WorldWideScience

Sample records for human influenza vaccine

  1. Influenza vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerhus, Sven Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Cochrane Library was systematically searched for meta-analyses regarding influenza vaccination of various populations, both healthy and sick. An effect in reducing the number of cases of influenza, influenza-like illness or complications to influenza was found in some studies, but, generally......, the quality of the studies was low, and several studies lacked hard clinical endpoints. Data on adverse effects were scarce. More randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of influenza vaccination are warranted....

  2. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling Dou

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27, influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  3. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yaling; Fu, Binqing; Sun, Rui; Li, Wenting; Hu, Wanfu; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK) cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27), influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular)+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  4. Eccentric exercise as an adjuvant to influenza vaccination in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kate M; Burns, Victoria E; Allen, Louise M; McPhee, Jamie S; Bosch, Jos A; Carroll, Douglas; Drayson, Mark; Ring, Christopher

    2007-02-01

    The immune response to vaccination in animals can be enhanced by exposure to acute stress at the time of vaccination. The efficacy of this adjuvant strategy for vaccination in humans requires investigation. The current study employed a randomised controlled trial design to examine the effects of eccentric exercise prior to influenza vaccination on the antibody and cell-mediated responses. Sixty young healthy adults (29 men, 31 women) performed eccentric contractions of the deltoid and biceps brachii muscles of the non-dominant arm (exercise group) or rested quietly (control group), and were vaccinated 6h later in the non-dominant arm. Change in arm circumference and pain were measured to assess the physiological response to exercise. Antibody titres were measured pre-vaccination and at 6- and 20-week follow-ups. Interferon-gamma in response to in vitro stimulation by the whole vaccine, an index of the cell-mediated response, was measured 8 weeks post-vaccination. Interferon-gamma responses were enhanced by exercise in men, whereas antibody titres were enhanced by eccentric exercise in women but not in men. Men showed greater increase in arm circumference after eccentric exercise than women but there was no difference in reported pain. The interferon-gamma response was positively associated with the percentage increase in arm circumference among the exercise group. Eccentric exercise exerted differential effects on the response to vaccination in men and women, with enhancement of the antibody response in women, but enhancement of the cell-mediated response in men. Eccentric exercise of the muscle at the site of vaccine administration should be explored further as a possible behavioural adjuvant to vaccination.

  5. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT ... to your doctor or pharmacist about the best flu vaccine option for you or your family.

  6. Heterosybtypic T-cell immunity to influenza in humans: challenges for universal T-cell influenza vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya eSridhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the 21st century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protection against a broad range of influenza strains. Such universal influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognising conserved antigens are a key contributor to reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed.

  7. Randomized controlled trials for influenza drugs and vaccines: a review of controlled human infection studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobana Balasingam

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Controlled human infection studies are an important research tool in assessing promising influenza vaccines and antivirals. These studies are performed quickly and are cost-effective and safe, with a low incidence of serious adverse events.

  8. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  9. Selecting Viruses for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  10. Integrative genomic analysis of the human immune response to influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Luis M; Bucasas, Kristine L; Wells, Janet M; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E; Arden, Nancy; Renwick, Alexander; Yu, Peng; Quarles, John M; Bray, Molly S; Couch, Robert B; Belmont, John W; Shaw, Chad A

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the host genetic factors that contribute to variation in vaccine responsiveness may uncover important mechanisms affecting vaccine efficacy. We carried out an integrative, longitudinal study combining genetic, transcriptional, and immunologic data in humans given seasonal influenza vaccine. We identified 20 genes exhibiting a transcriptional response to vaccination, significant genotype effects on gene expression, and correlation between the transcriptional and antibody responses. The results show that variation at the level of genes involved in membrane trafficking and antigen processing significantly influences the human response to influenza vaccination. More broadly, we demonstrate that an integrative study design is an efficient alternative to existing methods for the identification of genes involved in complex traits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00299.001 PMID:23878721

  11. DNA vaccines against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccine technology has been considerably developed within the last two decades. This cost effective and promising strategy can be applied for therapy of cancers and for curing allergy, chronic and infectious diseases, such as a seasonal and pandemic influenza. Despite numerous advantages, several limitations of this technology reduce its performance and can retard its commercial exploitation in humans and its veterinary applications. Inefficient delivery of the DNA vaccine into cells of immunized individuals results in low intracellular supply of suitable expression cassettes encoding an antigen, in its low expression level and, in turn, in reduced immune responses against the antigen. Improvement of DNA delivery into the host cells might significantly increase effectiveness of the DNA vaccine. A vast array of innovative methods and various experimental strategies have been applied in order to enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. They include various strategies improving DNA delivery as well as expression and immunogenic potential of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccines. Researchers focusing on DNA vaccines against influenza have applied many of these strategies. Recent examples of the most successful modern approaches are discussed in this review.

  12. 77 FR 13329 - Pandemic Influenza Vaccines-Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Pandemic Influenza Vaccines--Amendment ACTION: Notice of... influenza vaccines, which has been amended a number of times. The original pandemic influenza vaccine... (2010). The major actions taken by this pandemic influenza vaccine declaration are the following: (1...

  13. Towards universal influenza vaccines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractVaccination is the most cost-effective way to reduce the considerable disease burden of seasonal influenza. Although seasonal influenza vaccines are effective, their performance in the elderly and immunocompromised individuals would benefit from improvement. Major problems related to the

  14. Underutilization of Influenza Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall K. Cheney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Yearly influenza vaccination continues to be underutilized by those who would most benefit from it. The Health Belief Model was used to explain differences in beliefs about influenza vaccination among at-risk individuals resistant to influenza vaccination. Survey data were collected from 74 members of at-risk groups who were not vaccinated for influenza during the previous flu season. Accepting individuals were more likely to perceive flu as a threat to health and perceive access barriers, and cues to action were the most important influence on whether they plan to get vaccinated. In comparison, resistant individuals did not feel threatened by the flu, access barriers were not a problem, and they did not respond favorably to cues to action. Perceived threat, perceived access barriers, and cues to action were significantly associated with plans to be vaccinated for influenza in the next flu season. Participants who saw influenza as a threat to their health had 5.4 times the odds of planning to be vaccinated than those who did not. Participants reporting barriers to accessing influenza vaccination had 7.5 times the odds of reporting plans to be vaccinated. Those responding positively to cues to action had 12.2 times the odds of planning to be vaccinated in the next flu season than those who did not. Accepting and resistant individuals have significant differences in their beliefs, which require different intervention strategies to increase vaccination rates. These findings provide important information to researchers and practitioners working to increase influenza vaccination rates.

  15. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Mizuta, Hiroyuki [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oshita, Masatoshi; Ideno, Shoji [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Yunoki, Mikihiro [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kuhara, Motoki [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano 396-0002 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naomasa [Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ohu University, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8611 (Japan); Okuno, Yoshinobu [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa 768-0061 (Japan); Ikuta, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: ikuta@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-09-11

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  16. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Aitor Nogales; Luis Martínez-Sobrido

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influ...

  17. Computational prediction of vaccine strains for human influenza A (H3N2) viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrück, L; Klingen, T R; McHardy, A C

    2014-10-01

    Human influenza A viruses are rapidly evolving pathogens that cause substantial morbidity and mortality in seasonal epidemics around the globe. To ensure continued protection, the strains used for the production of the seasonal influenza vaccine have to be regularly updated, which involves data collection and analysis by numerous experts worldwide. Computer-guided analysis is becoming increasingly important in this problem due to the vast amounts of generated data. We here describe a computational method for selecting a suitable strain for production of the human influenza A virus vaccine. It interprets available antigenic and genomic sequence data based on measures of antigenic novelty and rate of propagation of the viral strains throughout the population. For viral isolates sampled between 2002 and 2007, we used this method to predict the antigenic evolution of the H3N2 viruses in retrospective testing scenarios. When seasons were scored as true or false predictions, our method returned six true positives, three false negatives, eight true negatives, and one false positive, or 78% accuracy overall. In comparison to the recommendations by the WHO, we identified the correct antigenic variant once at the same time and twice one season ahead. Even though it cannot be ruled out that practical reasons such as lack of a sufficiently well-growing candidate strain may in some cases have prevented recommendation of the best-matching strain by the WHO, our computational decision procedure allows quantitative interpretation of the growing amounts of data and may help to match the vaccine better to predominating strains in seasonal influenza epidemics. Importance: Human influenza A viruses continuously change antigenically to circumvent the immune protection evoked by vaccination or previously circulating viral strains. To maintain vaccine protection and thereby reduce the mortality and morbidity caused by infections, regular updates of the vaccine strains are required. We

  18. Vaccination strategies against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, E

    2009-01-01

    Every year, Influenza virus infection is at the origin of substantial excess in morbidity and mortality in developed as well as developing countries. Influenza viruses undergo antigenic drift which cause annual replacement of strain included in classical trivalent vaccines. Less frequently, this virus can also undergo antigenic shift, which corresponds to a major antigenic change and can lead to an extra medical burden. Several vaccines have been made available to immunize individuals against seasonal as well as pandemic influenza viruses. For seasonal Influenza vaccines, live attenuated and classical inactivated trivalent vaccines have been licensed and are widely used. Additionally, several strategies are under investigations to improve further the efficacy of existing seasonal vaccines in children and elderly. These include the use of adjuvant, increase in antigen content, or alternative route of delivery. Similarly, several approaches have been licensed to address additional challenge posed by pandemic viruses. The different vaccination strategies used to maximise protection against seasonal as well as pandemic influenza will be reviewed and discussed in the perspective the current threat posed by the H1N1v pandemic Influenza.

  19. United States of America Department of Health and Human Services support for advancing influenza vaccine manufacturing in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, Michael L; Bright, Rick A

    2011-07-01

    five years of age. In addition to achievements described in this issue of Vaccine, the programme has been successful from the US perspective because the working relationships established between the US Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) and its partners have assisted in advancing influenza vaccine development at many different levels. A few examples of BARDA's support include: establishment of egg-based influenza vaccine production from "scratch", enhancement of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) production techniques and infrastructure, completion of fill/finish operations for imported bulk vaccine, and training in advanced bio-manufacturing techniques. These HHS-supported programmes have been well-received internationally, and we and our partners hope the successes will stimulate even more interest within the international community in maximizing global production levels for influenza vaccines.

  20. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    As every year, the Medical Service is taking part in the campaign to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal influenza is especially recommended for people suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney conditions or diabetes, for those recovering from a serious illness or surgical operation and for everyone over the age of 65. The influenza virus is transmitted by air and contact with contaminated surfaces, hence the importance of washing hands regularly with soap and / or disinfection using a hydro-alcoholic solution. From the onset of symptoms (fever> 38°, chills, cough, muscle aches and / or joint pain, fatigue) you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. In the present context of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, it is important to dissociate these two illnesses and emphasise that the two viruses and the vaccines used to combat them are quite different and that protection against one will not pr...

  1. Avirulent Avian Influenza Virus as a Vaccine Strain against a Potential Human Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Ayato; Kuboki, Noritaka; Okazaki, Katsunori; Ninomiya, Ai; Tanaka, Hiroko; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Enami, Masayoshi; Tashiro, Masato; Shortridge, Kennedy F.; Kida, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    In the influenza H5N1 virus incident in Hong Kong in 1997, viruses that are closely related to H5N1 viruses initially isolated in a severe outbreak of avian influenza in chickens were isolated from humans, signaling the possibility of an incipient pandemic. However, it was not possible to prepare a vaccine against the virus in the conventional embryonated egg system because of the lethality of the virus for chicken embryos and the high level of biosafety therefore required for vaccine production. Alternative approaches, including an avirulent H5N4 virus isolated from a migratory duck as a surrogate virus, H5N1 virus as a reassortant with avian virus H3N1 and an avirulent recombinant H5N1 virus generated by reverse genetics, have been explored. All vaccines were formalin inactivated. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with each of vaccines elicited the production of hemagglutination-inhibiting and virus-neutralizing antibodies, while intranasal vaccination without adjuvant induced both mucosal and systemic antibody responses that protected the mice from lethal H5N1 virus challenge. Surveillance of birds and animals, particularly aquatic birds, for viruses to provide vaccine strains, especially surrogate viruses, for a future pandemic is stressed. PMID:10482580

  2. Subacute thyroiditis after seasonal influenza vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiatsu Yakushiji

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the first patient with subacute thyroiditis after influenza vaccination in Japan. A 49-year-old woman received a seasonal influenza vaccination in October 2009. She also received a seasonal influenza vaccination in 2008. After the vaccination, she experienced spontaneous pain and tenderness in the right lower neck. Together with the results of laboratory examinations and thyroid echography, we established the diagnosis of subacute thyroiditis. The patient had human leukocyte antigens (HLAs of A2/A11 and B62/B35. HLA-A2-positive is reported at a risk of interferon-alpha-induced autoimmune thyroid disorder, and HLA-B35-positive is reported at a risk of subacute thyroiditis. Since fever and cervical pain are reported as adverse effects of influenza vaccination, subacute thyroiditis after influenza vaccination might have been missed.

  3. A human multi-epitope recombinant vaccinia virus as a universal T cell vaccine candidate against influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan G Goodman

    Full Text Available There is a need to develop a universal vaccine against influenza virus infection to avoid developing new formulations of a seasonal vaccine each year. Many of the vaccine strategies for a universal vaccine target strain-conserved influenza virus proteins, such as the matrix, polymerase, and nucleoproteins, rather than the surface hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins. In addition, non-disease-causing viral vectors are a popular choice as a delivery system for the influenza virus antigens. As a proof-of-concept, we have designed a novel influenza virus immunogen based on the NP backbone containing human T cell epitopes for M1, NS1, NP, PB1 and PA proteins (referred as NPmix as well as a construct containing the conserved regions of influenza virus neuraminidase (N-terminal and hemagglutinin (C-terminal (referred as NA-HA. DNA vectors and vaccinia virus recombinants expressing NPmix (WR-NP or both NPmix plus NA-HA (WR-flu in the cytosol were tested in a heterologous DNA-prime/vaccinia virus-boost vaccine regimen in mice. We observed an increase in the number of influenza virus-specific IFNγ-secreting splenocytes, composed of populations marked by CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells producing IFNγ or TNFα. Upon challenge with influenza virus, the vaccinated mice exhibited decreased viral load in the lungs and a delay in mortality. These findings suggest that DNA prime/poxvirus boost with human multi-epitope recombinant influenza virus proteins is a valid approach for a general T-cell vaccine to protect against influenza virus infection.

  4. Changes in human Langerhans cells following intradermal injection of influenza virus-like particle vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Pearton

    Full Text Available There is a significant gap in our fundamental understanding of early morphological and migratory changes in human Langerhans cells (LCs in response to vaccine stimulation. As the vast majority of LCs studies are conducted in small animal models, substantial interspecies variation in skin architecture and immunity must be considered when extrapolating the results to humans. This study aims to determine whether excised human skin, maintained viable in organ culture, provides a useful human model for measuring and understanding early immune response to intradermally delivered vaccine candidates. Excised human breast skin was maintained viable in air-liquid-interface organ culture. This model was used for the first time to show morphological changes in human LCs stimulated with influenza virus-like particle (VLP vaccines delivered via intradermal injection. Immunohistochemistry of epidermal sheets and skin sections showed that LCs in VLP treated skin lost their typical dendritic morphology. The cells were more dispersed throughout the epidermis, often in close proximity to the basement membrane, and appeared vertically elongated. Our data provides for increased understanding of the complex morphological, spatial and temporal changes that occur to permit LC migration through the densely packed keratinocytes of the epidermis following exposure to vaccine. Significantly, the data not only supports previous animal data but also provides new and essential evidence of host response to this vaccination strategy in the real human skin environment.

  5. [Human influenza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2006-10-01

    Human influenza is one of the most common human infectious diseases, contributing to approximately one million deaths every year. In Germany, each year between 5.000 and 20.000 individuals die from severe influenza infections. In several countries, the morbidity and mortality of influenza is greatly underestimated. This is reflected by general low immunization rates. The emergence of avian influenza against the background of the scenario of a human influenza pandemic has revived public interest in the disease. According to the World Health Organisation, it is only the question on the beginning of a new influenza pandemic. The virus type of the new pandemic is still uncertain and it is also unclear, if a pandemic spread of the virus may be prevented by consistent controlling of avian influenza.

  6. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  7. DNA-based influenza vaccines as immunoprophylactic agents toward universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an illness of global public health concern. Influenza viruses have been responsible for several pandemics affecting humans. Current influenza vaccines have proved satisfactory safety; however, they have limitations and do not provide protection against unexpected emerging influenza virus strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative approaches to conventional influenza vaccines. The development of universal influenza vaccines will help alleviate the severity of influenza pandemics. Influenza DNA vaccines have been the subject of many studies over the past decades due to their ability to induce broad-based protective immune responses in various animal models. The present review highlights the recent advances in influenza DNA vaccine research and its potential as an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  8. Dried influenza vaccines : Over the counter vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2010-01-01

    Since last year influenza pandemic has struck again after 40 years, this is the right moment to discuss the different available formulation options for influenza vaccine. Looking back to the last 4 decades, most vaccines are still formulated as liquid solution. These vaccines have shown a poor

  9. Dried influenza vaccines : Over the counter vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2010-01-01

    Since last year influenza pandemic has struck again after 40 years, this is the right moment to discuss the different available formulation options for influenza vaccine. Looking back to the last 4 decades, most vaccines are still formulated as liquid solution. These vaccines have shown a poor stabi

  10. Developing vaccines against pandemic influenza.

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, J M

    2001-01-01

    Pandemic influenza presents special problems for vaccine development. There must be a balance between rapid availability of vaccine and the safeguards to ensure safety, quality and efficacy of vaccine. Vaccine was developed for the pandemics of 1957, 1968, 1977 and for the pandemic alert of 1976. This experience is compared with that gained in developing vaccines for a possible H5N1 pandemic in 1997-1998. Our ability to mass produce influenza vaccines against a pandemic threat was well illust...

  11. Increasing Childhood Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Lin, Chyongchiou J.; Hannibal, Kristin; Reis, Evelyn C.; Gallik, Gregory; Moehling, Krissy K.; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Allred, Norma J.; Wolfson, David H.; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since the 2008 inception of universal childhood influenza vaccination, national rates have risen more dramatically among younger children than older children and reported rates across racial/ethnic groups are inconsistent. Interventions may be needed to address age and racial disparities to achieve the recommended childhood influenza vaccination target of 70%. Purpose To evaluate an intervention to increase childhood influenza vaccination across age and racial groups. Methods In 2011–2012, 20 primary care practices treating children were randomly assigned to Intervention and Control arms of a cluster randomized controlled trial to increase childhood influenza vaccination uptake using a toolkit and other strategies including early delivery of donated vaccine, in-service staff meetings, and publicity. Results The average vaccination differences from pre-intervention to the intervention year were significantly larger in the Intervention arm (n=10 practices) than the Control arm (n=10 practices), for children aged 2–8 years (10.2 percentage points (pct pts) Intervention vs 3.6 pct pts Control) and 9–18 years (11.1 pct pts Intervention vs 4.3 pct pts Control, p<0.05), for non-white children (16.7 pct pts Intervention vs 4.6 pct pts Control, p<0.001), and overall (9.9 pct pts Intervention vs 4.2 pct pts Control, p<0.01). In multi-level modeling that accounted for person- and practice-level variables and the interactions among age, race and intervention, the likelihood of vaccination increased with younger age group (6–23 months), white race, commercial insurance, the practice’s pre-intervention vaccination rate, and being in the Intervention arm. Estimates of the interaction terms indicated that the intervention increased the likelihood of vaccination for non-white children in all age groups and white children aged 9–18 years. Conclusions A multi-strategy intervention that includes a practice improvement toolkit can significantly improve influenza

  12. Aging-dependent alterations in gene expression and a mitochondrial signature of responsiveness to human influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Juilee; Mohanty, Subhasis; West, A Phillip; Joshi, Samit R; Ueda, Ikuyo; Wilson, Jean; Meng, Hailong; Blevins, Tamara P; Tsang, Sui; Trentalange, Mark; Siconolfi, Barbara; Park, Koonam; Gill, Thomas M; Belshe, Robert B; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S; Kleinstein, Steven H; Shaw, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate gene expression pathways underlying age-associated impairment in influenza vaccine response, we screened young (age 21-30) and older (age≥65) adults receiving influenza vaccine in two consecutive seasons and identified those with strong or absent response to vaccine, including a subset of older adults meeting criteria for frailty. PBMCs obtained prior to vaccination (Day 0) and at day 2 or 4, day 7 and day 28 post-vaccine were subjected to gene expression microarray analysis. We defined a response signature and also detected induction of a type I interferon response at day 2 and a plasma cell signature at day 7 post-vaccine in young responders. The response signature was dysregulated in older adults, with the plasma cell signature induced at day 2, and was never induced in frail subjects (who were all non-responders). We also identified a mitochondrial signature in young vaccine responders containing genes mediating mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation that was consistent in two different vaccine seasons and verified by analyses of mitochondrial content and protein expression. These results represent the first genome-wide transcriptional profiling analysis of age-associated dynamics following influenza vaccination, and implicate changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and function as a critical factor in human vaccine responsiveness.

  13. Needle-free influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Hinrichs, Wouter L.J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Wilschut, Jan C.; Huckriede, Anke

    2010-01-01

    Vaccination is the cornerstone of influenza control in epidemic and pandemic situations. Influenza vaccines are typically given by intramuscular injection. However, needle-free vaccinations could offer several distinct advantages over intramuscular injections: they are pain-free, easier to distribut

  14. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Document Server

    SC Unit

    2009-01-01

    As every year, the Medical Service is taking part in the campaign to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal influenza is especially recommended for people suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney conditions or diabetes, for those recovering from a serious illness or surgical operation and for everyone over the age of 65. The influenza virus is transmitted by air and contact with contaminated surfaces, hence the importance of washing hands regularly with soap and / or disinfection using a hydro-alcoholic solution. From the onset of symptoms (fever> 38°, chills, cough, muscle aches and / or joint pain, fatigue) you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. In the present context of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, it is important to dissociate these two illnesses and emphasise that the two viruses and the vaccines used to combat them are quite different and that protection against one will not provide protection against the...

  15. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2009-01-01

    As every year, the Medical Service is taking part in the campaign to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal influenza is especially recommended for people suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney conditions or diabetes, for those recovering from a serious illness or surgical operation and for everyone over the age of 65. The influenza virus is transmitted by air and contact with contaminated surfaces, hence the importance of washing hands regularly with soap and / or disinfection using a hydro-alcoholic solution. From the onset of symptoms (fever> 38°, chills, cough, muscle aches and / or joint pain, fatigue) you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. In the present context of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, it is important to dissociate these two illnesses and emphasise that the two viruses and the vaccines used to combat them are quite different and that protection against one will not provide protection against the...

  16. 76 FR 51374 - Direct Discovery of HLA Associated Influenza Epitopes Isolated From Human Cells for Vaccine and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Direct Discovery of HLA Associated Influenza Epitopes Isolated From Human Cells for Vaccine and Therapeutic Evaluation and Development (U01) AGENCY: Food and... will provide the regulatory science to facilitate development and evaluation of direct discovery of...

  17. Vaccine-induced boosting of influenza virus-specific CD4 T cells in younger and aged humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas V Dolfi

    Full Text Available Current yearly influenza virus vaccines induce strain-specific neutralizing antibody (NAb responses providing protective immunity to closely matched viruses. However, these vaccines are often poorly effective in high-risk groups such as the elderly and challenges exist in predicting yearly or emerging pandemic influenza virus strains to include in the vaccines. Thus, there has been considerable emphasis on understanding broadly protective immunological mechanisms for influenza virus. Recent studies have implicated memory CD4 T cells in heterotypic immunity in animal models and in human challenge studies. Here we examined how influenza virus vaccination boosted CD4 T cell responses in younger versus aged humans. Our results demonstrate that while the magnitude of the vaccine-induced CD4 T cell response and number of subjects responding on day 7 did not differ between younger and aged subjects, fewer aged subjects had peak responses on day 14. While CD4 T cell responses were inefficiently boosted against NA, both HA and especially nucleocaspid protein- and matrix-(NP+M specific responses were robustly boosted. Pre-existing CD4 T cell responses were associated with more robust responses to influenza virus NP+M, but not H1 or H3. Finally pre-existing strain-specific NAb decreased the boosting of CD4 T cell responses. Thus, accumulation of pre-existing influenza virus-specific immunity in the form of NAb and cross-reactive T cells to conserved virus proteins (e.g. NP and M over a lifetime of exposure to infection and vaccination may influence vaccine-induced CD4 T cell responses in the aged.

  18. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute...

  19. Lineage Structure of the Human Antibody Repertoire in Response to Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ning; He, Jiankui; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; Sasaki, Sanae; He, Xiao-Song; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Zheng, Nai-ying; Huang, Min; Sullivan, Meghan; Wilson, Patrick C.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Davis, Mark M.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    The human antibody repertoire is one of the most important defenses against infectious disease, and the development of vaccines has enabled the conferral of targeted protection to specific pathogens. However, there are many challenges to measuring and analyzing the immunoglobulin sequence repertoire, such as the fact that each B cell contains a distinct antibody sequence encoded in its genome, that the antibody repertoire is not constant but changes over time, and the high similarity between antibody sequences. We have addressed this challenge by using high-throughput long read sequencing to perform immunogenomic characterization of expressed human antibody repertoires in the context of influenza vaccination. Informatic analysis of 5 million antibody heavy chain sequences from healthy individuals allowed us to perform global characterizations of isotype distributions, determine the lineage structure of the repertoire and measure age and antigen related mutational activity. Our analysis of the clonal structure and mutational distribution of individuals’ repertoires shows that elderly subjects have a decreased number of lineages but an increased pre-vaccination mutation load in their repertoire and that some of these subjects have an oligoclonal character to their repertoire in which the diversity of the lineages is greatly reduced relative to younger subjects. We have thus shown that global analysis of the immune system’s clonal structure provides direct insight into the effects of vaccination and provides a detailed molecular portrait of age-related effects. PMID:23390249

  20. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  1. Protection of human influenza vaccines against a reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin using a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Jittimanee, Supattra; Sitthicharoenchai, Panchan; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Poolperm, Pariwat; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2017-02-28

    Since the pandemic H1N1 emergence in 2009 (pdmH1N1), many reassortant pdmH1N1 viruses emerged and found circulating in the pig population worldwide. Currently, commercial human subunit vaccines are used commonly to prevent the influenza symptom based on the WHO recommendation. In case of current reassortant swine influenza viruses transmitting from pigs to humans, the efficacy of current human influenza vaccines is of interest. In this study, influenza A negative pigs were vaccinated with selected commercial human subunit vaccines and challenged with rH3N2. All sera were tested with both HI and SN assays using four representative viruses from the surveillance data in 2012 (enH1N1, pdmH1N1, rH1N2 and rH3N2). The results showed no significant differences in clinical signs and macroscopic and microscopic findings among groups. However, all pig sera from vaccinated groups had protective HI titers to the enH1N1, pdmH1N1 and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward and had protective SN titers only to pdmH1N1and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward. SN test results appeared more specific than those of HI tests. All tested sera had no cross-reactivity against the rH3N2. Both studied human subunit vaccines failed to protect and to stop viral shedding with no evidence of serological reaction against rH3N2. SIV surveillance is essential for monitoring a novel SIV emergence potentially for zoonosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Strains Elicit a Greater Innate Immune Response than Antigenically-Matched Seasonal Influenza Viruses during Infection of Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A.; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10–20% of the world’s population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the

  3. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  4. Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Sherry R; Merrill, Joan T; Vista, Evan S; Dedeke, Amy B; Thompson, David M; Stewart, Scott; Guthridge, Joel M; Niewold, Timothy B; Franek, Beverly S; Air, Gillian M; Thompson, Linda F; James, Judith A

    2011-08-01

    Vaccination against common pathogens, such as influenza, is recommended for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to decrease infections and improve health. However, most reports describing the vaccination response are limited to evaluations of SLE patients with quiescent disease. This study focuses on understanding the clinical, serologic, therapeutic, and demographic factors that influence the response to influenza vaccination in SLE patients with a broad range of disease activity. Blood specimens and information on disease activity were collected from 72 patients with SLE, at baseline and at 2, 6, and 12 weeks after influenza vaccination. Influenza-specific antibody responses were assessed by determining the total serum antibody concentration (B(max)), relative affinity (K(a)), and level of hemagglutination inhibition in the plasma. Using a cumulative score, the patients were evenly divided into groups of high or low vaccine responders. Autoantibody levels were evaluated at each time point using immunofluorescence tests and standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Compared to high responders, low responders to the vaccine were more likely to have hematologic criteria (P = 0.009), to have more American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for SLE (P = 0.05), and to be receiving concurrent prednisone treatment (P = 0.04). Interestingly, European American patients were more likely to be low responders than were African American patients (P = 0.03). Following vaccination, low responders were more likely to experience disease flares (P = 0.01) and to have increased titers of antinuclear antibodies (P = 0.04). Serum interferon-α activity at baseline was significantly higher in patients in whom a flare occurred after vaccination compared to a matched group of patients who did not experience a disease flare (P = 0.04). Ancestral background, prednisone treatment, hematologic criteria, and evidence of increased likelihood of disease flares were

  5. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Document Server

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    This year, as usual, the Medical Service is helping to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal flu is especially recommended for anyone who suffers from chronic pulmonary, cardio-vascular or kidney disease or diabetes, is recovering from a serious illness or major surgery, or is over 65 years of age. The flu virus is transmitted through the air and through contact with contaminated surfaces, so frequent hand-washing with soap and/or an antiseptic hand wash is of great importance. As soon as the first symptoms appear (fever above 38°, shivering, coughing, muscle and/or joint pains, generalised weakness), you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. Anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor), with their dose of vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement through UNIQA...

  6. Influenza vaccination for children with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2010-01-01

    QUESTION Parents of children with asthma are encouraged by many health organizations to vaccinate their children against seasonal influenza viruses. Is the influenza vaccine efficient in preventing asthma exacerbation? Are current vaccinations safe to administer to children with asthma?

  7. Influenza vaccinations and chemosensory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L; Berman, Austin H; Izhar, Mohammad; Hamilton, Hugh B; Villano, Danylko; Vazquez, Britney E; Warrum, Maja N; Mahbob, Mariam

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccines have saved millions of lives, some have been associated with extremely rare adverse effects such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, Bell's palsy, and optic neuritis. Despite the fact that olfactory loss after an influenza vaccination is noted in one case report, no quantitative olfactory testing was performed. Hence, it is unclear whether, in fact, olfactory dysfunction can be associated with such vaccinations. This study was designed to (1) identify patients from the University of Pennsylvania Smell and Taste Center who attributed their empirically determined chemosensory disturbances to influenza vaccinations and (2) determine whether influenza vaccinations add to the degree of olfactory or gustatory dysfunction due to other causes. A retrospective analysis of self-reported etiologies of 4554 consecutive patients presenting to the University of Pennsylvania Smell and Taste Center with complaints of chemosensory dysfunction was performed. Those who reported dysfunction secondary to influenza vaccinations were identified. Additionally, in a subset of 925 patients for whom detailed inoculation histories were available, it was determined whether the number of lifetime inoculations added to the deficits due to other causes. Nine of the 4554 patients (0.19%) attributed olfactory disturbances to an influenza vaccination. None complained of taste dysfunction. All nine had abnormally low scores on the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (p vaccinations and the chemosensory test scores. In accord with previous studies, age and sex were significantly related to the test scores. A very small percentage of the 4554 patients evaluated (0.19%) attributed their chemosensory dysfunction to a prior influenza vaccination. No influences of the number of lifetime influenza vaccinations on the test scores were evident in the subset of 925 patients whose dysfunction was due to other causes.

  8. [Allergic alveolitis after influenza vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, D; Sennekamp, J; Kirsten, A; Kirsten, D

    2009-09-01

    Allergic alveolitis as a side effect of vaccination is very rare. We report a life-threatening complication in a female patient after influenza vaccination. The causative antigen was the influenza virus itself. Our Patient has suffered from exogen-allergic alveolitis for 12 years. Because of the guidelines of regular administration of influenza vaccination in patients with chronic pulmonary disease further research in patients with known exogen-allergic alveolitis is vitally important for the pharmaceutical drug safety. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  9. Functional testing of an inhalable nanoparticle based influenza vaccine using a human precision cut lung slice technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Neuhaus

    Full Text Available Annual outbreaks of influenza infections, caused by new influenza virus subtypes and high incidences of zoonosis, make seasonal influenza one of the most unpredictable and serious health threats worldwide. Currently available vaccines, though the main prevention strategy, can neither efficiently be adapted to new circulating virus subtypes nor provide high amounts to meet the global demand fast enough. New influenza vaccines quickly adapted to current virus strains are needed. In the present study we investigated the local toxicity and capacity of a new inhalable influenza vaccine to induce an antigen-specific recall response at the site of virus entry in human precision-cut lung slices (PCLS. This new vaccine combines recombinant H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin (HAC1, produced in tobacco plants, and a silica nanoparticle (NP-based drug delivery system. We found no local cellular toxicity of the vaccine within applicable concentrations. However higher concentrations of NP (≥10(3 µg/ml dose-dependently decreased viability of human PCLS. Furthermore NP, not the protein, provoked a dose-dependent induction of TNF-α and IL-1β, indicating adjuvant properties of silica. In contrast, we found an antigen-specific induction of the T cell proliferation and differentiation cytokine, IL-2, compared to baseline level (152±49 pg/mg vs. 22±5 pg/mg, which could not be seen for the NP alone. Additionally, treatment with 10 µg/ml HAC1 caused a 6-times higher secretion of IFN-γ compared to baseline (602±307 pg/mg vs. 97±51 pg/mg. This antigen-induced IFN-γ secretion was further boosted by the adjuvant effect of silica NP for the formulated vaccine to a 12-fold increase (97±51 pg/mg vs. 1226±535 pg/mg. Thus we were able to show that the plant-produced vaccine induced an adequate innate immune response and re-activated an established antigen-specific T cell response within a non-toxic range in human PCLS at the site of virus entry.

  10. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  11. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor Nogales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influenza virus allows for the reassortment between two or more viruses within a co-infected cell, and this characteristic has also been harnessed in the laboratory to generate reassortant viruses for their use as either inactivated or live-attenuated influenza vaccines. With the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques, it is now possible to engineer recombinant influenza viruses entirely from full-length complementary DNA copies of the viral genome by transfection of susceptible cells. These reverse genetics systems have provided investigators with novel and powerful approaches to answer important questions about the biology of influenza viruses, including the function of viral proteins, their interaction with cellular host factors and the mechanisms of influenza virus transmission and pathogenesis. In addition, reverse genetics techniques have allowed the generation of recombinant influenza viruses, providing a powerful technology to develop both inactivated and live-attenuated influenza vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of state-of-the-art, plasmid-based, influenza reverse genetics approaches and their implementation to provide rapid, convenient, safe and more effective influenza inactivated or live-attenuated vaccines.

  12. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Aitor; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influenza virus allows for the reassortment between two or more viruses within a co-infected cell, and this characteristic has also been harnessed in the laboratory to generate reassortant viruses for their use as either inactivated or live-attenuated influenza vaccines. With the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques, it is now possible to engineer recombinant influenza viruses entirely from full-length complementary DNA copies of the viral genome by transfection of susceptible cells. These reverse genetics systems have provided investigators with novel and powerful approaches to answer important questions about the biology of influenza viruses, including the function of viral proteins, their interaction with cellular host factors and the mechanisms of influenza virus transmission and pathogenesis. In addition, reverse genetics techniques have allowed the generation of recombinant influenza viruses, providing a powerful technology to develop both inactivated and live-attenuated influenza vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of state-of-the-art, plasmid-based, influenza reverse genetics approaches and their implementation to provide rapid, convenient, safe and more effective influenza inactivated or live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:28025504

  13. [Importance of vaccination against influenza in individuals with cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynčl, J

    2014-09-01

    Influenza is one of the most common causes of human morbidity and mortality. Analysis of severe cases of influenza during the influenza season 2012/2013 found that 84 % of patients had at least one risk factor and the cohort of patients had lower influenza vaccine coverage in comparison with the general population. Influenza vaccine reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease and, therefore, should be recommended particularly to patients with chronic conditions who suffer more often from severe influenza. The education of physicians specialists is also desirable.

  14. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six "internal" influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production.

  15. Effective influenza vaccines for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzhoff, Angelika; Stoddard, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal influenza causes clinical illness and hospitalization in all age groups; however, conventional inactivated vaccines have only limited efficacy in young children. MF59®, an oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant, has been used since the 1990s to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in the elderly, a population with waning immune function due to immunosenescence.   Clinical trials now provide information to support a favorable immunogenicity and safety profile of MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine in young children. Published data indicate that Fluad®, a trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine with MF59, was immunogenic and well tolerated in young children, with a benefit/risk ratio that supports routine clinical use. A recent clinical trial also shows that Fluad provides high efficacy against PCR-confirmed influenza. Based on the results of clinical studies in children, the use of MF59-adjuvanted vaccine offers the potential to enhance efficacy and make vaccination a viable prevention and control strategy in this population. PMID:22327501

  16. Influenza vaccinations : who needs them and when?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, Eelko; Hoes, Arno W; Verheij, Theo J M

    2002-01-01

    Influenza vaccination programmes should aim at reducing the burden from influenza among those who need it most. The primary aim of this literature review is to identify who should receive priority in influenza vaccination programmes. Risk factors for severe post-influenza complications include immun

  17. Influenza vaccination in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Jan; Chlibek, Roman; Shaw, Jana; Splino, Miroslav; Prymula, Roman

    2017-07-14

    Seasonal influenza is a prevalent and serious annual illness resulting in widespread morbidity and economic disruption throughout the population; the elderly and immunocompromised are particularly vulnerable to serious sequelae and mortality. The changing demographics worldwide to an aging society have important implications for public health policy and pharmaceutical innovations. For instance, primary prevention via immunization is effective in reducing the burden of influenza illness among the elderly. However, the elderly may be insufficiently protected by vaccination due to the immunosenescence which accompanies aging. In addition, vaccine hesitancy among the younger populations increases the likelihood of circulating infectious diseases, and thus concomitant exposure. While it is clear that the development of more immunogenic vaccines is an imperative and worthy endeavor, clinical trials continue to demonstrate that the current influenza vaccine formulation remains highly effective in reducing morbidity and mortality when well matched to circulating strains.

  18. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. de Vries (Rory); A.F. Altenburg; G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically

  19. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. de Vries (Rory); A.F. Altenburg; G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically disti

  20. M2e-Based Universal Influenza A Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Deng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The successful isolation of a human influenza virus in 1933 was soon followed by the first attempts to develop an influenza vaccine. Nowadays, vaccination is still the most effective method to prevent human influenza disease. However, licensed influenza vaccines offer protection against antigenically matching viruses, and the composition of these vaccines needs to be updated nearly every year. Vaccines that target conserved epitopes of influenza viruses would in principle not require such updating and would probably have a considerable positive impact on global human health in case of a pandemic outbreak. The extracellular domain of Matrix 2 (M2e protein is an evolutionarily conserved region in influenza A viruses and a promising epitope for designing a universal influenza vaccine. Here we review the seminal and recent studies that focused on M2e as a vaccine antigen. We address the mechanism of action and the clinical development of M2e-vaccines. Finally, we try to foresee how M2e-based vaccines could be implemented clinically in the future.

  1. Influenza vaccines: an Asia-Pacific perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lance C

    2013-11-01

    This article provides an overview of some aspects of seasonal, pre-pandemic and pandemic influenza vaccines and initiatives aimed to increase influenza vaccine use within the Asia-Pacific region. Expanding the use of influenza vaccines in the Asia-Pacific region faces many challenges. Despite the recent regional history for the emergence of novel viruses, SARS, the H5N1 and H7N9, and the generation of and global seeding of seasonal influenza viruses and initiatives by WHO and other organisations to expand influenza awareness, the use of seasonal influenza vaccines remains low. The improvement in current vaccine technologies with the licensing of quadrivalent, live-attenuated, cell culture-based, adjuvanted and the first recombinant influenza vaccine is an important step. The development of novel influenza vaccines able to provide improved protection and with improved manufacturing capacity is also advancing rapidly. However, of ongoing concern are seasonal influenza impact and the low use of seasonal influenza vaccines in the Asia-Pacific region. Improved influenza control strategies and their implementation in the region are needed. Initiatives by the World Health Organization (WHO), and specifically the Western Pacific Regional Office of WHO, are focusing on consistent vaccine policies and guidelines in countries in the region. The Asian-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza (APACI) is contributing through the coordination of influenza advocacy initiates.

  2. Prospects of HA-Based Universal Influenza Vaccine

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    Anwar M. Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines afford substantial protection in humans by inducing strain-specific neutralizing antibodies (Abs. Most of these Abs target highly variable immunodominant epitopes in the globular domain of the viral hemagglutinin (HA. Therefore, current vaccines may not be able to induce heterosubtypic immunity against the divergent influenza subtypes. The identification of broadly neutralizing Abs (BnAbs against influenza HA using recent technological advancements in antibody libraries, hybridoma, and isolation of single Ab-secreting plasma cells has increased the interest in developing a universal influenza vaccine as it could provide life-long protection. While these BnAbs can serve as a source for passive immunotherapy, their identification represents an important step towards the design of such a universal vaccine. This review describes the recent advances and approaches used in the development of universal influenza vaccine based on highly conserved HA regions identified by BnAbs.

  3. 76 FR 79203 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Veterinary Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... methods of use as Veterinary Influenza Vaccines. Sustained outbreaks of highly pathogenic influenza in animals increase the risk of reassortment and adaption to humans. This technology describes DNA vaccines...

  4. A cell-based systems biology assessment of human blood to monitor immune responses after influenza vaccination.

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    Hoek, Kristen L; Samir, Parimal; Howard, Leigh M; Niu, Xinnan; Prasad, Nripesh; Galassie, Allison; Liu, Qi; Allos, Tara M; Floyd, Kyle A; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Levy, Shawn E; Joyce, Sebastian; Edwards, Kathryn M; Link, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to comprehensively study complex interactions within a biological system. Most published systems vaccinology studies have utilized whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to monitor the immune response after vaccination. Because human blood is comprised of multiple hematopoietic cell types, the potential for masking responses of under-represented cell populations is increased when analyzing whole blood or PBMC. To investigate the contribution of individual cell types to the immune response after vaccination, we established a rapid and efficient method to purify human T and B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), monocytes, and neutrophils from fresh venous blood. Purified cells were fractionated and processed in a single day. RNA-Seq and quantitative shotgun proteomics were performed to determine expression profiles for each cell type prior to and after inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. Our results show that transcriptomic and proteomic profiles generated from purified immune cells differ significantly from PBMC. Differential expression analysis for each immune cell type also shows unique transcriptomic and proteomic expression profiles as well as changing biological networks at early time points after vaccination. This cell type-specific information provides a more comprehensive approach to monitor vaccine responses.

  5. CURRENT APPROACHES TO UNIVERSAL VACCINE AGAINST INFLUENZA VIRUS

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    I. B. Esmagambetov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a seasonal infectious disease widespread across the globe. In Russia the share of influenza and other acute respiratory viral infections account for up to 90% of all infectious diseases. Scientific and reasonable method of influenza prevention is vaccination. However, traditional current influenza vaccines can’t induce protection against various virus strains that differ substantially in terms of their antigenic structure, and thus require periodic updates to its immunogenic components. In addition, there is the risk of a pandemic caused by an entirely new antigen in relation to variants of influenza virus A. Attempts to improve on traditional approaches to vaccination have focused primarily on improving production technologies and to increase immunogenicity of vaccines. Therefore, the urgent task is the creation of vaccines able to induce immune response a broad spectrum against different influenza virus strains and human strains of avian influenza, also can cause disease in humans. Protective effect of universal vaccine should be the induction of integrated immune response, based on the formulation of cross-reactive antibodies and T cells. The development of such universal vaccine could remove the need for periodical strain composition update of existing vaccines and, accor dingly, will be able to give the vaccine manufacturer itself, production planning regardless of epidemic seasons. Currently, the most widely studied antigens as key components of flu vaccines are proteins M2 and NP as well as the hemagglutinin of influenza virus. This review summarizes and lists some data of domestic and foreign research on a universal influenza virus vaccine.

  6. Can influenza epidemics be prevented by voluntary vaccination?

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    Raffaele Vardavas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous modeling studies have identified the vaccination coverage level necessary for preventing influenza epidemics, but have not shown whether this critical coverage can be reached. Here we use computational modeling to determine, for the first time, whether the critical coverage for influenza can be achieved by voluntary vaccination. We construct a novel individual-level model of human cognition and behavior; individuals are characterized by two biological attributes (memory and adaptability that they use when making vaccination decisions. We couple this model with a population-level model of influenza that includes vaccination dynamics. The coupled models allow individual-level decisions to influence influenza epidemiology and, conversely, influenza epidemiology to influence individual-level decisions. By including the effects of adaptive decision-making within an epidemic model, we can reproduce two essential characteristics of influenza epidemiology: annual variation in epidemic severity and sporadic occurrence of severe epidemics. We suggest that individual-level adaptive decision-making may be an important (previously overlooked causal factor in driving influenza epidemiology. We find that severe epidemics cannot be prevented unless vaccination programs offer incentives. Frequency of severe epidemics could be reduced if programs provide, as an incentive to be vaccinated, several years of free vaccines to individuals who pay for one year of vaccination. Magnitude of epidemic amelioration will be determined by the number of years of free vaccination, an individuals' adaptability in decision-making, and their memory. This type of incentive program could control epidemics if individuals are very adaptable and have long-term memories. However, incentive-based programs that provide free vaccination for families could increase the frequency of severe epidemics. We conclude that incentive-based vaccination programs are necessary to control

  7. Live attenuated intranasal influenza vaccine.

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    Esposito, Susanna; Montinaro, Valentina; Groppali, Elena; Tenconi, Rossana; Semino, Margherita; Principi, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Annual vaccination is the most effective means of preventing and controlling influenza epidemics, and the traditional trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) is by far the most widely used. Unfortunately, it has a number of limitations, the most important of which is its poor immunogenicity in younger children and the elderly, the populations at greatest risk of severe influenza. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) has characteristics that can overcome some of these limitations. It does not have to be injected because it is administered intranasally. It is very effective in children and adolescents, among whom it prevents significantly more cases of influenza than the traditional TIV. However, its efficacy in adults has not been adequately documented, which is why it has not been licensed for use by adults by the European health authorities. LAIV is safe and well tolerated by children aged > 2 y and adults, but some concerns arisen regarding its safety in younger children and subjects with previous asthma or with recurrent wheezing. Further studies are needed to solve these problems and to evaluate the possible role of LAIV in the annual vaccination of the general population.

  8. Influenza DNA vaccine:an update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈则

    2004-01-01

    @@ A series of global studies on the influenza DNA vaccine have revealed that it is capable of eliciting persistent humoral and cell mediated immune responses to influenza following delivery by various routes. DNA vaccines may not only serve as potentially safer alternatives to immunization with certain live virus vaccines, but may also provide a promising approach to the development of effective vaccines. The suggestions, based on our experiment, that both hemagglutinin (HA)- and neuraminidase (NA)- DNAs (or both HA and NA molecules) are highly protective against the influenza virus and are useful in the development of a more efficient vaccine against the influenza virus. In this article, we reviewed DNA vaccine against the influenza A and B viruses and the characteristics of the immune response induced by the DNA vaccine. Moreover, we discussed the importance of neutralizing antibodies to protect the host against a lethal influenza infection.

  9. Low seroprevalent species D adenovirus vectors as influenza vaccines.

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    Eric A Weaver

    Full Text Available Seasonal and pandemic influenza remains a constant threat. While standard influenza vaccines have great utility, the need for improved vaccine technologies have been brought to light by the 2009 swine flu pandemic, highly pathogenic avian influenza infections, and the most recent early and widespread influenza activity. Species C adenoviruses based on serotype 5 (AD5 are potent vehicles for gene-based vaccination. While potent, most humans are already immune to this virus. In this study, low seroprevalent species D adenoviruses Ad26, 28, and 48 were cloned and modified to express the influenza virus A/PR/8/34 hemagglutinin gene for vaccine studies. When studied in vivo, these species D Ad vectors performed quite differently as compared to species C Ad vectors depending on the route of immunization. By intramuscular injection, species D vaccines were markedly weaker than species C vaccines. In contrast, the species D vaccines were equally efficient as species C when delivered mucosally by the intranasal route. Intranasal adenovirus vaccine doses as low as 10(8 virus particles per mouse induced complete protection against a stringent lethal challenge dose of influenza. These data support translation of species D adenoviruses as mucosal vaccines and highlight the fundamental effects of differences in virus tropism on vaccine applications.

  10. Influenza (Flu) vaccine (Live, Intranasal): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC Influenza Live, Intranasal Flu Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... flulive.html . CDC review information for Live, Intranasal Influenza VIS: Vaccine Information Statement Influenza Page last reviewed: ...

  11. Cross-protection by conventional influenza vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, A.L.E.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we explore whether the protective efficacy of a trivalent virosomal seasonal influenza vaccine (TVV) can be broadened and thereby increase pandemic preparedness until more broadly protective influenza vaccines may become available. Chapter 2 examines the ability of a vaccination

  12. Recurrence of Panic Attacks after Influenza Vaccination: Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Sang-Won; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza is a contagious respiratory illness caused by the influenza virus. The influenza vaccination is recommended annually, but several adverse effects related to allergic reactions have been reported. Panic attacks are also known to occur, but no case of a panic attack adverse effect has been reported in South Korea. We present two cases of panic disorder patients whose symptoms were aggravated by the influenza vaccination. We assumed that dysregulation of T-lymphocytes in panic disorder patients could have a role in activating various kinds of cytokines and chemokines, which then can lead to panic attack aggravation. PMID:27776395

  13. Human circulating influenza-CD4+ ICOS1+IL-21+ T cells expand after vaccination, exert helper function, and predict antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spensieri, Fabiana; Borgogni, Erica; Zedda, Luisanna; Bardelli, Monia; Buricchi, Francesca; Volpini, Gianfranco; Fragapane, Elena; Tavarini, Simona; Finco, Oretta; Rappuoli, Rino; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Galli, Grazia; Castellino, Flora

    2013-08-27

    Protection against influenza is mediated by neutralizing antibodies, and their induction at high and sustained titers is key for successful vaccination. Optimal B cells activation requires delivery of help from CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In lymph nodes and tonsils, T-follicular helper cells have been identified as the T cells subset specialized in helping B lymphocytes, with interleukin-21 (IL-21) and inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS1) playing a central role for this function. We followed the expansion of antigen-specific IL-21(+) CD4(+) T cells upon influenza vaccination in adults. We show that, after an overnight in vitro stimulation, influenza-specific IL-21(+) CD4(+) T cells can be measured in human blood, accumulate in the CXCR5(-)ICOS1(+) population, and increase in frequency after vaccination. The expansion of influenza-specific ICOS1(+)IL-21(+) CD4(+) T cells associates with and predicts the rise of functionally active antibodies to avian H5N1. We also show that blood-derived CXCR5(-)ICOS1(+) CD4(+) T cells exert helper function in vitro and support the differentiation of influenza specific B cells in an ICOS1- and IL-21-dependent manner. We propose that the expansion of antigen-specific ICOS1(+)IL-21(+) CD4(+) T cells in blood is an early marker of vaccine immunogenicity and an important immune parameter for the evaluation of novel vaccination strategies.

  14. Human Phase 1 trial of low-dose inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David L; Sajkov, Dimitar; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Wilks, Samuel H; Aban, Malet; Barr, Ian G; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-07-19

    Influenza vaccines are usually non-adjuvanted but addition of adjuvant may improve immunogenicity and permit dose-sparing, critical for vaccine supply in the event of an influenza pandemic. The aim of this first-in-man study was to determine the effect of delta inulin adjuvant on the safety and immunogenicity of a reduced dose seasonal influenza vaccine. Healthy male and female adults aged 18-65years were recruited to participate in a randomized controlled study to compare the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a reduced-dose 2007 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant (LTIV+Adj) when compared to a full-dose of the standard TIV vaccine which does not contain an adjuvant. LTIV+Adj provided equivalent immunogenicity to standard TIV vaccine as assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays against each vaccine strain as well as against a number of heterosubtypic strains. HI responses were sustained at 3months post-immunisation in both groups. Antibody landscapes against a large panel of H3N2 influenza viruses showed distinct age effects whereby subjects over 40years old had a bimodal baseline HI distribution pattern, with the highest HI titers against the very oldest H3N2 isolates and with a second HI peak against influenza isolates from the last 5-10years. By contrast, subjects >40years had a unimodal baseline HI distribution with peak recognition of H3N2 isolates from approximately 20years ago. The reduced dose TIV vaccine containing Advax adjuvant was well tolerated and no safety issues were identified. Hence, delta inulin may be a useful adjuvant for use in seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12607000599471.

