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Sample records for human influenza strain

  1. Preexisting human antibodies neutralize recently emerged H7N9 influenza strains

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    Henry Dunand, Carole J.; Leon, Paul E.; Kaur, Kaval; Tan, Gene S.; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Andrews, Sarah; Huang, Min; Qu, Xinyan; Huang, Yunping; Salgado-Ferrer, Marlene; Ho, Irvin Y.; Taylor, William; Hai, Rong; Wrammert, Jens; Ahmed, Rafi; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and seasonal persistence of pathogenic H7N9 influenza viruses in China have raised concerns about the pandemic potential of this strain, which, if realized, would have a substantial effect on global health and economies. H7N9 viruses are able to bind to human sialic acid receptors and are also able to develop resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors without a loss in fitness. It is not clear whether prior exposure to circulating human influenza viruses or influenza vaccination confers immunity to H7N9 strains. Here, we demonstrate that 3 of 83 H3 HA-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated by individuals that had previously undergone influenza A virus vaccination were able to neutralize H7N9 viruses and protect mice against homologous challenge. The H7N9-neutralizing antibodies bound to the HA stalk domain but exhibited a difference in their breadth of reactivity to different H7 influenza subtypes. Mapping viral escape mutations suggested that these antibodies bind at least two different epitopes on the stalk region. Together, these results indicate that these broadly neutralizing antibodies may contribute to the development of therapies against H7N9 strains and may also be effective against pathogenic H7 strains that emerge in the future. PMID:25689254

  2. [Human influenza].

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    Stock, Ingo

    2006-10-01

    Human influenza is one of the most common human infectious diseases, contributing to approximately one million deaths every year. In Germany, each year between 5.000 and 20.000 individuals die from severe influenza infections. In several countries, the morbidity and mortality of influenza is greatly underestimated. This is reflected by general low immunization rates. The emergence of avian influenza against the background of the scenario of a human influenza pandemic has revived public interest in the disease. According to the World Health Organisation, it is only the question on the beginning of a new influenza pandemic. The virus type of the new pandemic is still uncertain and it is also unclear, if a pandemic spread of the virus may be prevented by consistent controlling of avian influenza.

  3. Computational prediction of vaccine strains for human influenza A (H3N2) viruses.

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    Steinbrück, L; Klingen, T R; McHardy, A C

    2014-10-01

    Human influenza A viruses are rapidly evolving pathogens that cause substantial morbidity and mortality in seasonal epidemics around the globe. To ensure continued protection, the strains used for the production of the seasonal influenza vaccine have to be regularly updated, which involves data collection and analysis by numerous experts worldwide. Computer-guided analysis is becoming increasingly important in this problem due to the vast amounts of generated data. We here describe a computational method for selecting a suitable strain for production of the human influenza A virus vaccine. It interprets available antigenic and genomic sequence data based on measures of antigenic novelty and rate of propagation of the viral strains throughout the population. For viral isolates sampled between 2002 and 2007, we used this method to predict the antigenic evolution of the H3N2 viruses in retrospective testing scenarios. When seasons were scored as true or false predictions, our method returned six true positives, three false negatives, eight true negatives, and one false positive, or 78% accuracy overall. In comparison to the recommendations by the WHO, we identified the correct antigenic variant once at the same time and twice one season ahead. Even though it cannot be ruled out that practical reasons such as lack of a sufficiently well-growing candidate strain may in some cases have prevented recommendation of the best-matching strain by the WHO, our computational decision procedure allows quantitative interpretation of the growing amounts of data and may help to match the vaccine better to predominating strains in seasonal influenza epidemics. Importance: Human influenza A viruses continuously change antigenically to circumvent the immune protection evoked by vaccination or previously circulating viral strains. To maintain vaccine protection and thereby reduce the mortality and morbidity caused by infections, regular updates of the vaccine strains are required. We

  4. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

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    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  5. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Strains Elicit a Greater Innate Immune Response than Antigenically-Matched Seasonal Influenza Viruses during Infection of Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Cultures

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    Fischer, William A.; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10–20% of the world’s population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the

  6. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  7. Published sequences do not support transfer of oseltamivir resistance mutations from avian to human influenza A virus strains.

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    Norberg, Peter; Lindh, Magnus; Olofsson, Sigvard

    2015-03-28

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate ester, OE) is a widely used antiviral active against influenza A virus. Its active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is chemically stable and secreted into wastewater treatment plants. OC contamination of natural habitats of waterfowl might induce OC resistance in influenza viruses persistently infecting waterfowl, and lead to transfer of OC-resistance from avian to human influenza. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such has occurred. A genomics approach including phylogenetic analysis and probability calculations for homologous recombination was applied on altogether 19,755 neuraminidase (N1 and N2) genes from virus sampled in humans and birds, with and without resistance mutations. No evidence for transfer of OE resistance mutations from avian to human N genes was obtained, and events suggesting recombination between human and avian influenza virus variants could not be traced in the sequence material studied. The results indicate that resistance in influenza viruses infecting humans is due to the selection pressure posed by the global OE administration in humans rather than transfer from avian influenza A virus strains carrying mutations induced by environmental exposure to OC.

  8. Complete-proteome mapping of human influenza A adaptive mutations: implications for human transmissibility of zoonotic strains.

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    Olivo Miotto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is widespread concern that H5N1 avian influenza A viruses will emerge as a pandemic threat, if they become capable of human-to-human (H2H transmission. Avian strains lack this capability, which suggests that it requires important adaptive mutations. We performed a large-scale comparative analysis of proteins from avian and human strains, to produce a catalogue of mutations associated with H2H transmissibility, and to detect their presence in avian isolates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We constructed a dataset of influenza A protein sequences from 92,343 public database records. Human and avian sequence subsets were compared, using a method based on mutual information, to identify characteristic sites where human isolates present conserved mutations. The resulting catalogue comprises 68 characteristic sites in eight internal proteins. Subtype variability prevented the identification of adaptive mutations in the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins. The high number of sites in the ribonucleoprotein complex suggests interdependence between mutations in multiple proteins. Characteristic sites are often clustered within known functional regions, suggesting their functional roles in cellular processes. By isolating and concatenating characteristic site residues, we defined adaptation signatures, which summarize the adaptive potential of specific isolates. Most adaptive mutations emerged within three decades after the 1918 pandemic, and have remained remarkably stable thereafter. Two lineages with stable internal protein constellations have circulated among humans without reassorting. On the contrary, H5N1 avian and swine viruses reassort frequently, causing both gains and losses of adaptive mutations. CONCLUSIONS: Human host adaptation appears to be complex and systemic, involving nearly all influenza proteins. Adaptation signatures suggest that the ability of H5N1 strains to infect humans is related to the presence of an

  9. Avirulent Avian Influenza Virus as a Vaccine Strain against a Potential Human Pandemic

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    Takada, Ayato; Kuboki, Noritaka; Okazaki, Katsunori; Ninomiya, Ai; Tanaka, Hiroko; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Enami, Masayoshi; Tashiro, Masato; Shortridge, Kennedy F.; Kida, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    In the influenza H5N1 virus incident in Hong Kong in 1997, viruses that are closely related to H5N1 viruses initially isolated in a severe outbreak of avian influenza in chickens were isolated from humans, signaling the possibility of an incipient pandemic. However, it was not possible to prepare a vaccine against the virus in the conventional embryonated egg system because of the lethality of the virus for chicken embryos and the high level of biosafety therefore required for vaccine production. Alternative approaches, including an avirulent H5N4 virus isolated from a migratory duck as a surrogate virus, H5N1 virus as a reassortant with avian virus H3N1 and an avirulent recombinant H5N1 virus generated by reverse genetics, have been explored. All vaccines were formalin inactivated. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with each of vaccines elicited the production of hemagglutination-inhibiting and virus-neutralizing antibodies, while intranasal vaccination without adjuvant induced both mucosal and systemic antibody responses that protected the mice from lethal H5N1 virus challenge. Surveillance of birds and animals, particularly aquatic birds, for viruses to provide vaccine strains, especially surrogate viruses, for a future pandemic is stressed. PMID:10482580

  10. Hemagglutinin protein of Asian strains of human influenza virus A H1N1 binds to sialic acid--a major component of human airway receptors.

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    Chua, K H; Chai, H C

    2012-03-16

    Hemagglutinin (HA) protein plays an important role in binding the influenza virus to infected cells and therefore mediates infection. Deposited HA sequences of 86 Asian strains of influenza A (H1N1) viruses during the first outbreak were obtained from the NCBI database and compared. Interaction of the HA protein of influenza A (H1N1) virus with the human sialic acid receptor was also studied using bioinformatics. Overall, not more than three single-point amino acid variants/changes were observed in the HA protein region of influenza A (H1N1) virus from Asian countries when a selected group sequence comparison was made. The bioinformatics study showed that the HA protein of influenza A (H1N1) binds to the sialic acid receptor in human airway receptors, possibly key to air-borne infection in humans.

  11. [Case report of the first world death due to a new strain of human influenza A H1N1 virus and behavior of human influenzae in pregnant women].

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    Noguera Sánchez, Marcelo Fidias; Karchmer Krivitzky, Samuel; EsliRabadán, Martínez Cesar; Antonio Sánchez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A H1N1 is an acute respiratory illness caused by a new strain of H1N1. Human influenza is a subtype of influenza Avirus, from the family of Orthomyxoviridae. This strain is the cause of new influenza pandemic declared by the World Health Organization in June, 2009. This paper reports the first case occurred in Mexico: a 39-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus type 2 and obesity grade II, which suffered atypical and aggressive pneumonia positive to coronavirus. Patient died 98 hours after her admission to the hospital unit. Due to the clinical presentation of the case, the doctors sent samples to the Instituto Nacional de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológica that sent an aliquot of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases of theAgency of Public Health in Canada, that reported positivity to influenza virus, and catalogued it as a new global strain called influenza A virus H1N1. The notice of 229E/NL63 coronavirus and its relationship to the recent outbreaks of avian influenza in humans and the clinical presentation of the case were the epidemiological circumstances that prevented the nation epidemiology system to establish global containment strategies to prevent the spread of this emerging infection. The consequence was the declaration of WHO pandemic alert level 6. Its behavior in pregnancy, reported by Assistant General Direction of Epidemiology in Mexico, has placed this infection as a risk factor for women.

  12. Human microvascular endothelial cell toxicity caused by Brazilian purpuric fever-associated strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

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    Weyant, R S; Quinn, F D; Utt, E A; Worley, M; George, V G; Candal, F J; Ades, E W

    1994-02-01

    An in vitro cytotoxicity model that uses an immortalized human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) differentiates Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF)-associated Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (HAE) strains from non-BPF-associated HAE strains. Toxic strains produced a characteristic HMEC-1 phenotype at an MOI of 1000 bacteria/TCC to produce an observable effect. The cytotoxic phenotype was characterized by the presence of large clumps of HMEC-1 cells, which detached from the monolayer within 48 h of inoculation by HAE cells. The cytotoxic phenotype was observed with 100% of BPF-associated HAE (40/40) and 14% of non-BPF-associated HAE (8/57; P < .001). The ability to study a BPF-associated phenotype in vitro using human microvascular cells should enhance our knowledge of BPF pathogenesis.

  13. Characterization of the 2009 pandemic A/Beijing/501/2009 H1N1 influenza strain in human airway epithelial cells and ferrets.

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    Penghui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A novel 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus (S-OIV H1N1 has been transmitted among humans worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of this virus in human airway epithelial cells and mammals is not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this study, we showed that a 2009 A (H1N1 influenza virus strain, A/Beijing/501/2009, isolated from a human patient, caused typical influenza-like symptoms including weight loss, fluctuations in body temperature, and pulmonary pathological changes in ferrets. We demonstrated that the human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line A549 was susceptible to infection and that the infected cells underwent apoptosis at 24 h post-infection. In contrast to the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus, the 2009 A (H1N1 influenza virus strain A/Beijing/501/2009 induced more cell death involving caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells. Additionally, ferrets infected with the A/Beijing/501/2009 H1N1 virus strain exhibited increased body temperature, greater weight loss, and higher viral titers in the lungs. Therefore, the A/Beijing/501/2009 H1N1 isolate successfully infected the lungs of ferrets and caused more pathological lesions than the seasonal influenza virus. Our findings demonstrate that the difference in virulence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus in vitro and in vivo may have been mediated by different mechanisms. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our understanding of the pathogenesis of the 2009 A (H1N1 influenza virus infection in both humans and animals is broadened by our findings that apoptotic cell death is involved in the cytopathic effect observed in vitro and that the pathological alterations in the lungs of S-OIV H1N1-infected ferrets are much more severe.

  14. Evaluation of a fully human monoclonal antibody against multiple influenza A viral strains in mice and a pandemic H1N1 strain in nonhuman primates.

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    Song, Aihua; Myojo, Kensuke; Laudenslager, John; Harada, Daisuke; Miura, Toru; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kuni-Kamochi, Reiko; Soloff, Rachel; Ohgami, Kinya; Kanda, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    Influenza virus is a global health concern due to its unpredictable pandemic potential. Frequent mutations of surface molecules, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), contribute to low efficacy of the annual flu vaccine and therapeutic resistance to standard antiviral agents. The populations at high risk of influenza virus infection, such as the elderly and infants, generally mount low immune responses to vaccines, and develop severe disease after infection. Novel therapeutics with high effectiveness and mutation resistance are needed. Previously, we described the generation of a fully human influenza virus matrix protein 2 (M2) specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), Z3G1, which recognized the majority of M2 variants from natural viral isolates, including highly pathogenic avian strains. Passive immunotherapy with Z3G1 significantly protected mice from the infection when administered either prophylactically or 1-2days post infection. In the present study, we showed that Z3G1 significantly protected mice from lethal infection when treatment was initiated 3days post infection. In addition, therapeutic administration of Z3G1 reduced lung viral titers in mice infected with different viral strains, including amantadine and oseltamivir-resistant strains. Furthermore, prophylactic and therapeutic administration of Z3G1 sustained O2 saturation and reduced lung pathology in monkeys infected with a pandemic H1N1 strain. Finally, de-fucosylated Z3G1 with an IgG1/IgG3 chimeric Fc region was generated (AccretaMab® Z3G1), and showed increased ADCC and CDC in vitro. Our data suggest that the anti-M2 mAb Z3G1 has great potential as a novel anti-flu therapeutic agent.

  15. Avian Influenza infection in Human

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    Mohan. M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks caused by the H5N1 strain are presently of the greatest concern for human health. In assessing risks to human health, it is important to know exactly which avian virus strains are causing the outbreaks in birds.All available evidence points to an increased risk of transmission to humans when outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza are widespread in poultry. There is mounting evidence that this strain has a unique capacity to jump the species barrier and cause severe disease, with high mortality, in humans. There is no evidence, to date that efficient human to human transmission of H5N1 strain has occurred and very often. Efficient transmission among humans is a key property of pandemic strains and a property that the avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses apparently lacked. The biological and molecular basis for effective aerosol transmission among humans is not known. The virus can improve its transmissibility among humans via two principal mechanisms. The first is a “reassortment” event, in which genetic material is exchanged between human and avian viruses during co-infection of a human or pig.Reassortment could result in a fully transmissible pandemic virus, announced by a sudden surge of cases with explosive spread. The second mechanism is a more gradual process of adaptive mutation, whereby the capability of the virus to bind to human cells increases during subsequent infections of humans. Adaptive mutation, expressed initially as small clusters of human cases with some evidence of human-to-human transmission, would probably give the world some time to take defensive action, if detected sufficiently early. As the number of human infections grows, the risk increases that a new virus subtype could emerge, triggering an influenza pandemic. Humans as well as swine must now be considered a potential mixing vessel for the generation of such a virus. This link between widespread infection in poultry and increased risk of human

  16. Conserved amino acid markers from past influenza pandemic strains

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    Vitalis Elizabeth A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding the amino acid mutations that affect the severity of influenza infections remains an open and challenging problem. Of special interest is better understanding how current circulating influenza strains could evolve into a new pandemic strain. Influenza proteomes from distinct viral phenotype classes were searched for class specific amino acid mutations conserved in past pandemics, using reverse engineered linear classifiers. Results Thirty-four amino acid markers associated with host specificity and high mortality rate were found. Some markers had little impact on distinguishing the functional classes by themselves, however in combination with other mutations they improved class prediction. Pairwise combinations of influenza genomes were checked for reassortment and mutation events needed to acquire the pandemic conserved markers. Evolutionary pathways involving H1N1 human and swine strains mixed with avian strains show the potential to acquire the pandemic markers with a double reassortment and one or two amino acid mutations. Conclusion The small mutation combinations found at multiple protein positions associated with viral phenotype indicate that surveillance tools could monitor genetic variation beyond single point mutations to track influenza strains. Finding that certain strain combinations have the potential to acquire pandemic conserved markers through a limited number of reassortment and mutation events illustrates the potential for reassortment and mutation events to lead to new circulating influenza strains.

  17. Genetic Reassortment Among the Influenza Viruses (Avian Influenza, Human Influenza and Swine Influenza in Pigs

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    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a hazardous virus and harm to respiratory tract. The virus infect birds, pigs, horses, dogs, mammals and humans. Pigs are important hosts in ecology of the influenza virus because they have two receptors, namely NeuAc 2,3Gal and NeuAc 2,6Gal which make the pigs are sensitive to infection of influenza virus from birds and humans and genetic reassortment can be occurred. Classical swine influenza H1N1 viruses had been circulated in pigs in North America and other countries for 80 years. In 1998, triple reassortant H3N2 swine influenza viruses that contains genes of human influenza A virus (H3N2, swine influenza virus (H1N1 and avian influenza are reported as cause an outbreaks in pigs in North America. Furthermore, the circulation of triple reassortant H3N2 swine influenza virus resulting reassortant H1N1 swine influenza and reassortant H1N2 swine influenza viruses cause infection in humans. Humans who were infected by triple reassortant swine influenza A virus (H1N1 usually made direct contact with pigs. Although without any clinical symptoms, pigs that are infected by triple reassortant swine influenza A (H1N1 can transmit infection to the humans around them. In June 2009, WHO declared that pandemic influenza of reassortant H1N1 influenza A virus (novel H1N1 has reached phase 6. In Indonesia until 2009, there were 1005 people were infected by H1N1 influenza A and 5 of them died. Novel H1N1 and H5N1 viruses have been circulated in humans and pigs in Indonesia. H5N1 reassortant and H1N1 viruses or the seasonal flu may could arise because of genetic reassortment between avian influenza and humans influenza viruses that infect pigs together.

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Previously Characterized Using an Electrophoretic Typing Scheme.

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    Mussa, Huda J; VanWagoner, Timothy M; Morton, Daniel J; Seale, Thomas W; Whitby, Paul W; Stull, Terrence L

    2015-11-25

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of human disease. Strains were selected for genome sequencing to represent the breadth of nontypeable strains within the species, as previously defined by the electrophoretic mobility of 16 metabolic enzymes.

  19. Will the swine strain crowd out the seasonal influenza strain?

    CERN Document Server

    Schinazi, Rinaldo B

    2010-01-01

    We use spatial and non spatial models to argue that competition alone may explain why two influenza strains do not usually coexist. The more virulent strain is likely to crowd out the less virulent one. This can be seen as a consequence of the Exclusion Principle of Ecology. We exhibit, however, a spatial model for which coexistence is possible.

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of Evolutionary Markers of Human Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) Viruses May Guide Selection of Vaccine Strain Candidates.

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    Belanov, Sergei S; Bychkov, Dmitrii; Benner, Christian; Ripatti, Samuli; Ojala, Teija; Kankainen, Matti; Kai Lee, Hong; Wei-Tze Tang, Julian; Kainov, Denis E

    2015-11-27

    Here we analyzed whole-genome sequences of 3,969 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and 4,774 A(H3N2) strains that circulated during 2009-2015 in the world. The analysis revealed changes at 481 and 533 amino acid sites in proteins of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively. Many of these changes were introduced as a result of random drift. However, there were 61 and 68 changes that were present in relatively large number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, respectively, that circulated during relatively long time. We named these amino acid substitutions evolutionary markers, as they seemed to contain valuable information regarding the viral evolution. Interestingly, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses acquired non-overlapping sets of evolutionary markers. We next analyzed these characteristic markers in vaccine strains recommended by the World Health Organization for the past five years. Our analysis revealed that vaccine strains carried only few evolutionary markers at antigenic sites of viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The absence of these markers at antigenic sites could affect the recognition of HA and NA by human antibodies generated in response to vaccinations. This could, in part, explain moderate efficacy of influenza vaccines during 2009-2014. Finally, we identified influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains, which contain all the evolutionary markers of influenza A strains circulated in 2015, and which could be used as vaccine candidates for the 2015/2016 season. Thus, genome-wide analysis of evolutionary markers of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses may guide selection of vaccine strain candidates.

  1. Infection of children with avian-human reassortant influenza virus from pigs in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.J. Claas (Eric); Y. Kawaoka (Yoshihiro); J.C. de Jong (Jan); N. Masurel (Nic); R.G. Webster (Robert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractPigs have been proposed to act as the intermediate hosts in the generation of pandemic human influenza strains by reassortment of genes from avian and human influenza virus strains. The circulation of avian-like H1N1 influenza viruses in European pigs since 1979 and the detection of huma

  2. Susceptibility of chickens, quail, and pigeons to an H7N9 human influenza virus and subsequent egg-passaged strains.

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    Uchida, Yuko; Kanehira, Katsushi; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    H7N9 human influenza virus A/Anhui/1/2013 (Anhui2013) showed low pathogenicity in chickens, quail, and pigeons, with quail being the most susceptible among the species tested. IVPIE1-1, which was recovered from a dead chicken after intravenous inoculation of Anhui 2013, had broader tissue tropism in chickens than did the original inoculum, as well as amino acid substitutions in the polymerase acidic gene and neuraminidase gene segments, but its pathogenicity was not enhanced. Viruses obtained after passage of Anhui 2013 in 10- and 14-day-old embryonated eggs showed rapid accumulation of amino acid substitutions at the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin protein. Two strains obtained through egg passage, 10E4/14E17 and 10E4/10E13, replicated better in intranasally infected chickens than did the original Anhui 2013 strain, yet the new isolates showed low pathogenicity in chickens despite their amino acid substitutions. The increased virus replication in chickens of 10E4/14E17 and 10E4/10E13 was not correlated with temperature-sensitive replication, given that virus replication was suppressed at increased temperatures. The existence of highly susceptible hosts, such as quail, which permit asymptomatic infection, facilitates increased mutation of the virus through amino acid substitution at the receptor-binding site, and this might be one of the mechanisms underlying the prolonged circulation of H7N9 influenza virus.

  3. Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A virus strains provoke heterogeneous IFN-α/β responses that distinctively affect viral propagation in human cells.

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    Markus Matthaei

    Full Text Available The fatal transmissions of highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses (IAV of the H5N1 subtype to humans and high titer replication in the respiratory tract indicate that these pathogens can overcome the bird-to-human species barrier. While type I interferons (IFN-α/β are well described to contribute to the species barrier of many zoonotic viruses, current data to the role of these antiviral cytokines during human H5N1 IAV infections is limited and contradictory. We hypothesized an important role for the IFN system in limiting productive infection of avian H5N1 strains in human cells. Hence, we examined IFN-α/β gene activation by different avian and human H5N1 isolates, if the IFN-α/β response restricts H5N1 growth and whether the different strains were equally capable to regulate the IFN-α/β system via their IFN-antagonistic NS1 proteins. Two human H5N1 isolates and a seasonal H3N2 strain propagated efficiently in human respiratory cells and induced little IFN-β, whereas three purely avian H5N1 strains were attenuated for replication and provoked higher IFN secretion. Replication of avian viruses was significantly enhanced on interferon-deficient cells, and exogenous IFN potently limited the growth of all strains in human cells. Moreover, IFN-α/β activation by all strains depended on retinoic acid-inducible gene I excluding principal differences in receptor activation between the different viruses. Interestingly, all H5N1 NS1 proteins suppressed IFN-α/β induction comparably well to the NS1 of seasonal IAV. Thus, our study shows that H5N1 strains are heterogeneous in their capacity to activate human cells in an NS1-independent manner. Our findings also suggest that H5N1 viruses need to acquire adaptive changes to circumvent strong IFN-α/β activation in human host cells. Since no single amino acid polymorphism could be associated with a respective high- or low induction phenotype we propose that the necessary adaptations to

  4. Genome Hotspots for Nucleotide Substitutions and the Evolution of Influenza A (H1N1) Human Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civetta, Alberto; Ostapchuk, David Cecil Murphy; Nwali, Basil

    2016-04-08

    In recent years a number of studies have brought attention to the role of positive selection during the evolution of antigenic escape by influenza strains. Particularly, the identification of positively selected sites within antigenic domains of viral surface proteins has been used to suggest that the evolution of viral-host receptor binding specificity is driven by selection. Here we show that, following the 1918 outbreak, the antigenic sites of the hemagglutinin (HA) viral surface protein and the stalk region of neuraminidase became substitution hotspots. The hotspots show similar patterns of nucleotide substitution bias at synonymous and nonsynonymous sites. Such bias imposes directionality in amino acid replacements that can influence signals of selection at antigenic sites. Our results suggest that the high accumulation of substitutions within the antigenic sites of HA can explain not only cases of antigenic escape by antigenic drift but also lead to occasional episodes of viral extinction. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Antigenic Detection of Human Strain of Influenza Virus A (H3N2) in Swine Populations at Three Locations in Nigeria and Ghana during the Dry Early Months of 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeola, O A; Olugasa, B O; Emikpe, B O

    2016-03-01

    Since the first detection of human H3N2 influenza virus in Taiwanese pigs in 1970, infection of pigs with wholly human viruses has been known to occur in other parts of the world. These viruses, referred to as human-like H3N2 viruses, have been known to cause clinical and subclinical infections of swine populations. Due to the paucity and complete unavailability of information on transmission of influenza viruses from other species, especially humans, to swine in Nigeria and Ghana, respectively, this study was designed to investigate the presence and prevalence of a human strain of influenza A (H3N2) in swine populations at three locations in two cities within these two West African countries in January and February, 2014. Using stratified random technique, nasal swab specimens were collected from seventy-five (75) pigs at two locations in Ibadan, Nigeria and from fifty (50) pigs in Kumasi, Ghana. These specimens were tested directly by a sensitive Quantitative Solid Phase Antigen-detection Sandwich ELISA using anti-A/Brisbane/10/2007 haemagglutinin monoclonal antibody. Influenza virus A/Brisbane/10/2007 (H3N2) was detected among pigs at the three study locations, with an aggregate prevalence of 4.0% for the two locations in Ibadan, Nigeria and also 4.0% for Kumasi, Ghana. Transmission of influenza viruses from other species to swine portends serious sinister prospects for genetic reassortment and evolvement of novel viruses. We therefore recommend that further studies should be carried out to investigate the presence of other circulating human and avian influenza viruses in swine populations in West Africa and also determine the extent of genetic reassortment of strains circulating among these pigs. This would provide an early warning system for detection of novel influenza viruses, which could have pandemic potentials.

  6. Surface structures and adherence properties of diverse strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Geme, J W; Gilsdorf, J R; Falkow, S

    1991-10-01

    Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius is an important cause of conjunctivitis and has recently been associated with Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF), a fulminant systemic disease of children. To gain insight into the bacterial factors involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, we investigated the surface structures and adherence properties of eight different strains of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius, including both BPF and non-BPF isolates. All eight strains were able to express long peritrichous pili similar to those observed in H. influenzae. As in H. influenzae, piliation correlated with colony binding of human erythrocytes. However, two strains were capable of hemagglutination in the absence of pili; in these strains, hemagglutination was insensitive to protease treatment, suggesting a nonproteinaceous hemagglutinin. All strains possessed short, thin, surface fibers distinct from long pili and demonstrated efficient attachment to cultured human conjunctival cells. Attachment to conjunctival cells occurred independently of long pili or a capacity for hemagglutination.

  7. The human side of influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshansky, Christine M.; Thomas, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    A clear understanding of immunity in individuals infected with influenza virus is critical for the design of effective vaccination and treatment strategies. Whereas myriad studies have teased apart innate and adaptive immune responses to influenza infection in murine models, much less is known about human immunity as a result of the ethical and technical constraints of human research. Still, these murine studies have provided important insights into the critical correlates of protection and pathogenicity in human infection and helped direct the human studies that have been conducted. Here, we examine and review the current literature on immunity in humans infected with influenza virus, noting evidence offered by select murine studies and suggesting directions in which future research is most warranted. PMID:22362872

  8. Naturally Occurring Antibodies in Humans Can Neutralize a Variety of Influenza Virus Strains, Including H3, H1, H2, and H5 ▿ §

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Nobuko; Iba, Yoshitaka; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Asano, Yoshizo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are classified into 16 subtypes according to the serotypes of hemagglutinin (HA). It is generally thought that neutralizing antibodies (Abs) are not broadly cross-reactive among HA subtypes. We examined the repertoire of neutralizing Abs against influenza viruses in humans. B lymphocytes were collected from donors by apheresis, and Ab libraries were constructed by using phage-display technology. Anti-HA clones were isolated by screening with H3N2 viruses. Their binding activity was examined, and four kinds of Abs showing broad strain specificity were identified from one donor. Two of the Abs, F045-092 and F026-427, were extensively analyzed. They neutralized not only H3N2 but also H1N1, H2N2, and H5N1 viruses, although the activities were largely varied. Flow cytometry suggested that they have the ability to bind to HA and HA1 artificially expressed on the cell surface. They show hemagglutination inhibition activity and do not compete with C179, an Ab thought to bind to the stalk region. F045-092 competes with Abs that recognize sites A and B for binding to HA. Furthermore, the serine at residue 136 in site A could be a part of the epitope. Thus, it is likely that F045-092 and F026-427 bind to a conserved epitope in the head region formed by HA1. Interestingly, while the VH1-69 gene can encode MAbs against the HA stem that are group 1 specific, F045-092 and its relatives that recognize the head region also use VH1-69. The possible epitope recognized by these clones is discussed. PMID:21865387

  9. The contrasting phylodynamics of human influenza B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Holmes, Edward C; Joseph, Udayan; Fourment, Mathieu; Su, Yvonne C F; Halpin, Rebecca; Lee, Raphael T C; Deng, Yi-Mo; Gunalan, Vithiagaran; Lin, Xudong; Stockwell, Timothy B; Fedorova, Nadia B; Zhou, Bin; Spirason, Natalie; Kühnert, Denise; Bošková, Veronika; Stadler, Tanja; Costa, Anna-Maria; Dwyer, Dominic E; Huang, Q Sue; Jennings, Lance C; Rawlinson, William; Sullivan, Sheena G; Hurt, Aeron C; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Wentworth, David E; Smith, Gavin J D; Barr, Ian G

    2015-01-16

    A complex interplay of viral, host, and ecological factors shapes the spatio-temporal incidence and evolution of human influenza viruses. Although considerable attention has been paid to influenza A viruses, a lack of equivalent data means that an integrated evolutionary and epidemiological framework has until now not been available for influenza B viruses, despite their significant disease burden. Through the analysis of over 900 full genomes from an epidemiological collection of more than 26,000 strains from Australia and New Zealand, we reveal fundamental differences in the phylodynamics of the two co-circulating lineages of influenza B virus (Victoria and Yamagata), showing that their individual dynamics are determined by a complex relationship between virus transmission, age of infection, and receptor binding preference. In sum, this work identifies new factors that are important determinants of influenza B evolution and epidemiology.

  10. Crosstalk between animal and human influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Although outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild and domestic birds have been posing the threat of a new influenza pandemic for the last decade, the first pandemic of the 21st century came from swine viruses. This fact emphasizes the complexity of influenza viral ecology and the difficulty of predicting influenza viral dynamics. Complete control of influenza viruses seems impossible. However, we must minimize the impact of animal and human influenza outbreaks by learning lessons from past experiences and recognizing the current status. Here, we review the most recent influenza virology data in the veterinary field, including aspects of zoonotic agents and recent studies that assessed the pandemic potential of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. PMID:25387011

  11. Isolation strategy of a two-strain avian influenza model using optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardlijah, Ariani, Tika Desi; Asfihani, Tahiyatul

    2017-08-01

    Avian influenza has killed many victims of both birds and humans. Most cases of avian influenza infection in humans have resulted transmission from poultry to humans. To prevent or minimize the patients of avian influenza can be done by pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical measures such as the use of masks, isolation, etc. We will be analyzed two strains of avian influenza models that focus on treatment of symptoms with insulation, then investigate the stability of the equilibrium point by using Routh-Hurwitz criteria. We also used optimal control to reduce the number of humans infected by making the isolation level as the control then proceeds optimal control will be simulated. The completion of optimal control used in this study is the Pontryagin Minimum Principle and for simulation we are using Runge Kutta method. The results obtained showed that the application of two control is more optimal compared to apply one control only.

  12. Suitability of PER.C6 cells to generate epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccine strains by reverse genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, W.; Hartgroves, L.; Havenga, M.; Legastelois, I.; Ophorst, C.; Siewerts, M.; Zuijdgeest, D.; Vogels, R.; Custers, J.; Boer-Luijtze, E. de; Leeuw, O. de; Cornelissen, L.; Goudsmit, J.; Barclay, W.

    2009-01-01

    Reverse genetics, the generation of influenza viruses from cDNA, presents a rapid method for creating vaccine strains. The technique necessitates the use of cultured cells. Due to technical and regulatory requirements, the choice of cell lines for production of human influenza vaccines is limited. P

  13. Suitability of PER.C6 cells to generate epidemic and pandemic influenza vaccine strains by reverse genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, W.; Hartgroves, L.; Havenga, M.; Legastelois, I.; Ophorst, C.; Siewerts, M.; Zuijdgeest, D.; Vogels, R.; Custers, J.; Boer-Luijtze, E. de; Leeuw, O. de; Cornelissen, L.; Goudsmit, J.; Barclay, W.

