondary hyperalgesia varies substantially between subjects, but little is known about the agreement following repeated measurements. The aim of this study was to determine if the areas of secondary hyperalgesia were consistently robust to be useful for phenotyping subjects, based on their pattern of sensitization by the heat pain models. METHODS: We performed post-hoc analyses of 10 completed healthy volunteer studies (n = 342 [409 repeated measurements]. Three different models were used to induce secondary hyperalgesia to monofilament stimulation: the heat/capsaicin sensitization (H/C, the brief thermal sensitization (BTS, and the burn injury (BI models. Three studies included both the H/C and BTS models. RESULTS: Within-subject compared to between-subject variability was low, and there was substantial strength of agreement between repeated induction-sessions in most studies. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC improved little with repeated testing beyond two sessions. There was good agreement in categorizing subjects into 'small area' (1(st quartile [75%] responders: 56-76% of subjects consistently fell into same 'small-area' or 'large-area' category on two consecutive study days. There was moderate to substantial agreement between the areas of secondary hyperalgesia induced on the same day using the H/C (forearm and BTS (thigh models. CONCLUSION: Secondary hyperalgesia induced by experimental heat pain models seem a consistent measure of sensitization in pharmacodynamic and physiological research. The analysis indicates that healthy volunteers can be phenotyped based on their pattern of sensitization by the heat [and heat plus capsaicin] pain models.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Transdermal Etofenamate and Diclofenac in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Sara; Imboden, Roger; Schlatter, Philipp; Buylaert, Mirabel; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Drewe, Juergen

    2017-05-31

    Little is known about the course of the plasma concentration and the bioavailability of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) contained in dermal patches. We compared an etofenamate prototype patch (patent EP 1833471) and a commercially available diclofenac epolamine patch regarding the bioavailability of the active ingredients relative to respective i.m. applications and regarding their plasma concentration-time course. Twenty-four healthy human volunteers were treated using a parallel group design (n = 12 per group) with a single dermal patch (removed after 12 hr) followed (after a latency of 48 hr) by eight consecutive dermal patches every 12 hr to reach steady-state conditions. The patches were generally well tolerated, but one volunteer treated with etofenamate developed an allergic contact dermatitis. After the first patch, Cmax was 0.81 ± 0.11 (mean ± S.E.M.) ng/mL (reached 12 hr after patch removal) for diclofenac and 31.3 ± 3.8 ng/mL for flufenamic acid (reached at patch removal), the main metabolite of etofenamate. Etofenamate was not detectable. After repetitive dosing, trough plasma concentrations after the eighth dose were 1.72 ± 0.32 ng/mL for diclofenac and 48.7 ± 6.6 ng/mL for flufenamic acid. Bioavailabilities (single dose) relative to i.m. applications were 0.22 ± 0.04% for diclofenac and 1.15 ± 0.06% for flufenamic acid. In conclusion, the relative bioavailability (compared to the respective i.m. application) of both drugs is low. The maximal plasma concentrations after topical administration of these drugs are well below the IC50 values for COX-1 and COX-2, explaining the absence of dose-dependent toxicities. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  14. Offer of outgoing volunteer tourism in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Bryndová, Karolína

    2015-01-01

    Bachelor thesis describes outgoing volunteer tourism in the Czech Republic through volunteer organizations that offer projects mainly for young people as a meaning leisure activity, but also organizations that are involved in rescue operations during various natural disasters and other emergencies. It then also describes types of projects as well as positive and negative impacts, benefits, and problems of international volunteering. Final survey identifies a profile of participants of these p...

  15. THE POTENTIAL OF EMPLOYEES ONLINE VOLUNTEERING IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We have started our research based on the hypothesis that although the concept of online volunteering has a history of more than 30 years (Cravens, 2006) it seems not to be very well known and used in Romania. One the other site, Corporate Social Responsibility programs have gained popularity in our country in recent years and we were interested in analysing the connection existing between the three concepts of CSR – Corporate Volunteering – Online Volunteering along with their impact in the ...

  16. A Systems Perspective on Volunteered Geographic Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Fast

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Volunteered geographic information (VGI is geographic information collected by way of crowdsourcing. However, the distinction between VGI as an information product and the processes that create VGI is blurred. Clearly, the environment that influences the creation of VGI is different than the information product itself, yet most literature treats them as one and the same. Thus, this research is motivated by the need to formalize and standardize the systems that support the creation of VGI. To this end, we propose a conceptual framework for VGI systems, the main components of which—project, participants, and technical infrastructure—form an environment conducive to the creation of VGI. Drawing on examples from OpenStreetMap, Ushahidi, and RinkWatch, we illustrate the pragmatic relevance of these components. Applying a system perspective to VGI allows us to better understand the components and functionality needed to effectively create VGI.

  17. AVOCLOUDY: a simulator of volunteer clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebastio, Stefano; Amoretti, Michele; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    providers. The relationship between users and providers is defined by a service-level agreement, where the non-fulfillment of its terms is regulated by the associated penalty fees. Therefore, it is important that the providers adopt proper monitoring and managing strategies. Despite their reduced......, with the purpose to ‘green’ them. Indeed, the combination of data center and volunteer resources, managed by agents, allows one to obtain a more robust and scalable cloud computing platform. The increased challenges in designing such a complex system can benefit from a simulation-based approach, to test autonomic...... management solutions before their deployment in the production environment. However, currently available simulators of cloud platforms are not suitable to model and analyze such heterogeneous, large-scale, and highly dynamic systems. We propose the AVOCLOUDY simulator to fill this gap. This paper presents...

  18. Towards a Production Volunteer Computing Infrastructure for HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høimyr, N.; Marquina, M.; Asp, T.; Jones, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Field, L.

    2015-12-01

    Following the successful inclusion of virtualisation to volunteer computing for theory simulations back in 2011, the use of volunteer computing with BOINC and CernVM has been extended to cover simulations for the LHC experiments ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. This paper describes the status of the BOINC volunteer computing platform at CERN used for LHC@home and how it has been designed to address a heterogeneous environment of different user communities with different computing infrastructure. The aim of the recent developments is to provide a volunteer computing platform that the experiments can build upon to exploit opportunistic resources. Furthermore, new developments of common solutions to span user authentication domains are explained.