  15. Adolescent Attitudes toward Influenza Vaccination and Vaccine Uptake in a School-Based Influenza Vaccination Intervention: A Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Pazol, Karen; Wingood, Gina M.; Windle, Michael; Orenstein, Walter A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: School-based vaccination programs may provide an effective strategy to immunize adolescents against influenza. This study examined whether adolescent attitudes toward influenza vaccination mediated the relationship between receipt of a school-based influenza vaccination intervention and vaccine uptake. Methods: Participants were…

  16. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D; Altenburg, Arwen F; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-01-01

    Currently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. Because of an ever-present threat of the next influenza pandemic and the continuous emergence of drift variants of seasonal influenza A viruses, there is a need for an universal influenza vaccine that induces protective immunity against all influenza A viruses. Here, we summarize some of the efforts that are ongoing to develop universal influenza vaccines.

  17. [Immune response to influenza vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, I; Corral, J; Arranz, A; Foruria, A; Landa, V; Lejarza, J R; Marijuán, L; Martínez, J M

    1989-01-01

    The present study investigated the level of immunity of the population against three strains of the influenza virus (A Chile/1/83 -A Philippines/2/82 and B URSS/100/83) before and three months after vaccination, and the immune response to whole virus vaccine as compared with fragmented virus vaccine. A high percentage of the population had titers greater than or equal to 1/10 before vaccination for the Chile (54%) and Philippines (65.7%) strains, while titers against the URSS strain were lower (25.4%). There was a definitive increase in antibody titer in the vaccinated population, although it was lower than expected. The overall response to both vaccines, with protecting titers greater than or equal to 1/40 after vaccination was 65.2% for the Chile strain, 74.6% for the Philippines strain, and 15% for the URSS strain. No differences in the overall immune response were found between the groups vaccinated with whole and fragmented virus.

  18. Assessment of human immune responses to H7 avian influenza virus of pandemic potential: results from a placebo-controlled, randomized double-blind phase I study of live attenuated H7N3 influenza vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Rudenko

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs are being developed to protect humans against future epidemics and pandemics. This study describes the results of a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled phase I clinical trial of cold-adapted and temperature sensitive H7N3 live attenuated influenza vaccine candidate in healthy seronegative adults. OBJECTIVE: The goal of the study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity and potential shedding and transmission of H7N3 LAIV against H7 avian influenza virus of pandemic potential. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Two doses of H7N3 LAIV or placebo were administered to 40 randomly divided subjects (30 received vaccine and 10 placebo. The presence of influenza A virus RNA in nasal swabs was detected in 60.0% and 51.7% of subjects after the first and second vaccination, respectively. In addition, vaccine virus was not detected among placebo recipients demonstrating the absence of person-to-person transmission. The H7N3 live attenuated influenza vaccine demonstrated a good safety profile and was well tolerated. The two-dose immunization resulted in measurable serum and local antibody production and in generation of antigen-specific CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ memory T cells. Composite analysis of the immune response which included hemagglutinin inhibition assay, microneutralization tests, and measures of IgG and IgA and virus-specific T cells showed that the majority (86.2% of vaccine recipients developed serum and/or local antibodies responses and generated CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ memory T cells. CONCLUSIONS: The H7N3 LAIV was safe and well tolerated, immunogenic in healthy seronegative adults and elicited production of antibodies broadly reactive against the newly emerged H7N9 avian influenza virus. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01511419.

  19. Aflunov(®): a prepandemic influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela; Lai, Piero Luigi; Panatto, Donatella

    2012-02-01

    Influenza viruses are adept in human populations. Indeed, they have the capacity to evade the immune system through mechanisms of mutations (antigenic drift) and major variations in surface protein expression (antigenic shift). When a major change occurs, the risk of a human pandemic arises. Three influenza pandemics occurred during the 20th century, the most serious being the Spanish influenza. The last pandemic of the past century occurred in 1968, and the responsible virus infected an estimated 1-3 million people throughout the world. The first pandemic of the present century occurred in 2009 and was sustained by a H1N1 strain (A/California/07/09). In 1997, a novel avian influenza virus, H5N1, first infected humans in China. Since its emergence, the H5N1 virus has spread from Asia to Europe and Africa, resulting in the infection of millions of poultry and wild birds. So far, 522 human cases and 322 deaths have been reported by the WHO. Many studies have therefore been performed to obtain efficacious and safe H5N1 vaccines. One of these is Aflunov(®). Aflunov is a prepandemic monovalent A/H5N1 influenza vaccine adjuvanted with MF59 produced by Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics. In nonclinical studies conducted in rabbits, Aflunov proved to be well-tolerated, did not cause maternal or embryo-fetal toxicity, was not teratogenic, and had no effects on postnatal development. In clinical studies, Aflunov proved safe and well-tolerated in infants, children, adolescents, adults and the elderly. In the same subjects, the vaccine elicited robust immunogenicity against both homologous (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 clade 1) and heterologous viral strains (for instance, A/Indonesia/05/2005 or A/Turkey/15/2006) and induced immunologic memory. Thus, in 2010, the CHMP issued a positive opinion on Aflunov and in January 2011 Aflunov was given marketing authorization. This vaccine could be very useful in the event of adaptation of the H5N1 virus to humans, which could cause a new

  20. Seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine protects against 1918 Spanish influenza virus in ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influenza H1N1 pandemic of 1918 was one of the worst medical disasters in human history. Recent studies have demonstrated that the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the 1918 virus and 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus, the latter now a component of the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV),...

  1. Expression of hBD-2 induced by 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhenwei; Lei, Han

    2012-10-01

    Human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial peptide with high activity and broad spectrum activity. hBD-2 expression may be highly elevated by microorganisms and inflammation. We reported that the majority of common vaccines used, including 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine, could induce the expression of hBD-2 in epithelial cells. Among them, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine was effective at a lower concentration (0.5 µg/ml), while Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine were effective at the concentration of 1 µg/ml. However, bacteriostatic experiments revealed that the split influenza virus vaccine was capable of inducing the highest antimicrobial activity. The medium of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine treatment group had a higher antimicrobial activity than the medium of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine treatment group. The transcriptional regulator of hBD-2, that is, the NF-κB subunit, had a high level of activity, while the normal epithelial cells showed barely detectable activity, indicating that these vaccines have potential for clinical application.

  2. An overview of the regulation of influenza vaccines in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Jerry P; Gruber, Marion F

    2016-09-01

    Influenza virus vaccines are unique among currently licensed viral vaccines. The vaccines designed to protect against seasonal influenza illness must be updated periodically in an effort to match the vaccine strain with currently circulating viruses, and the vaccine manufacturing timeline includes multiple, overlapping processes with a very limited amount of flexibility. In the United States (U.S.), over 150 million doses of seasonal trivalent and quadrivalent vaccine are produced annually, a mammoth effort, particularly in the context of a vaccine with components that usually change on a yearly basis. In addition, emergence of an influenza virus containing an HA subtype that has not recently circulated in humans is an ever present possibility. Recently, pandemic influenza vaccines have been licensed, and the pathways for licensure of pandemic vaccines and subsequent strain updating have been defined. Thus, there are formidable challenges for the regulation of currently licensed influenza vaccines, as well as for the regulation of influenza vaccines under development. This review describes the process of licensing influenza vaccines in the U.S., the process and steps involved in the annual updating of seasonal influenza vaccines, and some recent experiences and regulatory challenges faced in development and evaluation of novel influenza vaccines.

  3. Live attenuated influenza vaccine--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Panatto, D

    2011-09-01

    Owing to the variability of influenza viruses, vaccine composition needs to be up-dated annually. As many variables can influence their efficacy, vaccines are still considered "sub-optimal". Many studies have been carried out in recent years to improve vaccines. In particular, researchers and vaccine-producing corporations have focused on developing a live vaccine. Among the candidate vaccines, the strain developed by Maassab has recently been licensed in the USA and Europe, after extensive investigation. This vaccine is safe and well tolerated, and has shown very good genetic stability. Although vaccine recipients are able to spread the virus, transmission to close contacts is practically non-existent. Studies on cold-adapted attenuated influenza vaccines have demonstrated that such vaccines are effective, and sometimes more effective than inactivated influenza vaccines. Cold-adapted attenuated influenza vaccines therefore appear to be an important weapon against influenza. However, a more widespread use of these vaccines is to be recommended, especially in children, as the more acceptable way of administration can favour parental compliance.

  4. Emerging influenza viruses and the prospect of a universal influenza virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and pandemics at irregular intervals. Several cases of human infections with avian and swine influenza viruses have been detected recently, warranting enhanced surveillance and the development of more effective countermeasures to address the pandemic potential of these viruses. The most effective countermeasure against influenza virus infection is the use of prophylactic vaccines. However, vaccines that are currently in use for seasonal influenza viruses have to be re-formulated and re-administered in a cumbersome process every year due to the antigenic drift of the virus. Furthermore, current seasonal vaccines are ineffective against novel pandemic strains. This paper reviews zoonotic influenza viruses with pandemic potential and technological advances towards better vaccines that induce broad and long lasting protection from influenza virus infection. Recent efforts have focused on the development of broadly protective/universal influenza virus vaccines that can provide immunity against drifted seasonal influenza virus strains but also against potential pandemic viruses. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The human side of influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshansky, Christine M.; Thomas, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    A clear understanding of immunity in individuals infected with influenza virus is critical for the design of effective vaccination and treatment strategies. Whereas myriad studies have teased apart innate and adaptive immune responses to influenza infection in murine models, much less is known about human immunity as a result of the ethical and technical constraints of human research. Still, these murine studies have provided important insights into the critical correlates of protection and pathogenicity in human infection and helped direct the human studies that have been conducted. Here, we examine and review the current literature on immunity in humans infected with influenza virus, noting evidence offered by select murine studies and suggesting directions in which future research is most warranted. PMID:22362872

  6. Influenza vaccination coverage among Spanish children, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-de-Andres, Ana; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2009-07-01

    Traditionally, influenza is not considered to be a serious disease in healthy children. However, for vulnerable populations, such as young children and those with chronic medical conditions, influenza can lead to serious complications and even death. This study aimed to assess vaccination coverage among Spanish children under 16 years of age in 2006, and to describe the factors associated with vaccination. Cross-sectional survey. In total, 8851 records of children included in the Spanish National Health Survey for 2006 were analysed. The reply ('yes' or 'no') to the question: 'Did you have a flu shot in the latest campaign?' was used as a dependent variable. Influenza vaccine coverage was calculated as the percentage of individuals aged 6 months to 16 years whose parents reported that they had been vaccinated against influenza in the most recent campaign. The influence of sociodemographic variables on vaccination and the presence of associated chronic diseases (asthma and/or diabetes) were also analysed. Vaccination coverage among Spanish children in 2006 was 6.82%: 19.43% in children with associated conditions (asthma and/or diabetes), and 5.81% in healthy children. The only factor significantly associated with influenza vaccination in children with associated conditions was household income; children with a lower household monthly income were more likely to have been vaccinated against influenza than children with a higher household monthly income (odds ratio 1.96). In children for whom vaccination is not indicated, the probability of being vaccinated against influenza was greater in those whose parents were not university graduates. Influenza vaccination coverage in Spanish children is low. Socio-economic inequalities continue to be a factor at the time of vaccination.

  7. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Carlos J; Toro, Maria F; Aguirre, Carlos; Bustamante, Alberto; Hernandez, Mariluz; Arango, Liliana P; Echeverry, Marta; Arango, Ana E; Prada, Maria C; Alarcon, Herminia del P; Rojas, Mauricio

    2007-06-01

    Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40) against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  8. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Montoya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40 against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  9. Learning from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic: prospects for more broadly effective influenza vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ethan C. Settembre; Philip R. Dormitzer; Rino Rappuoli

    2011-01-01

    Calls to develop a universal influenza vaccine have increased in the wake of the 2009 H1 N1 influenza pandemic. This demand comes at a time when analyses of the human antibody repertoire, informed by structures of complexes between broadly neutralizing antibodies and influenza hemagglutinin, have revealed the target of a class of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Recent studies suggest a path forward to more broadly protective influenza vaccines.%@@ Calls to develop a universal influenza vaccine have increased in the wake of the 2009 H1 N1 influenza pandemic.This demand comes at a time when analyses of the human antibody repertoire, informed by structures of complexes between broadly neutralizing antibodies and influenza hemagglutinin, have revealed the target of a class of broadly neutralizing antibodies.Recent studies suggest a path forward to more broadly protective influenza vaccines.

  10. Development of stable influenza vaccine powder formulations : Challenges and possibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, J-P; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2008-01-01

    Influenza vaccination represents the cornerstone of influenza prevention. However, today all influenza vaccines are formulated as liquids that are unstable at ambient temperatures and have to be stored and distributed under refrigeration. In order to stabilize influenza vaccines, they can be brought

  11. How Experience Shapes Health Beliefs: The Case of Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of past experience with influenza and the influenza vaccine on four categories of the Health Belief Model: beliefs about susceptibility to contracting influenza, severity of illness, perceived benefits of the vaccine in preventing influenza, and perceived barriers to getting vaccinated. The study population comprised…

  12. Development of stable influenza vaccine powder formulations : Challenges and possibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, J-P; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2008-01-01

    Influenza vaccination represents the cornerstone of influenza prevention. However, today all influenza vaccines are formulated as liquids that are unstable at ambient temperatures and have to be stored and distributed under refrigeration. In order to stabilize influenza vaccines, they can be brought

  13. Universal or Specific? A Modeling-Based Comparison of Broad-Spectrum Influenza Vaccines against Conventional, Strain-Matched Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Subramanian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of vaccines, influenza remains a major public health challenge. A key reason is the virus capacity for immune escape: ongoing evolution allows the continual circulation of seasonal influenza, while novel influenza viruses invade the human population to cause a pandemic every few decades. Current vaccines have to be updated continually to keep up to date with this antigenic change, but emerging 'universal' vaccines-targeting more conserved components of the influenza virus-offer the potential to act across all influenza A strains and subtypes. Influenza vaccination programmes around the world are steadily increasing in their population coverage. In future, how might intensive, routine immunization with novel vaccines compare against similar mass programmes utilizing conventional vaccines? Specifically, how might novel and conventional vaccines compare, in terms of cumulative incidence and rates of antigenic evolution of seasonal influenza? What are their potential implications for the impact of pandemic emergence? Here we present a new mathematical model, capturing both transmission dynamics and antigenic evolution of influenza in a simple framework, to explore these questions. We find that, even when matched by per-dose efficacy, universal vaccines could dampen population-level transmission over several seasons to a greater extent than conventional vaccines. Moreover, by lowering opportunities for cross-protective immunity in the population, conventional vaccines could allow the increased spread of a novel pandemic strain. Conversely, universal vaccines could mitigate both seasonal and pandemic spread. However, where it is not possible to maintain annual, intensive vaccination coverage, the duration and breadth of immunity raised by universal vaccines are critical determinants of their performance relative to conventional vaccines. In future, conventional and novel vaccines are likely to play complementary roles in

  14. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.

  15. Development of stable influenza vaccine powder formulations: challenges and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorij, J-P; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2008-06-01

    Influenza vaccination represents the cornerstone of influenza prevention. However, today all influenza vaccines are formulated as liquids that are unstable at ambient temperatures and have to be stored and distributed under refrigeration. In order to stabilize influenza vaccines, they can be brought into the dry state using suitable excipients, stabilizers and drying processes. The resulting stable influenza vaccine powder is independent of cold-chain facilities. This can be attractive for the integration of the vaccine logistics with general drug distribution in Western as well as developing countries. In addition, a stockpile of stable vaccine formulations of potential vaccines against pandemic viruses can provide an immediate availability and simple distribution of vaccine in a pandemic outbreak. Finally, in the development of new needle-free dosage forms, dry and stable influenza vaccine powder formulations can facilitate new or improved targeting strategies for the vaccine compound. This review represents the current status of dry stable inactivated influenza vaccine development. Attention is given to the different influenza vaccine types (i.e. whole inactivated virus, split, subunit or virosomal vaccine), the rationale and need for stabilized influenza vaccines, drying methods by which influenza vaccines can be stabilized (i.e. lyophilization, spray drying, spray-freeze drying, vacuum drying or supercritical fluid drying), the current status of dry influenza vaccine development and the challenges for ultimate market introduction of a stable and effective dry-powder influenza vaccine.

  16. [Influenza vaccination. Effectiveness of current vaccines and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Tamames, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is an annual challenge for health-care systems, due to factors such as co-circulation of 2 influenza A subtypes jointly with 2 influenza B lineages; the antigenic drift of these virus, which eludes natural immunity, as well as immunity conferred by vaccination; together with influenza impact in terms of morbidity and mortality. Influenza vaccines have been available for more than 70 years and they have progressed in formulation, production and delivery route. Recommendations on vaccination are focused on those with a higher probability of severe disease, and have a progressively wider coverage, and classically based on inactivated vaccines, but with an increasing importance of attenuated live vaccines. More inactivated vaccines are becoming available, from adyuvanted and virosomal vaccines to intradermal delivery, cell-culture or quadrivalent. Overall vaccine effectiveness is about 65%, but varies depending on characteristics of vaccines, virus, population and the outcomes to be prevented, and ranges from less than 10% to almost 90%. Future challenges are formulations that confer more extensive and lasting protection, as well as increased vaccination coverage, especially in groups such as pregnant women and health-care professionals, as well as being extended to paediatrics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. 75 FR 48712 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... beginning of the upcoming influenza vaccination season, the proposed materials included in this notice are... representative in the case of a child) receiving vaccines covered under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation... infection are highest among children. For most people, it lasts only a few days. It can cause: Fever...

  18. Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013-2014 Influenza Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-21

    Naval Health Research Center Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013–2014 Influenza Season Angelia A. Cost...2000–2013 P A G E 1 5 Brief report: mid-season influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates for the 2013–2014 influenza season Angelia A. Cost, PhD...Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013–2014 Influenza Season Angelia A

  19. Delta Inulin Adjuvant Enhances Plasmablast Generation, Expression of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and B-Cell Affinity Maturation in Human Subjects Receiving Seasonal Influenza Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    Full Text Available There is a major need for new adjuvants to improve the efficacy of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Advax is a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin that has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in animal models and human clinical trials. To better understand the mechanism for this enhancement, we sought to assess its effect on the plasmablast response in human subjects. This pilot study utilised cryopreserved 7 day post-vaccination (7dpv peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples obtained from a subset of 25 adult subjects from the FLU006-12 trial who had been immunized intramuscularly with a standard dose of 2012 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV alone (n=9 subjects or combined with 5mg (n=8 or 10mg (n=8 of Advax adjuvant. Subjects receiving Advax adjuvant had increased 7dpv plasmablasts, which in turn exhibited a 2-3 fold higher rate of non-silent mutations in the B-cell receptor CDR3 region associated with higher expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, the major enzyme controlling BCR affinity maturation. Together, these data suggest that Advax adjuvant enhances influenza immunity in immunized subjects via multiple mechanisms including increased plasmablast generation, AID expression and CDR3 mutagenesis resulting in enhanced BCR affinity maturation and increased production of high avidity antibody. How Advax adjuvant achieves these beneficial effects on plasmablasts remains the subject of ongoing investigation.Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12612000709842 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362709.

  20. [Influenza vaccine: globalization of public health stakes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, N; Briand, S

    2009-08-01

    On June 11, 2009, Dr. Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), declared the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. It was the first time in history that an influenza outbreak had been tracked in real-time from the emergence of a new strain of influenza A (H1N1) up to its spread to all continents over a period of 9 weeks. In recent years the international community has been working closely to prepare for such situations. A notable example of this cooperation occurred in response to the threat posed by the highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1). Vaccine availability is a major challenge that will require increasing worldwide production and ensuring a widespread access. In this regard it is important to underline the fact that 70% of influenza vaccine is produced in Europe and the United States. In 2006 WHO implemented a global pandemic influenza action plan (GAP) aiming at increasing the world's production capacity for pandemic vaccine. The GAP contains three elements: (1) increased use of seasonal influenza vaccination in industrialized and developing countries (resolution WHA 56.19). (2) technology transfer. (3) development of new production technologies. Nevertheless numerous barriers still prevent people living in developing countries from rapid and fair access to pandemic influenza vaccine. Capacity for production of pandemic vaccine is limited and advanced purchase agreements between industrialized countries and vaccine manufacturers reduce potential access of developing countries to pandemic vaccine. Economic and logistic factors also limit global access to pandemic vaccine. Therefore, WHO is working with industrialized countries, pharmaceutical companies and the international community as a whole to promote global solidarity and cooperation and thus ensure distribution of pandemic vaccine in poor countries with no local production. The current pandemic situation highlights the increasing globalization of public

  1. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriban Valero-Pacheco

    Full Text Available The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs, have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

  2. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Pérez-Toledo, Marisol; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans.

  3. Antibody Persistence in Adults Two Years after Vaccination with an H1N1 2009 Pandemic Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Valencia, Adriana; Boscó-Gárate, Ilka; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Lara-Puente, Horacio; Espitia, Clara; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura C.; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus is a human pathogen that causes epidemics every year, as well as potential pandemic outbreaks, as occurred in 2009. Vaccination has proven to be sufficient in the prevention and containment of viral spreading. In addition to the current egg-based vaccines, new and promising vaccine platforms, such as cell culture-derived vaccines that include virus-like particles (VLPs), have been developed. VLPs have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic against influenza infections. Although antibody persistence has been studied in traditional egg-based influenza vaccines, studies on antibody response durations induced by VLP influenza vaccines in humans are scarce. Here, we show that subjects vaccinated with an insect cell-derived VLP vaccine, in the midst of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic outbreak in Mexico City, showed antibody persistence up to 24 months post-vaccination. Additionally, we found that subjects that reported being revaccinated with a subsequent inactivated influenza virus vaccine showed higher antibody titres to the pandemic influenza virus than those who were not revaccinated. These findings provide insights into the duration of the antibody responses elicited by an insect cell-derived pandemic influenza VLP vaccine and the possible effects of subsequent influenza vaccination on antibody persistence induced by this VLP vaccine in humans. PMID:26919288

  4. Intranasal vaccination promotes detrimental Th17-mediated immunity against influenza infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asher Maroof

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza disease is a global health issue that causes significant morbidity and mortality through seasonal epidemics. Currently, inactivated influenza virus vaccines given intramuscularly or live attenuated influenza virus vaccines administered intranasally are the only approved options for vaccination against influenza virus in humans. We evaluated the efficacy of a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 agonist CRX-601 as an adjuvant for enhancing vaccine-induced protection against influenza infection. Intranasal administration of CRX-601 adjuvant combined with detergent split-influenza antigen (A/Uruguay/716/2007 (H3N2 generated strong local and systemic immunity against co-administered influenza antigens while exhibiting high efficacy against two heterotypic influenza challenges. Intranasal vaccination with CRX-601 adjuvanted vaccines promoted antigen-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses and the generation of polyfunctional antigen-specific Th17 cells (CD4(+IL-17A(+TNFα(+. Following challenge with influenza virus, vaccinated mice transiently exhibited increased weight loss and morbidity during early stages of disease but eventually controlled infection. This disease exacerbation following influenza infection in vaccinated mice was dependent on both the route of vaccination and the addition of the adjuvant. Neutralization of IL-17A confirmed a detrimental role for this cytokine during influenza infection. The expansion of vaccine-primed Th17 cells during influenza infection was also accompanied by an augmented lung neutrophilic response, which was partially responsible for mediating the increased morbidity. This discovery is of significance in the field of vaccinology, as it highlights the importance of both route of vaccination and adjuvant selection in vaccine development.

  5. Intranasal Vaccination Promotes Detrimental Th17-Mediated Immunity against Influenza Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroof, Asher; Yorgensen, Yvonne M.; Li, Yufeng; Evans, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza disease is a global health issue that causes significant morbidity and mortality through seasonal epidemics. Currently, inactivated influenza virus vaccines given intramuscularly or live attenuated influenza virus vaccines administered intranasally are the only approved options for vaccination against influenza virus in humans. We evaluated the efficacy of a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 agonist CRX-601 as an adjuvant for enhancing vaccine-induced protection against influenza infection. Intranasal administration of CRX-601 adjuvant combined with detergent split-influenza antigen (A/Uruguay/716/2007 (H3N2)) generated strong local and systemic immunity against co-administered influenza antigens while exhibiting high efficacy against two heterotypic influenza challenges. Intranasal vaccination with CRX-601 adjuvanted vaccines promoted antigen-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses and the generation of polyfunctional antigen-specific Th17 cells (CD4+IL-17A+TNFα+). Following challenge with influenza virus, vaccinated mice transiently exhibited increased weight loss and morbidity during early stages of disease but eventually controlled infection. This disease exacerbation following influenza infection in vaccinated mice was dependent on both the route of vaccination and the addition of the adjuvant. Neutralization of IL-17A confirmed a detrimental role for this cytokine during influenza infection. The expansion of vaccine-primed Th17 cells during influenza infection was also accompanied by an augmented lung neutrophilic response, which was partially responsible for mediating the increased morbidity. This discovery is of significance in the field of vaccinology, as it highlights the importance of both route of vaccination and adjuvant selection in vaccine development PMID:24465206

  6. Uptake of the Influenza Vaccination in Pregnancy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crosby, DA

    2016-09-01

    Influenza is caused by a highly infectious RNA virus, which usually occurs in a seasonal pattern with epidemics in the winter months. The objective of this study was to determine the uptake of the influenza vaccine in a pregnant population and ascertain the reasons why some women did not receive it. A prospective cohort study was conducted over a two-week period in January 2016 in the National Maternity Hospital Dublin, a tertiary referral maternity hospital delivering over 9000 infants per year. There were 504 women studied over the 2-week period. Overall, 197(39.1%) women received the vaccine at a mean gestational age 20.9 weeks (SD 7.0). Given the increased rates of influenza in the community and the associated implications for mother and infant, it is important that pregnant women are educated regarding the risks of influenza in pregnancy and encourage this cohort to be vaccinated.

  7. Influenza vaccination in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patria, Maria Francesca; Longhi, Benedetta; Esposito, Susanna

    2013-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive pulmonary damage and respiratory failure. It is known that bacterial infections play a critical role in the development of significant lung damage, whereas the role of respiratory viruses in CF pulmonary exacerbations and the relationship between viral infections and the progression of lung damage are uncertain. Health authorities throughout the world recommend influenza vaccination for CF patients. The aim of this review is to analyze the impact of seasonal and pandemic influenza on CF patients and data concerning influenza vaccination in order to assess the current situation and identify areas for future study. As data are limited, further well-constructed clinical studies of the effectiveness of influenza vaccination on the main clinical outcome measures of pulmonary function and nutritional status in patients with CF are required.

  8. Human /avian influenza conjugated vaccines for human use%人用流感禽流感联合疫苗的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱函坪; 陈学奎; 姚苹苹; 徐芳; 谢荣辉; 杨章女; 李岩金; 朱智勇

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解人流感疫苗和H5N1禽流感疫苗联合后的安全性和疫苗之间产生抗体的相互干扰现象.方法 制成禽流感单价疫苗、人流感3价疫苗和流感禽流感联合4价疫苗,免疫家兔,测定中和抗体和血凝抑制抗体,并接种小鼠和豚鼠,观察毒性反应和过敏反应.结果 人流感疫苗和禽流感疫苗的联合,基本上没有发生疫苗对各自抗体产生的干扰;接种动物无毒性反应.结论 2种疫苗的联合是完全可能的.%In this study, the safety of the influenza vaccine conjugated with H5N1 avian influenza vaccine were investigated, and the cross-reaction between the two vaccines were tested.The monovalent-, tervalent- and quadrivalent- influenza vaccines and avian influenza were prepared, rabbits were immunized subsequently, and neutralizing antibodies and haemagglutination inhibition antibodies were further measured.Additionally, these vaccines were used to inoculate mouse and guinea pig, and monitored the toxicity and allergic effects.Our results demonstrated that no cross-reaction was observed using influenza vaccine conjugating with H5N1 avian influenza vaccine, nor toxicity occurred, indicating the potential application of these two conjgated vaccines.

  9. Developing Vaccines to Combat Pandemic Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othmar G. Engelhardt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccine manufacturers require antigenically relevant vaccine viruses that have good manufacturing properties and are safe to use. In developing pandemic vaccine viruses, reverse genetics has been employed as a rational approach that can also be used effectively to attenuate the highly virulent H5N1 virus and at the same time place the H5 HA and N1 NA on a background of PR8, a virus that has been used over many decades to provide high yielding vaccine viruses. Reverse genetics has also been used successfully alongside classical reassorting techniques in the development of (swine flu pandemic A(H1N1v vaccine viruses.

  10. 75 FR 2049 - National Influenza Vaccination Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Proclamation 8472--National Influenza Vaccination Week, 2010 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0...;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8472 of January 8, 2010 National Influenza Vaccination Week... that influenza vaccination is the best way to protect ourselves against the flu, and my...

  11. 75 FR 77517 - National Influenza Vaccination Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Proclamation 8615--National Influenza Vaccination Week, 2010 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0...;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8615 of December 7, 2010 National Influenza Vaccination Week... complications take American lives each year. During National Influenza Vaccination Week, we remind all...

  12. Influenza vaccination in children being treated with chemotherapy for cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Goossen; L.C.M. Kremer; M.D. van de Wetering

    2009-01-01

    Background Influenza infection is a potential cause of severe morbidity in children with cancer, therefore vaccination against influenza is recommended. However, there are conflicting data concerning the immune response to influenza vaccination in children with cancer and the value of vaccination re

  13. Vaccines and vaccination for avian influenza in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) vaccines have been developed and used to protect poultry and other birds in various countries of the world. Protection is principally mediated by an immune response to the subtype-specific hemagglutinin (HA) protein. AI vaccines prevent clinical signs of disease, death, egg pr...

  14. Influenza Vaccinations, Fall 2009: Model School-Located Vaccination Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herl Jenlink, Carolyn; Kuehnert, Paul; Mazyck, Donna

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza virus presented a major challenge to health departments, schools, and other community partners to effectively vaccinate large numbers of Americans, primarily children. The use of school-located vaccination (SLV) programs to address this challenge led health departments and schools to become creative in developing models for…

  15. Influenza Vaccinations, Fall 2009: Model School-Located Vaccination Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herl Jenlink, Carolyn; Kuehnert, Paul; Mazyck, Donna

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza virus presented a major challenge to health departments, schools, and other community partners to effectively vaccinate large numbers of Americans, primarily children. The use of school-located vaccination (SLV) programs to address this challenge led health departments and schools to become creative in developing models for…

  16. Economic evidence of influenza vaccination in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savidan, Emmanuelle; Chevat, Catherine; Marsh, Grenville

    2008-05-01

    We review published economic evaluations of influenza vaccination for children, including direct individual benefits and indirect societal benefits, to determine whether more studies are needed to fully understand the expected benefits of such strategies. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to May 2006 and in-press articles to October 2006 for studies including economic analyses of influenza vaccination in children. Abstracts of all potentially relevant articles were screened. Fifteen relevant articles from 1983 were retained. Most were based on modelling, using previously published data and considered the societal perspective. Three were a part of prospective clinical trials. Various paediatric vaccination scenarios and parameters were considered. Vaccinating children against influenza was cost saving or cost effective in 10/15 studies, cost saving or effective only under certain conditions in three studies, and not cost saving or effective in two studies whatever the outcome or perspective considered. Most published evidence points to an economic interest for society of vaccinating children against influenza. However, differences in study design hinder the comparison of the various vaccination strategies considered. Comparable and complete data on the burden and cost of disease, and the cost of vaccination are needed, especially outside of North America.

  17. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Koksunan, Sarawut [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya [National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Prachasupap, Apichai [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); Ono, Ken-ichiro [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Yasuha [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  18. The Saudi Thoracic Society guidelines for influenza vaccinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed O Zeitouni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses are responsible for the influenza outbreaks that lead to significant burden and cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Based on the core proteins, influenza viruses are classified into three types, A, B, and C, of which only A and B cause significant human disease and so the vaccine is directed against these two subtypes only. The effectiveness of the vaccine depends on boosting the immune system against the serotypes included within it. As influenza viruses undergo periodic changes in their antigen, the vaccine is modified annually to ensure susceptibility. In contrast to other countries, Saudi Arabia faces a unique and challenging situation due to Hajj and Umrah seasons, when millions of people gather at the holy places in Mecca and Madinah, during which influenza outbreaks are commonly found. Such challenges making the adoption of strict vaccination strategy in Saudi Arabia is of great importance. All efforts were made to develop this guideline in an easy-to-read form, making it very handy and easy to use by health care workers. The guideline was designed to provide recommendations for problems frequently encountered in real life, with special consideration for special situations such as Hajj and Umrah seasons and pregnancy.

  19. The Saudi Thoracic Society guidelines for influenza vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitouni, Mohammed O; Al Barrak, Ali M; Al-Moamary, Mohamed S; Alharbi, Nasser S; Idrees, Majdy M; Al Shimemeri, Abdullah A; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses are responsible for the influenza outbreaks that lead to significant burden and cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Based on the core proteins, influenza viruses are classified into three types, A, B, and C, of which only A and B cause significant human disease and so the vaccine is directed against these two subtypes only. The effectiveness of the vaccine depends on boosting the immune system against the serotypes included within it. As influenza viruses undergo periodic changes in their antigen, the vaccine is modified annually to ensure susceptibility. In contrast to other countries, Saudi Arabia faces a unique and challenging situation due to Hajj and Umrah seasons, when millions of people gather at the holy places in Mecca and Madinah, during which influenza outbreaks are commonly found. Such challenges making the adoption of strict vaccination strategy in Saudi Arabia is of great importance. All efforts were made to develop this guideline in an easy-to-read form, making it very handy and easy to use by health care workers. The guideline was designed to provide recommendations for problems frequently encountered in real life, with special consideration for special situations such as Hajj and Umrah seasons and pregnancy.

  20. Public health and economic impact of seasonal influenza vaccination with quadrivalent influenza vaccines compared to trivalent influenza vaccines in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhart, Mathieu; Bricout, Hélène; Clay, Emilie; Largeron, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza B strains represent on average 23% of all circulating strains in Europe and when there is a vaccine mismatch on B strains, additional influenza-related hospitalizations and deaths as well as substantial additional costs are observed. The objective was to estimate the public health and economic impact of seasonal influenza vaccination with quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIV) compared to trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV) in Europe (EU). Based on data from 5 EU countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and UK) during 10 influenza seasons from 2002 to 2013, epidemiological and associated economic outcomes were estimated for each season for the actual scenario where the TIV was used, and for a hypothetical scenario where QIV could have been used instead. By using QIV, this study estimated that for the 5 EU countries, an additional 1.03 million (327.9/100,000 inhabitants) influenza cases, 453,000 (143.9/100,000) general practitioners consultations, 672,000 (213.1/100,000) workdays lost, 24,000 (7.7/100,000) hospitalizations and 10,000 (3.1/100,000) deaths could have been avoided compared to the use of TIV over the 10-seasons-period. This study estimates that QIV can be of economic value since from a societal perspective 15 million Euros would have been saved on general practitioners consultations (14 million Euros from third-party payer perspective), 77 million on hospitalizations (74 million Euros from third-party payer perspective) and 150 million Euros on workdays lost, across the 5 EU countries. In conclusion, the present study estimates that, compared to TIV, QIV may result in a substantial decrease in epidemiological burden and in influenza-related costs. PMID:27166916

  1. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  2. Development and qualification of the parallel line model for the estimation of human influenza haemagglutinin content using the single radial immunodiffusion assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kessel, G.; Geels, M. J.; de Weerd, S.; Buijs, L. J.; de Bruijni, M. A. M.; Glansbeek, H. L.; van den Bosch, J. F.; Heldens, J. G.; van den Heuvel, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human influenza virus leads to serious respiratory disease. Vaccination is the most common and effective prophylactic measure to prevent influenza. Influenza vaccine manufacturing and release is controlled by the correct determination of the potency-defining haemagglutinin (HA)

  3. 76 FR 78658 - Webinar Overview of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee Healthcare Personnel Influenza...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... Influenza Vaccination Subgroup's Draft Report and Draft Recommendations for Achieving the Healthy People 2020 Annual Coverage Goals for Influenza Vaccination in Healthcare Personnel AGENCY: National Vaccine... of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC), Healthcare Personnel Influenza...

  4. Vitamins as influenza vaccine adjuvant components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintilio, Wagner; de Freitas, Fábio Alessandro; Rodriguez, Dunia; Kubrusly, Flavia Saldanha; Yourtov, Dimitri; Miyaki, Cosue; de Cerqueira Leite, Luciana Cezar; Raw, Isaias

    2016-10-01

    A number of adjuvant formulations were assayed in mice immunized with 3.75 µg of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) pdm09 influenza vaccine with vitamins A, D and/or E in emulsions or B2 and/or B9 combined with Bordetella pertussis MPLA and/or alum as adjuvants. Squalene was used as positive control, as well as MPLA with alum. The immune response was evaluated by a panel of tests, including a hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) test, ELISA for IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a and IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 quantification in splenocyte culture supernatant after stimulus with influenza antigen. Immunological memory was evaluated using a 1/10 dose booster 60 days after the first immunization followed by assessment of the response by HAI, IgG ELISA, and determination of the antibody affinity index. The highest increases in HAI, IgG1 and IgG2a titers were obtained with the adjuvant combinations containing vitamin E, or the hydrophilic combinations containing MPLA and alum or B2 and alum. The IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicates that the response to the combination of B2 with alum would have more Th2 character than the combination of MPLA with alum. In an assay to investigate the memory response, a significant increase in HAI titer was observed with a booster vaccine dose at 60 days after immunization with vaccines containing MPLA with alum or B2 with alum. Overall, of the 27 adjuvant combinations, MPLA with alum and B2 with alum were the most promising adjuvants to be evaluated in humans.

  5. Modeling the effects of annual influenza vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.J.; Ackley, D.H.; Forrest, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.

    1998-12-31

    Although influenza vaccine efficacy is 70--90% in young healthy first-time vaccinees, the efficacy in repeat vaccinees has varied considerably. In some studies, vaccine efficacy in repeat vaccinees was higher than in first-time vaccinees, whereas in other studies vaccine efficacy in repeat vaccinees was significantly lower than in first-time vaccinees and sometimes no higher than in unvaccinated controls. It is known that the closeness of the antigenic match between the vaccine strain and the epidemic virus is important for vaccine effectiveness. In this study the authors show that the antigenic differences between a first vaccine strain and a second vaccine strain, and between the first vaccine strain and the epidemic strain, might account for the observed variation in attack rate among two-time vaccinees.

  6. Quality control of seasonal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandušić Nazor, Tamara; Pipić Kosanović, Marta; Tomić, Siniša

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of seasonal influenza vaccination is to prevent its spread. The vaccines contain strains of the influenza virus recommended and approved for a particular season. Just like any other medicinal product, all vaccines require marketing approval. Batches of approved vaccines are extensively tested by the manufacturers and additionally controlled by the approving authorities, which issue the quality control certificates. This article not only to describes the legal background of quality control, but also how control test results obtained by a Croatian official control laboratory are compared to manufacturer's results. We have found that testing results can slightly differ depending on methods/analytical procedures used in different laboratories. This investigation has also shown how important it is to test finished medicinal products, independently of testing at intermediate stages, and how retesting by control authorities ensures that marketed vaccines meet quality standards.

  7. Immunogenicity and Efficacy of Different Haemophilus influenzae type b Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgani, N.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Haemophilus influenzae, a major cause of meningitis in young children leading to death and other neurological sequelae. The disease leaves 15 to 35% of the survivors with permanent disabilities, such as, mental retardation or deafness. Despite the availability of new and more powerful antibiotics children with Hib meningitis still suffer from high mortality or morbidity. The emergence of multiresistant Hib strains causes increasing difficulties in selecting proper antibiotics for the treatment. Since 1970, the capsular polysaccharide polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP in H. influenzae b has been the target for vaccine development. The first Hib polysaccharide vaccine licensed in 1985, proved immunogenic in human adults, but failed to elicit an immune response in children under 2 years of age who were at greatest risk of developing the invasive Hib infection. These factors led to one of the most exciting advances in pediatrics, the development of Hib conjugate vaccines. Unlike most other vaccines for preventing a particular disease which are generally similar for all types, the specific characteristics of the available Hib conjugate vaccines licensed vary from each other in structure and immunological properties. In this review the immunogenicity and efficacy of Hib vaccines including a PRP vaccine; b Conjugate vaccines; and c Combination vaccines is evaluated.

  8. School-based influenza vaccination: parents' perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Lind

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. PURPOSE: We explored parents' perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. FINDINGS: Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV, Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support, families (e.g. convenience, the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities, the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles. Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized, families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions and the education sector (loss of instructional time. Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. CONCLUSIONS: Parents perceived

  9. Evaluation of Three Live Attenuated H2 Pandemic Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Mice and Ferrets

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    H2 influenza viruses have not circulated in humans since 1968, and therefore a significant portion of the population would be susceptible to infection should H2 influenza viruses reemerge. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in avian reservoirs worldwide, and these reservoirs are a potential source from which these viruses could emerge. Three reassortant cold-adapted (ca) H2 pandemic influenza vaccine candidates with hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from the wild...

  10. New strategies for the development of H5N1 subtype influenza vaccines: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, John

    2011-10-01

    The emergence and spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) viruses among poultry in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa have fueled concerns of a possible human pandemic, and spurred efforts towards developing vaccines against H5N1 influenza viruses, as well as improving vaccine production methods. In recent years, promising experimental reverse genetics-derived H5N1 live attenuated vaccines have been generated and characterized, including vaccines that are attenuated through temperature-sensitive mutation, modulation of the interferon antagonist protein, or disruption of the M2 protein. Live attenuated influenza virus vaccines based on each of these modalities have conferred protection against homologous and heterologous challenge in animal models of influenza virus infection. Alternative vaccine strategies that do not require the use of live virus, such as virus-like particle (VLP) and DNA-based vaccines, have also been vigorously pursued in recent years. Studies have demonstrated that influenza VLP vaccination can confer homologous and heterologous protection from lethal challenge in a mouse model of infection. There have also been improvements in the formulation and production of vaccines following concerns over the threat of H5N1 influenza viruses. The use of novel substrates for the growth of vaccine virus stocks has been intensively researched in recent years, and several candidate cell culture-based systems for vaccine amplification have emerged, including production systems based on Madin-Darby canine kidney, Vero, and PerC6 cell lines. Such systems promise increased scalability of product, and reduced reliance on embryonated chicken eggs as a growth substrate. Studies into the use of adjuvants have shown that oil-in-water-based adjuvants can improve the immunogenicity of inactivated influenza vaccines and conserve antigen in such formulations. Finally, efforts to develop more broadly cross-protective immunization strategies through the inclusion

  11. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J.S.; Nidom, Chairul A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A.; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development. PMID:26334134

  12. Influenza vaccination is not associated with detection of noninfluenza respiratory viruses in seasonal studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Maria E; McClure, David L; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Friedrich, Thomas C; Meece, Jennifer K; Belongia, Edward A

    2013-09-01

     The test-negative control study design is the basis for observational studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE). Recent studies have suggested that influenza vaccination increases the risk of noninfluenza respiratory virus infection. Such an effect could create bias in VE studies using influenza-negative controls. We investigated the association between influenza infection, vaccination, and detection of other respiratory viruses among children virus targets using a multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) platform. Vaccination status was determined using a validated registry. Adjusted odds ratios for influenza and vaccination status were calculated using three different control groups: influenza-negative, other respiratory virus positive, and pan-negative.  Influenza was detected in 12% of 2010 children and 20% of 1738 adults. Noninfluenza respiratory viruses were detected in 70% of children and 38% of adults without influenza. The proportion vaccinated did not vary between virus-positive controls and pan-negative controls in children (P = .62) or adults (P = .33). Influenza infection was associated with reduced odds of vaccination, but adjusted odds ratios differed by no more than 0.02 when the analysis used influenza-negative or virus-positive controls.  Influenza vaccination was not associated with detection of noninfluenza respiratory viruses. Use of influenza-negative controls did not generate a biased estimate of vaccine effectiveness due to an effect of vaccination on other respiratory virus infections.

  13. Stimulating Influenza Vaccination via Prosocial Motives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    Full Text Available Americans do not vaccinate nearly enough against Influenza (flu infection, despite severe health and economic burden of influenza. Younger people are disproportionately responsible for transmission, but do not suffer severely from the flu. Thus, to achieve herd immunity, prosocial motivation needs to be a partial driver of vaccination decisions. Past research has not established the causal role of prosociality in flu vaccination, and the current research evaluates such causal relationship by experimentally eliciting prosociality through messages about flu victims.In an experimental study, we described potential flu victims who would suffer from the decision of others to not vaccinate to 3952 Internet participants across eight countries. We measured sympathy, general prosociality, and vaccination intentions. The study included two identifiable victim conditions (one with an elderly victim and another with a young victim, an unidentified victim condition, and a no message condition.We found that any of the three messages increased flu vaccination intentions. Moreover, this effect was mediated by enhanced prosocial motives, and was stronger among people who were historical non-vaccinators. In addition, younger victim elicited greater sympathy, and describing identifiable victims increased general sympathy and prosocial motives.These findings provide direct experimental evidence on the causal role of prosocial motives in flu vaccination, by showing that people can be prompted to vaccinate for the sake of benefiting others.

  14. Influenza vaccines for preventing cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Clar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUND: This is an update of the original review published in 2008. The risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes is increased with influenza-like infection, and vaccination against influenza may improve cardiovascular outcomes.OBJECTIVES: To assess the potential benefits of influenza vaccination for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.METHODS:Search methods:We searched the following electronic databases on 18 October 2013: The Cochrane Library (including Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE, Economic Evaluation Database (EED and Health Technology Assessment database (HTA, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science and ongoing trials registers (www.controlled-trials.com/ and www.clinicaltrials.gov. We examined reference lists of relevant primary studies and systematic reviews. We performed a limited PubMed search on 20 February 2015, just before publication.Selection criteria:Randomised controlled trials (RCTs of influenza vaccination compared with placebo or no treatment in participants with or without cardiovascular disease, assessing cardiovascular death or non-fatal cardiovascular events.Data collection and analysis:We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We carried out meta-analyses only for cardiovascular death, as other outcomes were reported too infrequently. We expressed effect sizes as risk ratios (RRs, and we used random-effects models.MAIN RESULTS: We included eight trials of influenza vaccination compared with placebo or no vaccination, with 12,029 participants receiving at least one vaccination or control treatment. We included six new studies (n = 11,251, in addition to the two included in the previous version of the review. Four of these trials (n = 10,347 focused on prevention of influenza in the general or elderly population

  15. Association of State Laws and Healthcare Workers' Influenza Vaccination Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Raymund, Mahlon; Sweeney, Patricia M; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2016-02-01

    State laws are being used to increase healthcare worker (HCW) influenza vaccine uptake. Approximately 40% of states have enacted such laws but their effectiveness has been infrequently studied. Data sources for this study were the 2000-2011 U.S. National Health Interview Survey Adult Sample File and a summary of U.S. state HCW influenza vaccination laws. Hierarchical linear modeling was used for two time periods: 1) 2000-2005 (before enactment of many state laws) and 2) 2006-2011 (a time of increased enactment of state HCW influenza vaccination legislation). During 2000-2005, two states had HCW influenza vaccination laws and HCW influenza vaccination rates averaged 22.5%. In 2006-2011, 19 states had such laws and vaccination rates averaged 50.9% (p law score. Although laws varied widely in scope and applicability, states with HCW influenza vaccination laws reported higher HCW vaccination rates.

  16. Influenza vaccination among the elderly in Bangkok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasai, Valaikanya; Lertmaharit, Somrat; Viputsiri, Ong-Arj; Pongpanich, Sathirakorn; Panichpathompong, Usa; Tarnmaneewongse, Veerachai; Baron-Papillon, Florence; Cheunkitmongkol, Sunate

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of influenza vaccinations among the elderly in Bangkok in reducing influenza-like illness (ILI) and influenza-related complications. Using a non-randomized, controlled, prospective methodology, healthy, active people aged 60 years or more, living in the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) area, were studied. The two study cohorts comprised 519 persons in the vaccinated group and 520 in the non-vaccinated group. The outcome under study was influenza-like illness (ILI), as reported by the study volunteers. The two groups were comparable for most socio-demographic characteristics, except for gender, level of education, marital status, and smoking habit. The age range was 60-88 years (mean: 68 years). Females outnumbered males in both groups, with ratio of female to male of 2.6:1 and 1.9:1 in the vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups, respectively. The top three co-morbidities among these groups were hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and heart disease, in that order. Only 1% of the volunteers reported lung disease as co-morbidity. During the 12-month study period, a total of 107 volunteers reported ILI in both groups, with 38 persons in the vaccinated group and 69 persons in the non-vaccinated group. There were 46 ILI episodes in the vaccinated group, and 86 in the non-vaccinated group, for a total of 132 episodes. The incidence rates rates of influenza in this population, therefore, were 8.9% for the vaccinated and 16.9% for the non-vaccinated groups; with a reduction in the rate of reported ILI and doctor visits of 8%. Vaccine effectiveness was rated at 47.6%, crude risk ratio at 1.9 (1.33-2.75), and adjusted risk ratio at 1.92 (95% CI: 1.25-2.95), after adjustment for gender, marital status, education, and smoking habit. No complications due to ILI were observed in this population during the study period. Hospitalizations during this period were due to non-ILI related causes, such as cancer and accident.

  17. Influenza vaccination in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are considered at higher risk of influenza-related complications and are listed worldwide among the subjects for whom yearly influenza vaccination is strongly recommended. However, influenza vaccination coverage of patients with ESRD is significantly lower than desired. This paper explores why compliance with official recommendations for influenza vaccination is poor in patients with ESRD and analyzes the true risk of infection as well as the immunogenicity, the effectiveness and the safety of influenza vaccination in these patients. Epidemiological and clinical data support the importance of influenza in conditioning clinical deterioration of patients with ESRD, particularly in relation to their level of immunosuppression. However, the variable levels of immunodeficiency detected in patients with ESRD may reduce the immune response to influenza vaccination, which appears to be lower than that usually found in healthy subjects. However, few studies are available, and they are difficult to compare for several reasons. Additionally, limited data have been collected on influenza vaccine effectiveness, although the available studies support positive results of vaccination on outcomes of severe disease. Despite such limitations, it is important to highlight that all the available studies have confirmed the good safety and tolerability of inactivated influenza vaccines. These findings, together with the risks associated with influenza in these patients, support annual influenza vaccination in patients with ESRD as well as vaccination of their close contacts and should be presented in educational programs organized for nephrologists and patient associations.

  18. Chemistry, manufacturing and control (CMC) and clinical trial technical support for influenza vaccine manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Rahnuma; Holt, Renee; Hjorth, Richard; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco

    2016-10-26

    With the support of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) of the US Department of Health and Human Services, PATH has contributed to the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines (GAP) by providing technical and clinical assistance to several developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVMs). GAP builds regionally based independent and sustainable influenza vaccine production capacity to mitigate the overall global shortage of influenza vaccines. The program also ensures adequate influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity in the event of an influenza pandemic. Since 2009, PATH has worked closely with two DCVMs in Vietnam: the Institute of Vaccines and Medical Biologicals (IVAC) and VABIOTECH. Beginning in 2013, PATH also began working with Torlak Institute in Serbia; Instituto Butantan in Brazil; Serum Institute of India Private Ltd. in India; and Changchun BCHT Biotechnology Co. (BCHT) in China. The DCVMs supported under the GAP program all had existing influenza vaccine manufacturing capability and required technical support from PATH to improve vaccine yield, process efficiency, and product formulation. PATH has provided customized technical support for the manufacturing process to each DCVM based on their respective requirements. Additionally, PATH, working with BARDA and WHO, supported several DCVMs in the clinical development of influenza vaccine candidates progressing toward national licensure or WHO prequalification. As a result of the activities outlined in this review, several companies were able to make excellent progress in developing state-of-the-art manufacturing processes and completing early phase clinical trials. Licensure trials are currently ongoing or planned for several DCVMs.

  19. Targeting B cell responses in universal influenza vaccine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kaval; Sullivan, Meghan; Wilson, Patrick C

    2011-01-01

    Since its first administration in the 1940s, the influenza vaccine has provided tremendous relief against influenza infections. However, time has revealed the vaccine’s ultimate limit and the call for its reinvention has now come, just as we are beginning to appreciate the antibody immune responses vital in preventing infections. New strategies to design the influenza vaccine rely on selectively inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies that are specific for highly conserved viral epitopes. Such approaches take us away from the limited range of protection provided by current seasonal influenza vaccines and towards a future with a pan-influenza vaccine capable of providing universal strain coverage. PMID:21940217

  20. Influenza vaccines: the good, the bad, and the eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Jones, Jeremy C

    2010-01-01

    Outbreaks of influenza A viruses continue to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. The global disease burden of influenza is substantial. While antiviral therapies are available, influenza vaccines are the mainstay of efforts to reduce the substantial health burden from seasonal influenza. Inactivated influenza vaccines have been available since the 1940s, with live attenuated, cold-adapted vaccines becoming available in the United States in 2003. In spite of the successes, more research is needed to develop more effective seasonal influenza vaccines that provide long-lasting immunity and broad protection against strains that differ antigenically from vaccine viruses. This review introduces the virus and its disease, the current state of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines, and the challenges we face in the future.