    2009-01-01

    Reverse genetics, the generation of influenza viruses from cDNA, presents a rapid method for creating vaccine strains. The technique necessitates the use of cultured cells. Due to technical and regulatory requirements, the choice of cell lines for production of human influenza vaccines is limited. P

  14. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the "harmful" internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs.

  15. Identification of novel conserved functional motifs across most Influenza A viral strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Azab Iman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza A virus poses a continuous threat to global public health. Design of novel universal drugs and vaccine requires a careful analysis of different strains of Influenza A viral genome from diverse hosts and subtypes. We performed a systematic in silico analysis of Influenza A viral segments of all available Influenza A viral strains and subtypes and grouped them based on host, subtype, and years isolated, and through multiple sequence alignments we extrapolated conserved regions, motifs, and accessible regions for functional mapping and annotation. Results Across all species and strains 87 highly conserved regions (conservation percentage > = 90% and 19 functional motifs (conservation percentage = 100% were found in PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, and NS segments. The conservation percentage of these segments ranged between 94 - 98% in human strains (the most conserved, 85 - 93% in swine strains (the most variable, and 91 - 94% in avian strains. The most conserved segment was different in each host (PB1 for human strains, NS for avian strains, and M for swine strains. Target accessibility prediction yielded 324 accessible regions, with a single stranded probability > 0.5, of which 78 coincided with conserved regions. Some of the interesting annotations in these regions included sites for protein-protein interactions, the RNA binding groove, and the proton ion channel. Conclusions The influenza virus has evolved to adapt to its host through variations in the GC content and conservation percentage of the conserved regions. Nineteen universal conserved functional motifs were discovered, of which some were accessible regions with interesting biological functions. These regions will serve as a foundation for universal drug targets as well as universal vaccine design.

  16. EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW); Scientific Opinion on monitoring for the emergence of possible new pandemic strains of influenza in animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Capua, Ilaria; Gatherer, Derek

    Following the emergence in 2009 of the new pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, which contained gene segments from pig, bird and human influenza viruses, it was apparent that a better scientific understanding is required of influenza viruses to protect public and animal health. The latest scientific data...... an alert for the emergence of new human influenza strains of public health significance. In contrast, there is an incomplete view of the influenza virus strains circulating among pigs and birds at the global level. Interpretation of the origins and pandemic potential of influenza viruses do require...... knowledge of the influenza gene pools in both pigs and birds, as well as other animal species. It is recommended that there should be long term support for a passive monitoring network in pigs and birds in order to promote greater understanding of the evolution of influenza viruses at the global level...

  17. Heterosybtypic T-cell immunity to influenza in humans: challenges for universal T-cell influenza vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya eSridhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the 21st century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protection against a broad range of influenza strains. Such universal influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognising conserved antigens are a key contributor to reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed.

  18. EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW); Scientific Opinion on monitoring for the emergence of possible new pandemic strains of influenza in animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Capua, Ilaria; Gatherer, Derek

    on biological properties of the virus, transmissibility, host susceptibility and epidemiology has been evaluated in order to identify factors that could be monitored in animals and that would suggest a risk of emergence of a new pandemic influenza strains. Virological studies and animal models have highlighted......Following the emergence in 2009 of the new pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, which contained gene segments from pig, bird and human influenza viruses, it was apparent that a better scientific understanding is required of influenza viruses to protect public and animal health. The latest scientific data...... an alert for the emergence of new human influenza strains of public health significance. In contrast, there is an incomplete view of the influenza virus strains circulating among pigs and birds at the global level. Interpretation of the origins and pandemic potential of influenza viruses do require...

  19. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  20. Carcinoembryonic antigens are targeted by diverse strains of typable and non-typable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virji, M; Evans, D; Griffith, J; Hill, D; Serino, L; Hadfield, A; Watt, S M

    2000-05-01

    Haemophilus influenzae (Hi), a commensal of the human respiratory mucosa, is an important cause of localized and systemic infections. We show that distinct strains belonging to typable (THi) and non-typable (NTHi) H. influenzae target human carcinoembryonic antigens (the membrane associated CEA family of cell adhesion molecules, are now termed CEACAMs). All strains of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius (Hi-aeg) and more than 70% of THi and NTHi strains tested specifically recognize CEACAMI-Fc soluble constructs. Furthermore, transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with human CEACAM1 cDNA alone was sufficient for promoting Hi interactions with the transfected cells. The majority of the Hi-aeg strains tested interacted with soluble constructs containing only the N-terminal domain. In contrast, several THi and NTHi strains reacted with soluble constructs only when additional extracellular A and B domains of the receptor were present. The use of monoclonal antibodies confirmed that THi and NTHi strains also interact primarily at the N-domain. We used site-directed mutants of CEACAM1 that contained substitutions at surface exposed amino acids and a molecular model of the N-domain to identify the residues involved in interactions with Hi ligands. The studies show that a common region exposed at the CFG face of the molecule is targeted by diverse Hi strains. However, mutation at distinct sites within this area affected the interactions of distinct strains signifying the potential for tissue tropism via this receptor. Analyses of the molecular basis of interaction with human cell lines and purified CEA show that Hi strains, especially those belonging to Hi-aeg, interact with multiple CEACAMs. Because Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) strains are also known to bind at the CFG face of the receptor, we used Nm and Hi strains in co-infection experiments and demonstrate competition between these mucosal pathogens in colonization of target cells via CEACAMs.

  1. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their saliva, mucous and feces. Human infections with bird flu viruses can happen when enough virus gets into ... Virus (CVV) for a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (Bird Flu) Virus ” for more information on this process. ...

  2. Modeling human influenza infection in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radigan KA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn A Radigan,1 Alexander V Misharin,2 Monica Chi,1 GR Scott Budinger11Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 2Division of Rheumatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Influenza is the leading cause of death from an infectious cause. Because of its clinical importance, many investigators use animal models to understand the biologic mechanisms of influenza A virus replication, the immune response to the virus, and the efficacy of novel therapies. This review will focus on the biosafety, biosecurity, and ethical concerns that must be considered in pursuing influenza research, in addition to focusing on the two animal models – mice and ferrets – most frequently used by researchers as models of human influenza infection.Keywords: mice, ferret, influenza, animal model, biosafety

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in 2015 in Germany indicates significant genetic divergence from vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Ahmed; Abdelwhab, El-Sayed M; Slanina, Heiko; Hussein, Mohamed A; Kuznetsova, Irina; Schüttler, Christian G; Ziebuhr, John; Pleschka, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Infections by H3N2-type influenza A viruses (IAV) resulted in significant numbers of hospitalization in several countries in 2014-2015, causing disease also in vaccinated individuals and, in some cases, fatal outcomes. In this study, sequence analysis of H3N2 viruses isolated in Germany from 1998 to 2015, including eleven H3N2 isolates collected early in 2015, was performed. Compared to the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (H3N2), the 2015 strains from Germany showed up to 4.5 % sequence diversity in their HA1 protein, indicating substantial genetic drift. The data further suggest that two distinct phylogroups, 3C.2 and 3C.3, with 1.6-2.3 % and 0.3-2.4 % HA1 nucleotide and amino acid sequence diversity, respectively, co-circulated in Germany in the 2014/2015 season. Distinct glycosylation patterns and amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins were identified, possibly contributing to the unusually high number of H3N2 infections in this season and providing important information for developing vaccines that are effective against both genotypes.

  4. Fc functional antibodies in humans with severe H7N9 and seasonal influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderven, Hillary A.; Liu, Lu; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Nguyen, Thi H.O.; Wan, Yanmin; Hogarth, P. Mark; Tilmanis, Danielle; Parsons, Matthew S.; Hurt, Aeron C.; Davenport, Miles P.; Kotsimbos, Tom; Cheng, Allen C.; Kedzierska, Katherine; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Kent, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Both seasonal and novel avian influenza viruses can result in severe infections requiring hospitalization. Anti-influenza antibodies (Abs) with Fc-mediated effector functions, such as Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), are of growing interest in control of influenza but have not previously been studied during severe human infections. As such, the objective of this study was to examine Fc-mediated Ab functions in humans hospitalized with influenza infection. METHODS. Serum Ab response was studied in subjects hospitalized with either pandemic H7N9 avian influenza virus in China (n = 18) or circulating seasonal influenza viruses in Melbourne, Australia (n = 16). Recombinant soluble Fc receptor dimer ELISAs, natural killer (NK) cell activation assays, and Ab-dependent killing assays with influenza-infected target cells were used to assess the Fc functionality of anti-influenza hemagglutinin (HA) Abs during severe human influenza infection. RESULTS. We found that the peak generation of Fc functional HA Abs preceded that of neutralizing Abs for both severe H7N9 and seasonal influenza infections. Subjects who succumbed to complications of H7N9 infection demonstrated reduced HA-specific Fc receptor–binding Abs (in magnitude and breadth) immediately prior to death compared with those who survived. Subjects who recovered from H7N9 and severe seasonal influenza infections demonstrated increased Fc receptor–binding Abs not only against the homologous infecting strain but against HAs from different influenza A subtypes. CONCLUSION. Collectively, survivors of severe influenza infection rapidly generate a functional Ab response capable of mediating ADCC against divergent influenza viruses. Broadly binding HA Abs with Fc-mediated functions may be a useful component of protective immunity to severe influenza infection. FUNDING. The National Health and Medical Research Council ([NHMRC] grants 1023294, 1041832, and 1071916), the Australian Department of Health

  5. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2016-12-15

    are known to be present during severe human infections, the role of pulmonary endothelial cells in the pathogenesis of avian influenza virus infections is largely unknown. By comparing human seasonal influenza strains to avian influenza viruses, we provide greater insight into the interaction of influenza virus with human pulmonary endothelial cells. We show that human influenza virus infection is blocked during the early stages of virus entry, which is likely due to the relatively high expression of the host antiviral factors IFITMs (interferon-induced transmembrane proteins) located in membrane-bound compartments inside cells. Overall, this study provides a mechanism by which human endothelial cells limit replication of human influenza virus strains, whereas avian influenza viruses overcome these restriction factors in this cell type. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Novel human H7N9 influenza virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengmin; Luo, Jing; Wang, Jing; Su, Wen; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Min; Xie, Li; Ding, Hua; Liu, Shelan; Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Yu; Jia, Yaxiong; He, Hongxuan

    2014-06-01

    Outbreaks of H7N9 avian influenza in humans in 5 provinces and 2 municipalities of China have reawakened concern that avian influenza viruses may again cross species barriers to infect the human population and thereby initiate a new influenza pandemic. Evolutionary analysis shows that human H7N9 influenza viruses originated from the H9N2, H7N3 and H11N9 avian viruses, and that it is as a novel reassortment influenza virus. This article reviews current knowledge on 11 subtypes of influenza A virus from human which can cause human infections.

  7. Susceptibility of human and avian influenza viruses to human and chicken saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Auewarakul, Prasert; Wiriyarat, Witthawat

    2014-05-01

    Oral cavity can be an entry site of influenza virus and saliva is known to contain innate soluble anti-influenza factors. Influenza strains were shown to vary in their susceptibility to those antiviral factors. Whether the susceptibility to the saliva antiviral factors plays any role in the host species specificity of influenza viruses is not known. In this study, the antiviral activity of human and chicken saliva against human and the H5N1 avian influenza viruses were investigated by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) assays. In comparison to human influenza viruses, H5N1 isolates showed reduced susceptibility to human saliva as measured by HI and NT assays. Interestingly, an H5N1 isolate that bind to both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid showed much higher HI titers with human saliva, suggesting that the susceptibility profile was linked to the receptor-binding preference and the presence of α2,6-linked sialic in human saliva. On the other hand, the H5N1 isolates showed increased HI titers but reduced NT titers to chicken saliva as compared to human influenza isolates. The human salivary antiviral components were characterized by testing the sensitivity to heat, receptor destroying enzyme (RDE), CaCl₂/EDTA dependence, and inhibition by mannan, and shown to be α- and γ-inhibitors. These data suggest that the H5N1 HPAI influenza virus had distinctive susceptibility patterns to human and chicken saliva, which may play some roles in its infectivity and transmissibility in these hosts.

  8. A cross-immunization model for the extinction of old influenza strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekermann, Florian; Sneppen, Kim

    2016-05-01

    Given the frequent mutation of antigenic features, the constancy of genetic and antigenic diversity of influenza within a subtype is surprising. While the emergence of new strains and antigenic features is commonly attributed to selection by the human immune system, the mechanism that ensures the extinction of older strains remains controversial. To replicate this dynamics of replacement current models utilize mechanisms such as short-lived strain-transcending immunity, a direct competition for hosts, stochastic extinction or constrained antigenic evolution. Building on the idea of short-lived immunity we introduce a minimal model that exhibits the aforementioned dynamics of replacement. Our model relies only on competition due to an antigen specific immune-response in an unconstrained antigenic space. Furthermore the model explains the size of typical influenza epidemics as well as the tendency that new epidemics are associated with mutations of old antigens.

  9. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling Dou

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27, influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  10. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yaling; Fu, Binqing; Sun, Rui; Li, Wenting; Hu, Wanfu; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK) cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27), influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular)+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  11. Broadly cross-reactive antibodies dominate the human B cell response against 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza pandemic demonstrated the global health threat of reassortant influenza strains. Herein, we report a detailed analysis of plasmablast and monoclonal antibody responses induced by pandemic H1N1 infection in humans. Unlike antibodies elicited by annual influenza vaccinations, most neutralizing antibodies induced by pandemic H1N1 infection were broadly cross-reactive against epitopes in the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk and head domain of multiple influenza strains. T...

  12. Sialic acid content in human saliva and anti-influenza activity against human and avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2016-03-01

    It was shown previously that human saliva has higher antiviral activity against human influenza viruses than against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, and that the major anti-influenza activity was associated with sialic-acid-containing molecules. To further characterize the differential susceptibility to saliva among influenza viruses, seasonal influenza A and B virus, pandemic H1N1 virus, and 15 subtypes of avian influenza virus were tested for their susceptibility to human and chicken saliva. Human saliva showed higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) titers against seasonal influenza A virus and the pandemic H1N1 viruses than against influenza B virus and most avian influenza viruses, except for H9N2 and H12N9 avian influenza viruses, which showed high HI and NT titers. To understand the nature of sialic-acid-containing anti-influenza factors in human saliva, α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid was measured in human saliva samples using a lectin binding and dot blot assay. α2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be more abundant than α2,3-linked sialic acid, and a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus bound more efficiently to human saliva than an H5N1 virus in a dot blot analysis. These data indicated that human saliva contains the sialic acid type corresponding to the binding preference of seasonal influenza viruses.

  13. Theoretical analysis of the neuraminidase epitope of the Mexican A H1N1 influenza strain, and experimental studies on its interaction with rabbit and human hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola, Paola Kinara Reyes; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Bello, Martiniano; Rojas-Hernández, S; Zimic, Mirko; Quiliano, Miguel; Briz, Verónica; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Tolentino-López, Luis; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-05-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) epitope from the Mexican AH1N1 influenza virus was identified by using sequences registered at the GenBank during the peak of a pandemic (from April 2009 to October 2010). First, NA protein sequences were submitted for multiple alignment analysis, and their three-dimensional models (3-D) were then built by using homology modeling. The most common sequence (denominated wild-type) and its mutants were submitted to linear and nonlinear epitope predictors, which included the major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC II) and B-cell peptides. The epitope prediction was in accordance with evolutionary behavior and some protein structural properties. The latter included a low NA mutation rate, NA 3-D surface exposure, and the presence of high hindrance side chain residues. After selecting the epitope, docking studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to explore interactions between the epitope and MHC II. Afterward, several experimental assays were performed to validate the theoretical study by using antibodies from humans (infected by pandemic H1N1) and rabbits (epitope vaccination). The results show 119 complete sequences that were grouped into 28 protein sequences according to their identity (one wild-type and 27 representative mutants (1-5 mutations)). The predictors yielded several epitopes, with the best fit being the one located in the C-terminal region. Theoretical methods demonstrated that the selected epitope reached the P4, P6, P7, and P9 pockets of MHC II, whereas the experimental evidence indicates that the epitope is recognized by human antibodies and also by rabbit antibodies immunized with the peptide.

  14. Weighing serological evidence of human exposure to animal influenza viruses - a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Reina Saapke; Freidl, Gudrun Stephanie; de Bruin, Erwin; Koopmans, Marion

    2016-11-03

    Assessing influenza A virus strains circulating in animals and their potential to cross the species barrier and cause human infections is important to improve human influenza surveillance and preparedness. We reviewed studies describing serological evidence of human exposure to animal influenza viruses. Comparing serological data is difficult due to a lack of standardisation in study designs and in laboratory methods used in published reports. Therefore, we designed a scoring system to assess and weigh specificity of obtained serology results in the selected articles. Many studies report reliable evidence of antibodies to swine influenza viruses among persons occupationally exposed to pigs. Most avian influenza studies target H5, H7 and H9 subtypes and most serological evidence of human exposure to avian influenza viruses is reported for these subtypes. Avian influenza studies receiving a low grade in this review often reported higher seroprevalences in humans compared with studies with a high grade. Official surveillance systems mainly focus on avian H5 and H7 viruses. Swine influenza viruses and avian subtypes other than H5 and H7 (emphasising H9) should be additionally included in official surveillance systems. Surveillance efforts should also be directed towards understudied geographical areas, such as Africa and South America. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  15. Human Dendritic Cell Response Signatures Distinguish 1918, Pandemic, and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Boris M; Thakar, Juilee; Albrecht, Randy A; Avey, Stefan; Zaslavsky, Elena; Marjanovic, Nada; Chikina, Maria; Fribourg, Miguel; Hayot, Fernand; Schmolke, Mirco; Meng, Hailong; Wetmur, James; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Kleinstein, Steven H; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2015-10-01

    Influenza viruses continue to present global threats to human health. Antigenic drift and shift, genetic reassortment, and cross-species transmission generate new strains with differences in epidemiology and clinical severity. We compared the temporal transcriptional responses of human dendritic cells (DC) to infection with two pandemic (A/Brevig Mission/1/1918, A/California/4/2009) and two seasonal (A/New Caledonia/20/1999, A/Texas/36/1991) H1N1 influenza viruses. Strain-specific response differences included stronger activation of NF-κB following infection with A/New Caledonia/20/1999 and a unique cluster of genes expressed following infection with A/Brevig Mission/1/1918. A common antiviral program showing strain-specific timing was identified in the early DC response and found to correspond with reported transcript changes in blood during symptomatic human influenza virus infection. Comparison of the global responses to the seasonal and pandemic strains showed that a dramatic divergence occurred after 4 h, with only the seasonal strains inducing widespread mRNA loss. Continuously evolving influenza viruses present a global threat to human health; however, these host responses display strain-dependent differences that are incompletely understood. Thus, we conducted a detailed comparative study assessing the immune responses of human DC to infection with two pandemic and two seasonal H1N1 influenza strains. We identified in the immune response to viral infection both common and strain-specific features. Among the stain-specific elements were a time shift of the interferon-stimulated gene response, selective induction of NF-κB signaling by one of the seasonal strains, and massive RNA degradation as early as 4 h postinfection by the seasonal, but not the pandemic, viruses. These findings illuminate new aspects of the distinct differences in the immune responses to pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All

  16. Inactivation of various influenza strains to model avian influenza (Bird Flu) with various disinfectant chemistries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberst, R. D.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Souza, Caroline Ann

    2005-12-01

    Due to the grave public health implications and economic impact possible with the emergence of the highly pathogenic avian influenza A isolate, H5N1, currently circulating in Asia we have evaluated the efficacy of various disinfectant chemistries against surrogate influenza A strains. Chemistries included in the tests were household bleach, ethanol, Virkon S{reg_sign}, and a modified version of the Sandia National Laboratories developed DF-200 (DF-200d, a diluted version of the standard DF-200 formulation). Validation efforts followed EPA guidelines for evaluating chemical disinfectants against viruses. The efficacy of the various chemistries was determined by infectivity, quantitative RNA, and qualitative protein assays. Additionally, organic challenges using combined poultry feces and litter material were included in the experiments to simulate environments in which decontamination and remediation will likely occur. In all assays, 10% bleach and Sandia DF-200d were the most efficacious treatments against two influenza A isolates (mammalian and avian) as they provided the most rapid and complete inactivation of influenza A viruses.

  17. Serologic evidence of human influenza virus infections in swine populations, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rith, Sareth; Netrabukkana, Punnaporn; Sorn, San; Mumford, Elizabeth; Mey, Channa; Holl, Davun; Goutard, Flavie; Y, Bunthin; Fenwick, Stan; Robertson, Ian; Roger, François; Buchy, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted from 2006 to 2010 and investigated the seroprevalence of influenza A viruses in Cambodian pigs, including human H1N1, H3N2, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A(H1N1)pdm09), and highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza A viruses. A total of 1147 sera obtained from pigs in Cambodia were tested by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays for antibody to human influenza A viruses along with both HI and microneutralization (MN) tests to assess immunological responses to H5N1 virus. The results were compared by year, age, and province. Antibodies against a human influenza A virus were detected in 14·9% of samples. A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were dominant over the study period (23·1%), followed by those to human H1N1 (17·3%) and H3N2 subtypes (9·9%). No pigs were serologically positive for avian H5 influenza viruses. The seroprevalence of human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses peaked in 2008, while that of A(H1N1)pdm09 reached a peak in 2010. No significant differences in seroprevalence to human influenza subtypes were observed in different age groups. Cambodian pigs were exposed to human strains of influenza A viruses either prior to or during this study. The implications of these high prevalence rates imply human-to-swine influenza virus transmission in Cambodia. Although pigs are mostly raised in small non-commercial farms, our preliminary results provide evidence of sustained human influenza virus circulation in pig populations in Cambodia. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Broadly Neutralizing against Influenza B Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasugi, Mayo; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kawashita, Norihito; Du, Anariwa; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Misaki, Ryo; Kuhara, Motoki; Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Nakaya, Takaaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has the ability to evade host immune surveillance through rapid viral genetic drift and reassortment; therefore, it remains a continuous public health threat. The development of vaccines producing broadly reactive antibodies, as well as therapeutic strategies using human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) with global reactivity, has been gathering great interest recently. Here, three hybridoma clones producing HuMAbs against influenza B virus, designated 5A7, 3A2 and 10C4, were prepared using peripheral lymphocytes from vaccinated volunteers, and were investigated for broad cross-reactive neutralizing activity. Of these HuMAbs, 3A2 and 10C4, which recognize the readily mutable 190-helix region near the receptor binding site in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, react only with the Yamagata lineage of influenza B virus. By contrast, HuMAb 5A7 broadly neutralizes influenza B strains that were isolated from 1985 to 2006, belonging to both Yamagata and Victoria lineages. Epitope mapping revealed that 5A7 recognizes 316G, 318C and 321W near the C terminal of HA1, a highly conserved region in influenza B virus. Indeed, no mutations in the amino acid residues of the epitope region were induced, even after the virus was passaged ten times in the presence of HuMAb 5A7. Moreover, 5A7 showed significant therapeutic efficacy in mice, even when it was administered 72 hours post-infection. These results indicate that 5A7 is a promising candidate for developing therapeutics, and provide insight for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza B virus. PMID:23408886

  19. A trivalent virus-like particle vaccine elicits protective immune responses against seasonal influenza strains in mice and ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted M Ross

    Full Text Available There is need for improved human influenza vaccines, particularly for older adults who are at greatest risk for severe disease, as well as to address the continuous antigenic drift within circulating human subtypes of influenza virus. We have engineered an influenza virus-like particle (VLP as a new generation vaccine candidate purified from the supernatants of Sf9 insect cells following infection by recombinant baculoviruses to express three influenza virus proteins, hemagglutinin (HA, neuraminidase (NA, and matrix 1 (M1. In this study, a seasonal trivalent VLP vaccine (TVV formulation, composed of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 and influenza B VLPs, was evaluated in mice and ferrets for the ability to elicit antigen-specific immune responses. Animals vaccinated with the TVV formulation had hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI antibody titers against all three homologous influenza virus strains, as well as HAI antibodies against a panel of heterologous influenza viruses. HAI titers elicited by the TVV were statistically similar to HAI titers elicited in animals vaccinated with the corresponding monovalent VLP. Mice vaccinated with the TVV had higher level of influenza specific CD8+ T cell responses than a commercial trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV. Ferrets vaccinated with the highest dose of the VLP vaccine and then challenged with the homologous H3N2 virus had the lowest titers of replicating virus in nasal washes and showed no signs of disease. Overall, a trivalent VLP vaccine elicits a broad array of immunity and can protect against influenza virus challenge.

  20. The role of CD4 T cell memory in generating protective immunity to novel and potentially pandemic strains of influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony eDiPiazza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent events have made it clear that potentially pandemic strains of influenza regularly pose a threat to human populations. Therefore, it is essential that we develop better strategies to enhance vaccine design and evaluation, to predict those that will be poor responders to vaccination and to identify those that are at particular risk of disease-associated complications following infection. Simplified animal models have revealed the discrete functions that CD4 T cells play in the developing immune response and to influenza immunity. However, humans have a complex immunological history with influenza through periodic infection and vaccination with seasonal variants, leading to the establishment of heterogeneous memory populations of CD4 T cells that participate in subsequent responses. The continual evolution of the influenza-specific CD4 T cell repertoire involves both specificity and function and overlays other restrictions on CD4 T cell activity derived from viral antigen handling and MHC class II:peptide epitope display. Together, these complexities in the influenza-specific CD4 T cell repertoire constitute a formidable obstacle to predicting protective immune response to potentially pandemic strains of influenza and in devising optimal vaccine strategies to potentiate these responses. We suggest that more precise efforts to identify and enumerate both the positive and negative contributors within the CD4 T cell compartment will aid significantly in achievement of these goals.

  1. Expression of an immunoreactive 72 kDa protein in strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius associated with Brazilian purpuric fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesse, A J; Bittner, W E

    1993-10-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) is a newly described pediatric syndrome that results in significant morbidity and mortality. BPF is caused by specific phenotypic strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius that are capable of intravascular survival. Immunoblotting of outer membrane proteins of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius with normal human serum showed that most virulent strains of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius associated with BPF expressed an immunologically prominent protein at 72 kDa. A corresponding protein in avirulent isolates migrated at 79 kDa. Although a minor component on SDS-PAGE analysis of the outer membrane, specific antibody against this protein is present in high concentrations in normal human serum.

  2. Universal or Specific? A Modeling-Based Comparison of Broad-Spectrum Influenza Vaccines against Conventional, Strain-Matched Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Subramanian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of vaccines, influenza remains a major public health challenge. A key reason is the virus capacity for immune escape: ongoing evolution allows the continual circulation of seasonal influenza, while novel influenza viruses invade the human population to cause a pandemic every few decades. Current vaccines have to be updated continually to keep up to date with this antigenic change, but emerging 'universal' vaccines-targeting more conserved components of the influenza virus-offer the potential to act across all influenza A strains and subtypes. Influenza vaccination programmes around the world are steadily increasing in their population coverage. In future, how might intensive, routine immunization with novel vaccines compare against similar mass programmes utilizing conventional vaccines? Specifically, how might novel and conventional vaccines compare, in terms of cumulative incidence and rates of antigenic evolution of seasonal influenza? What are their potential implications for the impact of pandemic emergence? Here we present a new mathematical model, capturing both transmission dynamics and antigenic evolution of influenza in a simple framework, to explore these questions. We find that, even when matched by per-dose efficacy, universal vaccines could dampen population-level transmission over several seasons to a greater extent than conventional vaccines. Moreover, by lowering opportunities for cross-protective immunity in the population, conventional vaccines could allow the increased spread of a novel pandemic strain. Conversely, universal vaccines could mitigate both seasonal and pandemic spread. However, where it is not possible to maintain annual, intensive vaccination coverage, the duration and breadth of immunity raised by universal vaccines are critical determinants of their performance relative to conventional vaccines. In future, conventional and novel vaccines are likely to play complementary roles in

  3. Protective efficacy of a live, attenuated, influenza virus vaccine (‘Alice’ strain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzie, A.; Delem, A.; Huygelen, C.

    1976-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated the high degree of efficacy and broad protection of ‘Alice’ vaccine against various heterologous H3N2 influenza virus strains. Similarly, challenge studies carried out in volunteers have confirmed the high degree of efficacy of ‘Alice’ vaccine versus homologous and heterologous influenza A virus strains. PMID:785431

  4. Avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in humans: epidemiology, evolution, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Matloob

    2014-12-01

    New human influenza A virus strains regularly emerge causing seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Lately, several zoonotic avian influenza A strains have been reported to directly infect humans. In early 2013, a novel avian influenza A virus (H7N9) strain was discovered in China to cause severe respiratory disease in humans. Since then, over 450 human cases of H7N9 infection have been discovered and 165 of them have died. Multiple epidemiological, phylogenetic, in vivo, and in vitro studies have been done to determine the origin and pathogenesis of novel H7N9 strain. This article reviews the literature related to the epidemiology, evolution, and pathogenesis of the H7N9 strain since its discovery in February 2013 till August 2014. The data available so far indicate that H7N9 was originated by a two-step reassortment process in birds and transmitted to humans through direct contact with live-bird markets. H7N9 is a low-pathogenic avian virus and contains several molecular signatures for adaptation in mammals. The severity of the respiratory disease caused by novel H7N9 virus in humans can be partly attributed to the age, sex, and underlying medical conditions of the patients. A universal influenza vaccine is not available, though several strain-specific H7N9 candidate vaccine viruses have been developed. Further, novel H7N9 virus is resistant to antiviral drug amantadine and some H7N9 isolates have acquired the resistance to neuraminidase-inhibitors. Therefore, constant surveillance and prompt control measures combined with novel research approaches to develop alternative and effective anti-influenza strategies are needed to overcome influenza A virus.

  5. Detecting emerging transmissibility of avian influenza virus in human households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, M. van; Koopmans, M.; Du Ry van Beest Holle, M.; Meijer, Adam; Klinkenberg, D.; Donnelly, C.A.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in humans underlines the need to track the ability of these viruses to spread among humans. A human-transmissible avian influenza virus is expected to cause clusters of infections in humans living in close contact. Therefore, epidemio

  6. Cross talk between animal and human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Although outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild and domestic birds have been posing the threat of a new influenza pandemic for the past decade, the first pandemic of the twenty-first century came from swine viruses. This fact emphasizes the complexity of influenza viral ecology and the difficulty of predicting influenza viral dynamics. Complete control of influenza viruses seems impossible. However, we must minimize the impact of animal and human influenza outbreaks by learning lessons from past experiences and recognizing the current status. Here, we review the most recent influenza virology data in the veterinary field, including aspects of zoonotic agents and recent studies that assess the pandemic potential of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

  7. Seasonal and pandemic human influenza viruses attach better to human upper respiratory tract epithelium than avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Debby; den Bakker, Michael A; Leijten, Lonneke M E; Chutinimitkul, Salin; Munster, Vincent J; de Wit, Emmie; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs

    2010-04-01

    Influenza viruses vary markedly in their efficiency of human-to-human transmission. This variation has been speculated to be determined in part by the tropism of influenza virus for the human upper respiratory tract. To study this tropism, we determined the pattern of virus attachment by virus histochemistry of three human and three avian influenza viruses in human nasal septum, conchae, nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, and larynx. We found that the human influenza viruses-two seasonal influenza viruses and pandemic H1N1 virus-attached abundantly to ciliated epithelial cells and goblet cells throughout the upper respiratory tract. In contrast, the avian influenza viruses, including the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, attached only rarely to epithelial cells or goblet cells. Both human and avian viruses attached occasionally to cells of the submucosal glands. The pattern of virus attachment was similar among the different sites of the human upper respiratory tract for each virus tested. We conclude that influenza viruses that are transmitted efficiently among humans attach abundantly to human upper respiratory tract, whereas inefficiently transmitted influenza viruses attach rarely. These results suggest that the ability of an influenza virus to attach to human upper respiratory tract is a critical factor for efficient transmission in the human population.

  8. Biological characteristics of influenza virus strains isolated at the Government of India Influenza Centre, Coonoor, during 1950-60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VEERARAGHAVAN, N; KIRTIKAR, M W

    1961-01-01

    The isolation of influenza virus strains of different types from the same or closely adjacent localities in the Nilgiris district of India in 1959-60 led the authors to investigate the biological characteristics of those strains and to compare them with strains isolated in previous years at the Government of India Influenza Centre at Coonoor. The haemagglutination with erythrocytes of different animal species, the sensitivity to inhibitors in normal sera, the effect of heat and the effect of ether are reported on in this paper.