  19. Leaving home: how older adults prepare for intensive volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Cheryl; Piercy, Kathleen W; Grainger, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Using the concepts in the Fogg Behavioral Model, 37 volunteers aged 50 and older described their preparation for intensive volunteering with faith-based organizations. Their multistage preparation process included decision points where respondents needed to choose whether to drop out or continue preparation. Ability was a stronger determinant of serving than motivation, particularly in terms of health and finances. This model can facilitate understanding of the barriers to volunteering and aid organizations in tailoring support at crucial points for potential older volunteers in intensive service.

  20. Networking for philanthropy: increasing volunteer behavior via social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoojung; Lee, Wei-Na

    2014-03-01

    Social networking sites (SNSs) provide a unique social venue to engage the young generation in philanthropy through their networking capabilities. An integrated model that incorporates social capital into the Theory of Reasoned Action is developed to explain volunteer behavior through social networks. As expected, volunteer behavior was predicted by volunteer intention, which was influenced by attitudes and subjective norms. In addition, social capital, an outcome of the extensive use of SNSs, was as an important driver of users' attitude and subjective norms toward volunteering via SNSs.

  1. LSD enhances suggestibility in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, R L; Kaelen, M; Whalley, M G; Bolstridge, M; Feilding, A; Nutt, D J

    2015-02-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has a history of use as a psychotherapeutic aid in the treatment of mood disorders and addiction, and it was also explored as an enhancer of mind control. The present study sought to test the effect of LSD on suggestibility in a modern research study. Ten healthy volunteers were administered with intravenous (i.v.) LSD (40-80 μg) in a within-subject placebo-controlled design. Suggestibility and cued mental imagery were assessed using the Creative Imagination Scale (CIS) and a mental imagery test (MIT). CIS and MIT items were split into two versions (A and B), balanced for 'efficacy' (i.e. A ≈ B) and counterbalanced across conditions (i.e. 50 % completed version 'A' under LSD). The MIT and CIS were issued 110 and 140 min, respectively, post-infusion, corresponding with the peak drug effects. Volunteers gave significantly higher ratings for the CIS (p = 0.018), but not the MIT (p = 0.11), after LSD than placebo. The magnitude of suggestibility enhancement under LSD was positively correlated with trait conscientiousness measured at baseline (p = 0.0005). These results imply that the influence of suggestion is enhanced by LSD. Enhanced suggestibility under LSD may have implications for its use as an adjunct to psychotherapy, where suggestibility plays a major role. That cued imagery was unaffected by LSD implies that suggestions must be of a sufficient duration and level of detail to be enhanced by the drug. The results also imply that individuals with high trait conscientiousness are especially sensitive to the suggestibility-enhancing effects of LSD.

  2. Performance of Junctional Tourniquets in Normal Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Institute of Surgical Research (USAISR), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas (JFK, RSK, APC, JKA, TJW, BSK, RAD , HFP, LCC), and Medical Evacuation Fusion Cell, U.S...tions. Furthermore, the American College of Surgeon’s Committee on Trauma has an External Hemorrhage Control Guideline whose authors specifically mention...improving com- bat casualty care. J Trauma . 2011;71:S4–8. 5. Eastridge BJ, Mabry RL, Seguin P, et al. Death on the battlefield (2001–2011): implications for

  3. Salivary arecoline levels during areca nut chewing in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Stephen; Vickers, Edward R; Ghu, Sonia; Zoellner, Hans

    2010-07-01

    Arecoline stimulates cultured cells above 0.1 microg/ml and is cytotoxic above 10 microg/ml. Although this alkaloid seems important for areca nut induced oral carcinogenesis, little is known of the levels achieved during chewing. Saliva was collected in 3- to 5-min intervals over 50 min in 32 habitual chewers: before, for 25 min during, and for 20 min after chewing areca nut (0.5 g) without any other additives. Salivary arecoline was quantitated by HPLC-MS. Controls comprised six subjects who denied areca nut use, and who were given rubber-base material to chew during experiments instead. Arecoline was detected before chewing in 22 subjects, exceeding the 0.1 microg/ml threshold in 20 cases. Salivary arecoline exceeded either the 0.1 or 10 microg/ml thresholds in all participants during chewing (P arecoline in at least 85% of time points studied (P Arecoline concentrations varied greatly over time between individuals, and levels were much lower when peak concentrations were reached before 3 min, than in cases where arecoline peaked later (P arecoline was found in control saliva. Areca nut users have persistent background salivary arecoline levels long after chewing, whereas concentrations achieved are highly variable and consistent with a role in oral pre-malignancy and malignancy.

  4. Human Resource Management for Volunteers in Sports Organisations in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Bjarne

    Resultater af en undersøgelse af frivilligt arbejde og HRM i frivillige idrætsorganisationer i Europa......Resultater af en undersøgelse af frivilligt arbejde og HRM i frivillige idrætsorganisationer i Europa...

  5. When Volunteering Breeds Trust – and When it Does Not A Panel Study of the Volunteering – Trust Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Bekkers, René

    2006-01-01

    It is a common belief that participation in voluntary associations makes citizens more trusting of others. This paper reports longitudinal analyses of volunteering and trust on the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (2002-2004; n=1246) refuting this belief. I find that volunteering has little positive impact on trust because social experiences of volunteers in organizations are not always positive. A second reason is that values are relatively stable over the life course. Finally, there ar...

  6. Investing in volunteering: measuring social returns of volunteer recruitment, training, and management

    OpenAIRE

    G. Manetti; M. Bellucci; E.Como; L. Bagnoli

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the costs and benefits of the investments that non-profit organizations (NPOs) make for the recruitment, training, and management of volunteers. Our main research question is whether we can apply the Social Return on Investment (SROI) to the identification and quantification of social returns in monetary terms. We believe that the “SROI of volunteering” may represent an effective instrument of internal control for NPOs for improving efficiency and sustainability. In o...

  7. Individual heterogeneity and costly punishment: a volunteer's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przepiorka, Wojtek; Diekmann, Andreas

    2013-05-22

    Social control and the enforcement of social norms glue a society together. It has been shown theoretically and empirically that informal punishment of wrongdoers fosters cooperation in human groups. Most of this research has focused on voluntary and uncoordinated punishment carried out by individual group members. However, as punishment is costly, it is an open question as to why humans engage in the punishment of wrongdoers even in one-time-only encounters. While evolved punitive preferences have been advocated as proximate explanations for such behaviour, the strategic nature of the punishment situation has remained underexplored. It has been suggested to conceive of the punishment situation as a volunteer's dilemma (VOD), where only one individual's action is necessary and sufficient to punish the wrongdoer. Here, we show experimentally that implementing the punishment situation as a VOD sustains cooperation in an environment where punishers and non-punishers coexist. Moreover, we show that punishment-cost heterogeneity allows individuals to tacitly agree on only the strongest group member carrying out the punishment, thereby increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of social norm enforcement. Our results corroborate that costly peer punishment can be explained without assuming punitive preferences and show that centralized sanctioning institutions can emerge from arbitrary individual differences.