  1. Clinical effectiveness of conventional influenza vaccination in asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A J; Hak, E; Stalman, W A B; van Essen, G A; Hoes, A W; Verheij, Th J M

    2002-01-01

    Influenza immunization rates among young asthmatics remain unsatisfactory due to persistent concern about the impact of influenza and the benefits of the vaccine. We assessed the effectiveness of the conventional inactivated trivalent sub-unit influenza vaccine in reducing acute respiratory disease

  2. An approach to monitor influenza vaccination uptake across Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroneman, M.; Paget, J.; Meuwissen, L.; Joseph, C.; Kennedy, H.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the monitoring of influenza vaccination uptake is mainly a national issue. As influenza infection easily crosses international borders, it is in the interest of all countries to have a high vaccine uptake in people who may be vulnerable when influenza spreads. A Europe-wide monitoring

  3. An Intranasal Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Broadly Protects Mice from Multiple Subtypes of Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Louis M; Cathcart, Andrea L; Pujanauski, Lindsey M; Qi, Li; Kash, John C; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2015-07-21

    Influenza virus infections are a global public health problem, with a significant impact of morbidity and mortality from both annual epidemics and pandemics. The current strategy for preventing annual influenza is to develop a new vaccine each year against specific circulating virus strains. Because these vaccines are unlikely to protect against an antigenically divergent strain or a new pandemic virus with a novel hemagglutinin (HA) subtype, there is a critical need for vaccines that protect against all influenza A viruses, a so-called "universal" vaccine. Here we show that mice were broadly protected against challenge with a wide variety of lethal influenza A virus infections (94% aggregate survival following vaccination) with a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine cocktail. The vaccine consisted of a mixture of VLPs individually displaying H1, H3, H5, or H7 HAs, and vaccinated mice showed significant protection following challenge with influenza viruses expressing 1918 H1, 1957 H2, and avian H5, H6, H7, H10, and H11 hemagglutinin subtypes. These experiments suggest a promising and practical strategy for developing a broadly protective "universal" influenza vaccine. The rapid and unpredictable nature of influenza A virus evolution requires new vaccines to be produced annually to match circulating strains. Human infections with influenza viruses derived from animals can cause outbreaks that may be associated with high mortality, and such strains may also adapt to humans to cause a future pandemic. Thus, there is a large public health need to create broadly protective, or "universal," influenza vaccines that could prevent disease from a wide variety of human and animal influenza A viruses. In this study, a noninfectious virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine was shown to offer significant protection against a variety of influenza A viruses in mice, suggesting a practical strategy to develop a universal influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Schwartzman et al.

  4. A comparative analysis of influenza vaccination programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Bansal

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The threat of avian influenza and the 2004-2005 influenza vaccine supply shortage in the United States have sparked a debate about optimal vaccination strategies to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality caused by the influenza virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We present a comparative analysis of two classes of suggested vaccination strategies: mortality-based strategies that target high-risk populations and morbidity-based strategies that target high-prevalence populations. Applying the methods of contact network epidemiology to a model of disease transmission in a large urban population, we assume that vaccine supplies are limited and then evaluate the efficacy of these strategies across a wide range of viral transmission rates and for two different age-specific mortality distributions. We find that the optimal strategy depends critically on the viral transmission level (reproductive rate of the virus: morbidity-based strategies outperform mortality-based strategies for moderately transmissible strains, while the reverse is true for highly transmissible strains. These results hold for a range of mortality rates reported for prior influenza epidemics and pandemics. Furthermore, we show that vaccination delays and multiple introductions of disease into the community have a more detrimental impact on morbidity-based strategies than mortality-based strategies. CONCLUSIONS: If public health officials have reasonable estimates of the viral transmission rate and the frequency of new introductions into the community prior to an outbreak, then these methods can guide the design of optimal vaccination priorities. When such information is unreliable or not available, as is often the case, this study recommends mortality-based vaccination priorities.

  5. Influenza vaccination accelerates recovery of ferrets from lymphopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedzad Music

    Full Text Available Ferrets are a useful animal model for human influenza virus infections, since they closely mimic the pathogenesis of influenza viruses observed in humans. However, a lack of reagents, especially for flow cytometry of immune cell subsets, has limited research in this model. Here we use a panel of primarily species cross-reactive antibodies to identify ferret T cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL, B cells, and granulocytes in peripheral blood. Following infection with seasonal H3N2 or H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses, these cell types showed rapid and dramatic changes in frequency, even though clinically the infections were mild. The loss of B cells and CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the increase in neutrophils, were especially marked 1-2 days after infection, when about 90% of CD8+ T cells disappeared from the peripheral blood. The different virus strains led to different kinetics of leukocyte subset alterations. Vaccination with homologous vaccine reduced clinical symptoms slightly, but led to a much more rapid return to normal leukocyte parameters. Assessment of clinical symptoms may underestimate the effectiveness of influenza vaccine in restoring homeostasis.

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanov, Sergei S; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E

    2015-11-27

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009-2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009-2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates.

  7. Acute sleep deprivation has no lasting effects on the human antibody titer response following a novel influenza A H1N1 virus vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies in humans have yielded evidence that adaptive immune function, including the production of antigen-specific antibodies, is distinctly impaired when sleep is deprived at the time of first antigen exposure. Here we examined the effects of a regular 24- hour sleep-wake cycle (including 8 hours of nocturnal sleep and a 24-hour period of continuous wakefulness on the 7-week antibody production in 11 males and 13 females in response to the H1N1 (swine flu virus vaccination. The specific antibody titer in serum was assayed by the hemagglutination inhibition test on the days 5, 10, 17, and 52 following vaccination. Results In comparison to the sleep group, sleep-deprived males but not females had reduced serum concentration of H1N1-specific antibodies five days after vaccination, whereas antibody titers at later time points did not differ between the conditions. Conclusions These findings concur with the notion that sleep is a supportive influence in the very early stage of an adaptive immune response to a viral antigen. However, our results do not support the view that acute sleep deprivation has lasting effects on the human antibody titer response to influenza vaccination.

  8. Effectiveness of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Tacken, Margot; Bos, Jens; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Korevaar, Joke C.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Wolters, Bert; Bijl, Marc; Postma, Maarten J.; Wilschut, Jan; Nichol, Kristin L.; Hak, Eelko

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we conducted a study in the adults belonging to the risk groups to assess the A(H1N1)pdm09 MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine effectiveness. METHODS: VE against influenza and/or pneumonia was ass

  9. Effectiveness of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, G.; Tacken, M.; Bos, J.; Stirbu-Wagner, I.; Korevaar, J.C.; Stolk, R.P.; Wolters, B.; Bijl, M.; Postma, M.J.; Wilschut, J.; Nichol, K.L.; Hak, E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we conducted a study in the adults belonging to the risk groups to assess the A(H1N1)pdm09 MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine effectiveness. Methods: VE against influenza and/or pneumonia was ass

  10. Effectiveness of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, G.; Tacken, M.; Bos, J.; Stirbu-Wagner, I.; Korevaar, J.C.; Stolk, R.P.; Wolters, B.; Bijl, M.; Postma, M.J.; Wilschut, J.; Nichol, K.L.; Hak, E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we conducted a study in the adults belonging to the risk groups to assess the A(H1N1)pdm09 MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine effectiveness. Methods: VE against influenza and/or pneumonia was

  11. Dry influenza vaccines : towards a stable, effective and convenient alternative to conventional parenteral influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomar, Jasmine; Born, Philip A.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-chain requirements, limited stockpiling potential and the lack of potent immune responses are major challenges of parenterally formulated influenza vaccines. Decreased cold chain dependence and stockpiling can be achieved if vaccines are formulated in a dry state using suitable excipients and d

  12. Dry influenza vaccines : towards a stable, effective and convenient alternative to conventional parenteral influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomar, Jasmine; Born, Philip A.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-chain requirements, limited stockpiling potential and the lack of potent immune responses are major challenges of parenterally formulated influenza vaccines. Decreased cold chain dependence and stockpiling can be achieved if vaccines are formulated in a dry state using suitable excipients and

  13. Dry influenza vaccines : towards a stable, effective and convenient alternative to conventional parenteral influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomar, Jasmine; Born, Philip A.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-chain requirements, limited stockpiling potential and the lack of potent immune responses are major challenges of parenterally formulated influenza vaccines. Decreased cold chain dependence and stockpiling can be achieved if vaccines are formulated in a dry state using suitable excipients and d

  14. The Split Virus Influenza Vaccine rapidly activates immune cells through Fcγ receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, William E; Huang, Huang; Wei, Yu-Ling; Davis, Kara L; Leipold, Michael D; Bendall, Sean C; Kidd, Brian A; Dekker, Cornelia L; Maecker, Holden T; Chien, Yueh-Hsiu; Davis, Mark M

    2014-10-14

    Seasonal influenza vaccination is one of the most common medical procedures and yet the extent to which it activates the immune system beyond inducing antibody production is not well understood. In the United States, the most prevalent formulations of the vaccine consist of degraded or "split" viral particles distributed without any adjuvants. Based on previous reports we sought to determine whether the split influenza vaccine activates innate immune receptors-specifically Toll-like receptors. High-dimensional proteomic profiling of human whole-blood using Cytometry by Time-of-Flight (CyTOF) was used to compare signaling pathway activation and cytokine production between the split influenza vaccine and a prototypical TLR response ex vivo. This analysis revealed that the split vaccine rapidly and potently activates multiple immune cell types but yields a proteomic signature quite distinct from TLR activation. Importantly, vaccine induced activity was dependent upon the presence of human sera indicating that a serum factor was necessary for vaccine-dependent immune activation. We found this serum factor to be human antibodies specific for influenza proteins and therefore immediate immune activation by the split vaccine is immune-complex dependent. These studies demonstrate that influenza virus "splitting" inactivates any potential adjuvants endogenous to influenza, such as RNA, but in previously exposed individuals can elicit a potent immune response by facilitating the rapid formation of immune complexes.

  15. Broadly protective influenza vaccines: Redirecting the antibody response through adjuvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and current vaccines have limited coverage, therefore it remains a high priority to develop broadly protective vaccines. With the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against influenza these vaccines becam

  16. Efficacy and safety of influenza vaccination in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patria, Maria Francesca; Tenconi, Rossana; Esposito, Susanna

    2012-04-01

    The mean global prevalence of asthma among children is approximately 12%, making it the most common chronic disease in children. Influenza infection has been associated with complications such as exacerbations of wheezing and asthma, increased airway hyper-reactivity and hospitalization. Although influenza vaccination is recommended for asthmatic patients by all health authorities, vaccination coverage remains significantly lower than expected and is lowest of all in children. Compliance is affected by the uncertainty of parents and physicians concerning the clinical risk of influenza in asthmatic subjects, the benefits of influenza vaccination in preventing asthma exacerbations and the safety of immunization. The aim of this review is to analyze the rationale for using influenza vaccine, discuss the relationship between influenza and the severity of asthmatic episodes and document the efficacy and safety of influenza vaccination in the pediatric asthmatic population.

  17. Effects of influenza vaccination and influenza illness on exacerbations in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Zwanikken, C

    1998-01-01

    Despite reports that influenza vaccination appears to be safe in multiple sclerosis there is uncertainty which patients may benefit from it. By using a questionnaire we compared the effects of influenza illness (1995-1996 season) and influenza vaccination (autumn of 1996) on neurologic symptoms in

  18. Bringing influenza vaccines into the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settembre, Ethan C; Dormitzer, Philip R; Rappuoli, Rino

    2014-01-01

    The recent H7N9 influenza outbreak in China highlights the need for influenza vaccine production systems that are robust and can quickly generate substantial quantities of vaccines that target new strains for pandemic and seasonal immunization. Although the influenza vaccine system, a public-private partnership, has been effective in providing vaccines, there are areas for improvement. Technological advances such as mammalian cell culture production and synthetic vaccine seeds provide a means to increase the speed and accuracy of targeting new influenza strains with mass-produced vaccines by dispensing with the need for egg isolation, adaptation, and reassortment of vaccine viruses. New influenza potency assays that no longer require the time-consuming step of generating sheep antisera could further speed vaccine release. Adjuvants that increase the breadth of the elicited immune response and allow dose sparing provide an additional means to increase the number of available vaccine doses. Together these technologies can improve the influenza vaccination system in the near term. In the longer term, disruptive technologies, such as RNA-based flu vaccines and 'universal' flu vaccines, offer a promise of a dramatically improved influenza vaccine system.

  19. Heavy-chain isotype patterns of human antibody-secreting cells induced by Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines in relation to age and preimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Juul, Lars; Gyhrs, A;

    1994-01-01

    The influence of preexisting immunity on the heavy-chain isotypes of circulating antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) induced by vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) or diphtheria toxoid (DT) and by vaccination with TT or DT...

  20. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Dae Gwon

    Full Text Available An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA. However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP-forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1. BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m. and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8, elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines.

  1. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which ... infections? Can HPV infections be prevented? What HPV vaccines are available? Who should get the HPV vaccines? ...

  2. Immunogenicity and Clinical Efficacy of Influenza Vaccination In Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W Kay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women are at high risk from influenza due to disproportionate morbidity, mortality, and adverse pregnancy outcomes following infection. As such, they are classified as a high priority group for vaccination. However, changes in the maternal immune system required to accommodate the allogeneic fetus may alter the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines. A large number of studies have evaluated the safety of the influenza vaccine. Here, we will review available studies on the immunogenicity and efficacy of the influenza vaccine during pregnancy, focusing on both humoral and cellular immunity.

  3. Attitudes towards influenza vaccination in high socioeconomic status Turkish parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Suzan; Yüksel, Nüket Ciğdem; Aktoprak, Hale Bozkurt; Canbal, Metin; Kaya, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the knowledge, attitudes, and demographic factors that influence the rate of influenza vaccination among high socioeconomic status parents. Questionnaire exploring the attitudes of parents to the influenza vaccine, and their knowledge about influenza and its vaccination, was given to parents of children from 1 through 16 years of age attending the Turgut Özal University Hospital after the 2011/12 influenza season. In the present study, 285 mothers and their children participated and 8.8% (n = 25) of children had the influenza vaccination. Between the vaccinated and nonvaccinated groups, there were statistically significantly differences for having received the recommendation of the physician, consulting with the physician, having the influenza vaccine previously, and having a chronic disease. The most common misconceptions of the parents about the vaccine were; there being no need for it, it not being useful, it having no effect, and it being harmful. Parents' knowledge about influenza and the influenza vaccine were not satisfactory. Reliable information from both health care providers during visits and the media about influenza, its severity, and the effectiveness and side effects of its vaccine should be provided.

  4. Pneumococcal and seasonal influenza vaccination among elderly patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorska-Ciebiada, Małgorzata; Saryusz-Wolska, Małgorzata; Ciebiada, Maciej; Loba, Jerzy

    2015-10-28

    Both seasonal influenza vaccination and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for elderly diabetics. The aim of the study was to determine the rate of seasonal influenza vaccination over the previous twelve months, pneumococcal vaccination over a lifetime, and to identify predictors which affect likelihood of vaccination. 219 diabetics elders were detailed questioned 3 months after the end of 2012/2013 influenza season. 26.48% of patients have been vaccinated against influenza in the last year and only 9.13% of patients reported pneumococcal vaccination in the past. The logistic regression analysis revealed that variables which increased the likelihood of having been vaccinated against influenza were: higher number of anti-hyperglycemic medications, increased number of co-morbidities, higher patients' income, recommendation of vaccination from General Practitioners (GPs) and specialist. Significant predictors of pneumococcal vaccine uptake included increased number of co-morbidities and recommendation of vaccination received from GPs and specialist. The commonest reasons given by those unvaccinated were lack of information about immunization and low perceived benefits of vaccination. Of patients who were not treated with influenza vaccine 86.7% had never received recommendation from specialist and 71.4% had never been advised by GPs. Influenza vaccination was too expensive to 24.85% of patients. The vaccination rate among elderly diabetics in Poland is low. Lack of knowledge and patients' income are the main barriers. Increased awareness of healthcare professionals to educate and encourage vaccination and propagation of free vaccinations to all people at risk may increase the rate of vaccination against influenza and pneumococcal disease.

  5. Influenza vaccination in children at high risk of respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patria, Maria Francesca; Tagliabue, Claudia; Longhi, Benedetta; Esposito, Susanna

    2013-05-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can affect the pediatric population and health authorities throughout the world recommend influenza vaccination because of the significant risk of influenza-related complications. However, despite this recommendation, vaccine coverage is generally unsatisfactory. The aim of this review is to analyze the impact of influenza on children at high risk of respiratory disease, and the immunogenicity, safety and efficacy of influenza vaccination in such children. The results show that there is a significant risk of influenza-related complications in preterm neonates and infants, in whom influenza vaccines are immunogenic and safe (although their efficacy has not been specifically studied). There are conflicting data concerning the effect of influenza infection on asthma morbidity in children, and whether or not influenza vaccination helps to prevent asthma exacerbations. Recent data provide no evidence that influenza is more frequent in patients with cystic fibrosis than in healthy subjects, or that it is responsible for increased lower respiratory tract morbidity. The lack of any clear correlate of protection suggests that future studies should also consider the efficacy of the different influenza vaccines and not only evaluate them in terms of immunogenicity. Furthermore, there is a need for clinical studies to assess the effectiveness of the available vaccines in patients with other rare CRDs and other chronic underlying diseases with possibly severe respiratory involvement. It is also important to determine whether children with recurrent respiratory tract infections should be included in the list of those for whom influenza vaccination is recommended. In the meantime, given the increasing evidence of the burden of influenza on the population as a whole and the benefits associated with vaccination, annual influenza vaccinations should be recommended for all children at high risk of

  6. Formulation of influenza T cell peptides : in search of a universal influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soema, Peter Christiaan

    2015-01-01

    Current seasonal influenza vaccines rely on the induction of antibodies to neutralize the virus. However, influenza viruses frequently undergo genetic mutations due to antigenic drift and shift, altering the surface proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase to which antibodies usually bind. This

  7. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Loudon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99 HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun was analyzed in rhesus macaques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  8. Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Against Pediatric Deaths: 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Brendan; Reynolds, Sue B; Blanton, Lenee; Santibanez, Tammy A; O'Halloran, Alissa; Lu, Peng-Jun; Chen, Jufu; Foppa, Ivo M; Gargiullo, Paul; Bresee, Joseph; Singleton, James A; Fry, Alicia M

    2017-05-01

    Surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pediatric deaths since 2004 has shown that most deaths occur in unvaccinated children. We assessed whether influenza vaccination reduced the risk of influenza-associated death in children and adolescents. We conducted a case-cohort analysis comparing vaccination uptake among laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pediatric deaths with estimated vaccination coverage among pediatric cohorts in the United States. Case vaccination and high-risk status were determined by case investigation. Influenza vaccination coverage estimates were obtained from national survey data or a national insurance claims database. We estimated odds ratios from logistic regression comparing odds of vaccination among cases with odds of vaccination in comparison cohorts. We used Bayesian methods to compute 95% credible intervals (CIs) for vaccine effectiveness (VE), calculated as (1 - odds ratio) × 100. From July 2010 through June 2014, 358 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported among children aged 6 months through 17 years. Vaccination status was determined for 291 deaths; 75 (26%) received vaccine before illness onset. Average vaccination coverage in survey cohorts was 48%. Overall VE against death was 65% (95% CI, 54% to 74%). Among 153 deaths in children with underlying high-risk medical conditions, 47 (31%) were vaccinated. VE among children with high-risk conditions was 51% (95% CI, 31% to 67%), compared with 65% (95% CI, 47% to 78%) among children without high-risk conditions. Influenza vaccination was associated with reduced risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pediatric death. Increasing influenza vaccination could prevent influenza-associated deaths among children and adolescents. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Cell-Based Systems Biology Analysis of Human AS03-Adjuvanted H5N1 Avian Influenza Vaccine Responses: A Phase I Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samir, Parimal; Galassie, Allison; Allos, Tara M.; Niu, Xinnan; Gordy, Laura E.; Creech, C. Buddy; Prasad, Nripesh; Jensen, Travis L.; Hill, Heather; Levy, Shawn E.; Joyce, Sebastian; Link, Andrew J.; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Vaccine development for influenza A/H5N1 is an important public health priority, but H5N1 vaccines are less immunogenic than seasonal influenza vaccines. Adjuvant System 03 (AS03) markedly enhances immune responses to H5N1 vaccine antigens, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Objective and Methods We compared the safety (primary endpoint), immunogenicity (secondary), gene expression (tertiary) and cytokine responses (exploratory) between AS03-adjuvanted and unadjuvanted inactivated split-virus H5N1 influenza vaccines. In a double-blinded clinical trial, we randomized twenty adults aged 18–49 to receive two doses of either AS03-adjuvanted (n = 10) or unadjuvanted (n = 10) H5N1 vaccine 28 days apart. We used a systems biology approach to characterize and correlate changes in serum cytokines, antibody titers, and gene expression levels in six immune cell types at 1, 3, 7, and 28 days after the first vaccination. Results Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Nine of 10 subjects in the adjuvanted group and 0/10 in the unadjuvanted group exhibited seroprotection (hemagglutination inhibition antibody titer > 1:40) at day 56. Within 24 hours of AS03-adjuvanted vaccination, increased serum levels of IL-6 and IP-10 were noted. Interferon signaling and antigen processing and presentation-related gene responses were induced in dendritic cells, monocytes, and neutrophils. Upregulation of MHC class II antigen presentation-related genes was seen in neutrophils. Three days after AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, upregulation of genes involved in cell cycle and division was detected in NK cells and correlated with serum levels of IP-10. Early upregulation of interferon signaling-related genes was also found to predict seroprotection 56 days after first vaccination. Conclusions Using this cell-based systems approach, novel mechanisms of action for AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccination were observed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  10. Universal Influenza Vaccines, a Dream to Be Realized Soon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to frequent viral antigenic change, current influenza vaccines need to be re-formulated annually to match the circulating strains for battling seasonal influenza epidemics. These vaccines are also ineffective in preventing occasional outbreaks of new influenza pandemic viruses. All these challenges call for the development of universal influenza vaccines capable of conferring broad cross-protection against multiple subtypes of influenza A viruses. Facilitated by the advancement in modern molecular biology, delicate antigen design becomes one of the most effective factors for fulfilling such goals. Conserved epitopes residing in virus surface proteins including influenza matrix protein 2 and the stalk domain of the hemagglutinin draw general interest for improved antigen design. The present review summarizes the recent progress in such endeavors and also covers the encouraging progress in integrated antigen/adjuvant delivery and controlled release technology that facilitate the development of an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  11. Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness for the 2012-2013 Influenza Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Naval Health Research Center Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness for the 2012-2013 Influenza Season Angelia A. Eick -Cost Zheng Hu...care encounters for Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness for the 2012-2013 Influenza Season Angelia A. Eick -Cost, PhD, ScM; Zheng Hu, MS; Michael...Forces Health Surveillance Center (Drs. Eick -Cost and Sanchez, Ms. Hu, CDR Cooper); Naval Health Research Center (Ms. Radin, Mr. Hawksworth, CDR

  12. Barriers to pandemic influenza vaccination and uptake of seasonal influenza vaccine in the post-pandemic season in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böhmer Merle M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, annual vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended for certain target groups (e.g. persons aged ≥60 years, chronically ill persons, healthcare workers (HCW. In season 2009/10, vaccination against pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09, which was controversially discussed in the public, was recommended for the whole population. The objectives of this study were to assess vaccination coverage for seasonal (seasons 2008/09-2010/11 and pandemic influenza (season 2009/10, to identify predictors of and barriers to pandemic vaccine uptake and whether the controversial discussions on pandemic vaccination has had a negative impact on seasonal influenza vaccine uptake in Germany. Methods We analysed data from the ‘German Health Update’ (GEDA10 telephone survey (n=22,050 and a smaller GEDA10-follow-up survey (n=2,493, which were both representative of the general population aged ≥18 years living in Germany. Results Overall only 8.8% of the adult population in Germany received a vaccination against pandemic influenza. High socioeconomic status, having received a seasonal influenza shot in the previous season, and belonging to a target group for seasonal influenza vaccination were independently associated with the uptake of pandemic vaccines. The main reasons for not receiving a pandemic vaccination were ‘fear of side effects’ and the opinion that ‘vaccination was not necessary’. Seasonal influenza vaccine uptake in the pre-pandemic season 2008/09 was 52.8% among persons aged ≥60 years; 30.5% among HCW, and 43.3% among chronically ill persons. A decrease in vaccination coverage was observed across all target groups in the first post-pandemic season 2010/11 (50.6%, 25.8%, and 41.0% vaccination coverage, respectively. Conclusions Seasonal influenza vaccination coverage in Germany remains in all target groups below 75%, which is a declared goal of the European Union. Our results suggest that controversial

  13. Developments of Subunit and VLP Vaccines Against Influenza A Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma-ping Deng; Zhi-hong Hu; Hua-lin Wang; Fei Deng

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is a continuous and severe global threat to mankind.The continuously re-emerging disease gives rise to thousands of deaths and enormous economic losses each year,which emphasizes the urgency and necessity to develop high-quality influenza vaccines in a safer,more efficient and economic way.The influenza subunit and VLP vaccines,taking the advantage of recombinant DNA technologies and expression system platforms,can be produced in such an ideal way.This review summarized the recent advancements in the research and development of influenza subunit and VLP vaccines based on the recombinant expression of hemagglutinin antigen (HA),neuraminidase antigen (NA),Matrix 2 protein (M2) and nucleocapsid protein (NP).It would help to get insight into the current stage of influenza vaccines,and suggest the future design and development of novel influenza vaccines.

  14. Influenza vaccination coverage among medical residents: an Italian multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Claudio; Mazzucco, Walter; Azzolini, Elena; Baldini, Cesare; Bergomi, Margherita; Biafiore, Alessio Daniele; Bianco, Manuela; Borsari, Lucia; Cacciari, Paolo; Cadeddu, Chiara; Camia, Paola; Carluccio, Eugenia; Conti, Andrea; De Waure, Chiara; Di Gregori, Valentina; Fabiani, Leila; Fallico, Roberto; Filisetti, Barbara; Flacco, Maria E; Franco, Elisabetta; Furnari, Roberto; Galis, Veronica; Gallea, Maria R; Gallone, Maria F; Gallone, Serena; Gelatti, Umberto; Gilardi, Francesco; Giuliani, Anna R; Grillo, Orazio C; Lanati, Niccolò; Mascaretti, Silvia; Mattei, Antonella; Micò, Rocco; Morciano, Laura; Nante, Nicola; Napoli, Giuseppe; Nobile, Carmelo Giuseppe; Palladino, Raffaele; Parisi, Salvatore; Passaro, Maria; Pelissero, Gabriele; Quarto, Michele; Ricciardi, Walter; Romano, Gabriele; Rustico, Ennio; Saponari, Anita; Schioppa, Francesco S; Signorelli, Carlo; Siliquini, Roberta; Trabacchi, Valeria; Triassi, Maria; Varetta, Alessia; Ziglio, Andrea; Zoccali, Angela; Vitale, Francesco; Amodio, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recognized to be safe and effective, recent studies have confirmed that immunization coverage among health care workers remain generally low, especially among medical residents (MRs). Aim of the present multicenter study was to investigate attitudes and determinants associated with acceptance of influenza vaccination among Italian MRs. A survey was performed in 2012 on MRs attending post-graduate schools of 18 Italian Universities. Each participant was interviewed via an anonymous, self-administered, web-based questionnaire including questions on attitudes regarding influenza vaccination. A total of 2506 MRs were recruited in the survey and 299 (11.9%) of these stated they had accepted influenza vaccination in 2011-2012 season. Vaccinated MRs were older (P = 0.006), working in clinical settings (P = 0.048), and vaccinated in the 2 previous seasons (P<0.001 in both seasons). Moreover, MRs who had recommended influenza vaccination to their patients were significantly more compliant with influenza vaccination uptake in 2011-2012 season (P<0.001). "To avoid spreading influenza among patients" was recognized as the main reason for accepting vaccination by less than 15% of vaccinated MRs. Italian MRs seem to have a very low compliance with influenza vaccination and they seem to accept influenza vaccination as a habit that is unrelated to professional and ethical responsibility. Otherwise, residents who refuse vaccination in the previous seasons usually maintain their behaviors. Promoting correct attitudes and good practice in order to improve the influenza immunization rates of MRs could represent a decisive goal for increasing immunization coverage among health care workers of the future.

  15. Influenza Vaccination Among US Children With Asthma, 2005-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Alan E; Ahrens, Katherine A; Akinbami, Lara J

    2016-01-01

    Children with asthma face higher risk of complications from influenza. Trends in influenza vaccination among children with asthma are unknown. We used 2005-2013 National Health Interview Survey data for children 2 to 17 years of age. We assessed, separately for children with and without asthma, any vaccination (received August through May) during each of the 2005-2006 through 2012-2013 influenza seasons and, for the 2010-2011 through 2012-2013 seasons only, early vaccination (received August through October). We used April-July interviews each year (n = 31,668) to assess vaccination during the previous influenza season. Predictive margins from logistic regression with time as the independent and vaccination status as the dependent variable were used to assess time trends. We also estimated the association between several sociodemographic variables and the likelihood of influenza vaccination. From 2005 to 2013, among children with asthma, influenza vaccination receipt increased about 3 percentage points per year (P children with asthma vaccinated by October (early vaccination) was slightly above 30% in 2012-2013. In 2010-2013, adolescents, the uninsured, children of parents with some college education, and those living in the Midwest, South, and West were less likely to be vaccinated. The percentage of children 2 to 17 years of age with asthma receiving influenza vaccination has increased since 2004-2005, reaching approximately 55% in 2012-2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Genetic Reassortment Among the Influenza Viruses (Avian Influenza, Human Influenza and Swine Influenza in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a hazardous virus and harm to respiratory tract. The virus infect birds, pigs, horses, dogs, mammals and humans. Pigs are important hosts in ecology of the influenza virus because they have two receptors, namely NeuAc 2,3Gal and NeuAc 2,6Gal which make the pigs are sensitive to infection of influenza virus from birds and humans and genetic reassortment can be occurred. Classical swine influenza H1N1 viruses had been circulated in pigs in North America and other countries for 80 years. In 1998, triple reassortant H3N2 swine influenza viruses that contains genes of human influenza A virus (H3N2, swine influenza virus (H1N1 and avian influenza are reported as cause an outbreaks in pigs in North America. Furthermore, the circulation of triple reassortant H3N2 swine influenza virus resulting reassortant H1N1 swine influenza and reassortant H1N2 swine influenza viruses cause infection in humans. Humans who were infected by triple reassortant swine influenza A virus (H1N1 usually made direct contact with pigs. Although without any clinical symptoms, pigs that are infected by triple reassortant swine influenza A (H1N1 can transmit infection to the humans around them. In June 2009, WHO declared that pandemic influenza of reassortant H1N1 influenza A virus (novel H1N1 has reached phase 6. In Indonesia until 2009, there were 1005 people were infected by H1N1 influenza A and 5 of them died. Novel H1N1 and H5N1 viruses have been circulated in humans and pigs in Indonesia. H5N1 reassortant and H1N1 viruses or the seasonal flu may could arise because of genetic reassortment between avian influenza and humans influenza viruses that infect pigs together.

  17. Year-and-a-Half Old, Dried Echinacea Roots Retain Cytokine-Modulating Capabilities in an in vitro Human Older Adult Model of Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchina, David S.; Wu, Lankun; Flinn, Gina N.; Konopka, Del N.; McCoy, Joe-Ann; Widrelechner, Mark P.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Kohut, Marian L.

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol tinctures prepared from aged Echinacea roots are typically taken for preventing or treating upper respiratory infections, as they are purported to stimulate immunity in this context. The effects of long-term (> 1 year) dry storage on the capabilities of Echinacea spp. roots from mature individuals to modulate cytokine production are unknown. Using an older human adult model of influenza vaccination, we collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects 6 months post-vaccination and stimulated them in vitro with the two Type A influenza viruses contained in the trivalent 2004–2005 vaccine with a 50% alcohol tincture prepared from the roots of one of seven Echinacea species: E. angustifolia, E. pallida, E. paradoxa, E. purpurea, E. sanguinea, E. simulata, and E. tennesseensis. Before being processed into extracts, all roots had been stored under dry conditions for sixteen months. Cells were cultured for 48 hours; following incubation, supernatants were collected and assayed for interleukin-2, interleukin-10, and interferon-γ production, cytokines important in the immune response to viral infection. Four species (E. angustifolia, E. purpurea, E. simulata, E. tennesseensis) augmented IL-10 production, diminished IL-2 production, and had no effect on IFN-γ production. Echinacea pallida suppressed production of all cytokines; E. paradoxa and E. sanguinea behaved similarly, although to a lesser extent. The results from these in vitro bioactivity assays indicate that dried Echinacea roots stored for sixteen months maintain cytokine-modulating capacities. Our data support and extend previous research and indicate that tinctures from different Echinacea species have different patterns of immune modulation; further, they indicate that certain species may be efficacious in the immune response to viral infection. PMID:17021999

  18. Suitability of PER.C6 cells to generate epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccine strains by reverse genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, W.; Hartgroves, L.; Havenga, M.; Legastelois, I.; Ophorst, C.; Siewerts, M.; Zuijdgeest, D.; Vogels, R.; Custers, J.; Boer-Luijtze, E. de; Leeuw, O. de; Cornelissen, L.; Goudsmit, J.; Barclay, W.

    2009-01-01

    Reverse genetics, the generation of influenza viruses from cDNA, presents a rapid method for creating vaccine strains. The technique necessitates the use of cultured cells. Due to technical and regulatory requirements, the choice of cell lines for production of human influenza vaccines is limited. P

  19. Suitability of PER.C6 cells to generate epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccine strains by reverse genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, W.; Hartgroves, L.; Havenga, M.; Legastelois, I.; Ophorst, C.; Siewerts, M.; Zuijdgeest, D.; Vogels, R.; Custers, J.; Boer-Luijtze, E. de; Leeuw, O. de; Cornelissen, L.; Goudsmit, J.; Barclay, W.

    2009-01-01

    Reverse genetics, the generation of influenza viruses from cDNA, presents a rapid method for creating vaccine strains. The technique necessitates the use of cultured cells. Due to technical and regulatory requirements, the choice of cell lines for production of human influenza vaccines is limited. P

  20. Progress toward the development of universal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoft, Daniel F; Belshe, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    Influenza remains a major problem causing significant morbidity and mortality annually and periodic pandemics with the potential for 10-100 fold increased mortality. Conventional vaccines can be highly effective if generated each year to match currently circulating viruses. Ongoing research focuses on producing cross-protective vaccines that induce T cell and/ or antibody responses specific for highly conserved viral epitopes. The Saint Louis University Center for Vaccine Development (SLUCVD) is highly engaged in multiple efforts to generate universally relevant influenza vaccines.

  1. Establishment of pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity at Bio Farma, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhardono, Mahendra; Ugiyadi, Dori; Nurnaeni, Ida; Emelia, Imelda

    2011-07-01

    In Indonesia, avian influenza A(H5N1) virus started to spread in humans in June 2005, with an alarming case-fatality rate of more than 80%. Considering that global influenza vaccine production capacity would barely have covered 10% of the world's pandemic vaccine needs, and that countries with no production facilities or prearranged contracts would be without access to a vaccine, the Government of Indonesia embarked on a programme to increase its readiness for a future influenza pandemic. This included the domestic production of influenza vaccine, which was entrusted to Bio Farma. This health security strategy consists of developing trivalent influenza vaccine production capacity in order to be able to convert immediately to monovalent production of up to 20 million pandemic doses for the Indonesian market upon receipt of the seed strain from the World Health Organization (WHO). For this purpose, a dedicated production facility is being constructed within the Bio Farma premises in Bandung. As an initial stage of influenza vaccine development, imported seasonal influenza bulk has been formulated and filled in the Bio Farma facility. Following three consecutive batches and successful clinical trials, the product was licensed by the Indonesian National Regulatory Authority and distributed commercially for the Hajj programme in 2009. With continued support from its technology transfer partners, Bio Farma is now advancing with the development of upstream processes to produce its own bulk for seasonal and pandemic use.

  2. Recombinant Hemagglutinin and Virus-Like Particle Vaccines for H7N9 Influenza Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Pushko, Peter; Tretyakova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Cases of H7N9 human infection were caused by a novel, avian-origin H7N9 influenza A virus that emerged in eastern China in 2013. Clusters of human disease were identified in many cities in China, with mortality rates approaching 30%. Pandemic concerns were raised, as historically, influenza pandemics were caused by introduction of novel influenza A viruses into immunologically naïve human population. Currently, there are no approved human vaccines for H7N9 viruses. Recombinant protein vaccine approaches have advantages in safety and manufacturing. In this review, we focused on evaluation of the expression of recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA) proteins as candidate vaccines for H7N9 influenza, with the emphasis on the role of oligomeric and particulate structures in immunogenicity and protection. Challenges in preparation of broadly protective influenza vaccines are discussed, and examples of broadly protective vaccines are presented including rHA stem epitope vaccines, as well as recently introduced experimental multi-HA VLP vaccines. PMID:26523241

  3. Changes in and shortcomings of control strategies, drug stockpiles, and vaccine development during outbreaks of avian influenza A H5N1, H1N1, and H7N9 among humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Song, Peipei; Tang, Qi; Shan, Ke; Tobe, Ruoyan Gai; Selotlegeng, Lesego; Ali, Asghar Hammad; Cheng, Yangyang; Xu, Lingzhong

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a reference for the future prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases by summarizing the control strategies, the status of drugs and vaccines, and shortcomings during three major outbreaks of avian influenza among humans (H5N1 in 2003, H1N1 in 2009, and H7N9 in 2013). Data on and documents regarding the three influenza outbreaks have been reviewed. Results indicated that the response to pandemic influenza outbreaks has improved markedly in terms of control strategies, stockpiles of antivirals, and vaccine development. These improvements also suggest advances in disease surveillance, transparency in reporting, and regional collaboration and cooperation. These trends also foreshadow better prospects for prevention and control of emerging infectious diseases. However, there are shortcomings since strategies failed to focus on high-risk groups, quantitative and measurable results (both direct and indirect) were unclear, and quantitative assessment is still lacking.

  4. Evaluating the immunogenicity and safety of a BiondVax-developed universal influenza vaccine (Multimeric-001) either as a standalone vaccine or as a primer to H5N1 influenza vaccine : Phase IIb study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Eva; Liu, Heng; Ben-Yedidia, Tamar; Hassin, Shimon; Visontai, Ildiko; Norley, Stephen; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hak, Eelko

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Influenza is a major respiratory viral infection of humans with high mortality and morbidity rates and profound economic impact. Although influenza vaccines are generally updated yearly to match the viruses expected in the coming season, genetic mutation and reassortment can result in

  5. The road to a more effective influenza vaccine: Up to date studies and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kaori; Ainai, Akira; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2017-09-25

    Influenza virus causes an acute respiratory infection in humans. Frequent point mutations in the influenza genome and occasional exchange of genetic segments between virus strains help the virus evade the pre-existing immunity, resulting in epidemics and pandemics. Although vaccination is the most effective intervention, mismatches between circulating viruses and vaccine strains reduce vaccine efficacy. Furthermore, current injectable vaccines induce IgG antibodies in serum (which limit progression of influenza symptoms) but not secretory IgA antibodies in the respiratory mucosa (which prevent virus infection efficiently). Therefore, numerous studies have attempted to improve influenza vaccines. The discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies has progressed research into antigen design. Studies designed to improve vaccine efficacy by changing the vaccine administration route have also been conducted. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the action of various vaccines is essential if we are to develop a universal influenza vaccine. Therefore, evaluating the quality and quantity of antibodies induced by vaccines, which determine vaccine efficacy, is critical. However, at present vaccine evaluation relies on hemagglutination inhibition tests, which only measure the quantity of antibody produced. Antibody repertoires comprise a set of antibodies with specific genetic or molecular features that correspond to their functions. Genetically and functionally similar antibodies may be produced by multiple individuals exposed to an identical stimulus. Therefore, it may be possible to evaluate and compare multiple vaccine strategies in terms of the quality and quantity of an antibody response induced by a vaccine by examining antibody repertoires. Recent studies have used single cell expression and high-throughput immunoglobulin sequencing to provide a detailed picture of antibody responses. These novel methods may be critical for detailed characterization of

  6. Examination of influenza specific T cell responses after influenza virus challenge in individuals vaccinated with MVA-NP+M1 vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Powell

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines stimulate neutralising antibody to the haemagglutinin antigen but as there is antigenic drift in HA it is difficult to prepare a vaccine in advance against an emergent strain. A potential strategy is to induce CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells that recognize epitopes within internal proteins that are less subject to antigenic drift. Augmenting humoral responses to HA with T cell responses to more conserved antigens may result in a more broadly protective vaccine. In this study, we evaluate the quality of influenza specific T cell responses in a clinical trial using MVA-NP+M1 vaccination followed by influenza virus challenge. In vaccinated volunteers, the expression of Granzyme A, Perforin and CD57 on influenza HLA A*02 M158-66 antigen specific cells was higher than non-vaccinated volunteers before and after challenge despite a similar frequency of antigen specific cells. BCL2 expression was lower in vaccinated volunteers. These data indicate that antigen specific T cells are a useful additional measure for use in human vaccination or immunization studies.

  7. Impact of vaccines and vaccination on global control of avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayne, David E

    2012-12-01

    There are 30 recorded epizootics of H5 or H7 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) from 1959 to early 2012. The largest of these epizootics, affecting more birds and countries than the other 29 epizootics combined, has been the H5N1 HPAI, which began in Guangdong China in 1996, and has killed or resulted in culling of over 250 million poultry and/or wild birds in 63 countries. Most countries have used stamping-out programs in poultry to eradicate H5N1 HPAI. However, 15 affected countries have utilized vaccination as a part of the control strategy. Greater than 113 billion doses were used from 2002 to 2010. Five countries have utilized nationwide routine vaccination programs, which account for 99% of vaccine used: 1) China (90.9%), 2) Egypt (4.6%), 3) Indonesia (2.3%), 4) Vietnam (1.4%), and 5) Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (emergency vaccination programs. Inactivated AI vaccines have accounted for 95.5% of vaccine used, and live recombinant virus vaccines have accounted for 4.5% of vaccine used. The latter are primarily recombinant Newcastle disease vectored vaccine with H5 influenza gene insert. China, Indonesia, Egypt, and Vietnam implemented vaccination after H5N1 HPAI became enzootic in domestic poultry. Bangladesh and eastern India have enzootic H5N1 HPAI and have not used vaccination in their control programs. Clinical disease and mortality have been prevented in chickens, human cases have been reduced, and rural livelihoods and food security have been maintained by using vaccines during HPAI outbreaks. However, field outbreaks have occurred in vaccinating countries, primarily because of inadequate coverage in the target species, but vaccine failures have occurred following antigenic drift in field viruses within China, Egypt, Indonesia, Hong Kong, and Vietnam. The primary strategy for HPAI and H5/H7 low pathogenicity notifiable avian influenza control will continue to be immediate eradication using a four-component strategy: 1) education, 2

  8. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination of the elderly in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yeong-Hwang; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Chou, Chih-Chieh; Su, Wen-Lin; Loh, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shih-Ha

    2004-07-29

    In 1998, Taiwan became the first country in Asia to provide free influenza vaccination to high-risk groups, mainly the elderly. The purpose of this study is to determine: (1) the annual mortality rate from influenza and pneumococcal-related illnesses such as pneumonia, chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema and asthma and (2) the effectiveness of and adverse events associated with the influenza vaccination. In the elderly, influenza vaccination caused the annual death rate due chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema, and asthma to decline steadily but had no effect on the annual pneumonia death rate. The only adverse effect of concern was vertigo (in approximately 2-3%).

  9. Cell culture based production of avian influenza vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielink, van R.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination of poultry can be used as a tool to control outbreaks of avian influenza, including that of highly pathogenic H5 and H7 strains. Influenza vaccines are traditionally produced in embryonated chicken eggs. Continuous cell lines have been suggested as an alternative substrate to produce inf

  10. Cell culture based production of avian influenza vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielink, van R.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination of poultry can be used as a tool to control outbreaks of avian influenza, including that of highly pathogenic H5 and H7 strains. Influenza vaccines are traditionally produced in embryonated chicken eggs. Continuous cell lines have been suggested as an alternative substrate to produce

  11. Impact of influenza vaccination on mortality risk among the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenwold, R. H. H.; Hoes, A. W.; Hak, E.

    2009-01-01

    Estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness have mostly been derived from nonrandomised studies and therefore are potentially confounded. The aim of the current study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness in preventing mortality among the elderly, taking both measured and unmeasured confo

  12. Influenza vaccination in kids, are you kidding me?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahout, I.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Groot, R. de

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal influenza infections cause a high burden of disease for the whole community every year. Effective vaccines are available and used worldwide in adults and children. Discussion is ongoing as to whether influenza vaccination for children should be implemented in the National Immunization Progr

  13. Influenza vaccine effectiveness during the 2012 influenza season in Victoria, Australia: influences of waning immunity and vaccine match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sheena G; Komadina, Naomi; Grant, Kristina; Jelley, Lauren; Papadakis, Georgina; Kelly, Heath

    2014-06-01

    Vaccine effectiveness may wane with increasing time since vaccination. This analysis used the Victorian sentinel general practitioner (GP) network to estimate vaccine effectiveness for trivalent inactivated vaccines in the 2012 season. A test-negative design was used where patients presenting to GPs with influenza-like illness who tested positive for influenza were cases and noncases were those who tested negative. Vaccination status was recorded by GPs. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated as (1-odds ratio) × 100%. Estimates were compared early versus late in the season and by time since vaccination. Virus isolates were assessed antigenically by hemagglutination inhibition assay in a selection of positive samples and viruses from healthy adults who experienced a vaccine breakthrough were analyzed genetically. The adjusted vaccine effectiveness estimate for any type of influenza was 45% (95% CI: 8,66) and for influenza A(H3) was 35% (95% CI: -11,62). A non-significant effect of waning effectiveness by time since vaccination was observed for A(H3). For those vaccinated influenza vaccine provided moderate protection against influenza and showed limited evidence for waning effectiveness. Antigenic and genetic data can provide additional insight into understanding these estimates.

  14. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... pig. The requirements for general safety for inactivated influenza vaccine shall not be considered...

  15. Influenza-vaccination: an inventory of strategies to reach the target population and optimise vaccination uptake.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroneman, M.; Paget, J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Influenza continues to be a considerable health problem of the populations in Europe. Complications of influenza are especially present in elderly patients and patients with chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disorders and respiratory disorders. Vaccination is an effective

  16. Planning and executing a vaccination campaign against avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, S; Cristalli, A; Busani, L

    2007-01-01

    Vaccination against avian influenza infection caused by H5 or H7 virus subtypes has been used on several occasions in recent years to control and in some cases eradicate the disease. In order to contain avian influenza infection effectively, immunization should be combined with a coordinated set of control and monitoring measures. The outcome of an immunization campaign depends on the territorial strategy; whereas the capacity of the veterinary services in developed countries permits enforcement of strategies aimed at eradicating avian influenza, many countries currently affected by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses have a limited veterinary infrastructure and a limited capacity to respond to such epidemics. In these countries, resources are still insufficient to conduct adequate surveillance for identification and reaction to avian influenza outbreaks when they occur. When properly applied in this scenario, immunization can reduce mortality and production losses. In the long term, immunization might also decrease the prevalence of infection to levels at which stamping-out and surveillance can be applied. Countries should adapt their immunization programmes to local conditions in order to guarantee their efficacy and sustainability. In the initial emergency phase, human resources can be mobilized, with reliance on personal responsibility and motivation, thus compensating for potential shortcomings in organization. A more appropriate allocation of resources must be pursued in the long term, remembering that biosecurity is the main component of an exit strategy and must always be improved.

  17. Adenovirus-based vaccines against avian-origin H5N1 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Biao; Zheng, Bo-jian; Wang, Qian; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Since 1997, human infection with avian H5N1, having about 60% mortality, has posed a threat to public health. In this review, we describe the epidemiology of H5N1 transmission, advantages and disadvantages of different influenza vaccine types, and characteristics of adenovirus, finally summarizing advances in adenovirus-based H5N1 systemic and mucosal vaccines.

  18. Evaluation of Three Live Attenuated H2 Pandemic Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Mice and Ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Grace L.; Lamirande, Elaine W.; Cheng, Xing; Torres-Velez, Fernando; Orandle, Marlene; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT H2 influenza viruses have not circulated in humans since 1968, and therefore a significant portion of the population would be susceptible to infection should H2 influenza viruses reemerge. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in avian reservoirs worldwide, and these reservoirs are a potential source from which these viruses could emerge. Three reassortant cold-adapted (ca) H2 pandemic influenza vaccine candidates with hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes derived from the wild-type A/Japan/305/1957 (H2N2) (Jap/57), A/mallard/6750/1978 (H2N2) (mal/78), or A/swine/MO/4296424/2006 (H2N3) (sw/06) viruses and the internal protein gene segments from the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca virus were generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics (Jap/57 ca, mal/78 ca, and sw/06 ca, respectively). The vaccine candidates exhibited the in vitro phenotypes of temperature sensitivity and cold adaptation and were restricted in replication in the respiratory tract of ferrets. In mice and ferrets, the vaccines elicited neutralizing antibodies and conferred protection against homologous wild-type virus challenge. Of the three candidates, the sw/06 ca vaccine elicited cross-reactive antibodies and provided significant protection against the greatest number of heterologous viruses. These observations suggest that the sw/06 ca vaccine should be further evaluated in a clinical trial as an H2 pandemic influenza vaccine candidate. IMPORTANCE Influenza pandemics arise when novel influenza viruses are introduced into a population with little prior immunity to the new virus and often result in higher rates of illness and death than annual seasonal influenza epidemics. An influenza H2 subtype virus caused a pandemic in 1957, and H2 viruses circulated in humans till 1968. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in birds, and the development of an H2 influenza vaccine candidate is therefore considered a priority in preparing for future pandemics. However, we cannot predict whether a

  19. Influence of sources of information about influenza vaccine on parental attitudes and adolescent vaccine receipt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Lisa M; Underwood, Natasha L; Sales, Jessica M; Seib, Katherine; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M

    2015-01-01

    In 2011-2012, only 34% of 13-17 years olds in the United States (US) received seasonal influenza vaccine. Little is known about the link between parents' sources of health information, their vaccine-related attitudes, and vaccination of their adolescent against influenza. This study seeks to determine the relationship between number of sources of information on influenza vaccine, parental attitudes toward influenza vaccine, and influenza vaccine uptake in adolescents. We conducted a telephone and web-based survey among US parents of students enrolled in 6 middle and 5 high schools in Georgia. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to examine associations between the number of information sources about influenza vaccine and vaccine receipt and whether parent vaccine-related attitudes act as a mediator. The most commonly reported sources of information were: a physician/medical professional (95.0%), a family member or friend (80.6%), and television (77.2%). Parents who had higher attitude scores toward influenza vaccine were 5 times as likely to report their adolescent had ever received influenza vaccine compared to parents who had lower attitude scores (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.1; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 3.1-8.4; P sources of information and vaccine receipt. In light of the low response rate and participation in an adolescent vaccination intervention, findings may not be generalizable to other populations. This study shows the importance of multiple sources of information in influencing parental decision-making about influenza vaccine for adolescents. Harnessing the power of mass media and family members and friends as health advocates for influenza vaccination can potentially help increase vaccination coverage of adolescents.