  9. A review on the clinical spectrum and natural history of human influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punpanich, Warunee; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this review is to provide updated information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of human influenza, including risk factors for severe disease, and to identify the knowledge gap in this area. We searched the MEDLINE database of the recent literature for the period January 2009 to August 17, 2011 with regard to the abovementioned aspects of human influenza, focusing on A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza. The clinical spectrum and outcomes of cases of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza have been mild and rather indistinguishable from those of seasonal influenza. Sporadic cases covering a wide range of neurological complications have been reported. Underlying predisposing conditions considered to be high-risk for A(H1N1)pdm09 infections are generally similar to those of seasonal influenza, but with two additional risk groups: pregnant women and the morbidly obese. Co-infections with bacteria and D222/N variants or 225G substitution of the viral genome have also been reported to be significant factors associated with the severity of disease. The current knowledge gap includes: (1) a lack of clarification regarding the relatively greater severity of the Mexican A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza outbreak in the early phase of the pandemic; (2) insufficient data on the clinical impact, risk factors, and outcomes of human infections caused by resistant strains of influenza; and (3) insufficient data from less developed countries that would enable them to prioritize strategies for influenza prevention and control. Clinical features and risk factors of A(H1N1)pdm09 are comparable to those of seasonal influenza. Emerging risk factors for severe disease with A(H1N1)pdm09 include morbid obesity, pregnancy, bacterial co-infections, and D222/N variants or 225G substitution of the viral genome. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influenza-associated encephalopathy: no evidence for neuroinvasion by influenza virus nor for reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 or 7.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeijl, J.H.; Bakkers, J.; Wilbrink, B.; Melchers, W.J.; Mullaart, R.A.; Galama, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    During 2 consecutive influenza seasons we investigated the presence of influenza virus, human herpesvirus (HHV) type 6, and HHV-7 in cerebrospinal fluid samples from 9 white children suffering from influenza-associated encephalopathy. We conclude that it is unlikely that neuroinvasion by influenza

  11. Replication of swine and human influenza viruses in juvenile and layer turkey hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Yassine, Hadi; Awe, Olusegun O; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2013-04-12

    Since the first reported isolation of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in turkeys in the 1980s, transmission of SIVs to turkeys was frequently documented. Recently, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, that was thought to be of swine origin, was detected in turkeys with a severe drop in egg production. In this study, we assessed the infectivity of different mammalian influenza viruses including swine, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human influenza viruses in both juvenile and layer turkeys. In addition, we investigated the potential influenza virus dissemination in the semen of experimentally infected turkey toms. Results showed that all mammalian origin influenza viruses tested can infect turkeys. SIVs were detected in respiratory and digestive tracts of both juvenile and layer turkeys. Variations in replication efficiencies among SIVs were observed especially in the reproductive tract of layer turkeys. Compared to SIVs, limited replication of seasonal human H1N1 and no detectable replication of recent human-like swine H1N2, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human H3N2 viruses was noticed. All birds seroconverted to all tested viruses regardless of their replication level. In turkey toms, we were able to detect swine H3N2 virus in semen and reproductive tract of infected toms by real-time RT-PCR although virus isolation was not successful. These data suggest that turkey hens could be affected by diverse influenza strains especially SIVs. Moreover, the differences in the replication efficiency we demonstrated among SIVs and between SIV and human influenza viruses in layer turkeys suggest a possible use of turkeys as an animal model to study host tropism and pathogenesis of influenza viruses. Our results also indicate a potential risk of venereal transmission of influenza viruses in turkeys. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic structure of human A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 influenza virus on Corsica Island: phylogenetic analysis and vaccine strain match, 2006-2010.

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    Alessandra Falchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyse the genetic patterns of Hemagglutinin (HA genes of influenza A strains circulating on Corsica Island during the 2006-2009 epidemic seasons and the 2009-2010 pandemic season. METHODS: Nasopharyngeal samples from 371 patients with influenza-like illness (ILI were collected by General Practitioners (GPs of the Sentinelles Network through a randomised selection routine. RESULTS: Phylogenetic analysis of HA revealed that A/H3N2 strains circulating on Corsica were closely related to the WHO recommended vaccine strains in each analyzed season (2006-2007 to 2008-2009. Seasonal Corsican influenza A/H1N1 isolated during the 2007-2008 season had drifted towards the A/Brisbane/59/2007 lineage, the A/H1N1 vaccine strain for the 2008-2009 season. The A/H1N1 2009 (A/H1N1pdm strains isolated on Corsica Island were characterized by the S220T mutation specific to clade 7 isolates. It should be noted that Corsican isolates formed a separate sub-clade of clade 7 as a consequence of the presence of the fixed substitution D222E. The percentages of the perfect match vaccine efficacy, estimated by using the p(epitope model, against influenza viruses circulating on Corsica Island varied substantially across the four seasons analyzed, and tend to be highest for A/H1N1 compared with A/H3N2 vaccines, suggesting that cross-immunity seems to be stronger for the H1 HA gene. CONCLUSION: The molecular analysis of the HA gene of influenza viruses that circulated on Corsica Island between 2006-2010 showed for each season the presence of a dominant lineage characterized by at least one fixed mutation. The A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm isolates were characterized by multiples fixation at antigenic sites. The fixation of specific mutations at each outbreak could be explained by the combination of a neutral phenomenon and a founder effect, favoring the presence of a dominant lineage in a closed environment such as Corsica Island.

  13. Which influenza vaccine formulation should be used in Kenya? A comparison of influenza isolates from Kenya to vaccine strains, 2007-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waiboci, L.W.; Mott, J.A.; Kikwai, G.; Arunga, G.; Xu, X.; Mayieka, L.; Emukule, G.O.; Muthoka, P.; Njenga, M.K.; Fields, B.S.; Katz, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Every year the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends which influenza virus strains should be included in a northern hemisphere (NH) and a southern hemisphere (SH) influenza vaccine. To determine the best vaccine formulation for Kenya, we compared influenza viruses collected in

  14. Caveolin-1 influences human influenza A virus (H1N1 multiplication in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemgård Gun-Viol

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The threat of recurring influenza pandemics caused by new viral strains and the occurrence of escape mutants necessitate the search for potent therapeutic targets. The dependence of viruses on cellular factors provides a weak-spot in the viral multiplication strategy and a means to interfere with viral multiplication. Results Using a motif-based search strategy for antiviral targets we identified caveolin-1 (Cav-1 as a putative cellular interaction partner of human influenza A viruses, including the pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1 strains of swine origin circulating from spring 2009 on. The influence of Cav-1 on human influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1 virus replication was determined in inhibition and competition experiments. RNAi-mediated Cav-1 knock-down as well as transfection of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant results in a decrease in virus titre in infected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK, a cell line commonly used in basic influenza research as well as in virus vaccine production. To understand the molecular basis of the phenomenon we focussed on the putative caveolin-1 binding domain (CBD located in the lumenal, juxtamembranal portion of the M2 matrix protein which has been identified in the motif-based search. Pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that caveolin-1 binds to M2. The data suggest, that Cav-1 modulates influenza virus A replication presumably based on M2/Cav-1 interaction. Conclusion As Cav-1 is involved in the human influenza A virus life cycle, the multifunctional protein and its interaction with M2 protein of human influenza A viruses represent a promising starting point for the search for antiviral agents.

  15. Clinical characteristics of human infection with a novel avian-origin influenza A(H10N8) virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei; Wan Jianguo; Qian Kejian; Liu Xiaoqing; Xiao Zuke; Sun Jian; Zeng Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel influenza A viruses of avian-origin may be the precursors of pandemic strains.This descriptive study aims to introduce a novel avian-origin influenza A (H10N8) virus which can infect humans and cause severe diseases.Methods Collecting clinical data of three cases of human infection with a novel reassortment avian influenza A (H10N8)virus in Nanchang,Jiangxi Province,China.Results Three cases of human infection with a new reassortment avian influenza A(H10N8) virus were described,of which two were fatal cases,and one was severe case.These cases presented with severe pneumonia that progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and intractable respiratory failure.Conclusion This novel reassortment avian influenza A (H10N8) virus in China resulted in fatal human infections,and should be added to concerns in clinical practice.

  16. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Defective interfering (DI viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8 was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1; it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  17. KINETIC PROFILE OF INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractInfluenza infection is a respiratory disease of viral origin that can cause major epidemics in man. The influenza virus infects and damages epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and causes pneumonia. Lung lesions of mice infected with influenza virus resembl...

  18. KINETIC PROFILE OF INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractInfluenza infection is a respiratory disease of viral origin that can cause major epidemics in man. The influenza virus infects and damages epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and causes pneumonia. Lung lesions of mice infected with influenza virus resembl...

  19. Current Approaches for Diagnosis of Influenza Virus Infections in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Vikram Vemula

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advancement in vaccine and virus research, influenza continues to be a major public health concern. Each year in the United States of America, influenza viruses are responsible for seasonal epidemics resulting in over 200,000 hospitalizations and 30,000–50,000 deaths. Accurate and early diagnosis of influenza viral infections are critical for rapid initiation of antiviral therapy to reduce influenza related morbidity and mortality both during seasonal epidemics and pandemics. Several different approaches are currently available for diagnosis of influenza infections in humans. These include viral isolation in cell culture, immunofluorescence assays, nucleic acid amplification tests, immunochromatography-based rapid diagnostic tests, etc. Newer diagnostic approaches are being developed to overcome the limitations associated with some of the conventional detection methods. This review discusses diagnostic approaches currently available for detection of influenza viruses in humans.

  20. Haemophilus haemolyticus: A Human Respiratory Tract Commensal to Be Distinguished from Haemophilus influenzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, T.F.; Brauer, A.L.; Sethi, S.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Haemophilus influenzae is a common pathogen in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a prospective study, selected isolates of apparent H. influenzae had an altered phenotype. We tested the hypothesis that these variant strains were genetically different from ty...... distinguish H. haemolyticus from H. influenzae. H. haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal. The recognition that some strains of apparent H. influenzae are H. haemolyticus substantially strengthens the association of true H. influenzae with clinical infection....

  1. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infected pig coughs or sneezes and droplets with influenza virus in them spread through the air. If these ... possibly get infected is to inhale particles containing influenza virus. Scientists aren’t really sure which of these ...

  2. Detecting emerging transmissibility of avian influenza virus in human households.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Boven

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in humans underlines the need to track the ability of these viruses to spread among humans. A human-transmissible avian influenza virus is expected to cause clusters of infections in humans living in close contact. Therefore, epidemiological analysis of infection clusters in human households is of key importance. Infection clusters may arise from transmission events from (i the animal reservoir, (ii humans who were infected by animals (primary human-to-human transmission, or (iii humans who were infected by humans (secondary human-to-human transmission. Here we propose a method of analysing household infection data to detect changes in the transmissibility of avian influenza viruses in humans at an early stage. The method is applied to an outbreak of H7N7 avian influenza virus in The Netherlands that was the cause of more than 30 human-to-human transmission events. The analyses indicate that secondary human-to-human transmission is plausible for the Dutch household infection data. Based on the estimates of the within-household transmission parameters, we evaluate the effectiveness of antiviral prophylaxis, and conclude that it is unlikely that all household infections can be prevented with current antiviral drugs. We discuss the applicability of our method for the detection of emerging human-to-human transmission of avian influenza viruses in particular, and for the analysis of within-household infection data in general.

  3. Human influenza is more effective than avian influenza at antiviral suppression in airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Alan Chen-Yu; Barr, Ian; Hansbro, Philip M; Wark, Peter A

    2011-06-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the initial site of infection with influenza viruses. The innate immune responses of airway epithelial cells to infection are important in limiting virus replication and spread. However, relatively little is known about the importance of this innate antiviral response to infection. Avian influenza viruses are a potential source of future pandemics; therefore, it is critical to examine the effectiveness of the host antiviral system to different influenza viruses. We used a human influenza (H3N2) and a low-pathogenic avian influenza (H11N9) to assess and compare the antiviral responses of Calu-3 cells. After infection, H3N2 replicated more effectively than the H11N9 in Calu-3 cells. This was not due to differential expression of sialic acid residues on Calu-3 cells, but was attributed to the interference of host antiviral responses by H3N2. H3N2 induced a delayed antiviral signaling and impaired type I and type III IFN induction compared with the H11N9. The gene encoding for nonstructural (NS) 1 protein was transfected into the bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), and the H3N2 NS1 induced a greater inhibition of antiviral responses compared with the H11N9 NS1. Although the low-pathogenic avian influenza virus was capable of infecting BECs, the human influenza virus replicated more effectively than avian influenza virus in BECs, and this was due to a differential ability of the two NS1 proteins to inhibit antiviral responses. This suggests that the subversion of human antiviral responses may be an important requirement for influenza viruses to adapt to the human host and cause disease.

  4. Purification and characterization of a pilin specific for Brazilian purpuric fever-associated Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (H. aegyptius) strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, R S; Bibb, W F; Stephens, D S; Holloway, B P; Moo-Penn, W F; Birkness, K A; Helsel, L O; Mayer, L W

    1990-04-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) is a recently described fatal pediatric disease caused by systemic infection with Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius. Previous studies have shown that all H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains isolated from BPF cases and case contacts share several unique phenotypic and genotypic characteristics that differentiate them from other H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains isolated from conjunctivitis cases in Brazil. One key characteristic of this BPF clone is reactivity in a BPF-specific monoclonal antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We have purified and partially characterized a pilin, referred to as the 25-kilodalton (kDa) protein. Aggregates of this protein contain a heat-labile epitope which is recognized by a monoclonal antibody used in the BPF-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The protein has a molecular weight of approximately 25,000, is insoluble in most detergents, and fractionates with outer membrane vesicles after LiCl extraction. Biochemical analysis of the 25-kDa protein shows it to have an amino acid composition similar but not identical to that of the H. influenzae type b pilin. The sequence of 20 N-terminal amino acids of the 25-kDa protein shows almost complete homology with the N terminus of the H. influenzae type b pilin and the types 1 and P pilins of Escherichia coli. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of the purified protein shows the presence of filamentous structures similar in morphology to those of H. influenzae pili. Reactivity between the 25-kDa protein and the BPF-specific monoclonal antibody is demonstrated by Western blotting (immunoblotting) and colloidal gold-enhanced immunoelectron microscopy. Hemadsorption analysis shows that expression of this protein is associated with increases in piliated cells and enhanced binding of these cells to human erythrocytes. These studies indicate that expression of the 25-kDa protein is a characteristic unique to the BPF clone and

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains That Establish Bacteremia in the Infant Rat Model of Invasive Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Mussa, Huda J.; Cole, Brett K.; Whitby, Paul W.; Stull, Terrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of invasive disease. The infant rat is the accepted model of invasive H. influenzae disease. Here, we report the genome sequences of six nontypeable H. influenzae strains that establish bacteremia in the infant rat. PMID:26404588

  6. Detection of pandemic strain of influenza virus (A/H1N1/pdm09 in pigs, West Africa: implications and considerations for prevention of future influenza pandemics at the source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwagbenga A. Adeola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human and animal influenza are inextricably linked. In particular, the pig is uniquely important as a mixing vessel for genetic reassortment of influenza viruses, leading to emergence of novel strains which may cause human pandemics. Significant reduction in transmission of influenza viruses from humans, and other animals, to swine may therefore be crucial for preventing future influenza pandemics. This study investigated the presence of the 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus, A(H1N1pdm09, in Nigerian and Ghanaian pigs, and also determined levels of acceptance of preventive measures which could significantly reduce the transmission of this virus from humans to pigs. Methods: Nasal swab specimens from 125 pigs in Ibadan, Nigeria, and Kumasi, Ghana, were tested for the presence of influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1 by quantitative antigen-detection ELISA. A semi-structured questionnaire was also administered to pig handlers in the two study areas and responses were analyzed to evaluate their compliance with seven measures for preventing human-to-swine transmission of influenza viruses. Results: The virus was detected among pigs in the two cities, with prevalence of 8% in Ibadan and 10% in Kumasi. Levels of compliance of pig handlers with relevant preventive measures were also found to be mostly below 25 and 40% in Ibadan and Kumasi, respectively. Conclusion: Detection of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 among pigs tested suggests the possibility of human-to-swine transmission, which may proceed even more rapidly, considering the very poor acceptance of basic preventive measures observed in this study. This is also the first report on detection of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in Ghanaian pigs. We recommend improvement on personal hygiene among pig handlers, enforcement of sick leave particularly during the first few days of influenza-like illnesses, and training of pig handlers on recognition of influenza-like signs in humans and pigs. These could be

  7. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISATION OF Haemophilus influenzae STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH INVASIVE AND RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kostyanev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 175 H. influenzae strains were collected between 1994 and 2009 from all aged patient groups. The strains were isolated from patients with invasive and community-acquired respiratory tract infections. All strains were identified according to standard microbiological methods. Serotyping was done by a coagglutination test and by molecular PCR capsular genotyping. Beta-lactamase production was determined by the chromogenic cephalosporin test with nitrocephin as substrate. Most of the isolated H. influenzae strains were from children under 5 years of age (57.7%. Overall, 61 strains belonged to serotype b (34.9% by the means of PCR capsular typing, 1 strain was type f, and 113 isolates (64.6% were non-typeable (non-encapsulated H. influenzae. Among the infants and children with meningitis or other invasive infections, aged 2 month to 5 years, all strains, except one, were serotype b. In respiratory tract infections (pneumonia, otitis media, sinusitis and people with chronic pulmonary diseases - exacerbations of COPD, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis the most common - 96.5% were non-typeable strains in both groups children and adults. Overall, the prevalence of beta-lactamase production was 19.4%. But, it was much higher for invasive strains from CSF isolates - 37.7%, 25% in blood samples, and 37.5% in otitis media causative strains. Beta-lactamase production was less frequent in respiratory tract isolates - in sputum 13.3% and in URT samples - 2.3%. The rate of beta-lactamase production in CSF isolates has not changed for the last 10 years.PCR capsular genotyping method has to be performed for all non-b-type strains. The implementation of Hib vaccine in our country will be accompanied by a reduction in invasive diseases caused by H. influenzae type b in children, but it is not useful in preventing infections caused by non-typeable H. influenzae strains.

  8. Structural and Functional Bases for Broad-Spectrum Neutralization of Avian and Human Influenza A Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Sui, Jianhua; Hwang, William C; Perez, Sandra; Wei, Ge; Aird, Daniel; Chen, Li-Mei; Santelli, Eugenio; Stec, Boguslaw; Cadwell, Greg; Ali, Maryam; Wan, Hongquan; Murakami, Akikazu; Yammanuru, Anuradha; Han, Thomas; Cox, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    Influenza virus remains a constant public health threat, owing to its ability to evade immune surveillance through rapid genetic drift and reassortment. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based immunotherapy is a promising strategy for disease control. Here we use a human Ab phage display library and H5 hemagglutinin (HA) ectodomain to select ten neutralizing mAbs (nAbs) with a remarkably broad range among Group 1 influenza viruses, including the H5N1 “bird flu” and the H1N1 “Spanish flu” strains. Not...

  9. Programme of the Community Network of Reference Laboratories for Human Influenza to improve Influenza Surveillance in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Adam; Brown, Caroline; Hungnes, Olav; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Valette, Martine; Werf, Sylvie van der; Zambon, Maria

    2006-01-01

    All laboratories participating in the Community Network of Reference Laboratories for Human Influenza in Europe (CNRL) co-ordinated by the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) should be able to perform a range of influenza diagnostics. This includes direct detection, culture, typing, subtyp

  10. Programme of the community network of reference laboratories for human influenza to improve influenza surveillance in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.; Brown, C.; Hungnes, O.; Schweiger, B.; Valette, M.; Werf, S. van der; Zambon, M.

    2006-01-01

    All laboratories participating in the Community Network of Reference Laboratories for Human Influenza in Europe (CNRL) co-ordinated by the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) should be able to perform a range of influenza diagnostics. This includes direct detection, culture, typing, subtyp

  11. Influenza A (H3N2) virus in swine at agricultural fairs and transmission to humans, Michigan and Ohio, USA, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    An 18 case outbreak of variant H3N2 influenza A occurred during 2016 after exposure to influenza-infected swine at seven agricultural fairs. Sixteen cases were infected with a reassortant between 2010-2011 human seasonal H3N2 strains and viruses endemic in North American swine, a viral lineage incre...

  12. Application of three duplex real-time PCR assays for simultaneous detection of human seasonal and avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefańska, Ilona; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Brydak, Lidia B; Romanowska, Magdalena

    2013-08-01

    This study was performed to develop real-time PCR (qPCR) for detection of human seasonal and avian influenza viruses in duplex format. First duplex qPCR detects haemagglutinin (HA) gene of influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 and HA gene of influenza virus A(H3N2), the second reaction detects neuraminidase (NA) gene of influenza virus A(H3N2) and NA gene of influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H5N1), and the third reaction detects HA gene of influenza A(H5N1) and nonstructural protein gene of influenza B virus. Primers and probes were designed using multiple alignments of target gene sequences of different reference strains. Assays were optimised for identical thermocycling conditions. Their specificity was confirmed by conventional PCR and monoplex qPCR with nucleic acids isolated from different influenza viruses and other respiratory pathogens. Plasmid constructs with a fragment of specific gene were used to assess sensitivity of the assay. The limit of detection ranged from 27 to 96 cDNA copies/reaction. Clinical specimens (n = 107) have been tested using new assays, immunofluorescence and monoplex qRT-PCR. It has been shown that developed assays have been capable of rapid and accurate simultaneous detection and differentiation of influenza viruses. They are more sensitive than immunofluorescence and at least as sensitive as monoplex qRT-PCR.

  13. Annually repeated influenza vaccination improves humoral responses to several influenza virus strains in healthy elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. de Bruijn (Iris); E.J. Remarque (Edmond); W.E.Ph. Beyer (Walter); S. le Cessie (Saskia); N. Masurel (Nic); G.L. Ligthart (Gerard)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe benefit of annually repeated influenza vaccination on antibody formation is still under debate. In this study the effect of annually repeated influenza vaccination on haemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody formation in the elderly is investigated. Between 1990 and 1993 healthy yo

  14. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Mizuta, Hiroyuki [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oshita, Masatoshi; Ideno, Shoji [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Yunoki, Mikihiro [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kuhara, Motoki [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano 396-0002 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naomasa [Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ohu University, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8611 (Japan); Okuno, Yoshinobu [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa 768-0061 (Japan); Ikuta, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: ikuta@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-09-11

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  15. Resistance to serum bactericidal activity distinguishes Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) case strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (H. aegyptius) from non-BPF strains. Brazilian Purpuric Fever Study Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Porto, M H; Noel, G J; Edelson, P J

    1989-01-01

    We studied the ability of normal human serum to lyse H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius (H. aegyptius) isolates recovered from patients with Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF clone) or non-BPF clone strains. BPF clone isolates, although similar to non-BPF clone isolates with regard to the ability to fix C3 to their surfaces, could be distinguished from non-BPF clone strains by their resistance to lysis in vitro following incubation with normal adult human serum.

  16. Resistance to serum bactericidal activity distinguishes Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) case strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (H. aegyptius) from non-BPF strains. Brazilian Purpuric Fever Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, M H; Noel, G J; Edelson, P J

    1989-04-01

    We studied the ability of normal human serum to lyse H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius (H. aegyptius) isolates recovered from patients with Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF clone) or non-BPF clone strains. BPF clone isolates, although similar to non-BPF clone isolates with regard to the ability to fix C3 to their surfaces, could be distinguished from non-BPF clone strains by their resistance to lysis in vitro following incubation with normal adult human serum.

  17. The Mx1 Gene Protects Mice against the Pandemic 1918 and Highly Lethal Human H5N1 Influenza Viruses▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Mice carrying a wild-type Mx1 gene (Mx1+/+) differ from standard laboratory mice (Mx1−/−) in being highly resistant to infection with common laboratory strains of influenza A virus. We report that Mx1 also protects mice against the pandemic human 1918 influenza virus and a highly lethal human H5N1 strain from Vietnam. Resistance to H5N1 of Mx1+/+ but not Mx1−/− mice was enhanced if the animals were treated with a single dose of exogenous alpha interferon before infection. Thus, the interferon...

  18. Stable, conserved outer membrane epitope of strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius associated with Brazilian purpuric fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Lesse, A J; Gheesling, L L; Bittner, W E; Myers, S.D.; Carlone, G M

    1992-01-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever is a rapidly fatal childhood disease associated with a clonal strain of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius. We describe a conserved, surface-exposed epitope present on 95% of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius isolates that are associated with Brazilian purpuric fever. This epitope, defined by reaction with the monoclonal antibody 8G3, is on or associated with the 48-kDa heat-modifiable P1 protein. The epitope is absent on strains of H. influenzae biogroup aegypt...

  19. Analysis of antigenic relationships among influenza virus strains using a taxonomic cluster procedure. Comparison of three kinds of antibody preparations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.F. Weijers; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); W.E.Ph. Beyer (Walter); J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack); F.M. de Ronde-Verloop; K. Bijlsma (Klaas); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractHemagglutination inhibiting (HI) monoclonal antibody preparations (MA) were raised against six influenza A (H3N2) strains from the period 1977-1982. Twenty-three hybridomas were selected and titrated in HI assays against these strains and against 18 influenza A (H3N2) viruses isolated in

  20. FluShuffle and FluResort: new algorithms to identify reassorted strains of the influenza virus by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Aaron TL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza is one of the oldest and deadliest infectious diseases known to man. Reassorted strains of the virus pose the greatest risk to both human and animal health and have been associated with all pandemics of the past century, with the possible exception of the 1918 pandemic, resulting in tens of millions of deaths. We have developed and tested new computer algorithms, FluShuffle and FluResort, which enable reassorted viruses to be identified by the most rapid and direct means possible. These algorithms enable reassorted influenza, and other, viruses to be rapidly identified to allow prevention strategies and treatments to be more efficiently implemented. Results The FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms were tested with both experimental and simulated mass spectra of whole virus digests. FluShuffle considers different combinations of viral protein identities that match the mass spectral data using a Gibbs sampling algorithm employing a mixed protein Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method. FluResort utilizes those identities to calculate the weighted distance of each across two or more different phylogenetic trees constructed through viral protein sequence alignments. Each weighted mean distance value is normalized by conversion to a Z-score to establish a reassorted strain. Conclusions The new FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms can correctly identify the origins of influenza viral proteins and the number of reassortment events required to produce the strains from the high resolution mass spectral data of whole virus proteolytic digestions. This has been demonstrated in the case of constructed vaccine strains as well as common human seasonal strains of the virus. The algorithms significantly improve the capability of the proteotyping approach to identify reassorted viruses that pose the greatest pandemic risk.

  1. FAO-OIE-WHO Joint Technical Consultation on Avian Influenza at the Human-Animal Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tara; Capua, Ilaria; Dauphin, Gwenaëlle; Donis, Ruben; Fouchier, Ron; Mumford, Elizabeth; Peiris, Malik; Swayne, David; Thiermann, Alex

    2010-05-01

    For the past 10 years, animal health experts and human health experts have been gaining experience in the technical aspects of avian influenza in mostly separate fora. More recently, in 2006, in a meeting of the small WHO Working Group on Influenza Research at the Human Animal Interface (Meeting report available from: http://www.who.int/csr/resources/publications/influenza/WHO_CDS_EPR_GIP_2006_3/en/index.html) in Geneva allowed influenza experts from the animal and public health sectors to discuss together the most recent avian influenza research. Ad hoc bilateral discussions on specific technical issues as well as formal meetings such as the Technical Meeting on HPAI and Human H5N1 Infection (Rome, June, 2007; information available from: http://www.fao.org/avianflu/en/conferences/june2007/index.html) have increasingly brought the sectors together and broadened the understanding of the topics of concern to each sector. The sectors have also recently come together at the broad global level, and have developed a joint strategy document for working together on zoonotic diseases (Joint strategy available from: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/011/ajl37e/ajl37e00.pdf). The 2008 FAO-OIE-WHO Joint Technical Consultation on Avian Influenza at the Human Animal Interface described here was the first opportunity for a large group of influenza experts from the animal and public health sectors to gather and discuss purely technical topics of joint interest that exist at the human-animal interface. During the consultation, three influenza-specific sessions aimed to (1) identify virological characteristics of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) important for zoonotic and pandemic disease, (2) evaluate the factors affecting evolution and emergence of a pandemic influenza strain and identify existing monitoring systems, and (3) identify modes of transmission and exposure sources for human zoonotic influenza infection (including discussion of specific exposure risks by affected countries). A

  2. [Polymorphism of current human influenza A and B virus population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinbaum, E B; Litvinova, O M; Bannikov, A I; Konovalenko, I B; Chernookaia, N Iu; Iukhnova, L G; Kiselev, O I

    1994-01-01

    During the past years, the etiological situation has been significantly complicated. It is characterized by simultaneous circulation of A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and influenza B viruses and by the isolation of reassortant strains and viruses, which are atypical in relation to the process of their natural variability. The antigenic properties of epidemic strains and unusual isolates were investigated. The marked heterogeneity of the A(H3N2) influenza viruses was demonstrated. It was determined by the circulation of several antigenic variants during the epidemic. Two separate antigenic lineage of the influenza B viruses--b/Victoria/2/87 and B/Yamagata/16/88--cocirculated in our country in 1991. Since 1986, all the influenza A(H1N1) viruses have been considered to be varieties of the reference strain A/Taiwan/1/86. A direct correlation was found between some atypical viruses and the vaccine strains previously used.

  3. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (Novartis); (US-FDA); (Duke)

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  4. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Aitor Nogales; Luis Martínez-Sobrido

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influ...

  5. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the NS1 protein of non-cultured influenza B virus strains circulating in Singapore

    KAUST Repository

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan

    2016-08-04

    In this study we compared the NS1 protein of Influenza B/Lee/40 and several non-cultured Influenza B virus clinical strains detected in Singapore. In B/Lee/40 virus-infected cells and in cells expressing the recombinant B/Lee/40 NS1 protein a full-length 35 kDa NS1 protein and a 23 kDa NS1 protein species (p23) were detected. Mutational analysis of the NS1 gene indicated that p23 was generated by a novel cleavage event within the linker domain between an aspartic acid and proline at amino acid residues at positions 92 and 93 respectively (DP92–93), and that p23 contained the first 92 amino acids of the NS1 protein. Sequence analysis of the Singapore strains indicated the presence of either DP92–93 or NP92–93 in the NS1 protein, but protein expression analysis showed that p23 was only detected in NS1 proteins with DP92–93.. An additional adjacent proline residue at position 94 (P94) was present in some strains and correlated with increased p23 levels, suggesting that P94 has a synergistic effect on the cleavage of the NS1 protein. The first 145 amino acids of the NS1 protein are required for inhibition of ISG15-mediated ubiquitination, and our analysis showed that Influenza B viruses circulating in Singapore with DP92–93 expressed truncated NS1 proteins and may differ in their capacity to inhibit ISG15 activity. Thus, DP92–93 in the NS1 protein may confer a disadvantage to Influenza B viruses circulating in the human population and interestingly the low frequency of DP92–93detection in the NS1 protein since 2004 is consistent with this suggestion.

  6. Antigenic and genomic characterization of human influenza A and B viruses circulating in Argentina after the introduction of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Mara L; Pontoriero, Andrea V; Benedetti, Estefania; Czech, Andrea; Avaro, Martin; Periolo, Natalia; Campos, Ana M; Savy, Vilma L; Baumeister, Elsa G

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted as part of the Argentinean Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses Surveillance Network, in the context of the Global Influenza Surveillance carried out by the World Health Organization (WHO). The objective was to study the activity and the antigenic and genomic characteristics of circulating viruses for three consecutive seasons (2010, 2011 and 2012) in order to investigate the emergence of influenza viral variants. During the study period, influenza virus circulation was detected from January to December. Influenza A and B, and all current subtypes of human influenza viruses, were present each year. Throughout the 2010 post-pandemic season, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, unexpectedly, almost disappeared. The haemagglutinin (HA) of the A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses studied were segregated in a different genetic group to those identified during the 2009 pandemic, although they were still antigenically closely related to the vaccine strain A/California/07/2009. Influenza A(H3N2) viruses were the predominant strains circulating during the 2011 season, accounting for nearly 76 % of influenza viruses identified. That year, all HA sequences of the A(H3N2) viruses tested fell into the A/Victoria/208/2009 genetic clade, but remained antigenically related to A/Perth/16/2009 (reference vaccine recommended for this three-year period). A(H3N2) viruses isolated in 2012 were antigenically closely related to A/Victoria/361/2011, recommended by the WHO as the H3 component for the 2013 Southern Hemisphere formulation. B viruses belonging to the B/Victoria lineage circulated in 2010. A mixed circulation of viral variants of both B/Victoria and B/Yamagata lineages was detected in 2012, with the former being predominant. A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses remained antigenically closely related to the vaccine virus A/California/7/2009; A(H3N2) viruses continually evolved into new antigenic clusters and both B lineages, B/Victoria/2/87-like and B/Yamagata/16/88-like viruses, were observed

  7. Dynamics of a New Strain of the H1N1 Influenza A Virus Incorporating the Effects of Repetitive Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puntani Pongsumpun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory disease caused by the Influenza A Virus is occurring worldwide. The transmission for new strain of the H1N1 Influenza A virus is studied by formulating a SEIQR (susceptible, exposed, infected, quarantine, and recovered model to describe its spread. In the present model, we have assumed that a fraction of the infected population will die from the disease. This changes the mathematical equations governing the transmission. The effect of repetitive contact is also included in the model. Analysis of the model by using standard dynamical modeling method is given. Conditions for the stability of equilibrium state are given. Numerical solutions are presented for different values of parameters. It is found that increasing the amount of repetitive contacts leads to a decrease in the peak numbers of exposed and infectious humans. A stability analysis shows that the solutions are robust.

  8. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Genes Essential for Influenza A (H7N9) Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stefan; Wu, Weilin; Jones, Cheryl; Perwitasari, Olivia; Mahalingam, Suresh; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens of humans and animals. While seasonal influenza viruses infect humans every year, occasionally animal-origin viruses emerge to cause pandemics with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates. In March 2013, the public health authorities of China reported three cases of laboratory confirmed human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus, and subsequently there have been many cases reported across South East Asia and recently in North America. Most patients experience severe respiratory illness, and morbidity with mortality rates near 40%. No vaccine is currently available and the use of antivirals is complicated due the frequent emergence of drug resistant strains. Thus, there is an imminent need to identify new drug targets for therapeutic intervention. In the current study, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was performed using microRNA (miRNA) inhibitors to identify new host miRNA targets that reduce influenza H7N9 replication in human respiratory (A549) cells. Validation studies lead to a top hit, hsa-miR-664a-3p, that had potent antiviral effects in reducing H7N9 replication (TCID50 titers) by two logs. In silico pathway analysis revealed that this microRNA targeted the LIF and NEK7 genes with effects on pro-inflammatory factors. In follow up studies using siRNAs, anti-viral properties were shown for LIF. Furthermore, inhibition of hsa-miR-664a-3p also reduced virus replication of pandemic influenza A strains H1N1 and H3N2. PMID:27166678

  9. Reduced influenza viral neutralizing activity of natural human trimers of surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L; White, Mitchell R; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection. Common human polymorphisms of SP-D have been found in many human populations and associated with increased risk of certain infections. We recently reported that the Thr...... human SP-D multimers as well as reduced hemagglutination inhibiting activity against several strains of IAV. Natural SP-D trimers also had different interactions with human neutrophil peptide defensins (HNPs) in viral neutralization assays as compared to multimeric SP-D. CONCLUSION: These studies......-D can be useful for dissecting out different functional properties of the protein....