  8. Motivations for Deceased Organ Donation Among Volunteers in China: A Qualitative Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhike; Liu, Shan; Yan, Jin; Liu, Jia

    2016-06-09

    BACKGROUND To align with guiding principles on human organ and tissue transplantation published by the World Health Organization (WHO), the Red Cross Society of China (RCSC) launched a new nationwide organ donation program in 2010 to recruit organ donation volunteers. Despite severe shortage of donated organs, there is a very low rate of volunteering for organ donation among the Chinese population (only 0.03 donors per million population) in the national program. Motivating organ donation is the key to the success of organ transplantation in China. MATERIAL AND METHODS Semi-structured 45- to 60-min interviews were conducted among 34 volunteers. Data analysis was performed with Nvivo 8.0 software. RESULTS Six motivations for organ donation were identified: helping others/altruism, fulfilling long-cherished wishes, reducing the burdens, making the best use of everything, giving back to society, and life extension. Factors affecting the motivation of organ donation among volunteers in China included traditional values, personal experiences, role model effect, family support, and problems in the donation system. Possible strategies to improve organ donation included fostering a scientific concept of the body and death, focusing donation promotion efforts on certain groups, and simplifying the process of organ donation. CONCLUSIONS There are multiple reasons for Chinese people to register for organ donation, with helping others as the central motivation.

  9. In vivo electroporation enhances the immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA vaccine candidate in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Vasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA-based vaccines have been safe but weakly immunogenic in humans to date. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sought to determine the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of ADVAX, a multigenic HIV-1 DNA vaccine candidate, injected intramuscularly by in vivo electroporation (EP in a Phase-1, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial in healthy volunteers. Eight volunteers each received 0.2 mg, 1 mg, or 4 mg ADVAX or saline placebo via EP, or 4 mg ADVAX via standard intramuscular injection at weeks 0 and 8. A third vaccination was administered to eleven volunteers at week 36. EP was safe, well-tolerated and considered acceptable for a prophylactic vaccine. EP delivery of ADVAX increased the magnitude of HIV-1-specific cell mediated immunity by up to 70-fold over IM injection, as measured by gamma interferon ELISpot. The number of antigens to which the response was detected improved with EP and increasing dosage. Intracellular cytokine staining analysis of ELISpot responders revealed both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, with co-secretion of multiple cytokines. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first demonstration in healthy volunteers that EP is safe, tolerable, and effective in improving the magnitude, breadth and durability of cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine candidate. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00545987.

  10. Three Steps to Engage Volunteers in Membership Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossell, Tony

    2011-01-01

    There is a big world out there, and volunteers can make a significant impact in helping one reach out to others and grow his/her PTA membership. In fact, word-of-mouth marketing tied for the top spot as the most effective method of new member recruitment in Marketing General's 2010 Membership Marketing Benchmarking Report. So getting volunteers'…

  11. Who Benefits from Volunteering? Variations in Perceived Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Song-Iee; Tang, Fengyan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document the benefits of volunteering perceived by older adults and to explain variation in these self-perceived benefits. Design and Methods: This is a quantitative study of 13 volunteer programs and 401 older adults serving in those programs. Program directors completed telephone interviews, and older…

  12. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain...

  13. Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

    2014-01-01

    Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what motivates…

  14. Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

    2014-01-01

    Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what motivates…

  15. Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

    2014-01-01

    Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what…

  16. 75 FR 56501 - Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... exists regarding volunteering in general, there is very little rigorous, academic research on volunteering as it applies to LMAs, largely because there is no reliable, uniform, and comprehensive data... management values and objectives; and will facilitate further application of findings. The exact number...

  17. The Association of Childhood Personality Type with Volunteering during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Robert; Hart, Daniel; Donnelly, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    Using a longitudinal design, we investigated the relation of childhood personality type to volunteering during adolescence. We hypothesized that participants with more adaptive personality functioning during childhood would be more likely to volunteer during adolescence and that membership in social organizations would mediate the relation of…

  18. Leveraging Telehealth to Bring Volunteer Physicians Into Underserved Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Rudin, Robert; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2016-11-28

    Many disadvantaged communities lack sufficient numbers of local primary care and specialty physicians. Yet tens of thousands of physicians, in particular those who are retired or semiretired, desire meaningful volunteer opportunities. Multiple programs have begun to use telehealth to bridge the gap between volunteer physicians and underserved patients. In this brief, we describe programs that are using this model and discuss the promise and pitfalls. Physician volunteers in these programs report that the work can be fulfilling and exciting, a cutting-edge yet convenient way to remain engaged and contribute. Given the projected shortfall of physicians in the United States, recruiting retired and semiretired physicians to provide care through telehealth increases the total supply of active physicians and the capacity of the existing workforce. However, programs typically use volunteers in a limited capacity because of uncertainty about the level and duration of commitment. Acknowledging this reality, most programs only use volunteer physicians for curbside consults rather than fully integrating them into longitudinal patient care. The part-time availability of volunteers may also be difficult to incorporate into the workflow of busy safety net clinics. As more physicians volunteer in a growing number of telehealth programs, the dual benefits of enriching the professional lives of volunteers and improving care for underserved communities will make further development of these programs worthwhile.

  19. School Volunteer Program. A Two-Year Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew Consolidated School Corp., Columbus, IN.