  20. Efficacy of a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus vaccine in pigs against the pandemic influenza virus is superior to commercially available swine influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, W L A; Stockhofe, N; Weesendorp, E; van Zoelen-Bos, D; Heutink, R; Quak, S; Goovaerts, D; Heldens, J G M; Maas, R; Moormann, R J; Koch, G

    2011-09-28

    In April 2009 a new influenza A/H1N1 strain, currently named "pandemic (H1N1) influenza 2009" (H1N1v), started the first official pandemic in humans since 1968. Several incursions of this virus in pig herds have also been reported from all over the world. Vaccination of pigs may be an option to reduce exposure of human contacts with infected pigs, thereby preventing cross-species transfer, but also to protect pigs themselves, should this virus cause damage in the pig population. Three swine influenza vaccines, two of them commercially available and one experimental, were therefore tested and compared for their efficacy against an H1N1v challenge. One of the commercial vaccines is based on an American classical H1N1 influenza strain, the other is based on a European avian H1N1 influenza strain. The experimental vaccine is based on reassortant virus NYMC X179A (containing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1v) and the internal genes of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1)). Excretion of infectious virus was reduced by 0.5-3 log(10) by the commercial vaccines, depending on vaccine and sample type. Both vaccines were able to reduce virus replication especially in the lower respiratory tract, with less pathological lesions in vaccinated and subsequently challenged pigs than in unvaccinated controls. In pigs vaccinated with the experimental vaccine, excretion levels of infectious virus in nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, were at or below 1 log(10)TCID(50) per swab and lasted for only 1 or 2 days. An inactivated vaccine containing the HA and NA of an H1N1v is able to protect pigs from an infection with H1N1v, whereas swine influenza vaccines that are currently available are of limited efficaciousness. Whether vaccination of pigs against H1N1v will become opportune remains to be seen and will depend on future evolution of this strain in the pig population. Close monitoring of the pig population, focussing on presence and evolution of

  1. Effectiveness of 2010/2011 seasonal influenza vaccine in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barret, A S

    2012-02-01

    We conducted a case-control study to estimate the 2010\\/2011 trivalent influenza vaccine effectiveness (TIVE) using the Irish general practitioners\\' influenza sentinel surveillance scheme. Cases were influenza-like illness (ILI) patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza. Controls were ILI patients who tested negative for influenza. Participating sentinel general practitioners (GP) collected swabs from patients presenting with ILI along with their vaccination history and other individual characteristics. The TIVE was computed as (1 - odds ratiofor vaccination) x100%. Of 60 sentinel GP practices, 22 expressed interest in participating in the study and 17 (28%) recruited at least one ILI patient. In the analysis, we included 106 cases and 85 controls. Seven controls (8.2%) and one influenza case (0.9%) had been vaccinated in 2010\\/2011. The estimated TIVE against any influenza subtype was 89.4% [95% CI: 13.8; 99.8%], suggesting a protective effect against GP-attended laboratory confirmed influenza. This study design could be used to monitor influenza vaccine effectiveness annually but sample size and vaccination coverage should be increased to obtain precise and adjusted estimates.

  2. Evaluation of in vitro cross-reactivity to avian H5N1 and pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza following prime boost regimens of seasonal influenza vaccination in healthy human subjects: a randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Bethell

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have demonstrated that inactivated seasonal influenza vaccines (IIV may elicit production of heterosubtypic antibodies, which can neutralize avian H5N1 virus in a small proportion of subjects. We hypothesized that prime boost regimens of live and inactivated trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines (LAIV and IIV would enhance production of heterosubtypic immunity and provide evidence of cross-protection against other influenza viruses. METHODS: In an open-label study, 26 adult volunteers were randomized to receive one of four vaccine regimens containing two doses of 2009-10 seasonal influenza vaccines administered 8 (±1 weeks apart: 2 doses of LAIV; 2 doses of IIV; LAIV then IIV; IIV then LAIV. Humoral immunity assays for avian H5N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1, and seasonal vaccine strains were performed on blood collected pre-vaccine and 2 and 4 weeks later. The percentage of cytokine-producing T-cells was compared with baseline 14 days after each dose. RESULTS: Subjects receiving IIV had prompt serological responses to vaccine strains. Two subjects receiving heterologous prime boost regimens had enhanced haemagglutination inhibition (HI and neutralization (NT titres against pH1N1, and one subject against avian H5N1; all three had pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies detected at baseline. Significantly elevated titres to H5N1 and pH1N1 by neuraminidase inhibition (NI assay were observed following LAIV-IIV administration. Both vaccines elicited cross-reactive CD4+ T-cell responses to nucleoprotein of avian H5N1 and pH1N1. All regimens were safe and well tolerated. CONCLUSION: Neither homologous nor heterologous prime boost immunization enhanced serum HI and NT titres to 2009 pH1N1 or avian H5N1 compared to single dose vaccine. However heterologous prime-boost vaccination did lead to in vitro evidence of cross-reactivity by NI; the significance of this finding is unclear. These data support the strategy of

  3. A dual purpose universal influenza vaccine candidate confers protective immunity against anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo, Maria T; Li, Junwei; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Navarro, Ashley; Wu, Lihong; Yan, Yongyong; Zeng, Mingtao

    2017-03-01

    Preventive influenza vaccines must be reformulated annually because of antigen shift and drift of circulating influenza viral strains. However, seasonal vaccines do not always match the circulating strains, and there is the ever-present threat that avian influenza viruses may adapt to humans. Hence, a universal influenza vaccine is needed to provide protective immunity against a broad range of influenza viruses. We designed an influenza antigen consisting of three tandem M2e repeats plus HA2, in combination with a detoxified anthrax oedema toxin delivery system (EFn plus PA) to enhance immune responses. The EFn-3×M2e-HA2 plus PA vaccine formulation elicited robust, antigen-specific, IgG responses; and was protective against heterologous influenza viral challenge when intranasally delivered to mice three times. Moreover, use of the detoxified anthrax toxin system as an adjuvant had the additional benefit of generating protective immunity against anthrax. Hence, this novel vaccine strategy could potentially address two major emerging public health and biodefence threats. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A synthetic adjuvant to enhance and expand immune responses to influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coler, Rhea N; Baldwin, Susan L; Shaverdian, Narek; Bertholet, Sylvie; Reed, Steven J; Raman, Vanitha S; Lu, Xiuhua; DeVos, Joshua; Hancock, Kathy; Katz, Jacqueline M; Vedvick, Thomas S; Duthie, Malcolm S; Clegg, Christopher H; Van Hoeven, Neal; Reed, Steven G

    2010-10-27

    Safe, effective adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency, including induction of neutralizing Abs against a broad range of variant strains, is an important strategy for the development of seasonal influenza vaccines which can provide optimal protection, even during seasons when available vaccines are not well matched to circulating viruses. We investigated the safety and ability of Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE), a synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 agonist formulation, to adjuvant Fluzone® in mice and non-human primates. The GLA-SE adjuvanted Fluzone vaccine caused no adverse reactions, increased the induction of T helper type 1 (T(H)1)-biased cytokines such as IFNγ, TNF and IL-2, and broadened serological responses against drifted A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza variants. These results suggest that synthetic TLR4 adjuvants can enhance the magnitude and quality of protective immunity induced by influenza vaccines.

  5. A synthetic adjuvant to enhance and expand immune responses to influenza vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea N Coler

    Full Text Available Safe, effective adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency, including induction of neutralizing Abs against a broad range of variant strains, is an important strategy for the development of seasonal influenza vaccines which can provide optimal protection, even during seasons when available vaccines are not well matched to circulating viruses. We investigated the safety and ability of Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE, a synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR4 agonist formulation, to adjuvant Fluzone® in mice and non-human primates. The GLA-SE adjuvanted Fluzone vaccine caused no adverse reactions, increased the induction of T helper type 1 (T(H1-biased cytokines such as IFNγ, TNF and IL-2, and broadened serological responses against drifted A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza variants. These results suggest that synthetic TLR4 adjuvants can enhance the magnitude and quality of protective immunity induced by influenza vaccines.

  6. CAF01 potentiates immune responses and efficacy of an inactivated influenza vaccine in ferrets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Agger, Else Marie; Poulsen, Julie Juul;

    2011-01-01

    Trivalent inactivated vaccines (TIV) against influenza are given to 350 million people every year. Most of these are non-adjuvanted vaccines whose immunogenicity and protective efficacy are considered suboptimal. Commercially available non-adjuvanted TIV are known to elicit mainly a humoral immune...... the immunogenicity of the vaccine, with increased influenza-specific IgA and IgG levels. Additionally, CAF01 promoted cellular-mediated immunity as indicated by interferon-gamma expressing lymphocytes, measured by flow cytometry. CAF01 also enhanced the protection conferred by the vaccine by reducing the viral load...... measured in nasal washes by RT-PCR. Finally, CAF01 allowed for dose-reduction and led to higher levels of protection compared to TIV adjuvanted with a squalene emulsion. The data obtained in this human-relevant challenge model supports the potential of CAF01 in future influenza vaccines....

  7. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hib Vaccine ( Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in Spanish and other languages. See www. immunize. ...

  8. Influenza virus vaccination and kidney graft rejection: causality or coincidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anne Sophie Lind; Møller, Bjarne Kuno; Krag, Søren; Jespersen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Influenza can cause significant morbidity and mortality in renal transplant recipients especially with a high rate of lower respiratory disease. Annual influenza vaccination is therefore recommended to renal transplant recipients. We report the first three cases of acute kidney injury in renal transplant recipients following influenza vaccination that all led to graft loss. They all had different native diseases and were all vaccinated in the same season of 2009–10. The time span from vaccination to decline of kidney function is shorter than the time to diagnosis since the three patients only had blood tests every 3 months or when symptoms became severe. These reports do not justify a change of current recommendations regarding influenza vaccination in renal transplant recipients, but they support the continued attention and registration of vaccinations to monitor side effects. PMID:26034595

  9. Optimal timing of influenza vaccination in patients with human immunodeficiency virus: a Markov cohort model based on serial study participant hemoagglutination inhibition titers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werker, Gregory R; Sharif, Behnam; Sun, Huiying; Cooper, Curtis; Bansback, Nick; Anis, Aslam H

    2014-02-03

    Seasonal influenza vaccination offers one of the best population-level protections against influenza-like illness (ILI). For most people, a single dose prior to the flu season offers adequate immunogenicity. HIV+ patients, however, tend to exhibit a shorter period of clinical protection, and therefore may not retain immunogenicity for the entire season. Building on the work of Nosyk et al. (2011) that determined a single dose is the optimal dosing strategy for HIV+ patients, we investigate the optimal time to administer this vaccination. Using data from the "single dose" treatment arm of an RCT conducted at 12 CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network sites we estimated semimonthly clinical seroprotection levels for a cohort (N=93) based on HAI titer levels. These estimates were combined with CDC attack rate data for the three main strains of seasonal influenza to estimate instances of ILI over different vaccination timing strategies. Using bootstrap resampling of the cohort, nine years of CDC data, and parameter distributions, we developed a Markov cohort model that included probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Cost, quality adjusted life-years (QALYs), and net monetary benefits are presented for each timing strategy. The beginning of December is the optimal time for HIV+ patients to receive the seasonal influenza vaccine. Assuming a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000, the net monetary benefit associated with a Dec 1 vaccination date is $19,501.49 and the annual QALY was 0.833744. Our results support a policy of administering the seasonal influenza vaccination for this population in the middle of November or beginning of December, assuming nothing is know about the upcoming flu season. But because the difference in between this strategy and the CDC guideline is small-12 deaths averted per year and a savings of $60 million across the HIV+ population in the US-more research is needed concerning strategies for subpopulations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. Annually repeated influenza vaccination improves humoral responses to several influenza virus strains in healthy elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. de Bruijn (Iris); E.J. Remarque (Edmond); W.E.Ph. Beyer (Walter); S. le Cessie (Saskia); N. Masurel (Nic); G.L. Ligthart (Gerard)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe benefit of annually repeated influenza vaccination on antibody formation is still under debate. In this study the effect of annually repeated influenza vaccination on haemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody formation in the elderly is investigated. Between 1990 and 1993 healthy yo

  11. Reasons for not having received influenza vaccination and its predictors in Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y

    2012-08-01

    had an influenza vaccination previously, the primary reason for not having an influenza vaccination in the last year was “Have not gotten around to it.”Conclusions: More than two-thirds of Canadians 12+ years of age did not receive an influenza vaccination in the past year, and “Respondent did not think it necessary” and “Have not gotten around to it” were the main reasons.Keywords: Canada, flu shot, human, influenza, survey, vaccination

  12. Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness against Hospitalisation with Confirmed Influenza in the 2010–11 Seasons: A Test-negative Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Allen C.; Mark Holmes; Irving, Louis B.; Simon G A Brown; Waterer, Grant W.; Korman, Tony M.; N Deborah Friedman; Sanjaya Senanayake; Dwyer, Dominic E; Stephen Brady; Grahame Simpson; Richard Wood-Baker; John Upham; David Paterson; Christine Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Immunisation programs are designed to reduce serious morbidity and mortality from influenza, but most evidence supporting the effectiveness of this intervention has focused on disease in the community or in primary care settings. We aimed to examine the effectiveness of influenza vaccination against hospitalisation with confirmed influenza. We compared influenza vaccination status in patients hospitalised with PCR-confirmed influenza with patients hospitalised with influenza-negative respirat...

  13. Influenza Vaccine Research funded by the European Commission FP7-Health-2013-Innovation-1 project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Heng; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Huckriede, Anke; van Doorn, Eva; Schmidt, Ed; Leroy, Odile; Rimmelzwaan, Guus; McCullough, Keneth; Whelan, Mike; Hak, Eelko

    2016-01-01

    Due to influenza viruses continuously displaying antigenic variation, current seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated annually to include the latest predicted strains. Despite all the efforts put into vaccine strain selection, vaccine production, testing, and administration, the protective effic

  14. The safety of influenza vaccines in children: An Institute for Vaccine Safety white paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Neal A; Talaat, Kawsar R; Greenbaum, Adena; Mensah, Eric; Dudley, Matthew Z; Proveaux, Tina; Salmon, Daniel A

    2015-12-30

    Most influenza vaccines are generally safe, but influenza vaccines can cause rare serious adverse events. Some adverse events, such as fever and febrile seizures, are more common in children than adults. There can be differences in the safety of vaccines in different populations due to underlying differences in genetic predisposition to the adverse event. Live attenuated vaccines have not been studied adequately in children under 2 years of age to determine the risks of adverse events; more studies are needed to address this and several other priority safety issues with all influenza vaccines in children. All vaccines intended for use in children require safety testing in the target age group, especially in young children. Safety of one influenza vaccine in children should not be extrapolated to assumed safety of all influenza vaccines in children. The low rates of adverse events from influenza vaccines should not be a deterrent to the use of influenza vaccines because of the overwhelming evidence of the burden of disease due to influenza in children.

  15. Polyarteritis nodosa related with influenza vaccine = Poliarteritis nodosa relacionada con vacuna contra la influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restrepo Escobar, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasculitis can be secondary to various processes, among them infections, malignancies, connective tissue diseases or medications, or primary, generally idiopathic. The reported adverse events after vaccination can be mild and transient or more serious such as autoimmune diseases. Possibly the most frequently described autoimmune phenomena after influenza vaccination are different forms of vasculitis. We report the case of a patient who presented a clinical picture of vasculitis classified as polyarteritis nodosa that began two weeks after receiving the influenza vaccine. After critically reviewing the literature, this would be the first clearly documented case of polyarteritis nodosa associated with vaccination against influenza.

  16. Usage of quadrivalent influenza vaccine among children in the United States, 2013-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Loren; Pabst, Laura J; Zhu, Liping; Chaves, Sandra S

    2015-11-27

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone ≥ 6 months in the U.S. During the 2013-14 influenza season, in addition to trivalent influenza vaccines, quadrivalent vaccines were available, protecting against two influenza A and two influenza B viruses. We analyzed 1,976,443 immunization records from six sentinel sites to compare influenza vaccine usage among children age 6 months-18 years. A total of 983,401 (49.8%) influenza vaccine doses administered were trivalent and 920,333 (46.6%) were quadrivalent (unknown type: 72,709). Quadrivalent vaccine administration varied by age and was least frequent among those <2 years of age.

  17. Influenza vaccination for healthcare workers: from a simple concept to a resistant issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Gaëtan

    2009-06-01

    Different strategies for the management of influenza epidemics are particularly important in elderly population. High morbidity and mortality rates are associated with influenza in the elderly, and annual vaccination against flu is considered to be the best cost-effective strategy. However, its efficiency is reduced in older adults and only half of them are protected. Several studies show that vaccinating healthcare workers is an efficient way of decreasing mortality rates in nursing home residents within influenza season. National and international public health authorities recommend therefore healthcare worker vaccinations for up to 5 years. However, influenza healthcare worker vaccination coverages are still low. Here we summarize data regarding the justification of healthcare worker vaccination, the efficiency of this strategy, the reasons of the reluctance of vaccination, the means and results of interventional programs and, then, focus on the debate of a mandatory healthcare worker influenza vaccination. Because several interventional programs are efficient but still need high financial and human support, only a strong political-will can improve this chosen strategy.

  18. A trivalent virus-like particle vaccine elicits protective immune responses against seasonal influenza strains in mice and ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted M Ross

    Full Text Available There is need for improved human influenza vaccines, particularly for older adults who are at greatest risk for severe disease, as well as to address the continuous antigenic drift within circulating human subtypes of influenza virus. We have engineered an influenza virus-like particle (VLP as a new generation vaccine candidate purified from the supernatants of Sf9 insect cells following infection by recombinant baculoviruses to express three influenza virus proteins, hemagglutinin (HA, neuraminidase (NA, and matrix 1 (M1. In this study, a seasonal trivalent VLP vaccine (TVV formulation, composed of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 and influenza B VLPs, was evaluated in mice and ferrets for the ability to elicit antigen-specific immune responses. Animals vaccinated with the TVV formulation had hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI antibody titers against all three homologous influenza virus strains, as well as HAI antibodies against a panel of heterologous influenza viruses. HAI titers elicited by the TVV were statistically similar to HAI titers elicited in animals vaccinated with the corresponding monovalent VLP. Mice vaccinated with the TVV had higher level of influenza specific CD8+ T cell responses than a commercial trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV. Ferrets vaccinated with the highest dose of the VLP vaccine and then challenged with the homologous H3N2 virus had the lowest titers of replicating virus in nasal washes and showed no signs of disease. Overall, a trivalent VLP vaccine elicits a broad array of immunity and can protect against influenza virus challenge.

  19. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  20. Vaccines for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: the Future Is Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2015-05-01

    Infections due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae result in enormous global morbidity in two clinical settings: otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recurrent otitis media affects up to 20% of children and results in hearing loss, delays in speech and language development and, in developing countries, chronic suppurative otitis media. Infections in people with COPD result in clinic and emergency room visits, hospital admissions, and respiratory failure. An effective vaccine would prevent morbidity, help control health care costs, and reduce antibiotic use, a major contributor to the global crisis in bacterial antibiotic resistance. The widespread use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is causing a relative increase in H. influenzae otitis media. The partial protection against H. influenzae otitis media induced by the pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine represents a proof of principle of the feasibility of a vaccine for nontypeable H. influenzae. An ideal vaccine antigen should be conserved among strains, have abundant epitopes on the bacterial surface, be immunogenic, and induce protective immune responses. Several surface proteins of H. influenzae have been identified as potential vaccine candidates and are in various stages of development. With continued research, progress toward a broadly effective vaccine to prevent infections caused by nontypeable H. influenzae is expected over the next several years.

  1. Rural parents' vaccination-related attitudes and intention to vaccinate middle and high school children against influenza following educational influenza vaccination intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Sales, Jessica M.; Painter, Julia E.; PAZOL, Karen; Gargano, Lisa M.; Orenstein, Walter; Hughes, James M.; Ralph J. DiClemente

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined changes in parental influenza vaccination attitudes and intentions after participating in school-based educational influenza vaccination intervention. Methods: Participants were drawn from three counties participating in a school-based influenza vaccination intervention in rural Georgia (baseline N=324; follow-up N=327). Data were collected pre- and post-intervention from phone surveys with parents’ with children attending middle- and high-school. Attitudes, bel...

  2. 75 FR 10268 - Pandemic Influenza Vaccines-Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Vaccines--Amendment Authority: 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d. ACTION: Notice of amendment to the September 28, 2009... and Emergency Preparedness Act for H5N1, H2, H6, H7, H9 and 2009-H1N1 Vaccines: Whereas there are or... September 28, 2009 declaration extended through February 28, 2010 for vaccines against influenza virus...

  3. School-Located Influenza Vaccinations: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Peter G; Schaffer, Stanley; Rand, Cynthia M; Vincelli, Phyllis; Eagan, Ashley; Goldstein, Nicolas P N; Hightower, A Dirk; Younge, Mary; Blumkin, Aaron; Albertin, Christina S; Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Humiston, Sharon G

    2016-11-01

    Assess impact of offering school-located influenza vaccination (SLIV) clinics using both Web-based and paper consent upon overall influenza vaccination rates among elementary school children. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial (stratified by suburban/urban districts) in upstate New York in 2014-2015. We randomized 44 elementary schools, selected similar pairs of schools within districts, and allocated schools to SLIV versus usual care (control). Parents of children at SLIV schools were sent information and vaccination consent forms via e-mail, backpack fliers, or both (depending on school preferences) regarding school vaccine clinics. Health department nurses conducted vaccine clinics and billed insurers. For all children registered at SLIV/control schools, we compared receipt of influenza vaccination anywhere (primary outcome). The 44 schools served 19 776 eligible children in 2014-2015. Children in SLIV schools had higher influenza vaccination rates than children in control schools county-wide (54.1% vs 47.4%, P vaccination in previous season) confirmed bivariate findings. Among parents who consented for SLIV, nearly half of those notified by backpack fliers and four-fifths of those notified by e-mail consented online. In suburban districts, SLIV did not substitute for primary care influenza vaccination. In urban schools, some substitution occurred. SLIV raised seasonal influenza vaccination rates county-wide and in both suburban and urban settings. SLIV did not substitute for primary care vaccinations in suburban settings where pediatricians often preorder influenza vaccine but did substitute somewhat in urban settings. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Deaths following influenza vaccination--background mortality or causal connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokia, Ehud S; Silverman, Barbara G; Green, Manfred; Kedem, Hagai; Guindy, Michal; Shemer, Joshua

    2007-12-12

    In October 2006, four deaths occurred in Israel shortly after influenza immunization, resulting in a temporary halt to the vaccination campaign. After an epidemiologic investigation, the Ministry of Health concluded that these deaths were not related to the vaccine itself and the campaign resumed; however, vaccine uptake was markedly reduced. Estimates of true background mortality in this high-risk population would aid in public education and quell unnecessary concerns regarding vaccine safety. We used data from a large HMO to estimate mortality in influenza vaccine recipients aged 55 and over during four consecutive winters (2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006). Date of immunization was ascertained from patient treatment files, vital status through Israeli National Insurance Institute data. We calculated crude death rates within 7, 14 and 30 days of influenza immunization, and used a Cox Proportional Hazards Model to estimate the risk of death within 14 days of vaccination, adjusting for age and comorbid conditions (age over 75, history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease, status as homebound patient) in 2006. The death rate among influenza vaccine recipients ranged from 0.01 to 0.02% within 7 days and 0.09-0.10% at 30 days. Influenza immunization was associated with a decreased risk of death within 14 days after adjustment for comorbidities (Hazard ratio, 0.33, 95% CI, 0.18-0.61). Our findings support the assumption that influenza vaccination is not associated with increased risk of death in the short term.

  5. Serological response to influenza vaccination among children vaccinated for multiple influenza seasons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Rafiq

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate if, among children aged 3 to 15 years, influenza vaccination for multiple seasons affects the proportion sero-protected. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants were 131 healthy children aged 3-15 years. Participants were vaccinated with trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV over the 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-8 seasons. Number of seasons vaccinated were categorized as one (2007-08; two (2007-08 and 2006-07 or 2007-08 and 2005-06 or three (2005-06, 2006-07, and 2007-08. Pre- and post-vaccination sera were collected four weeks apart. Antibody titres were determined by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI assay using antigens to A/Solomon Islands/03/06 (H1N1, A/Wisconsin/67/05 (H3N2 and B/Malaysia/2506/04. The proportions sero-protected were compared by number of seasons vaccinated using cut-points for seroprotection of 1:40 vs. 1:320. The proportions of children sero-protected against H1N1 and H3N2 was high (>85% regardless of number of seasons vaccinated and regardless of cut-point for seroprotection. For B Malaysia there was no change in proportions sero-protected by number of seasons vaccinated; however the proportions protected were lower than for H1N1 and H3N2, and there was a lower proportion sero-protected when the higher, compared to lower, cut-point was used for sero-protection. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The proportion of children sero-protected is not affected by number of seasons vaccinated.

  6. Bovine adenoviral vector-based H5N1 influenza vaccine overcomes exceptionally high levels of pre-existing immunity against human adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neetu; Pandey, Aseem; Jayashankar, Lakshmi; Mittal, Suresh K

    2008-05-01

    Because of the high prevalence of adenovirus (Ad) infections in humans, it is believed that pre-existing Ad-neutralizing antibodies (vector immunity) may negatively impact the immune response to vaccine antigens when delivered by human Ad (HAd) vectors. In order to evaluate whether bovine Ad subtype 3 (BAd3), a non-HAd vector, can effectively elude high levels of pre-existing vector immunity, naïve and HAd serotype 5 (HAd)-primed mice were immunized with BAd-H5HA [BAd3 vector expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H5N1 influenza virus]. Even in the presence of very high levels of HAd-specific neutralizing antibody, no significant reductions in HA-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were observed in HAd-primed mice immunized with BAd-H5HA. In naïve mice immunized with HAd-H5HA (HAd5 vector expressing H5N1 HA) and boosted with BAd-H5HA, the humoral responses elicited were significantly higher (P BAd-H5HA alone, while the CMI responses were comparable in the groups. This finding underlines the importance of a heterologous prime-boost approach for achieving an enhanced immune response. The immunization of naïve or HAd-primed mice with BAd-H5HA bestowed full protection from morbidity and mortality following a potentially lethal challenge with A/Hong Kong/483/97. These results demonstrate the importance of BAd vectors as an alternate or supplement to HAd vectors for influenza pandemic preparedness.

  7. Current Approaches for Diagnosis of Influenza Virus Infections in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Vikram Vemula

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advancement in vaccine and virus research, influenza continues to be a major public health concern. Each year in the United States of America, influenza viruses are responsible for seasonal epidemics resulting in over 200,000 hospitalizations and 30,000–50,000 deaths. Accurate and early diagnosis of influenza viral infections are critical for rapid initiation of antiviral therapy to reduce influenza related morbidity and mortality both during seasonal epidemics and pandemics. Several different approaches are currently available for diagnosis of influenza infections in humans. These include viral isolation in cell culture, immunofluorescence assays, nucleic acid amplification tests, immunochromatography-based rapid diagnostic tests, etc. Newer diagnostic approaches are being developed to overcome the limitations associated with some of the conventional detection methods. This review discusses diagnostic approaches currently available for detection of influenza viruses in humans.

  8. Sublingual immunization with M2-based vaccine induces broad protective immunity against influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Shik Shim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ectodomain of matrix protein 2 (M2e of influenza A virus is a rationale target antigen candidate for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza as M2e undergoes little sequence variation amongst human influenza A strains. Vaccine-induced M2e-specific antibodies (Abs have been shown to display significant cross-protective activity in animal models. M2e-based vaccine constructs have been shown to be more protective when administered by the intranasal (i.n. route than after parenteral injection. However, i.n. administration of vaccines poses rare but serious safety issues associated with retrograde passage of inhaled antigens and adjuvants through the olfactory epithelium. In this study, we examined whether the sublingual (s.l. route could serve as a safe and effective alternative mucosal delivery route for administering a prototype M2e-based vaccine. The mechanism whereby s.l. immunization with M2e vaccine candidate induces broad protection against infection with different influenza virus subtypes was explored. METHODS AND RESULTS: A recombinant M2 protein with three tandem copies of the M2e (3M2eC was expressed in Escherichia coli. Parenteral immunizations of mice with 3M2eC induced high levels of M2e-specific serum Abs but failed to provide complete protection against lethal challenge with influenza virus. In contrast, s.l. immunization with 3M2eC was superior for inducing protection in mice. In the latter animals, protection was associated with specific Ab responses in the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate that s.l. immunization with 3M2eC vaccine induced airway mucosal immune responses along with broad cross-protective immunity to influenza. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the M2-based vaccine approach to control epidemic and pandemic influenza infections.

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccine among HIV-infected adults: Conventional vaccine vs. intradermal vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yu Bin; Lee, Jacob; Song, Joon Young; Choi, Hee Jung; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported poor immune responses to conventional influenza vaccines in HIV-infected individuals. This study sought to elicit more potent immunogenicity in HIV-infected adults using an intradermal vaccine compared with a conventional intramuscular vaccine. This multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label study was conducted at 3 university hospitals during the 2011/2012 pre-influenza season. Three vaccines were used in HIV-infected adults aged 18 – 60 years: an inactivated intramuscular vaccine (Agrippal), a reduced-content intradermal vaccine (IDflu9μg) and a standard-content intradermal vaccine (IDflu15μg). Serum hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibodies and INF-γ ELISpot assay were measured at the time of vaccination and 1 month after vaccination. Adverse events were recorded for 7 d. A total of 28 Agrippal, 30 IDflu9μg, and 28 IDflu15μg volunteers were included in this analysis. One month after vaccination, the GMTs and differences in INF-γ ELISpot assay results were similar among the 3 groups. Seroprotection rates, seroconversion rates and mean fold increases (MFI) among the 3 groups were also similar, at approximately 80%, 50–60% and 2.5 – 10.0, respectively. All three vaccines satisfied the CHMP criteria for the A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 strains, but not those for the B strain. In univariate analysis, no demographic or clinical factors, including age, CD4+ T-cell counts, HIV viral load, ART status and vaccine type, were related to failure to achieve seroprotection. The three vaccines were all well-tolerated and all reported reactions were mild to moderate. However, there was a tendency toward a higher incidence of local and systemic reactions in the intradermal vaccine groups. The intradermal vaccine did not result in higher immunogenicity compared to the conventional intramuscular vaccine, even with increased antigen dose. PMID:26431466

  10. Barriers of Influenza Vaccination Intention and Behavior – A Systematic Review of Influenza Vaccine Hesitancy, 2005 – 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Philipp; Rauber, Dorothee; Betsch, Cornelia; Lidolt, Gianni; Denker, Marie-Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccine hesitancy is a significant threat to global efforts to reduce the burden of seasonal and pandemic influenza. Potential barriers of influenza vaccination need to be identified to inform interventions to raise awareness, influenza vaccine acceptance and uptake. Objective This review aims to (1) identify relevant studies and extract individual barriers of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccination for risk groups and the general public; and (2) map knowledge gaps in understanding influenza vaccine hesitancy to derive directions for further research and inform interventions in this area. Methods Thirteen databases covering the areas of Medicine, Bioscience, Psychology, Sociology and Public Health were searched for peer-reviewed articles published between the years 2005 and 2016. Following the PRISMA approach, 470 articles were selected and analyzed for significant barriers to influenza vaccine uptake or intention. The barriers for different risk groups and flu types were clustered according to a conceptual framework based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and discussed using the 4C model of reasons for non-vaccination. Results Most studies were conducted in the American and European region. Health care personnel (HCP) and the general public were the most studied populations, while parental decisions for children at high risk were under-represented. This study also identifies understudied concepts. A lack of confidence, inconvenience, calculation and complacency were identified to different extents as barriers to influenza vaccine uptake in risk groups. Conclusion Many different psychological, contextual, sociodemographic and physical barriers that are specific to certain risk groups were identified. While most sociodemographic and physical variables may be significantly related to influenza vaccine hesitancy, they cannot be used to explain its emergence or intensity. Psychological determinants were meaningfully related to uptake and should

  11. Immunological Effect of Subunit Influenza Vaccine Entrapped by Liposomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHUI-HUA ZHANG; JIA-XU LIANG; SHU-YAN DAI; XIAO-LIN QIU; YAN-RONG YI; YUN PAN

    2009-01-01

    Objective To elevate the immunological effect of subunit influenza vaccine in infants and aged people (over 60) using liposomal adjuvant in the context of its relatively low immunity and to investigate the relation between vaccine antigens and liposomal characteristics. Methods Several formulations of liposomal subunit influenza vaccine were prepared. Their relevant characteristics were investigated to optimize the preparation method. Antisera obtained from immunizinged mice were used to evaluate the antibody titers of various samples by HI and ELISA. Results Liposomal trivalent influenza vaccine prepared by film evaporation in combinedation with freeze-drying significantly increased its immunological effect in SPF Balb/c mice. Liposomal vaccine stimulated the antibody titer of H3N2, H1N1, and B much stronger than conventional influenza vaccine. As a result, liposomal vaccine (mean size: 4.5-5.5 μm, entrapment efficiency: 30%-40%) significantly increased the immunological effect of subunit influenza vaccine. Conclusion The immune effect of liposomal vaccine depends on different antigens, and enhanced immunity is not positively correlated with the mean size of liposome or its entrapped efficiency.

  12. Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvan Staffan PE

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present prospective study was conducted from 2003–2005, among all individuals 65 years and older in Uppsala County, a region with 300 000 inhabitants situated close to the Stockholm urban area. The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and length of hospital stay (LOHS even during periods of low influenza activity. The specificity of the apparent vaccine associations were evaluated in relation to the influenza seasons. Results In 2003, the total study population was 41,059, of which 12,907 (31% received influenza vaccine of these, 4,447 (11% were administered the pneumococcal vaccine. In 2004, 14,799 (34% individuals received the influenza vaccine and 8,843 (21% the pneumococcal vaccine and in 2005 16,926 (39% individuals were given the influenza vaccine and 12,340 (28% the pneumococcal vaccine. Our findings indicated that 35% of the vaccinated cohort belonged to a medical risk category (mainly those persons that received the pneumococcal vaccine. Data on hospitalisation and mortality during the 3-year period were obtained from the administrative database of the Uppsala county council. During the influenza seasons, reduction of hospital admissions and significantly shorter in-hospital stay for influenza was observed in the vaccinated cohort (below 80 years of age. For individuals who also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, a significant reduction of hospital admissions and of in-hospital stay was observed for invasive pneumococcal disease and for pneumococcal pneumonia. Effectiveness was observed for cardiac failure even in persons that also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, despite that the pneumococcal vaccinated mainly belonged to a medical risk category. Reduction of death from all causes was observed during the influenza season of 2004, in the 75–84-year old age group and in all age-groups during the influenza

  13. Influenza vaccination by registered nurses: a personal decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Donna M Pierrynowski; Vollman, Ardene Robinson; Sethi, Sarla

    2009-01-01

    Influenza is a contagious respiratory virus that causes high rates of morbidity and mortality and is associated with life-threatening complications. Despite the wide availability of a highly effective influenza vaccine, nurses are reluctant to receive influenza vaccination and vaccination rates among them are low. The purpose of this study was to generate a substantive theory/theoretical model regarding the phenomenon of influenza vaccination uptake by registered nurses (RNs). The study used grounded theory to develop a deeper understanding of RNs' decision-making regarding the acceptance or refusal to be vaccinated against influenza in Nova Scotia, Canada. Data were collected from 11 RNs using an unstructured and conversational interview format and analysed using the constant comparative method. The primary finding of this study is that nurses consider getting vaccinated to be a personal decision (the core variable). Their decisions are based on sources of information (including formal education, continuing education and the media); personal knowing (personal philosophy, perceived risks and benefits and personal experience); and personal modifiers (the availability and accessibility of the vaccine). The process of making a personal decision defined in this study provides a framework for creating more effective influenza immunization education and delivery programs.

  14. The effect of age and recent influenza vaccination history on the immunogenicity and efficacy of 2009-10 seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that annual vaccination of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV may lead to reduced vaccine immunogenicity but evidence is lacking on whether vaccine efficacy is affected by prior vaccination history. The efficacy of one dose of TIV in children 6-8 y of age against influenza B is uncertain. We examined whether immunogenicity and efficacy of influenza vaccination in school-age children varied by age and past vaccination history. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 2009-10 TIV. Influenza vaccination history in the two preceding years was recorded. Immunogenicity was assessed by comparison of HI titers before and one month after receipt of TIV/placebo. Subjects were followed up for 11 months with symptom diaries, and respiratory specimens were collected during acute respiratory illnesses to permit confirmation of influenza virus infections. We found that previous vaccination was associated with reduced antibody responses to TIV against seasonal A(H1N1 and A(H3N2 particularly in children 9-17 y of age, but increased antibody responses to the same lineage of influenza B virus in children 6-8 y of age. Serological responses to the influenza A vaccine viruses were high regardless of vaccination history. One dose of TIV appeared to be efficacious against confirmed influenza B in children 6-8 y of age regardless of vaccination history. CONCLUSIONS: Prior vaccination was associated with lower antibody titer rises following vaccination against seasonal influenza A vaccine viruses, but higher responses to influenza B among individuals primed with viruses from the same lineage in preceding years. In a year in which influenza B virus predominated, no impact of prior vaccination history was observed on vaccine efficacy against influenza B. The strains that circulated in the year of study did not allow us to study the effect of prior vaccination on vaccine efficacy against influenza A.

  15. Influenza vaccine effectiveness in preventing inpatient and outpatient cases in a season dominated by vaccine-matched influenza B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Baz, Iván; Navascués, Ana; Pozo, Francisco; Chamorro, Judith; Albeniz, Esther; Casado, Itziar; Reina, Gabriel; Cenoz, Manuel García; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Castilla, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Studies that have evaluated the influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) to prevent laboratory-confirmed influenza B cases are uncommon, and few have analyzed the effect in preventing hospitalized cases. We have evaluated the influenza VE in preventing outpatient and hospitalized cases with laboratory-confirmed influenza in the 2012-2013 season, which was dominated by a vaccine-matched influenza B virus. In the population covered by the Navarra Health Service, all hospitalized patients with influenza-like illness (ILI) and all ILI patients attended by a sentinel network of general practitioners were swabbed for influenza testing, and all were included in a test-negative case-control analysis. VE was calculated as (1-odds ratio) × 100. Among 744 patients tested, 382 (51%) were positive for influenza virus: 70% for influenza B, 24% for A(H1N1)pdm09, and 5% for A(H3N2). The overall estimate of VE in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza was 63% (95% confidence interval (CI): 34 to 79), 55% (1 to 80) in outpatients and 74% (33 to 90) in hospitalized patients. The VE was 70% (41 to 85) against influenza B and 43% (-45 to 78) against influenza A. The VE against virus B was 87% (52 to 96) in hospitalized patients and 56% in outpatients (-5 to 81). Adjusted comparison of vaccination status between inpatient and outpatient cases with influenza B did not show statistically significant differences (odds ratio: 1.13; p = 0.878). These results suggest a high protective effect of the vaccine in the 2012-2013 season, with no differences found for the effect between outpatient and hospitalized cases.

  16. Influenza Vaccination Coverage among School Employees: Assessing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Perio, Marie A.; Wiegand, Douglas M.; Brueck, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Influenza can spread among students, teachers, and staff in school settings. Vaccination is the most effective method to prevent influenza. We determined 2012-2013 influenza vaccination coverage among school employees, assessed knowledge and attitudes regarding the vaccine, and determined factors associated with vaccine receipt.…

  17. Influenza Vaccination Coverage among School Employees: Assessing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Perio, Marie A.; Wiegand, Douglas M.; Brueck, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Influenza can spread among students, teachers, and staff in school settings. Vaccination is the most effective method to prevent influenza. We determined 2012-2013 influenza vaccination coverage among school employees, assessed knowledge and attitudes regarding the vaccine, and determined factors associated with vaccine receipt.…

  18. Seasonal Influenza Questions & Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  19. Current developments in avian influenza vaccines, including safety of vaccinated birds as food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayne, D E; Suarez, D L

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, most vaccines against avian influenza were based on oil-emulsified inactivated low- or high-pathogenicity viruses. Now, recombinant fowl pox and avian paramyxovirus type 1 vaccines with avian influenza H5 gene inserts (+ or - N1 gene insert) are available and licensed. New technologies might overcome existing limitations to make available vaccines that can be grown in tissue culture systems for more rapid production; provide optimized protection, as a result of closer genetic relations to field viruses; allow mass administration by aerosol, in drinking-water or in ovo; and allow easier strategies for identifying infected birds within vaccinated populations (DIVA). The technologies include avian influenza viruses with partial gene deletions, avian influenza-Newcastle disease virus chimeras, vectored vaccines such as adenoviruses and Marek's disease virus, and subunit vaccines. These new methods should be licensed only after their purity, safety, efficacy and potency against avian influenza viruses have been demonstrated, and, for live vectored vaccines, restriction of viral transmission to unvaccinated birds. Use of vaccines in countries affected by highly pathogenic avian influenza will not only protect poultry but will provide additional safety for consumers. Experimental studies have shown that birds vaccinated against avian influenza have no virus in meat and minimal amounts in eggs after HPAI virus challenge, and that replication and shedding from their respiratory and alimentary tracts is greatly reduced.

  20. Prevention and control of influenza and dengue through vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David P; Robertson, Corwin A; Gordon, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Influenza and dengue are viral illnesses of global public health importance, especially among children. Accordingly, these diseases have been the focus of efforts to improve their prevention and control. Influenza vaccination offers the best protection against clinical disease caused by strains contained within the specific year's formulation. It is not uncommon for there to be a mismatch between vaccine strains and circulating strains, particularly with regards to the B lineages. For more than a decade, two distinct lineages of influenza B (Yamagata and Victoria) have co-circulated in the US with varying frequencies, but trivalent influenza vaccines contain only one B-lineage strain and do not offer adequate protection against the alternate B-lineage. Quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIVs), containing two A strains (H1N1 and H3N2) and two B strains (one from each lineage) have been developed to help protect against the four strains predicted to be the most likely to be circulating. The QIV section of this article discusses epidemiology of pediatric influenza, importance of influenza B in children, potential benefits of QIV, and new quadrivalent vaccines. In contrast to influenza, a vaccine against dengue is not yet available in spite of many decades of research and development. A global increase in reports of dengue fever (DF) and its more severe presentations, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), suggest that US physicians will increasingly encounter patients with this disease. Similarities of the early signs and symptoms of influenza and dengue and the differences in disease management necessitates a better understanding of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, management, and prevention of DF by US physicians, including pediatricians. The article also provides a brief overview of dengue and discusses dengue vaccine development.

  1. Genetic content of Influenza H3N2 vaccine seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Corinne; Valette, Martine; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michele

    2010-09-05

    Influenza vaccine seeds produced in chicken eggs are selected through HA and NA surface glycoproteins antigenicity, as well as through high replicative ability. Here we characterize the genetic content of recently used thirteen H3N2 influenza vaccine seeds. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the vaccine seeds shows reassortment events leading to PR8:H3N2 segment constellations, ranging from the 6:2 to 2:6 constellations. This study shows that the H3N2 PB1 is the most frequent internal segment incorporated in the tested vaccines seeds.

  2. Antigen sparing and enhanced protection using a novel rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant in aqueous formulation with influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiu; Fisher, Erin M; Hensley, Scott E; Lustigman, Sara; Murasko, Donna M; Shen, Hao

    2014-05-13

    Influenza is one of the most common infectious diseases endangering the health of humans, especially young children and the elderly. Although vaccination is the most effective means of protection against influenza, frequent mutations in viral surface antigens, low protective efficacy of the influenza vaccine in the elderly, slow production process and the potential of vaccine supply shortage during a pandemic are significant limitations of current vaccines. Adjuvants have been used to enhance the efficacy of a variety of vaccines; however, no adjuvant is included in current influenza vaccines approved in the United States. In this study, we found that a novel adjuvant, rOv-ASP-1, co-administrated with inactivated influenza vaccine using an aqueous formulation, substantially improved the influenza-specific antibody response and protection against lethal infection in a mouse model. rOv-ASP-1 enhanced the magnitude of the specific antibody response after immunization with low doses of influenza vaccine, allowing antigen-sparring by 10-fold. The rOv-ASP-1 formulated vaccine induced a more rapid response and a stronger Th1-associated antibody response compared to vaccine alone and to the vaccine formulated with the adjuvant alum. Importantly, rOv-ASP-1 significantly enhanced cross-reactive antibody responses and protection against challenge with an antigenically distinct strain. These results demonstrate that rOv-ASP-1 is an effective adjuvant that: (1) accelerates and enhances the specific antibody response induced by influenza vaccine; (2) allows for antigen sparing; and (3) augments a Th1-biased and cross-reactive antibody response that confers protection against an antigenically distinct strain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Economic evaluation of influenza vaccination : Assessment for The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Maarten J.; Bos, Jasper M.; Van Gennep, Mark; Jager, Johannes C.; Baltussen, Rob; Sprenger, Marc J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the costs associated with influenza and the cost effectiveness (net costs per life-year gained) of influenza vaccination in The Netherlands. Design and setting: The economic evaluation comprised a cost-of-illness assessment and a cost- effectiv

  4. The Benefits and Risks of Pandemic Influenza Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Wijnans (Leonoor)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractIn 2009 and 2010 the world experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. As the new influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus spread across the world, vaccines were being produced and licensed at an unprecedented scale and speed. In Europe, adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted H1N1pdm09

  5. The Benefits and Risks of Pandemic Influenza Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Wijnans (Leonoor)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractIn 2009 and 2010 the world experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. As the new influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus spread across the world, vaccines were being produced and licensed at an unprecedented scale and speed. In Europe, adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted H1N1pdm09

  6. Improving pandemic H5N1 influenza vaccines by combining different vaccine platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Catherine J; Subbarao, Kanta

    2014-07-01

    A variety of platforms are being explored for the development of vaccines for pandemic influenza. Observations that traditional inactivated subvirion vaccines and live-attenuated vaccines against H5 and some H7 influenza viruses were poorly immunogenic spurred efforts to evaluate new approaches, including whole virus vaccines, higher doses of antigen, addition of adjuvants and combinations of different vaccine modalities in heterologous prime-boost regimens to potentiate immune responses. Results from clinical trials of prime-boost regimens have been very promising. Further studies are needed to determine optimal combinations of platforms, intervals between doses of vaccines and the logistics of deployment in pre-pandemic and early pandemic settings.

  7. Opposite effects of actively and passively acquired immunity to the carrier on responses of human infants to a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Gyhrs, A; Kristensen, Kim

    1994-01-01

    Vaccination of infants with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) coupled to carrier proteins has proven protective against invasive Hib diseases in several trials. However, insufficient immunogenicity has been noted in certain populations. Therefore, studies analyzing...... factors influencing the antibody response to conjugate vaccines are needed. In this study, the response to HibCP coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) was examined in relation to (i) priming with or coadministration of the carrier protein and (ii) the levels of passively acquired maternal TT antibodies. One...... hundred forty-four infants were vaccinated with HibCP-TT at 5 and 6 months. They were randomized into three groups that received TT as part of a diphtheria-tetanus-polio vaccine at either 6 and 7 months (group A), 5 and 6 months (group B), or 4 and 5 months (group C). Maternally acquired TT antibodies...

  8. Vaccination of influenza a virus decreases transmission rates in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagosa, Anna; Allerson, Matt; Gramer, Marie; Joo, Han Soo; Deen, John; Detmer, Susan; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2011-12-20

    Limited information is available on the transmission and spread of influenza virus in pig populations with differing immune statuses. In this study we assessed differences in transmission patterns and quantified the spread of a triple reassortant H1N1 influenza virus in naïve and vaccinated pig populations by estimating the reproduction ratio (R) of infection (i.e. the number of secondary infections caused by an infectious individual) using a deterministic Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (SIR) model, fitted on experimental data. One hundred and ten pigs were distributed in ten isolated rooms as follows: (i) non-vaccinated (NV), (ii) vaccinated with a heterologous vaccine (HE), and (iii) vaccinated with a homologous inactivated vaccine (HO). The study was run with multiple replicates and for each replicate, an infected non-vaccinated pig was placed with 10 contact pigs for two weeks and transmission of influenza evaluated daily by analyzing individual nasal swabs by RT-PCR. A statistically significant difference between R estimates was observed between vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs (p transmission was observed in the vaccinated groups where R (95%CI) was 1 (0.39-2.09) and 0 for the HE and the HO groups respectively, compared to an Ro value of 10.66 (6.57-16.46) in NV pigs (p Transmission in the HE group was delayed and variable when compared to the NV group and transmission could not be detected in the HO group. Results from this study indicate that influenza vaccines can be used to decrease susceptibility to influenza infection and decrease influenza transmission.

  9. Optimal pandemic influenza vaccine allocation strategies for the Canadian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh R Tuite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The world is currently confronting the first influenza pandemic of the 21(st century. Influenza vaccination is an effective preventive measure, but the unique epidemiological features of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1 (pH1N1 introduce uncertainty as to the best strategy for prioritization of vaccine allocation. We sought to determine optimal prioritization of vaccine distribution among different age and risk groups within the Canadian population, to minimize influenza-attributable morbidity and mortality. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a deterministic, age-structured compartmental model of influenza transmission, with key parameter values estimated from data collected during the initial phase of the epidemic in Ontario, Canada. We examined the effect of different vaccination strategies on attack rates, hospitalizations, intensive care unit admissions, and mortality. In all scenarios, prioritization of high-risk individuals (those with underlying chronic conditions and pregnant women, regardless of age, markedly decreased the frequency of severe outcomes. When individuals with underlying medical conditions were not prioritized and an age group-based approach was used, preferential vaccination of age groups at increased risk of severe outcomes following infection generally resulted in decreased mortality compared to targeting vaccine to age groups with higher transmission, at a cost of higher population-level attack rates. All simulations were sensitive to the timing of the epidemic peak in relation to vaccine availability, with vaccination having the greatest impact when it was implemented well in advance of the epidemic peak. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our model simulations suggest that vaccine should be allocated to high-risk groups, regardless of age, followed by age groups at increased risk of severe outcomes. Vaccination may significantly reduce influenza-attributable morbidity and mortality, but the benefits are

  10. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  11. Possible Triggering Effect of Influenza Vaccination on Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tahsin Gunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, recurrent, immune-mediated inflammatory disease and it can be provoked or exacerbated by a variety of different environmental factors, particularly infections and drugs. In addition, a possible association between vaccination and the new onset and/or exacerbation of psoriasis has been reported by a number of different authors. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of influenza vaccination on patients with psoriasis. Here, we report the findings from 43 patients suffering from psoriasis (clinical phenotypes as mixed guttate/plaque lesions, palmoplantar or scalp psoriasis whose diseases had been triggered after influenza vaccination applied in the 2009-2010 season. The short time intervals between vaccination and psoriasis flares in our patients and the lack of other possible triggers suggest that influenza vaccinations may have provocative effects on psoriasis. However, further large and controlled studies need to be carried out to confirm this relationship.

  12. Economic evaluations of childhood influenza vaccination: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newall, Anthony T; Jit, Mark; Beutels, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    The potential benefits of influenza vaccination programmes targeted at children have gained increasing attention in recent years. We conducted a literature search of economic evaluations of influenza vaccination in those aged ≤18 years. The search revealed 20 relevant articles, which were reviewed. The studies differed widely in terms of the costs and benefits that were included. The conclusions were generally favourable for vaccination, but often applied a wider perspective (i.e. including productivity losses) than the reference case for economic evaluations used in many countries. Several evaluations estimated outcomes from a single-year epidemiological study, which may limit their validity given the year-to-year variation in influenza transmissibility, virulence, vaccine match and prior immunity. Only one study used a dynamic transmission model able to fully incorporate the indirect herd protection to the wider community. The use of dynamic models offers great scope to capture the population-wide implications of seasonal vaccination efforts, particularly those targeted at children.

  13. Avian influenza vaccines against H5N1 'bird flu'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengjun; Bu, Zhigao; Chen, Hualan

    2014-03-01

    H5N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) have spread widely to more than 60 countries spanning three continents. To control the disease, vaccination of poultry is implemented in many of the affected countries, especially in those where H5N1 viruses have become enzootic in poultry and wild birds. Recently, considerable progress has been made toward the development of novel avian influenza (AI) vaccines, especially recombinant virus vector vaccines and DNA vaccines. Here, we will discuss the recent advances in vaccine development and use against H5N1 AIV in poultry. Understanding the properties of the available, novel vaccines will allow for the establishment of rational vaccination protocols, which in turn will help the effective control and prevention of H5N1 AI.