  10. Global migration dynamics underlie evolution and persistence of human influenza A (H3N2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Trevor; Cobey, Sarah; Beerli, Peter; Pascual, Mercedes

    2010-05-27

    The global migration patterns of influenza viruses have profound implications for the evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics of the disease. We developed a novel approach to reconstruct the genetic history of human influenza A (H3N2) collected worldwide over 1998 to 2009 and used it to infer the global network of influenza transmission. Consistent with previous models, we find that China and Southeast Asia lie at the center of this global network. However, we also find that strains of influenza circulate outside of Asia for multiple seasons, persisting through dynamic migration between northern and southern regions. The USA acts as the primary hub of temperate transmission and, together with China and Southeast Asia, forms the trunk of influenza's evolutionary tree. These findings suggest that antiviral use outside of China and Southeast Asia may lead to the evolution of long-term local and potentially global antiviral resistance. Our results might also aid the design of surveillance efforts and of vaccines better tailored to different geographic regions.

  11. Impact of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus on Circulation Dynamics of Seasonal Influenza Strains in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majanja, Janet; Njoroge, Rose N.; Achilla, Rachel; Wurapa, Eyako K.; Wadegu, Meshack; Mukunzi, Silvanos; Mwangi, Josephat; Njiri, James; Gachara, George; Bulimo, Wallace

    2013-01-01

    We describe virus variations from patients with influenza-like illness before and after the appearance of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Kenya during January 2008–July 2011. A total of 11,592 nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from consenting patients. Seasonal influenza B, A/H1N1, A/H3N2, A/H5N1, and influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were detected by real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Of patients enrolled, 2073 (17.9%) had influenza. A total of 1,524 (73.4%) of 2,073 samples were positive for influenza A virus and 549 (26.6%) were positive for influenza B virus. Influenza B virus predominated in 2008 and seasonal A(H1N1) virus predominated in the first half of 2009. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus predominated in the second half of 2009. Influenza A/H3N2 virus predominated in 2010, and co-circulation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and influenza B virus predominated the first half of 2011. The reduction and displacement of seasonal A(H1N1) virus was the most obvious effect of the arrival of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The decision of the World Health Organization to replace seasonal A(H1N1) virus with the pandemic virus strain for the southern hemisphere vaccine was appropriate for Kenya. PMID:23458953

  12. Receptor binding properties of human and animal H1 influenza virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, G N; D'Souza, B L

    1989-11-01

    It has been previously reported that several human H1 influenza viruses isolated prior to 1956, in contrast to human H3 isolates which are quite specific for SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences, apparently recognize both SA alpha 2,3Gal and SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences (Rogers, G.N., and Paulson, J.C., Virology 127, 361-373, 1983). In this report human H1 isolates representative of two epidemic periods, from 1934 to 1957 and from 1977 to 1986, and H1 influenza isolated from pigs, ducks, and turkeys were compared for their ability to utilize sialyloligosaccharide structures containing terminal SA alpha 2,3Gal or SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences as receptor determinants. Five of the eight human isolates from the first epidemic period recognize both SA alpha 2,3Gal and SA alpha 2,6Gal linkages, in agreement with our previous results. Of the remaining three strains, all isolated towards the end of the first epidemic, two appear to prefer SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences while the third preferentially binds SA alpha 2,3Gal sequences. In contrast to the early isolates, 11 of 13 human strains isolated during the second epidemic period preferentially bind SA alpha 2,6Gal containing oligosaccharides. On the basis of changes in receptor binding associated with continued passage in the laboratory for some of these later strains, it seems likely that human H1 isolates preferentially bind SA alpha 2,6Gal sequences in nature, and that acquisition of SA alpha 2,3Gal-binding is associated with laboratory passage. Influenza H1 viruses isolated from pigs were predominantly SA alpha 2,6Gal-specific while those isolated from ducks were primarily SA alpha 2,3Gal-specific. Thus, as has been previously reported for H3 influenza isolates, receptor specificity for influenza H1 viruses appears to be influenced by the species from which they were isolated, human isolates binding preferentially to SA alpha 2,6Gal-containing oligosaccharides while those isolated from ducks prefer SA alpha 2,3Gal

  13. A Novel Duplex Real-Time Reverse-Transcription PCR Assay for the Detection of Influenza A and the Novel Influenza A(H1N1 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo P. Sloots

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Timely implementation of antiviral treatment and other public health based responses are dependent on accurate and rapid diagnosis of the novel pandemic influenza A(H1N1 strain. In this study we developed a duplex real-time PCR (RT-PCR (dFLU-TM assay for the simultaneous detection of a broad range of influenza A subtypes and specific detection of the novel H1N1 2009 pandemic strain. The assay was compared to the combined results of two previously described monoplex RT-PCR assays using 183 clinical samples and 10 seasonal influenza A isolates. Overall, the results showed that the dFLU-TM RT-PCR method is suitable for detection of influenza A, including the novel H1N1 pandemic strain, in clinical samples.

  14. Characterization of H5N1 influenza viruses isolated from humans in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameoka Masanori

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since December 1997, highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1viruses have swept through poultry populations across Asian countries and been transmitted into African and European countries. We characterized 6 avian influenza H5N1 viruses isolated from humans in 2004 in Thailand. A highly pathogenic (HP KAN353 strain showed faster replication and higher virulence in embryonated eggs compared to other strains, especially compared to the low pathogenic (LP SP83 strain. HP KAN353 also showed strong cytopathogenicity compared to SP83 in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Interestingly, LP SP83 induced smaller plaques compared to other strains, especially HP KAN353. PB2 amino acid 627E may contribute to low virulence, whereas either PB2 amino acid 627 K or the combination of 627E/701N seems to be associated with high virulence. The in vitro assays used in this study may provide the basis for assessing the pathogenesis of influenza H5N1 viruses in vivo.

  15. Single assay for simultaneous detection and differential identification of human and avian influenza virus types, subtypes, and emergent variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metzgar

    Full Text Available For more than four decades the cause of most type A influenza virus infections of humans has been attributed to only two viral subtypes, A/H1N1 or A/H3N2. In contrast, avian and other vertebrate species are a reservoir of type A influenza virus genome diversity, hosting strains representing at least 120 of 144 combinations of 16 viral hemagglutinin and 9 viral neuraminidase subtypes. Viral genome segment reassortments and mutations emerging within this reservoir may spawn new influenza virus strains as imminent epidemic or pandemic threats to human health and poultry production. Traditional methods to detect and differentiate influenza virus subtypes are either time-consuming and labor-intensive (culture-based or remarkably insensitive (antibody-based. Molecular diagnostic assays based upon reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR have short assay cycle time, and high analytical sensitivity and specificity. However, none of these diagnostic tests determine viral gene nucleotide sequences to distinguish strains and variants of a detected pathogen from one specimen to the next. Decision-quality, strain- and variant-specific pathogen gene sequence information may be critical for public health, infection control, surveillance, epidemiology, or medical/veterinary treatment planning. The Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM-Flu is a robust, highly multiplexed and target gene sequencing-based alternative to both traditional culture- or biomarker-based diagnostic tests. RPM-Flu is a single, simultaneous differential diagnostic assay for all subtype combinations of type A influenza viruses and for 30 other viral and bacterial pathogens that may cause influenza-like illness. These other pathogen targets of RPM-Flu may co-infect and compound the morbidity and/or mortality of patients with influenza. The informative specificity of a single RPM-Flu test represents specimen-specific viral gene sequences as determinants of virus type, A

  16. The Mx1 gene protects mice against the pandemic 1918 and highly lethal human H5N1 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumpey, Terrence M; Szretter, Kristy J; Van Hoeven, Neal; Katz, Jacqueline M; Kochs, Georg; Haller, Otto; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Staeheli, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Mice carrying a wild-type Mx1 gene (Mx1+/+) differ from standard laboratory mice (Mx1-/-) in being highly resistant to infection with common laboratory strains of influenza A virus. We report that Mx1 also protects mice against the pandemic human 1918 influenza virus and a highly lethal human H5N1 strain from Vietnam. Resistance to H5N1 of Mx1+/+ but not Mx1-/- mice was enhanced if the animals were treated with a single dose of exogenous alpha interferon before infection. Thus, the interferon-induced resistance factor Mx1 represents a key component of the murine innate immune system that mediates protection against epidemic and pandemic influenza viruses.

  17. Experimental infection with H1N1 European swine influenza virus protects pigs from an infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 human influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Núria; Segalés, Joaquim; Córdoba, Lorena; Mussá, Tufaria; Crisci, Elisa; Martín-Valls, Gerard E; Simon-Grifé, Meritxell; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Pérez-Maíllo, Monica; Núñez, Jose I; Abad, Francesc X; Fraile, Lorenzo; Pina, Sonia; Majó, Natalia; Bensaid, Albert; Domingo, Mariano; Montoya, María

    2010-01-01

    The recent pandemic caused by human influenza virus A(H1N1) 2009 contains ancestral gene segments from North American and Eurasian swine lineages as well as from avian and human influenza lineages. The emergence of this A(H1N1) 2009 poses a potential global threat for human health and the fact that it can infect other species, like pigs, favours a possible encounter with other influenza viruses circulating in swine herds. In Europe, H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes of swine influenza virus currently have a high prevalence in commercial farms. To better assess the risk posed by the A(H1N1) 2009 in the actual situation of swine farms, we sought to analyze whether a previous infection with a circulating European avian-like swine A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as SwH1N1) generated or not cross-protective immunity against a subsequent infection with the new human pandemic A/Catalonia/63/2009 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as pH1N1) 21 days apart. Pigs infected only with pH1N1 had mild to moderate pathological findings, consisting on broncho-interstitial pneumonia. However, pigs inoculated with SwH1N1 virus and subsequently infected with pH1N1 had very mild lung lesions, apparently attributed to the remaining lesions caused by SwH1N1 infection. These later pigs also exhibited boosted levels of specific antibodies. Finally, animals firstly infected with SwH1N1 virus and latter infected with pH1N1 exhibited undetectable viral RNA load in nasal swabs and lungs after challenge with pH1N1, indicating a cross-protective effect between both strains.

  18. Isolation of a novel swine influenza virus from Oklahoma in 2011 which is distantly related to human influenza C viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D; Webby, Richard J; Simonson, Randy R; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution.

  19. [Immunomorphological changes in the mouse brain after intracerebral administration of a neurotropic strain of influenza virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimova, I M; Nagornev, V A; Bannikov, A I; Iakovleva, O A; Platonov, V G; Chernookaia, K M; Kiselev, O I

    1991-09-01

    The work dealt with intracerebral inoculation of 150 mice with neurotropic strain of influenza virus A/WSN/33. Virological and immunohistochemical study of virus localization in the mice brain was carried out. It was shown that virus reproduction in ependymal lining cells and plexus choroideus epithelium is followed by destruction of cells and uptake of disintegration products by macrophages. Since the influenza infection is followed by a large number of macrophages involved in gene expression of the main histocompatibility complex, the development of autoimmune reaction with the formation of autoantibodies to brain specific antigens can't be ruled out.

  20. Physician's knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding seasonal influenza, pandemic influenza, and highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus infections of humans in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiri, Amalya; Iuliano, A Danielle; Wahyuningrum, Yunita; Praptiningsih, Catharina Y; Lafond, Kathryn E; Storms, Aaron D; Samaan, Gina; Ariawan, Iwan; Soeharno, Nugroho; Kreslake, Jennifer M; Storey, J Douglas; Uyeki, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    Indonesia has reported highest number of fatal human cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N1) virus infection worldwide since 2005. There are limited data available on seasonal and pandemic influenza in Indonesia. During 2012, we conducted a survey of clinicians in two districts in western Java, Indonesia, to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of clinical diagnosis, testing, and treatment of patients with seasonal influenza, pandemic influenza, or HPAI H5N1 virus infections. Overall, a very low percentage of physician participants reported ever diagnosing hospitalized patients with seasonal, pandemic, or HPAI H5N1 influenza. Use of influenza testing was low in outpatients and hospitalized patients, and use of antiviral treatment was very low for clinically diagnosed influenza patients. Further research is needed to explore health system barriers for influenza diagnostic testing and availability of antivirals for treatment of influenza in Indonesia. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Stable, conserved outer membrane epitope of strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius associated with Brazilian purpuric fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesse, A J; Gheesling, L L; Bittner, W E; Myers, S D; Carlone, G M

    1992-04-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever is a rapidly fatal childhood disease associated with a clonal strain of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius. We describe a conserved, surface-exposed epitope present on 95% of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius isolates that are associated with Brazilian purpuric fever. This epitope, defined by reaction with the monoclonal antibody 8G3, is on or associated with the 48-kDa heat-modifiable P1 protein. The epitope is absent on strains of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius that are not associated with Brazilian purpuric fever but is present on one strain of H. influenzae biotype II. None of 81 other Haemophilus strains tested reacted with 8G3. The sensitivity and specificity of the 8G3 monoclonal antibody in detecting Brazilian case-clone strains of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius associated with Brazilian purpuric fever are 95 and 99%, respectively. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the epitope is surface exposed, and N-terminal amino acid sequencing of an 8G3-reactive P1 protein from a strain of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius showed 100% correlation with the published N-terminal amino acid sequence of a P1 protein of H. influenzae type b. The virulence of the organism in an infant rat model of bacteremia was not dependent on the expression of this epitope.

  2. Phylogenetic relationships of the HA and NA genes between vaccine and seasonal influenza A(H3N2) strains in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sehee; Bae, Joon-Yong; Yoo, Kirim; Cheong, Hee Jin; Noh, Ji Yun; Hong, Kyung Wook; Lemey, Philippe; Vrancken, Bram; Kim, Juwon; Nam, Misun; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Cho, Woo In; Song, Joon Young; Kim, Woo Joo; Park, Mee Sook; Song, Jin-Won; Kee, Sun-Ho; Song, Ki-Joon; Park, Man-Seong

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is caused by two influenza A subtype (H1N1 and H3N2) and two influenza B lineage (Victoria and Yamagata) viruses. Of these antigenically distinct viruses, the H3N2 virus was consistently detected in substantial proportions in Korea during the 2010/11-2013/14 seasons when compared to the other viruses and appeared responsible for the influenza-like illness rate peak during the first half of the 2011/12 season. To further scrutinize possible causes for this, we investigated the evolutionary and serological relationships between the vaccine and Korean H3N2 strains during the 2011/12 season for the main antigenic determinants of influenza viruses, the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes. In the 2011/12 season, when the number of H3N2 cases peaked, the majority of the Korean strains did not belong to the HA clade of A/Perth/16/2009 vaccine, and no Korean strains were of this lineage in the NA segment. In a serological assay, post-vaccinated human sera exhibited much reduced hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers against the non-vaccine clade Korean H3N2 strains. Moreover, Korean strains harbored several amino acid differences in the HA antigenic sites and in the NA with respect to vaccine lineages during this season. Of these, the HA antigenic site C residues 45 and 261 and the NA residue 81 appeared to be the signatures of positive selection. In subsequent seasons, when H3N2 cases were lower, the HA and NA genes of vaccine and Korean strains were more phylogenetically related to each other. Combined, our results provide indirect support for using phylogenetic clustering patterns of the HA and possibly also the NA genes in the selection of vaccine viruses and the assessment of vaccine effectiveness. PMID:28257427

  3. Circulation of reassortant influenza A(H7N9) viruses in poultry and humans, Guangdong Province, China, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Changwen; Lu, Jing; Wu, Jie; Guan, Dawei; Zou, Lirong; Song, Tie; Yi, Lina; Zeng, Xianqiao; Liang, Lijun; Ni, Hanzhong; Kang, Min; Zhang, Xin; Zhong, Haojie; He, Jianfeng; Lin, Jinyan; Smith, Derek; Burke, David; Fouchier, Ron A M; Koopmans, Marion; Zhang, Yonghui

    2014-12-01

    Influenza A(H7N9) virus emerged in eastern China in February 2013 and continues to circulate in this region, but its ecology is poorly understood. In April 2013, the Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) implemented environmental and human syndromic surveillance for the virus. Environmental samples from poultry markets in 21 city CDCs (n=8,942) and respiratory samples from persons with influenza-like illness or pneumonia (n=32,342) were tested; viruses isolated from 6 environmental samples and 16 patients were sequenced. Sequence analysis showed co-circulation of 4 influenza A(H7N9) virus strains that evolved by reassortment with avian influenza A(H9N2) viruses circulating in this region. In addition, an increase in human cases starting in late 2013 coincided with an increase in influenza A H7 virus isolates detected by environmental surveillance. Co-circulation of multiple avian influenza viruses that can infect humans highlights the need for increased surveillance of poultry and potential environmental sources.

  4. Influenza virus A(H3N2) strain isolated from cerebrospinal fluid from a patient presenting myelopathy post infectious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, T M; Theotonio, G; Paulino, R S; Benega, M A; Silva, D B B; Borborema, S E T; Ikeda, T I; Kisielius, J J; Ueda, M; Oliveira, M I; Santos, C L S

    2013-09-01

    Neurological involvement during influenza infection has been described during epidemics and is often consistent with serious sequelae or death. To investigate the etiologic agent involved in myelopathy post influenza-like syndrome. This investigation focuses on virus isolation from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from a 19-year-old male student presenting with clinical diagnosis of myelopathy post influenza-like syndrome. To achieve this goal, different cell cultures and molecular methodologies were carried out. Influenza virus A(H3N2) strain was isolated in MDCK cell culture; virus particles were observed under electron microscopy. Phylogenetics analyses showed that the Brazilian influenza A(H3N2) strains were closely related to the A/Perth/16/2009-like. This study demonstrates that influenza virus A(H3N2) strain was the cause of illness of the students. According to the Brazilian influenza virus sentinel surveillance data A/Perth/16/2009-LIKE (H3N2) strain has predominated during the 2010 influenza virus season in Brasília-DF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pandemic influenza: human rights, ethics and duty to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlman, I; Tohmo, H; Gylling, H

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic seems to be only moderately severe. In the future, a pandemic influenza with high lethality, such as the Spanish influenza in 1918-1919 or even worse, may emerge. In this kind of scenario, lethality rates ranging roughly from 2% to 30% have been proposed. Legal and ethical issues should be discussed before the incident. This article aims to highlight the legal, ethical and professional aspects that might be relevant to anaesthesiologists in the case of a high-lethality infectious disease such as a severe pandemic influenza. The epidemiology, the role of anaesthesiologists and possible threats to the profession and colleagueship within medical specialties relevant to anaesthesiologists are reviewed. During historical plague epidemics, some doctors have behaved like 'deserters'. However, during the Spanish influenza, physicians remained at their jobs, although many perished. In surveys, more than half of the health-care workers have reported their willingness to work in the case of severe pandemics. Physicians have the same human rights as all citizens: they have to be effectively protected against infectious disease. However, they have a duty to treat. Fair and responsible colleagueship among the diverse medical specialties should be promoted. Until disaster threatens humanity, volunteering to work during a pandemic might be the best way to ensure that physicians and other health-care workers stay at their workplace. Broad discussion in society is needed.

  6. A human multi-epitope recombinant vaccinia virus as a universal T cell vaccine candidate against influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan G Goodman

    Full Text Available There is a need to develop a universal vaccine against influenza virus infection to avoid developing new formulations of a seasonal vaccine each year. Many of the vaccine strategies for a universal vaccine target strain-conserved influenza virus proteins, such as the matrix, polymerase, and nucleoproteins, rather than the surface hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins. In addition, non-disease-causing viral vectors are a popular choice as a delivery system for the influenza virus antigens. As a proof-of-concept, we have designed a novel influenza virus immunogen based on the NP backbone containing human T cell epitopes for M1, NS1, NP, PB1 and PA proteins (referred as NPmix as well as a construct containing the conserved regions of influenza virus neuraminidase (N-terminal and hemagglutinin (C-terminal (referred as NA-HA. DNA vectors and vaccinia virus recombinants expressing NPmix (WR-NP or both NPmix plus NA-HA (WR-flu in the cytosol were tested in a heterologous DNA-prime/vaccinia virus-boost vaccine regimen in mice. We observed an increase in the number of influenza virus-specific IFNγ-secreting splenocytes, composed of populations marked by CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells producing IFNγ or TNFα. Upon challenge with influenza virus, the vaccinated mice exhibited decreased viral load in the lungs and a delay in mortality. These findings suggest that DNA prime/poxvirus boost with human multi-epitope recombinant influenza virus proteins is a valid approach for a general T-cell vaccine to protect against influenza virus infection.

  7. Emerging Influenza Strains in the Last Two Decades: A Threat of a New Pandemic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trombetta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last 20 years, novel non-seasonal influenza viruses have emerged, most of which have originated from birds. Despite their apparent inability to cause pandemics, with the exception of H1N1 swine influenza virus, these viruses still constitute a constant threat to public health. While general concern has decreased after the peak of the H5N1 virus, in recent years several novel reassorted influenza viruses (e.g., H7N9, H9N2, H10N8 have jumped the host-species barrier and are under surveillance by the scientific community and public health systems. It is still unclear whether these viruses can actually cause pandemics or just isolated episodes. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of old and novel potential pandemic strains of recent decades.

  8. Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) mutants transmissible by air are susceptible to human and animal neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lanying; Li, Ye; Zhao, Guangyu; Wang, Lili; Zou, Peng; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-10-15

    A laboratory-generated reassortant H5 hemagglutinin (HA)/influenza A(H1N1) strain containing 4 mutations in influenza A(H5N1) HA has become transmissible by air among mammals. Here, we constructed 15 influenza A(H5N1) pseudoviruses containing a single mutation or a combination of mutations and showed that the pseudoviruses were susceptible to neutralizing antibodies from patients with influenza A(H5N1) infection and from mice immunized with a vaccine containing the conserved HA1 sequence of influenza A(H5N1). These results indicate that antibodies in patients currently infected by influenza A(H5N1) and antibodies induced by vaccines containing conserved sequences in HA1 of wild-type influenza A(H5N1) are highly effective in cross-neutralizing future influenza A(H5N1) mutants with airborne transmissibility, suggesting that human influenza pandemics caused by these influenza A(H5N1) variants can be prevented.

  9. Evaluation of antibody response in mice against avian influenza A (H5N1) strain neuraminidase expressed in yeast Pichia pastoris

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Murugan Subathra; Ponsekaran Santhakumar; Mangamoori Lakshmi Narasu; Syed Sultan Beevi; Sunil K Lal

    2014-06-01

    Avian influenza has raised many apprehension in the recent years because of its potential transmitability to humans. With the increasing emergence of drug-resistant avian influenza strains, development of potential vaccines are imperative to manage this disease. Two structural antigens, haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, have been the target candidates for the development of subunit vaccine against influenza. In an effort to develop a faster and economically beneficial vaccine, the neuraminidase gene of a highly pathogenic avian influenza isolate was cloned and expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The recombinant neuraminidase (rNA) antigen was purified, and its bioactivity was analysed. The rNA was found to be functional, as determined by the neuraminidase assay. Four groups of mice were immunized with different concentrations of purified rNA antigen, which were adjuvanted with aluminium hydroxide. The immune response against rNA was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neuraminidase inhibition assay. The mice groups immunized with 25 g and 10 g of antigen had a significant immune response against rNA. This method can be utilized for faster and cost-effective development of vaccines for a circulating and newer strain of avian influenza, and would aid in combating the disease in a pandemic situation, in which production time matters greatly.

  10. Agglutination of human O erythrocytes by influenza A(H1N1) viruses freshly isolated from patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Seto, Y; Kimura, T; Minoshiro, S; Shibe, K

    1991-04-01

    The hemagglutinin titers of 10 influenza A (H1N1) viruses were examined using the erythrocytes of several species. Human O erythrocytes showed the highest agglutination titer to the viruses, whereas chicken erythrocytes showed a low titer. These findings were noted for at least 10 passages by serial dilutions of the viruses in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. All influenza A(H1N1) viruses, plaque-cloned directly from throat-washing specimens of patients, also agglutinated human O but not chicken erythrocytes. The results of a hemadsorption test indicated that chicken erythrocytes possess less affinity to MDCK cells infected with the A/Osaka City/2/88(H1N1) stain than to those infected with the A/Yamagata/120/86(H1N1) strain which is used as an inactivated influenza vaccine in Japan. However, there were no significant differences between the A/Osaka City/2/88 and the A/Yamagata/120/86 strains in the hemagglutination inhibition test. Since human O erythrocytes have high agglutination activity to influenza A(H1N1) and also to A(H3N2) and B viruses in MDCK cells, these erythrocytes may be useful for the serological diagnosis of influenza.

  11. Recognition of influenza H3N2 variant virus by human neutralizing antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangaru, Sandhya; Nieusma, Travis; Kose, Nurgun; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Kaplan, Bryan S.; King, Hannah G.; Singh, Vidisha; Lampley, Rebecca M.; Cisneros, Alberto; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Lai, Lilin; Richt, Juergen A.; Webby, Richard J.; Ward, Andrew B.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2011, over 300 human cases of infection, especially in exposed children, with the influenza A H3N2 variant (H3N2v) virus that circulates in swine in the US have been reported. The structural and genetic basis for the lack of protection against H3N2v induced by vaccines containing seasonal H3N2 antigens is poorly understood. We isolated 17 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralized H3N2v virus from subjects experimentally immunized with an H3N2v candidate vaccine. Six mAbs exhibited very potent neutralizing activity (IC50 < 200 ng/ml) against the H3N2v virus but not against current human H3N2 circulating strains. Fine epitope mapping and structural characterization of antigen-antibody complexes revealed that H3N2v specificity was attributable to amino acid polymorphisms in the 150-loop and the 190-helix antigenic sites on the hemagglutinin protein. H3N2v-specific antibodies also neutralized human H3N2 influenza strains naturally circulating between 1995 and 2005. These results reveal a high level of antigenic relatedness between the swine H3N2v virus and previously circulating human strains, consistent with the fact that early human H3 seasonal strains entered the porcine population in the 1990s and reentered the human population, where they had not been circulating, as H3N2v about a decade later. The data also explain the increased susceptibility to H3N2v viruses in young children, who lack prior exposure to human seasonal strains from the 1990s. PMID:27482543

  12. Genome evolution of novel influenza A (H1N1)viruses in humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOU Zheng; HU SongNian; LI TianXian

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic situation of A H1N1 flu arose in North America in April 2009,which rapidly expanded to three continents of Europe,Asia and Africa,with the risk ranking up to 5.Until May 13th,the flu virus of A H1N1 had spread into 33 countries and regions,with a laboratory confirmed case number of 5728,including 61 deaths.Based on IRV and EpiFluDB database,425 parts of A H1N1 flu virus sequence were achieved,followed by sequenced comparison and evolution analysis.The results showed that the current predominant A H1N1 flu virus was a kind of triple reassortment A flu virus:(i) HA,NA,MP,NP and NS originated from swine influenza virus;PB2 and PA originated from bird influenza virus;PB1 originated from human influenza virus.(ii) The origin of swine influenza virus could be subdivided as follows:HA,NP and NS originated from classic swine influenza virus of H1N1 subtype;NA and MP originated from bird origin swine influenza virus of H1N1 subtype.(iii) A H1N1 flu virus experienced no significant mutation during the epidemic spread,accompanied with no reassortment of the virus genome.In the paper,the region of the representative strains for sequence analysis (A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) and A/Mexico/4486/2009 (H1N1)) included USA and Mexico and was relatively wide,which suggested that the analysis results were convincing.

  13. Infectious Progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) Influenza Virus Replicated in and Released from Human Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Huang, Tao; Yu, Feiyuan; Liu, Xingmu; Zhao, Conghui; Chen, Xueling; Kelvin, David J; Gu, Jiang

    2015-12-07

    Various reports have indicated that a number of viruses could infect neutrophils, but the multiplication of viruses in neutrophils was abortive. Based on our previous finding that avian influenza viral RNA and proteins were present in the nucleus of infected human neutrophils in vivo, we investigated the possibility of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza viral synthesis in infected neutrophils and possible release of infectious progeny from host cells. In this study we found that human neutrophils in vitro without detectable level of sialic acid expression could be infected by this virus strain. We also show that the infected neutrophils can not only synthesize 2009 A (H1N1) viral mRNA and proteins, but also produce infectious progeny. These findings suggest that infectious progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus could be replicated in and released from human neutrophils with possible clinical implications.

  14. Computational Characterization of Transient Strain-Transcending Immunity against Influenza A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, David C.; Burke, Donald S.; Rosenfeld, Roni

    2015-01-01

    The enigmatic observation that the rapidly evolving influenza A (H3N2) virus exhibits, at any given time, a limited standing genetic diversity has been an impetus for much research. One of the first generative computational models to successfully recapitulate this pattern of consistently constrained diversity posits the existence of a strong and short-lived strain-transcending immunity. Building on that model, we explored a much broader set of scenarios (parameterizations) of a transient strain-transcending immunity, ran long-term simulations of each such scenario, and assessed its plausibility with respect to a set of known or estimated influenza empirical measures. We evaluated simulated outcomes using a variety of measures, both epidemiological (annual attack rate, epidemic duration, reproductive number, and peak weekly incidence), and evolutionary (pairwise antigenic diversity, fixation rate, most recent common ancestor, and kappa, which quantifies the potential for antigenic evolution). Taking cumulative support from all these measures, we show which parameterizations of strain-transcending immunity are plausible with respect to the set of empirically derived target values. We conclude that strain-transcending immunity which is milder and longer lasting than previously suggested is more congruent with the observed short- and long-term behavior of influenza. PMID:25933195

  15. Potency of a vaccine prepared from A/swine/Hokkaido/2/1981 (H1N1 against A/Narita/1/2009 (H1N1 pandemic influenza virus strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamatsu Masatoshi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pandemic 2009 (H1N1 influenza virus has spread throughout the world and is now causing seasonal influenza. To prepare for the emergence of pandemic influenza, we have established a library of virus strains isolated from birds, pigs, and humans in global surveillance studies. Methods Inactivated whole virus particle (WV and ether-split (ES vaccines were prepared from an influenza virus strain, A/swine/Hokkaido/2/1981 (H1N1, from the library and from A/Narita/1/2009 (H1N1 pandemic strain. Each of the vaccines was injected subcutaneously into mice and their potencies were evaluated by challenge with A/Narita/1/2009 (H1N1 virus strain in mice. Results A/swine/Hokkaido/2/81 (H1N1, which was isolated from the lung of a diseased piglet, was selected on the basis of their antigenicity and growth capacity in embryonated chicken eggs. Two injections of the WV vaccine induced an immune response in mice, decreasing the impact of disease caused by the challenge with A/Narita/1/2009 (H1N1, as did the vaccine prepared from the homologous strain. Conclusion The WV vaccine prepared from an influenza virus in the library is useful as an emergency vaccine in the early phase of pandemic influenza.

  16. Severe swine influenza A (H1N1) versus severe human seasonal influenza A (H3N2): clinical comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Pherez, Francisco M; Strollo, Stephanie; Syed, Uzma; Laguerre, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    At the beginning of the swine influenza (H1N1) pandemic in the spring of 2009, there were still stories of human seasonal influenza A circulating in the New York area. Adult patients admitted with influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) (fever > 102°F, dry cough, and myalgias) presented diagnostic problems. First, clinicians had to differentiate ILIs from influenza, and then differentiate human seasonal influenza A from H1N1 in hospitalized adults with ILIs and negative chest films (no focal segmental/lobar infiltrates). Human seasonal influenza A was diagnosed by rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs), but H1N1 was often RIDT negative. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for H1N1 was restricted or not available. The Winthrop-University Hospital Infectious Disease Division developed clinical diagnostic criteria (a diagnostic weighted point score system) to rapidly and clinically diagnose H1N1 in patients with negative RIDTs. The point score system was modified and shortened for ease of use, that is, the diagnostic H1N1 triad (any 3 of 4) (ILI, see above) plus thrombocytopenia, relative lymphopenia, elevated serum transaminases, or an elevated creatine phosphokinase. Our clinical experience during the pandemic allowed us to develop the swine diagnostic H1N1 triad. In the process, similarities and differences between human seasonal influenza A and H1N1 were noted. We present 2 illustrative cases of severe influenza, one due to human seasonal influenza A and one due to H1N1, for clinical consideration reflective of our experiences early in the H1N1 pandemic in 2009.

  17. Influenza virus infection in seal (Phocidae) : seroepidemiological survey of influenza virus in Caspian seals(Phoca caspica)

    OpenAIRE

    OHISHI, Kazue; NINOMIYA, Ai; Kida, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Tadashi; Arai, Takaomi; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

    2003-01-01

    In the last a few decades, several viral diseases in marine mammals such as seals and cetaceans were characterized. Influenza virus causes a worldwide zoonosis, influenza, and was shown to be involved in mass mortality in seals. Several influenza virus strains have been isolated from the sick seals. Because interspecies transmission of influenza virus plays a crucial role in the introduction of pandemic influenza disease in humans, it is important to monitor the virus distribution in wild ani...

  18. Glycomic analysis of human respiratory tract tissues and correlation with influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevenan Walther

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The first step in influenza infection of the human respiratory tract is binding of the virus to sialic (Sia acid terminated receptors. The binding of different strains of virus for the receptor is determined by the α linkage of the sialic acid to galactose and the adjacent glycan structure. In this study the N- and O-glycan composition of the human lung, bronchus and nasopharynx was characterized by mass spectrometry. Analysis showed that there was a wide spectrum of both Sia α2-3 and α2-6 glycans in the lung and bronchus. This glycan structural data was then utilized in combination with binding data from 4 of the published glycan arrays to assess whether these current glycan arrays were able to predict replication of human, avian and swine viruses in human ex vivo respiratory tract tissues. The most comprehensive array from the Consortium for Functional Glycomics contained the greatest diversity of sialylated glycans, but was not predictive of productive replication in the bronchus and lung. Our findings indicate that more comprehensive but focused arrays need to be developed to investigate influenza virus binding in an assessment of newly emerging influenza viruses.