    This report evaluates a volunteer program established in the Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation in Columbus, Indiana. Areas identified for evaluation were (1) the fulfillment or achievement of program objectives; (2) measurable differences in volunteers' attitudes toward the schooling process and parenting skills, as well as their…

  20. National context, religiosity and volunteering: Results from 53 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, S.; Graaf, N.D. de

    2006-01-01

    To what extent does the national religious context affect volunteering? Does a religious environment affect the relation between religiosity and volunteering? To answer these questions, this study specifies individual level, contextual level, and cross-level interaction hypotheses. The authors test

  1. The Impact of Institutional Mission on Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Susan Crawford; Ludden, Alison Bryant; Singleton, Royce A., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined patterns and predictors of volunteering among students at a liberal arts college with an institutional culture that strongly promotes community service. Results showed that predictors varied across four different types of volunteering: community service, social action, religious service, and service to the college. Year in…

  2. National Context, Religiosity, and Volunteering : Results from 53 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, Stijn; Graaf, Nan Dirk de

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does the national religious context affect volunteering? Does a religious environment affect the relation between religiosity and volunteering? To answer these questions, this study specifies individual level, contextual level, and cross-level interaction hypotheses. The authors test

  3. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of lorazepam tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-junQIU; Guo-xinHU; Jian-gangWANG; Zong-shunDAI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of lorazepam tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers. METHODS:Twenty Chinese healthy male volunteers were involved in the study. Each subject received a single dose of 3 mg Lorazepam tested formulation (T, Hubei Zhongtian Airbeck Pharmaceutical Limited Company) or Lorazepam reference formulation (R, Thailand Atlatic Pharmaceutical Limited Company) with a random-

  4. Mé Féin nó an Pobal: Social Processes and Connectivity in Irish Volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Claire Van Hout

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ireland has a longstanding history of diverse volunteer action (Volunteering Ireland, 2010a. Ireland’s current economic recession has impacted on the community and voluntary sector, with frequent contraction in staff numbers and incomes, and increasing reliance on volunteer participation (Harvey, 2012. This study utilised social capital theory to garner a phenomenological understanding of the contribution of volunteering to perceived social capital amongst Irish volunteers and host organisation representatives. A convenience sample of 28 participants (17 volunteers and 11 organisation representatives was interviewed. A shift in personal and social definitions of volunteering were described, with informal volunteering increasingly replaced by structured, formalized and regulated volunteer placements. Volunteers described their experiences as contributing to increased personal well being and sense of purpose, development of friendships and meeting new people. The volunteer participants identified volunteering activity as a specified community need, providing work related experiences, fulfillment in free time and opportunity for up-skilling. Integration of volunteers into the organisation’s workforce was described as dependent on duration, intensity of interaction and scope of volunteer contributions. Power differentials and a lack of trust between volunteers and staff, was described, as was a lack of volunteer recognition staff. Subsequently, some volunteers identified and aligned themselves within the wider social volunteer network rather than their host organisation. The research reflected an emergent consumerist approach to volunteering and underscores the need to preserve informal social networks of community volunteers, alongside the development of more formalized work specific routes for volunteering in Ireland.

  5. English Training for College Student Volunteers at Sports Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies English training for student volunteers at large scale sports events with a comprehensive investigation of the undergraduate student volunteers from Capital University of Physical Education who have taken part in large scale sports events. By examining the current volunteer training situation, the author finds that there is a sever lack of professional and system-atical English training for student volunteers at large scale sports events. The study shows focusing on sports events knowledge and requirements of the volunteers’specific job is crucial to the service level of the volunteers. The study concludes that the problem can be solved by developing new course books, innovating new flexible training methods, and offering more comprehensive training content. The recommended training methods include intensive group training, computer aided teaching, task training and on-the-spot training to make them fit their work soon.

  6. Predicting professional quality of life among professional and volunteer caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avieli, Hila; Ben-David, Sarah; Levy, Inna

    2016-01-01

    This study is one of the few that has compared volunteers' professional quality of life (PQL), which includes secondary traumatic stress (STS), burnout, and compassion satisfaction (CS), to those of professional caregivers. In addition, the research compared the ethical behavior of volunteers with that of professional therapists and examined the connection between years of experience, ethical behavior, and PQL. One hundred eighty-three volunteers and professional caregivers filled out a sociodemographic questionnaire, an Ethical Behavior Questionnaire and the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) questionnaire. The results indicated that professional caregivers report lower levels of STS and burnout, and higher levels of CS and ethical behavior compared with volunteer caregivers. Moreover, the findings suggest that ethical behavior correlates with STS, burnout, and CS. Ethical behavior has a protective value for mental health caregivers. The discussion emphasizes the value of a professional code of ethics and ethical training for professional and volunteering caregivers.

  7. "Communication is everything:" The experiences of volunteers who use AAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembath, David; Balandin, Susan; Stancliffe, Roger J; Togher, Leanne

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact that using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) had on the experiences of 24 adults with lifelong disabilities who worked as volunteers. This research forms part of a larger qualitative study of volunteering amongst adults who use AAC. Based on in-depth interviews and grounded theory analysis, the results indicate that communication is central to successful volunteering and, in particular, that access to AAC has the potential to provide valuable support to individuals with complex communication needs who want to volunteer. However, a number of barriers must be addressed in order for this potential to be achieved. Strategies for promoting and supporting adults who use AAC and want to volunteer are discussed.

  8. Gender and religious differences associated with volunteering in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Lydia K

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a nationally representative sample of older adults in the United States to investigate the effect gender and religiosity has on volunteer behavior in later life. This study looks specifically at the gender and religious differences associated with volunteering in later life. Accounting for gender and religious differences, more specifically, this study examines the assumption that older women are more likely to volunteer in later life as opposed to men, and that gender is a better predictor than being religious for the likelihood of occupying a volunteer role in later life. This study poses questions about the differences in gender and religiosity associated with volunteering in later life; the results indicate there is more work to be done as we conduct research that is clearer about how volunteerism and religiosity are measured in relation to gender, and the overall impact these differences have for older women and their respective communities.

  9. Municipality and Neighborhood Influences on Volunteering in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dury, Sarah; Willems, Jurgen; De Witte, Nico; De Donder, Liesbeth; Buffel, Tine; Verté, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    This article explores the relationships between municipality features and volunteering by older adults. In the literature, strong evidence exists of the influence of place on older people's health. However, the question how neighborhoods and municipalities promote or hinder volunteer participation remains under-explored. Data for the research are derived from the Belgian Aging Studies. We estimate logistic multilevel models for older individuals' engagement in volunteering across 141 municipalities in Belgium (N = 67,144). Analysis shows that neighborhood connectedness, neighborhood satisfaction, home ownership, and presence of services predict voluntary engagement at older ages. The findings support that perceptions and quality of social resources that relate to neighborhoods may be important factors to explain volunteering among older adults. Moreover, the findings suggest that volunteering in later life must be considered within a broader framework.