  14. Association between hospitalization with community acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia and prior receipt of influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J.; Self, Wesley H.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Stockmann, Chris R.; McCullers, Jonathan; Arnold, Sandra R.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Anderson, Evan J.; Lindstrom, Stephen; Fry, Alicia M.; Foppa, Ivo M.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Jain, Seema; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Few studies have evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pneumonia, a serious complication of influenza infection. Objective Assess the association between influenza vaccination status and hospitalization for community-acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia. Design, Setting and Participants The Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study was a prospective observational multicenter study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia conducted from January 2010 through June 2012 in four US sites. We used EPIC study data from patients ≥6 months of age with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection and verified vaccination status during the influenza seasons, and excluded patients with recent hospitalization, from chronic care residential facilities, and with severe immunosuppression. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, comparing the odds of vaccination between influenza-positive (cases) and influenza-negative (controls) pneumonia patients, controlling for demographics, co-morbidities, season, study site and timing of disease onset. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1-odds ratio) × 100%. Exposure Influenza vaccination, verified through record review. Outcome Influenza pneumonia, confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction performed on nasal/oropharyngeal swabs. Results Overall, 2767 patients hospitalized for pneumonia were eligible for the study; 162 (5.9%) were influenza positive. Twenty-eight (17%) of 162 cases with influenza-associated pneumonia and 766 (29%) of 2605 controls with influenza-negative pneumonia had been vaccinated. The adjusted odds ratio of prior influenza vaccination between cases and controls was 0.43 (95% CI 0.28–0.68 [estimated vaccine effectiveness 56.7% (95% CI 31.9–72.5)]). Conclusions and relevance Among children and adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia, those with laboratory confirmed influenza

  15. Association Between Hospitalization With Community-Acquired Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Pneumonia and Prior Receipt of Influenza Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva, Carlos G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Self, Wesley H; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Stockmann, Chris R; McCullers, Jonathan; Arnold, Sandra R; Wunderink, Richard G; Anderson, Evan J; Lindstrom, Stephen; Fry, Alicia M; Foppa, Ivo M; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Griffin, Marie R; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2015-10-13

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pneumonia, a serious complication of influenza infection. To assess the association between influenza vaccination status and hospitalization for community-acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia. The Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study was a prospective observational multicenter study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia conducted from January 2010 through June 2012 at 4 US sites. In this case-control study, we used EPIC data from patients 6 months or older with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection and verified vaccination status during the influenza seasons and excluded patients with recent hospitalization, from chronic care residential facilities, and with severe immunosuppression. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, comparing the odds of vaccination between influenza-positive (case) and influenza-negative (control) patients with pneumonia, controlling for demographics, comorbidities, season, study site, and timing of disease onset. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1 - adjusted odds ratio) × 100%. Influenza vaccination, verified through record review. Influenza pneumonia, confirmed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction performed on nasal/oropharyngeal swabs. Overall, 2767 patients hospitalized for pneumonia were eligible for the study; 162 (5.9%) had laboratory-confirmed influenza. Twenty-eight of 162 cases (17%) with influenza-associated pneumonia and 766 of 2605 controls (29%) with influenza-negative pneumonia had been vaccinated. The adjusted odds ratio of prior influenza vaccination between cases and controls was 0.43 (95% CI, 0.28-0.68; estimated vaccine effectiveness, 56.7%; 95% CI, 31.9%-72.5%). Among children and adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia, those with laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pneumonia, compared with those with pneumonia not

  16. Influenza vaccination guidelines and vaccine sales in southeast Asia: 2008-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Gupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Southeast Asia is a region with great potential for the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus. Global efforts to improve influenza surveillance in this region have documented the burden and seasonality of influenza viruses and have informed influenza prevention strategies, but little information exists about influenza vaccination guidelines and vaccine sales. METHODS: To ascertain the existence of influenza vaccine guidelines and define the scope of vaccine sales, we sent a standard three-page questionnaire to the ten member nations of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. We also surveyed three multinational manufacturers who supply influenza vaccines in the region. RESULTS: Vaccine sales in the private sector were <1000 per 100,000 population in the 10 countries. Five countries reported purchasing vaccine for use in the public sector. In 2011, Thailand had the highest combined reported rate of vaccine sales (10,333 per 100,000. In the 10 countries combined, the rate of private sector sales during 2010-2011 (after the A(H1N12009pdm pandemic exceeded 2008 pre-pandemic levels. Five countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam had guidelines for influenza vaccination but only two were consistent with global guidelines. Four recommended vaccination for health care workers, four for elderly persons, three for young children, three for persons with underlying disease, and two for pregnant women. CONCLUSIONS: The rate of vaccine sales in Southeast Asia remains low, but there was a positive impact in sales after the A(H1N12009pdm pandemic. Low adherence to global vaccine guidelines suggests that more work is needed in the policy arena.

  17. Downfall of the current antibody correlates of influenza vaccine response in yearly vaccinated subjects: Toward qualitative rather than quantitative assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigi, Alberto; Cotugno, Nicola; Rinaldi, Stefano; Santilli, Veronica; Rossi, Paolo; Palma, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Response to seasonal influenza vaccination is currently evaluated by antibody correlates that estimate vaccine seroconversion as well as immune protection. These correlates rely on the general dogmas surrounding seasonal influenza vaccination; that is, that vaccine-induced antibodies would exclusively generate immunity to influenza vaccine strains and that protective immunity would wane before the next season. Here, we summarize recently reported data on immunity to seasonal influenza in healthy individuals and rediscuss results on yearly vaccinated pediatric immunocompromised patients that together highlight the need for revision of the current correlates of vaccine response to shift from quantitative to qualitative measurements.

  18. Policy resistance undermines superspreader vaccination strategies for influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad R Wells

    Full Text Available Theoretical models of infection spread on networks predict that targeting vaccination at individuals with a very large number of contacts (superspreaders can reduce infection incidence by a significant margin. These models generally assume that superspreaders will always agree to be vaccinated. Hence, they cannot capture unintended consequences such as policy resistance, where the behavioral response induced by a new vaccine policy tends to reduce the expected benefits of the policy. Here, we couple a model of influenza transmission on an empirically-based contact network with a psychologically structured model of influenza vaccinating behavior, where individual vaccinating decisions depend on social learning and past experiences of perceived infections, vaccine complications and vaccine failures. We find that policy resistance almost completely undermines the effectiveness of superspreader strategies: the most commonly explored approaches that target a randomly chosen neighbor of an individual, or that preferentially choose neighbors with many contacts, provide at best a 2% relative improvement over their non-targeted counterpart as compared to 12% when behavioral feedbacks are ignored. Increased vaccine coverage in super spreaders is offset by decreased coverage in non-superspreaders, and superspreaders also have a higher rate of perceived vaccine failures on account of being infected more often. Including incentives for vaccination provides modest improvements in outcomes. We conclude that the design of influenza vaccine strategies involving widespread incentive use and/or targeting of superspreaders should account for policy resistance, and mitigate it whenever possible.

  19. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health Care Personnel - United States, 2015-16 Influenza Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carla L; Yue, Xin; Ball, Sarah W; Donahue, Sara M A; Izrael, David; de Perio, Marie A; Laney, A Scott; Williams, Walter W; Lindley, Megan C; Graitcer, Samuel B; Lu, Peng-Jun; DiSogra, Charles; Devlin, Rebecca; Walker, Deborah K; Greby, Stacie M

    2016-09-30

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends annual influenza vaccination for all health care personnel to reduce influenza-related morbidity and mortality among both health care personnel and their patients (1-4). To estimate influenza vaccination coverage among U.S. health care personnel for the 2015-16 influenza season, CDC conducted an opt-in Internet panel survey of 2,258 health care personnel during March 28-April 14, 2016. Overall, 79.0% of survey participants reported receiving an influenza vaccination during the 2015-16 season, similar to the 77.3% coverage reported for the 2014-15 season (5). Coverage in long-term care settings increased by 5.3 percentage points compared with the previous season. Vaccination coverage continued to be higher among health care personnel working in hospitals (91.2%) and lower among health care personnel working in ambulatory (79.8%) and long-term care settings (69.2%). Coverage continued to be highest among physicians (95.6%) and lowest among assistants and aides (64.1%), and highest overall among health care personnel who were required by their employer to be vaccinated (96.5%). Among health care personnel working in settings where vaccination was neither required, promoted, nor offered onsite, vaccination coverage continued to be low (44.9%). An increased percentage of health care personnel reporting a vaccination requirement or onsite vaccination availability compared with earlier influenza seasons might have contributed to the overall increase in vaccination coverage during the past 6 influenza seasons.

  20. Comprehensive Hands-on Training for Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing: A WHO-BARDA-BTEC Partnership for Global Workforce Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jennifer; Gilleskie, Gary L.; Brown, Patty; Burnett, Bruce; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    The critical need for enhancing influenza pandemic preparedness in many developing nations has led the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), to develop an international influenza vaccine capacity-building program. Among…

  1. Influenza vaccination in children primed with MF59®-adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Forstén, Aino; Arora, Ashwani; Tsai, Theodore; Clemens, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Routine annual influenza immunization is increasingly recommended in young children. We compared the safety and immunogenicity of vaccination with trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) versus MF59-adjuvanted TIV (aTIV) in children who received 2 half or full doses of aTIV or TIV, or non-influenza control vaccine, in an efficacy trial conducted 2 years earlier. 197 healthy children aged 30–96 months were randomized to receive vaccination with aTIV or TIV in 2010. To evaluate responses to the first follow-up seasonal vaccination after priming we excluded children who received influenza vaccine(s) in the 2009 pandemic year leaving 40 children vaccinated with aTIV, 26 children with TIV and 10 children with aTIV after a control vaccine in the parent study. Hemagglutination inhibiting antibodies were assayed on Days 1, 22 and 181. aTIV vaccination produced 6.9 to 8.0-fold higher antibody responses than the reference TIV-TIV regimen against A/H3N2 and B strains, which remained higher 6 months following vaccination. The response to the B/Victoria lineage antigen in the second year's vaccine (the first vaccine contained a B/Yamagata lineage antigen) demonstrated that aTIV primed for an adequate response after a single dose on Day 22 (GMTs 160, 95 to antigens in the 2 lineages, respectively), whereas TIV did not (GMTs 38, 20). Vaccination with aTIV produced slightly higher but acceptable local and systemic reactogenicity compared to TIV-TIV and TIV-aTIV mixed regimens. Within the limitations of a small study, the strong immune responses support the use of aTIV for vaccination in young children. PMID:26091244

  2. Self-immunization with live attenuated influenza vaccine in a mass vaccination clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Matt; Pursiful, Priscilla; Carrico, Ruth; Woods, Charles; Troutman, Adewale

    2013-04-01

    An influenza pandemic may demand that a large number of influenza immunizations be rapidly given with limited resources. This study tested the utility and practicality of self-immunization with live attenuated influenza intranasal vaccine in a mass vaccination event. The self-immunization clinic model was evaluated in a three-tiered fashion using student, first responder, and open community events. A single nurse was easily able to direct 89 people through the process of self-administration of the vaccine in a three-hour first-responder event and 122 people in a three-hour open community event. 96% of participants believed that they had performed the self-administration correctly, and the same percentage reported that they would like to receive influenza immunization by self-vaccination in the future. The self-immunization clinic is a practical and potentially useful model in an influenza pandemic setting.

  3. Influenza Vaccination in Pregnant Women: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvao, Tais F.; Silva, Marcus T.; Zimmermann, Ivan R.; Lopes, Luiz Antonio B.; Bernardo, Eneida F.; Pereira, Mauricio G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the effects of the inactivated influenza virus vaccine on influenza outcomes in pregnant women and their infants. Methods. We performed a systematic review of the literature. We searched for randomized controlled trials and cohort studies in the MEDLINE, Embase, and other relevant databases (inception to September 2013). Two researchers selected studies and extracted the data independently. We used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to assess the quality of the evidence. Results. We included eight studies out of 1,967 retrieved records. Influenza vaccination in pregnant women significantly reduced the incidence of influenza-like illness in mothers and their infants when compared with control groups (high-quality evidence) and reduced the incidence of laboratory-confirmed influenza in infants (moderate-quality evidence). No difference was found with regard to influenza-like illness with fever higher than 38°C (moderate-quality evidence) or upper respiratory infection (very-low-quality evidence) in mothers and infants. Conclusions. Maternal vaccination against influenza was shown to prevent influenza-like illness in women and infants; no differences were found for other outcomes. As the quality of evidence was not high overall, further research is needed to increase confidence and could possibly change these estimates. PMID:24971194

  4. Physical Theory of Vaccine Design for Influenza and Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. I will introduce a physical theory of the evolutionary dynamics that occurs in the antibody-mediated and T cell-mediated immune responses. The theory will be used to provide a mechanism for original antigenic sin, wherein an initial exposure to antigen can degrade the response of the immune system upon subsequent exposure to related, but different, antigens. A new order parameter to characterize antigenic distance will be introduced from the theory. This order parameter predicts effectiveness of the influenza vaccine more reliably than do results from animal model studies currently used by world health authorities. I will discuss how this order parameter might be a valuable new tool for making vaccine-related public health policy decisions. Next, I will briefly discuss dengue fever. Infection with, or vaccination against, one of the four serotypes of dengue fever typically increases susceptibility to dengue hemorrhagic fever from one of the other three serotypes. I will present a physical theory of this immunodominance and use this theory to quantify the predicted mitigation of immunodominance in a novel formulation of the dengue vaccine.

  5. Adaptation of high-growth influenza H5N1 vaccine virus in Vero cells: implications for pandemic preparedness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Tseng

    Full Text Available Current egg-based influenza vaccine production technology can't promptly meet the global demand during an influenza pandemic as shown in the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Moreover, its manufacturing capacity would be vulnerable during pandemics caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Therefore, vaccine production using mammalian cell technology is becoming attractive. Current influenza H5N1 vaccine strain (NIBRG-14, a reassortant virus between A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1 virus and egg-adapted high-growth A/PR/8/1934 virus, could grow efficiently in eggs and MDCK cells but not Vero cells which is the most popular cell line for manufacturing human vaccines. After serial passages and plaque purifications of the NIBRG-14 vaccine virus in Vero cells, one high-growth virus strain (Vero-15 was generated and can grow over 10(8 TCID(50/ml. In conclusion, one high-growth H5N1 vaccine virus was generated in Vero cells, which can be used to manufacture influenza H5N1 vaccines and prepare reassortant vaccine viruses for other influenza A subtypes.

  6. A Highly Immunogenic Vaccine against A(H7N9) Influenza Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weiping; Liepkalns, Justine; Hassan, Ahmed O.; Kamal, Ram; Hofstetter, Amelia R.; Amoah, Samuel; Kim, Jin Hyang; Reber, Adrian; Stevens, James; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Gangappa, Shivaprakash; York, Ian; Mittal, Suresh K.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Since the first case of human infection in March 2013, continued reports of H7N9 cases highlight a potential pandemic threat. Highly immunogenic vaccines to this virus are urgently needed to protect vulnerable populations who lack protective immunity. In this study, an egg- and adjuvant-independent adenoviral vector-based, hemagglutinin H7 subtype influenza vaccine (HAd-H7HA) demonstrated enhanced cell-mediated immunity as well as serum antibody responses in a mouse model. Most importantly, this vaccine provided complete protection against homologous A/(H7N9) viral challenge suggesting its potential utility as a pandemic vaccine. PMID:26765287

  7. State law and influenza vaccination of health care personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexandra M; Cox, Marisa A

    2013-01-21

    Nosocomial influenza outbreaks, attributed to the unvaccinated health care workforce, have contributed to patient complications or death, worker illness and absenteeism, and increased economic costs to the health care system. Since 1981, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that all HCP receive an annual influenza vaccination. Health care employers (HCE) have adopted various strategies to encourage health care personnel (HCP) to voluntarily receive influenza vaccination, including: sponsoring educational and promotional campaigns, increasing access to seasonal influenza vaccine, permitting the use of declination statements, and combining multiple approaches. However, these measures failed to significantly increase uptake among HCP. As a result, beginning in 2004, health care facilities and local health departments began to require certain HCP to receive influenza vaccination as a condition of employment and annually. Today, hundreds of facilities throughout the country have developed and implemented similar policies. Mandatory vaccination programs have been endorsed by professional and non-profit organizations, state health departments, and public health. These programs have been more effective at increasing coverage rates than any voluntary strategy, with some health systems reporting coverage rates up to 99.3%. Several states have enacted laws requiring HCEs to implement vaccination programs for the workforce. These laws present an example of how states will respond to threats to the public's health and constrain personal choice in order to protect vulnerable populations. This study analyzes laws in twenty states that address influenza vaccination requirements for HCP who practice in acute or long-term care facilities in the United States. The laws vary in the extent to which they incorporate the six elements of a mandatory HCP influenza vaccination program. Four of the

  8. Control of Influenza and Poliomyelitis with Killed Virus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Jonas; Salk, Darrell

    1977-01-01

    Discusses control of poliomyelitis and influenza by live and killed virus vaccines. Considered are the etiological agents, pathogenic mechanisms and epidemiology of each disease. Reviews recent scientific studies of the diseases. Recommends use of killed virus vaccines in controlling both diseases. (CS)

  9. Fugleinfluenza og perspektiverne for vaccination mod pandemisk influenza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2008-01-01

    on existing and future vaccination strategies directed towards prevention of pandemic influenza is presented. There is an urgent need to develop paninfluenza-specific vaccines and invest substantially in new technologies in order to better meet this threat. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-24...

  10. School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics: Local Health Department Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, James

    2009-01-01

    Universal childhood influenza vaccination presents challenges and opportunities for health care and public health systems to vaccinate the children who fall under the new recommendation. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations and guidelines are helpful, but they do not provide strategies on how to deliver immunization…

  11. Mechanistic insights into influenza vaccine-associated narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-12-01

    We previously reported an increased frequency of antibodies to hypocretin (HCRT) receptor 2 in sera obtained from narcoleptic patients who received the European AS03-adjuvanted vaccine Pandemrix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, s.a.) for the global influenza A H1N1 pandemic in 2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09]. These antibodies cross-reacted with a particular fragment of influenza nucleoprotein (NP) - one of the proteins naturally contained in the virus used to make seasonal influenza vaccine and pandemic influenza vaccines. The purpose of this commentary is to provide additional insights and interpretations of the findings and share additional data not presented in the original paper to help the reader appreciate the key messages of that publication. First, a brief background to narcolepsy and vaccine-induced narcolepsy will be provided. Then, additional insights and clarification will be provided on the following topics: 1) the critical difference identified in the adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines, 2) the contributing factor likely for the discordant association of narcolepsy between the AS03-adjuvanted pandemic vaccines Pandemrix and Arepanrix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, s.a.), 3) the significance of detecting HCRT receptor 2 (HCRTr2) antibodies in some Finnish control subjects, 4) the approach used for the detection of HCRTr2 antibodies in vaccine-associated narcolepsy, and 5) the plausibility of the proposed mechanism involving HCRTr2 modulation in vaccine-associated narcolepsy.

  12. Subdeltoid/subacromial bursitis associated with influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old male presented with subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis following influenza vaccine administration into the left deltoid muscle. This shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) could have been prevented by the use of a safe, evidence based protocol for the intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle.

  13. Attitude of Dutch hospital personnel towards influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Dool, C; Van Strien, A M; den Akker, I Looijmans-Van; Bonten, M J M; Sanders, E A; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the Dutch Health Council recommended influenza vaccination of all institutional healthcare workers (HCWs). In this questionnaire study largely based on the health belief model we assessed the attitude and intentions of hospital personnel towards such vaccination. We sent out 220 questionnai

  14. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flu.html CDC review information for Inactivated Influenza VIS: ...

  15. Response to influenza virus vaccination during chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerveld-Eggink, A.; de Weerdt, O.; van der Velden, A. M. T.; Los, M.; van der Velden, A. W. G.; Stouthard, J. M. L.; Nijziel, M. R.; Westerman, M.; Beeker, A.; van Beek, R.; Rimmelzwaan, G. F.; Rijkers, G. T.; Biesma, D. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients receiving chemotherapy are at increased risk for influenza virus infection. Little is known about the preferred moment of vaccination during chemotherapy. Patients and methods: Breast cancer patients received influenza vaccination during FEC (5-fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclo

  16. Preliminary study about sublingual administration of bacteria-expressed pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in miniature pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyekwon; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Song, Hohyun; Choi, Jungah; Shim, Byoungshik; Kang, Bokyu; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Yeom, Minjoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Song, Daesub; Song, Manki

    2014-09-01

    Sublingual (SL) administration of influenza vaccine would be non-invasive and effective way to give human populations protective immunity against the virus, especially when pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this study, the efficacy of pandemic influenza virus-based subunit vaccines was tested after sublingual (SL) adjuvant administration in pigs. Eight specific pathogen-free Yucatan pigs were divided into 4 groups: nonvaccinated but challenged (A) and vaccinated and challenged (B, C, and D). The vaccinated groups were subdivided by vaccine type and inoculation route: SL subunit vaccine (hemagglutinin antigen 1 [HA1] + wild-type cholera toxin [wtCT], B); IM subunit vaccine (HA1 + aluminum hydroxide, C); and IM inactivated vaccine (+ aluminum hydroxide, D). The vaccines were administered twice at a 2-week interval. All pigs were challenged with pandemic influenza virus (A/swine/GCVP-KS01/2009 [H1N1]) and monitored for clinical signs, serology, viral shedding, and histopathology. After vaccination, hemagglutination inhibition titre was higher in group D (320) than in the other vaccinated groups (40-80) at the time of challenge. The mobility and feed intake were reduced in group C. Both viral shedding and histopathological lesions were reduced in groups B and D. Although this study has limitation due to the limited number of pigs (2 pigs per a group), the preliminary data in this study provided the protective potential of SL administration of bacteria-expressed pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in pigs. There should be additional animal studies about effective adjuvant system and vaccine types for the use of SL influenza vaccination.

  17. Southern Hemisphere Influenza and Vaccine Effectiveness Research and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiu Sue; Turner, Nikki; Baker, Michael G; Williamson, Deborah A; Wong, Conroy; Webby, Richard; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-07-01

    The 2009 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic highlighted the need for improved scientific knowledge to support better pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. The Southern Hemisphere Influenza and Vaccine Effectiveness Research and Surveillance (SHIVERS) project, a 5-year (2012-2016) multiagency and multidisciplinary collaboration, aimed to measure disease burden, epidemiology, aetiology, risk factors, immunology, effectiveness of vaccination and other prevention strategies for influenza and other respiratory infectious diseases of public health importance. Two active, prospective, population-based surveillance systems were established for monitoring influenza and other respiratory pathogens among those hospitalized patients with acute respiratory illness and those enrolled patients seeking consultations at sentinel general practices. In 2015, a sero-epidemiological study will use a sample of patients from the same practices. These data will provide a full picture of the disease burden and risk factors from asymptomatic infections to severe hospitalized disease and deaths and related economic burden. The results during the first 2 years (2012-2013) provided scientific evidence to (a) support a change to NZ's vaccination policy for young children due to high influenza hospitalizations in these children; (b) contribute to the revision of the World Health Organization's case definition for severe acute respiratory illness for global influenza surveillance; and (c) contribute in part to vaccine strain selection using vaccine effectiveness assessment in the prevention of influenza-related consultations and hospitalizations. In summary, SHIVERS provides valuable international platforms for supporting seasonal influenza control and pandemic preparedness, and responding to other emerging/endemic respiratory-related infections.

  18. Adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines and perpetual viral metamorphosis: the importance of cross-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldi, Filippo; Canepa, Paola; Parodi, Valentina; Bacilieri, Sabrina; Orsi, Andrea; Compagnino, Federica; Icardi, Giancarlo; Durando, Paolo

    2009-05-26

    Vaccination is considered the most effective means of reducing influenza burden, providing substantial benefits in terms of reduction of morbidity, complications, hospitalizations and deaths, even if vaccines have been associated with a reduced immune response and lower effectiveness in older adults, in particular when a mismatch between the vaccine and the circulating virus strains occurred. Several strategies have been proposed to enhance vaccine protection against drifted strains, including the use of adjuvants. Among oil-emulsion adjuvants, MF-59 was approved for human use more than a decade ago and it is largely used for adjuvantation of influenza vaccine. Recent studies have demonstrated that addition of the MF-59 to subunit influenza vaccine can lead to higher haemagglutination-inhibiting seroprotection rates and to higher neutralization antibody titers against drifted strains not included in the vaccine respect to non-adjuvanted vaccine. Promising results were obtained using a new generation of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvants, named AS, offering cross-protection against heterologous challenge in ferrets.

  19. Microsurgeon Hirudo medicinalis as a Natural Bioshuttle for Spontaneous Mass Vaccination against Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Khani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent report on existence of a stem region of hemagglutinin has arisen new hopes for vaccination of influenza A as it consist of a conserve fusion peptide shared across several influenza subtypes and can be targeted by human immune system. Methods: Given that traditional vaccination based on live attenuated viruses often fails to surpass such viral infection, a great deal of attention has been devoted to develop a safe yet efficient system for vaccination influenza A. We believe that a natural bioshuttle can be recruited for spontaneous mass vaccination. Results: Thus, here, we hypothesize that a bioengineered transgenic Hirudo medicinalis can be considered as an alive bioshuttle for in-situ vaccination against influenza A virus. By introducing the designated gene(s encoding the target fragment (i.e., stem region of hemagglutinin, this microsurgeon can act as a rapid microproducer of viral proteins for in-house mass vaccination through imparting the necessary proteins such as those, naturally presented in leech's saliva. Conclusion: This peculiar bioshuttle can be easily exploited as a medical modality choice at home resulting in greater patient compliance.

  20. Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Uptake in a Respiratory Outpatients Clinic

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rossiter, A

    2017-02-01

    Influenza is an acute viral respiratory illness that continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in Ireland. Despite well-established national and international guidelines1 and increased public awareness campaigns, vaccine uptake rates are well below target worldwide2. We performed an audit of influenza vaccine uptake at a Respiratory outpatient clinic in a tertiary referral centre. 54% (n=41) of patients received the annual vaccine, well below the target of 75% set by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

  1. Rapid generation of a well-matched vaccine seed from a modern influenza A virus primary isolate without recourse to eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartgroves, L.C.S.; Koudstaal, W.; McLeod, C.; Moncorgé, O.; Thompson, C.I.; Ellis, J.; Bull, C.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Goudsmit, J.; Barclay, W.S.

    2010-01-01

    Most influenza vaccines are produced in chicken eggs but recent human influenza strains often do not grow well in this substrate. The PER.C6® cell line is an alternative platform for vaccine production. Here we demonstrate that PER.C6 cells faithfully propagate recent clinical isolates, without sele

  2. Improving immunogenicity and effectiveness of influenza vaccine in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weiping; Kim, Jin Hyang; Chirkova, Tatiana; Reber, Adrian J; Biber, Renata; Shay, David K; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2011-11-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in immune function (immunosenescence) that leads to progressive deterioration in both innate and adaptive immune functions. These changes contribute to the subsequent increased risk for infectious diseases and their sequelae. Vaccination is the most effective and inexpensive public health strategy for prevention of infection, despite the decreased efficacy of vaccines in older adults due to immunosenescence. The rapid rise in the older adult population globally represents a great challenge for vaccination programs. This article first addresses the status of innate and adaptive immune functions in aging and then focuses on influenza vaccine. The development history of influenza vaccines, current status, and potential strategies to improve the immunogenicity and vaccine effectiveness in older adults are discussed.

  3. Reducing Racial Disparities in Influenza Vaccination Among Children With Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Zimmerman, Richard K; Moehling, Krissy K; Conti, Tracey; Allred, Norma J; Reis, Evelyn C

    2016-01-01

    A multifaceted intervention to raise influenza vaccination rates was tested among children with asthma. In a pre/post study design, 18 primary care practices implemented the 4 Pillars Immunization Toolkit along with other strategies. The primary outcome was the difference in influenza vaccination rates at each practice among children with asthma between the baseline year (before the intervention) and at the end of year 2 (after the intervention), both overall and by race (White vs. non-White). Influenza vaccination rates increased significantly in 13 of 18 practices. The percentage of vaccinated non-White children increased from 46% to 61% (p children increased from 58% to 65% (p children before the intervention (odds ratio = 0.66; 95% confidence interval = 0.59-0.73; p children with asthma. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. All rights reserved.

  4. Which influenza vaccine formulation should be used in Kenya? A comparison of influenza isolates from Kenya to vaccine strains, 2007-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waiboci, L.W.; Mott, J.A.; Kikwai, G.; Arunga, G.; Xu, X.; Mayieka, L.; Emukule, G.O.; Muthoka, P.; Njenga, M.K.; Fields, B.S.; Katz, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Every year the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends which influenza virus strains should be included in a northern hemisphere (NH) and a southern hemisphere (SH) influenza vaccine. To determine the best vaccine formulation for Kenya, we compared influenza viruses collected in

  5. Influenza vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation with confirmed influenza in the 2010-11 seasons: a test-negative observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen C Cheng

    Full Text Available Immunisation programs are designed to reduce serious morbidity and mortality from influenza, but most evidence supporting the effectiveness of this intervention has focused on disease in the community or in primary care settings. We aimed to examine the effectiveness of influenza vaccination against hospitalisation with confirmed influenza. We compared influenza vaccination status in patients hospitalised with PCR-confirmed influenza with patients hospitalised with influenza-negative respiratory infections in an Australian sentinel surveillance system. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated from the odds ratio of vaccination in cases and controls. We performed both simple multivariate regression and a stratified analysis based on propensity score of vaccination. Vaccination status was ascertained in 333 of 598 patients with confirmed influenza and 785 of 1384 test-negative patients. Overall estimated crude vaccine effectiveness was 57% (41%, 68%. After adjusting for age, chronic comorbidities and pregnancy status, the estimated vaccine effectiveness was 37% (95% CI: 12%, 55%. In an analysis accounting for a propensity score for vaccination, the estimated vaccine effectiveness was 48.3% (95% CI: 30.0, 61.8%. Influenza vaccination was moderately protective against hospitalisation with influenza in the 2010 and 2011 seasons.

  6. Retrospective public health impact of a quadrivalent influenza vaccine in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crepey, Pascal; de Boer, Pieter T.; Postma, Maarten J.; Pitman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionVaccination is an effective preventive strategy against influenza. However, current trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs) contain only one of the two influenza B lineages that circulate each year. Vaccine mismatches are frequent because predicting which one will predominate is difficult. R

  7. Which factors are important in adults' uptake of a (pre)pandemic influenza vaccine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijtregtop, E A M; Wilschut, J; Koelma, N; Van Delden, J J M; Stolk, R P; Van Steenbergen, J; Broer, J; Wolters, B; Postma, Maarten; Hak, E

    2009-01-01

    Since 2008, (pre)pandemic vaccines against H5N1 influenza have been available and pandemic vaccines against new influenza H1N1 are currently produced In The Netherlands. the vaccination call for seasonal influenza among the recommended groups approximates 70% These statistics raise the question if a

  8. 76 FR 81467 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice... test, an unlicensed Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA. The environmental assessment, which is based on a...: Requester: Harrisvaccines, Inc. Product: Swine Influenza Vaccine, RNA. Field Test Locations: North...

  9. Influenza vaccine effectiveness among US military basic trainees, 2005-06 season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Jennifer K; Hawksworth, Anthony W; Myers, Christopher; Irvine, Marina; Ryan, Margaret A K; Russell, Kevin L

    2007-04-01

    Virtually all US military basic trainees receive seasonal influenza vaccine. Surveillance data collected from December 2005 through March 2006 were evaluated to estimate effectiveness of the influenza vaccine at 6 US military basic training centers. Vaccine effectiveness against laboratory-confirmed influenza was 92% (95% confidence interval 85%-96%).

  10. [Prophylactic influenza vaccination: what is the situation in Germany?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutzler, P

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination is the most efficacious and cost-effective measure for the prevention of influenza. Although the vaccination rate among the population of Germany has been gradually increasing in the last few years, only 40% of chronically ill persons are vaccinated. As a third of all persons aged over 50 years have a chronic disease, vaccination of those aged 50 years and over, from the those recommended 60 years, should be considered. Such a strategy would be cost-effective both for insurance companies and society as a whole. There are at present no data on ambulatory influenza vaccination rates in children, even though this could reduce the high death rate among this age group and decrease the spread of the disease among the general population. At present all children with an underlying disease and all those in immediate contact with them should be vaccinated. Pregnant women whose expected date of delivery falls within the influenza season should also be vaccinated so that they and their newborn child are protected against influenza.

  11. Influence of Statins on Influenza Vaccine Response in Elderly Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven; Nicolay, Uwe; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2016-04-15

    Influenza vaccination strategies have targeted elderly individuals because they are at high risk of disease complications and mortality. Statins are a class of drugs used to treat hypercholesterolemia and are frequently used in the elderly population to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, statins are also known to have immunomodulatory effects that could impact influenza vaccine response. In a post hoc analysis, we performed a cross-sectional observational study nested within a comparative immunogenicity clinical trial of adjuvanted versus unadjuvanted influenza vaccine in elderly persons to evaluate the influence of statin therapy on the immune response to vaccination. Overall, data on >5000 trial participants were available for analysis. Comparison of hemagglutination-inhibiting geometric mean titers to influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and B strains revealed that titers were 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27%-50%), 67% (95% CI, 54%-80%), and 38% (95% CI, 28%-29%) lower, respectively, in subjects receiving chronic statin therapy, compared with those not receiving chronic statin therapy. This apparent immunosuppressive effect of statins on the vaccine immune response was most dramatic in individuals receiving synthetic statins. These effects were seen in both the adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccine groups in the clinical trial. These results, if confirmed, could have implications both for future clinical trials design, as well as for vaccine use recommendations for elderly individuals.

  12. ADHERENCE TO INFLUENZA VACCINATION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS DURING AND AFTER INFLUENZA A (H1N1) PANDEMIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Stéfano Ivani de; Paula, Gustavo Ivani de; Cunegundes, Kelly Simone Almeida; Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel de

    2016-11-03

    This study evaluated the adherence to influenza vaccination among medical students in 2010 and 2011. From August to December 2011, a questionnaire was used to record the influenza vaccination in 2010 and 2011, reasons for acceptance of the influenza vaccine and knowledge of healthcare workers about the influenza vaccine recommendation. One hundred and forty-four students from the 2ndto the 6th years of the medical school were interviewed. A great adherence to pandemic influenza vaccine was noted in 2010, (91% of the students), with "self-protection" being the most common reason cited for vaccination. Other determinants for the vaccination during pandemic were "convenient access to vaccine" and "encouragement by peers and teachers in workplaces and at the university". However, there was a great decay in the acceptance to vaccine in the next influenza season (2011). Only 42% of the students received the vaccine. They claimed "lack of time" and "have forgotten to take the vaccine" as the main reasons. The "knowledge on the recommendation of influenza vaccine to healthcare workers" increased when the students come to attend the last year of the medical school, but that was an insufficient motivator for vaccination. Strategies to increase vaccination should be based on the abovementioned aspects for the adoption of effective measures in both, pandemic and seasonal periods.

  13. Vaccination of influenza a virus decreases transmission rates in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romagosa Anna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Limited information is available on the transmission and spread of influenza virus in pig populations with differing immune statuses. In this study we assessed differences in transmission patterns and quantified the spread of a triple reassortant H1N1 influenza virus in naïve and vaccinated pig populations by estimating the reproduction ratio (R of infection (i.e. the number of secondary infections caused by an infectious individual using a deterministic Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (SIR model, fitted on experimental data. One hundred and ten pigs were distributed in ten isolated rooms as follows: (i non-vaccinated (NV, (ii vaccinated with a heterologous vaccine (HE, and (iii vaccinated with a homologous inactivated vaccine (HO. The study was run with multiple replicates and for each replicate, an infected non-vaccinated pig was placed with 10 contact pigs for two weeks and transmission of influenza evaluated daily by analyzing individual nasal swabs by RT-PCR. A statistically significant difference between R estimates was observed between vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs (p R (95%CI was 1 (0.39-2.09 and 0 for the HE and the HO groups respectively, compared to an Ro value of 10.66 (6.57-16.46 in NV pigs (p

  14. Temporal Patterns of Influenza A and B in Tropical and Temperate Countries: What Are the Lessons for Influenza Vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saverio Caini

    Full Text Available Determining the optimal time to vaccinate is important for influenza vaccination programmes. Here, we assessed the temporal characteristics of influenza epidemics in the Northern and Southern hemispheres and in the tropics, and discuss their implications for vaccination programmes.This was a retrospective analysis of surveillance data between 2000 and 2014 from the Global Influenza B Study database. The seasonal peak of influenza was defined as the week with the most reported cases (overall, A, and B in the season. The duration of seasonal activity was assessed using the maximum proportion of influenza cases during three consecutive months and the minimum number of months with ≥80% of cases in the season. We also assessed whether co-circulation of A and B virus types affected the duration of influenza epidemics.212 influenza seasons and 571,907 cases were included from 30 countries. In tropical countries, the seasonal influenza activity lasted longer and the peaks of influenza A and B coincided less frequently than in temperate countries. Temporal characteristics of influenza epidemics were heterogeneous in the tropics, with distinct seasonal epidemics observed only in some countries. Seasons with co-circulation of influenza A and B were longer than influenza A seasons, especially in the tropics.Our findings show that influenza seasonality is less well defined in the tropics than in temperate regions. This has important implications for vaccination programmes in these countries. High-quality influenza surveillance systems are needed in the tropics to enable decisions about when to vaccinate.

  15. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs.

  16. Pandemic vaccination strategies and influenza severe outcomes during the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and the post-pandemic influenza season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil Cuesta, Julita; Aavitsland, Preben; Englund, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    During the 2009/10 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, the five Nordic countries adopted different approaches to pandemic vaccination. We compared pandemic vaccination strategies and severe influenza outcomes, in seasons 2009/10 and 2010/11 in these countries with similar influenza surveillance...... and experienced less A(H1N1)pdm09-related severe outcomes in 2010/11. Pandemic vaccination may have had an impact on severe influenza outcomes in the post-pandemic season. Surveillance of severe outcomes may be used to compare the impact of influenza between seasons and support different vaccination strategies....

  17. Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Antigenically Drifted Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses among Children and Adolescents following 2014-2015 Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Judith M.; Gross, F. Liaini; Jefferson, Stacie; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Archibald, Crystal Ann; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Susick, Michael; Moehling, Krissy; Spencer, Sarah; Chung, Jessie R.; Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza A(H3N2) viruses that predominated during the moderately severe 2014-2015 influenza season differed antigenically from the vaccine component, resulting in reduced vaccine effectiveness (VE). To examine antibody responses to 2014-2015 inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) and live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) among children and adolescents, we collected sera before and after vaccination from 150 children aged 3 to 17 years enrolled at health care facilities. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were used to assess the antibody responses to vaccine strains. We evaluated cross-reactive antibody responses against two representative A(H3N2) viruses that had antigenically drifted from the A(H3N2) vaccine component using microneutralization (MN) assays. Postvaccination antibody titers to drifted A(H3N2) viruses were higher following receipt of IIV (MN geometric mean titers [GMTs], 63 to 68; 38 to 45% achieved seroconversion) versus LAIV (MN GMT, 22; only 3 to 5% achieved seroconversion). In 9- to 17-year-olds, the highest MN titers were observed among IIV-vaccinated individuals who had received LAIV in the previous season. Among all IIV recipients aged 3 to 17 years, the strongest predictor of antibody responses to the drifted viruses was the prevaccination titers to the vaccine strain. The results of our study suggest that in an antigenically drifted influenza season, vaccination still induced cross-reactive antibody responses to drifted circulating A(H3N2) viruses, although higher antibody titers may be required for protection. Antibody responses to drifted A(H3N2) viruses following vaccination were influenced by multiple factors, including vaccine type and preexisting immunity from prior exposure. PMID:27558294

  18. Current and Emerging Cell Culture Manufacturing Technologies for Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Milián

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Annually, influenza virus infects millions of people worldwide. Vaccination programs against seasonal influenza infections require the production of hundreds of million doses within a very short period of time. The influenza vaccine is currently produced using a technology developed in the 1940s that relies on replicating the virus in embryonated hens’ eggs. The monovalent viral preparation is inactivated and purified before being formulated in trivalent or tetravalent influenza vaccines. The production process has depended on a continuous supply of eggs. In the case of pandemic outbreaks, this mode of production might be problematic because of a possible drastic reduction in the egg supply and the low flexibility of the manufacturing process resulting in a lack of supply of the required vaccine doses in a timely fashion. Novel production systems using mammalian or insect cell cultures have emerged to overcome the limitations of the egg-based production system. These industrially well-established production systems have been primarily selected for a faster and more flexible response to pandemic threats. Here, we review the most important cell culture manufacturing processes that have been developed in recent years for mass production of influenza vaccines.

  19. Stabilization of influenza vaccine enhances protection by microneedle delivery in the mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Shi Quan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simple and effective vaccine administration is particularly important for annually recommended influenza vaccination. We hypothesized that vaccine delivery to the skin using a patch containing vaccine-coated microneedles could be an attractive approach to improve influenza vaccination compliance and efficacy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Solid microneedle arrays coated with inactivated influenza vaccine were prepared for simple vaccine delivery to the skin. However, the stability of the influenza vaccine, as measured by hemagglutination activity, was found to be significantly damaged during microneedle coating. The addition of trehalose to the microneedle coating formulation retained hemagglutination activity, indicating stabilization of the coated influenza vaccine. For both intramuscular and microneedle skin immunization, delivery of un-stabilized vaccine yielded weaker protective immune responses including viral neutralizing antibodies, protective efficacies, and recall immune responses to influenza virus. Immunization using un-stabilized vaccine also shifted the pattern of antibody isotypes compared to the stabilized vaccine. Importantly, a single microneedle-based vaccination using stabilized influenza vaccine was found to be superior to intramuscular immunization in controlling virus replication as well as in inducing rapid recall immune responses post challenge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The functional integrity of hemagglutinin is associated with inducing improved protective immunity against influenza. Simple microneedle influenza vaccination in the skin produced superior protection compared to conventional intramuscular immunization. This approach is likely to be applicable to other vaccines too.

  20. AVIDITY EVALUATION OF LOCAL IgA ANTIBODIES IN PERSONS IMMUNIZED WITH LIVE INFLUENZA VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Donina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. At present, immunogenicity evaluation of influenza vaccines is performed by quantitative assessment of increased serum antibodies. It was, however, shown that the degree of human defense against influenza is mostly related to their qualitative characteristics, i.e., avidity (functional activity. Leading role of local immunity is demonstrated in protection against influenza. Such immunity is mediated by IgA antibodies from mucosal airways. Meanwhile, the avidity issues for local antibodies still remain open.In present study, an attempt was undertaken to evaluate post-vaccination local immunological memory for influenza A virus, according to IgA antibodies from upper respiratory secretions. Two techniques were used to evaluate antibody avidity, that were previously applied for studying this phenomenon with serum imunoglobulins, i.e., a dynamic test (measurement of antigen-antibody reaction rates, and a test with urea, a chaotropic agent (avidity is determined as a strength of antigen-antibody complex. A total of 202 persons (18 to 20 years old were enrolled into the study.With both tests, a broad range of individual avidity values was observed for the antibodies. A significant cohort (up to 30 per cent of persons immunized with live influenza vaccine, showed sharply increased avidity of secretory IgA antibodies by both methods, along with accumulation of these immunoglobulins after vaccination. A reverse relationship is revealed between avidity levels of these antibodies before vaccination, and increase of this parameter post-immunization. The data present convincing arguments for specific renewal of local humoral immunological memory, as induced by live influenza vaccine. The study substantiates a necessity for application of the both tests in parallel, when determining avidity of secretory IgA antibodies. (Med. Immunol., vol. 10, N 4-5, pp 423-430.

  1. School-located influenza vaccination decreases laboratory-confirmed influenza and improves school attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannaraj, Pia S; Wang, Hai-Lin; Rivas, Hector; Wiryawan, Hilda; Smit, Michael; Green, Nicole; Aldrovandi, Grace M; El Amin, Alvin Nelson; Mascola, Laurene

    2014-08-01

    School-located influenza vaccination (SLV) programs can efficiently immunize large numbers of school-aged children. We evaluated the impact of SLV on laboratory-confirmed influenza and absenteeism. Active surveillance for influenza-like illness (ILI) was conducted on 4455 children in 4 SLV intervention and 4 control elementary schools (grades K-6) matched for sociodemographic characteristics during the 2010-2011 influenza season in Los Angeles County, California. Combined nose/throat swabs were collected from febrile children with ILI at presentation to the school nurse or during absenteeism. In SLV schools, 26.9%-46.6% of enrolled students received at least 1 dose of either inactivated or live attenuated influenza vaccine compared with 0.8%-4.3% in control schools. Polymerase chain reaction for respiratory viruses (PCR) was performed on 1021 specimens obtained from 898 children. Specimens were positive for influenza in 217 (21.3%), including 2009 H1N1 (30.9%), H3 (9.2%), and B (59.9%). Children attending SLV schools, regardless of vaccination status, were 30.8% (95% confidence interval, 10.1%-46.8%) less likely to acquire influenza compared with children at control schools. Unvaccinated children were indirectly protected in the school with nearly 50% vaccination coverage compared with control schools (influenza rate, 27.1 vs 60.0 per 1000 children; P = .023). Unvaccinated children missed more school days than vaccinated children (4.3 vs 2.8 days per 100 school days; P rates and improved school attendance. Herd immunity for unvaccinated children may occur in schools with vaccination coverage approaching 50%. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Parental views on vaccine safety and future vaccinations of children who experienced an adverse event following routine or seasonal influenza vaccination in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrella, Adriana; Gold, Michael; Marshall, Helen; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Watson, Maureen; Baghurst, Peter

    2012-05-01

    To assess parental vaccine safety views and future vaccination decisions after an adverse event following immunization (AEFI) experienced by their child. A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted of parents of children aged 0-7 y, identified in AEFI reports submitted to the South Australian Immunization Section, Department Health. The reports included childhood National Immunization Program (NIP), seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines. Interviews were conducted following a national suspension of the 2010 seasonal trivalent influenza (STIV) vaccine. Parental attitudes toward vaccine safety, reasons for reporting the AEFI and impact on future vaccination intent were assessed. Of 179 parents interviewed, 88% were confident in the safety of vaccines in general. Parents reporting an AEFI to the STIV were more likely to state the event had influenced future vaccination decisions than the NIP vaccine reporters (65% vs 14%, p vaccinate their children against influenza. Media reports of the 2010 STIV program suspension was the most common reason for reporting an AEFI for parents of children who received an influenza vaccination. The AEFI experience did not impact on parental decision to continue with routine childhood NIP schedules, regardless of whether children received influenza or NIP vaccines. In contrast, most parents whose child experienced an AEFI to the 2010 STIV stated decreased confidence in the safety of influenza vaccines, which is likely to have impacted on the uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination in 2011. Addressing influenza vaccine safety concerns to promote influenza vaccination in the community is required.

  3. Influenza B-cells protective epitope characterization: a passkey for the rational design of new broad-range anti-influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Nicola; Criscuolo, Elena; Castelli, Matteo; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-11-14

    The emergence of new influenza strains causing pandemics represents a serious threat to human health. From 1918, four influenza pandemics occurred, caused by H1N1, H2N2 and H3N2 subtypes. Moreover, in 1997 a novel influenza avian strain belonging to the H5N1 subtype infected humans. Nowadays, even if its transmission is still circumscribed to avian species, the capability of the virus to infect humans directly from avian reservoirs can result in fatalities. Moreover, the risk that this or novel avian strains could adapt to inter-human transmission, the development of resistance to anti-viral drugs and the lack of an effective prevention are all incumbent problems for the world population. In this scenario, the identification of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against conserved regions shared among influenza isolates has raised hopes for the development of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy and "universal" anti-influenza vaccines.

  4. Economic Evaluations of Influenza Vaccination in the Elderly: Impact on Public Health Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Susan C. Wood; Van Hung Nguyen; Claudia Schmidt

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To determine 1. whether influenza vaccination in the elderly is cost effective or cost saving compared with a non-intervention strategy and 2. whether it is worth framing a vaccination policy for this population. Background: Influenza causes substantial morbidity and mortality in elderly people. Despite the availability of effective vaccines against this disease, vaccine coverage in the elderly is low in many countries. Evaluations of the economic impact of influenza vaccination ca...

  5. [Influenza vaccines dispensed in community pharmacies during the 2010-2011 flu season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruyn, K; Hamelinck, W

    2011-12-01

    In this article we consider the delivery of influenza vaccines in the Belgian communiy pharmacies during the influenza season 2010-2011. We compare this season with the previous influenza seasons and consider the age distribution the flu-vaccinated patients. The vaccination rate of the entire population is compared to the vaccination rate among the risk group of diabetic patients. Also the market introduction of intradermal vaccinations in investigated.

  6. Economic Analysis of Pandemic Influenza Vaccination Strategies in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vernon J.; Tok, Mei Yin; Chow, Vincent T.; Phua, Kai Hong; Ooi, Eng Eong; Tambyah, Paul A.; Chen, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    Background All influenza pandemic plans advocate pandemic vaccination. However, few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different vaccination strategies. This paper compares the economic outcomes of vaccination compared with treatment with antiviral agents alone, in Singapore. Methodology We analyzed the economic outcomes of pandemic vaccination (immediate vaccination and vaccine stockpiling) compared with treatment-only in Singapore using a decision-based model to perform cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. We also explored the annual insurance premium (willingness to pay) depending on the perceived risk of the next pandemic occurring. Principal Findings The treatment-only strategy resulted in 690 deaths, 13,950 hospitalization days, and economic cost of USD$497 million. For immediate vaccination, at vaccine effectiveness of >55%, vaccination was cost-beneficial over treatment-only. Vaccine stockpiling is not cost-effective in most scenarios even with 100% vaccine effectiveness. The annual insurance premium was highest with immediate vaccination, and was lower with increased duration to the next pandemic. The premium was also higher with higher vaccine effectiveness, attack rates, and case-fatality rates. Stockpiling with case-fatality rates of 0.4–0.6% would be cost-beneficial if vaccine effectiveness was >80%; while at case-fatality of >5% stockpiling would be cost-beneficial even if vaccine effectiveness was 20%. High-risk sub-groups warrant higher premiums than low-risk sub-groups. Conclusions The actual pandemic vaccine effectiveness and lead time is unknown. Vaccine strategy should be based on perception of severity. Immediate vaccination is most cost-effective, but requires vaccines to be available when required. Vaccine stockpiling as insurance against worst-case scenarios is also cost-effective. Research and development is therefore critical to develop and stockpile cheap, readily available effective vaccines. PMID:19771173

  7. Economic analysis of pandemic influenza vaccination strategies in Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon J Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All influenza pandemic plans advocate pandemic vaccination. However, few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different vaccination strategies. This paper compares the economic outcomes of vaccination compared with treatment with antiviral agents alone, in Singapore. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed the economic outcomes of pandemic vaccination (immediate vaccination and vaccine stockpiling compared with treatment-only in Singapore using a decision-based model to perform cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. We also explored the annual insurance premium (willingness to pay depending on the perceived risk of the next pandemic occurring. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The treatment-only strategy resulted in 690 deaths, 13,950 hospitalization days, and economic cost of USD$497 million. For immediate vaccination, at vaccine effectiveness of >55%, vaccination was cost-beneficial over treatment-only. Vaccine stockpiling is not cost-effective in most scenarios even with 100% vaccine effectiveness. The annual insurance premium was highest with immediate vaccination, and was lower with increased duration to the next pandemic. The premium was also higher with higher vaccine effectiveness, attack rates, and case-fatality rates. Stockpiling with case-fatality rates of 0.4-0.6% would be cost-beneficial if vaccine effectiveness was >80%; while at case-fatality of >5% stockpiling would be cost-beneficial even if vaccine effectiveness was 20%. High-risk sub-groups warrant higher premiums than low-risk sub-groups. CONCLUSIONS: The actual pandemic vaccine effectiveness and lead time is unknown. Vaccine strategy should be based on perception of severity. Immediate vaccination is most cost-effective, but requires vaccines to be available when required. Vaccine stockpiling as insurance against worst-case scenarios is also cost-effective. Research and development is therefore critical to develop and stockpile cheap, readily available effective vaccines.

  8. Response to 2009 pandemic influenza a (H1N1) vaccine in HIV-infected patients and the influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Soonawala (Darius); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); L.B.S. Gelinck (Luc); L.G. Visser; F.P. Kroon (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The immunogenicity of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (pH1N1) vaccines and the effect of previous influenza vaccination is a matter of current interest and debate. We measured the immune response to pH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients and in healthy controls. In addition w

  9. Response to 2009 pandemic influenza a (H1N1) vaccine in HIV-infected patients and the influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Soonawala (Darius); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); L.B.S. Gelinck (Luc); L.G. Visser; F.P. Kroon (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The immunogenicity of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (pH1N1) vaccines and the effect of previous influenza vaccination is a matter of current interest and debate. We measured the immune response to pH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients and in healthy controls. In addition

  10. Influenza Vaccination in Community Dwelling Elderly Persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.G. Voordouw (Bettie)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAn influenza epidemic was first described in 1173, although there are reports of influenza as early as 412 BC. Recurrent epidemics and incidental pandemics caused by influenza virus are documented since the last 400 years. These were based upon clinical observation and epidemiology. Alth

  11. Interim Estimates of 2016-17 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness - United States, February 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Brendan; Chung, Jessie R; Thaker, Swathi N; Monto, Arnold S; Martin, Emily T; Belongia, Edward A; McLean, Huong Q; Gaglani, Manjusha; Murthy, Kempapura; Zimmerman, Richard K; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Jackson, Michael L; Jackson, Lisa A; Foust, Angie; Sessions, Wendy; Berman, LaShondra; Spencer, Sarah; Fry, Alicia M

    2017-02-17

    In the United States, annual vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months (1). Each influenza season since 2004-05, CDC has estimated the effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine to prevent influenza-associated, medically attended, acute respiratory illness (ARI). This report uses data, as of February 4, 2017, from 3,144 children and adults enrolled in the U.S. Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network (U.S. Flu VE Network) during November 28, 2016-February 4, 2017, to estimate an interim adjusted effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine for preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza virus infection associated with medically attended ARI. During this period, overall vaccine effectiveness (VE) (adjusted for study site, age group, sex, race/ethnicity, self-rated general health, and days from illness onset to enrollment) against influenza A and influenza B virus infection associated with medically attended ARI was 48% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 37%-57%). Most influenza infections were caused by A (H3N2) viruses. VE was estimated to be 43% (CI = 29%-54%) against illness caused by influenza A (H3N2) virus and 73% (CI = 54%-84%) against influenza B virus. These interim VE estimates indicate that influenza vaccination reduced the risk for outpatient medical visits by almost half. Because influenza activity remains elevated (2), CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommend that annual influenza vaccination efforts continue as long as influenza viruses are circulating (1). Vaccination with 2016-17 influenza vaccines will reduce the number of infections with most currently circulating influenza viruses. Persons aged ≥6 months who have not yet been vaccinated this season should be vaccinated as soon as possible.