  19. Influenza H3N2 infection of the collaborative cross founder strains reveals highly divergent host responses and identifies a unique phenotype in CAST/EiJ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leist, Sarah R; Pilzner, Carolin; van den Brand, Judith M A; Dengler, Leonie; Geffers, Robert; Kuiken, Thijs; Balling, Rudi; Kollmus, Heike; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-02-27

    Influenza A virus is a zoonotic pathogen that poses a major threat to human and animal health. The severe course of influenza infection is not only influenced by viral virulence factors but also by individual differences in the host response. To determine the extent to which the genetic background can modulate severity of an infection, we studied the host responses to influenza infections in the eight genetically highly diverse Collaborative Cross (CC) founder mouse strains. We observed highly divergent host responses between the CC founder strains with respect to survival, body weight loss, hematological parameters in the blood, relative lung weight and viral load. Mouse strain was the main factor with highest effect size on body weight loss after infection, demonstrating that this phenotype was highly heritable. Sex represented another significant main effect, although it was less strong. Analysis of survival rates and mean time to death suggested three groups of susceptibility phenotypes: highly susceptible (A/J, CAST/EiJ, WSB/EiJ), intermediate susceptible (C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ, NOD/ShiLtJ) and highly resistant strains (NZO/HlLtJ, PWK/PhJ). These three susceptibility groups were significantly different with respect to death/survival counts. Viral load was significantly different between susceptible and resistant strains but not between intermediate and highly susceptible strains. CAST/EiJ mice showed a unique phenotype. Despite high viral loads in their lungs, CAST/EiJ mice exhibited low counts of infiltrating granulocytes and showed increased numbers of macrophages in the lung. Histological studies of infected lungs and transcriptome analyses of peripheral blood cells and lungs confirmed an abnormal response in the leukocyte recruitment in CAST/EiJ mice. The eight CC founder strains exhibited a large diversity in their response to influenza infections. Therefore, the CC will represent an ideal mouse genetic reference population to study the influence of

  20. Different pattern of haemagglutinin immunoreactivity of equine influenza virus strains isolated in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaśnik Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The immunoreactivity of haemagglutinin (HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus was compared among the strains isolated in Poland, using H3 monoclonal antibody. A stronger signal in immunoblot reaction was observed for A/equi/Pulawy/2008 HA polypeptides compared to A/equi/Pulawy/2006, despite the fact that both strains are phylogenetically closely related and belong to Florida clade 2 of American lineage. The strongest signal, observed in the case of A/equi/Pulawy/2008, seemed to be connected with the presence of G135, I213, E379, and/or V530 instead of R135, M213, G379, and I530 present in A/equi/Pulawy/2006 HA sequence. This implies that point mutations within amino acid sequences of HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus may change their immunoreactivity even when they are not located within five basic antigenic sites.

  1. Influenza infection in wild raccoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S; Bentler, Kevin T; Landolt, Gabrielle; Elmore, Stacey A; Minnis, Richard B; Campbell, Tyler A; Barras, Scott C; Root, J Jeffrey; Pilon, John; Pabilonia, Kristy; Driscoll, Cindy; Slate, Dennis; Sullivan, Heather; McLean, Robert G

    2008-12-01

    Raccoons (Procyon lotor) are common, widely distributed animals that frequently come into contact with wild waterfowl, agricultural operations, and humans. Serosurveys showed that raccoons are exposed to avian influenza virus. We found antibodies to a variety of influenza virus subtypes (H10N7, H4N6, H4N2, H3, and H1) with wide geographic variation in seroprevalence. Experimental infection studies showed that raccoons become infected with avian and human influenza A viruses, shed and transmit virus to virus-free animals, and seroconvert. Analyses of cellular receptors showed that raccoons have avian and human type receptors with a similar distribution as found in human respiratory tracts. The potential exists for co-infection of multiple subtypes of influenza virus with genetic reassortment and creation of novel strains of influenza virus. Experimental and field data indicate that raccoons may play an important role in influenza disease ecology and pose risks to agriculture and human health.

  2. Migration and persistence of human influenza A viruses, Vietnam, 2001-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Mai Quynh; Lam, Ha Minh; Cuong, Vuong Duc; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Halpin, Rebecca A; Wentworth, David E; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Thanh, Le Thi; Phuong, Hoang Vu Mai; Horby, Peter; Boni, Maciej F

    2013-11-01

    Understanding global influenza migration and persistence is crucial for vaccine strain selection. Using 240 new human influenza A virus whole genomes collected in Vietnam during 2001-2008, we looked for persistence patterns and migratory connections between Vietnam and other countries. We found that viruses in Vietnam migrate to and from China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Cambodia, Japan, South Korea, and the United States. We attempted to reduce geographic bias by generating phylogenies subsampled at the year and country levels. However, migration events in these phylogenies were still driven by the presence or absence of sequence data, indicating that an epidemiologic study design that controls for prevalence is required for robust migration analysis. With whole-genome data, most migration events are not detectable from the phylogeny of the hemagglutinin segment alone, although general migratory relationships between Vietnam and other countries are visible in the hemagglutinin phylogeny. It is possible that virus lineages in Vietnam persisted for >1 year.

  3. Host- and Strain-Specific Regulation of Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity by Interacting Cellular Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bortz, Eric; Westera, Liset; Maamary, Jad; Steel, John; Albrecht, Randy A.; Manicassamy, Balaji; Chase, Geoffrey; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Schwemmle, Martin; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI) viruses of the H5N1 subtype have recently emerged from avian zoonotic reservoirs to cause fatal human disease. Adaptation of HPAI virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (PB1, PB2, and PA proteins) and nucleoprotein (NP) to interactions with mammalian host prote

  4. An ELISA for detection of antibodies against influenza A nucleoprotein in humans and various animal species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. de Boer; W. Back; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA double antibody sandwich blocking ELISA, using a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against influenza A nucleoprotein (NP) was developed to detect antibodies against influenza. Collections of serum samples were obtained from human and various animal species. All influenza A subtypes induced ant

  5. Clarithromycin Resistance Mechanisms of Epidemic β-Lactamase-Nonproducing Ampicillin-Resistant Haemophilus influenzae Strains in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyama, Shoji; Wajima, Takeaki; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the clarithromycin resistance mechanisms of β-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae strains. In all clarithromycin-resistant strains, the transcript level of acrB was significantly elevated, and these strains had a frameshift mutation in acrR Introduction of the acrR mutation into H. influenzae Rd generated a clarithromycin-resistant transformant with the same MIC as the donor strain. Our results indicate that the acrR mutation confers clarithromycin resistance by the increasing the transcription of acrB.

  6. Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 5 Contributes to H3N2 Influenza Virus Infection in Human Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnen, Mélia; Gueugnon, Fabien; Guillon, Antoine; Baranek, Thomas; Thibault, Virginie C; Petit-Courty, Agnès; de Veer, Simon J; Harris, Jonathan; Humbles, Alison A; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Courty, Yves

    2017-08-15

    Hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus must be activated by proteolysis before the virus can become infectious. Previous studies indicated that HA cleavage is driven by membrane-bound or extracellular serine proteases in the respiratory tract. However, there is still uncertainty as to which proteases are critical for activating HAs of seasonal influenza A viruses (IAVs) in humans. This study focuses on human KLK1 and KLK5, 2 of the 15 serine proteases known as the kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs). We find that their mRNA expression in primary human bronchial cells is stimulated by IAV infection. Both enzymes cleaved recombinant HA from several strains of the H1 and/or H3 virus subtype in vitro, but only KLK5 promoted the infectivity of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) and A/Scotland/20/74 (H3N2) virions in MDCK cells. We assessed the ability of treated viruses to initiate influenza in mice. The nasal instillation of only the KLK5-treated virus resulted in weight loss and lethal outcomes. The secretion of this protease in the human lower respiratory tract is enhanced during influenza. Moreover, we show that pretreatment of airway secretions with a KLK5-selective inhibitor significantly reduced the activation of influenza A/Scotland/20/74 virions, providing further evidence of its importance. Differently, increased KLK1 secretion appeared to be associated with the recruitment of inflammatory cells in human airways regardless of the origin of inflammation. Thus, our findings point to the involvement of KLK5 in the proteolytic activation and spread of seasonal influenza viruses in humans.IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause acute infection of the respiratory tract that affects millions of people during seasonal outbreaks every year. Cleavage of the hemagglutinin precursor by host proteases is a critical step in the life cycle of these viruses. Consequently, host proteases that activate HA can be considered promising targets for the development of new antivirals

  7. Brazilian purpuric fever: evolutionary genetic relationships of the case clone of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius to encapsulated strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, J M; Selander, R K

    1990-01-01

    As a first step toward identifying the evolutionary origin of a pathogenic clone of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius causing Brazilian purpuric fever, chromosomal variation and genetic relationships were indexed among 17 isolates of biogroup aegyptius and 2209 previously characterized encapsulated H. influenzae strains recovered from 30 countries on six continents. Biogroup aegyptius isolates form three distinct evolutionary lineages of the species H. influenzae and isolates of the case clone are genetically not closely related to other isolates classified as biogroup aegyptius. The Brazilian purpuric fever case clone was found to be genetically allied with H. influenzae isolates producing serotype c polysaccharide capsule. The population genetic evidence suggests that biogroup aegyptius isolates may represent cell lineages occasionally transmitted from nonhuman hosts or spawned from a much larger base population consisting of genetically diverse nonpathogenic precursor clones.

  8. Vaccine-induced boosting of influenza virus-specific CD4 T cells in younger and aged humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas V Dolfi

    Full Text Available Current yearly influenza virus vaccines induce strain-specific neutralizing antibody (NAb responses providing protective immunity to closely matched viruses. However, these vaccines are often poorly effective in high-risk groups such as the elderly and challenges exist in predicting yearly or emerging pandemic influenza virus strains to include in the vaccines. Thus, there has been considerable emphasis on understanding broadly protective immunological mechanisms for influenza virus. Recent studies have implicated memory CD4 T cells in heterotypic immunity in animal models and in human challenge studies. Here we examined how influenza virus vaccination boosted CD4 T cell responses in younger versus aged humans. Our results demonstrate that while the magnitude of the vaccine-induced CD4 T cell response and number of subjects responding on day 7 did not differ between younger and aged subjects, fewer aged subjects had peak responses on day 14. While CD4 T cell responses were inefficiently boosted against NA, both HA and especially nucleocaspid protein- and matrix-(NP+M specific responses were robustly boosted. Pre-existing CD4 T cell responses were associated with more robust responses to influenza virus NP+M, but not H1 or H3. Finally pre-existing strain-specific NAb decreased the boosting of CD4 T cell responses. Thus, accumulation of pre-existing influenza virus-specific immunity in the form of NAb and cross-reactive T cells to conserved virus proteins (e.g. NP and M over a lifetime of exposure to infection and vaccination may influence vaccine-induced CD4 T cell responses in the aged.

  9. Pathogenesis of avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. Genetic reassortment of avian influenza H5N1 viruses with currently circulating human influenza A strains is one possibility that could lead to efficient human-to-human transmissibility. Domestic pigs which are susceptible to infection with both human and avian influenza A viruses are o...

  10. N-Nitrosocarbaryl-induced mutagenesis in Haemophilus influenzae strains deficient in repair and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, K L

    1975-02-01

    Mutagenesis was studied in repair- and recombination-deficient strains of Haemophilus influenzae after treatment with N-nitrosocarbaryl (NC). Three different strains of H. influenzae carrying mutations affecting excision-repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers exhibited normal repair of premutational lesions (as detected by decreased mutation yield resulting from post-treatment DNA synthesis delay) and normal nonreplicative mutation fixation. This indicated that neither of these phenomena are caused by the smae repair mechanism that removes UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the DNA. The recombination-deficient mutant recI is apparently deficient in the replication-dependent mode of NC-induced mutation fixation. This conclusion is based on the following results: (I) NC-induced mutagenesis is lower in the recI strain than in rec+ cells. (2) Repair of premutational lesions (which depends on the existence of replication-dependent mutation fixation for its detection) was not detected in the recI strain. (3) When nonreplicative mutation fixation and final mutation frequency were measured in the same experiment, about I/4 to I/3 of the final mutation yield could be accounted for by nonreplicative mutation fixation in the rec+ strain, whereas all of the mutation could be accounted for in the recI strain by the nonreplicative mutation fixation. (4) When mutation fixation in strain dna9 recI was followed at the permissive (36 degrees) and nonpermissive (41 degrees) temperatures, it became apparent that in the recI strain replication-dependent mutation fixation occurs at early times, but these newly fixed mutations are unstable and disappear at later times, leaving only the mutations fixed by the nonreplicative process. The recI strain exhibits normal repair of NC-induced single-strand breaks or alkali-labile bonds in the DNA labeled before treatment, but is slow in joining discontinuties present in DNA synthesized after treatment. The results are consistent with the idea that

  11. Occurrence of Haemophilus influenzae strains in three Brazilian states since the introduction of a conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine

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    A.E.C.C. de Almeida

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Few vaccines in history have induced such a dramatic decline in incidence over such a short period of time as the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib conjugate. This vaccine was introduced in 1988 in the United States, but only in 1999 was Hib immunization introduced by the Brazilian Ministry of Health as part of the routine infant National Immunization Program. The authors analyzed 229 H. influenzae (Hi isolates from Public Health Laboratories in three Brazilian states: Pernambuco (Northeast, N = 54, Santa Catarina (South, N = 19, and Rio de Janeiro (Southeast, N = 156. The isolates were collected from Brazilian children 0-10 years of age with meningitis and other infections from 1990 to 2003 and were part of the research collection of the National Institute of Quality Control in Health, FIOCRUZ. Bacterial strains were characterized by serotyping and biotyping. During the pre-vaccination period the prevalence infection due to Hib was of 165 isolates and only 2 non-b Hi among all the notified meningitis infections caused by Hi. Our results showed a significant decrease in the prevalence of Hib meningitis from 165 to 33 isolates after 1999. However, during the post-vaccination period of 2001-2003 we observed an increase in the number of non-b Hi isolates: only 2 non-b strains isolated from 1990 to 1999 and 29 from 1999 to 2003. Based on the present data, the authors emphasize the need for more sensitive epidemiological and bacteriological studies aiming the improvement of the available Hib vaccine, in order to protect the susceptible population to infections due to other serological types of Hi and the reevaluation of immunization schedules used by the National Immunization Program.

  12. Improving influenza virological surveillance in Europe: strain-based reporting of antigenic and genetic characterisation data, 11 European countries, influenza season 2013/14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Eeva; Hungnes, Olav; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Prosenc, Katarina; Daniels, Rod; Guiomar, Raquel; Ikonen, Niina; Kossyvakis, Athanasios; Pozo, Francisco; Puzelli, Simona; Thomas, Isabelle; Waters, Allison; Wiman, Åsa; Meijer, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Influenza antigenic and genetic characterisation data are crucial for influenza vaccine composition decision making. Previously, aggregate data were reported to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control by European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries. A system for collecting case-specific influenza antigenic and genetic characterisation data was established for the 2013/14 influenza season. In a pilot study, 11 EU/EEA countries reported through the new mechanism. We demonstrated feasibility of reporting strain-based antigenic and genetic data and ca 10% of influenza virus-positive specimens were selected for further characterisation. Proportions of characterised virus (sub)types were similar to influenza virus circulation levels. The main genetic clades were represented by A/StPetersburg/27/2011(H1N1)pdm09 and A/Texas/50/2012(H3N2). A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were more prevalent in age groups (by years) < 1 (65%; p = 0.0111), 20–39 (50%; p = 0.0046) and 40–64 (55%; p = 0.00001) while A(H3N2) viruses were most prevalent in those ≥ 65 years (62%*; p = 0.0012). Hospitalised patients in the age groups 6–19 years (67%; p = 0.0494) and ≥ 65 years (52%; p = 0.0005) were more frequently infected by A/Texas/50/2012 A(H3N2)-like viruses compared with hospitalised cases in other age groups. Strain-based reporting enabled deeper understanding of influenza virus circulation among hospitalised patients and substantially improved the reporting of virus characterisation data. Therefore, strain-based reporting of readily available data is recommended to all reporting countries within the EU/EEA. PMID:27762211

  13. Increase human metapneumovirus mediated morbidity following pandemic influenza infection.

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    Liora Regev

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is a recently discovered respiratory pathogen, infecting mainly young children. The infected patients suffer from influenza like symptoms (ILS. In Israel the virus is mainly circulating in February to March. Here we report on an increased rate of hMPV infection in the winter season of 2009-10. The 2009-10 infection had several unique characteristics when compared to previous seasons; it started around January and a large number of infants were infected by the virus. Genetic analysis based on the viral L and F genes of hMPV showed that only subtypes A2 and B2 circulated in Israel. Additionally, we have identified a novel variant of hMPV within subgroup A2b, which subdivide it into A2b1 and A2b2. Finally, we showed that the hMPV infection was detected in the country soon after the infection with the pandemic influenza virus had declined, that infection with the pandemic influenza virus was dominant and that it interfered with the infection of other respiratory viruses. Thus, we suggest that the unusual increase in hMPV infection observed in 2009-10 was due to the appearance of the pandemic influenza virus in the winter season prior to 2009-10.

  14. Carriage of antibiotic-resistant Haemophilus influenzae strains in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafny, Elżbieta A; Olszewska-Sosińska, Olga; Antos-Bielska, Małgorzata; Kozłowska, Krystyna; Stępińska, Małgorzata; Lau-Dworak, Magdalena; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata

    2014-07-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is one of the major pathogenic bacteria in upper respiratory tract of children. In this study, the presence of various H. influenzae genotypes were followed-up for at least 13 weeks, starting from one week before surgery. Forty-one children with chronic adenoid hypertrophy were prospectively enrolled to the study. The consecutive swabs of adenoid and tonsils, two before adenotonsillectomy and two after the surgery together with homogenates of adenotonsillar tissues and lysates of the CD14(+) cells fraction were acquired from 34 children undergoing adenotonsillectomy. Up to ten isolates from each patient at each collection period were genotyped using a PFGE method and their capsular type and antibiotic susceptibility was determined. Of the 1001 isolates examined, we identified 325 isolates grouped into 16 persistent genotypes, which colonized throats for more than seven weeks and were not eliminated by the surgery. The other 506 isolates grouped into 48 transient genotypes that had been eliminated by the surgery. The resistance to ampicillin were found in 23.8% of the transient strains, and 4.7% of the newly acquired strains following the surgical intervention. In contrast, none of the persistent strains were resistant to ampicillin; however, these strains showed apparently higher level of resistance to co-trimoxazole when compared to transient strains. The transient and persistent strains did not significantly differ in bacterial viability in the biofilms formed in vitro. Some of the strains were identified in two or three different patients and were considered as the strains circulating in the region between 2010 and 2012.

  15. Molecular characterization of H1N1 influenza A viruses from human cases in North America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; WANG ChengMin; DONG GuoYing; LUO Jing; ZHAO BaoHua; HE HongXuan

    2009-01-01

    Subtypes of H1N1 influenza virus can be found in humans in North America,while they are also associated with the infection of swine.Characterization of the genotypes of viral strains in human populations is important to understand the source and distribution of viral strains.Genomic and protein sequences of 10 isolates of the 2009 outbreak of influenza A (H1N1) virus in North America were obtained from GenBank database.To characterize the genotypes of these viruses,phylogenetic trees of genes PB2,PB1,PA,HA,NP,NA,NS and M were constructed by Phylip3.67 program and N-Linked glycosylation sites of HA,NA,PB2,NS1 and M2 proteins were analyzed online by NetNGIyc1.0 program.Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these isolates are virtually identical but may be recombinant viruses because their genomic fragments come from different viruses.The isolates also contain a characteristic lowly pathogenic amino acid motif at their HA cleavage sites (IPSIQSR↓GL),and an E residue at position 627 of the PB2 protein which shows its high affinity to humans.The homologous model of M proteins showed that the viruses had obtained the ability of anti-amantadine due to the mutation at the drug-sensitive site,while sequence analysis of NA proteins indicated that the viruses are still susceptible to the neuraminidase inhibitor drug (i.e.oseltamivir and zanamivir) because no mutations have been observed.Our results strongly suggested that the viruses responsible for the 2009 outbreaks of influenza A (H1N1) virus have the ability to cross species barriers to infect human and mammalian animals based on molecular analysis.These findings may further facilitate the therapy and prevention of possible transmission from North America to other countries.

  16. Application of reverse genetics for producing attenuated vaccine strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yuko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-08-01

    In this study, reverse genetics was applied to produce vaccine candidate strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of the H5N1 subtype. The H5 subtype vaccine strains were generated by a reverse genetics method in a biosafety level 2 facility. The strain contained the HA gene from the H5N1 subtype HPAIV attenuated by genetic modification at the cleavage site, the NA gene derived from the H5N1 subtype HPAI or the H5N3 subtype of avian influenza virus and internal genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/34. Vaccination with an inactivated recombinant virus with oil-emulsion completely protected chickens from a homologous viral challenge with a 640 HAU or 3,200 HAU/vaccination dose. Vaccination with a higher dose of antigen, 3,200 HAU, was effective at increasing survival and efficiently reduced viral shedding even when challenged by a virus of a different HA clade. The feasibility of differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) was demonstrated against a challenge with H5N1 HPAIVs when the recombinant H5N3 subtype viruses were used as the antigens of the vaccine. Our study demonstrated that the use of reverse genetics would be an option to promptly produce an inactivated vaccine with better matching of antigenicity to a circulating strain.

  17. Complement-Dependent Lysis of Influenza A Virus-Infected Cells by Broadly Cross-Reactive Human Monoclonal Antibodies ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terajima, Masanori; Cruz, John; Co, Mary Dawn T.; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Kaur, Kaval; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ennis, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cloned from influenza virus-infected patients and from influenza vaccine recipients by complement-dependent lysis (CDL) assay. Most MAbs active in CDL were neutralizing, but not all neutralizing MAbs can mediate CDL. Two of the three stalk-specific neutralizing MAbs tested were able to mediate CDL and were more cross-reactive to temporally distant H1N1 strains than the conventional hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing MAbs. One of the stalk-specific MAbs was subtype cross-reactive to H1 and H2 hemagglutinins, suggesting a role for stalk-specific antibodies in protection against influenza illness, especially by a novel viral subtype which can cause pandemics. PMID:21994454

  18. Human Coronavirus-Associated Influenza-Like Illness in the Community Setting in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razuri, Hugo; Malecki, Monika; Tinoco, Yeny; Ortiz, Ernesto; Guezala, M Claudia; Romero, Candice; Estela, Abel; Breña, Patricia; Morales, Maria-Luisa; Reaves, Erik J; Gomez, Jorge; Uyeki, Timothy M; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Bausch, Daniel G; Schildgen, Verena; Schildgen, Oliver; Montgomery, Joel M

    2015-11-01

    We present findings describing the epidemiology of non-severe acute respiratory syndrome human coronavirus-associated influenza-like illness from a population-based active follow-up study in four different regions of Peru. In 2010, the prevalence of infections by human coronaviruses 229E, OC43, NL63, or HKU1 was 6.4% in participants with influenza-like illness who tested negative for influenza viruses. Ten of 11 human coronavirus infections were identified in the fall-winter season. Human coronaviruses are present in different regions of Peru and are relatively frequently associated with influenza-like illness in Peru.

  19. Pandemic influenza A viruses escape from restriction by human MxA through adaptive mutations in the nucleoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mänz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced dynamin-like MxA GTPase restricts the replication of influenza A viruses. We identified adaptive mutations in the nucleoprotein (NP of pandemic strains A/Brevig Mission/1/1918 (1918 and A/Hamburg/4/2009 (pH1N1 that confer MxA resistance. These resistance-associated amino acids in NP differ between the two strains but form a similar discrete surface-exposed cluster in the body domain of NP, indicating that MxA resistance evolved independently. The 1918 cluster was conserved in all descendent strains of seasonal influenza viruses. Introduction of this cluster into the NP of the MxA-sensitive influenza virus A/Thailand/1(KAN-1/04 (H5N1 resulted in a gain of MxA resistance coupled with a decrease in viral replication fitness. Conversely, introduction of MxA-sensitive amino acids into pH1N1 NP enhanced viral growth in Mx-negative cells. We conclude that human MxA represents a barrier against zoonotic introduction of avian influenza viruses and that adaptive mutations in the viral NP should be carefully monitored.

  20. Innate Defense against Influenza A Virus: Activity of Human Neutrophil Defensins and Interactions of Defensins with Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; White, Mitchell R.; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study was to characte......Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study...... with the hemagglutination-inhibiting activity of SP-D. HNPs had significant viral neutralizing activity against divergent IAV strains. However, the HNPs generally had competitive effects when combined with SP-D in assays using an SP-D-sensitive IAV strain. In contrast, cooperative antiviral effects were noted in some...

  1. Cellular and humoral cross-immunity against two H3N2v influenza strains in presumably unexposed healthy and HIV-infected subjects.

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    Chiara Agrati

    Full Text Available Human cases of infection due to a novel swine-origin variant of influenza A virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2v have recently been identified in the United States. Pre-existing humoral and cellular immunity has been recognized as one of the key factors in limiting the infection burden of an emerging influenza virus strain, contributing to restrict its circulation and to mitigate clinical presentation. Aim of this study was to assess humoral and cell-mediated cross immune responses to H3N2v in immuno-competent (healthy donors, n = 45 and immuno-compromised hosts (HIV-infected subjects, n = 46 never exposed to H3N2v influenza strain. Humoral response against i H3N2v (A/H3N2/Ind/08/11, ii animal vaccine H3N2 strain (A/H3N2/Min/11/10, and iii pandemic H1N1 virus (A/H1N1/Cal/07/09 was analysed by hemagglutination inhibition assay; cell-mediated response against the same influenza strains was analysed by ELISpot assay. A large proportion of healthy and HIV subjects displayed cross-reacting humoral and cellular immune responses against two H3N2v strains, suggesting the presence of B- and T-cell clones able to recognize epitopes from emerging viral strains in both groups. Specifically, humoral response was lower in HIV subjects than in HD, and a specific age-related pattern of antibody response against different influenza strains was observed both in HD and in HIV. Cellular immune response was similar between HD and HIV groups and no relationship with age was reported. Finally, no correlation between humoral and cellular immune response was observed. Overall, a high prevalence of HD and HIV patients showing cross reactive immunity against two H3N2v strains was observed, with a slightly lower proportion in HIV persons. Other studies focused on HIV subjects at different stages of diseases are needed in order to define how cross immunity can be affected by advanced immunosuppression.

  2. Duplex Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Haemophilus influenzae That Distinguishes Fucose- and Protein D-Negative Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gier, Camilla; Pickering, Janessa L; Richmond, Peter C; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a specific Haemophilus influenzae quantitative PCR (qPCR) that also identifies fucose-negative and protein D-negative strains. Analysis of 100 H. influenzae isolates, 28 Haemophilus haemolyticus isolates, and 14 other bacterial species revealed 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 96% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 92% to 100%) for this assay. The evaluation of 80 clinical specimens demonstrated a strong correlation between semiquantitative culture and the qPCR (P < 0.001).

  3. Development and pre-clinical evaluation of two LAIV strains against potentially pandemic H2N2 influenza virus.

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    Irina Isakova-Sivak

    Full Text Available H2N2 Influenza A caused the Asian flu pandemic in 1957, circulated for more than 10 years and disappeared from the human population after 1968. Given that people born after 1968 are naïve to H2N2, that the virus still circulates in wild birds and that this influenza subtype has a proven pandemic track record, H2N2 is regarded as a potential pandemic threat. To prepare for an H2N2 pandemic, here we developed and tested in mice and ferrets two live attenuated influenza vaccines based on the haemagglutinins of the two different H2N2 lineages that circulated at the end of the cycle, using the well characterized A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2 master donor virus as the backbone. The vaccine strains containing the HA and NA of A/California/1/66 (clade 1 or A/Tokyo/3/67 (clade 2 showed a temperature sensitive and cold adapted phenotype and a reduced reproduction that was limited to the respiratory tract of mice, suggesting that the vaccines may be safe for use in humans. Both vaccine strains induced haemagglutination inhibition titers in mice. Vaccination abolished virus replication in the nose and lung and protected mice from weight loss after homologous and heterologous challenge with the respective donor wild type strains. In ferrets, the live attenuated vaccines induced high virus neutralizing, haemagglutination and neuraminidase inhibition titers, however; the vaccine based on the A/California/1/66 wt virus induced higher homologous and better cross-reactive antibody responses than the A/Tokyo/3/67 based vaccine. In line with this observation, was the higher virus reduction observed in the throat and nose of ferrets vaccinated with this vaccine after challenge with either of the wild type donor viruses. Moreover, both vaccines clearly reduced the infection-induced rhinitis observed in placebo-vaccinated ferrets. The results favor the vaccine based on the A/California/1/66 isolate, which will be evaluated in a clinical study.

  4. Positive Selection in CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by a Comparative Analysis of Human and Swine Viral Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machkovech, Heather M; Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Bloom, Jesse D

    2015-11-01

    Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells contribute to immunity against influenza by limiting viral replication. It is therefore surprising that rigorous statistical tests have failed to find evidence of positive selection in the epitopes targeted by CD8(+) T cells. Here we use a novel computational approach to test for selection in CD8(+) T-cell epitopes. We define all epitopes in the nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein (M1) with experimentally identified human CD8(+) T-cell responses and then compare the evolution of these epitopes in parallel lineages of human and swine influenza viruses that have been diverging since roughly 1918. We find a significant enrichment of substitutions that alter human CD8(+) T-cell epitopes in NP of human versus swine influenza virus, consistent with the idea that these epitopes are under positive selection. Furthermore, we show that epitope-altering substitutions in human influenza virus NP are enriched on the trunk versus the branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that viruses that acquire these mutations have a selective advantage. However, even in human influenza virus NP, sites in T-cell epitopes evolve more slowly than do nonepitope sites, presumably because these epitopes are under stronger inherent functional constraint. Overall, our work demonstrates that there is clear selection from CD8(+) T cells in human influenza virus NP and illustrates how comparative analyses of viral lineages from different hosts can identify positive selection that is otherwise obscured by strong functional constraint. There is a strong interest in correlates of anti-influenza immunity that are protective against diverse virus strains. CD8(+) T cells provide such broad immunity, since they target conserved viral proteins. An important question is whether T-cell immunity is sufficiently strong to drive influenza virus evolution. Although many studies have shown that T cells limit viral replication in animal

  5. Ex vivo analysis of human memory B lymphocytes specific for A and B influenza hemagglutinin by polychromatic flow-cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia Bardelli

    Full Text Available Understanding the impact that human memory B-cells (MBC, primed by previous infections or vaccination, exert on neutralizing antibody responses against drifted influenza hemagglutinin (HA is key to design best protective vaccines. A major obstacle to these studies is the lack of practical tools to analyze HA-specific MBCs in human PBMCs ex vivo. We report here an efficient method to identify MBCs carrying HA-specific BCR in frozen PBMC samples. By using fluorochrome-tagged recombinant HA baits, and vaccine antigens from mismatched influenza strains to block BCR-independent binding, we developed a protocol suitable for quantitative, functional and molecular analysis of single MBCs specific for HA from up to two different influenza strains in the same tube. This approach will permit to identify the naive and MBC precursors of plasmablasts and novel MBCs appearing in the blood following infection or vaccination, thus clarifying the actual contribution of pre-existing MBCs in antibody responses against novel influenza viruses. Finally, this protocol can allow applying high throughput deep sequencing to analyze changes in the repertoire of HA⁺ B-cells in longitudinal samples from large cohorts of vaccinees and infected subjects with the ultimate goal of understanding the in vivo B-cell dynamics driving the evolution of broadly cross-protective antibody responses.

  6. Influenza A virus infection of healthy piglets in an abattoir in Brazil: animal-human interface and risk for interspecies transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Ribeiro Amorim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic influenza virus infections in pigs are frequent and the lack of measures for controlling viral spread facilitates the circulation of different virus strains between pigs. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the circulation of influenza A virus strains among asymptomatic piglets in an abattoir in Brazil and discuss the potential public health impacts. Tracheal samples (n = 330 were collected from asymptomatic animals by a veterinarian that also performed visual lung tissue examinations. No slaughtered animals presented with any noticeable macroscopic signs of influenza infection following examination of lung tissues. Samples were then analysed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction that resulted in the identification of 30 (9% influenza A positive samples. The presence of asymptomatic pig infections suggested that these animals could facilitate virus dissemination and act as a source of infection for the herd, thereby enabling the emergence of influenza outbreaks associated with significant economic losses. Furthermore, the continuous exposure of the farm and abattoir workers to the virus increases the risk for interspecies transmission. Monitoring measures of swine influenza virus infections and vaccination and monitoring of employees for influenza infection should also be considered. In addition regulatory agencies should consider the public health ramifications regarding the potential zoonotic viral transmission between humans and pigs.

  7. Brazilian purpuric fever caused by Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains lacking the 3031 plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondella, M L; Quinn, F D; Perkins, B A

    1995-01-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) is a life-threatening pediatric infection caused by Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (Hae), an organism formerly associated with only self-limited purulent conjunctivitis. Strains of Hae causing BPF have a 24-MDa plasmid with a specific AccI restriction pattern designated 3031. This plasmid was thought to code for a virulence factor because it had been detected only among Hae strains isolated from BPF cases or their contacts. From 3 typical BPF cases recently identified in São Paulo State, sterile-site Hae isolates were obtained; these isolates were similar to earlier BPF-associated Hae except they did not possess a 3031 plasmid. HindIII restricted chromosomal DNA from these strains was probed with purified 3031 plasmid DNA under high-stringency conditions. There was no evidence that 3031 plasmid DNA had become chromosomally integrated. It appears that the 3031 plasmid does not code for BPF-specific virulence factors.