  10. Histology and Mucous Histochemistry of the Integument and Body Wall of a Marine Polychaete Worm, Ophryotrocha n. sp. (Annelida: Dorvilleidae Associated with Steelhead Trout Cage Sites on the South Coast of Newfoundland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Murray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Histology and mucous histochemistry of the integument and body wall of a marine polychaete worm, Ophryotrocha n. sp. (Annelida: Dorvilleidae associated with Steelhead trout cage sites on the south coast of Newfoundland. A new species of polychaete (Ophryotrocha n. sp. (Annelida: Dorvilleidae was identified from sediment below Steelhead trout cages on the south coast of Newfoundland, Canada. The organisms were observed to produce a network of mucus in which groups of individuals would reside. Questions regarding the nature and cellular source of the mucus were addressed in this study. Samples of worms were taken from below cages and transported to the laboratory where individuals were fixed for histological study of the cuticle and associated mucus histochemistry. The body wall was organized into segments with an outer cuticle that stained strongly for acid mucopolysaccharides. The epidermis was thin and supported by loose fibrous connective tissue layers. Channels separating individual segments were lined with cells staining positive for Alcian blue. Mucoid cellular secretions appeared thick and viscous, strongly staining with Alcian blue and Periodic Acid Schiff Reagent. It was noted that lateral channels were connected via a second channel running through the anterior/posterior axis. The role of mucus secretion is discussed.

  11. A Method for Analyzing Volunteered Geographic Information ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI) can be used to identify public valuation of ecosystem services in a defined geographic area using photos as a representation of lived experiences. This method can help researchers better survey and report on the values and preferences of stakeholders involved in rehabilitation and revitalization projects. Current research utilizes VGI in the form of geotagged social media photos from three platforms: Flickr, Instagram, and Panaramio. Social media photos have been obtained for the neighborhoods next to the St. Louis River in Duluth, Minnesota, and are being analyzed along several dimensions. These dimensions include the spatial distribution of each platform, the characteristics of the physical environment portrayed in the photos, and finally, the ecosystem service depicted. In this poster, we focus on the photos from the Irving and Fairmount neighborhoods of Duluth, MN to demonstrate the method at the neighborhood scale. This study demonstrates a method for translating the values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially-explicit data to be used in multiple settings, including the City of Duluth’s Comprehensive Planning and community revitalization efforts, habitat restoration in a Great Lakes Area of Concern, and the USEPA’s Office of Research and Development. This poster will demonstrate a method for translating values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially

  12. Using volunteered geographic information to visualize ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI), specifically geotagged photographs available from social media platforms, is a promising technology that can be utilized to identify public values for ecosystem goods and services in a defined geographic area. VGI can help researchers indirectly survey and report on the values and preferences of communities involved in restoration and revitalization projects. We are using geotagged images from three social media platforms: Flickr, Instagram, and Panaramio. Images are obtained for the neighborhoods to the St. Louis River in the Duluth, MN and analyzed along several dimensions including the spatial distribution of images from each platform and the types and frequencies of social values and ecosystem service depicted. This study will demonstrate a method for translating the values of ecosystem goods and services as captured in social media into spatially-explicit data. Study outcomes are the incorporation of social media-derived indicators of ecosystems services into City of Duluth’s Comprehensive Planning and community revitalization efforts, habitat restoration in a Great Lakes Area of Concern, and the USEPA’s Office of Research and Development Sustainable and Healthy Community research. Not applicable

  13. A Method for Analyzing Volunteered Geographic Information ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI) can be used to identify public valuation of ecosystem services in a defined geographic area using photos as a representation of lived experiences. This method can help researchers better survey and report on the values and preferences of stakeholders involved in rehabilitation and revitalization projects. Current research utilizes VGI in the form of geotagged social media photos from three platforms: Flickr, Instagram, and Panaramio. Social media photos have been obtained for the neighborhoods next to the St. Louis River in Duluth, Minnesota, and are being analyzed along several dimensions. These dimensions include the spatial distribution of each platform, the characteristics of the physical environment portrayed in the photos, and finally, the ecosystem service depicted. In this poster, we focus on the photos from the Irving and Fairmount neighborhoods of Duluth, MN to demonstrate the method at the neighborhood scale. This study demonstrates a method for translating the values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially-explicit data to be used in multiple settings, including the City of Duluth’s Comprehensive Planning and community revitalization efforts, habitat restoration in a Great Lakes Area of Concern, and the USEPA’s Office of Research and Development. This poster will demonstrate a method for translating values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially

  14. Education and Outreach for Volunteer Planetary Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    When a large meteor exploded over Chelyabinsk in 2013, people saw the bright flash and rushed to windows. Then the blast wave hit and many were injured by flying glass fragments. Education about airbursts might have reduced the casualties. Education and Public Outreach (EPO) can also be important in broadening public involvement in preparations for dealing with cosmic hazards. Amateur astronomers have an important role in discovering potentially hazardous asteroids and comets, and also in making follow-up observations after discovery. This is especially important for Southern Hemisphere observing sites where professional observers are relatively few. The Planetary Society makes small Shoemaker grants to aid amateur astronomers in this work. Much more could be done if educators, students and the general public were aware of the opportunity and the need. Beyond this, public engagement is essential to raise and maintain support for active agencies, including the UN-sponsored International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Mission Planning Advisory Group (SMPAG). This paper will describe and advocate EPO efforts in support of these and other Volunteer Planetary Defense activities.

  15. Prediction of psilocybin response in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Studerus

    Full Text Available Responses to hallucinogenic drugs, such as psilocybin, are believed to be critically dependent on the user's personality, current mood state, drug pre-experiences, expectancies, and social and environmental variables. However, little is known about the order of importance of these variables and their effect sizes in comparison to drug dose. Hence, this study investigated the effects of 24 predictor variables, including age, sex, education, personality traits, drug pre-experience, mental state before drug intake, experimental setting, and drug dose on the acute response to psilocybin. The analysis was based on the pooled data of 23 controlled experimental studies involving 409 psilocybin administrations to 261 healthy volunteers. Multiple linear mixed effects models were fitted for each of 15 response variables. Although drug dose was clearly the most important predictor for all measured response variables, several non-pharmacological variables significantly contributed to the effects of psilocybin. Specifically, having a high score in the personality trait of Absorption, being in an emotionally excitable and active state immediately before drug intake, and having experienced few psychological problems in past weeks were most strongly associated with pleasant and mystical-type experiences, whereas high Emotional Excitability, low age, and an experimental setting involving positron emission tomography most strongly predicted unpleasant and/or anxious reactions to psilocybin. The results confirm that non-pharmacological variables play an important role in the effects of psilocybin.