  12. Technology transfer of an oil-in-water vaccine-adjuvant for strengthening pandemic influenza preparedness in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Roland; Brunner, Livia; Heriyanto, Bambang; de Boer, Otto; O'Hara, Michael; Huynh, Chuong; Suhardono, Mahendra; Collin, Nicolas

    2013-03-15

    With the current enzootic circulation of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, the ability to increase global pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity is of paramount importance. This has been highlighted by, and is one of the main pillars of, the WHO Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines (GAP). Such capacity expansion is especially relevant in developing countries. The Vaccine Formulation Laboratory at University of Lausanne is engaged in the technology transfer of an antigen-sparing oil-in-water adjuvant in order to empower developing countries vaccine manufacturers to increase pandemic influenza vaccine capacity. In a one-year project funded by United States Department of Health and Human Services, the Vaccine Formulation Laboratory transferred the process know-how and associated equipment for the pilot-scale manufacturing of an oil-in-water adjuvant to Bio Farma, Indonesia's state-owned vaccine manufacturer, for subsequent formulation with H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccines. This paper describes the experience acquired and lessons learnt from this technology transfer project.

  13. Influenza Prevention: Information for Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  14. Pregnant Women and Influenza (Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  15. Factors affecting influenza vaccination among pregnant women : a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Choi-ching; 方賽貞

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pregnancy has been recognized as a risk factor for severe pandemic influenza illness and this “vulnerable” group is suggested to be heightened alertness to the disease by WHO. This systemic review aims to identify the factors affecting the uptake of influenza vaccination among pregnant women as the immunization uptake among this particular group of population is low or suboptimal worldwide. Methods: Systematic literature reviews were conducted by using MEDLINE and PubMed with th...

  16. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  17. Seasonal influenza vaccine coverage among pregnant women: pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Indu B; Singleton, James A; Jamieson, Denise J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Harrison, Leslie

    2011-05-01

    Since 2004, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) have recommended that pregnant women receive the seasonal influenza vaccine, regardless of pregnancy trimester, because of their increased risk for severe complications from influenza. However, the uptake of the influenza vaccine by pregnant women has been low. During the 2009-2010 influenza season, pregnant women were identified as a priority population to receive the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 (2009 H1N1) monovalent vaccine in addition to the seasonal influenza vaccine. In this issue, we highlight information from the 10 states that collected data using the survey administered by the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS) about seasonal vaccine coverage among women with recent live births and reasons for those who chose not to get vaccinated. The combined estimates from PRAMS of influenza vaccination coverage for the 2009-2010 season, which included data from October 2009 to March 2010, from 10 states were 50.7% for seasonal and 46.6% for 2009 H1N1 vaccine among women with recent live births. Among women who did not get vaccinated, reasons varied from worries about the safety of the vaccines for self and baby to not normally getting the vaccination. Further evaluation is needed on ways to increase influenza vaccination among pregnant women, effectively communicate the risk of influenza illness during pregnancy, and address women's concerns about influenza vaccination safety during pregnancy.

  18. Practical aspects of vaccination of poultry against avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Erica; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J

    2014-12-01

    Although little has changed in vaccine technology for avian influenza virus (AIV) in the past 20 years, the approach to vaccination of poultry (chickens, turkeys and ducks) for avian influenza has evolved as highly pathogenic AIV has become endemic in several regions of the world. Vaccination for low pathogenicity AIV is also becoming routine in regions where there is a high level of field challenge. In contrast, some countries will not use vaccination at all and some will only use it on an emergency basis during eradication efforts (i.e. stamping-out). There are pros and cons to each approach and, since every outbreak situation is different, no one method will work equally well in all situations. Numerous practical aspects must be considered when developing an AIV control program with vaccination as a component, such as: (1) the goals of vaccination must be defined; (2) the population to be vaccinated must be clearly identified; (3) there must be a plan to obtain and administer good quality vaccine in a timely manner and to achieve adequate coverage with the available resources; (4) risk factors for vaccine failure should be mitigated as much as possible; and, most importantly, (5) biosecurity must be maintained as much as possible, if not enhanced, during the vaccination period.

  19. Lichenoid drug reaction following influenza vaccination in an HIV-positive patient: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Golian, Emily W; Brennan, Christina B; Davis, Loretta S

    2014-07-01

    Lichenoid drug reactions to vaccinations are rare but well-documented events. The vast majority of these reported reactions have been triggered by Hepatitis B vaccination (HBV). We describe an impressive generalized lichenoid drug reaction following the influenza vaccination. A 46-year-old African-American woman with a history of treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease developed a diffuse, pruritic rash one day following vaccination against the influenza virus. Physical exam and histopathology were consistent with a lichenoid drug eruption. This is only the fifth reported case of lichenoid drug reaction, and only the second generalized case, following influenza vaccination. The patient's underlying HIV disease, known to be a risk factor for both cutaneous drug reactions and more severe manifestations of lichen planus, likely predisposed her to this generalized hypersensitivity phenomenon.

  20. Is there bias in the current recommendations for influenza vaccine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Alvear Téllez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Context. Influenza vaccine has been aggressively promoted and is currently recommended to practically the whole population, especially in some European Union countries and in the United States of America. Is there sound evidence to support this policy recommendation? Is this disease so serious and aggressive to merit the enormous expenditure associated with mass immunization? Aim. The article seeks to analyze the published evidence that supports the practically generalized recommendation of universal immunization for influenza. Analysis. The analysis of the evidence invoked to support this recommendation of mass flu vaccine shows that there are multiple types of bias present. Likewise, the evidence shows that the vaccine only has effects on flu symptoms. Conversely, adverse effects to the flu vaccine have been reported in Australia (febrile seizures in 1/110, Canada (people who got the flu shot in 2008 had increased risk of contracting H1N1 pandemic influenza in 2009, Sweden and Finland (one case of narcolepsy in 55,000. Conclusion. There is no solid evidence showing that influenza is a threat to public health, nor that the flu shot in any way reduces influenza complications and mortality.

  1. The Association between Influenza Vaccination and Other Preventative Health Behaviors in a Cohort of Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheminske, Megan; Henninger, Michelle; Irving, Stephanie A.; Thompson, Mark; Williams, Jenny; Shifflett, Pat; Ball, Sarah W.; Avalos, Lyndsay Ammon; Naleway, Allison L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although pregnant women are a high-priority group for seasonal influenza vaccination, vaccination rates in this population remain below target levels. Previous studies have identified sociodemographic predictors of vaccine choice, but relationships between preconception heath behaviors and seasonal influenza vaccination are poorly…

  2. Pityriasis rosea following influenza (H1N1 vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Feng Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rosea is a distinct papulosquamous skin eruption that has been attributed to viral reactivation, certain drug exposures or rarely, vaccination. Herein, we reported a clinicopathlogically typical case of pityriasis rosea that developed after the H1N1 vaccination. With a global H1N1 vaccination program against the pandemic H1N1 influenza, patients should be apprised of the possibility of such rare but benign skin reaction to avoid unnecessary fear. Furthermore, a brief review of the current reported skin adverse events related to the novel H1N1 vaccination in Taiwan is presented here.

  3. Development of cross-protective influenza A vaccines based on cellular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Christiaan Soema

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal influenza vaccines provide protection against matching influenza A virus (IAV strains mainly through the induction of neutralizing serum IgG antibodies. However, these antibodies fail to confer a protective effect against mismatched IAV. This lack of efficacy against heterologous influenza strains has spurred the vaccine development community to look for other influenza vaccine concepts, which have the ability to elicit cross-protective immune responses.One of the concepts that is currently been worked on are influenza vaccines inducing influenza-specific T cell responses. T cells are able to lyse infected host cells, thereby clearing the virus. More interestingly, these T cells can recognize highly conserved epitopes of internal influenza proteins, making cellular responses less vulnerable to antigenic variability. T cells are therefore cross-reactive against many influenza strains, and thus are a promising concept for future influenza vaccines. Despite their potential, there are currently no T cell based IAV vaccines on the market. Selection of the proper antigen, appropriate vaccine formulation and evaluation of the efficacy of T cell vaccines remains challenging, both in preclinical and clinical settings.In this review, we will discuss the current developments in influenza T cell vaccines, focusing on existing protein-based and novel peptide-based vaccine formulations. Furthermore, we will discuss the feasibility of influenza T cell vaccines and their possible use in the future.

  4. [Influenza vaccination coverage in children with risk conditions in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roser; Campins, Magda; Rodrigo, José Ángel; Uriona, Sonia; Vilca, Luz María

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is recommended in Catalonia in children older than 6 months with risk conditions for developing flu-related complications. The aim of this study is to determine influenza vaccine coverage in children with risk conditions and their association with socio-demographic factors and medical variables. Descriptive cross-sectional study of children with risk conditions for developing influenza complications (aged between 6months and 15years old) assigned to Primary Health Care centers in Catalonia at the beginning of the 2011-2012 influenza vaccination campaign. The information on vaccination status and study variables were obtained from data registered on electronic health records by primary care teams. The relationship between influenza vaccination and demographic and medical variables was analyzed using bivariate analysis and a multiple logistic regression model. Influenza vaccination coverage was 23.9%. Variables associated with influenza vaccination were: age 2years or older (aOR: 1.6 [1.4-1.7] in children 3-5years old; 1.8 [1.7-2.0] in those 6-10 years, and 2.2 [2.0 -2.4] in children ≥11years]); male sex (aOR: 1.1 [1.0-1.1]); foreign nationality (aOR: 1.2 [1.2-1.3]); age-appropriate immunization according to the systematic immunization schedule (aOR: 3.3 [2.8-3.8]); more than one visit to the primary care physician (5 or more visits) (aOR: 4.1 [3.8-4.4]), and more than one risk condition (3 or more conditions) (aOR: 2.5 [1.6-3.9]). Compared to other countries, influenza vaccination coverage among children with risk conditions is low in our study. Strategies to improve coverage should be implemented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Influenza vaccination in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis: efficacy and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Sasan; Argani, Hassan; Gholamin, Sharareh; Razavi, Seyed‐Mostafa; Keshtkar‐Jahromi, Marzieh; Talebian, Amir S.; Moghaddam, Keivan G.; Sepehri, Zahra; Azad, Talat M.; Keshtkar‐Jahromi, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Tavana et al. (2011) Influenza vaccination in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis: efficacy and safety. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2011.00290.x. Background  Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory, granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology. The role of cellular and humoral immune systems in this disease is unclear, whereas dysregulation of the immune system is suggested. Patients with sarcoidosis show diverse responses while exposed to various antigens. Although influenza vaccination is recommended in pulmonary sarcoidosis, its efficacy and safety has not been investigated. Objectives  To evaluate safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in patients with sarcoidosis. Patients/Methods  Influenza vaccination was performed in 23 eligible patients with sarcoidosis (SP) and 26 healthy controls (HC). Antibody titers against H1N1, H3N2, and B influenza virus antigens were evaluated just before and 1 month after vaccination. Patients were followed for 6 months to assess vaccine safety. Results  Serological response and magnitude of changes in antibody titers against influenza vaccine antigens were comparable between SPs and HCs. Women showed a better serological response against B antigen (P = 0·034) than men. Twenty‐four‐hour urine calcium was associated with antibody response against H1N1 [correlation coefficient (CC) = 0·477, P = 0·003] and H3N2 (CC = 0·352, P = 0·028) antigens. Serum angiotensin‐converting enzyme correlated negatively with antibody response against B antigen (CC = −0·331, P = 0·040). Higher residual volume was associated with fewer rises in antibody titer against H3N2 antigen (CC = −0·377, P = 0·035). No major adverse events or disease flare‐up was observed during follow‐up. Conclusions  In this study, influenza vaccination did not cause any major adverse event in SPs, and their serological response was equal to HCs

  6. National seasonal influenza vaccination survey in Europe, 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mereckiene, J

    2008-10-23

    A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with the European Union (EU) Member States and Norway and Iceland to describe seasonal influenza immunisation in the 2006-7 season, in particular to identify country-specific recommendations for risk groups, obtain vaccine uptake information and allow comparison with global recommendations. A standardised questionnaire was completed electronically by each country\\'s project gatekeeper. Of the 29 countries surveyed, 28 recommended seasonal influenza vaccination for older age groups (22 for those aged > 65 years), and in one country vaccine was recommended for all age groups. All countries recommended vaccinating patients with chronic pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases and most countries advised to immunise patients with haematologic or metabolic disorders (n=28), immunologic disorders (n=27) and renal disease (n=27), as well as residents of long-term care facilities (n=24). Most countries recommended vaccination for staff in hospitals (n=25), long-term care facilities (n=25) and outpatient clinics (n=23), and one-third had such recommendations for workers in essential (n=10), military (n=10) and veterinary services (n=10) and poultry industry (n=13). Eight countries recommended vaccine for pregnant women; and five advised to vaccinate children (with age limits ranging from 6 months to 5 years). Twenty countries measured influenza vaccine uptake among those aged > 65 years (range 1.8%-82.1%), seven reported uptake in healthcare workers (range 14%-48%) and seven assessed coverage in persons with underlying medical conditions (range 27.6%-75.2%). The data provided by this study can assist EU states to assess and compare their influenza vaccination programme performance with other countries. The information provides a comprehensive overview of policies and programmes and their outcomes and can be used to inform joint discussions on how the national policies in the EU might be standardised in the future to achieve optimal

  7. Bacterially produced recombinant influenza vaccines based on virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Jegerlehner

    Full Text Available Although current influenza vaccines are effective in general, there is an urgent need for the development of new technologies to improve vaccine production timelines, capacities and immunogenicity. Herein, we describe the development of an influenza vaccine technology which enables recombinant production of highly efficient influenza vaccines in bacterial expression systems. The globular head domain of influenza hemagglutinin, comprising most of the protein's neutralizing epitopes, was expressed in E. coli and covalently conjugated to bacteriophage-derived virus-like particles produced independently in E.coli. Conjugate influenza vaccines produced this way were used to immunize mice and found to elicit immune sera with high antibody titers specific for the native influenza hemagglutinin protein and high hemagglutination-inhibition titers. Moreover vaccination with these vaccines induced full protection against lethal challenges with homologous and highly drifted influenza strains.

  8. Modelling the impact of vaccination on curtailing Haemophilus influenzae serotype 'a'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konini, Angjelina; Moghadas, Seyed M

    2015-12-21

    Haemophilus influenzae serotype a (Hia) is a human-restricted bacterial pathogen transmitted via direct contacts with an infectious individual. Currently, there is no vaccine available for prevention of Hia, and the disease is treated with antibiotics upon diagnosis. With ongoing efforts for the development of an anti-Hia protein-polysaccharide conjugated vaccine, we sought to investigate the effect of vaccination on curtailing Hia infection. We present the first stochastic model of Hia transmission and control dynamics, and parameterize it using available estimates in the literature. Since both naturally acquired and vaccine-induced immunity wane with time, model simulations show three important results. First, vaccination of only newborns cannot eliminate the pathogen from the population, even when a booster program is implemented with a high coverage. Second, achieving and maintaining a sufficiently high level of herd immunity for pathogen elimination requires vaccination of susceptible individuals in addition to a high vaccination coverage of newborns. Third, for a low vaccination rate of susceptible individuals, a high coverage of booster dose may be needed to raise the level of herd immunity for Hia eradication. Our findings highlight the importance of vaccination and timely boosting of the individual׳s immunity within the expected duration of vaccine-induced protection against Hia. When an anti-Hia vaccine becomes available, enhanced surveillance of Hia incidence and herd immunity could help determine vaccination rates and timelines for booster doses necessary to eliminate Hia from affected populations.

  9. Influence of prevaccination immunity on the human B-lymphocyte response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Kristensen, K; Henrichsen, J

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether preexisting immunity to components of a polysaccharide-protein conjugate influences the B-lymphocyte response to vaccination with the conjugate. Thirty-two healthy adults were vaccinated once or twice with a conjugate (PRP-D) consisting...... of circulating PRP and DT antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) (postvaccination days 6 to 9). The B-cell responses (antibody response and AbSC) to both PRP and DT correlated positively with prevaccination levels of anti-DT. DT AbSC appeared earlier (peak, day 7) than PRP AbSC (peak, day 8). Individuals whose PRP Ab......SC peaked early (day 7) had higher prevaccination anti-DT levels than those who peaked later (P less than 0.05). In contrast, the prevaccination levels of anti-PRP did not correlate significantly with the magnitude of the antibody or AbSC response and did not affect the kinetics of the AbSC. Following...

  10. Influenza vaccine production for Brazil: a classic example of successful North-South bilateral technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Cosue; Meros, Mauricio; Precioso, Alexander R; Raw, Isaias

    2011-07-01

    Technology transfer is a promising approach to increase vaccine production at an affordable price in developing countries. In the case of influenza, it is imperative that developing countries acquire the technology to produce pandemic vaccines through the transfer of know-how, as this will be the only way for the majority of these countries to face the huge demand for vaccine created by influenza pandemics. Access to domestically produced influenza vaccine in such health crises is thus an important national defence strategy. However, technology transfer is not a simple undertaking. It requires a committed provider who is willing to transfer a complete production process, and not just the formulation and fill-finish parts of the process. It requires a recipient with established experience in vaccine production for human use and the ability to conduct research into new developments. In addition, the country of the recipient should preferably have sufficient financial resources to support the undertaking, and an internal market for the new vaccine. Technology transfer should create a solid partnership that results in the joint development of new competency, improvements to the product, and to further innovation. The Instituto Butantan-sanofi pasteur partnership can be seen as a model for successful technology transfer and has led to the technological independence of the Instituto Butantan in the use a strategic public health tool.

  11. Influence of prevaccination immunity on the human B-lymphocyte response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Kristensen, K; Henrichsen, J

    1991-01-01

    of Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (PRP) and diphtheria toxoid (DT), and the response was related to the prevaccination levels of PRP and DT antibodies. Positive correlations were found between increases in plasma PRP (median, 32.0 micrograms/ml) and DT (1.14 IU/ml) antibodies and numbers...... of circulating PRP and DT antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) (postvaccination days 6 to 9). The B-cell responses (antibody response and AbSC) to both PRP and DT correlated positively with prevaccination levels of anti-DT. DT AbSC appeared earlier (peak, day 7) than PRP AbSC (peak, day 8). Individuals whose PRP Ab......SC peaked early (day 7) had higher prevaccination anti-DT levels than those who peaked later (P less than 0.05). In contrast, the prevaccination levels of anti-PRP did not correlate significantly with the magnitude of the antibody or AbSC response and did not affect the kinetics of the AbSC. Following...

  12. Influenza vaccination coverage in patients treated with chemotherapy : current clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wumkes, M. L.; van der Velden, A. M. T.; van der Velden, A. W. G.; Stouthard, J. M. L.; Nijziel, M. R.; Westerman, M.; Beeker, A.; Meerveld-Eggink, A.; Rijkers, G. T.; Biesma, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Influenza virus vaccination is recommended for patients treated with chemotherapy. Little is known about vaccination coverage in these patients. Methods: Vaccination coverage in the Netherlands was analysed by questionnaires completed by general practitioners, within a catchment area of

  13. Effectiveness of influenza vaccine in aging and older adults: comprehensive analysis of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang PO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Pierre-Olivier Lang1,2, Aline Mendes1, Jennifer Socquet1, Noémie Assir1, Sheila Govind2, Richard Aspinall21Department of Internal Medicine, Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, University Hospitals and Medical School of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; 2Translational Medicine Research Group, Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Cranfield, EnglandAbstract: Foremost amongst the diseases preventable by vaccination is influenza. Worldwide, influenza virus infection is associated with serious adverse events leading to hospitalization, debilitating complications, and death in elderly individuals. Immunization is considered to be the cornerstone for preventing these adverse health outcomes, and vaccination programs are timed to optimize protection during the annual influenza season. Trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccines are believed to be both effective and cost-saving; however, in spite of widespread influenza vaccination programs, rates of hospitalization for acute respiratory illness and cardiovascular diseases have been increasing in this population during recent annual influenza seasons. From meta-analyses summarizing estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness from available observational clinical studies, this review aims to examine how effective current influenza vaccine strategies are in the aging and older adult population and to analyze which are the most important biases that interfere with measurements of influenza vaccine effectiveness. Furthermore, consideration is given to strategies that should be adopted in order to optimize influenza vaccine effectiveness in the face of immune exhaustion.Keywords: influenza vaccine effectiveness, influenza virus infection, immunosenescence, hemagglutinin activity inhibition, innate immunity, hemagglutinin inhibition, older adults

  14. Plant-based rapid production of recombinant subunit hemagglutinin vaccines targeting H1N1 and H5N1 influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Yoko; Chichester, Jessica A; Jones, Mark; Manceva, Slobodanka D; Damon, Emily; Mett, Vadim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Bi, Hong; Farrance, Christine; Shamloul, Moneim; Kushnir, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a novel H1N1 swine influenza virus was isolated from infected humans in Mexico and the United States, and rapidly spread around the world. Another virus, a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype, identified by the World Health Organization as a potential pandemic threat in 1997, continues to be a significant risk. While vaccination is the preferred strategy for the prevention and control of influenza infections, the traditional egg-based approach to producing influenza vaccines does not provide sufficient capacity and adequate speed to satisfy global needs to combat newly emerging strains, seasonal or potentially pandemic. Significant efforts are underway to develop and implement new cell substrates with improved efficiency for influenza vaccine development and manufacturing. In recent years, plants have been used to produce recombinant proteins including subunit vaccines and antibodies. The main advantages of using plant systems for the production of vaccine antigens against influenza are their independence from pathogenic viruses, and cost and time efficiency. Here, we describe the large-scale production of recombinant hemagglutinin proteins from A/California/04/09 (H1N1) and A/Indonesia/05/05 (H5N1) strains of influenza virus in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and their immunogenicity (serum hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralizing antibodies), and safety in animal models. These results support the testing of these candidate vaccines in human volunteers and also the utility of our plant expression system for large-scale recombinant influenza vaccine production.

  15. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccination in healthcare workers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, A N M; Lai, C K Y

    2011-12-01

    Vaccination is considered a key measure to protect vulnerable groups against influenza infection. The objectives of this review are to determine the effect of influenza vaccinations in reducing laboratory-confirmed influenza infections, influenza-like illnesses (ILIs), working days lost among vaccinated HCWs, and associated adverse effects after vaccination. Twenty-two healthcare-related databases and internet resources, as well as reference lists, and the bibliographies of all of the retrieved articles were examined. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness of any kind of influenza vaccine among all groups of HCWs with a placebo/vaccine other than the influenza vaccine/no intervention were included in the review. Only three RCTs matched the inclusion criteria. There is a limited amount of evidence suggesting that receiving influenza vaccination reduces laboratory-confirmed influenza infections in HCWs. No evidence can be found of influenza vaccinations significantly reducing the incidence of influenza, number of ILI episodes, days with ILI symptoms, or amount of sick leave taken among vaccinated HCWs. There is insufficient data to assess the adverse effects after vaccination. There is no definitive conclusion on the effectiveness of influenza vaccinations in HCWs because of the limited number of related trials. Further research is necessary to evaluate whether annual vaccination is a key measure to protect HCWs against influenza infection and thus increase their confidence in the vaccine. In the mean time, the direction of promoting influenza vaccination to HCWs can be shifted from staff protection to patient protection, with accurate information to address concerns and misconceptions.

  16. Collaborative studies on the development of national reference standards for potency determination of H7N9 influenza vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changgui; Xu, Kangwei; Hashem, Anwar; Shao, Ming; Liu, Shuzhen; Zou, Yong; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Yongchao; Yuan, Liyong; Xu, Miao; Li, Xuguang; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of human infections of a novel avian influenza virus A (H7N9) prompted the development of the vaccines against this virus. Like all types of influenza vaccines, H7N9 vaccine must be tested for its potency prior to being used in humans. However, the unavailability of international reference reagents for the potency determination of H7N9 vaccines substantially hinders the progress in vaccine development. To facilitate clinical development, we enlisted 5 participants in a collaborative study to develop critical reagents used in Single Radial Immunodiffusion (SRID), the currently acceptable assay for potency determination of influenza vaccine. Specifically, the hemagglutinin (HA) content of one vaccine bulk for influenza A (H7N9), herein designated as Primary Liquid Standard (PLS), was determined by SDS-PAGE. In addition, the freeze-dried antigen references derived from PLS were prepared to enhance the stability for long term storage. The final HA content of lyophilized antigen references were calibrated against PLS by SRID assay in a collaborative study. Importantly, application of these national reference standards to potency analyses greatly facilitated the development of H7N9 vaccines in China. PMID:25970793

  17. Introducing a pneumococcal vaccine to an existing influenza immunization program : vaccination rates and predictors of noncompliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstelten, W; Hak, E; Verheij, T J; van Essen, G A

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Influenza vaccination has been recommended for all elderly people in The Netherlands since 1996, with greater than 80% compliance. It is unknown, however, if the addition of another vaccine to this immunization program will affect compliance. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: General practitioners offe

  18. Use of vaccination in avian influenza control and eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, S; Cecchinato, M; Capua, I

    2008-01-01

    Vaccination against avian influenza (AI) infections caused by viruses of the H5 and H7 subtypes has been used in several occasions in recent years with the general objective of controlling and in some cases eradicating the disease. To contain AI infections effectively, vaccination should only be used as part of a comprehensive control strategy that also includes biosecurity, quarantine, surveillance, education, and elimination of infected and at-risk poultry. Although properly used, potent AI vaccines can prevent disease and death, increase resistance to infection, reduce virus replication and shedding, and reduce viral transmission, they cannot completely prevent AI virus replication. A wide variety of vaccines against AI has been developed and tested in experimental conditions, but only inactivated whole AI virus vaccines and recombinant H5-AI vaccines have been licensed and widely used in various countries. AI vaccination programmes should be adapted to local conditions to guarantee efficacy and sustainability. In particular, vaccination programmes should be modulated in diverse situations according to the virus strain involved, the characteristics of the poultry producing sector, the capacity of the veterinary infrastructure, and the availability of adequate resources. Based on the eco-epidemiological situation in the affected region/area/compartment and the assessment of the risk of AI introduction, different vaccination strategies could be implemented to control AI: (i) routine vaccination performed in endemic areas; (ii) emergency vaccination in the face of an epidemic; and (iii) preventative vaccination carried out whenever a high risk of virus incursion is identified.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of abnormal shoulder pain following influenza vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okur, Gokcan [Etimesgut Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Chaney, Kimberly A. [Presence St. Joseph Hospital, Department of Radiology, Elgin, IL (United States); Lomasney, Laurie M. [Loyola University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The influenza vaccine is increasingly available to the general public and mandated by many employers in the United States. The prevalence of post-vaccination complications is likely on the rise. Complications are well known to general clinicians, but are under-reported in the imaging literature. We present four cases of post-vaccination shoulder pain with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. An intrasubstance fluid-like signal in deep muscular and/or tendinous structures was the most common finding on MRI of these four cases. Focal bone marrow signal within the humeral head and inflammatory changes in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa were also observed. The most likely reason for a humeral intraosseous edema-like signal was presumed injection of vaccine substance directly into osseous structures that might lead to focal osteitis. In the published literature, there is little emphasis on the imaging of local injection site complications accompanying influenza vaccination. We intended to increase familiarity of MRI findings in the setting of prolonged or severe clinical symptoms following influenza vaccination through the imaging findings of these four cases. (orig.)

  20. The influenza vaccine innovation system and lessons for PDPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzair, Farah

    2012-03-01

    As Product Development Partnerships (PDPs) emerge and evolve in response to the need for vaccines, this paper re-examines the oldest and most successful PDP in the vaccine field; that which year after year, produces and reinvents influenza vaccines. This paper describes the influenza vaccine production and innovation system and reviews some of its most recent major innovations. Innovation in this system is a result of collaborative partnerships between various actors from both the public and private sector. It is argued that the influenza vaccine innovation system is a Product Development Partnership (PDP), be it an unconventional one, with a central coordination role allocated to the WHO rather than a private company or charitable/not for profit entity. The unusual structure of this PDP overcomes some of the organizational issues surrounding vaccine research and production faced by other documented PDPs. These are first, the need to coordinate knowledge flow via an effective knowledge broker. Second, the need to build in-house capacity and fund essential research and elements of production where private partners find involvement too risky or costly.

  1. Using game theory to examine incentives in influenza vaccination behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Gretchen B; Li, Meng; Vietri, Jeffrey; Ibuka, Yoko; Thomas, David; Yoon, Haewon; Galvani, Alison P

    2012-09-01

    The social good often depends on the altruistic behavior of specific individuals. For example, epidemiological studies of influenza indicate that elderly individuals, who face the highest mortality risk, are best protected by vaccination of young individuals, who contribute most to disease transmission. To examine the conditions under which young people would get vaccinated to protect elderly people, we conducted a game-theory experiment that mirrored real-world influenza transmission, with "young" players contributing more than "elderly" players to herd immunity. Participants could spend points to get vaccinated and reduce the risk of influenza. When players were paid according to individual point totals, more elderly than young players got vaccinated, a finding consistent with the Nash equilibrium predicting self-interested behavior. When players were paid according to group point totals, however, more young than elderly players got vaccinated-a finding consistent with the utilitarian equilibrium predicting group-optimal behavior-which resulted in higher point totals than when players were paid for their individual totals. Thus, payout structure affected whether individuals got vaccinated for self-interest or group benefit.

  2. Influenza vaccination: from epidemiological aspects and advances in research to dissent and vaccination policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Panatto, D

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a serious public health problem, since seasonal epidemics affect approximately 5-10% of the population and thus give rise to a heavy social and healthcare burden. The heavy burden of disease is due to several factors, one of which is the biological features of the pathogen. Indeed influenza viruses display high mutation rates and undergo frequent genetic reassortment. Minor variations cause seasonal epidemics and major variations, which result from the hybridization of viruses typical of different animal species, can lead to pandemics. Vaccination remains the most efficacious means of mitigating the harmful healthcare and social effects of influenza. Influenza vaccines have evolved over time in order to offer broader protection against circulating strains. Trivalent vaccines containing two A viruses and one B virus are currently available. However, given the co-circulation of both B virus lineages (B/Yamagata and B/Victoria), quadrivalent vaccines have recently been developed. The new quadrivalent vaccines constitute a great advance, in that they can offer broader strain coverage. Despite the availability of effective and safe influenza vaccines, the Italian public's trust in vaccination has declined and, in the last few years, influenza vaccination coverage rates have decreased both among the elderly and among at-risk adults. It is therefore necessary that users, in their own interests, regain trust in this important means of disease prevention. In order to mitigate the damage wreaked by influenza, it seems important to: (i) improve clinical-epidemiological and virological surveillance of the disease; (ii) promote the development of new efficacious vaccines, as has recently been done through the introduction of the quadrivalent vaccine; (iii) extend free vaccination to the entire population, as in the US and Canada; (iv) ensure that general healthcare professionals are properly informed and always updated with regard to vaccination; (v) promote public

  3. Beliefs and Opinions of Health Care Workers and Students Regarding Influenza and Influenza Vaccination in Tuscany, Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Bonaccorsi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunization of health care workers (HCWs against influenza has been associated with improvements in patient safety. The aim of this study is to assess the beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge of HCWs and health profession students regarding influenza. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to HCWs in three local Florentine healthcare units, at Careggi University Teaching Hospital, and to students in health profession degree programs. A total of 2576 questionnaires were fully completed. A total of 12.3% of subjects responded that they were “always vaccinated” in all three of the seasonal vaccination campaigns studied (2007–2008 to 2009–2010, 13.1% had been vaccinated once or twice, and 74.6% had not received vaccinations. Although the enrolled subjects tended to respond that they were “never vaccinated,” they considered influenza to be a serious illness and believed that the influenza vaccine is effective. The subjects who refused vaccination more frequently believed that the vaccine could cause influenza and that it could have serious side effects. More than 60% of the “always vaccinated” group completely agreed that HCWs should be vaccinated. Self-protection and protecting family members or other people close to the respondent from being infected and representing potential sources of influenza infection can be considered motivating factors for vaccination. The results highlight the importance of improving vaccination rates among all HCWs through multi-component interventions. Knowledge of influenza should be reinforced.

  4. Advances in the vaccination of the elderly against influenza: role of a high-dose vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Seth J; Jacobson, Robert; Poland, Gregory A

    2010-10-01

    On 23 December 2009, the US FDA approved Fluzone® High Dose, a high-dose formulation of the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine, for prevention of influenza in people 65 years of age and older. As it was approved via an accelerated process designed to allow expeditious availability of safe and effective products with promise to treat or prevent serious or life-threatening diseases, the manufacturer is required to conduct further studies to demonstrate effectiveness. Although these studies are underway, a recently completed randomized, controlled trial demonstrated that this vaccine, containing four-times more hemagglutinin than standard-dose inactivated influenza vaccines, can produce an enhanced immunologic response in subjects of 65 years of age and older, while maintaining a favorable safety profile. This article introduces the vaccine, presents currently available safety and immunogenicity data, discusses current recommendations for use, and proposes what we can expect in the coming years.

  5. Seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness against influenza in 2012-2013 : A hospital-based case-control study in Lithuania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Rahamat-Langendoen, Janette; Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Mickiene, Aukse; Jancoriene, Ligita; Kuliese, Monika; Velyvyte, Daiva; Niesters, Hubert; Stolk, Ronald P.; Zagminas, Kestutis; Hak, Eelko

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to scarce information on seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness (SIVE) against severe clinical influenza outcomes in risk populations, we conducted a case-control study to assess its effects against laboratory-confirmed influenza in hospitalized patients during the 2012-2013

  6. Long-term correlation between influenza vaccination coverage and incidence of influenza-like illness in 14 European Countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, I.T.; Lang, M.M.A. de; Dijkstra, F.; Donker, G.A.; Hoek, W. van der

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to examine the long-term correlation between influenza vaccination coverage and the incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI) in the total and elderly populations of European countries for which data was available on at least six consecutive influenza seasons. We graphically visualised

  7. Seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness against influenza in 2012-2013 : A hospital-based case-control study in Lithuania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Rahamat-Langendoen, Janette; Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Mickiene, Aukse; Jancoriene, Ligita; Kuliese, Monika; Velyvyte, Daiva; Niesters, Hubert; Stolk, Ronald P.; Zagminas, Kestutis; Hak, Eelko

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to scarce information on seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness (SIVE) against severe clinical influenza outcomes in risk populations, we conducted a case-control study to assess its effects against laboratory-confirmed influenza in hospitalized patients during the 2012-2013 influe

  8. Developing Universal Influenza Vaccines: Hitting the Nail, Not Just on the Head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.M. Wiersma (Lidewij); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); R.D. de Vries (Rory)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza viruses have a huge impact on public health. Current influenza vaccines need to be updated annually and protect poorly against antigenic drift variants or novel emerging subtypes. Vaccination against influenza can be improved in two important ways, either by inducing more broad

  9. Predictors of seasonal influenza vaccination among healthcare workers in hospitals : a descriptive meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riphagen-Dalhuisen, Josien; Gefenaite, Giedre; Hak, Eelko

    2012-01-01

    Objective Vaccinating healthcare workers (HCWs) against influenza is one of the most important methods of decreasing influenza transmission among at-risk patients in healthcare facilities. However, despite recommendations, the rate of uptake of influenza vaccine among HCWs remains low. The objective

  10. Vaccine-induced waning of Haemophilus influenzae empyema and meningitis, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula; Bernardino, Luis; Monteiro, Lurdes; Silvestre, Silvia da Conceição; Anjos, Elizabete; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Pitkäranta, Anne; Roine, Irmeli

    2014-11-01

    In Angola during 2003-2012, we detected Haemophilus influenzae in 18% of 2,634 and 26% of 2,996 bacteriologically positive pleural or cerebrospinal fluid samples, respectively, from children. After vaccination launch in 2006, H. influenzae empyema declined by 83% and meningitis by 86%. Severe H. influenzae pneumonia and meningitis are preventable by vaccination.

  11. Immunity to viruses: learning from successful human vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulendran, Bali; Oh, Jason Z; Nakaya, Helder I; Ravindran, Rajesh; Kazmin, Dmitri A

    2013-09-01

    For more than a century, immunologists and vaccinologists have existed in parallel universes. Immunologists have for long reveled in using 'model antigens', such as chicken egg ovalbumin or nitrophenyl haptens, to study immune responses in model organisms such as mice. Such studies have yielded many seminal insights about the mechanisms of immune regulation, but their relevance to humans has been questioned. In another universe, vaccinologists have relied on human clinical trials to assess vaccine efficacy, but have done little to take advantage of such trials for studying the nature of immune responses to vaccination. The human model provides a nexus between these two universes, and recent studies have begun to use this model to study the molecular profile of innate and adaptive responses to vaccination. Such 'systems vaccinology' studies are beginning to provide mechanistic insights about innate and adaptive immunity in humans. Here, we present an overview of such studies, with particular examples from studies with the yellow fever and the seasonal influenza vaccines. Vaccination with the yellow fever vaccine causes a systemic acute viral infection and thus provides an attractive model to study innate and adaptive responses to a primary viral challenge. Vaccination with the live attenuated influenza vaccine causes a localized acute viral infection in mucosal tissues and induces a recall response, since most vaccinees have had prior exposure to influenza, and thus provides a unique opportunity to study innate and antigen-specific memory responses in mucosal tissues and in the blood. Vaccination with the inactivated influenza vaccine offers a model to study immune responses to an inactivated immunogen. Studies with these and other vaccines are beginning to reunite the estranged fields of immunology and vaccinology, yielding unexpected insights about mechanisms of viral immunity. Vaccines that have been proven to be of immense benefit in saving lives offer us a new

  12. Dutch influenza vaccination rate drops for fifth consecutive year

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacken, M.A.J.B.; Jansen, B.; Mulder, J.; Campbell, S.M.; Braspenning, J.C.C.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and trend of the influenza vaccination-rate of the overall target population in the period 2008-2013, with a specific focus on groups at risk such as patients with cardiovascular diseases, lung diseases, diabetes and aged 60 years and older. METHODS: In an observatio

  13. Narcolepsy and H1N1 Influenza Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of narcolepsy between January 2000 and December 2010 in children in western Sweden and its relation to the Pandemrix H1N1 influenza vaccination were assessed by collection of data from hospital and clinic medical records and by parent telephone interviews.

  14. Mass Media Campaign Impacts Influenza Vaccine Obtainment of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, Ali M.; Brent-Hotchkiss, Renee; Andrews, Urkovia K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the effectiveness of a mass media campaign in increasing the rate of college student influenza vaccine obtainment. Participants/Methods: Students ("N" = 721) at a large southern university completed a survey between September 2011 and January 2012 assessing what flu clinic media sources were visualized and if they…

  15. Instrumental variables in influenza vaccination studies : mission impossible?!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenwold, Rolf H H; Hak, Eelko; Klungel, Olaf H; Hoes, Arno W

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Unobserved confounding has been suggested to explain the effect of influenza vaccination on mortality reported in several observational studies. An instrumental variable (IV) is strongly related to the exposure under study, but not directly or indirectly (through other variables) with th

  16. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis following influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta-Wszolek, Lauren; Mousette, Alyse M; Mahalingam, Meera; Levin, Nikki A

    2009-11-15

    Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis (LABD) is an immune-mediated subepidermal vesiculobullous eruption characterized by linear deposits of IgA at the basement membrane zone. Most cases are idiopathic but medications, infections, and malignancies have also been reported to induce LABD. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman who developed LABD shortly after receiving an influenza vaccination.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in 2015 in Germany indicates significant genetic divergence from vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Ahmed; Abdelwhab, El-Sayed M; Slanina, Heiko; Hussein, Mohamed A; Kuznetsova, Irina; Schüttler, Christian G; Ziebuhr, John; Pleschka, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Infections by H3N2-type influenza A viruses (IAV) resulted in significant numbers of hospitalization in several countries in 2014-2015, causing disease also in vaccinated individuals and, in some cases, fatal outcomes. In this study, sequence analysis of H3N2 viruses isolated in Germany from 1998 to 2015, including eleven H3N2 isolates collected early in 2015, was performed. Compared to the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (H3N2), the 2015 strains from Germany showed up to 4.5 % sequence diversity in their HA1 protein, indicating substantial genetic drift. The data further suggest that two distinct phylogroups, 3C.2 and 3C.3, with 1.6-2.3 % and 0.3-2.4 % HA1 nucleotide and amino acid sequence diversity, respectively, co-circulated in Germany in the 2014/2015 season. Distinct glycosylation patterns and amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins were identified, possibly contributing to the unusually high number of H3N2 infections in this season and providing important information for developing vaccines that are effective against both genotypes.

  18. Low immunogenicity predicted for emerging avian-origin H7N9: implication for influenza vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, Anne S; Ardito, Matthew; Terry, Frances; Levitz, Lauren; Ross, Ted; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William

    2013-05-01

    A new avian-origin influenza virus emerged near Shanghai in February 2013, and by the beginning of May it had caused over 130 human infections and 36 deaths. Human-to-human transmission of avian-origin H7N9 influenza A has been limited to a few family clusters, but the high mortality rate (27%) associated with human infection has raised concern about the potential for this virus to become a significant human pathogen. European, American, and Asian vaccine companies have already initiated the process of cloning H7 antigens such as hemagglutinin (HA) into standardized vaccine production vehicles. Unfortunately, previous H7 HA-containing vaccines have been poorly immunogenic. We used well-established immunoinformatics tools to analyze the H7N9 protein sequences and compare their T cell epitope content to other circulating influenza A strains as a means of estimating the immunogenic potential of the new influenza antigen. We found that the HA proteins derived from closely related human-derived H7N9 strains contain fewer T cell epitopes than other recently circulating strains of influenza, and that conservation of T cell epitopes with other strains of influenza was very limited. Here, we provide a detailed accounting of the type and location of T cell epitopes contained in H7N9 and their conservation in other H7 and circulating (A/California/07/2009, A/Victoria/361/2011, and A/Texas/50/2012) influenza A strains. Based on this analysis, avian-origin H7N9 2013 appears to be a "stealth" virus, capable of evading human cellular and humoral immune response. Should H7N9 develop pandemic potential, this analysis predicts that novel strategies for improving vaccine immunogenicity for this unique low-immunogenicity strain of avian-origin influenza will be urgently needed.

  19. Cross-sectional study on factors associated with influenza vaccine uptake and pertussis vaccination status among pregnant women in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Birte; Walter, Dietmar; Reiter, Sabine; Wichmann, Ole

    2014-07-16

    Pregnant women and their newborns are at increased risk for influenza-related complications; the latter also have an increased risk for pertussis-related complications. In Germany, seasonal influenza vaccination is recommended for pregnant women since 2010. A dose of pertussis-containing vaccine has been recommended since 2004 for women of childbearing age if they have not been vaccinated within the past 10 years. We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey among pregnant women in February/March 2013 to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to influenza vaccination during pregnancy and to identify factors associated with their pertussis vaccination status. In total, 1025 pregnant women participated and provided information through a self-administered questionnaire. Of these, 23.2% were vaccinated against seasonal influenza during the 2012/13 season; 15.9% during their pregnancy. Major reasons for being unvaccinated (n=686 respondents) were lack of confidence in the vaccine (60.4%) and the perception that vaccination was not necessary (40.3%). Influenza vaccination during pregnancy was independently associated with having received influenza vaccine in the previous season, having received a recommendation from a physician, a high level of vaccine-related knowledge and of perceived disease severity. In contrast, knowledge of the recommendation for regular hand-washing to prevent influenza and the perception that vaccine-related side effects were likely to occur or likely to be severe were negatively associated with vaccine uptake. Receipt of a pertussis vaccine in the past 10 years was reported by 22.5% of participants. Pertussis vaccine uptake was independently associated with living in the Eastern federal states and receiving seasonal influenza vaccination annually, while a migration background was associated with a lower uptake. To enhance vaccine uptake in pregnant women and women of childbearing age, special efforts must be undertaken to improve

  20. New Wisdom to Defy an Old Enemy: Summary from a scientific symposium at the 4th Influenza Vaccines for the World (IVW) 2012 Congress, 11 October, Valencia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Gregory A; Fleming, Douglas M; Treanor, John J; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Luke, Thomas C; Ball, Emma M A; Poland, Caroline M

    2013-04-17

    Both seasonal and pandemic influenza cause considerable morbidity and mortality globally. In addition, the ongoing threat of new, unpredictable influenza pandemics from emerging variant strains cannot be underestimated. Recently bioCSL (previously known as CSL Biotherapies) sponsored a symposium 'New Wisdom to Defy an Old Enemy' at the 4th Influenza Vaccines for the World Congress in Valencia, Spain. This symposium brought together a renowned faculty of experts to discuss lessons from past experience, novel influenza vaccine developments, and new methods to increase vaccine acceptance and coverage. Specific topics reviewed and discussed included new vaccine development efforts focused on improving efficacy via alternative administration routes, dose modifications, improved adjuvants, and the use of master donor viruses. Improved safety was also discussed, particularly the new finding of an excess of febrile reactions isolated to children who received the 2010 Southern Hemisphere (SH) trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV). Significant work has been done to both identify the cause and minimize the risk of febrile reactions in children. Other novel prophylactic and therapeutic advances were discussed including immunotherapy. Standard IVIg and hIVIg have been used in ferret studies and human case reports with promising results. New adjuvants, such as ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, were noted to provide single-dose, prolonged protection with seasonal vaccine after lethal H5N1 virus challenge in a ferret model of human influenza disease. The data suggest that adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines may provide broader protection than unadjuvanted vaccines. The use of an antigen-formulated vaccine to induce broad protection between pandemics that could bridge the gap between pandemic declaration and the production of a homologous vaccine was also discussed. Finally, despite the availability of effective vaccines, most current efforts to increase influenza vaccine coverage

  1. Protective immunity to H7N9 influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S; Walters, Jewell N; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2014-05-19

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses' ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases.

  2. A basis for vaccine development: Comparative characterization of Haemophilus influenzae outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roier, Sandro; Blume, Thomas; Klug, Lisa; Wagner, Gabriel E; Elhenawy, Wael; Zangger, Klaus; Prassl, Ruth; Reidl, Joachim; Daum, Günther; Feldman, Mario F; Schild, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical and bilayered particles that are naturally released from the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria. They have been proposed to possess several biological roles in pathogenesis and interbacterial interactions. Additionally, OMVs have been suggested as potential vaccine candidates against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria like Haemophilus influenzae, a human pathogen of the respiratory tract. Unfortunately, there is still a lack of fundamental knowledge regarding OMV biogenesis, protein sorting into OMVs, OMV size and quantity, as well as OMV composition in H. influenzae. Thus, this study comprehensively characterized and compared OMVs and OMs derived from heterologous encapsulated as well as nonencapsulated H. influenzae strains. Semiquantitative immunoblot analysis revealed that certain OM proteins are enriched or excluded in OMVs suggesting the presence of regulated protein sorting mechanisms into OMVs as well as interconnected OMV biogenesis mechanisms in H. influenzae. Nanoparticle tracking analysis, transmission electron microscopy, as well as protein and lipooligosaccharide quantifications demonstrated that heterologous H. influenzae strains differ in their OMV size and quantity. Lipidomic analyses identified palmitic acid as the most abundant fatty acid, while phosphatidylethanolamine was found to be the most dominant phospholipid present in OMVs and the OM of all strains tested. Proteomic analysis confirmed that H. influenzae OMVs contain vaccine candidate proteins as well as important virulence factors. These findings contribute to the understanding of OMV biogenesis as well as biological roles of OMVs and, in addition, may be important for the future development of OMV based vaccines against H. influenzae infections. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Key issues and challenges in estimating the impact and cost-effectiveness of quadrivalent influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Emma; Jit, Mark; Newall, Anthony T

    2014-06-01

    Evidence has shown that quadrivalent influenza vaccines containing all four subtypes are safe and immunogenic. However, to date there have been few published studies exploring the population-level clinical and economic impact of quadrivalent compared to trivalent influenza vaccines. Economic evaluation studies need to be conducted in order to inform country-level decision making about whether (and how to) introduce and replace the current trivalent influenza vaccines with quadrivalent influenza vaccination programs. Several key issues associated with estimating the clinical and economic impact of the trivalent versus quadrivalent vaccines are discussed in this article, particularly the complexities involved in estimating the incremental preventable disease and economic burden. Other factors, such as the indirect (herd) protection from quadrivalent influenza vaccination and the timing of the replacement of trivalent influenza vaccination programs are also discussed.

  4. African Green Monkeys Recapitulate the Clinical Experience with Replication of Live Attenuated Pandemic Influenza Virus Vaccine Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yumiko; Suguitan, Amorsolo; Orandle, Marlene; Paskel, Myeisha; Boonnak, Kobporn; Gardner, Donald J.; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz; Marino, Michael; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Live attenuated cold-adapted (ca) H5N1, H7N3, H6N1, and H9N2 influenza vaccine viruses replicated in the respiratory tract of mice and ferrets, and 2 doses of vaccines were immunogenic and protected these animals from challenge infection with homologous and heterologous wild-type (wt) viruses of the corresponding subtypes. However, when these vaccine candidates were evaluated in phase I clinical trials, there were inconsistencies between the observations in animal models and in humans. The vaccine viruses did not replicate well and immune responses were variable in humans, even though the study subjects were seronegative with respect to the vaccine viruses before vaccination. Therefore, we sought a model that would better reflect the findings in humans and evaluated African green monkeys (AGMs) as a nonhuman primate model. The distribution of sialic acid (SA) receptors in the respiratory tract of AGMs was similar to that in humans. We evaluated the replication of wt and ca viruses of avian influenza (AI) virus subtypes H5N1, H6N1, H7N3, and H9N2 in the respiratory tract of AGMs. All of the wt viruses replicated efficiently, while replication of the ca vaccine viruses was restricted to the upper respiratory tract. Interestingly, the patterns and sites of virus replication differed among the different subtypes. We also evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of H5N1, H6N1, H7N3, and H9N2 ca vaccines. Protection from wt virus challenge correlated well with the level of serum neutralizing antibodies. Immune responses were slightly better when vaccine was delivered by both intranasal and intratracheal delivery than when it was delivered intranasally by sprayer. We conclude that live attenuated pandemic influenza virus vaccines replicate similarly in AGMs and human subjects and that AGMs may be a useful model to evaluate the replication of ca vaccine candidates. IMPORTANCE Ferrets and mice are commonly used for preclinical evaluation of influenza

  5. Concurrent influenza vaccination reduces anti-FVIII antibody responses in murine hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jesse D; Moorehead, Paul C; Sponagle, Kate; Steinitz, Katharina N; Reipert, Birgit M; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2016-06-30

    Inflammatory signals such as pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns have been hypothesized as risk factors for the initiation of the anti-factor VIII (FVIII) immune response seen in 25% to 30% of patients with severe hemophilia A (HA). In these young patients, vaccines may be coincidentally administered in close proximity with initial exposure to FVIII, thereby providing a source of such stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of 3 vaccines commonly used in pediatric patients on FVIII immunogenicity in a humanized HA murine model with variable tolerance to recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII). Mice vaccinated intramuscularly against the influenza vaccine prior to multiple infusions of rhFVIII exhibited a decreased incidence of rhFVIII-specific neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies. Similar findings were observed with the addition of an adjuvant. Upon exposure to media from influenza- or FVIII-stimulated lymph node or splenic lymphocytes, naïve CD4(+) lymphocytes preferentially migrated toward media from influenza-stimulated cells, indicating that antigen competition, by means of lymphocyte recruitment to the immunization site, is a potential mechanism for the observed decrease in FVIII immunogenicity. We also observed no differences in incidence or titer of rhFVIII-specific antibodies and inhibitors in mice exposed to the live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccine regardless of route of administration. Together, our results suggest that concomitant FVIII exposure and vaccination against influenza does not increase the risk of inhibitor formation and may in fact decrease anti-FVIII immune responses. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Association of School-Based Influenza Vaccination Clinics and School Absenteeism--Arkansas, 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquelais, Rachel E.; Safi, Haytham; Butler, Sandra; Smith, Nathaniel; Haselow, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a major cause of seasonal viral respiratory illness among school-aged children. Accordingly, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) coordinates >800 school-based influenza immunization clinics before each influenza season. We quantified the relationship between student influenza vaccination in Arkansas public schools…

  7. Developing Universal Influenza Vaccines: Hitting the Nail, Not Just on the Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidewij C. M. Wiersma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses have a huge impact on public health. Current influenza vaccines need to be updated annually and protect poorly against antigenic drift variants or novel emerging subtypes. Vaccination against influenza can be improved in two important ways, either by inducing more broadly protective immune responses or by decreasing the time of vaccine production, which is relevant especially during a pandemic outbreak. In this review, we outline the current efforts to develop so-called “universal influenza vaccines”, describing antigens that may induce broadly protective immunity and novel vaccine production platforms that facilitate timely availability of vaccines.