  8. Avian influenza viruses that cause highly virulent infections in humans exhibit distinct replicative properties in contrast to human H1N1 viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Philippe F.; de La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Paradis, Éric; Mendoza, Emelissa; Coombs, Kevin M.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Avian influenza viruses present an emerging epidemiological concern as some strains of H5N1 avian influenza can cause severe infections in humans with lethality rates of up to 60%. These have been in circulation since 1997 and recently a novel H7N9-subtyped virus has been causing epizootics in China with lethality rates around 20%. To better understand the replication kinetics of these viruses, we combined several extensive viral kinetics experiments with mathematical modelling of in vitro infections in human A549 cells. We extracted fundamental replication parameters revealing that, while both the H5N1 and H7N9 viruses replicate faster and to higher titers than two low-pathogenicity H1N1 strains, they accomplish this via different mechanisms. While the H7N9 virions exhibit a faster rate of infection, the H5N1 virions are produced at a higher rate. Of the two H1N1 strains studied, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain exhibits the longest eclipse phase, possibly indicative of a less effective neuraminidase activity, but causes infection more rapidly than the seasonal strain. This explains, in part, the pandemic strain’s generally slower growth kinetics and permissiveness to accept mutations causing neuraminidase inhibitor resistance without significant loss in fitness. Our results highlight differential growth properties of H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses.

  9. Human Alveolar Macrophages May Not Be Susceptible to Direct Infection by a Human Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettensohn, David B; Frampton, Mark W; Nichols, Joan E; Roberts, Norbert J

    2016-12-01

    The current studies were undertaken to determine the susceptibility of human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to influenza A virus (IAV) infection in comparison with autologous peripheral blood-derived monocytes-macrophages (PBMs). AMs and PBMs were exposed to IAV in vitro and examined for their ability to bind and internalize IAV, and synthesize viral proteins and RNA. PBMs but not AMs demonstrated binding and internalization of the virus, synthesizing viral proteins and RNA. Exposure of AMs in the presence of a sialidase inhibitor or anti-IAV antibody resulted in viral protein synthesis by the cells. Exposure of AMs to fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled IAV in the presence of anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody also resulted in viral protein synthesis. Thus, human AMs are apparently not susceptible to direct infection by a human IAV but are likely to be infected indirectly in the setting of exposure in the presence of antibody that binds the challenging strain of IAV. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Reverse zoonosis of influenza to swine: new perspectives on the human-animal interface

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Martha I.; Vincent, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic of 2009 in swine are unknown, highlighting gaps in our understanding of influenza A virus ecology and evolution. Here we review how recently strengthened influenza virus surveillance in pigs has revealed that influenza virus transmission from humans to swine is far more frequent than swine-to-human zoonosis, and is central in seeding swine globally with new viral diversity. The scale of global human-to-swine transmission represents the largest ‘r...

  11. Genomic characteristics of 2 strains of influenza A (H9N2) virus isolated from human infection cases in Anhui province%安徽省2株人感染H9N2流感病毒基因特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何军; 刘丽萍; 侯赛; 龚磊; 吴家兵; 胡万富; 王建军

    2016-01-01

    目的 分析2015年安徽省2株人感染H9N2禽流感病毒分离株全基因组特征.方法 对安徽省2015年4月和9月流感监测网络实验室先后发现并确诊的2例H9N2禽流感病毒感染病例及其病毒分离株全基因组序列进行分析,使用Mega 6.0等软件解析2株H9N2毒株全基因组特征.结果 安徽省首次报道人感染H9N2禽流感病毒病例,对病毒分离株分析显示,其HA和NA基因与中国2013年禽间流行的H9N2病毒高度同源,属于A/Chicken/Shanghai/F/98(H9N2)支系;而PB2和MP基因属于A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/97支系,与H7N9、H10N8和H6N2具有较高的相似度.氨基酸序列比对发现该2株病毒出现多个人易感倾向位点分子特征:HA蛋白发生Q226L、H183N和E190T突变,且HA裂解位点为PSRSSR\\GL排列,NA蛋白茎部发生63~65位氨基酸缺失,M2蛋白S31N突变,以及PA-100A、PA-356R和PA-409N.结论 安徽省首次报道的人感染禽源H9N2流感病毒为H9N2系间重配病毒,存在多个人易感位点.%Objective To understand genomic characteristics of 2 strains of influenza A (H9N2) virus isolated from human infection cases in Anhui province in 2015.Methods Two human infection with H9N2 virus were confirmed by national influenza surveillance laboratory network in Anhui through viral isolation in April and September,2015,respectively.The full genomic sequences of the two viral isolates were analyzed in this study by using molecular bioinformatics software Mega 6.0.Results Human infection with H9N2 virus was first reported in Anhui province.The analysis of genomic sequence showed that the HA and NA genes of the two H9N2 isolates belonged to A/Chicken/ Shanghai/F/98(H9N2)-like lineage,and shared high identity with H9N2 virus circulating in poultry in 2013.The PB2 and MP genes belonged to the A/quail/Hong Kong/G 1/97-like lineage,and shared high homology with H7N9,H10N8 or H6N2 viruses.The amino acid sequence alignment results showed that several mutations for human

  12. Quantifying the fitness advantage of polymerase substitutions in Influenza A/H7N9 viruses during adaptation to humans.

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    Judith M Fonville

    Full Text Available Adaptation of zoonotic influenza viruses towards efficient human-to-human transmissibility is a substantial public health concern. The recently emerged A/H7N9 influenza viruses in China provide an opportunity for quantitative studies of host-adaptation, as human-adaptive substitutions in the PB2 gene of the virus have been found in all sequenced human strains, while these substitutions have not been detected in any non-human A/H7N9 sequences. Given the currently available information, this observation suggests that the human-adaptive PB2 substitution might confer a fitness advantage to the virus in these human hosts that allows it to rise to proportions detectable by consensus sequencing over the course of a single human infection. We use a mathematical model of within-host virus evolution to estimate the fitness advantage required for a substitution to reach predominance in a single infection as a function of the duration of infection and the fraction of mutant present in the virus population that initially infects a human. The modeling results provide an estimate of the lower bound for the fitness advantage of this adaptive substitution in the currently sequenced A/H7N9 viruses. This framework can be more generally used to quantitatively estimate fitness advantages of adaptive substitutions based on the within-host prevalence of mutations. Such estimates are critical for models of cross-species transmission and host-adaptation of influenza virus infections.

  13. Characterization of the N-Acetyl-5-neuraminic Acid-binding Site of the Extracytoplasmic Solute Receptor (SiaP) of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strain 2019

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    Johnston, Jason W.; Coussens, Nathan P.; Allen, Simon; Houtman, Jon C.D.; Turner, Keith H.; Zaleski, Anthony; Ramaswamy, S.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Apicella, Michael A. (Iowa); (Buck Inst.)

    2012-11-14

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic human pathogen causing otitis media in children and chronic bronchitis and pneumonia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The outer membrane of nontypeable H. influenzae is dominated by lipooligosaccharides (LOS), many of which incorporate sialic acid as a terminal nonreducing sugar. Sialic acid has been demonstrated to be an important factor in the survival of the bacteria within the host environment. H. influenzae is incapable of synthesizing sialic acid and is dependent on scavenging free sialic acid from the host environment. To achieve this, H. influenzae utilizes a tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter. In this study, we characterize the binding site of the extracytoplasmic solute receptor (SiaP) from nontypeable H. influenzae strain 2019. A crystal structure of N-acetyl-5-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)-bound SiaP was determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Thermodynamic characterization of Neu5Ac binding shows this interaction is enthalpically driven with a substantial unfavorable contribution from entropy. This is expected because the binding of SiaP to Neu5Ac is mediated by numerous hydrogen bonds and has several buried water molecules. Point mutations targeting specific amino acids were introduced in the putative binding site. Complementation with the mutated siaP constructs resulted either in full, partial, or no complementation, depending on the role of specific residues. Mass spectrometry analysis of the O-deacylated LOS of the R127K point mutation confirmed the observation of reduced incorporation of Neu5Ac into the LOS. The decreased ability of H. influenzae to import sialic acid had negative effects on resistance to complement-mediated killing and viability of biofilms in vitro, confirming the importance of sialic acid transport to the bacterium.

  14. Characterization of the N-acetyl-5-neuraminic acid-binding site of the extracytoplasmic solute receptor (SiaP) of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae strain 2019.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jason W; Coussens, Nathan P; Allen, Simon; Houtman, Jon C D; Turner, Keith H; Zaleski, Anthony; Ramaswamy, S; Gibson, Bradford W; Apicella, Michael A

    2008-01-11

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an opportunistic human pathogen causing otitis media in children and chronic bronchitis and pneumonia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The outer membrane of nontypeable H. influenzae is dominated by lipooligosaccharides (LOS), many of which incorporate sialic acid as a terminal nonreducing sugar. Sialic acid has been demonstrated to be an important factor in the survival of the bacteria within the host environment. H. influenzae is incapable of synthesizing sialic acid and is dependent on scavenging free sialic acid from the host environment. To achieve this, H. influenzae utilizes a tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter. In this study, we characterize the binding site of the extracytoplasmic solute receptor (SiaP) from nontypeable H. influenzae strain 2019. A crystal structure of N-acetyl-5-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)-bound SiaP was determined to 1.4A resolution. Thermodynamic characterization of Neu5Ac binding shows this interaction is enthalpically driven with a substantial unfavorable contribution from entropy. This is expected because the binding of SiaP to Neu5Ac is mediated by numerous hydrogen bonds and has several buried water molecules. Point mutations targeting specific amino acids were introduced in the putative binding site. Complementation with the mutated siaP constructs resulted either in full, partial, or no complementation, depending on the role of specific residues. Mass spectrometry analysis of the O-deacylated LOS of the R127K point mutation confirmed the observation of reduced incorporation of Neu5Ac into the LOS. The decreased ability of H. influenzae to import sialic acid had negative effects on resistance to complement-mediated killing and viability of biofilms in vitro, confirming the importance of sialic acid transport to the bacterium.

  15. H5N6 influenza virus infection, the newest influenza

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    Beuy Joob

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The most recent new emerging infection is the H5N6 influenza virus infection. This infection has just been reported from China in early May 2014. The disease is believed to be a cross species infection. All indexed cases are from China. Of interest, the H5N6 influenza virus is the primary virus for avian. The avian H5N6 influenza virus in avian population is a low virulent strain. However, the clinical manifestation in human seems severe. In this mini-review, the authors summarize and discuss on this new emerging influenza.

  16. DNA-based influenza vaccines as immunoprophylactic agents toward universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an illness of global public health concern. Influenza viruses have been responsible for several pandemics affecting humans. Current influenza vaccines have proved satisfactory safety; however, they have limitations and do not provide protection against unexpected emerging influenza virus strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative approaches to conventional influenza vaccines. The development of universal influenza vaccines will help alleviate the severity of influenza pandemics. Influenza DNA vaccines have been the subject of many studies over the past decades due to their ability to induce broad-based protective immune responses in various animal models. The present review highlights the recent advances in influenza DNA vaccine research and its potential as an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  17. Antiviral drug susceptibilities of seasonal human influenza viruses in Lebanon, 2008-09 season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Wakim, Rima; Tabet, Carelle; Medlej, Fouad; Reda, Mariam; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Yasushi; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Dbaibo, Ghassan S; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    The emergence of antiviral drug-resistant strains of the influenza virus in addition to the rapid spread of the recent pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus highlight the importance of surveillance of influenza in identifying new variants as they appear. In this study, genetic characteristics and antiviral susceptibility patterns of influenza samples collected in Lebanon during the 2008-09 season were investigated. Forty influenza virus samples were isolated from 89 nasopharyngeal swabs obtained from patients with influenza-like illness. Of these samples, 33 (82.5%) were A(H3N2), 3 (7.5%) were A(H1N1), and 4 (10%) were B. All the H3N2 viruses were resistant to amantadine but were sensitive to oseltamivir and zanamivir; while all the H1N1 viruses were resistant to oseltamivir (possessed H275Y mutation, N1 numbering, in their NA) but were sensitive to amantadine and zanamivir. In the case of influenza B, both Victoria and Yamagata lineages were identified (three and one isolates each, respectively) and they showed decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir when compared to influenza A viruses. Influenza circulation patterns in Lebanon were very similar to those in Europe during the same season. Continued surveillance is important to fully elucidate influenza patterns in Lebanon and the Middle East in general, especially in light of the current influenza pandemic.

  18. Comparative distribution of human and avian type sialic acid influenza receptors in the pig

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    Perez Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major determinant of influenza infection is the presence of virus receptors on susceptible host cells to which the viral haemagglutinin is able to bind. Avian viruses preferentially bind to sialic acid α2,3-galactose (SAα2,3-Gal linked receptors, whereas human strains bind to sialic acid α2,6-galactose (SAα2,6-Gal linked receptors. To date, there has been no detailed account published on the distribution of SA receptors in the pig, a model host that is susceptible to avian and human influenza subtypes, thus with potential for virus reassortment. We examined the relative expression and spatial distribution of SAα2,3-GalG(1-3GalNAc and SAα2,6-Gal receptors in the major organs from normal post-weaned pigs by binding with lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinins (MAA II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA respectively. Results Both SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors were extensively detected in the major porcine organs examined (trachea, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, skeletal muscle, cerebrum, small intestine and colon. Furthermore, distribution of both SA receptors in the pig respiratory tract closely resembled the published data of the human tract. Similar expression patterns of SA receptors between pig and human in other major organs were found, with exception of the intestinal tract. Unlike the limited reports on the scarcity of influenza receptors in human intestines, we found increasing presence of SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors from duodenum to colon in the pig. Conclusions The extensive presence of SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors in the major organs examined suggests that each major organ may be permissive to influenza virus entry or infection. The high similarity of SA expression patterns between pig and human, in particular in the respiratory tract, suggests that pigs are not more likely to be potential hosts for virus reassortment than humans. Our finding of relative abundance of SA receptors

  19. Influenza Forecasting in Human Populations: A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Jean-Paul; George, Dylan; Shaman, Jeffrey; Chitale, Rohit A.; McKenzie, F. Ellis

    2014-01-01

    Forecasts of influenza activity in human populations could help guide key preparedness tasks. We conducted a scoping review to characterize these methodological approaches and identify research gaps. Adapting the PRISMA methodology for systematic reviews, we searched PubMed, CINAHL, Project Euclid, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for publications in English since January 1, 2000 using the terms “influenza AND (forecast* OR predict*)”, excluding studies that did not validate forecasts against independent data or incorporate influenza-related surveillance data from the season or pandemic for which the forecasts were applied. We included 35 publications describing population-based (N = 27), medical facility-based (N = 4), and regional or global pandemic spread (N = 4) forecasts. They included areas of North America (N = 15), Europe (N = 14), and/or Asia-Pacific region (N = 4), or had global scope (N = 3). Forecasting models were statistical (N = 18) or epidemiological (N = 17). Five studies used data assimilation methods to update forecasts with new surveillance data. Models used virological (N = 14), syndromic (N = 13), meteorological (N = 6), internet search query (N = 4), and/or other surveillance data as inputs. Forecasting outcomes and validation metrics varied widely. Two studies compared distinct modeling approaches using common data, 2 assessed model calibration, and 1 systematically incorporated expert input. Of the 17 studies using epidemiological models, 8 included sensitivity analysis. This review suggests need for use of good practices in influenza forecasting (e.g., sensitivity analysis); direct comparisons of diverse approaches; assessment of model calibration; integration of subjective expert input; operational research in pilot, real-world applications; and improved mutual understanding among modelers and public health officials. PMID:24714027

  20. Influenza

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    Forleo-Neto Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A influenza (gripe é doença infecciosa aguda de origem viral que acomete o trato respiratório e a cada inverno atinge mais de 100 milhões de pessoas na Europa, Japão e Estados Unidos, causando anualmente a morte de cerca de 20 a 40 mil pessoas somente neste último país. O agente etiológico é o Myxovirus influenzae, ou vírus da gripe. Este subdivide-se nos tipos A, B e C, sendo que apenas os do tipo A e B apresentam relevância clínica em humanos. O vírus influenza apresenta altas taxas de mutação, o que resulta freqüentemente na inserção de novas variantes virais na comunidade, para as quais a população não apresenta imunidade. São poucas as opções disponíveis para o controle da influenza. Dentre essas, a vacinação constitui a forma mais eficaz para o controle da doença e de suas complicações. Em função das mutações que ocorrem naturalmente no vírus influenza, recomenda-se que a vacinação seja realizada anualmente. No Brasil, segundo dados obtidos pelo Projeto VigiGripe - ligado à Universidade Federal de São Paulo -, verifica-se que a influenza apresenta pico de atividade entre os meses de maio e setembro. Assim, a época mais indicada para a vacinação corresponde aos meses de março e abril. Para o tratamento específico da influenza estão disponíveis quatro medicamentos antivirais: os fármacos clássicos amantadina e rimantidina e os antivirais de segunda geração oseltamivir e zanamivir. Os últimos, acrescentam alternativas para o tratamento da influenza e ampliam as opções disponíveis para o seu controle.

  1. Genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Yin, Yanbo; Sun, Zhongsheng; Gao, Lei; Gao, George F; Liu, Sidang; Sun, Lei; Liu, Wenjun

    2010-11-01

    H1N1 is the main subtype influenza A virus circulating in human and swine population, and has long been a threat to economy and public health. To explore the genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses. Three new H1N1 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) were isolated and genomes sequencing were conducted followed by phylogenetic and molecular analysis of all swine and human H1N1 influenza viruses isolated in China in the past five years. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three isolates possessed different characteristics: the genome of A/Swine/Shandong/1112/2008 was closely related to that of classical H1N1 SIV, while A/Swine/Shandong/1123/2008 was a reassortant with NS gene from the human-like H3N2 influenza virus and other genes from the classical H1N1 SIV, and A/Swine/Fujian/0325/2008 fell into a lineage of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses. Genetically, 2009 H1N1 influenza A viruses (2009 H1N1) in China were contiguous to the SIV lineages rather than the seasonal H1N1 human influenza virus's lineage. Furthermore, molecular analysis among human and swine influenza viruses provided more detail information for understanding their genetic correlation. These results suggested that in China in the past five years, the classical, avian-like and human-like H1N1 SIV existed in swine herds and the reassortment between H1N1 swine and H3N2 human influenza viruses was identified. In addition, the present data showed no evidence to support a strong correlation between the 2009 H1N1 and the swine influenza virus circulating in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Human Infection with Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus - China

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biorisk reduction Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus – China Disease outbreak news 18 January 2017 ... laboratory-confirmed human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus and on 12 January 2017, the Health ...

  3. H5N1 Avian Influenza Pre-pandemic Vaccine Strains in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO Hong; DONG Li Bo; ZHANG Ye; DONG Jie; ZOU Shu Mei; GAO Rong Bao; WANG Da Yan; SHU Yue Long

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo prepare the 4 candidate vaccine strains of H5N1 avian influenza virus isolated in China. MethodsRecombinant viruses were rescued using reverse genetics. Neuraminidase (NA) and hemagglutinin (HA) segments of the A/Xinjiang/1/2006, A/Guangxi/1/2009, A/Hubei/1/2010, and A/Guangdong/1/2011 viruses were amplified by RT-PCR. Multibasic amino acid cleavage site of HA was removed and ligated into the pCIpolI vector for virus rescue. The recombinant viruses were evaluated by trypsin dependent assays. Their embryonate survival and antigenicity were compared with those of the respective wild-type viruses. ResultsThe 4 recombinant viruses showed similar antigenicity compared with wild-type viruses, chickenembryo survival and trypsin-dependent characteristics. ConclusionThe 4 recombinantviruses rescued using reverse genetics meet the criteria for classification of low pathogenic avian influenza strains, thus supporting the use of them for the development of seeds and production of pre-pandemic vaccines.

  4. Reverse zoonosis of influenza to swine: new perspectives on the human-animal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Martha I; Vincent, Amy L

    2015-03-01

    The origins of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in swine are unknown, highlighting gaps in our understanding of influenza A virus (IAV) ecology and evolution. We review how recently strengthened influenza virus surveillance in pigs has revealed that influenza virus transmission from humans to swine is far more frequent than swine-to-human zoonosis, and is central in seeding swine globally with new viral diversity. The scale of global human-to-swine transmission represents the largest 'reverse zoonosis' of a pathogen documented to date. Overcoming the bias towards perceiving swine as sources of human viruses, rather than recipients, is key to understanding how the bidirectional nature of the human-animal interface produces influenza threats to both hosts.

  5. Avian influenza biosecurity: a key for animal and human protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolas Charisis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern biosecurity methods have provided the best way of preventing the spread of a communicable disease since people realised that human and animal contact can transmit exotic diseases. The avian influenza virus is readily transmitted through animal vectors and inanimate matter and incurs heavy losses to the poultry industry. Biosecurity measures include the prevention of vaccination of flocks in an endemic area and the isolation of farms from the surrounding world (villages, other farms, fields, etc.. Veterinary services work in liaison with owners to implement national quarantine and vaccination measures for the benefit of farmers and the industry and for protection of public health.

  6. Genotyping of Haemophilus influenzae type b strains and their incidence in the clinical samples isolated from Iranian patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh Khodashahri, Somayeh; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Rahbar, Mohammad; Abdollahpour-Alitappeh, Meghdad; Vaziri, Farzam; Rahnamaye-Farzami, Mrjan; Mohammadzadeh, Mona; Davari, Mehdi; Fateh, Abolfazl; Masoumi, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is divided into two distinct genotypes, type I and type II, based on the structure of capsular polysaccharides. The capsulation locus of Haemophilus influenzae type b consists of three functionally distinct regions, designated regions 1 to 3. Region III contains hcsA and hcsB genes; however, notable sequence variation in this region can be used to recognize different Hib genotypes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genotype of the Hib strains isolated from patients with invasive disease in Iran. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 8 pairs of primers were used for identification and serotyping of encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae strains, as well as confirmation of species identification. Additionally, in order to identify the capsular genotypes of Haemophilus influenzae type b (type I and II), two additional primer pairs were used to amplify the hcsA gene. Results: Out of 50 isolates of H. influenzae, four were found to be type b. Interestingly, among these 4 Hib isolates, 2 strains belonged to the type-II category. Conclusion: Our study shows that the prevalence of both Hib types I and II seems to be high in Iran. PMID:26668700

  7. HI responses induced by seasonal influenza vaccination are associated with clinical protection and with seroprotection against non-homologous strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luytjes, Willem; Enouf, Vincent; Schipper, Maarten; Gijzen, Karlijn; Liu, Wai Ming; van der Lubben, Mariken; Meijer, Adam; van der Werf, Sylvie; Soethout, Ernst C

    2012-07-27

    Vaccination against influenza induces homologous as well as cross-specific hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) responses. Induction of cross-specific HI responses may be essential when the influenza strain does not match the vaccine strain, or even to confer a basic immune response against a pandemic influenza virus. We carried out a clinical study to evaluate the immunological responses after seasonal vaccination in healthy adults 18-60 years of age, receiving the yearly voluntary vaccination during the influenza season 2006/2007. Vaccinees of different age groups were followed for laboratory confirmed influenza (LCI) and homologous HI responses as well as cross-specific HI responses against the seasonal H1N1 strain of 2008 and pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009 (H1N1pdm09) were determined. Homologous HI titers that are generally associated with protection (i.e. seroprotective HI titers ≥40) were found in more than 70% of vaccinees. In contrast, low HI titers before and after vaccination were significantly associated with seasonal LCI. Cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against drifted seasonal H1N1 were found in 69% of vaccinees. Cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against H1N1pdm09 were also significantly induced, especially in the youngest age group. More specifically, cross-specific HI titers ≥40 against H1N1pdm09 were inversely correlated with age. We did not find a correlation between the subtype of influenza which was circulating at the age of birth of the vaccinees and cross-specific HI response against H1N1pdm09. These data indicate that the HI titers before and after vaccination determine the vaccination efficacy. In addition, in healthy adults between 18 and 60 years of age, young adults appear to be best able to mount a cross-protective HI response against H1N1pdm09 or drifted seasonal influenza after seasonal vaccination.

  8. Host genetics of severe influenza: from mouse Mx1 to human IRF7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancanelli, Michael J; Abel, Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Influenza viruses cause mild to moderate respiratory illness in most people, and only rarely devastating or fatal infections. The virulence factors encoded by viral genes can explain seasonal or geographic differences at the population level but are unlikely to account for inter-individual clinical variability. Inherited or acquired immunodeficiencies may thus underlie severe cases of influenza. The crucial role of host genes was first demonstrated by forward genetics in inbred mice, with the identification of interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible Mx1 as a canonical influenza susceptibility gene. Reverse genetics has subsequently characterized the in vivo role of other mouse genes involved in IFN-α/β and -λ immunity. A series of in vitro studies with mouse and human cells have also refined the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of protection against influenza viruses. Population-based human genetic studies have not yet uncovered variants with a significant impact. Interestingly, human primary immunodeficiencies affecting T and B cells were also not found to predispose to severe influenza. Recently however, human IRF7 was shown to be essential for IFN-α/β- and IFN-λ-dependent protective immunity against primary influenza in vivo, as inferred from a patient with life-threatening influenza revealed to be IRF7-deficient by whole exome sequencing. Next generation sequencing of human exomes and genomes will facilitate the analysis of the human genetic determinism of severe influenza.

  9. Rules of co-occurring mutations characterize the antigenic evolution of human influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haifen; Zhou, Xinrui; Zheng, Jie; Kwoh, Chee-Keong

    2016-12-05

    The human influenza viruses undergo rapid evolution (especially in hemagglutinin (HA), a glycoprotein on the surface of the virus), which enables the virus population to constantly evade the human immune system. Therefore, the vaccine has to be updated every year to stay effective. There is a need to characterize the evolution of influenza viruses for better selection of vaccine candidates and the prediction of pandemic strains. Studies have shown that the influenza hemagglutinin evolution is driven by the simultaneous mutations at antigenic sites. Here, we analyze simultaneous or co-occurring mutations in the HA protein of human influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1 and B viruses to predict potential mutations, characterizing the antigenic evolution. We obtain the rules of mutation co-occurrence using association rule mining after extracting HA1 sequences and detect co-mutation sites under strong selective pressure. Then we predict the potential drifts with specific mutations of the viruses based on the rules and compare the results with the "observed" mutations in different years. The sites under frequent mutations are in antigenic regions (epitopes) or receptor binding sites. Our study demonstrates the co-occurring site mutations obtained by rule mining can capture the evolution of influenza viruses, and confirms that cooperative interactions among sites of HA1 protein drive the influenza antigenic evolution.

  10. Comparison of microarray-predicted closest genomes to sequencing for poliovirus vaccine strain similarity and influenza A phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Lee, Charlie W H; Patel, Champa; Lucero, Marilla; Nohynek, Hanna; Sung, Wing-Kin; Murad, Chrysanti; Ma, Jianmin; Hibberd, Martin L; Wong, Christopher W; Simões, Eric A F

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate sequence data from the PathChip high-density hybridization array for epidemiological interpretation of detected pathogens. For influenza A, we derive similar relative outbreak clustering in phylogenetic trees from PathChip-derived compared to classical Sanger-derived sequences. For a positive polio detection, recent infection could be excluded based on vaccine strain similarity.

  11. Previous infection with a mesogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus affects infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide, but little is known on the interactions between these two viruses when infecting birds. In a previous study we found that infection of chickens with a mesogenic strain of...

  12. Identification of Rare PB2-D701N Mutation from a Patient with Severe Influenza: Contribution of the PB2-D701N Mutation to the Pathogenicity of Human Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Amelia; Pozo, Francisco; Vidal-García, Matxalen; Omeñaca, Manuel; Casas, Inmaculada; Falcón, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Several amino acid changes have been previously implicated in adaptation of avian influenza viruses to human hosts, among them the D701N change in the PB2 polymerase subunit that also is the main determinant of avian virus pathogenesis in animal models. However, previous studies using recombinant viruses did not provide conclusive information of the contribution of this PB2 residue to pathogenicity in human influenza virus strains. We identified this mutation in an A(H1N1)pdm09-like human influenza virus isolated from an infected patient with pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, admitted to the intensive care unit. An exhaustive search has revealed PB2-D701 as a highly conserved position in all available H1N1 human virus sequences in NCBI database, showing a very low prevalence of PB2-D701N change. Presence of PB2-701N amino acid correlates with severe or fatal outcome in those scarce cases with known disease outcome of the infection. In these patients, the residue PB2-701N may contribute to pathogenicity as it was previously reported in humans infected with avian viruses. This study helps to clarify a debate that has arisen regarding the role of PB2-D701N in human influenza virus pathogenicity.

  13. Identification of Rare PB2-D701N Mutation from a Patient with Severe Influenza: Contribution of the PB2-D701N Mutation to the Pathogenicity of Human Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Amelia; Pozo, Francisco; Vidal-García, Matxalen; Omeñaca, Manuel; Casas, Inmaculada; Falcón, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Several amino acid changes have been previously implicated in adaptation of avian influenza viruses to human hosts, among them the D701N change in the PB2 polymerase subunit that also is the main determinant of avian virus pathogenesis in animal models. However, previous studies using recombinant viruses did not provide conclusive information of the contribution of this PB2 residue to pathogenicity in human influenza virus strains. We identified this mutation in an A(H1N1)pdm09-like human influenza virus isolated from an infected patient with pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, admitted to the intensive care unit. An exhaustive search has revealed PB2-D701 as a highly conserved position in all available H1N1 human virus sequences in NCBI database, showing a very low prevalence of PB2-D701N change. Presence of PB2-701N amino acid correlates with severe or fatal outcome in those scarce cases with known disease outcome of the infection. In these patients, the residue PB2-701N may contribute to pathogenicity as it was previously reported in humans infected with avian viruses. This study helps to clarify a debate that has arisen regarding the role of PB2-D701N in human influenza virus pathogenicity. PMID:28421062

  14. Pandemic and Avian Influenza A Viruses in Humans: Epidemiology, Virology, Clinical Characteristics, and Treatment Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Cao, Bin

    2017-03-01

    The intermittent outbreak of pandemic influenza and emergence of novel avian influenza A virus is worldwide threat. Although most patients present with mild symptoms, some deteriorate to severe pneumonia and even death. Great progress in the understanding of the mechanism of disease pathogenesis and a series of vaccines has been promoted worldwide; however, incidence, morbidity, and mortality remains high. To step up vigilance and improve pandemic preparedness, this article elucidates the virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and treatment of human infections by influenza A viruses, with an emphasis on the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, H5N1, and H7N9 subtypes.

  15. Detection of antibodies against H5 and H7 strains in birds: evaluation of influenza pseudovirus particle neutralization tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Wallerström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Avian influenza viruses circulate in bird populations, and it is important to maintain and uphold our knowledge of the viral strains that are currently of interest in this context. Here, we describe the use of hemagglutinin-pseudotype retroviruses based on highly pathogenic influenza viruses for the screening of avian sera for influenza A antibodies. Our aim was also to determine whether the pseudovirus neutralization tests that we assessed were sensitive and simple to use compared to the traditional methods, including hemagglutination inhibition assays and microneutralization tests. Material and methods: H5 and H7 pseudovirus neutralization tests were evaluated by using serum from infected rabbits. Subsequently, the assays were further investigated using a panel of serum samples from avian species. The panel contained samples that were seropositive for five different hemagglutinin subtypes as well as influenza A seronegative samples. Results and discussion: The results suggest that the pseudovirus neutralization test is an alternative to hemagglutination inhibition assays, as we observed comparable titers to those of both standard microneutralizations assays as well as hemagglutinin inhibition assays. When evaluated by a panel of avian sera, the method also showed its capability to recognize antibodies directed toward low-pathogenic H5 and H7. Hence, we conclude that it is possible to use pseudoviruses based on highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses to screen avian sera for antibodies directed against influenza A subtypes H5 and H7.

  16. Emerging influenza virus: A global threat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Khanna; P Kumar; K Choudhary; B Kumar; V K Vijayan

    2008-11-01

    Since 1918, influenza virus has been one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality, especially among young children. Though the commonly circulating strain of the virus is not virulent enough to cause mortality, the ability of the virus genome to mutate at a very high rate may lead to the emergence of a highly virulent strain that may become the cause of the next pandemic. Apart from the influenza virus strain circulating in humans (H1N1 and H3N2), the avian influenza H5N1 H7 and H9 virus strains have also been reported to have caused human infections, H5N1 H7 and H9 have shown their ability to cross the species barrier from birds to humans and further replicate in humans. This review addresses the biological and epidemiological aspects of influenza virus and efforts to have a control on the virus globally.