  16. Prediction of psilocybin response in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studerus, Erich; Gamma, Alex; Kometer, Michael; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2012-01-01

    Responses to hallucinogenic drugs, such as psilocybin, are believed to be critically dependent on the user's personality, current mood state, drug pre-experiences, expectancies, and social and environmental variables. However, little is known about the order of importance of these variables and their effect sizes in comparison to drug dose. Hence, this study investigated the effects of 24 predictor variables, including age, sex, education, personality traits, drug pre-experience, mental state before drug intake, experimental setting, and drug dose on the acute response to psilocybin. The analysis was based on the pooled data of 23 controlled experimental studies involving 409 psilocybin administrations to 261 healthy volunteers. Multiple linear mixed effects models were fitted for each of 15 response variables. Although drug dose was clearly the most important predictor for all measured response variables, several non-pharmacological variables significantly contributed to the effects of psilocybin. Specifically, having a high score in the personality trait of Absorption, being in an emotionally excitable and active state immediately before drug intake, and having experienced few psychological problems in past weeks were most strongly associated with pleasant and mystical-type experiences, whereas high Emotional Excitability, low age, and an experimental setting involving positron emission tomography most strongly predicted unpleasant and/or anxious reactions to psilocybin. The results confirm that non-pharmacological variables play an important role in the effects of psilocybin.

  17. Beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, volunteering behavior, and purpose in life among Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ben M F; Shek, Daniel T L

    2009-09-01

    The relationships among beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, volunteering behavior, and purpose in life were examined in this study. A total of 5,946 participants completed a series of scales, including the Revised Personal Functions of Volunteerism Scale, Volunteering Intention Scale, and Purpose in Life Scale. The results showed that participants whose purpose in life had different levels also had varied prosocial beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, and volunteering behavior. Purpose in life was associated more strongly with prosocial value function than with other types of beliefs (except understanding function). When different beliefs are grouped, the correlation between purpose in life and other-serving beliefs was higher than that between purpose in life and self-serving beliefs. Purpose in life was also associated with volunteering intention and behavior. Path analyses showed that purpose in life predicted volunteering behavior via beliefs and intention. While other-serving beliefs predicted volunteering behavior directly, self-serving beliefs did not have such direct effect.

  18. Socialising adolescent volunteering : How important are parents and friends? Age dependent effects of parents and friends on adolescents' volunteering behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, Anne A J; van Hoof, Anne; van Aken, Marcel A G; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Raaijmakers, Quinten A W

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relative importance of best friend's and parents' volunteering and civic family orientation (combined with open family communication) in adolescent volunteering, and the moderating effect of age. Results, involving 698 adolescents (M age. = 15.19; SD= 1.43), revealed that ado

  19. Socialising adolescent volunteering: how important are parents and friends? Age dependent effects of parents and friends on adolescents' volunteering behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goethem, A.A.J.; van Hoof, A.; van Aken, M.A.G.; Orobio de Castro, B.; Raaijmakers, Q.A.W.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relative importance of best friend's and parents' volunteering and civic family orientation (combined with open family communication) in adolescent volunteering, and the moderating effect of age. Results, involving 698 adolescents (M age = 15.19; SD = 1.43), revealed that ado

  20. The Challenge of Volunteering Frequency in Croatia--Can Volunteers Contribute to the Social Capital Development Once a Year?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culum, Bojana; Forcic, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Volunteering is one of the strongest elements of shaping democratic change within the society. It is also an essential element in citizenship development and in re-establishing a sense of community. Volunteering empowers individuals, builds solidarity, encourages participation and protects vulnerable groups against social and economic…

  1. When Volunteering Breeds Trust – and When it Does Not A Panel Study of the Volunteering – Trust Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René

    2006-01-01

    It is a common belief that participation in voluntary associations makes citizens more trusting of others. This paper reports longitudinal analyses of volunteering and trust on the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (2002-2004; n=1246) refuting this belief. I find that volunteering has little pos

  2. Measuring the Impacts of a Volunteer-Based Community Development Program in Developing Volunteers' Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Amy; Singletary, Loretta; Hill, George

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an evaluation of the impacts of a community development program to develop leadership skills in its adult volunteers. The evaluation featured 20 questions about leadership skills learned as a result of volunteer experiences. Data analysis strategies beyond a simple means ranking resulted in evidence…

  3. Beliefs about Volunteerism, Volunteering Intention, Volunteering Behavior, and Purpose in Life among Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben M. F. Law

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships among beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, volunteering behavior, and purpose in life were examined in this study. A total of 5,946 participants completed a series of scales, including the Revised Personal Functions of Volunteerism Scale, Volunteering Intention Scale, and Purpose in Life Scale. The results showed that participants whose purpose in life had different levels also had varied prosocial beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, and volunteering behavior. Purpose in life was associated more strongly with prosocial value function than with other types of beliefs (except understanding function. When different beliefs are grouped, the correlation between purpose in life and other-serving beliefs was higher than that between purpose in life and self-serving beliefs. Purpose in life was also associated with volunteering intention and behavior. Path analyses showed that purpose in life predicted volunteering behavior via beliefs and intention. While other-serving beliefs predicted volunteering behavior directly, self-serving beliefs did not have such direct effect.

  4. Psychological characteristics of Swedish mandatory enlisted soldiers volunteering and not volunteering for international missions: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydstedt, Leif W; Osterberg, Johan

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess personality traits, psychological fitness, and hardiness among conscript soldiers volunteering for international missions (n = 146), by comparing them with conscripts from the same year class and unit who did not apply for international missions (n = 275). The sample consisted of all mandatory enlisted soldiers assigned to a supply and maintenance regiment. There were no demographic differences between the groups. The volunteers reported greater stress tolerance, concern for others, extraversion, and self-confidence than the non-volunteers. There were no differences between the groups in orderliness, temper instability, or independence. Volunteers repeatedly reported greater psychological fitness for military missions and greater hardiness over the period of military service compared to the non-volunteers.