  8. Cost–effectiveness analysis of quadrivalent influenza vaccine in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Amos; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Reina, Jordi; Callejo, Daniel; Cuervo, Jesús; Morano Larragueta, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza has a major impact on healthcare systems and society, but can be prevented using vaccination. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends that influenza vaccines should include at least two virus A and one virus B lineage (trivalent vaccine; TIV). A new quadrivalent vaccine (QIV), which includes an additional B virus strain, received regulatory approval and is now recommended by several countries. The present study estimates the cost-effectiveness of replacing TIVs with QIV for risk groups and elderly population in Spain. A static, lifetime, multi-cohort Markov model with a one-year cycle time was adapted to assess the costs and health outcomes associated with a switch from TIV to QIV. The model followed a cohort vaccinated each year according to health authority recommendations, for the duration of their lives. National epidemiological data allowed the determination of whether the B strain included in TIVs matched the circulating one. Societal perspective was considered, costs and outcomes were discounted at 3% and one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Compared to TIVs, QIV reduced more influenza cases and influenza-related complications and deaths during periods of B-mismatch strains in the TIV. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was 8,748€/quality-adjusted life year (QALY). One-way sensitivity analysis showed mismatch with the B lineage included in the TIV was the main driver for ICER. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows ICER below 30,000€/QALY in 96% of simulations. Replacing TIVs with QIV in Spain could improve influenza prevention by avoiding B virus mismatch and provide a cost-effective healthcare intervention. PMID:27184622

  9. An audit of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in rheumatology outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell William S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for a number of clinical risk groups including patients treated with major immunosuppressant disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Such immunisation is not only safe but immunogenic in patients with rheumatic diseases. We sought to establish dual vaccination rates and significant influencing factors amongst our hospital rheumatology outpatients. Method We audited a sample of 101 patients attending hospital rheumatology outpatient clinics on any form of disease modifying treatment by clinical questionnaire and medical record perusal. Further data were collected from the local immunisation coordinating agency and analysed by logistic regression modelling. Results Although there was a high rate of awareness with regard to immunisation, fewer patients on major immunosuppressants were vaccinated than patients with additional clinical risk factors against influenza (53% vs 93%, p Conclusion Influenza and pneumococcal immunisation is suboptimal amongst patients on current immunosuppressant treatments attending rheumatology outpatient clinics. Raising awareness amongst patients may not be sufficient to improve vaccination rates and alternative strategies such as obligatory pneumococcal vaccination prior to treatment initiation and primary care provider education need to be explored.

  10. Influenza Vaccine: Federal Investments in Alternative Technologies and Challenges to Development and Licensure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    late 1990s and early 2000s, detection of the H5N1 avian influenza (also known as “bird flu”) virus in animals raised concerns among experts that it or...of infection by, for example, the H5N1 avian influenza virus (also known as “bird flu”). Alternative technologies that can be used in producing...genes. Recombinant technology is currently used in U.S.-marketed vaccines against other diseases, such as hepatitis B and the human papillomavirus

  11. A systematic analysis of influenza vaccine shortage policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Barnett, Daniel J; Sapsin, Jason W; Bishai, David M; Balicer, Ran D

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to apply SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) to a domestic shortage of influenza vaccine, to identify lessons learned, and to generate effective solutions for future public health rationing emergencies. SWOT and TOWS techniques were employed to characterize the vulnerability of the USA to disruptions in the supply of influenza vaccine. A group of five researchers reviewed relevant literature, engaged in group brainstorming, and categorized elements according to the SWOT framework. Three strengths, five weaknesses, five threats and seven opportunities were identified in the areas of vaccine production, purchasing and distribution, and provision. Four future recommendations emerged with respect to government investment, communications, sanctioning of physicians, and incident command. Application of the SWOT technique is highly relevant to the health policy realm and can assist public health planners in planning for future resource scarcity.

  12. Heterosubtypic cross-protection induced by whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in mice : Influence of the route of vaccine administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budimir, Natalija; de Haan, Aalzen; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Huckriede, Anke; Wilschut, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of influenza vaccines capable of inducing broad protection against different virus subtypes is necessary given the ever-changing viral genetic landscape. Previously, we showed that vaccination with whole inactivated virus (WIV) induces heterosubtypic protection against lethal

  13. Avian Influenza infection in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan. M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks caused by the H5N1 strain are presently of the greatest concern for human health. In assessing risks to human health, it is important to know exactly which avian virus strains are causing the outbreaks in birds.All available evidence points to an increased risk of transmission to humans when outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza are widespread in poultry. There is mounting evidence that this strain has a unique capacity to jump the species barrier and cause severe disease, with high mortality, in humans. There is no evidence, to date that efficient human to human transmission of H5N1 strain has occurred and very often. Efficient transmission among humans is a key property of pandemic strains and a property that the avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses apparently lacked. The biological and molecular basis for effective aerosol transmission among humans is not known. The virus can improve its transmissibility among humans via two principal mechanisms. The first is a “reassortment” event, in which genetic material is exchanged between human and avian viruses during co-infection of a human or pig.Reassortment could result in a fully transmissible pandemic virus, announced by a sudden surge of cases with explosive spread. The second mechanism is a more gradual process of adaptive mutation, whereby the capability of the virus to bind to human cells increases during subsequent infections of humans. Adaptive mutation, expressed initially as small clusters of human cases with some evidence of human-to-human transmission, would probably give the world some time to take defensive action, if detected sufficiently early. As the number of human infections grows, the risk increases that a new virus subtype could emerge, triggering an influenza pandemic. Humans as well as swine must now be considered a potential mixing vessel for the generation of such a virus. This link between widespread infection in poultry and increased risk of human

  14. Effectiveness of the influenza A(H1N1)PDM09 vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination: A matched case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Tacken, Margot; Bos, Jens; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Korevaar, Joke C.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Wolters, Bert; Bijl, Marc; Postma, Maarten J.; Wilschut, Jan; Nichol, Kristin L.; Hak, Eelko

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we aimed to assess the effectiveness of MF59-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine in a matched case-control study. Patients/methods This study was conducted during the pandemic influenza

  15. SAFETY OF CELL-DERIVED SUBUNIT ADJUVANTED INFLUENZA VACCINE FOR CHILDREN VACCINATION: DOUBLE-BLIND RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Kharit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the safety data for cell-derived inactivated subunit adjuvanted influenza vaccine «Grippol Neo» in children 3–17 years old in comparison with reference egg-derived inactivated subunit vaccine «Grippol plus». Good test vaccine tolerability and high efficacy profile is demonstrated. Based on the results obtained vaccine «Grippol Neo» is recommended for mass influenza prophylaxis in pediatry, including National Immunization Schedule.Key words: children, influenza, vaccination, «Grippol Neo».(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:44-49

  16. Evaluation of Influenza Virus A/H3N2 and B Vaccines on the Basis of Cross-Reactivity of Postvaccination Human Serum Antibodies against Influenza Viruses A/H3N2 and B Isolated in MDCK Cells and Embryonated Hen Eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Noriko; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Yokoyama, Masaru; Sato, Hironori; Saito, Reiko; Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Xu, Hong; Takashita, Emi; Tashiro, Masato; Takao, Shinichi; Yano, Takuya; Suga, Tomoko; Kawakami, Chiharu; Yamamoto, Miwako; Kajiyama, Keiko; Saito, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Shin'ichi; Watanabe, Sumi; Aoki, Satomi; Taira, Katsuya; Kon, Miyako; Lin, Jih-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The vaccine strains against influenza virus A/H3N2 for the 2010-2011 season and influenza virus B for the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 seasons in Japan are a high-growth reassortant A/Victoria/210/2009 (X-187) strain and an egg-adapted B/Brisbane/60/2008 (Victoria lineage) strain, respectively. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests with postinfection ferret antisera indicated that the antisera raised against the X-187 and egg-adapted B/Brisbane/60/2008 vaccine production strains poorly inhibited recent epidemic isolates of MDCK-grown A/H3N2 and B/Victoria lineage viruses, respectively. The low reactivity of the ferret antisera may be attributable to changes in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of production strains during egg adaptation. To evaluate the efficacy of A/H3N2 and B vaccines, the cross-reactivities of postvaccination human serum antibodies against A/H3N2 and B/Victoria lineage epidemic isolates were assessed by a comparison of the geometric mean titers (GMTs) of HI and neutralization (NT) tests. Serum antibodies elicited by the X-187 vaccine had low cross-reactivity to both MDCK- and egg-grown A/H3N2 isolates by HI test and narrow cross-reactivity by NT test in all age groups. On the other hand, the GMTs to B viruses detected by HI test were below the marginal level, so the cross-reactivity was assessed by NT test. The serum neutralizing antibodies elicited by the B/Brisbane/60/2008 vaccine reacted well with egg-grown B viruses but exhibited remarkably low reactivity to MDCK-grown B viruses. The results of these human serological studies suggest that the influenza A/H3N2 vaccine for the 2010-2011 season and B vaccine for the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 seasons may possess insufficient efficacy and low efficacy, respectively. PMID:22492743

  17. Haemophilus influenzae Type b (Hib) vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc. ... statements/hib.pdf . CDC review information for Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) VIS: Page last reviewed: April 2, ...

  18. Clinical characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in Denmark in the post-vaccination era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T.I.; Howitz, M.; Andersen, Christian Østergaard

    2010-01-01

    P>The introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine into the Danish childhood vaccination programme in 1993 may have influenced the epidemiology of H. influenzae meningitis (i.e. increasing frequency of other non-vaccine types; presentation in other age groups). Based on nationwide...

  19. Lymphocyte responses in the lungs of vaccinated pigs following homologous and heterologous influenza A virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) has been described in pigs vaccinated with whole-inactivated influenza virus (WIV) following infection with heterologous influenza A virus (IAV). WIV vaccination elicits production of non-neutralizing antibody that is cross-reactive to the chal...

  20. Influenza vaccination in children with asthma: randomized double-blind placebo- controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Bueving (Herman); R.M.D. Bernsen (Roos); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen); S. Thomas (Siep); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThere is little evidence that influenza vaccination reduces asthma exacerbations. We determined whether influenza vaccination is more effective than placebo in 6-18-year-old children with asthma. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Parenteral vaccination

  1. Crosstalk between animal and human influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Although outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild and domestic birds have been posing the threat of a new influenza pandemic for the last decade, the first pandemic of the 21st century came from swine viruses. This fact emphasizes the complexity of influenza viral ecology and the difficulty of predicting influenza viral dynamics. Complete control of influenza viruses seems impossible. However, we must minimize the impact of animal and human influenza outbreaks by learning lessons from past experiences and recognizing the current status. Here, we review the most recent influenza virology data in the veterinary field, including aspects of zoonotic agents and recent studies that assessed the pandemic potential of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. PMID:25387011

  2. Influenza vaccination among veterans with spinal cord injury: Part 2. Increasing vaccination rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Frances M; Goldstein, Barry; Evans, Charlesnika T; Legro, Marcia W; LaVela, Sherri; Smith, Bridget; Miskevics, Scott; Hammond, Margaret C

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory complications are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Influenza vaccination is effective in reducing the likelihood of contracting influenza and of subsequent respiratory complications, hospitalizations, and deaths. Historically, vaccination rates for veterans with SCI treated in Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities have been low. The objective of this study was to increase vaccination rates in this population using a multipronged strategy. A quasi-experimental design involving 2,284 veterans treated at 8 VA SCI Centers was used. Patients at 4 centers received reminder letters and educational materials tailored to SCI. Provider education included mailed reminders and posters in SCI clinical areas. Clinical champions were identified at each site. Four other centers, matched to the study sites in program size and prior vaccination rates, served as comparison sites providing usual care. Vaccination rates were assessed using mailed surveys with telephone follow-up. The influenza vaccination rate was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the comparison group (60.5% vs 54.3%; P = 0.01 ). Vaccine recipients were older than nonrecipients (mean age 60.8 vs 53.1 years; P low-cost mailed reminders and educational materials resulted in significantly higher vaccination rates. Further efforts to reach targeted subgroups of nonrecipients, such as patients who are younger or from an ethnic minority, are warranted.

  3. Safety and Efficacy of Vaccination Against Influenza in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ori Elkayam

    2006-01-01

    Vaccination against influenza is currently recommended for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The safety and efficacy of vaccination in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases is still a matter of debate. This review summarizes the studies performed on the safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccination in patients with RA as well as the rheumatic complications of the vaccine in otherwise healthy persons. Several trials have shown that the vaccine induces an adequate humoral respo...

  4. Pandemic influenza vaccines: meeting the supply, distribution and deployment challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Luc

    2009-07-01

    An influenza pandemic will place an enormous strain on the world's vaccine production, distribution and administration systems. Following a pandemic declaration, industry's priority will be to deliver as much vaccine in as short a timeframe as possible. In respect to this challenge, manufacturers have successfully developed antigen-sparing strategies and significantly increased production capacity, with further growth planned assuming ongoing rising demand for seasonal vaccines. The combination of these factors has the potential to closer meet global needs for vaccine supply than ever before through increased availability of pandemic and pre-pandemic vaccines. The demonstration of cross-clade reactivity with H5N1 viruses makes the concept of pre-pandemic stockpiling and vaccination a reality for this subtype. Ensuring these vaccines are made available in a timely fashion to those who need them will present significant challenges. For local authorities, national governments and international organisations this means defining vaccine allocation and procurement processes as well as strengthening, and where necessary establishing, the critical health systems and infrastructure required for vaccine deployment. For vaccine producers this means addressing the technical and logistical issues associated with supply. This includes working with regulators to streamline key procedures, including generic labelling and batch release, while establishing flexibility in supply formats, including bulk and finished products, to maximise the speed of delivery. Similarly, the deployment of large quantities of vaccines in an emergency situation requires appropriate transport infrastructure and the distribution of associated medical supplies. As well as addressing these issues, specific consideration must be given to the logistics and storage aspects associated with stockpiling pre-pandemic vaccines. Finally, mutually agreed contractual arrangements between manufacturers and governments

  5. Surveillance and vaccine effectiveness of an influenza epidemic predominated by vaccine-mismatched influenza B/Yamagata-lineage viruses in Taiwan, 2011-12 season.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Lo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The 2011-12 trivalent influenza vaccine contains a strain of influenza B/Victoria-lineage viruses. Despite free provision of influenza vaccine among target populations, an epidemic predominated by influenza B/Yamagata-lineage viruses occurred during the 2011-12 season in Taiwan. We characterized this vaccine-mismatched epidemic and estimated influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE. METHODS: Influenza activity was monitored through sentinel viral surveillance, emergency department (ED and outpatient influenza-like illness (ILI syndromic surveillance, and case-based surveillance of influenza with complications and deaths. VE against laboratory-confirmed influenza was evaluated through a case-control study on ILI patients enrolled into sentinel viral surveillance. Logistic regression was used to estimate VE adjusted for confounding factors. RESULTS: During July 2011-June 2012, influenza B accounted for 2,382 (72.5% of 3,285 influenza-positive respiratory specimens. Of 329 influenza B viral isolates with antigen characterization, 287 (87.2% were B/Yamagata-lineage viruses. Proportions of ED and outpatient visits being ILI-related increased from November 2011 to January 2012. Of 1,704 confirmed cases of influenza with complications, including 154 (9.0% deaths, influenza B accounted for 1,034 (60.7% of the confirmed cases and 103 (66.9% of the deaths. Reporting rates of confirmed influenza with complications and deaths were 73.5 and 6.6 per 1,000,000, respectively, highest among those aged ≥65 years, 50-64 years, 3-6 years, and 0-2 years. Adjusted VE was -31% (95% CI: -80, 4 against all influenza, 54% (95% CI: 3, 78 against influenza A, and -66% (95% CI: -132, -18 against influenza B. CONCLUSIONS: This influenza epidemic in Taiwan was predominated by B/Yamagata-lineage viruses unprotected by the 2011-12 trivalent vaccine. The morbidity and mortality of this vaccine-mismatched epidemic warrants careful consideration of introducing a

  6. Single PA mutation as a high yield determinant of avian influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ilseob; Il Kim, Jin; Park, Sehee; Bae, Joon-Yong; Yoo, Kirim; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Kim, Kisoon; Kang, Chun; Park, Man-Seong

    2017-01-01

    Human infection with an avian influenza virus persists. To prepare for a potential outbreak of avian influenza, we constructed a candidate vaccine virus (CVV) containing hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of a H5N1 virus and evaluated its antigenic stability after serial passaging in embryonated chicken eggs. The passaged CVV harbored the four amino acid mutations (R136K in PB2; E31K in PA; A172T in HA; and R80Q in M2) without changing its antigenicity, compared with the parental CVV. Notably, the passaged CVV exhibited much greater replication property both in eggs and in Madin-Darby canine kidney and Vero cells. Of the four mutations, the PA E31K showed the greatest effect on the replication property of reverse genetically-rescued viruses. In a further luciferase reporter, mini-replicon assay, the PA mutation appeared to affect the replication property by increasing viral polymerase activity. When applied to different avian influenza CVVs (H7N9 and H9N2 subtypes), the PA E31K mutation resulted in the increases of viral replication in the Vero cell again. Taken all together, our results suggest the PA E31K mutation as a single, substantial growth determinant of avian influenza CVVs and for the establishment of a high-yield avian influenza vaccine backbone. PMID:28084423

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Vaccination Against Influenza in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ori Elkayam

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination against influenza is currently recommended for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The safety and efficacy of vaccination in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases is still a matter of debate. This review summarizes the studies performed on the safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccination in patients with RA as well as the rheumatic complications of the vaccine in otherwise healthy persons. Several trials have shown that the vaccine induces an adequate humoral response and does not induce clinical exacerbation of RA. Rheumatic complications (mainly vasculitis following influenza vaccination in the general population are scarce.

  8. Long Term Persistence of IgE Anti-Influenza Virus Antibodies in Pediatric and Adult Serum Post Vaccination with Influenza Virus Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar A. Smith-Norowitz, Darrin Wong, Melanie Kusonruksa, Kevin B. Norowitz, Rauno Joks, Helen G. Durkin, Martin H. Bluth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of IgE specific to different viruses (HIV-1, Parvovirus B19, Parainfluenza virus, Varicella Zoster Virus, and the ability of IgE anti-HIV-1 to suppress HIV-1 production in vitro, strongly suggest an important role for IgE and/or anti viral specific IgE in viral pathogenesis. Nevertheless, the presence and persistence of IgE anti-Influenza virus antibodies has not been studied. Total serum IgE and specific IgE and IgG anti-Influenza virus antibodies were studied in children (N=3 (m/f 14-16 y/o and adults (N=3 (m/f, 41-49 y/o 2-20 months after vaccination with Influenza virus (Flumist® or Fluzone®, as well as in non-vaccinated children (N=2. (UniCAP total IgE Fluoroenzymeimmunoassay, ELISA, Immunoblot. We found that serum of vaccinated children and adults contained IgE and IgG anti-Influenza virus antibodies approaching two years post vaccination. Non-vaccinated children did not make either IgE or IgG anti-Influenza antibodies. Similar levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 cytokines were detected in serum of vaccinated compared with non vaccinated subjects (p>0.05, as well as between vaccinated adults compared with vaccinated children and non vaccinated subjects (p>0.05. Vaccinated children and adults continue to produce IgE anti-Influenza virus antibodies long term post vaccination. The long term production of IgE anti-Influenza virus antibodies induced by vaccination may contribute to protective immunity against Influenza.

  9. Effectiveness of influenza vaccine against laboratory-confirmed influenza, in the late 2011–2012 season in Spain, among population targeted for vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In Spain, the influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated in the last three seasons using the observational study cycEVA conducted in the frame of the existing Spanish Influenza Sentinel Surveillance System. The objective of the study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza-like illness (ILI) among the target groups for vaccination in Spain in the 2011–2012 season. We also studied influenza VE in the early (weeks 52/2011-7/2012) and late (weeks 8-14/2012) phases of the epidemic and according to time since vaccination. Methods Medically attended patients with ILI were systematically swabbed to collect information on exposure, laboratory outcome and confounding factors. Patients belonging to target groups for vaccination and who were swabbed 4 months, respectively, since vaccination. A decrease in VE with time since vaccination was only observed in individuals aged ≥ 65 years. Regarding the phase of the season, decreasing point estimates were only observed in the early phase, whereas very low or null estimates were obtained in the late phase for the shortest time interval. Conclusions The 2011–2012 influenza vaccine showed a low-to-moderate protective effect against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza in the target groups for vaccination, in a late season and with a limited match between the vaccine and circulating strains. The suggested decrease in influenza VE with time since vaccination was mostly observed in the elderly population. The decreasing protective effect of the vaccine in the late part of the season could be related to waning vaccine protection because no viral changes were identified throughout the season. PMID:24053661

  10. Long term persistence of IgE anti-influenza virus antibodies in pediatric and adult serum post vaccination with influenza virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A; Wong, Darrin; Kusonruksa, Melanie; Norowitz, Kevin B; Joks, Rauno; Durkin, Helen G; Bluth, Martin H

    2011-03-18

    The production of IgE specific to different viruses (HIV-1, Parvovirus B19, Parainfluenza virus, Varicella Zoster Virus), and the ability of IgE anti-HIV-1 to suppress HIV-1 production in vitro, strongly suggest an important role for IgE and/or anti viral specific IgE in viral pathogenesis. Nevertheless, the presence and persistence of IgE anti-Influenza virus antibodies has not been studied. Total serum IgE and specific IgE and IgG anti-Influenza virus antibodies were studied in children (N = 3) (m/f 14-16 y/o) and adults (N = 3) (m/f, 41-49 y/o) 2-20 months after vaccination with Influenza virus (Flumist(®) or Fluzone(®)), as well as in non-vaccinated children (N = 2). (UniCAP total IgE Fluoroenzymeimmunoassay, ELISA, Immunoblot). We found that serum of vaccinated children and adults contained IgE and IgG anti-Influenza virus antibodies approaching two years post vaccination. Non-vaccinated children did not make either IgE or IgG anti-Influenza antibodies. Similar levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 cytokines were detected in serum of vaccinated compared with non vaccinated subjects (p > 0.05), as well as between vaccinated adults compared with vaccinated children and non vaccinated subjects (p > 0.05). Vaccinated children and adults continue to produce IgE anti-Influenza virus antibodies long term post vaccination. The long term production of IgE anti-Influenza virus antibodies induced by vaccination may contribute to protective immunity against Influenza.

  11. Pandemic influenza vaccines and neuraminidase inhibitors: efficacy and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, D

    2011-01-01

    At the time of the outbreak of the pandemic of New Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic influenza vaccines became available via an accelerated registration procedure. In 2005 large stocks of the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir were built up in the Netherlands and other western countries. There was considerable doubt about the efficacy of this medicine. Initially reported positive effects of the drug were largely based on unpublished research, which was sponsored by the manufacturer and was partially written by ghostwriters. There now have been reports of rare and serious side effects. The first reports on the severity of the pandemic in Australia and New Zealand indicated a mild course.

  12. Immunization-Safety Monitoring Systems for the 2009 H1N1 Monovalent Influenza Vaccination Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Daniel A.; Akhtar, Aysha; Mergler, Michelle J.; Vannice, Kirsten S.; Izurieta, Hector; Ball, Robert; Lee, Grace M.; Vellozzi, Claudia; Garman, Patrick; Cunningham, Francesca; Gellin, Bruce; Koh, Howard; Lurie, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The effort to vaccinate the US population against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus hinged, in part, on public confidence in vaccine safety. Early in the vaccine program, >20% of parents reported that they would not vaccinate their children. Concerns about the safety of the vaccines were reported by man

  13. Immunization-Safety Monitoring Systems for the 2009 H1N1 Monovalent Influenza Vaccination Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Daniel A.; Akhtar, Aysha; Mergler, Michelle J.; Vannice, Kirsten S.; Izurieta, Hector; Ball, Robert; Lee, Grace M.; Vellozzi, Claudia; Garman, Patrick; Cunningham, Francesca; Gellin, Bruce; Koh, Howard; Lurie, Nicole

    The effort to vaccinate the US population against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus hinged, in part, on public confidence in vaccine safety. Early in the vaccine program, >20% of parents reported that they would not vaccinate their children. Concerns about the safety of the vaccines were reported by

  14. Multivalent HA DNA vaccination protects against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza infection in chickens and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sustained outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 in avian species increase the risk of reassortment and adaptation to humans. The ability to contain its spread in chickens would reduce this threat and help maintain the capacity for egg-based vaccine production. While vaccines offer the potential to control avian disease, a major concern of current vaccines is their potency and inability to protect against evolving avian influenza viruses. METHODOLOGY / PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ability of DNA vaccines encoding hemagglutinin (HA proteins from different HPAI H5N1 serotypes was evaluated for its ability to elicit neutralizing antibodies and to protect against homologous and heterologous HPAI H5N1 strain challenge in mice and chickens after DNA immunization by needle and syringe or with a pressure injection device. These vaccines elicited antibodies that neutralized multiple strains of HPAI H5N1 when given in combinations containing up to 10 HAs. The response was dose-dependent, and breadth was determined by the choice of the influenza virus HA in the vaccine. Monovalent and trivalent HA vaccines were tested first in mice and conferred protection against lethal H5N1 A/Vietnam/1203/2004 challenge 68 weeks after vaccination. In chickens, protection was observed against heterologous strains of HPAI H5N1 after vaccination with a trivalent H5 serotype DNA vaccine with doses as low as 5 microg DNA given twice either by intramuscular needle injection or with a needle-free device. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: DNA vaccines offer a generic approach to influenza virus immunization applicable to multiple animal species. In addition, the ability to substitute plasmids encoding different strains enables rapid adaptation of the vaccine to newly evolving field isolates.

  15. Evaluating the case for trivalent or quadrivalent influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, David

    2016-10-02

    Influenza viruses circulate widely throughout the world and it is estimated that they affect between 5 and 15% of the population annually. Since 1977, four viruses co-circulate - two A Viruses (H1N1 and H3N2) and two B viruses (B Yamagata and B Victoria). Type A viruses generally cause up to two thirds of annual infections, although single country studies have shown that B infections may be the predominant virus in the one year in four. Influenza vaccines have traditionally included the hamagglutinins and neuraminidases from the two circulating A viruses and either B Yamagata or B Victoria - however, selecting the B strain for inclusion in these trivalent vaccines has variable success. The alternative approach is to include both B strains in a quadrivalent vaccine. Immunological studies of such vaccines show non-inferiority with a trivalent vaccine comparator, and significant superiority to the additional B strain. Quadrivalent vaccines are more expensive than trivalent preparations but theoretical evidence would suggest they are likely to be more effective and therefore play a much greater role in national immunisation programmes in the future.

  16. WHO influenza vaccine technology transfer initiative: role and activities of the Technical Advisory Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Donald P; Grohmann, Gary

    2011-07-01

    In May 2006, the WHO published a Global Pandemic Influenza Action Plan. A significant part of that plan involves the transfer of technology necessary to build production capacity in developing countries. The WHO influenza technology transfer initiative has been successful. Clearly the relatively small WHO investments made in these companies to develop their own influenza vaccine production facilities have had quite dramatic results. A few companies are already producing large amounts of influenza vaccine. Others will soon follow. Whether they are developing egg-based or planning non-egg based influenza vaccine production, all companies are optimistic that their efforts will come to fruition.

  17. Engineering temperature sensitive live attenuated influenza vaccines from emerging viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Li, Yan; Speer, Scott D; Subba, Anju; Lin, Xudong; Wentworth, David E

    2012-05-21

    The licensed live attenuated influenza A vaccine (LAIV) in the United States is created by making a reassortant containing six internal genes from a cold-adapted master donor strain (ca A/AA/6/60) and two surface glycoprotein genes from a circulating/emerging strain (e.g., A/CA/7/09 for the 2009/2010 H1N1 pandemic). Technologies to rapidly create recombinant viruses directly from patient specimens were used to engineer alternative LAIV candidates that have genomes composed entirely of vRNAs from pandemic or seasonal strains. Multiple mutations involved in the temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype of the ca A/AA/6/60 master donor strain were introduced into a 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain rA/New York/1682/2009 (rNY1682-WT) to create rNY1682-TS1, and additional mutations identified in other ts viruses were added to rNY1682-TS1 to create rNY1682-TS2. Both rNY1682-TS1 and rNY1682-TS2 replicated efficiently at 30°C and 33°C. However, rNY1682-TS1 was partially restricted, and rNY1682-TS2 was completely restricted at 39°C. Additionally, engineering the TS1 or TS2 mutations into a distantly related human seasonal H1N1 influenza A virus also resulted pronounced restriction of replication in vitro. Clinical symptoms and virus replication in the lungs of mice showed that although rNY1682-TS2 and the licensed FluMist(®)-H1N1pdm LAIV that was used to combat the 2009/2010 pandemic were similarly attenuated, the rNY1682-TS2 was more protective upon challenge with a virulent mutant of pandemic H1N1 virus or a heterologous H1N1 (A/PR/8/1934) virus. This study demonstrates that engineering key temperature sensitive mutations (PB1-K391E, D581G, A661T; PB2-P112S, N265S, N556D, Y658H) into the genomes of influenza A viruses attenuates divergent human virus lineages and provides an alternative strategy for the generation of LAIVs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence and factors associated with 2009 to 2011 influenza vaccinations at a university medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Kathleen A; Myers, Ronnie; Magda, Lori A; Morse, Stephen S; Brandt-Rauf, Paul; Gershon, Robyn R M

    2013-09-01

    Information on the rates and factors associated with influenza vaccinations, although limited, is important because it can inform the development of effective vaccination campaigns in a university medical center setting. A study was conducted in 2011 to identify individual and organizational level barriers and facilitators to influenza vaccination among clinical and nonclinical personnel (N = 428) from a major university medical center. Seventy-one percent of clinical personnel (n = 170) reported pandemic H1N1 vaccination compared with 27% of nonclinical personnel (n = 258), even though vaccine was made widely available to all personnel at no cost. Similarly, disparate rates between clinical and nonclinical personnel were noted for the 2009/2010 seasonal influenza vaccine (82% vs 42%, respectively) and 2010/2011 combination (pandemic plus seasonal) influenza vaccine (73% vs 28%, respectively). Factors associated with pandemic vaccination in nonclinical personnel included the following: high level of influenza-related knowledge, concern regarding influenza contagion, history of previous influenza vaccinations or influenza illness, participation in vaccine-related training, and awareness of the institution's written pandemic plan. For clinicians, past history of seasonal influenza vaccination was associated with pandemic vaccination. For all participants, taking any 1 or more of the 3 influenza vaccines available in 2009 to 2011 was associated with intent to take a hypothetical future novel pandemic vaccine (odds ratio, 6.7; 95% confidence interval: 4.32-10.44; P vaccination uptake are amenable to organizational strategies. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Increasing influenza vaccination in New York City taxi drivers: A community driven approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gany, Francesca; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Mujawar, Imran

    2015-05-21

    The Healthy People 2020 influenza immunization goal is 80% for non-institutionalized adults 18-64. However, vaccination rates remain stubbornly low. Culturally tailored approaches to communities with poor vaccine uptake are necessary. Taxi drivers are at risk for influenza and its complications, could serve as vectors for influenza infection, and could be an effective vaccination target to enhance herd immunity of the urban population. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study related to influenza vaccination among taxi drivers. The NYC Taxi Network surveyed a convenience sample of 53 taxi drivers to understand vaccination barriers. Only 17% had been vaccinated. Results informed a pilot tailored workplace intervention, which resulted in vaccinations for 44% of unvaccinated drivers. The study revealed that older drivers were more likely to be vaccinated than younger drivers, while the most common barrier to immunization was that drivers thought vaccination was 'not necessary'.

  20. Hospital-based influenza vaccination of children: an opportunity to prevent subsequent hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerr, Danielle M; Englund, Janet A; Robertson, Andrea S; Marcuse, Edgar K; Garrison, Michelle M; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2008-02-01

    We performed this study to determine the frequency of previous hospitalization among children hospitalized with influenza. The Pediatric Health Information System database (discharges that occurred between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2006) was used to determine the proportion of children hospitalized with influenza or respiratory illness who had a previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season. Subjects included pediatric patients (through 18 years of age). The index hospitalization was defined as the first influenza or respiratory illness hospitalization for a child that occurred during the study period and between November 1 and April 30. A previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season was defined as a hospitalization for any reason in the 0.5 to 6 months before the index hospitalization but not before September 1 or on or after March 1. Overall, 16% of children hospitalized with influenza and 12% of children hospitalized with influenza or a respiratory illness had a previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season. Approximately 23% of the children hospitalized with influenza and a comorbidity had a previous hospitalization during the most recent influenza-vaccination season. Hospital-based programs for influenza vaccination have the potential to reach children at highest risk of influenza complications and to reduce the rates of pediatric hospitalization for treatment of influenza-related illness.

  1. Safety and immunogenicity of 3 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines in the Chinese military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dongqi; Yang, Huisuo; Deng, Bing; Yin, Gang; Song, Wenjing; Zhang, Haiyang; Li, Yapin

    2016-10-02

    Influenza, caused by the influenza virus, is a contagious acute viral respiratory disease with a high incidence rate and wide and rapid spread. Influenza-related morbidity, mortality, and hospitalization rates remain high and are increasing continuously in high-risk groups, with a significant impact on human health and the economy. In order to evaluate the immunogenicity of 3 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines in Chinese military, we conducted this field trial. We assessed the safety and immunogenicity of 3 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines(TIVs)manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline(GSK), Beijing Sinovac Biotech (Sinovac), and Shenzhen Sanofi Pasteur (Pasteur) in healthy Chinese servicemen. We used theimported GSKTIV as the control, comparing it with the 2 domestic TIVs in a 1:1:1randomized, double-blind, controlled trial in a military command in Beijing. Healthy individuals, aged between 18 and 34 years, who had not received any influenza vaccine in the preceding3 years were enrolled and administered one dose of a TIV. Safety data were collected throughout the whole study (day 0 to day 30). Blood samples were collected to assess the subjects' immunogenicity before vaccination and 21 d after vaccination. In total, 292 subjects enrolled in the study. Twelve participants (4.1%) reported 12 adverse events. The incidence of adverse events was 1%, 5%, and7% for the GSK, Sinovac, and Pasteur TIVs, respectively. The reported injection-site reaction frequencies were similar for all 3 TIVs (p = 0.217). However, the proportion of systemic reactions was higher after the GSKTIV than after the Pasteur or Sinovac TIV (7.1% vs 3.1% or1%, respectively; p = 0.020). Three TIVs satisfied both the European and US Food and Drug Administration criteria for H1N1-179, H1N1-74, H3N2, and B strains based on the post vaccination sero-protection, the sero-conversion rate, and the geometric mean titer ratio. The Sinovac TIV, Pasteur TIV, and GSK TIV were well tolerated and immunogenic in

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of 3 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines in the Chinese military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dongqi; Yang, Huisuo; Deng, Bing; Yin, Gang; Song, Wenjing; Zhang, Haiyang; Li, Yapin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza, caused by the influenza virus, is a contagious acute viral respiratory disease with a high incidence rate and wide and rapid spread. Influenza-related morbidity, mortality, and hospitalization rates remain high and are increasing continuously in high-risk groups, with a significant impact on human health and the economy. In order to evaluate the immunogenicity of 3 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines in Chinese military, we conducted this field trial. We assessed the safety and immunogenicity of 3 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines(TIVs)manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline(GSK), Beijing Sinovac Biotech (Sinovac), and Shenzhen Sanofi Pasteur (Pasteur) in healthy Chinese servicemen. We used theimported GSKTIV as the control, comparing it with the 2 domestic TIVs in a 1:1:1randomized, double-blind, controlled trial in a military command in Beijing. Healthy individuals, aged between 18 and 34 years, who had not received any influenza vaccine in the preceding3 years were enrolled and administered one dose of a TIV. Safety data were collected throughout the whole study (day 0 to day 30). Blood samples were collected to assess the subjects' immunogenicity before vaccination and 21 d after vaccination. In total, 292 subjects enrolled in the study. Twelve participants (4.1%) reported 12 adverse events. The incidence of adverse events was 1%, 5%, and7% for the GSK, Sinovac, and Pasteur TIVs, respectively. The reported injection-site reaction frequencies were similar for all 3 TIVs (p = 0.217). However, the proportion of systemic reactions was higher after the GSKTIV than after the Pasteur or Sinovac TIV (7.1% vs 3.1% or1%, respectively; p = 0.020). Three TIVs satisfied both the European and US Food and Drug Administration criteria for H1N1–179, H1N1–74, H3N2, and B strains based on the post vaccination sero-protection, the sero-conversion rate, and the geometric mean titer ratio. The Sinovac TIV, Pasteur TIV, and GSK TIV were well tolerated and

  3. Live, attenuated influenza A H5N1 candidate vaccines provide broad cross-protection in mice and ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amorsolo L Suguitan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic influenza A H5N1 viruses in humans and avian species that began in Asia and have spread to other continents underscore an urgent need to develop vaccines that would protect the human population in the event of a pandemic. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Live, attenuated candidate vaccines possessing genes encoding a modified H5 hemagglutinin (HA and a wild-type (wt N1 neuraminidase from influenza A H5N1 viruses isolated in Hong Kong and Vietnam in 1997, 2003, and 2004, and remaining gene segments derived from the cold-adapted (ca influenza A vaccine donor strain, influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca (H2N2, were generated by reverse genetics. The H5N1 ca vaccine viruses required trypsin for efficient growth in vitro, as predicted by the modification engineered in the gene encoding the HA, and possessed the temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotypes specified by the internal protein genes of the ca vaccine donor strain. More importantly, the candidate vaccines were immunogenic in mice. Four weeks after receiving a single dose of 10(6 50% tissue culture infectious doses of intranasally administered vaccines, mice were fully protected from lethality following challenge with homologous and antigenically distinct heterologous wt H5N1 viruses from different genetic sublineages (clades 1, 2, and 3 that were isolated in Asia between 1997 and 2005. Four weeks after receiving two doses of the vaccines, mice and ferrets were fully protected against pulmonary replication of homologous and heterologous wt H5N1 viruses. CONCLUSIONS: The promising findings in these preclinical studies of safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the H5N1 ca vaccines against antigenically diverse H5N1 vaccines provide support for their careful evaluation in Phase 1 clinical trials in humans.

  4. Evaluating the effectiveness, impact and safety of live attenuated and seasonal inactivated influenza vaccination: protocol for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Effectiveness II (SIVE II) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Nazir I; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Robertson, Chris; McMenamin, Jim; von Wissmann, Beatrix; Vasileiou, Eleftheria; Butler, Chris; Ritchie, Lewis D; Gunson, Rory; Schwarze, Jürgen; Sheikh, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Seasonal (inactivated) influenza vaccination is recommended for all individuals aged 65+ and in individuals under 65 who are at an increased risk of complications of influenza infection, for example, people with asthma. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) was recommended for children as they are thought to be responsible for much of the transmission of influenza to the populations at risk of serious complications from influenza. A phased roll-out of the LAIV pilot programme began in 2013/2014. There is limited evidence for vaccine effectiveness (VE) in the populations targeted for influenza vaccination. The aim of this study is to examine the safety and effectiveness of the live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine programme in children and the inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination programme among different age and at-risk groups of people. Methods and analysis Test negative and cohort study designs will be used to estimate VE. A primary care database covering 1.25 million people in Scotland for the period 2000/2001 to 2015/2016 will be linked to the Scottish Immunisation Recall Service (SIRS), Health Protection Scotland virology database, admissions to Scottish hospitals and the Scottish death register. Vaccination status (including LAIV uptake) will be determined from the primary care and SIRS database. The primary outcome will be influenza-positive real-time PCR tests carried out in sentinel general practices and other healthcare settings. Secondary outcomes include influenza-like illness and asthma-related general practice consultations, hospitalisations and death. An instrumental variable analysis will be carried out to account for confounding. Self-controlled study designs will be used to estimate the risk of adverse events associated with influenza vaccination. Ethics and dissemination We obtained approval from the National Research Ethics Service Committee, West Midlands—Edgbaston. The study findings will be presented at

  5. Use of computational and recombinant technologies for developing novel influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terianne M; Ross, Ted M

    2016-01-01

    Influenza vaccine design has changed considerably with advancements in bioinformatics and computational biology. Improved surveillance efforts provide up-to-date information about influenza sequence diversity and assist with monitoring the spread of epidemics and vaccine efficacy rates. The advent of next-generation sequencing, epitope scanning and high-throughput analysis all help decipher influenza-associated protein interactions as well as predict immune responsiveness based on host genetic diversity. Computational approaches are utilized in nearly all aspects of vaccine design, from modeling, compatibility predictions, and optimization of antigens in various platforms. This overview discusses how computational techniques strengthen vaccine efforts against highly diverse influenza species.

  6. Incidence of medically attended influenza infection and cases averted by vaccination, 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 influenza seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael L; Jackson, Lisa A; Kieke, Burney; McClure, David; Gaglani, Manjusha; Murthy, Kempapura; Malosh, Ryan; Monto, Arnold; Zimmerman, Richard K; Foppa, Ivo M; Flannery, Brendan; Thompson, Mark G

    2015-09-22

    We estimated the burden of outpatient influenza and cases prevented by vaccination during the 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 influenza seasons using data from the United States Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness (US Flu VE) Network. We defined source populations of persons who could seek care for acute respiratory illness (ARI) at each of the five US Flu VE Network sites. We identified all members of the source population who were tested for influenza during US Flu VE influenza surveillance. Each influenza-positive subject received a sampling weight based on the proportion of source population members who were tested for influenza, stratified by site, age, and other factors. We used the sampling weights to estimate the cumulative incidence of medically attended influenza in the source populations. We estimated cases averted by vaccination using estimates of cumulative incidence, vaccine coverage, and vaccine effectiveness. Cumulative incidence of medically attended influenza ranged from 0.8% to 2.8% across sites during 2011/2012 and from 2.6% to 6.5% during the 2012/2013 season. Stratified by age, incidence ranged from 1.2% among adults 50 years of age and older in 2011/2012 to 10.9% among children 6 months to 8 years of age in 2012/2013. Cases averted by vaccination ranged from 4 to 41 per 1000 vaccinees, depending on the study site and year. The incidence of medically attended influenza varies greatly by year and even by geographic region within the same year. The number of cases averted by vaccination varies greatly based on overall incidence and on vaccine coverage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Strategies to improve influenza vaccination coverage in Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, F; Richart, M J; Serrano, S; Martínez, A M; Pruteanu, D F

    2016-04-01

    Vaccination coverage reached in adults is insufficient, and there is a real need for new strategies. To compare strategies for improving influenza vaccination coverage in persons older than 64 years. New strategies were introduced in our health care centre during 2013-2014 influenza vaccination campaign, which included vaccinating patients in homes for the aged as well as in the health care centre. A comparison was made on vaccination coverage over the last 4 years in 3 practices of our health care centre: P1, the general physician vaccinated patients older than 64 that came to the practice; P2, the general physician systematically insisted in vaccination in elderly patients, strongly advising to book appointments, and P3, the general physician did not insist. These practices looked after P1: 278; P2: 320; P3: 294 patients older than 64 years. Overall/P1/P2/P3 coverages in 2010: 51.2/51.4/55/46.9% (P=NS), in 2011: 52.4/52.9/53.8/50.3% (P=NS), in 2012: 51.9/52.5/55.3/47.6% (P=NS), and in 2013: 63.5/79.1/59.7/52.7 (P=.000, P1 versus P2 and P3; P=NS between P2 and P3). Comparing the coverages in 2012-2013 within each practice P1 (P=.000); P2 (P=.045); P3 (P=.018). In P2 and P3 all vaccinations were given by the nurses as previously scheduled. In P3, 55% of the vaccinations were given by the nurses, 24.1% by the GP, 9.7% rejected vaccination, and the remainder did not come to the practice during the vaccination period (October 2013-February 2014). The strategy of vaccinating in the homes for the aged improved the vaccination coverage by 5% in each practice. The strategy of "I've got you here, I jab you here" in P1 improved the vaccination coverage by 22%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards a cross-protective influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Braeckel-Budimir, Natalija

    2012-01-01

    Omdat griep met name voor jonge kinderen en ouderen gevaarlijk kan zijn, is het belangrijk dat er goede vaccins zijn. De effectiviteit van de huidige griepvaccins laat te wensen over. Het promotieonderzoek van Natalija Budimir laat zien dat een ‘oud’, in onbruik geraakt vaccin mogelijk

  9. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Rate for Medical Staff: Influence of Hospital-Based Vaccination Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, T M; Szymańczak, M; Jakubiak, J; Nitsch-Osuch, A; Życińska, K

    2016-01-01

    Despite intensive recommendations, influenza vaccination rate in medical staff in Poland ranges from about 20 % in physicians to 10 % in nurses. The objective of this work was to assess the influence of hospital influenza vaccination campaign directed toward health care workers, combined with dispensing free of charge vaccine, on vaccination rate. The campaign was conducted by the Hospital Infection Control Team of the Czerniakowski Hospital in Warsaw, Poland, separately for physicians, nurses, and physiotherapists. Overall, 37 % of medical staff were vaccinated, including 55 % of physicians and 21 % of nurses. Concerning physicians, the greatest vaccination rate was in the orthopedic (80 %) and ophthalmology units (73 %), whereas the lowest rate was in the intensive care (22 %) and neurology units (20 %). Concerning nurses, the greatest vaccination rate was in those working in the outpatient (40 %) and emergency units (29 %), whereas the lowest rate was in the ophthalmology (6 %) and surgery units (11 %). We conclude that the professional knowledge campaign combined with the incentive of free of charge vaccine substantially raises the vaccination rate among medical staff.

  10. Early estimates of seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness - United States, January 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Brendan; Clippard, Jessie; Zimmerman, Richard K; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Jackson, Michael L; Jackson, Lisa A; Monto, Arnold S; Petrie, Joshua G; McLean, Huong Q; Belongia, Edward A; Gaglani, Manjusha; Berman, LaShondra; Foust, Angie; Sessions, Wendy; Thaker, Swathi N; Spencer, Sarah; Fry, Alicia M

    2015-01-16

    In the United States, annual vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months. Each season since 2004-05, CDC has estimated the effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine in preventing medically attended acute respiratory illness (ARI) associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza. This season, early estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness are possible because of widespread, early circulation of influenza viruses. By January 3, 2015, 46 states were experiencing widespread flu activity, with predominance of influenza A (H3N2) viruses. This report presents an initial estimate of seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness at preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza virus infection associated with medically attended ARI based on data from 2,321 children and adults enrolled in the U.S. Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network (Flu VE) during November 10, 2014-January 2, 2015. During this period, overall vaccine effectiveness (VE) (adjusted for study site, age, sex, race/ethnicity, self-rated health, and days from illness onset to enrollment) against laboratory-confirmed influenza associated with medically attended ARI was 23% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 8%-36%). Most influenza infections were due to A (H3N2) viruses. This interim VE estimate is relatively low compared with previous seasons when circulating viruses and vaccine viruses were well-matched and likely reflects the fact that more than two-thirds of circulating A (H3N2) viruses are antigenically and genetically different (drifted) from the A (H3N2) vaccine component of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere seasonal influenza vaccines. These early, low VE estimates underscore the need for ongoing influenza prevention and treatment measures. CDC continues to recommend influenza vaccination because the vaccine can still prevent some infections with the currently circulating A (H3N2) viruses as well as other viruses that might circulate later in the season, including influenza B

  11. [Pandemic without drama. Influenza vaccination and Asian flu in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    The history of the 1957/58 Asian flu in Germany is systematically presented for the first time. The focus is on flu vaccination, which is discussed as a yardstick of the perception of the pandemic. International expertise on influenza virology was predominantly based in Anglo-Saxon countries. German microbiologists issued no clear recommendation for preventative vaccination until 1960. Instead, quinine was relied upon as the traditional medicinal prophylaxis. Antibiotics were more frequently administered. In East Germany, little fuss was made over the Asian flu. In line with the authorities' social hygiene orientation, vaccination was accepted as a matter of principle. In the Federal Republic and West Berlin, the population rejected the vaccination largely. It was seen as a scandal that many employees were on sick leave because of the flu, thus adversely affecting the economy.

  12. Baseline levels of influenza-specific CD4 memory T-cells affect T-cell responses to influenza vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Song He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors affecting immune responses to influenza vaccines have not been studied systematically. We hypothesized that T-cell and antibody responses to the vaccines are functions of pre-existing host immunity against influenza antigens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the 2004 and 2005 influenza seasons, we have collected data on cellular and humoral immune reactivity to influenza virus in blood samples collected before and after immunization with inactivated or live attenuated influenza vaccines in healthy children and adults. We first used cross-validated lasso regression on the 2004 dataset to identify a group of candidate baseline correlates with T-cell and antibody responses to vaccines, defined as fold-increase in influenza-specific T-cells and serum HAI titer after vaccination. The following baseline parameters were examined: percentages of influenza-reactive IFN-gamma(+ cells in T and NK cell subsets, percentages of influenza-specific memory B-cells, HAI titer, age, and type of vaccine. The candidate baseline correlates were then tested with the independent 2005 dataset. Baseline percentage of influenza-specific IFN-gamma(+ CD4 T-cells was identified as a significant correlate of CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses, with lower baseline levels associated with larger T-cell responses. Baseline HAI titer and vaccine type were identified as significant correlates for HAI response, with lower baseline levels and the inactivated vaccine associated with larger HAI responses. Previously we reported that baseline levels of CD56(dim NK reactivity against influenza virus inversely correlated with the immediate T-cell response to vaccination, and that NK reactivity induced by influenza virus depended on IL-2 produced by influenza-specific memory T-cells. Taken together these results suggest a novel mechanism for the homeostasis of virus-specific T-cells, which involves interaction between memory helper T-cells, CD56(dim NK and DC

  13. Influenza neuraminidase as a vaccine antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuraminidase protein of influenza viruses is a surface glycoprotein that has enzymatic activity to remove sialic acid, the viral receptor, from both viral and host proteins. The removal of sialic acid from viral proteins plays a key role in the release of the virus from the cell by preventing ...

  14. Does influenza vaccination improve pregnancy outcome? Methodological issues and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, David A; Fell, Deshayne B; Ortiz, Justin R; Bhat, Niranjan

    2015-11-25

    Evidence that influenza vaccination during pregnancy is safe and effective at preventing influenza disease in women and their children through the first months of life is increasing. Several reports of reduced risk of adverse outcomes associated with influenza vaccination have generated interest in its potential for improving pregnancy outcome. Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, estimates maternal influenza immunization programs in low-income countries would have a relatively modest impact on mortality compared to other new or under-utilized vaccines, however the impact would be substantially greater if reported vaccine effects on improved pregnancy outcomes were accurate. Here, we examine the available evidence and methodological issues bearing on the relationship between influenza vaccination and pregnancy outcome, particularly preterm birth and fetal growth restriction, and summarize research needs. Evidence for absence of harm associated with vaccination at a point in time is not symmetric with evidence of benefit, given the scenario in which vaccination reduces risk of influenza disease and, in turn, risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. The empirical evidence for vaccination preventing influenza in pregnant women is strong, but the evidence that influenza itself causes adverse pregnancy outcomes is inconsistent and limited in quality. Studies of vaccination and pregnancy outcome have produced mixed evidence of potential benefit but are limited in terms of influenza disease assessment and control of confounding, and their analytic methods often fail to fully address the longitudinal nature of pregnancy and influenza prevalence. We recommend making full use of results of randomized trials, re-analysis of existing observational studies to account for confounding and time-related factors, and quantitative assessment of the potential benefits of vaccination in improving pregnancy outcome, all of which should be informed by the collective engagement of experts in influenza

  15. School-located influenza vaccination reduces community risk for influenza and influenza-like illness emergency care visits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuc H Tran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: School-located influenza vaccination (SLIV programs can substantially enhance the sub-optimal coverage achieved under existing delivery strategies. Randomized SLIV trials have shown these programs reduce laboratory-confirmed influenza among both vaccinated and unvaccinated children. This work explores the effectiveness of a SLIV program in reducing the community risk of influenza and influenza-like illness (ILI associated emergency care visits. METHODS: For the 2011/12 and 2012/13 influenza seasons, we estimated age-group specific attack rates (AR for ILI from routine surveillance and census data. Age-group specific SLIV program effectiveness was estimated as one minus the AR ratio for Alachua County versus two comparison regions: the 12 county region surrounding Alachua County, and all non-Alachua counties in Florida. RESULTS: Vaccination of ∼50% of 5-17 year-olds in Alachua reduced their risk of ILI-associated visits, compared to the rest of Florida, by 79% (95% confidence interval: 70, 85 in 2011/12 and 71% (63, 77 in 2012/13. The greatest indirect effectiveness was observed among 0-4 year-olds, reducing AR by 89% (84, 93 in 2011/12 and 84% (79, 88 in 2012/13. Among all non-school age residents, the estimated indirect effectiveness was 60% (54, 65 and 36% (31, 41 for 2011/12 and 2012/13. The overall effectiveness among all age-groups was 65% (61, 70 and 46% (42, 50 for 2011/12 and 2012/13. CONCLUSION: Wider implementation of SLIV programs can significantly reduce the influenza-associated public health burden in communities.