  17. Development and qualification of the parallel line model for the estimation of human influenza haemagglutinin content using the single radial immunodiffusion assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kessel, G.; Geels, M. J.; de Weerd, S.; Buijs, L. J.; de Bruijni, M. A. M.; Glansbeek, H. L.; van den Bosch, J. F.; Heldens, J. G.; van den Heuvel, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human influenza virus leads to serious respiratory disease. Vaccination is the most common and effective prophylactic measure to prevent influenza. Influenza vaccine manufacturing and release is controlled by the correct determination of the potency-defining haemagglutinin (HA)

  18. Heterosubtypic protection against pathogenic human and avian influenza viruses via in vivo electroporation of synthetic consensus DNA antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick J Laddy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The persistent evolution of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI highlights the need for novel vaccination techniques that can quickly and effectively respond to emerging viral threats. We evaluated the use of optimized consensus influenza antigens to provide broad protection against divergent strains of H5N1 influenza in three animal models of mice, ferrets, and non-human primates. We also evaluated the use of in vivo electroporation to deliver these vaccines to overcome the immunogenicity barrier encountered in larger animal models of vaccination. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mice, ferrets and non-human primates were immunized with consensus plasmids expressing H5 hemagglutinin (pH5HA, N1 neuraminidase (pN1NA, and nucleoprotein antigen (pNP. Dramatic IFN-gamma-based cellular immune responses to both H5 and NP, largely dependent upon CD8+ T cells were seen in mice. Hemaggutination inhibition titers classically associated with protection (>1:40 were seen in all species. Responses in both ferrets and macaques demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus antigens to induce antibodies capable of inhibiting divergent strains of the H5N1 subtype, and studies in the mouse and ferret demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus vaccines to induce protection even in the absence of such neutralizing antibodies. After challenge, protection from morbidity and mortality was seen in mice and ferrets, with significant reductions in viral shedding and disease progression seen in vaccinated animals. CONCLUSIONS: By combining several consensus influenza antigens with in vivo electroporation, we demonstrate that these antigens induce both protective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice, ferrets and non-human primates. We also demonstrate the ability of these antigens to protect from both morbidity and mortality in a ferret model of HPAI, in both the presence and absence of neutralizing antibody, which will be critical in responding to the

  19. Identification of a novel strain of influenza A (H9N2) virus in chicken

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning; Wang; Zheng; Ruan; Yun; Wan; Bo; Wang; Si-Hua; Zhang; Xing-Yi; Ge

    2015-01-01

    Dear Editor,Avian Influenza virus(AIV)H9N2 subtype viruses circulate widely in domestic fowl,and usually cause mild clinical signs in poultry(Li et al.,2005).Occasionally,avian H9N2 can infect humans and cause mild clinical symptoms(Peiris et al.,1999;Lin et al.,2000).Genetic analysis indicates that the H9N2 genotype viruses exist in major poultry species(such as duck and chicken)and in minor poultry species(such as quail,partridge,chukar,pheasant,and guinea fowl)(Guan et al.,2000;Li et al.,2005).Meanwhile,frequent reassortment events among

  20. Subclinical avian influenza A(H5N1) virus infection in human, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Mai Quynh; Horby, Peter; Fox, Annette; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Le Nguyen, Hang Khanh; Hoang, Phuong Mai Vu; Nguyen, Khanh Cong; de Jong, Menno D; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Rogier van Doorn, H; Farrar, Jeremy; Wertheim, Heiman F L

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory-confirmed cases of subclinical infection with avian influenza A(H5N1) virus in humans are rare, and the true number of these cases is unknown. We describe the identification of a laboratory-confirmed subclinical case in a woman during an influenza A(H5N1) contact investigation in northern Vietnam.

  1. A review on human influenza A H5N1 infections in Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN Paul K S

    2009-01-01

    Avian influenza A H5N1 remains the most threatening virus that may cause another devastating pan-demic in the foreseeable future, In 1997, Hong Kong was the first place to detect human infections due to this virus originated from birds. The experience and lessons learnt provide important information for controlling further outbreaks caused by avian influenza viruses.

  2. A review on human influenza A H5N1 infections in Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN; Paul; K; S

    2009-01-01

    Avian influenza A H5N1 remains the most threatening virus that may cause another devastating pandemic in the foreseeable future. In 1997, Hong Kong was the first place to detect human infections due to this virus originated from birds. The experience and lessons learnt provide important information for controlling further outbreaks caused by avian influenza viruses.

  3. WHO Regional Office for Europe guidance for influenza surveillance in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, C.S.; Andraghetti, R.; Paget, J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent international mandates, and the emergent circulation of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in human populations, call for strengthening influenza surveillance to better target seasonal influenza control programmes and support pandemic preparedness. This document provides technical guidance to establi

  4. Comparative analysis of avian influenza virus diversity in poultry and humans during a highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N7) virus outbreak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jonges (Marcel); A. Bataille (Arnaud); R. Enserink (Remko); A. Meijer (Adam); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A. Stegeman (Arjan); G. Koch (Guus); M. Koopmans (Matty)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough increasing data have become available that link human adaptation with specific molecular changes in nonhuman influenza viruses, the molecular changes of these viruses during a large highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) outbreak in poultry along with avian-to-human tran

  5. Comparative Analysis of Avian Influenza Virus Diversity in Poultry and Humans during a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H7N7) Virus Outbreak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonges, M.; Bataille, A.; Enserink, R.; Meijer, A.; Fouchier, R.A.M.; Stegeman, A.; Koch, G.; Koopmans, M.

    2011-01-01

    Although increasing data have become available that link human adaptation with specific molecular changes in nonhuman influenza viruses, the molecular changes of these viruses during a large highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) outbreak in poultry along with avian-to-human transmission hav

  6. Molecular characterization of a novel reassortant H1N2 influenza virus containing genes from the 2009 pandemic human H1N1 virus in swine from eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiuming; Wu, Haibo; Xu, Lihua; Peng, Xiaorong; Cheng, Linfang; Jin, Changzhong; Xie, Tiansheng; Lu, Xiangyun; Wu, Nanping

    2016-06-01

    Pandemic outbreaks of H1N1 swine influenza virus have been reported since 2009. Reassortant H1N2 viruses that contain genes from the pandemic H1N1 virus have been isolated in Italy and the United States. However, there is limited information regarding the molecular characteristics of reassortant H1N2 swine influenza viruses in eastern China. Active influenza surveillance programs in Zhejiang Province identified a novel H1N2 influenza virus isolated from pigs displaying clinical signs of influenza virus infection. Whole-genome sequencing was performed and this strain was compared with other influenza viruses available in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the novel strain contained genes from the 2009 pandemic human H1N1 and swine H3N2 viruses. BALB/c mice were infected with the isolated virus to assess its virulence in mice. While the novel H1N2 isolate replicated well in mice, it was found to be less virulent. These results provide additional evidence that swine serve as intermediate hosts or 'mixing vessels' for novel influenza viruses. They also emphasize the importance of surveillance in the swine population for use as an early warning system for influenza outbreaks in swine and human populations.

  7. Avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza, or “bird flu”, is a contagious disease of animals which crossed the species barrier to infect humans and gave a quite impact on public health in the world since 2004, especially due to the threat of pandemic situation. Until 1st March 2006, laboratory-confirmed human cases have been reported in seven countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Viet Nam, China, Iraq and Turkey with a total of 174 cases and 94 dead (54.02%. Indonesia has 27 cases, 20 were dead (74.07%. AI cases in Indonesia are more in male (62.5% and all have a symptom of fever. An influenza pandemic is a rare but recurrent event. An influenza pandemic happens when a new subtype emerges that has not previously circulated in humans. For this reason, avian H5N1 is a strain with pandemic potential, since it might ultimately adapt into a strain that is contagious among humans. Impact of the pandemic could include high rates of illness and worker absenteeism are expected, and these will contribute to social and economic disruption. Historically, the number of deaths during a pandemic has varied greatly. Death rates are largely determined by four factors: the number of people who become infected, the virulence of the virus, the underlying characteristics and vulnerability of affected populations, and the effectiveness of preventive measures. Accurate predictions of mortality cannot be made before the pandemic virus emerges and begins to spread. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:125-8Keywords: Avian Influenza, Pandemic

  8. Viral factors in influenza pandemic risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsitch, M. (Marc); W.S. Barclay (Wendy); Raman, R. (Rahul); Russell, C.J. (Charles J.); Belser, J.A. (Jessica A.); Cobey, S. (Sarah); Kasson, P.M. (Peter M.); J. Lloyd-Smith (James); S. Maurer-Stroh (Sebastian); S. Riley (Steven); Beauchemin, C.A. (Catherine A.); T. Bedford (Trevor); Friedrich, T.C. (Thomas C.); Handel, A. (Andreas); S. Herfst (Sander); Murcia, P.R. (Pablo R.); Roche, B. (Benjamin); Wilke, C.O. (Claus O.); C.A. Russell (Colin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe threat of an influenza A virus pandemic stems from continual virus spillovers from reservoir species, a tiny fraction of which spark sustained transmission in humans. To date, no pandemic emergence of a new influenza strain has been preceded by detection of a closely related

  9. Inhibitory activity of a standardized elderberry liquid extract against clinically-relevant human respiratory bacterial pathogens and influenza A and B viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domann Eugen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Black elderberries (Sambucus nigra L. are well known as supportive agents against common cold and influenza. It is further known that bacterial super-infection during an influenza virus (IV infection can lead to severe pneumonia. We have analyzed a standardized elderberry extract (Rubini, BerryPharma AG for its antimicrobial and antiviral activity using the microtitre broth micro-dilution assay against three Gram-positive bacteria and one Gram-negative bacteria responsible for infections of the upper respiratory tract, as well as cell culture experiments for two different strains of influenza virus. Methods The antimicrobial activity of the elderberry extract was determined by bacterial growth experiments in liquid cultures using the extract at concentrations of 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. The inhibitory effects were determined by plating the bacteria on agar plates. In addition, the inhibitory potential of the extract on the propagation of human pathogenic H5N1-type influenza A virus isolated from a patient and an influenza B virus strain was investigated using MTT and focus assays. Results For the first time, it was shown that a standardized elderberry liquid extract possesses antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive bacteria of Streptococcus pyogenes and group C and G Streptococci, and the Gram-negative bacterium Branhamella catarrhalis in liquid cultures. The liquid extract also displays an inhibitory effect on the propagation of human pathogenic influenza viruses. Conclusion Rubini elderberry liquid extract is active against human pathogenic bacteria as well as influenza viruses. The activities shown suggest that additional and alternative approaches to combat infections might be provided by this natural product.

  10. Demographic and ecological risk factors for human influenza A virus infections in rural Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Elisabeth Dowling; Agustian, Dwi; Kartasasmita, Cissy; Uyeki, Timothy M; Simões, Eric A F

    2017-09-01

    Indonesia has the world's highest reported mortality for human infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) virus. Indonesia is an agriculturally driven country where human-animal mixing is common and provides a unique environment for zoonotic influenza A virus transmission. To identify potential demographic and ecological risk factors for human infection with seasonal influenza A viruses in rural Indonesia, a population-based study was conducted in Cileunyi and Soreang subdistricts near Bandung in western Java from 2008 to 2011. Passive influenza surveillance with RT-PCR confirmation of influenza A viral RNA in respiratory specimens was utilized for case ascertainment. A population census and mapping were utilized for population data collection. The presence of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections in a household was modeled using Generalized Estimating Equations. Each additional child aged influenza A virus infections in rural Indonesian households with young children and poultry. © 2017 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Innate immune induction and influenza protection elicited by a response-selective agonist of human C5a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam D Sanderson

    Full Text Available The anaphylatoxin C5a is an especially potent mediator of both local and systemic inflammation. However, C5a also plays an essential role in mucosal host defense against bacterial, viral, and fungal infection. We have developed a response-selective agonist of human C5a, termed EP67, which retains the immunoenhancing activity of C5a at the expense of its inflammatory, anaphylagenic properties. EP67 insufflation results in the rapid induction of pulmonary cytokines and chemokines. This is followed by an influx of innate immune effector cells, including neutrophils, NK cells, and dendritic cells. EP67 exhibits both prophylactic and therapeutic protection when tested in a murine model of influenza A infection. Mice treated with EP67 within a twenty-four hour window of non-lethal infection were significantly protected from influenza-induced weight loss. Furthermore, EP67 delivered twenty-four hours after lethal infection completely blocked influenza-induced mortality (0% vs. 100% survival. Since protection based on innate immune induction is not restricted to any specific pathogen, EP67 may well prove equally efficacious against a wide variety of possible viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens. Such a strategy could be used to stop the worldwide spread of emergent respiratory diseases, including but not limited to novel strains of influenza.

  12. TEM-1 AND ROB-1 PRESENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE STRAINS, ISTANBUL, TURKEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvat, Nuray; Nazik, Hasan; Berkiten, Rahmiye; Öngen, Betigül

    2015-03-01

    Resistance of 235 Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolates from Istanbul Medical Faculty Hospital, Turkey were determined against 19 antibiotics by disc diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of those found resistant to ampicillin, cefuroxim, chloramphenicol and meropenem were measured using E-test. Ampicillin-resistant isolates producing beta-lactamase as demonstrated by a nitrocefin assay were analyzed for the presence of TEM-1 and ROB-1 genes by PCR. Eleven percent of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin (10 µg/ml), of which 73% were beta-lactamase positive and carried TEM-1 gene, but none were positive for ROB-1 gene. All isolates susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate (20/10 µg/ml), azithromycin (15 µg/ml), aztreonam (30 µg/ml), cefotaxime (30 µg/ml), ceftriaxone (30 µg/ml), ciprofloxacin (5 µg/ml), levofloxacin (5 µg/ml), and telithromycin (15 µg/ml) but 24%, 15%, 4%, 4%, 2%, 1%, 1%, 0.5%, 0.5% and 0.5% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (1.25/23.75 µg/ml), tetracycline (30 µg/ml), cefaclor (30 µg/ml), clarithromycin (15 µg/ml), cefuroxime (30 µg/ml), meropenem (10 µg/ml), chloramphenicol (30 µg/ml), ampicillin-sulbactam (10/10 µg/ml), nalidixic acid (30 µg/ml), and fosfomycin (30 µg/ml), respectively. MIC values of three cefuroxime-resistant isolates was 24, 48 and > 256 µg/ml, respectively; of two meropenem-resistant strains > 256 µg/ml; and of two chloramphenicol-susceptible isolates (by disc diffusion method) 6 µg/ml (considered as intermediate susceptible). Multiple- antibiotics resistance was detected in 15% of the strains, with resistance to 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 antibiotics in 8.5%, 4%, 2%, 0.5% and 0.5% of the isolates, respectively. By identifying beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae, empirical therapy with beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations and second generation cephalosporins would be inappropriate for such patients (approximately 3%). Our findings will

  13. H7N9 avian influenza A virus and the perpetual challenge of potential human pandemicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Fauci, Anthony S

    2013-07-09

    ABSTRACT The ongoing H7N9 influenza epizootic in China once again presents us questions about the origin of pandemics and how to recognize them in early stages of development. Over the past ~135 years, H7 influenza viruses have neither caused pandemics nor been recognized as having undergone human adaptation. Yet several unusual properties of these viruses, including their poultry epizootic potential, mammalian adaptation, and atypical clinical syndromes in rarely infected humans, suggest that they may be different from other avian influenza viruses, thus questioning any assurance that the likelihood of human adaptation is low. At the same time, the H7N9 epizootic provides an opportunity to learn more about the mammalian/human adaptational capabilities of avian influenza viruses and challenges us to integrate virologic and public health research and surveillance at the animal-human interface.

  14. Genetic makeup of amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant human influenza A/H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Yasushi; Baranovich, Tatiana; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    The emergence and widespread occurrence of antiviral drug-resistant seasonal human influenza A viruses, especially oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 virus, are major concerns. To understand the genetic background of antiviral drug-resistant A/H1N1 viruses, we performed full genome sequencing of prepandemic A/H1N1 strains. Seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses, including antiviral-susceptible viruses, amantadine-resistant viruses, and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, obtained from several areas in Japan during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 influenza seasons were analyzed. Sequencing of the full genomes of these viruses was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships among the sequences of each individual genome segment were inferred. Reference genome sequences from the Influenza Virus Resource database were included to determine the closest ancestor for each segment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the oseltamivir-resistant strain evolved from a reassortant oseltamivir-susceptible strain (clade 2B) which circulated in the 2007-2008 season by acquiring the H275Y resistance-conferring mutation in the NA gene. The oseltamivir-resistant lineage (corresponding to the Northern European resistant lineage) represented 100% of the H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 season and further acquired at least one mutation in each of the polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes. Therefore, a reassortment event involving two distinct oseltamivir-susceptible lineages, followed by the H275Y substitution in the NA gene and other mutations elsewhere in the genome, contributed to the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant lineage. In contrast, amantadine-resistant viruses from the 2007-2008 season distinctly clustered in clade 2C and were characterized by extensive amino acid substitutions across their genomes, suggesting that a fitness gap among its genetic components might have driven these mutations to maintain it in the

  15. Nasal IgA Provides Protection against Human Influenza Challenge in Volunteers with Low Serum Influenza Antibody Titre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Victoria M W; Francis, James N; Anderson, Katie J; Georges, Bertrand; Cope, Alethea V; Tregoning, John S

    2017-01-01

    In spite of there being a number of vaccines, influenza remains a significant global cause of morbidity and mortality. Understanding more about natural and vaccine induced immune protection against influenza infection would help to develop better vaccines. Virus specific IgG is a known correlate of protection, but other factors may help to reduce viral load or disease severity, for example IgA. In the current study we measured influenza specific responses in a controlled human infection model using influenza A/California/2009 (H1N1) as the challenge agent. Volunteers were pre-selected with low haemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titres in order to ensure a higher proportion of infection; this allowed us to explore the role of other immune correlates. In spite of HAI being uniformly low, there were variable levels of H1N1 specific IgG and IgA prior to infection. There was also a range of disease severity in volunteers allowing us to compare whether differences in systemic and local H1N1 specific IgG and IgA prior to infection affected disease outcome. H1N1 specific IgG level before challenge did not correlate with protection, probably due to the pre-screening for individuals with low HAI. However, the length of time infectious virus was recovered from the nose was reduced in patients with higher pre-existing H1N1 influenza specific nasal IgA or serum IgA. Therefore, IgA contributes to protection against influenza and should be targeted in vaccines.

  16. Serological report of pandemic and seasonal human influenza virus infection in dogs in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Zhao, Fu-Rong; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Wei, Ping; Chang, Hui-Yun

    2014-11-01

    From January to July 2012, we looked for evidence of subclinical A (H1N1) pdm09 and seasonal human influenza viruses infections in healthy dogs in China. Sera from a total of 1920 dogs were collected from Guangdong, Guangxi, Fujian and Jiangxi provinces. We also examined archived sera from 66 dogs and cats that were collected during 2008 from these provinces. Using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization (MN) assays, we found that only the dogs sampled in 2012 had elevated antibodies (≥ 1:32) against A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and seasonal human influenza viruses: Of the 1920 dog sera, 20.5 % (n = 393) had elevated antibodies against influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 by the HI assay, 1.1 % (n = 22), and 4.7 % (n = 91) of the 1920 dogs sera had elevated antibodies against human seasonal H1N1 influenza virus and human seasonal H3N2 influenza virus by the HI assay. Compared with dogs that were raised on farms, dogs that were raised as pets were more likely to have elevated antibodies against A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal human influenza viruses. Seropositivity was highest among pet dogs, which likely had more diverse and frequent exposures to humans than farm dogs. These findings will help us better understand which influenza A viruses are present in dogs and will contribute to the prevention and control of influenza A virus. Moreover, further in-depth study is necessary for us to understand what roles dogs play in the ecology of influenza A.

  17. Randomized controlled trials for influenza drugs and vaccines: a review of controlled human infection studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobana Balasingam

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Controlled human infection studies are an important research tool in assessing promising influenza vaccines and antivirals. These studies are performed quickly and are cost-effective and safe, with a low incidence of serious adverse events.

  18. Chest imaging of H7N9 subtype of human avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-ming Wang

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: The characteristic imaging demonstrations of H7N9 subtype of human avian influenza are segmental or lobar exudative lesions at lungs at the initial stage, which rapidly progress into bilateral distribution at lungs at the progressive stage.

  19. Contemporary North American influenza H7 viruses possess human receptor specificity: Implications for virus transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belser, Jessica A; Blixt, Ola; Chen, Li-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Avian H7 influenza viruses from both the Eurasian and North American lineage have caused outbreaks in poultry since 2002, with confirmed human infection occurring during outbreaks in The Netherlands, British Columbia, and the United Kingdom. The majority of H7 infections have resulted in self......-limiting conjunctivitis, whereas probable human-to-human transmission has been rare. Here, we used glycan microarray technology to determine the receptor-binding preference of Eurasian and North American lineage H7 influenza viruses and their transmissibility in the ferret model. We found that highly pathogenic H7N7...... in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets and was capable of transmission in this species by direct contact. These results indicate that H7 influenza viruses from the North American lineage have acquired sialic acid-binding properties that more closely resemble those of human influenza viruses and have...

  20. A humanized anti-M2 scFv shows protective in vitro activity against influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Velappan, Nileena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmidt, Jurgen G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    M2 is one of the most conserved influenza proteins, and has been widely prospected as a potential universal vaccine target, with protection predominantly mediated by antibodies. In this paper we describe the creation of a humanized single chain Fv from 14C2, a potent monoclonal antibody against M2. We show that the humanized scFv demonstrates similar activity to the parental mAb: it is able to recognize M2 in its native context on cell surfaces and is able to show protective in vitro activity against influenza, and so represents a potential lead antibody candidate for universal prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in influenza.

  1. MULTIPLE HAEMOPHILUS-INFLUENZAE STRAINS AND STRAIN VARIANTS COEXIST IN THE RESPIRATORY-TRACT OF PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC-FIBROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLLER, LVM; REGELINK, AG; GRASSELIER, H; DANKERTROELSE, JE; VANALPHEN, L

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiology of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, H. influenzae isolates from sputum specimens of 40 CF patients were analyzed longitudinally for 2 years. The isolates were characterized by analysis of the major outer mem

  2. A novel branching pattern in the lipopolysaccharide expressed by non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae strain 1232.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiazeva, Varvara; Li, Jianjun; Hood, Derek W; Moxon, E Richard; Schweda, Elke K H

    2013-08-30

    We report the novel branching pattern in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) expressed by non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) strain 1232. The strain expressed the β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-[α-d-Galp-(1→4)-β-d-Galp-(1→7)]-d-α-d-Hepp-(1→6)-β-d-Glcp chain linked to the proximal heptose (HepI) of the conserved triheptosyl inner-core moiety of NTHi LPS: l-α-d-HepIIIp-(1→2)-[PEtn→6]-l-α-d-HepIIp-(1→3)-l-α-d-HepIp-(1→5)-[PPEtn→4]-α-Kdop-(2→6)-lipid A. The structure has been elucidated using NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS(n)) on O-deacylated LPS and core oligosaccharide (OS) materials, as well as HPLC-ESI-MS(n) on permethylated, dephosphorylated OS. It was also found that a tetrasaccharide unit bearing sialic acid [α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)-β-d-Galp-(1→4)-β-d-GlcNAcp-(1→3)-β-d-Galp-(1→] could substitute O-4 of the β-d-Glcp linked to HepI. In addition, the distal heptose (HepIII) was substituted by PCho→6-β-d-Galp-(1→ at the O-2 position.

  3. Influenza-A infections in animals and birds and their significance in the epidemiology of human influenza-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurišić Slavko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this presentation is to point out at knowledge obtained so far through comparative analyses of the influenza-A virus, certain ecological and epizootiological aspects, and at the cases registered so far of the transfer of this virus among animals, animals and birds and humans. In this way, we believe we will help our professional public to take a more comprehensive view of the currently uncertain epizootiological (epidemiological situation regarding infections with influenza-A viruses in the world, and to secure preventive measures with due attention. New information is daily added to this matter, which is of wide-ranging aspects and, because of insufficient space, we have limited this work to the aspects which, because of insufficient space, we have limited this work to the aspects which are currently biologically the most significant. Consequently we have divided the entire presentation into the following sections Introduction with emphasis on the existence of large numbers of influenza-A viruses in nature, with a wide range of antigenic and biological characteristics in domestic and wild animals and birds, as well as on the fact that these viruses can be a potential source of so-called new pandemic viruses and pose a constant threat to human welfare. Results of comparative analyses of the influnza-A virus, with special emphasis on classification virion structure, genome structure and nomenclature, on the progressive mutation of the virus, known as antigenic drift, and the genetic recombination, known as antigenic shift. Influenza-A viruses in humans animals and birds with a presentation of subtypes and variants of the virus identified so far. Transfer of the virus among animals, birds and humans with a presentation of cases registered so far of virus transfer in nature as well as possibilities for experimental infections of calves, swine, mice hamsters, and squirrels with influenza-A viruses originating from birds. Concluding

  4. An Amphibian Host Defense Peptide Is Virucidal for Human H1 Hemagglutinin-Bearing Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthausen, David J; Lee, Song Hee; Kumar, Vineeth Tv; Bouvier, Nicole M; Krammer, Florian; Ellebedy, Ali H; Wrammert, Jens; Lowen, Anice C; George, Sanil; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna; Jacob, Joshy

    2017-04-18

    Although vaccines confer protection against influenza A viruses, antiviral treatment becomes the first line of defense during pandemics because there is insufficient time to produce vaccines. Current antiviral drugs are susceptible to drug resistance, and developing new antivirals is essential. We studied host defense peptides from the skin of the South Indian frog and demonstrated that one of these, which we named "urumin," is virucidal for H1 hemagglutinin-bearing human influenza A viruses. This peptide specifically targeted the conserved stalk region of H1 hemagglutinin and was effective against drug-resistant H1 influenza viruses. Using electron microscopy, we showed that this peptide physically destroyed influenza virions. It also protected naive mice from lethal influenza infection. Urumin represents a unique class of anti-influenza virucide that specifically targets the hemagglutinin stalk region, similar to targeting of antibodies induced by universal influenza vaccines. Urumin therefore has the potential to contribute to first-line anti-viral treatments during influenza outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influenza virus strains with a fusion threshold of pH 5.5 or lower are inhibited by amantadine. Brief report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E.Ph. Beyer (Walter); R.W.H. Ruigrok; H. van Driel; N. Masurel (Nic)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractNineteen influenza virus strains were examined for susceptibility to amantadine-HCl (AMT) and for pH-thresholds of haemagglutinin-induced haemolysis. Whereas pH-thresholds below 5.5 were not seen in AMT-resistant strains, AMT-sensitive strains showed pH-thresholds either below or above 5

  6. A systems approach to understanding human rhinovirus and influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taek-Kyun; Bheda-Malge, Anjali; Lin, Yakang; Sreekrishna, Koti; Adams, Rachel; Robinson, Michael K; Bascom, Charles C; Tiesman, Jay P; Isfort, Robert J; Gelinas, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinovirus and influenza virus infections of the upper airway lead to colds and the flu and can trigger exacerbations of lower airway diseases including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets are still needed to differentiate between the cold and the flu, since the clinical course of influenza can be severe while that of rhinovirus is usually more mild. In our investigation of influenza and rhinovirus infection of human respiratory epithelial cells, we used a systems approach to identify the temporally changing patterns of host gene expression from these viruses. After infection of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) with rhinovirus, influenza virus or co-infection with both viruses, we studied the time-course of host gene expression changes over three days. We modeled host responses to these viral infections with time and documented the qualitative and quantitative differences in innate immune activation and regulation.

  7. Avian influenza A virus PB2 promotes interferon type I inducing properties of a swine strain in porcine dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocana-Macchi, Manuela; Ricklin, Meret E.; Python, Sylvie; Monika, Gsell-Albert [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland); Stech, Juergen; Stech, Olga [Friedrich-Loeffler Institut, Greifswald-Insel Riems (Germany); Summerfield, Artur, E-mail: artur.summerfield@ivi.admin.ch [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland)

    2012-05-25

    The 2009 influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic resulted from reassortment of avian, human and swine strains probably in pigs. To elucidate the role of viral genes in host adaptation regarding innate immune responses, we focussed on the effect of genes from an avian H5N1 and a porcine H1N1 IAV on infectivity and activation of porcine GM-CSF-induced dendritic cells (DC). The highest interferon type I responses were achieved by the porcine virus reassortant containing the avian polymerase gene PB2. This finding was not due to differential tropism since all viruses infected DC equally. All viruses equally induced MHC class II, but porcine H1N1 expressing the avian viral PB2 induced more prominent nuclear NF-{kappa}B translocation compared to its parent IAV. The enhanced activation of DC may be detrimental or beneficial. An over-stimulation of innate responses could result in either pronounced tissue damage or increased resistance against IAV reassortants carrying avian PB2.

  8. High permissivity of human HepG2 hepatoma cells for influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollier, Laurence; Caramella, Anne; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2004-12-01

    Human HepG2 hepatoma cells are highly permissive for influenza virus type A and type B, even without the addition of trypsin, and they exhibit a marked cytopathic effect. This property greatly facilitates the primary isolation of influenza viruses. Virus replication was significantly reduced by the plasmin(ogen)-specific inhibitor tranexamic acid, and this suggests a potential role played by the plasminogen/tissue plasminogen activator complex at the surface of HepG2 cells. This might represent a new approach for study of the interrelations of this complex with influenza viruses.

  9. Functional testing of an inhalable nanoparticle based influenza vaccine using a human precision cut lung slice technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Neuhaus

    Full Text Available Annual outbreaks of influenza infections, caused by new influenza virus subtypes and high incidences of zoonosis, make seasonal influenza one of the most unpredictable and serious health threats worldwide. Currently available vaccines, though the main prevention strategy, can neither efficiently be adapted to new circulating virus subtypes nor provide high amounts to meet the global demand fast enough. New influenza vaccines quickly adapted to current virus strains are needed. In the present study we investigated the local toxicity and capacity of a new inhalable influenza vaccine to induce an antigen-specific recall response at the site of virus entry in human precision-cut lung slices (PCLS. This new vaccine combines recombinant H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin (HAC1, produced in tobacco plants, and a silica nanoparticle (NP-based drug delivery system. We found no local cellular toxicity of the vaccine within applicable concentrations. However higher concentrations of NP (≥10(3 µg/ml dose-dependently decreased viability of human PCLS. Furthermore NP, not the protein, provoked a dose-dependent induction of TNF-α and IL-1β, indicating adjuvant properties of silica. In contrast, we found an antigen-specific induction of the T cell proliferation and differentiation cytokine, IL-2, compared to baseline level (152±49 pg/mg vs. 22±5 pg/mg, which could not be seen for the NP alone. Additionally, treatment with 10 µg/ml HAC1 caused a 6-times higher secretion of IFN-γ compared to baseline (602±307 pg/mg vs. 97±51 pg/mg. This antigen-induced IFN-γ secretion was further boosted by the adjuvant effect of silica NP for the formulated vaccine to a 12-fold increase (97±51 pg/mg vs. 1226±535 pg/mg. Thus we were able to show that the plant-produced vaccine induced an adequate innate immune response and re-activated an established antigen-specific T cell response within a non-toxic range in human PCLS at the site of virus entry.

  10. Relationship of the quaternary structure of human secretory IgA to neutralization of influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tadaki; Kawaguchi, Akira; Ainai, Akira; Tamura, Shin-ichi; Ito, Ryo; Multihartina, Pretty; Setiawaty, Vivi; Pangesti, Krisna Nur Andriana; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Secretory IgA (S-IgA) antibodies, the major contributors to humoral mucosal immunity to influenza virus infection, are polymeric Igs present in many external secretions. In the present study, the quaternary structures of human S-IgA induced in nasal mucosa after administration of intranasal inactivated influenza vaccines were characterized in relation to neutralization potency against influenza A viruses. Human nasal IgA antibodies have been shown to contain at least five quaternary structures. Direct and real-time visualization of S-IgA using high-speed atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated that trimeric and tetrameric S-IgA had six and eight antigen-binding sites, respectively, and that these structures exhibited large-scale asynchronous conformational changes while capturing influenza HA antigens in solution. Furthermore, trimeric, tetrameric, and larger polymeric structures, which are minor fractions in human nasal IgA, displayed increased neutralizing potency against influenza A viruses compared with dimeric S-IgA, suggesting that the larger polymeric than dimeric forms of S-IgA play some important roles in protection against influenza A virus infection in the human upper respiratory tract. PMID:26056267

  11. Relationship of the quaternary structure of human secretory IgA to neutralization of influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tadaki; Kawaguchi, Akira; Ainai, Akira; Tamura, Shin-ichi; Ito, Ryo; Multihartina, Pretty; Setiawaty, Vivi; Pangesti, Krisna Nur Andriana; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2015-06-23

    Secretory IgA (S-IgA) antibodies, the major contributors to humoral mucosal immunity to influenza virus infection, are polymeric Igs present in many external secretions. In the present study, the quaternary structures of human S-IgA induced in nasal mucosa after administration of intranasal inactivated influenza vaccines were characterized in relation to neutralization potency against influenza A viruses. Human nasal IgA antibodies have been shown to contain at least five quaternary structures. Direct and real-time visualization of S-IgA using high-speed atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated that trimeric and tetrameric S-IgA had six and eight antigen-binding sites, respectively, and that these structures exhibited large-scale asynchronous conformational changes while capturing influenza HA antigens in solution. Furthermore, trimeric, tetrameric, and larger polymeric structures, which are minor fractions in human nasal IgA, displayed increased neutralizing potency against influenza A viruses compared with dimeric S-IgA, suggesting that the larger polymeric than dimeric forms of S-IgA play some important roles in protection against influenza A virus infection in the human upper respiratory tract.

  12. Reassortment patterns in Swine influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khiabanian

    Full Text Available Three human influenza pandemics occurred in the twentieth century, in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Influenza pandemic strains are the results of emerging viruses from non-human reservoirs to which humans have little or no immunity. At least two of these pandemic strains, in 1957 and in 1968, were the results of reassortments between human and avian viruses. Also, many cases of swine influenza viruses have reportedly infected humans, in particular, the recent H1N1 influenza virus of swine origin, isolated in Mexico and the United States. Pigs are documented to allow productive replication of human, avian, and swine influenza viruses. Thus it has been conjectured that pigs are the "mixing vessel" that create the avian-human reassortant strains, causing the human pandemics. Hence, studying the process and patterns of viral reassortment, especially in pigs, is a key to better understanding of human influenza pandemics. In the last few years, databases containing sequences of influenza A viruses, including swine viruses, collected since 1918 from diverse geographical locations, have been developed and made publicly available. In this paper, we study an ensemble of swine influenza viruses to analyze the reassortment phenomena through several statistical techniques. The reassortment patterns in swine viruses prove to be similar to the previous results found in human viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, that the surface glycoprotein coding segments reassort most often. Moreover, we find that one of the polymerase segments (PB1, reassorted in the strains responsible for the last two human pandemics, also reassorts frequently.