  5. The impact of volunteer mentoring schemes on carers of people with dementia and volunteer mentors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Raymond; Greenwood, Nan

    2014-02-01

    This systematic review aims to examine the differences and similarities between the various types of volunteer mentoring (befriending, mentoring and peer support) and to identify the benefits for carers and volunteers. Literature searching was performed using 8 electronic databases, gray literature, and reference list searching of relevant systematic reviews. Searches were carried out in January 2013. Four studies fitted the inclusion criteria, with 3 investigating peer support and 1 befriending for carers. Quantitative findings highlighted a weak but statistically significant (P =.04) reduction in depression after 6 months of befriending. Qualitative findings highlighted the value carers placed on the volunteer mentors' experiential similarity. Matching was not essential for the development of successful volunteer mentoring relationships. In conclusion, the lack of need for matching and the importance of experiential similarity deserve further investigation. However, this review highlights a lack of demonstrated efficacy of volunteer mentoring for carers of people with dementia.

  6. Synergy of Volunteer Measurements and Volunteer Computing for Effective Data Collecting, Processing, Simulating and Analyzing on a Worldwide Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Gordienko, Nikita; Fedak, Gilles; Gordienko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    The paper concerns the hype idea of "Citizen Science" and the related paradigm shift: to go from the passive "volunteer computing" to other volunteer actions like "volunteer measurements" under guidance of scientists. They can be carried out by ordinary people with standard computing gadgets (smartphone, tablet, etc.) and the various standard sensors in them. Here the special attention is paid to the system of volunteer scientific measurements to study air showers caused by cosmic rays. The technical implementation is based on integration of data about registered night flashes (by radiometric software) in shielded camera chip, synchronized time and GPS-data in ordinary gadgets: to identify night "air showers" of elementary particles; to analyze the frequency and to map the distribution of "air showers" in the densely populated cities. The project currently includes the students of the National Technical University of Ukraine "KPI", which are compactly located in Kyiv city and contribute their volunteer measur...

  7. Reactivity of allergy skin test in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supakthanasiri, Phisit; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Chantaphakul, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Healthy individuals may be exposed and sensitised to allergens, and have a positive response to a skin prick test despite being asymptomatic. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of atopic sensitisation and identify the reactivity of healthy volunteers to common aeroallergens. Healthy volunteers with no known allergic symptoms were recruited in this study. All volunteers were scheduled to undergo a skin prick test with 16 common aeroallergens that were previously identified among atopic patients. A total of 100 volunteers (mean age 28 years) were enrolled in this study. 42 volunteers had positive skin prick tests for at least one allergen. The median number of sensitised allergen was 2 (range 1-7). Volunteers with positive skin tests (n = 42) were younger than those with negative skin tests (n = 58) (mean age 25.5 vs. 29.2 years; p mite (n = 33), house dust (n = 23) and American cockroach (n = 20). In this study, up to 42% of healthy volunteers, particularly those with a family history of atopy, were sensitised to allergens. Reactivity of the skin test without allergic symptoms, however, does not indicate allergic disease. Therefore, the skin test should only be indicated in atopic symptomatic individuals.

  8. Cyclone Center: Insights on Historical Tropical Cyclones from Citizen Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, P.; Hennon, C. C.; Knapp, K. R.; Schreck, C. J., III; Stevens, S. E.; Kossin, J. P.; Rennie, J.; Hennon, P. A.; Kruk, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The cyclonecenter.org project started in fall 2012 and has been collecting citizen scientist volunteer tropical cyclone intensity estimates ever since. The project is hosted by the Citizen Science Alliance (zooniverse) and the platform is supported by a range of scientists. We have over 30 years of satellite imagery of tropical cyclones but the analysis to date has been done on an ocean-basin by ocean-basin basis and worse still practices have changed over time. We therefore do not, presently, have a homogeneous record relevant for discerning climatic changes. Automated techniques can classify many of the images but have a propensity to be challenged during storm transitions. The problem is fundamentally one where many pairs of eyes are invaluable as there is no substitute for human eyes in discerning patterns. Each image is classified by ten unique users before it is retired. This provides a unique insight into the uncertainty inherent in classification. In the three years of the project much useful data has accrued. This presentation shall highlight some of the results and analyses to date and touch on insights as to what has worked and what perhaps has not worked so well. There are still many images left to complete so its far from too late to jump over to www.cyclonecenter.org and help out.

  9. The pharmacokinetics of taurolidine metabolites in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Li; Greenberg, Howard E; Perhach, James L; Waldman, Scott A; Kraft, Walter K

    2007-06-01

    Taurolidine is an experimental antibacterial and antiendotoxic compound whose clinical utility as an antitumor agent is being investigated in human clinical trials. Taurolidine in aqueous solution exists in equilibrium with taurultam. Taurultam is subsequently transformed to taurinamide. The pharmacokinetic profiles of these metabolites are not well established. In this study, 18 healthy volunteers were administered 5.0 g of taurolidine in 250 mL of 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone in water over 2, 1, or 0.5 hours by intravenous infusion in a parallel-group design. All subjects noted discomfort at the infusion site, although there were no serious adverse events. t(max) generally occurred at the end of infusion for taurinamide, whereas that of taurultam was reached before completion of infusion. The taurolidine metabolite taurultam demonstrated a shorter half-life and lower systemic exposure than taurinamide. Shortening of infusion duration increased the C(max) and AUC of taurultam. Changes in infusion rate did not substantially change the pharmacokinetic parameters of taurinamide.

  10. Pharmacogenetics of healthy volunteers in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio-Campos, Karla; Orengo-Mercado, Carmelo; Renta, Jessicca Y; Peguero, Muriel; García, Ricardo; Hernández, Gabriel; Corey, Susan; Cadilla, Carmen L; Duconge, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    Puerto Ricans are a unique Hispanic population with European, Native American (Taino), and higher West African ancestral contributions than other non-Caribbean Hispanics. In admixed populations, such as Puerto Ricans, genetic variants can be found at different frequencies when compared to parental populations and uniquely combined and distributed. Therefore, in this review, we aimed to collect data from studies conducted in healthy Puerto Ricans and to report the frequencies of genetic polymorphisms with major relevance in drug response. Filtering for healthy volunteers or individuals, we performed a search of pharmacogenetic studies in academic literature databases without limiting the period of the results. The search was limited to Puerto Ricans living in the island, excluding those studies performed in mainland (United States). We found that the genetic markers impacting pharmacological therapy in the areas of cardiovascular, oncology, and neurology are the most frequently investigated. Coincidently, the top causes of mortality in the island are cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke. In addition, polymorphisms in genes that encode for members of the CYP450 family (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) are also available due to their relevance in the metabolism of drugs. The complex genetic background of Puerto Ricans is responsible for the divergence in the reported allele frequencies when compared to parental populations (Africans, East Asians, and Europeans). The importance of reporting the findings of pharmacogenetic studies conducted in Puerto Ricans is to identify genetic variants with potential utility among this genetically complex population and eventually move forward the adoption of personalized medicine in the island.