  16. Influenza bivalent vaccine comprising recombinant H3 hemagglutinin (HA) and H1 HA containing replaced H3 hemagglutinin transmembrane domain exhibited improved heterosubtypic protection immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiliang; Xue, Chunyi; Zheng, Jing; Liu, Kang; Wang, Yang; Wei, Ying; Liu, George Dacai; Cao, Yongchang

    2015-07-31

    Influenza caused by infection of influenza viruses is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in human. Vaccination is the main defense against influenza virus, but current influenza trivalent or quatrivalent vaccines (TIV/QIV) would lose their effectiveness when vaccine strains are mismatched with circulating strains. Our early study showed that recombinant influenza Hx-TM HA proteins containing H3 HA transmembrane domain(TM) had improved immunogenicity and heterosubtypic protection over corresponding wild-type Hx-WT HA proteins. In present study, bivalent vaccines containing H3-WT+Hx-TM were investigated for their immune responses and heterosubtypic protection immunities. The data showed that the bivalent vaccines containing H3-WT and H5-TM or H1-TM had improved immune responses and heterosubtypic protection over the bivalent vaccines containing H3-WT and H5-WT or H1-WT respectively. These results demonstrated that the improved immune responses and heterosubtypic protection of Hx-TM HA proteins could be translated into bivalent vaccines, suggesting a feasible strategy of improving the immune responses and heterosubtypic protection of influenza multivalent vaccines such as TIV and QIV.

  17. Evaluation of targeted influenza vaccination strategies via population modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Glasser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because they can generate comparable predictions, mathematical models are ideal tools for evaluating alternative drug or vaccine allocation strategies. To remain credible, however, results must be consistent. Authors of a recent assessment of possible influenza vaccination strategies conclude that older children, adolescents, and young adults are the optimal targets, no matter the objective, and argue for vaccinating them. Authors of two earlier studies concluded, respectively, that optimal targets depend on objectives and cautioned against changing policy. Which should we believe? METHODS AND FINDINGS: In matrices whose elements are contacts between persons by age, the main diagonal always predominates, reflecting contacts between contemporaries. Indirect effects (e.g., impacts of vaccinating one group on morbidity or mortality in others result from off-diagonal elements. Mixing matrices based on periods in proximity with others have greater sub- and super-diagonals, reflecting contacts between parents and children, and other off-diagonal elements (reflecting, e.g., age-independent contacts among co-workers, than those based on face-to-face conversations. To assess the impact of targeted vaccination, we used a time-usage study's mixing matrix and allowed vaccine efficacy to vary with age. And we derived mortality rates either by dividing observed deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza by average annual cases from a demographically-realistic SEIRS model or by multiplying those rates by ratios of (versus adding to them differences between pandemic and pre-pandemic mortalities. CONCLUSIONS: In our simulations, vaccinating older children, adolescents, and young adults averts the most cases, but vaccinating either younger children and older adults or young adults averts the most deaths, depending on the age distribution of mortality. These results are consistent with those of the earlier studies.

  18. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Broadly Neutralizing against Influenza B Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasugi, Mayo; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kawashita, Norihito; Du, Anariwa; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Misaki, Ryo; Kuhara, Motoki; Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Nakaya, Takaaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has the ability to evade host immune surveillance through rapid viral genetic drift and reassortment; therefore, it remains a continuous public health threat. The development of vaccines producing broadly reactive antibodies, as well as therapeutic strategies using human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) with global reactivity, has been gathering great interest recently. Here, three hybridoma clones producing HuMAbs against influenza B virus, designated 5A7, 3A2 and 10C4, were prepared using peripheral lymphocytes from vaccinated volunteers, and were investigated for broad cross-reactive neutralizing activity. Of these HuMAbs, 3A2 and 10C4, which recognize the readily mutable 190-helix region near the receptor binding site in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, react only with the Yamagata lineage of influenza B virus. By contrast, HuMAb 5A7 broadly neutralizes influenza B strains that were isolated from 1985 to 2006, belonging to both Yamagata and Victoria lineages. Epitope mapping revealed that 5A7 recognizes 316G, 318C and 321W near the C terminal of HA1, a highly conserved region in influenza B virus. Indeed, no mutations in the amino acid residues of the epitope region were induced, even after the virus was passaged ten times in the presence of HuMAb 5A7. Moreover, 5A7 showed significant therapeutic efficacy in mice, even when it was administered 72 hours post-infection. These results indicate that 5A7 is a promising candidate for developing therapeutics, and provide insight for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza B virus. PMID:23408886

  19. Vaccine failure caused an outbreak of equine influenza in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbic, Ljubo; Madic, Josip; Turk, Nenad; Daly, Janet

    2009-01-01

    In April 2004 an outbreak of equine influenza occurred at the Zagreb hippodrome, Croatia. Clinical respiratory disease of the same intensity was recorded in vaccinated and non-vaccinated horses. The equine influenza vaccine used in Croatia at the time of the outbreak contained the strains A/equine/Miami/63 (H3N8), A/equine/Fontainebleau/79 (H3N8) and A/equine/Prague/56 (H7N7). At the same time, the usual strains in vaccines used in Europe were, in accordance with the recommendation of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Expert Surveillance Panel on equine influenza, A/equine/Newmarket/1/93 (H3N8) and A/equine/Newmarket/2/93 (H3N8). At the same time, some current vaccines in the USA contained A/equine/Kentucky/97 (H3N8). Genetic characterization of the HA1 portion of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene of virus isolated from the outbreak indicated that the isolate (A/equine/Zagreb/04) was an H3N8 strain closely related to recent representative viruses of the American lineage Florida sub-lineage. In comparison with both H3N8 vaccine strains used in horses at the Zagreb hippodrome, A/equine/Zagreb/04 displayed amino acids changes localised to 4 of the 5 described antigenic sites (A-D) of subunit protein HA1. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the HA1 subunit protein of the outbreak strain with that of A/equine/Newmarket/1/93 displayed three amino acids changes localised in antigenic sites B and C, while antigenic sites A, D and E were unchanged. The Zagreb 2004 outbreak strain had the same amino acids at antigenic sites of the HA1 subunit protein as the strain A/equine/Kentucky/97. Amino acid changes in antigenic sites between HA1 subunit of the outbreak strain and the strains used in the vaccines likely accounted for the vaccine failure and the same clinical signs in vaccinated and unvaccinated horses. Use of a recent strain in vaccines should limit future outbreaks.

  20. An Atypical Case of Pityriasis Rosea Gigantea after Influenza Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Papakostas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rosea is a common erythematosquamous eruption, typically presenting along the cleavage lines of the skin. A wide spectrum of atypical manifestations may challenge even the most experienced physician. Here we report a rare case of a suberythrodermic pityriasis rosea with gigantic plaques after an influenza vaccination, and we discuss the possible triggers of atypical manifestations of such a common dermatological disease in the setting of an altered immunity.

  1. DoD Influenza Surveillance and Vaccine Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Specimens within the DoD, 2013 - 2014 Contributors Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Science – Bangkok , Thailand Brooke Army Medical Center...3. This is a continuation of the direction from 2012 -2013 season. • Only 15% of H3 sequences were from US 15 Influenza A(H3N2) HA Phylogenetic...Vaccine strain: A/Texas/50/ 2012 Reference Strain July-August 2013 53% September-October 2013 16% November-December

  2. An Atypical Case of Pityriasis Rosea Gigantea after Influenza Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Papakostas; Stavropoulos, Panagiotis G; Dafni Papafragkaki; Ekaterini Grigoraki; Georgia Avgerinou; Christina Antoniou

    2014-01-01

    Pityriasis rosea is a common erythematosquamous eruption, typically presenting along the cleavage lines of the skin. A wide spectrum of atypical manifestations may challenge even the most experienced physician. Here we report a rare case of a suberythrodermic pityriasis rosea with gigantic plaques after an influenza vaccination, and we discuss the possible triggers of atypical manifestations of such a common dermatological disease in the setting of an altered immunity.

  3. Single-dose monomeric HA subunit vaccine generates full protection from influenza challenge

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mallajosyula, JK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are an efficient strategy to meet the demands of a possible influenza pandemic, because of rapid and scalable production. However, vaccines made from recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) subunit protein are often of low...

  4. Elementary school-based influenza vaccination: evaluating impact on respiratory illness absenteeism and laboratory-confirmed influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjos, Sonia A; Irving, Stephanie A; Meece, Jennifer K; Belongia, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness in schools have assessed all-cause absenteeism rather than laboratory-confirmed influenza. We conducted an observational pilot study to identify absences due to respiratory illness and laboratory-confirmed influenza in schools with and without school-based vaccination. A local public health agency initiated school-based influenza vaccination in two Wisconsin elementary schools during October 2010 (exposed schools); two nearby schools served as a comparison group (non-exposed schools). Absences due to fever or cough illness were monitored for 12 weeks. During the 4 weeks of peak influenza activity, parents of absent children with fever/cough illness were contacted and offered influenza testing. Parental consent for sharing absenteeism data was obtained for 937 (57%) of 1,640 students. Fifty-two percent and 28%, respectively, of all students in exposed and non-exposed schools were vaccinated. Absences due to fever or cough illness were significantly lower in the exposed schools during seven of 12 surveillance weeks. Twenty-seven percent of students at exposed schools and 39% at unexposed schools had one or more days of absence due to fever/cough illness (pstudents absent for other reasons (p = 0.23). During the 4 week period of influenza testing, respiratory samples were obtained for 68 (42%) of 163 episodes of absence due to fever or cough illness. Influenza was detected in 6 students; 3 attended exposed schools. Detection of laboratory-confirmed influenza in schools was challenging due to multiple consent requirements, difficulty obtaining samples from absent children, and a mild influenza season. School-based influenza vaccination was associated with reduced absenteeism due to fever or cough illness, but not absenteeism for other reasons. Although nonspecific, absence due to fever or cough illness may be a useful surrogate endpoint in school-based studies if identification of laboratory confirmed influenza is not

  5. Pandemic Influenza Vaccines – The Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cox

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years’ enzootic spread of highly pathogenic H5N1 virus among poultry and the many lethal zoonoses in its wake has stimulated basic and applied pandemic vaccine research. The quest for an efficacious, affordable and timely accessible pandemic vaccine has been high on the agenda. When a variant H1N1 strain of swine origin emerged as a pandemic virus, it surprised many, as this subtype is well-known to man as a seasonal virus. This review will cover some difficult vaccine questions, such as the immunological challenges, the new production platforms, and the limited supply and global equity issues.

  6. Quantitation of antibody-secreting cells in the blood after vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Heilmann, C; Andersen, V

    1990-01-01

    The human B-lymphocyte response to protein-conjugated polysaccharide antigens has not previously been studied at the cellular level. In order to do so, we developed and evaluated haemolytic plaque-forming cell assays detecting Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide-specific a......The human B-lymphocyte response to protein-conjugated polysaccharide antigens has not previously been studied at the cellular level. In order to do so, we developed and evaluated haemolytic plaque-forming cell assays detecting Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide...... capsular polysaccharides from Hib and pneumococci. The predominance of IgA AbSC in response to both conjugate and pure polysaccharide vaccines is probably due to reactivation of the same clones of IgA-committed memory B cells originally primed at the mucosa by natural exposure to the polysaccharide...

  7. Avian influenza biosecurity: a key for animal and human protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolas Charisis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern biosecurity methods have provided the best way of preventing the spread of a communicable disease since people realised that human and animal contact can transmit exotic diseases. The avian influenza virus is readily transmitted through animal vectors and inanimate matter and incurs heavy losses to the poultry industry. Biosecurity measures include the prevention of vaccination of flocks in an endemic area and the isolation of farms from the surrounding world (villages, other farms, fields, etc.. Veterinary services work in liaison with owners to implement national quarantine and vaccination measures for the benefit of farmers and the industry and for protection of public health.

  8. Influenza 2010-2011: ACIP Vaccination Recommendations

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-22

    In this podcast targeted to clinicians, Dr. Joe Bresee discusses who should be vaccinated against seasonal flu during the 2010-2011 season. He explains who is at risk for severe illness from the flu and discusses the benefits of vaccination.  Created: 9/22/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/23/2010.

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Swine Influenza Vaccine: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjot Basra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common chronic inflammatory joint disease. Multiple scientific articles have documented that vaccinations for influenza, MMR, and HBV, to name a few, could be triggers of RA in genetically predisposed individuals. However, there is limited data regarding the association of swine flu vaccine (H1N1 and RA. We report the case of a Mexican American female who developed RA right after vaccination with H1N1 vaccine. Genetically, RA has consistently been associated with an epitope in the third hypervariable region of the HLA-DR chains, known as the “shared epitope”, which is found primarily in DR4 and DR1 regions. The presence of HLA-DRB1 alleles is associated with susceptibility to RA in Mexican Americans. Hence, certain individuals with the presence of the “shared epitope” may develop RA following specific vaccinations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of RA following vaccination with the swine flu vaccine.

  10. Pandemic and Avian Influenza A Viruses in Humans: Epidemiology, Virology, Clinical Characteristics, and Treatment Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Cao, Bin

    2017-03-01

    The intermittent outbreak of pandemic influenza and emergence of novel avian influenza A virus is worldwide threat. Although most patients present with mild symptoms, some deteriorate to severe pneumonia and even death. Great progress in the understanding of the mechanism of disease pathogenesis and a series of vaccines has been promoted worldwide; however, incidence, morbidity, and mortality remains high. To step up vigilance and improve pandemic preparedness, this article elucidates the virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and treatment of human infections by influenza A viruses, with an emphasis on the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, H5N1, and H7N9 subtypes.

  11. The 2015 global production capacity of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Kenneth A; Goldin, Shoshanna; Nannei, Claudia; Sparrow, Erin; Torelli, Guido

    2016-10-26

    A global shortage and inequitable access to influenza vaccines has been cause for concern for developing countries who face dire consequences in the event of a pandemic. The Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines (GAP) was launched in 2006 to increase global capacity for influenza vaccine production to address these concerns. It is widely recognized that well-developed infrastructure to produce seasonal influenza vaccines leads to increased capacity to produce pandemic influenza vaccines. This article summarizes the results of a survey administered to 44 manufacturers to assess their production capacity for seasonal influenza and pandemic influenza vaccine production. When the GAP was launched in 2006, global production capacity for seasonal and pandemic vaccines was estimated to be 500million and 1.5billion doses respectively. Since 2006 there has been a significant increase in capacity, with the 2013 survey estimating global capacity at 1.5billion seasonal and 6.2billion pandemic doses. Results of the current survey showed that global seasonal influenza vaccine production capacity has decreased since 2013 from 1.504billion doses to 1.467billion doses. However, notwithstanding the overall global decrease in seasonal vaccine capacity there were notable positive changes in the distribution of production capacity with increases noted in South East Asia (SEAR) and the Western Pacific (WPR) regions, albeit on a small scale. Despite a decrease in seasonal capacity, there has been a global increase of pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity from 6.2 billion doses in 2013 to 6.4 billion doses in 2015. This growth can be attributed to a shift towards more quadrivalent vaccine production and also to increased use of adjuvants. Pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity is at its highest recorded levels however challenges remain in maintaining this capacity and in ensuring access in the event of a pandemic to underserved regions.

  12. Incorporation of membrane-bound, mammalian-derived immunomodulatory proteins into influenza whole virus vaccines boosts immunogenicity and protection against lethal challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Paul C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza epidemics continue to cause morbidity and mortality within the human population despite widespread vaccination efforts. This, along with the ominous threat of an avian influenza pandemic (H5N1, demonstrates the need for a much improved, more sophisticated influenza vaccine. We have developed an in vitro model system for producing a membrane-bound Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccine (CYT-IVAC. Numerous cytokines are involved in directing both innate and adaptive immunity and it is our goal to utilize the properties of individual cytokines and other immunomodulatory proteins to create a more immunogenic vaccine. Results We have evaluated the immunogenicity of inactivated cytokine-bearing influenza vaccines using a mouse model of lethal influenza virus challenge. CYT-IVACs were produced by stably transfecting MDCK cell lines with mouse-derived cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2 and IL-4 fused to the membrane-anchoring domain of the viral hemagglutinin. Influenza virus replication in these cell lines resulted in the uptake of the bioactive membrane-bound cytokines during virus budding and release. In vivo efficacy studies revealed that a single low dose of IL-2 or IL-4-bearing CYT-IVAC is superior at providing protection against lethal influenza challenge in a mouse model and provides a more balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune response, similar to live virus infections. Conclusion We have validated the protective efficacy of CYT-IVACs in a mammalian model of influenza virus infection. This technology has broad applications in current influenza virus vaccine development and may prove particularly useful in boosting immune responses in the elderly, where current vaccines are minimally effective.

  13. Research of universal influenza virus vaccine conjugated human papillomavirus 16 LI as a vector%以人乳头瘤病毒16 L1为载体的流感通用疫苗初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘蕊; 李志奎; 王希良; 罗德炎; 颜艳; 陈中伟; 花艳红

    2008-01-01

    Objective To construct a universal influenza virus vaccine Baemid containing M2 extracellular domain(M2e) of influenza virus which conjugated human papillomavirus(HPV)16 L1 as a vector and expressed the protein in insect baeulovirus system. Methods HPV16 L1 gene was amplified by PCR with the primers contained M2e gene. The conjugated genes were inserted into pFast HTA vector to recombine in DHI0Bac. The recombinant baemid was transfected into sf9 insect cells by liposome to produce baculovirus contained M2e-HPVI6 L1. Protein was determined by SDS-PAGE, immunofluorescence and electronmicroseope. Results The universal influenza virus vaccine Bacmid containing M2e of influenza virus which conjugated HPV16 L1 as a vector was successfully constructed. The recombinant protein wasexpressed in insect cells. Conclusions The recombinant protein was expressed in insect cells in the form of virus-like particles through the baculovirus system,which was a base of the universal influenza virus vaccine development.%目的 构建以人乳头瘤病毒(human papillomavirus,HPV)16 L1为载体的甲型流感病毒M2基因胞外区(M2e)通用疫苗杆粒,利用昆虫细胞杆状病毒表达系统,进行初步的蛋白表达.方法 利用PCR技术将甲型流感病毒M2e基因序列与HPVl6 L1相连.经酶切、酶联将融合基因插入pFastBacHTA载体,在DH10Bac细胞中进行同源重组,经测序鉴定后构建M2e-HPV16 L1杆粒,脂质体转染sf9昆虫细胞,收获并扩增含有M2e-HPV16 L1的杆状病毒,经扩增后获得高效价的重组杆状病毒,用SDS-PAGE、免疫荧光法和电镜检测目的蛋白的表达.结果 构建了以HPV16 L1为载体的M2e通用疫苗杆粒,通过转染sf9昆虫细胞得到初步M2e-HPV16 L1融合蛋白表达.结论 成功构建了HPV16 L1与甲型流感病毒M2e融合蛋白的病毒样颗粒,为流感通用疫苗的研制奠定了基础.

  14. Prioritization of pandemic influenza vaccine: rationale and strategy for decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Benjamin; Orenstein, Walter A

    2009-01-01

    Few catastrophes can compare with the global impact of a severe influenza pandemic. The 1918-1919 pandemic was associated with more than 500,000 deaths in the USA and an estimated 20-40 million deaths worldwide, though some place the global total much higher. In an era when infectious disease mortality had been steadily decreasing, the 1918-1919 pandemic caused a large spike in overall population mortality, temporarily reversing decades of progress. The US Department of Health and Human Services, extrapolating from the 1918-1919 pandemic to the current US population size and demographics, has estimated that a comparable pandemic today would result in almost two million deaths. Vaccination is an important component of a pandemic response. Public health measures such as reduction of close contacts with others, improved hygiene, and respiratory protection with facemasks or respirators can reduce the risk of exposure and illness (Germann et al. 2006; Ferguson et al. 2006), but would not reduce susceptibility among the population. Prophylaxis with antiviral medications also may prevent illness but depends on the availability of large antiviral drug stockpiles and also does not provide long-term immunity. By contrast, immunization with a well-matched pandemic vaccine would provide active immunity and represent the most durable pandemic response. However, given current timelines for the development of a pandemic influenza vaccine and its production capacity, vaccine is likely not to be available in sufficient quantities to protect the entire population before pandemic outbreaks occur, and thus potentially limited stocks may need to be prioritized. This chapter reviews information on influenza vaccine production capacity, describes approaches used in the USA to set priorities for vaccination in the setting of limited supply, and presents a proposed strategy for prioritization.

  15. Solid bioneedle-delivered influenza vaccines are highly thermostable and induce both humoral and cellular immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Soema

    Full Text Available The potential of bioneedles to deliver influenza vaccines was investigated. Four influenza vaccine formulations were screened to determine the optimal formulation for use with bioneedles. The stability of the formulations after freeze-drying was checked to predict the stability of the influenza vaccines in the bioneedles. Subunit, split, virosomal and whole inactivated influenza (WIV vaccine were formulated and lyophilized in bioneedles, and subsequently administered to C57BL/6 mice. Humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed after vaccination. The thermostability of lyophilized vaccines was determined after one-month storage at elevated temperatures. Bioneedle influenza vaccines induced HI titers that are comparable to those induced by intramuscular WIV vaccination. Delivery by bioneedles did not alter the type of immune response induced by the influenza vaccines. Stability studies showed that lyophilized influenza vaccines have superior thermostability compared to conventional liquid vaccines, and remained stable after one-month storage at 60°C. Influenza vaccines delivered by bioneedles are a viable alternative to conventional liquid influenza vaccines. WIV was determined to be the most potent vaccine formulation for administration by bioneedles. Lyophilized influenza vaccines in bioneedles are independent of a cold-chain, due to their increased thermostability, which makes distribution and stockpiling easier.

  16. Factors Associated with Influenza Vaccination of Hospitalized Elderly Patients in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Àngela; Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; Force, Lluís; Morales, María; Mayoral, José María; Egurrola, Mikel; Tamames, Sonia; Martín, Vicente; Astray, Jenaro

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of the elderly is an important factor in limiting the impact of influenza in the community. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors associated with influenza vaccination coverage in hospitalized patients aged ≥ 65 years hospitalized due to causes unrelated to influenza in Spain. We carried out a cross-sectional study. Bivariate analysis was performed comparing vaccinated and unvaccinated patients, taking in to account sociodemographic variables and medical risk conditions. Multivariate analysis was performed using multilevel regression models. We included 1038 patients: 602 (58%) had received the influenza vaccine in the 2013-14 season. Three or more general practitioner visits (OR = 1.61; 95% CI 1.19-2.18); influenza vaccination in any of the 3 previous seasons (OR = 13.57; 95% CI 9.45-19.48); and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination (OR = 1.97; 95% CI 1.38-2.80) were associated with receiving the influenza vaccine. Vaccination coverage of hospitalized elderly people is low in Spain and some predisposing characteristics influence vaccination coverage. Healthcare workers should take these characteristics into account and be encouraged to proactively propose influenza vaccination to all patients aged ≥ 65 years.

  17. Cross-protection against lethal H5N1 challenge ferrets with an adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Baras (Benoît); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); J.H. Simon (James); R.J.M.M. Thoolen (Robert); S.P. Mossman (Sally); F.H. Pistoor (Frank); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M.A. Wettendorff (Martine); E. Hanon (Emmanuel); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Unprecedented spread between birds and mammals of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAI) of the H5N1 subtype has resulted in hundreds of human infections with a high fatality rate. This has highlighted the urgent need for the development of H5N1 vaccines that can be

  18. Immunization with a live attenuated H7N9 influenza vaccine protects mice against lethal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolan Yang

    Full Text Available The emergence of severe cases of human influenza A (H7N9 viral infection in China in the spring of 2003 resulted in a global effort to rapidly develop an effective candidate vaccine. In this study, a cold-adapted (ca, live attenuated monovalent reassortant influenza H7N9 virus (Ah01/AA ca was generated using reverse genetics that contained hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes from a 2013 pandemic A H7N9 isolate, A/Anhui/01/2013 virus (Ah01/H7N9; the remaining six backbone genes derived from the cold-adapted influenza H2N2 A/Ann Arbor/6/60 virus (AA virus. Ah01/AA ca virus exhibited temperature sensitivity (ts, ca, and attenuation (att phenotypes. Intranasal immunization of female BALB/c mice with Ah01/AA ca twice at a 2-week interval induced robust humoral, mucosal, and cell-mediated immune responses in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the candidate Ah01/AA ca virus was immunogenic and offered partial or complete protection of mice against a lethal challenge by the live 2013 influenza A H7N9 (A/Anhui/01/2013. Protection was demonstrated by the inhibition of viral replication and the attenuation of histopathological changes in the challenged mouse lung. Taken together, these data support the further evaluation of this Ah01/AA ca candidate vaccine in primates.

  19. Vaccination against seasonal influenza: a reminder

    CERN Document Server

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    At this time every year the Medical Service suggests that you should get vaccinated against seasonal flu. We would like to remind you that vaccination is the best method of protecting yourself and others against this contagious illness which can have serious consequences for certain people, especially those suffering from chronic medical conditions (e.g. chronic pulmonary, cardiovascular or kidney disease or diabetes), pregnant women, people suffering from obesity (BMI>30) and those over 65. As the Medical Service does not supply the vaccine, you must purchase it from a pharmacy (in France without the need for a prescription). From the beginning of October you can then bring your vaccine to the Infirmary (Building 57-Ground floor) and get vaccinated without an appointment between 9 a.m. and 12 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. For the purposes of health insurance reimbursement, you can get a prescription from the Medical Service either on the day of the injection or beforehand. Reminder: The Medical Se...

  20. Vaccination against seasonal influenza: a reminder

    CERN Document Server

    Medical Service

    2013-01-01

    At this time every year, the Medical Service suggests that you should get vaccinated against seasonal flu.   We would like to remind you that vaccination is the best method of protecting yourself and others against this contagious illness which can have serious consequences for certain people, especially those suffering from chronic medical conditions (e.g. chronic pulmonary, cardiovascular or kidney disease or diabetes), pregnant women, people suffering from obesity (BMI>30) and those over 65. As the Medical Service does not supply the vaccine, you must purchase it from a pharmacy (without the need for a prescription in France). From the beginning of October you can then bring your vaccine to the Infirmary (Building 57-Ground floor) and get vaccinated without an appointment between 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. For the purposes of health insurance reimbursement, you can get a prescription from the Medical Service either on the day of the injection or beforehand. Reminder: The...

  1. Vaccination against seasonal influenza: a reminder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    At this time every year the Medical Service suggests that you should get vaccinated against seasonal flu.   We would like to remind you that vaccination is the best method of protecting yourself and others against this contagious illness which can have serious consequences for certain people, especially those suffering from chronic medical conditions (e.g. chronic pulmonary, cardiovascular or kidney disease or diabetes), pregnant women, people suffering from obesity (BMI>30) and those over 65. As the Medical Service does not supply the vaccine, you must purchase it from a pharmacy (in France you don't need a prescription). From the beginning of October you can then bring your vaccine to the Infirmary (Building 57-Ground floor) and get vaccinated without an appointment between 9 a.m. and 12 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. For the purposes of health insurance reimbursement, you can get a prescription from the Medical Service either on the day of the injection or beforehand. Reminder:...

  2. Seasonal influenza vaccine uptake in HSE-funded hospitals and nursing homes during the 2011/2012 influenza season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Lorcain, P; Cotter, S; Hickey, L; O'Flanagan, D; Corcoran, B; O'Meara, M

    2014-03-01

    Annual seasonal influenza vaccine is recommended for all health care workers (HCWs) in Ireland. For the 2011/2012 influenza season, information was collected on influenza vaccination uptake among HCWs employed in Health Service Executive (HSE)-funded hospitals (primarily acute) and of nursing homes (NHs) and also among NH long-term and short-term respite care residents. Forty-five hospitals (80%) and 120 NHs (75%) provided uptake data. Nationally, influenza vaccine uptake among hospital employed HCWs was estimated to be 18% and 14% among HCWs in NHs; in NHs vaccine uptake among long-term care residents was estimated to 88%. These findings highlight the continued low uptake among HCWs of all categories and demonstrate the need for sustained measures to improve uptake rates.

  3. Development of cross-protective influenza a vaccines based on cellular responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soema, P.C.; Riet, van E.; Kersten, G.F.A.; Amorij, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccines provide protection against matching influenza A virus (IAV) strains mainly through the induction of neutralizing serum IgG antibodies. However, these antibodies fail to confer a protective effect against mismatched IAV. This lack of efficacy against heterologous influenza

  4. Cost-effectiveness of quadrivalent versus trivalent influenza vaccine in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Pieter; Pitman, R.J.; Macabeo, B.; Chit, A.; Postma, M.J.; Crépey, P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently used trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs) contain two strains of influenza A and one strain of influenza B. However, co-circulation of two distinct B lineages and difficulties in predicting which lineage will predominate in the next season have led to frequent B-strain mismatche

  5. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccine uptake among nursing home residents in Nottingham, England: a postal questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivancos Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown influenza vaccine uptake in UK nursing home residents to be low. Very little information exists regarding the uptake of pneumococcal vaccine in this population. The formulation of policies relating to the vaccination of residents has been proposed as a simple step that may help improve vaccine uptake in care homes. Methods A postal questionnaire was sent to matrons of all care homes with nursing within the Greater Nottingham area in January 2006. Non respondents were followed up with up to 3 phone calls. Results 30% (16/53 of respondents reported having a policy addressing influenza vaccination and 15% (8/53 had a policy addressing pneumococcal vaccination. Seasonal influenza vaccine coverage in care homes with a vaccination policy was 87% compared with 84% in care homes without a policy (p = 0.47. The uptake of pneumococcal vaccination was found to be low, particularly in care homes with no vaccination policy. Coverage was 60% and 32% in care homes with and without a vaccination policy respectively (p = 0.06. This result was found to be statistically significant on multivariate analysis (p = 0.03, R = 0.46 Conclusion The uptake of influenza vaccine among care home residents in the Nottingham region is relatively high, although pneumococcal vaccine uptake is low. This study shows that there is an association between pneumococcal vaccine uptake and the existence of a vaccination policy in care homes, and highlights that few care homes have vaccination policies in place.

  6. Establishment of Vero cell RNA polymerase I-driven reverse genetics for Influenza A virus and its application for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Suk; Baek, Yun Hee; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Choi, Young-Ki

    2013-06-01

    The constant threat of newly emerging influenza viruses with pandemic potential requires the need for prompt vaccine production. Here, we utilized the Vero cell polymerase I (PolI) promoter, rather than the commonly used human PolI promoter, in an established reverse-genetics system to rescue viable influenza viruses in Vero cells, an approved cell line for human vaccine production. The Vero PolI promoter was more efficient in Vero cells and demonstrated enhanced transcription levels and virus rescue rates commensurate with that of the human RNA PolI promoter in 293T cells. These results appeared to be associated with more efficient generation of A(H1N1)pdm09- and H5N1-derived vaccine seed viruses in Vero cells, whilst the rescue rates in 293T cells were comparable. Our study provides an alternative means for improving vaccine preparation by using a novel reverse-genetics system for generating influenza A viruses.

  7. Successful vaccination strategies that protect aged mice from lethal challenge from influenza virus and heterologous severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, Timothy; Whitmore, Alan; Long, Kristin; Ferris, Martin; Rockx, Barry; Funkhouser, William; Donaldson, Eric; Gralinski, Lisa; Collier, Martha; Heise, Mark; Davis, Nancy; Johnston, Robert; Baric, Ralph S

    2011-01-01

    Newly emerging viruses often circulate as a heterogeneous swarm in wild animal reservoirs prior to their emergence in humans, and their antigenic identities are often unknown until an outbreak situation. The newly emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and reemerging influenza virus cause disproportionate disease in the aged, who are also notoriously difficult to successfully vaccinate, likely due to immunosenescence. To protect against future emerging strains, vaccine platforms should induce broad cross-reactive immunity that is sufficient to protect from homologous and heterologous challenge in all ages. From initial studies, we hypothesized that attenuated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particle (VRP) vaccine glycoproteins mediated vaccine failure in the aged. We then compared the efficacies of vaccines bearing attenuated (VRP(3014)) or wild-type VEE glycoproteins (VRP(3000)) in young and aged mice within novel models of severe SARS-CoV pathogenesis. Aged animals receiving VRP(3000)-based vaccines were protected from SARS-CoV disease, while animals receiving the VRP(3014)-based vaccines were not. The superior protection for the aged observed with VRP(3000)-based vaccines was confirmed in a lethal influenza virus challenge model. While the VRP(3000) vaccine's immune responses in the aged were sufficient to protect against lethal homologous and heterologous challenge, our data suggest that innate defects within the VRP(3014) platform mediate vaccine failure. Exploration into the mechanism(s) of successful vaccination in the immunosenescent should aid in the development of successful vaccine strategies for other viral diseases disproportionately affecting the elderly, like West Nile virus, influenza virus, norovirus, or other emerging viruses of the future.

  8. Influenza vaccine effectiveness among adult patients in a University of Lyon hospital (2004-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Sélilah; Voirin, Nicolas; Regis, Corinne; Bouscambert-Duchamp, Maude; Comte, Brigitte; Coppéré, Brigitte; Pires-Cronenberger, Silene; Lina, Bruno; Vanhems, Philippe

    2012-01-20

    The aim of this study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against laboratory-confirmed influenza among hospitalized patients. A case-control investigation was based on the prospective surveillance of influenza-like illness (ILI) during five flu seasons. We compared influenza-positive cases and influenza-negative controls. Unadjusted overall IVE was 62% (95% confidence interval 24% to 81%). We found that IVE was lower during the 2004-05 flu season (11%; 95% CI -232% to 76%) when the vaccine and circulating viruses were mismatched. Expansion of the study to other hospitals could provide IVE estimates earlier in the season, for different age groups and emerging virus strains.

  9. Effectiveness of 2012–2013 influenza vaccine against influenza-like illness in general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debin, Marion; Colizza, Vittoria; Blanchon, Thierry; Hanslik, Thomas; Turbelin, Clement; Falchi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Most of the methods used for estimating the influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) target the individuals who have an influenza-like illness (ILI) rather than virologically-proven influenza and access the healthcare system. The objective of this study was to estimate the 2012–2013 IVE in general French population, using a cohort of volunteers registered on GrippeNet.fr, an online surveillance system for ILI. The IVE estimations were obtained through a logistic regression, and analyses were also performed by focusing on at-risk population of severe influenza, and by varying inclusion period and ILI definition. Overall, 1996 individuals were included in the analyses. The corrected IVE was estimated to 49% (20 to 67) for the overall population, and 32% (0 to 58) for the at-risk population. Three covariables appeared with a significant effect on the occurrence of at least one ILI during the epidemic: the age (P = 0.045), the presence of a child in the household (P < 10−3), and the frequency of cold/flu (P < 10−3). Comparable results were found at epidemic peak time in the hypothesis of real-time feed of data. In this study, we proposed a novel, follow-up, web-based method to reveal seasonal vaccine effectiveness, which enables analysis in a portion of the population that is not tracked by the health care system in most VE studies. PMID:24343049

  10. The significance of avian influenza virus mouse-adaptation and its application in characterizing the efficacy of new vaccines and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Suk; Lloren, Khristine Kaith S; Baek, Yun Hee; Song, Min-Suk

    2017-07-01

    Due to the increased frequency of interspecies transmission of avian influenza viruses, studies designed to identify the molecular determinants that could lead to an expansion of the host range have been increased. A variety of mouse-based mammalian-adaptation studies of avian influenza viruses have provided insight into the genetic alterations of various avian influenza subtypes that may contribute to the generation of a pandemic virus. To date, the studies have focused on avian influenza subtypes H5, H6, H7, H9, and H10 which have recently caused human infection. Although mice cannot fully reflect the course of human infection with avian influenza, these mouse studies can be a useful method for investigating potential mammalian adaptive markers against newly emerging avian influenza viruses. In addition, due to the lack of appropriate vaccines against the diverse emerging influenza viruses, the generation of mouse-adapted lethal variants could contribute to the development of effective vaccines or therapeutic agents. Within this review, we will summarize studies that have demonstrated adaptations of avian influenza viruses that result in an altered pathogenicity in mice which may suggest the potential application of mouse-lethal strains in the development of influenza vaccines and/or therapeutics in preclinical studies.

  11. Seasonal influenza vaccine policy, use and effectiveness in the tropics and subtropics: a systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirve, S.; Lambach, P.; Paget, J.; Vandemaele, K.; Fitzner, J.; Zhang, W.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The evidence needed for tropical countries to take informed decisions on influenza vaccination is scarce. This paper reviews policy, availability, use and effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine in tropical and subtropical countries. Method: Global health databases were searched in three th

  12. Clinical effectiveness of first and repeat influenza vaccination in adult and elderly diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijmans-Van den Akker, I.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Buskens, E.; Nichol, K.L.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.; Hak, E.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Influenza vaccine uptake remains low among the high-risk group of patients with diabetes, partly because of conflicting evidence regarding its potential benefits. We assessed the clinical effectiveness of influenza vaccination in adults with diabetes and specifically examined potential mo

  13. Immunologic correlates of protection and potential role for adjuvants to improve influenza vaccines in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhaney, Janet E; Coler, Rhea N; Baldwin, Susan L

    2013-07-01

    The decrease in influenza vaccine efficacy in the elderly is associated with a decline in the stimulation of cell-mediated and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses required for clinical protection against influenza, and may be particularly problematic when this population is administered split-virus vaccines that lack conserved viral proteins. Adjuvants, which act through innate immune mechanisms, are known to enhance both humoral and T-cell-mediated responses to influenza vaccines in this population. Adjuvant effects including enhanced antigen presentation, activation and maturation of dendritic cells and production of inflammatory cytokines can drive the desired cell-mediated immune responses. Toll-like receptor ligands comprise one class of adjuvants, which interact with external and internal receptors associated with dendritic cells and other APCs, leading to the regulation and production of important inflammatory cytokines. Potential advances in the production of more effective influenza vaccines for older people include the addition of adjuvants to standard split-virus vaccines and the use of alternate routes of vaccine delivery to augment the response to influenza infection. In this review, the authors discuss the impact of immune senescence on the response to influenza vaccination, the correlates of protection against influenza disease and the progress being made in the design of better influenza vaccines for the population aged 65 years and older.

  14. Optimal Allocation of Pandemic Influenza Vaccine Depends on Age, Risk and Timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mylius, S.D.; Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Lugner, A.K.; Wallinga, J.

    2008-01-01

    The limited production capacity for vaccines raises the question what the best strategy is for allocating the vaccine to mitigate an influenza pandemic. We developed an age-structured model for spread of an influenza pandemic and validated it against observations from the Asian flu pandemic. Two str

  15. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of School Personnel Regarding Influenza, Vaccinations, and School Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Chrysanthy; Rios, Lenoa M.; Pannaraj, Pia S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: School personnel are important for communicating with parents about school vaccination programs and recognizing influenza outbreaks. This study examined knowledge, attitudes, and practices of school personnel regarding seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza, vaccinations, and school outbreak investigations. Methods: Data were analyzed from…

  16. Analysis of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Uptake among Children and Adolescents with an Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chia-Feng; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Fang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Chia-Ling; Chu, Cordia M.; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the seasonal influenza vaccination rate and to examine its determinants for children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID) living in the community. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to analyze the data on seasonal influenza vaccination rate among 1055 ID individuals between the ages…

  17. Pharmacoeconomics of influenza vaccination in the elderly - Reviewing the available evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, MJ; Baltussen, RMPM; Heijnen, MLA; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW; Jager, JC

    2000-01-01

    Most western countries have influenza vaccination programmes for citizens aged greater than or equal to 65 years. This paper reviews the available evidence on whether elderly influenza vaccination is worthwhile from a pharmacoeconomic point of view. A search on Medline and EMBASE resulted in a prima

  18. Further evidence for favorable cost-effectiveness of elderly influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, M.J.; Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Palache, M.A.; Wilschut, J.

    2006-01-01

    Vaccination represents the single most cost-effective strategy to avert influenza-related morbidity, mortality and economic consequences. This review presents an analysis of the pharmacoeconomic aspects of influenza vaccination of the elderly. The methodology of the analysis focuses on the main driv

  19. Further evidence for favorable cost-effectiveness of elderly influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Postma (Maarten); R.M.P.M. Baltussen (Rob); A.M. Palache (Abraham); J.C. Wilschut (Jan C.)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractVaccination represents the single most cost-effective strategy to avert influenza-related morbidity, mortality and economic consequences. This review presents an analysis of the pharmacoeconomic aspects of influenza vaccination of the elderly. The methodology of the analysis focuses on t

  20. Dietary wolfberry supplementation enhances protective effect of flu vaccine against influenza challenge in aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current vaccines for influenza do not fully protect the aged against influenza infection. Wolfberry, or goji berry, has been shown to improve immune response including enhanced antibody production in response to vaccination in the aged; however, it is not known if this effect of wolfberry would tran...

  1. Clinical effectiveness of first and repeat influenza vaccination in adult and elderly diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijmans-Van den Akker, I.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Buskens, E.; Nichol, K.L.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.; Hak, E.

    OBJECTIVE: Influenza vaccine uptake remains low among the high-risk group of patients with diabetes, partly because of conflicting evidence regarding its potential benefits. We assessed the clinical effectiveness of influenza vaccination in adults with diabetes and specifically examined potential

  2. Protective efficacy of a live, attenuated, influenza virus vaccine (‘Alice’ strain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzie, A.; Delem, A.; Huygelen, C.

    1976-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated the high degree of efficacy and broad protection of ‘Alice’ vaccine against various heterologous H3N2 influenza virus strains. Similarly, challenge studies carried out in volunteers have confirmed the high degree of efficacy of ‘Alice’ vaccine versus homologous and heterologous influenza A virus strains. PMID:785431

  3. Psychosocial Correlates of Intention to Receive an Influenza Vaccination among Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Pazol, Karen; Wingood, Gina M.; Windle, Michael; Orenstein, Walter A.; Diclemente, Ralph J.

    2010-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recently expanded annual influenza vaccination recommendations to include all children 6 months through 18 years of age. Adolescent attitudes toward influenza vaccination may play a key role in reaching this newly added age group. This study examined the…

  4. Vaccine Candidates against Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouzi, Ava; Vaziri, Farzam; Rahimi-Jamnani, Fatemeh; Afrough, Parviz; Rahbar, Mohammad; Satarian, Fereshteh; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2017-01-01

    Nonencapsulated, nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) remains an important cause of acute otitis and respiratory diseases in children and adults. NTHi bacteria are one of the major causes of respiratory tract infections, including acute otitis media, cystic fibrosis, and community-acquired pneumonia among children, especially in developing countries. The bacteria can also cause chronic diseases such as chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the lower respiratory tract of adults. Such bacteria express several outer membrane proteins, some of which have been studied as candidates for vaccine development. Due to the lack of effective vaccines as well as the spread and prevalence of NTHi worldwide, there is an urgent need to design and develop effective vaccine candidates against these strains. PMID:28088130

  5. Non-traditional settings for influenza vaccination of adults: costs and cost effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Lisa A; O'Brien, Megan A; Molinari, Noelle-Angelique M; Hohman, Katherine H; Nichol, Kristin L; Messonnier, Mark L; Lieu, Tracy A

    2008-01-01

    Influenza vaccination rates remain far below national goals in the US. Expanding influenza vaccination in non-traditional settings such as worksites and pharmacies may be a way to enhance vaccination coverage for adults, but scant data exist on the cost effectiveness of this strategy. The aims of this study were to (i) describe the costs of vaccination in non-traditional settings such as pharmacies and mass vaccination clinics; and (ii) evaluate the projected health benefits, costs and cost effectiveness of delivering influenza vaccination to adults of varying ages and risk groups in non-traditional settings compared with scheduled doctor's office visits. All analyses are from the US societal perspective. We evaluated the costs of influenza vaccination in non-traditional settings via detailed telephone interviews with representatives of organizations that conduct mass vaccination clinics and pharmacies that use pharmacists to deliver vaccinations. Next, we constructed a decision tree to compare the projected health benefits and costs of influenza vaccination delivered via non-traditional settings or during scheduled doctor's office visits with no vaccination. The target population was stratified by age (18-49, 50-64 and >or=65 years) and risk status (high or low risk for influenza-related complications). Probabilities and costs (direct and opportunity) for uncomplicated influenza illness, outpatient visits, hospitalizations, deaths, vaccination and vaccine adverse events were derived from primary data and from published and unpublished sources. The mean cost (year 2004 values) of vaccination was lower in mass vaccination (dollars US 17.04) and pharmacy (dollars US 11.57) settings than in scheduled doctor's office visits (dollars US 28.67). Vaccination in non-traditional settings was projected to be cost saving for healthy adults aged >or=50 years, and for high-risk adults of all ages. For healthy adults aged 18-49 years, preventing an episode of influenza would

  6. The Modification Effect of Influenza Vaccine on Prognostic Indicators for Cardiovascular Events after Acute Coronary Syndrome: Observations from an Influenza Vaccination Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apirak Sribhutorn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prognosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients has been improved with several treatments such as antithrombotics, beta-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI as well as coronary revascularization. Influenza vaccination has been shown to reduce adverse outcomes in ACS, but no information exists regarding the interaction of other treatments. Methods. This study included 439 ACS patients from Phrommintikul et al. A single dose of inactivated influenza vaccine was given by intramuscular injection in the vaccination group. The cardiovascular outcomes were described as major cardiovascular events (MACEs which included mortality, hospitalization due to ACS, and hospitalization due to heart failure (HF. The stratified and multivariable Cox’s regression analysis was performed. Results. The stratified Cox’s analysis by influenza vaccination for each cardiovascular outcome and discrimination of hazard ratios showed that beta-blockers had an interaction with influenza vaccination. Moreover, the multivariable hazard ratios disclosed that influenza vaccine is associated with a significant reduction of hospitalization due to HF in patients who received beta-blockers (HR = 0.05, 95% CI = 0.004–0.71, P=0.027, after being adjusted for prognostic indicators (sex, dyslipidemia, serum creatinine, and left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions. The influenza vaccine was shown to significantly modify the effect of beta-blockers in ACS patients and to reduce the hospitalization due to HF. However, further study of a larger population and benefits to HF patients should be investigated.

  7. Serological response to vaccination against avian influenza in zoo-birds using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads F.; Klausen, Joan; Holm, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Five hundred and forty birds in three zoos were vaccinated twice against avian influenza with a 6-week interval using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine. Serological response was evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition test 4-6 weeks following the second vaccine administration. 84% of the birds...

  8. Vaccination response following aerobic exercise: Can a brisk walk enhance antibody response to pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, J.E.; Ring, C.; Drayson, M.; Bosch, J.; Campbell, J.P.; Bhabra, J.; Browne, D.; Dawson, J.; Harding, S.; Lau, J.; Burns, V.E.

    2012-01-01

    High intensity acute exercise at the time of vaccination has been shown to enhance the subsequent antibody response. This study examines whether an acute moderate intensity aerobic intervention prior to vaccination can enhance antibody response to pneumonia and half dose influenza vaccination. Sixty

  9. Distribution of influenza vaccine to high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ompad, Danielle C; Galea, Sandro; Vlahov, David

    2006-01-01

    Vaccine distribution programs have historically targeted individuals at high risk of complications due to influenza. Despite recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, vaccination coverage among high-risk populations has been generally low. This review systematically summarizes the recent literature evaluating programs in different settings, from within medical settings to venue-based and community-based approaches, in an effort to identify successful program components. The published literature was identified by using the MEDLINE database from 1990 to 2006 covering studies that reported on interventions or programs aimed at vaccinating high-risk populations. The authors reviewed 56 studies. In the United States, the Healthy People 2010 goals included 90% vaccination coverage for adults aged > or = 65 years and 60% for high-risk adults aged 18-64 years. Only a handful of the studies reviewed managed to meet those goals. Interventions that increased vaccination coverage to Healthy People 2010 goals included advertising, provider and patient mailings, registry-based telephone calls, patient and staff education, standing orders coupled with standardized forms, targeting of syringe exchange customers, and visiting nurses. Few studies evaluated the impact of vaccination programs by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Few studies targeted individuals outside of the health-care and social services sectors. Given the growing disparities in health and health-care access, understanding the way in which interventions can remedy disparities is crucial.

  10. New strategies for simplifying influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murugappan, Senthil

    2014-01-01

    Griep is een virale ziekte die wereldwijd een enorme impact heeft op de gezondheid van de mens. Vaccinatie wordt gezien als de beste maatregel om de verspreiding van het influenzavirus onder controle te houden. De huidige vaccins hebben echter een aantal tekortkomingen. Ze moeten per injectie worden

  11. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-10-22

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines.

  12. Inactivated split-virion seasonal influenza vaccine (Fluarix): a review of its use in the prevention of seasonal influenza in adults and the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Monique P; Leroux-Roels, Isabel

    2010-08-20

    Fluarix is a trivalent, inactivated, split-virion influenza vaccine containing 15 microg haemagglutinin from each of the three influenza virus strains (including an H1N1 influenza A virus subtype, an H3N2 influenza A virus subtype and an influenza B virus) that are expected to be circulating in the up-coming influenza season. Fluarix is highly immunogenic in healthy adults and elderly, and exceeds the criteria that make it acceptable for licensure in various regions (including the US and Europe). In a large, phase III, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial conducted in the US (2004/2005) in subjects aged 18-64 years, postvaccination seroconversion rates against the H1N1, H3N2 and B antigens were 60-78% and respective postvaccination seroprotection rates were 97-99% in Fluarix recipients. Another phase III trial conducted in the US (2005/2006) established the noninferiority of Fluarix versus another trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccine in subjects aged >or=18 years, including a subgroup of elderly subjects. In annual European registration trials, Fluarix has consistently exceeded the immunogenicity criteria set by the EU Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use for adults and the elderly. Fluarix demonstrated immunogenicity in small, open-label studies in at-risk subjects. During a year when the vaccine was well matched to the circulating strain, Fluarix demonstrated efficacy against culture-confirmed influenza A and/or B in a placebo-controlled trial in adults aged 18-64 years. In addition, Fluarix vaccination of pregnant women demonstrated efficacy in reducing the rate of laboratory-confirmed influenza in the infants and reducing febrile respiratory illnesses in the mothers and their new-born infants in a randomized trial. Fluarix was generally well tolerated in adults and the elderly in well designed clinical trials and in the annual European registration trials, with most local and general adverse events being transient and mild to moderate in

  13. Advancing new vaccines against pandemic influenza in low-resource countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanda Scorza, Francesco

    2017-09-25

    With the support of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), PATH is working with governments and vaccine manufacturers to strengthen their influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity and improve their ability to respond to emerging pandemic influenza viruses. Vaccines directed against influenza A/H5N1 and A/H7N9 strains are a particular focus, given the potential for these viruses to acquire properties that may lead to a pandemic. This paper will review influenza vaccine development from a developing country perspective and PATH's support of this effort. Several vaccines are currently in preclinical and clinical development at our partners for seasonal and pandemic influenza in Vietnam (IVAC and VABIOTECH), Serbia (Torlak), China (BCHT), Brazil (Butantan), and India (SII). Products in development include split, whole-virus inactivated and live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs). Additionally, while most manufacturers propagate the virus in eggs, PATH is supporting the development of cell-based processes that could substantially increase global manufacturing capacity and flexibility. We review recent data from clinical trials of pandemic influenza vaccines manufactured in developing countries. An important discussion is on the role of whole virion vaccines for H5N1, given the poor immunogenicity of split vaccines and the complexity involved in developing potent adjuvants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Design and rationale for the Influenza vaccination After Myocardial Infarction (IAMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøbert, Ole; Götberg, Matthias; Angerås, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    influenza vaccination in patients with established cardiovascular disease. Influenza vaccination is recommended by international guidelines for patients with cardiovascular disease, but uptake is varying and vaccination is rarely prioritized during hospitalization for AMI. METHODS/DESIGN: The Influenza...... be assigned eith