  11. Psychomotor slowing, neuroendocrine responses, and behavioral changes after oral administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in normal volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Maes, M.; Pier, M.P.B.I.; Scharpé, S.; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    The mixed 5-HT receptor agonist/antagonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is known to suppress locomotor activity in mice and rats. This study aimed: (1) to determine whether mCPP induces cognitive and motor changes in normal human volunteers and how these changes relate to the neuroendocrine ef

  12. Psychomotor slowing, neuroendocrine responses, and behavioral changes after oral administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in normal volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Maes, M.; Pier, M.P.B.I.; Scharpé, S.; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    The mixed 5-HT receptor agonist/antagonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is known to suppress locomotor activity in mice and rats. This study aimed: (1) to determine whether mCPP induces cognitive and motor changes in normal human volunteers and how these changes relate to the neuroendocrine ef

  13. Pharmacokinetics of IL-18 binding protein in healthy volunteers and subjects with rheumatoid arthritis or plaque psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Tak; M. Bacchi; M. Bertolino

    2006-01-01

    IL-18 binding protein (BP) neutralizes the activity of IL-18, a cytokine implicated in psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of recombinant human IL-18 BP (r-hIL-18 BP) in healthy volunteers and subjects with psoriasis or RA in fou

  14. Sumatriptan does not change calcitonin gene-related peptide in the cephalic and extracephalic circulation in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Petersen, Jesper; Wienecke, Troels;

    2009-01-01

    not differ between the four vascular compartments (P=0.49). It was found that Sumatriptan did not change the levels of circulating CGRP in the intra or extracerebral circulation in healthy volunteers. This speaks against a direct CGRP-reducing effect of sumatriptan in vivo in humans when the trigemino...

  15. DNA Damage of Lymphocytes in Volunteers after 4 hours Use of Mobile Phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Seonmi; Oh, Eunha; Sul, Donggeun; Choi, Jae Wook; Park, Heechan; Lee, Eunil

    2004-11-01

    There has been gradually increasing concern about the adverse health effects of electromagnetic radiation originating from cell phones which are widely used in modern life. Cell phone radiation may affect human health by increasing free radicals of human blood cells. This study has been designed to identify DNA damage of blood cells by electromagnetic radiation caused by cell phone use. This study investigated the health effect of acute exposure to commercially available cell phones on certain parameters such as an indicator of DNA damage for 14 healthy adult volunteers. Each volunteer during the experiment talked over the cell phone with the keypad facing the right side of the face for 4 hours. The single cell gel electrophoresis assay (Comet assay), which is very sensitive in detecting the presence of DNA strand-breaks and alkali-labile damage in individual cells, was used to assess peripheral blood cells (T-cells, B-cells, granulocytes) from volunteers before and after exposure to cell phone radiation. The parameters of Comet assay measured were Olive Tail Moment and Tail DNA %. The Olive Tail Moment of B-cells and granulocytes and Tail DNA % of B-cells and granulocytes were increased by a statistically significant extent after 4- hour use of a cell phone compared with controls. It is concluded that cell phone radiation caused the DNA damage during the 4 hours of experimental condition. Nonetheless, this study suggested that cell phone use may increase DNA damage by electromagnetic radiation and other contributing factors.

  16. Volunteering in the maternity services: for whose benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years volunteers have become part of the maternity services to support midwives in the UK. Future midwifery students are being expected to have gained such experience when applying for courses. They are providing significant support for women in relation to breastfeeding and in other supportive roles. However this article aims to explore what volunteers are doing, questions whether the recent shortage of midwives is leading to volunteers being asked to take on tasks that are beyond their unpaid status and asks who is really benefiting from this role.

  17. Influence of Youth Volunteering on Socialization and Development of Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Volunteering is one of manifestations of citizenship. It indicates the individual’s quality in terms of citizenship and the readiness to take an active part in public activities. The current paper analyses the phenomenon of volunteering (its place and role in ensuring public development and sustainability. The influence of volunteer - ing on the youth socialization and personal development of competences (in particular, social, professional and communicative is disclosed in the article. The article also highlights the motives and factors that promote and prevent the youth participation in voluntary activities.

  18. ATLAS@Home: Harnessing Volunteer Computing for HEP

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has setup a volunteer computing project called ATLAS@home. Volunteers running Monte-Carlo simulation on their personal computer provide significant computing resources, but also belong to a community potentially interested in HEP. Four types of contributors have been identified, whose questions range from advanced technical details to the reason why simulation is needed, how Computing is organized and how it relates to society. The creation of relevant outreach material for simulation, event visualization and distributed production will be described, as well as lessons learned while interacting with the BOINC volunteers community.

  19. The Individual Economic Returns to Volunteering in Work Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Hans-Peter; Munk, Martin David

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the individual economic returns to volunteering over the course of one’s work life. Towards this end, the article uses a unique panel dataset created by combining rich survey data from Denmark with information on wages from administrative registers covering the period from 2...... mechanisms link volunteer work and wages depending on the current stage of people’s work lives.......This article examines the individual economic returns to volunteering over the course of one’s work life. Towards this end, the article uses a unique panel dataset created by combining rich survey data from Denmark with information on wages from administrative registers covering the period from...

  20. Improving remote sensing flood assessment using volunteered geographical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schnebele

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology for the generation of flood hazard maps is presented fusing remote sensing and volunteered geographical data. Water pixels are identified utilizing a machine learning classification of two Landsat remote sensing scenes, acquired before and during the flooding event as well as a digital elevation model paired with river gage data. A statistical model computes the probability of flooded areas as a function of the number of adjacent pixels classified as water. Volunteered data obtained through Google news, videos and photos are added to modify the contour regions. It is shown that even a small amount of volunteered ground data can dramatically improve results.