  13. Highly Pathogenic H5N1 and Novel H7N9 Influenza A Viruses Induce More Profound Proteomic Host Responses than Seasonal and Pandemic H1N1 Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Philippe François; McCorrister, Stuart; Hu, Pingzhao; Chong, Patrick; Silaghi, Alex; Westmacott, Garrett; Coombs, Kevin M; Kobasa, Darwyn

    2015-11-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) are important human and animal pathogens with potential for causing pandemics. IAVs exhibit a wide spectrum of clinical illness in humans, from relatively mild infections by seasonal strains to acute respiratory distress syndrome during infections with some highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. In the present study, we infected A549 human cells with seasonal H1N1 (sH1N1), 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pdmH1N1), or novel H7N9 and HPAI H5N1 strains. We used multiplexed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification to measure proteomic host responses to these different strains at 1, 3, and 6 h post-infection. Our analyses revealed that both H7N9 and H5N1 strains induced more profound changes to the A549 global proteome compared to those with low-pathogenicity H1N1 virus infection, which correlates with the higher pathogenicity these strains exhibit at the organismal level. Bioinformatics analysis revealed important modulation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) oxidative stress response in infection. Cellular fractionation and Western blotting suggested that the phosphorylated form of NRF2 is not imported to the nucleus in H5N1 and H7N9 virus infections. Fibronectin was also strongly inhibited in infection with H5N1 and H7N9 strains. This is the first known comparative proteomic study of the host response to H7N9, H5N1, and H1N1 viruses and the first time NRF2 is shown to be implicated in infection with highly pathogenic strains of influenza.

  14. Introductions and evolution of human-origin seasonal influenza a viruses in multinational swine populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Martha I; Wentworth, David E; Culhane, Marie R; Vincent, Amy L; Viboud, Cecile; LaPointe, Matthew P; Lin, Xudong; Holmes, Edward C; Detmer, Susan E

    2014-09-01

    The capacity of influenza A viruses to cross species barriers presents a continual threat to human and animal health. Knowledge of the human-swine interface is particularly important for understanding how viruses with pandemic potential evolve in swine hosts. We sequenced the genomes of 141 influenza viruses collected from North American swine during 2002 to 2011 and identified a swine virus that possessed all eight genome segments of human seasonal A/H3N2 virus origin. A molecular clock analysis indicates that this virus--A/sw/Saskatchewan/02903/2009(H3N2)--has likely circulated undetected in swine for at least 7 years. For historical context, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of an additional 1,404 whole-genome sequences from swine influenza A viruses collected globally during 1931 to 2013. Human-to-swine transmission occurred frequently over this time period, with 20 discrete introductions of human seasonal influenza A viruses showing sustained onward transmission in swine for at least 1 year since 1965. Notably, human-origin hemagglutinin (H1 and H3) and neuraminidase (particularly N2) segments were detected in swine at a much higher rate than the six internal gene segments, suggesting an association between the acquisition of swine-origin internal genes via reassortment and the adaptation of human influenza viruses to new swine hosts. Further understanding of the fitness constraints on the adaptation of human viruses to swine, and vice versa, at a genomic level is central to understanding the complex multihost ecology of influenza and the disease threats that swine and humans pose to each other. The swine origin of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscored the importance of understanding how influenza A virus evolves in these animals hosts. While the importance of reassortment in generating genetically diverse influenza viruses in swine is well documented, the role of human-to-swine transmission has not been as intensively studied. Through a

  15. Hydrogen peroxide scavenging is not a virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of Haemophilus influenzae type b strain Eagan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Beeumen Jozef J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A potentially lethal flux of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is continuously generated during aerobic metabolism. It follows that aerobic organisms have equipped themselves with specific H2O2 dismutases and H2O2 reductases, of which catalase and the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpR are the best-studied prokaryotic members. The sequenced Haemophilus influenzae Rd genome reveals one catalase, designated HktE, and no AhpR. However, Haemophilus influenzae type b strain Eagan (Hib, a causative agent of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in young children, disrupted in its hktE gene is not attenuated in virulence, and retains the ability to rapidly scavenge H2O2. This redundancy in H2O2-scavenging is accounted for by peroxidatic activity which specifically uses glutathione as the reducing substrate. Results We show here that inside acatalasaemic H. influenzae all of the residual peroxidatic activity is catalyzed by PGdx, a hybrid peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin glutathione-dependent peroxidase. In vitro kinetic assays on crude hktE- pgdx- H. influenzae Rd extracts revealed the presence of NAD(PH:peroxide oxidoreductase activity, which, however, appears to be physiologically insignificant because of its low affinity for H2O2 (Km = 1.1 mM. Hydroperoxidase-deficient hktE- pgdx- H. influenzae Rd showed a slightly affected aerobic growth phenotype in rich broth, while, in chemically defined medium, growth was completely inhibited by aerobic conditions, unless the medium contained an amino acid/vitamin supplement. To study the role of PGdx in virulence and to assess the requirement of H2O2-scavenging during the course of infection, both a pgdx single mutant and a pgdx/hktE double mutant of Hib were assayed for virulence in an infant rat model. The ability of both mutant strains to cause bacteremia was unaffected. Conclusion Catalase (HktE and a sole peroxidase (PGdx account for the majority of scavenging of metabolically generated H2O2 in the H

  16. Antibody titers against swine influenza subtypes determined by the hemagglutination inhibition test are highly dependent on the strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Nielsen, Jens; Bøtner, Anette

    In Denmark there are three circulating strains of swine influenza H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2. The H1N2 is different from the H1N2 subtypes circulating in other European countries. The Danish subtype is a reassortment between the two Danish circulating swine influenza subtypes H1N1 and H3N2. From...... a diagnostic and epidemiological point of view it is crucial to clarify whether the immunological response to one subtype protects against infection with the other subtype. The hemagglutination inhibition test (HI-test) has been used widely to determine the presence of antibodies in serum against influenza...... viruses. In the present study the HI-test was used to determine antibody response from experimental infected pigs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibody response against the new Danish influenza subtype H1N2 (H1N2dk) and to examine the level of crossprotection/reaction between the two...

  17. High Permissivity of Human HepG2 Hepatoma Cells for Influenza Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Ollier, Laurence; Caramella, Anne; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    Human HepG2 hepatoma cells are highly permissive for influenza virus type A and type B, even without the addition of trypsin, and they exhibit a marked cytopathic effect. This property greatly facilitates the primary isolation of influenza viruses. Virus replication was significantly reduced by the plasmin(ogen)-specific inhibitor tranexamic acid, and this suggests a potential role played by the plasminogen/tissue plasminogen activator complex at the surface of HepG2 cells. This might represe...

  18. Serum amyloid P component inhibits influenza A virus infections: in vitro and in vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, A; Andersen, I; Junker, K

    2001-01-01

    . These studies were extended to comprise five mouse-adapted influenza A strains, two swine influenza A strains, a mink influenza A virus, a ferret influenza A reassortant virus, a influenza B virus and a parainfluenza 3 virus. The HA activity of all these viruses was inhibited by SAP. Western blotting showed......Serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds in vitro Ca(2+)-dependently to several ligands including oligosaccharides with terminal mannose and galactose. We have earlier reported that SAP binds to human influenza A virus strains, inhibiting hemagglutinin (HA) activity and virus infectivity in vitro...... that SAP bound to HA trimers, monomers and HA1 and HA2 subunits of influenza A virus. Binding studies indicated that galactose, mannose and fucose moieties contributed to the SAP reacting site(s). Intranasal administration of human SAP to mice induced no demonstrable toxic reactions, and circulating...

  19. Biochemical, genetic, and epidemiologic characterization of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (Haemophilus aegyptius) strains associated with Brazilian purpuric fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, D J; Mayer, L W; Carlone, G M; Harrison, L H; Bibb, W F; Brandileone, M C; Sottnek, F O; Irino, K; Reeves, M W; Swenson, J M

    1988-08-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) is a recently recognized fulminant pediatric disease characterized by fever, with rapid progression to purpura, hypotensive shock, and death. BPF is usually preceded by purulent conjunctivitis that has resolved before the onset of fever. Both the conjunctivitis and BPF are caused by Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (formerly called H. aegyptius). Isolates from 15 BPF cases, mainly from blood or hemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid, case-associated isolates from 42 persons in towns where BPF cases occurred, and control strains from 32 persons in towns without BPF cases were characterized biochemically, genetically, and epidemiologically. Results indicated that a single clone was responsible for all BPF cases identified in six Brazilian towns from 1984 through 1986. All of 15 (100%) case strains were the same clone as was 1 of 32 (3%) control strains (P = less than 10(-8). Isolates of the clone were preferentially intrarelated by DNA hybridization (99% relatedness, hydroxyapatite method at 60 and 75 degrees C) and were separable from other H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains (approximately 90% relatedness at 60 degrees C and 82% relatedness at 75 degrees C). All isolates of the BPF clone and no other strains contained a 24-megadalton plasmid of restriction endonuclease type 3031, were of a single multilocus enzyme mobility type, were of a single sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis type, and were in one of two ribosomal DNA restriction patterns. All BPF clone isolates reacted with monoclonal antibodies produced from a case strain; only 3 of 62 (5%) other strains reacted with this monoclonal antibody. Ninety percent of BPF clone strains and 27% of other strains were relatively resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim.

  20. Antimicrobial resistance among invasive Haemophilus influenzae strains: results of a Brazilian study carried out from 1996 through 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casagrande S.T.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1712 strains of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from patients with invasive diseases were obtained from ten Brazilian states from 1996 to 2000. ß-Lactamase production was assessed and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone and rifampin were determined using a method for broth microdilution of Haemophilus test medium. The prevalence of strains producing ß-lactamase ranged from 6.6 to 57.7%, with an overall prevalence of 18.4%. High frequency of ß-lactamase-mediated ampicillin resistance was observed in Distrito Federal (25%, São Paulo (21.7% and Paraná (18.5%. Of the 1712 strains analyzed, none was ß-lactamase negative, ampicillin resistant. A total of 16.8% of the strains were resistant to chloramphenicol, and 13.8% of these also presented resistance to ampicillin, and only 3.0% were resistant to chloramphenicol alone. All strains were susceptible to ceftriaxone and rifampin and the MIC90 were 0.015 µg/ml and 0.25 µg/ml, respectively. Ceftriaxone is the drug of choice for empirical treatment of bacterial meningitis in pediatric patients who have not been screened for drug susceptibility. The emergence of drug resistance is a serious challenge for the management of invasive H. influenzae disease, which emphasizes the fundamental role of laboratory-based surveillance for antimicrobial resistance.

  1. Mx1 causes resistance against influenza A viruses in the Mus spretus-derived inbred mouse strain SPRET/Ei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlaere, Ineke; Vanderrijst, Ananza; Guénet, Jean-Louis; De Filette, Marina; Libert, Claude

    2008-04-01

    Inbred SPRET/Ei mice, derived from Mus spretus, were found to be extremely resistant to infection with a mouse adapted influenza A virus. The resistance was strongly linked to distal chromosome 16, where the interferon-inducible Mx1 gene is located. This gene encodes for the Mx1 protein which stimulates innate immunity to Orthomyxoviruses. The Mx1 gene is defective in most inbred mouse strains, but PCR revealed that SPRET/Ei carries a functional allele. The Mx1 proteins of M. spretus and A2G, the other major resistant strain derived from Mus musculus, share 95.7% identity. We were interested whether the sequence variations between the two Mx1 alleles have functional significance. To address this, we used congenic mouse strains containing the Mx1 gene from M. spretus or A2G in a C57BL/6 background. Using a highly pathogenic influenza virus strain, we found that the B6.spretus-Mx1 congenic mice were better protected against infection than the B6.A2G-Mx1 mice. This effect may be due to different Mx1 induction levels, as was shown by RT-PCR and Western blot. We conclude that SPRET/Ei is a novel Mx1-positive inbred strain useful to study the biology of Mx1.

  2. Cross-recognition of avian H5N1 influenza virus by human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte populations directed to human influenza A virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.C.M. Kreijtz (Joost); G. de Mutsert (Gerrie); C.A. van Baalen (Carel); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSince the number of human cases of infection with avian H5N1 influenza viruses is ever increasing, a pandemic outbreak caused by these viruses is feared. Therefore, in addition to virus-specific antibodies, there is considerable interest in immune correlates of protection against these v

  3. A Review of the Antiviral Susceptibility of Human and Avian Influenza Viruses over the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yuan Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antivirals play an important role in the prevention and treatment of influenza infections, particularly in high-risk or severely ill patients. Two classes of influenza antivirals have been available in many countries over the last decade (2004–2013, the adamantanes and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs. During this period, widespread adamantane resistance has developed in circulating influenza viruses rendering these drugs useless, resulting in the reliance on the most widely available NAI, oseltamivir. However, the emergence of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal A(H1N1 viruses in 2008 demonstrated that NAI-resistant viruses could also emerge and spread globally in a similar manner to that seen for adamantane-resistant viruses. Previously, it was believed that NAI-resistant viruses had compromised replication and/or transmission. Fortunately, in 2013, the majority of circulating human influenza viruses remain sensitive to all of the NAIs, but significant work by our laboratory and others is now underway to understand what enables NAI-resistant viruses to retain the capacity to replicate and transmit. In this review, we describe how the susceptibility of circulating human and avian influenza viruses has changed over the last ten years and describe some research studies that aim to understand how NAI-resistant human and avian influenza viruses may emerge in the future.

  4. A Novel H1N2 Influenza Virus Related to the Classical and Human Influenza Viruses from Pigs in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yafen; Wu, Xiaowei; Wang, Nianchen; Ouyang, Guowen; Qu, Nannan; Cui, Jin; Qi, Yan; Liao, Ming; Jiao, Peirong

    2016-01-01

    Southern China has long been considered to be an epicenter of pandemic influenza viruses. The special environment, breeding mode, and lifestyle in southern China provides more chances for wild aquatic birds, domestic poultry, pigs, and humans to be in contact. This creates the opportunity for interspecies transmission and generation of new influenza viruses. In this study, we reported a novel reassortant H1N2 influenza virus from pigs in southern China. According to the phylogenetic trees and homology of the nucleotide sequence, the virus was confirmed to be a novel triple-reassortant H1N2 virus containing genes from classical swine (PB2, PB1, HA, NP, and NS genes), triple-reassortant swine (PA and M genes), and recent human (NA gene) lineages. It indicated that the novel reassortment virus among human and swine influenza viruses occurred in pigs in southern China. The isolation of the novel reassortant H1N2 influenza viruses provides further evidence that pigs are "mixing vessels," and swine influenza virus surveillance in southern China will provide important information about genetic evaluation and antigenic variation of swine influenza virus to formulate the prevention and control measures for the viruses.

  5. A pandemic influenza vaccine in India: from strain to sale within 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhere, Rajeev; Yeolekar, Leena; Kulkarni, Prasad; Menon, Ravi; Vaidya, Vivek; Ganguly, Milan; Tyagi, Parikshit; Barde, Prajakt; Jadhav, Suresh

    2011-07-01

    In the event of a highly pathogenic influenza pandemic, the Indian subcontinent would need 1.2 billion doses of vaccine to immunize its entire population, double if two doses were required to assure immunity. Serum Institute of India Limited (SII) thus became one of six initial grantees of the World Health Organization (WHO) technology transfer initiative to create capacity in developing countries to manufacture H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccine. At the outbreak of the A(H1N1) 2009 influenza pandemic, experience gained from the H5N1 project was used to develop a live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), since this was the only option for the level of surge capacity required for a large-scale immunization campaign in India. SII took sustainability of its influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human Sentinel Surveillance of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viral Pathogens in Border Areas of Western Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ans Timmermans

    Full Text Available Little is known about circulation of influenza and other respiratory viruses in remote populations along the Thai-Cambodia border in western Cambodia. We screened 586 outpatients (median age 5, range 1-77 presenting with influenza-like-illness (ILI at 4 sentinel sites in western Cambodia between May 2010 and December 2012. Real-time reverse transcriptase (rRT PCR for influenza was performed on combined nasal and throat specimens followed by viral culture, antigenic analysis, antiviral susceptibility testing and full genome sequencing for phylogenetic analysis. ILI-specimens negative for influenza were cultured, followed by rRT-PCR for enterovirus and rhinovirus (EV/RV and EV71. Influenza was found in 168 cases (29% and occurred almost exclusively in the rainy season from June to November. Isolated influenza strains had close antigenic and phylogenetic relationships, matching vaccine and circulating strains found elsewhere in Cambodia. Influenza vaccination coverage was low (<20%. Western Cambodian H1N1(2009 isolate genomes were more closely related to 10 earlier Cambodia isolates (94.4% genome conservation than to 13 Thai isolates (75.9% genome conservation, despite sharing the majority of the amino acid changes with the Thai references. Most genes showed signatures of purifying selection. Viral culture detected only adenovirus (5.7% and parainfluenza virus (3.8%, while non-polio enteroviruses (10.3% were detected among 164 culture-negative samples including coxsackievirus A4, A6, A8, A9, A12, B3, B4 and echovirus E6 and E9 using nested RT-PCR methods. A single specimen of EV71 was found. Despite proximity to Thailand, influenza epidemiology of these western Cambodian isolates followed patterns observed elsewhere in Cambodia, continuing to support current vaccine and treatment recommendations from the Cambodian National Influenza Center. Amino acid mutations at non-epitope sites, particularly hemagglutinin genes, require further investigation in

  7. Brief literature review for the WHO global influenza research agenda--highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 risk in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kerkhove, Maria D

    2013-09-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses remain a significant health threat to humans given the continued rare occurrence of human cases with a high case fatality rate. This brief literature review summarizes available evidence of risk factors for H5N1 infection in humans and updates a recent systematic review published in early 2011. Several epidemiologic studies have been published to evaluate the risk factors for H5N1 infection in humans, including contact with poultry and poultry products and non-poultry-related contact such as from H5N1-contaminated water. While most H5N1 cases are attributed to exposure to sick poultry, it is unclear how many may be due to human-to-human transmission. The collective results of published literature suggest that transmission risk of H5N1 from poultry to humans may be highest among individuals who may have been in contact with the highest potential concentrations of virus shed by poultry. This suggests that there may be a threshold of virus concentration needed for effective transmission and that circulating H5N1 strains have not yet mutated to transmit readily from either poultry to human or from human to human. However, the mode of potential transmission can be quite varied throughout different countries and by study with exposures ranging from visiting a wet market, preparing infected poultry for consumption, to swimming or bathing in ponds frequented by poultry. Several important data gaps remain in the understanding of the epidemiology of H5N1 in humans and limit our ability to interpret the results of the available H5N1 seroepidemiologic studies.

  8. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Carlos J; Toro, Maria F; Aguirre, Carlos; Bustamante, Alberto; Hernandez, Mariluz; Arango, Liliana P; Echeverry, Marta; Arango, Ana E; Prada, Maria C; Alarcon, Herminia del P; Rojas, Mauricio

    2007-06-01

    Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40) against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  9. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Montoya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40 against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  10. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor Nogales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influenza virus allows for the reassortment between two or more viruses within a co-infected cell, and this characteristic has also been harnessed in the laboratory to generate reassortant viruses for their use as either inactivated or live-attenuated influenza vaccines. With the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques, it is now possible to engineer recombinant influenza viruses entirely from full-length complementary DNA copies of the viral genome by transfection of susceptible cells. These reverse genetics systems have provided investigators with novel and powerful approaches to answer important questions about the biology of influenza viruses, including the function of viral proteins, their interaction with cellular host factors and the mechanisms of influenza virus transmission and pathogenesis. In addition, reverse genetics techniques have allowed the generation of recombinant influenza viruses, providing a powerful technology to develop both inactivated and live-attenuated influenza vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of state-of-the-art, plasmid-based, influenza reverse genetics approaches and their implementation to provide rapid, convenient, safe and more effective influenza inactivated or live-attenuated vaccines.

  11. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Aitor; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influenza virus allows for the reassortment between two or more viruses within a co-infected cell, and this characteristic has also been harnessed in the laboratory to generate reassortant viruses for their use as either inactivated or live-attenuated influenza vaccines. With the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques, it is now possible to engineer recombinant influenza viruses entirely from full-length complementary DNA copies of the viral genome by transfection of susceptible cells. These reverse genetics systems have provided investigators with novel and powerful approaches to answer important questions about the biology of influenza viruses, including the function of viral proteins, their interaction with cellular host factors and the mechanisms of influenza virus transmission and pathogenesis. In addition, reverse genetics techniques have allowed the generation of recombinant influenza viruses, providing a powerful technology to develop both inactivated and live-attenuated influenza vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of state-of-the-art, plasmid-based, influenza reverse genetics approaches and their implementation to provide rapid, convenient, safe and more effective influenza inactivated or live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:28025504

  12. Broad-range neutralizing anti-influenza A human monoclonal antibodies: new perspectives in therapy and prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Nicola; Criscuolo, Elena; Castelli, Matteo; Clementi, Massimo

    2012-10-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against different subtypes of influenza A viruses are novel tools for the potential development of effective anti-influenza prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. In both cases, the main candidates for passive transfer and new vaccine development are represented by protective mAbs directed against influenza hemagglutinin (HA). A large number of mAbs directed against influenza HA has been developed to date. However, even if they can be useful and contribute to develop new vaccinal strategies, only few of them can be a good candidate for human administration. In this review, we will describe the most relevant human mAb directed against influenza HA able to recognize highly divergent influenza isolates and possibly useful for human therapy and prophylaxis.

  13. Genetic characterization of human influenza viruses in the pandemic (2009-2010) and post-pandemic (2010-2011) periods in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapat, Isolde C; Dapat, Clyde; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Yasushi; Kondo, Hiroki; Shobugawa, Yugo; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus was first detected in Japan in May 2009 and continued to circulate in the 2010-2011 season. This study aims to characterize human influenza viruses circulating in Japan in the pandemic and post-pandemic periods and to determine the prevalence of antiviral-resistant viruses. Respiratory specimens were collected from patients with influenza-like illness on their first visit at outpatient clinics during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons. Cycling probe real-time PCR assays were performed to screen for antiviral-resistant strains. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the HA and NA genes were done to characterize circulating strains. In the pandemic period (2009-2010), the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus was the only circulating strain isolated. None of the 601 A(H1N1)pdm09 virus isolates had the H275Y substitution in NA (oseltamivir resistance) while 599/601 isolates (99.7%) had the S31N substitution in M2 (amantadine resistance). In the post-pandemic period (2010-2011), cocirculation of different types and subtypes of influenza viruses was observed. Of the 1,278 samples analyzed, 414 (42.6%) were A(H1N1)pdm09, 525 (54.0%) were A(H3N2) and 33 (3.4%) were type-B viruses. Among A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates, 2 (0.5%) were oseltamivir-resistant and all were amantadine-resistant. Among A(H3N2) viruses, 520 (99.0%) were amantadine-resistant. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses from the post-pandemic period showed further evolution from the pandemic period viruses. For viruses that circulated in 2010-2011, strain predominance varied among prefectures. In Hokkaido, Niigata, Gunma and Nagasaki, A(H3N2) viruses (A/Perth/16/2009-like) were predominant whereas, in Kyoto, Hyogo and Osaka, A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses (A/New_York/10/2009-like) were predominant. Influenza B Victoria(HA)-Yamagata(NA) reassortant viruses (B/Brisbane/60/2008-like) were predominant while a small proportion was in Yamagata lineage. Genetic

  14. Selection for phase variation of LOS biosynthetic genes frequently occurs in progression of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae infection from the nasopharynx to the middle ear of human patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L Fox

    Full Text Available Surface structures in Haemophilus influenzae are subject to rapid ON/OFF switching of expression, a process termed phase variation. We analyse tetranucleotide repeats controlling phase variation in lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS genes of H. influenzae in paired isolates from both the nasopharynx and middle ears of paediatric patients with chronic or recurrent otitis media. A change in expression of at least one of the seven phase variable LOS biosynthesis genes was seen in 12 of the 21 strain pairs. Several strains showed switching of expression in multiple LOS genes, consistent with a key role for phase variable LOS biosynthetic genes in human infection.

  15. Determination of efficacious vaccine seed strains for use against Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses through antigenic cartography and in vivo challenge studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 2006, there have been reported outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in vaccinated chickens in Africa and Asia. This study provides experimental data for selection of efficacious H5N1 vaccine seed strains against recently circulating strains of H5N1 HPAI viruses in Egypt....

  16. Differences in iron acquisition from human haemoglobin among strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashida, H.; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    . actinomycetemcomitans strains examined harboured a single genomic sequence with homology to the hgpA gene encoding haemoglobin-binding protein A in Haemophilus influenzae. However, in all three strains belonging to the JP2 clone and in one serotype e strain hgpA was a pseudogene. Seven other strains possessed...

  17. Epidemiology of human influenza A(H7N9) infection in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yiu-Hong; To, May-Kei; Lam, Tsz-Sum; Yau, Shui-Wah; Leung, Oi-Shan; Chuang, Shuk-Kwan

    2017-04-01

    We conducted a case series study to review the epidemiology of human influenza A(H7N9) infection reported in Hong Kong. We reviewed case records of confirmed human cases of influenza A(H7N9) infection reported in Hong Kong in the 2013-2014 winter season. We compared the median viral shedding duration and interval from illness onset to initiation of oseltamivir treatment between severe and mild cases. We estimated the incubation period of influenza A(H7N9) virus from cases with a single known date of poultry exposure. A total of 10 cases were reported and all were imported infection from Mainland China. Four patients died and the cause of death was related to influenza A(H7N9) infection in two patients. The median interval from illness onset to initiation of oseltamivir treatment for the severe cases (4.5 days) was significantly longer than the mild cases (2 days; p = 0.025). Severe cases had a significantly longer viral shedding duration than mild cases (p = 0.028). The median incubation period for cases with a single known exposure date was 4 days. Nasopharyngeal aspirate taken from the 88 close contacts of the 10 patients all tested negative for influenza A virus using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Delayed administration of antiviral treatment may be associated with a more severe illness for influenza A(H7N9) infection. Despite our aggressive contact tracing policy with laboratory testing of all close contacts, no secondary case was identified which implied that the potential of human-to-human transmission of the circulating influenza A(H7N9) virus remains low. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Reduced influenza viral neutralizing activity of natural human trimers of surfactant protein D

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    Sorensen Grith L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV infection. Common human polymorphisms of SP-D have been found in many human populations and associated with increased risk of certain infections. We recently reported that the Thr/Thr 11 form of SP-D is associated with low serum levels and assembles predominantly as trimers as opposed to the more common multimeric forms of SP-D. Methods Preliminary experiments were done to establish the effects of different monoclonal antibodies against SP-D on ability of SP-D to bind to or neutralize the virus. We then purified natural human trimeric and multimeric forms of SP-D from amniotic fluid and tested ability of these preparations to bind to IAV, to inhibit infectivity and hemagglutination activity of IAV in vitro. Results In initial experiments mAbs directed against different areas on the CRD of SP-D were found to have differing effects on antiviral activity. Using an mAb that did not interfere with antiviral activity of SP-D, we confirm that natural SP-D trimers had reduced ability to bind to IAV. In addition, the trimers had reduced ability to neutralize IAV as compared to natural human SP-D multimers as well as reduced hemagglutination inhibiting activity against several strains of IAV. Natural SP-D trimers also had different interactions with human neutrophil peptide defensins (HNPs in viral neutralization assays as compared to multimeric SP-D. Conclusion These studies indicate that a common human polymorphic form of SP-D may modulate host defense against IAV and give impetus to clinical studies correlating this genotype with risk for IAV infection in susceptible groups. We also show that mAbs directed against different areas on the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D can be useful for dissecting out different functional properties of the protein.

  19. Prediction of biological functions on glycosylation site migrations in human influenza H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shisheng; Wang, Qinzhe; Zhao, Fei; Chen, Wentian; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Protein glycosylation alteration is typically employed by various viruses for escaping immune pressures from their hosts. Our previous work had shown that not only the increase of glycosylation sites (glycosites) numbers, but also glycosite migration might be involved in the evolution of human seasonal influenza H1N1 viruses. More importantly, glycosite migration was likely a more effectively alteration way for the host adaption of human influenza H1N1 viruses. In this study, we provided more bioinformatics and statistic evidences for further predicting the significant biological functions of glycosite migration in the host adaptation of human influenza H1N1 viruses, by employing homology modeling and in silico protein glycosylation of representative HA and NA proteins as well as amino acid variability analysis at antigenic sites of HA and NA. The results showed that glycosite migrations in human influenza viruses have at least five possible functions: to more effectively mask the antigenic sites, to more effectively protect the enzymatic cleavage sites of neuraminidase (NA), to stabilize the polymeric structures, to regulate the receptor binding and catalytic activities and to balance the binding activity of hemagglutinin (HA) with the release activity of NA. The information here can provide some constructive suggestions for the function research related to protein glycosylation of influenza viruses, although these predictions still need to be supported by experimental data.

  20. Antigenic Patterns and Evolution of the Human Influenza A (H1N1) Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mi; Zhao, Xiang; Hua, Sha; Du, Xiangjun; Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiyan; Lan, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Wu, Aiping; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2015-09-28

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus causes seasonal epidemics that result in severe illnesses and deaths almost every year. A deep understanding of the antigenic patterns and evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus is extremely important for its effective surveillance and prevention. Through development of antigenicity inference method for human influenza A (H1N1), named PREDAC-H1, we systematically mapped the antigenic patterns and evolution of the human influenza A (H1N1) virus. Eight dominant antigenic clusters have been inferred for seasonal H1N1 viruses since 1977, which demonstrated sequential replacements over time with a similar pattern in Asia, Europe and North America. Among them, six clusters emerged first in Asia. As for China, three of the eight antigenic clusters were detected in South China earlier than in North China, indicating the leading role of South China in H1N1 transmission. The comprehensive view of the antigenic evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus can help formulate better strategy for its prevention and control.

  1. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza virus infections in swine were first noticed in the US in 1918, during the human pandemic of the Spanish flu. In Europe, seroprevalences for the three most common swine influenza strains at the moment, H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2, range from 20-80% in finishing pigs at the end of the finishing per

  2. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza virus infections in swine were first noticed in the US in 1918, during the human pandemic of the Spanish flu. In Europe, seroprevalences for the three most common swine influenza strains at the moment, H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2, range from 20-80% in finishing pigs at the end of the finishing

  3. Eccentric exercise as an adjuvant to influenza vaccination in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kate M; Burns, Victoria E; Allen, Louise M; McPhee, Jamie S; Bosch, Jos A; Carroll, Douglas; Drayson, Mark; Ring, Christopher

    2007-02-01

    The immune response to vaccination in animals can be enhanced by exposure to acute stress at the time of vaccination. The efficacy of this adjuvant strategy for vaccination in humans requires investigation. The current study employed a randomised controlled trial design to examine the effects of eccentric exercise prior to influenza vaccination on the antibody and cell-mediated responses. Sixty young healthy adults (29 men, 31 women) performed eccentric contractions of the deltoid and biceps brachii muscles of the non-dominant arm (exercise group) or rested quietly (control group), and were vaccinated 6h later in the non-dominant arm. Change in arm circumference and pain were measured to assess the physiological response to exercise. Antibody titres were measured pre-vaccination and at 6- and 20-week follow-ups. Interferon-gamma in response to in vitro stimulation by the whole vaccine, an index of the cell-mediated response, was measured 8 weeks post-vaccination. Interferon-gamma responses were enhanced by exercise in men, whereas antibody titres were enhanced by eccentric exercise in women but not in men. Men showed greater increase in arm circumference after eccentric exercise than women but there was no difference in reported pain. The interferon-gamma response was positively associated with the percentage increase in arm circumference among the exercise group. Eccentric exercise exerted differential effects on the response to vaccination in men and women, with enhancement of the antibody response in women, but enhancement of the cell-mediated response in men. Eccentric exercise of the muscle at the site of vaccine administration should be explored further as a possible behavioural adjuvant to vaccination.

  4. Variable number of tandem repeats in clinical strains of Haemophilus influenzae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); S. Scherer; D. Willemse; L. van Alphen (Loek); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAn algorithm capable of identifying short repeat motifs was developed and used to screen the whole genome sequence available for Haemophilus influenzae, since some of these repeats have been shown to affect bacterial virulence. Various di- to hexanucleotide

  5. Proteomic expression profiling of Haemophilus influenzae grown in pooled human sputum from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease reveal antioxidant and stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer Aimee L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae colonizes and infects the airways of adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the fourth most common cause of death worldwide.Thus, H. influenzae, an exclusively human pathogen, has adapted to survive in the hostile environment of the human airways.To characterize proteins expressed by H. influenzae in the airways, a prototype strain was grown in pooled human sputum to simulate conditions in the human respiratory tract.The proteins from whole bacterial cell lysates were solubilized with a strong buffer and then quantitatively cleaned with an optimized precipitation/on-pellet enzymatic digestion procedure.Proteomic profiling was accomplished by Nano-flow liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy with low void volume and high separation efficiency with a shallow, long gradient. Results A total of 1402 proteins were identified with high confidence, including 170 proteins that were encoded by genes that are annotated as conserved hypothetical proteins.Thirty-one proteins were present in greater abundance in sputum-grown conditions at a ratio of > 1.5 compared to chemically defined media.These included 8 anti-oxidant and 5 stress-related proteins, suggesting that expression of antioxidant activity and stress responses is important for survival in the airways.Four proteins involved in uptake of divalent anions and 9 proteins that function in uptake of various molecules were present in greater abundance in sputum-grown conditions. Conclusions Proteomic expression profiling of H. influenzae grown in pooled human sputum revealed increased expression of antioxidant, stress-response proteins and cofactor and nutrient uptake systems compared to media grown cells.These observations suggest that H. influenzae adapts to the oxidative and nutritionally limited conditions of the airways in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by increasing expression of molecules necessary for survival

  6. Post-pandemic seroprevalence of human influenza viruses in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Ali, Ahmed; Daniels, Joshua B; Lee, Chang-Won

    2016-12-30

    The continuous exposure of cats to diverse influenza viruses raises the concern of a potential role of cats in the epidemiology of these viruses. Our previous seroprevalence study of domestic cat sera collected during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic wave (September 2009-September 2010) revealed a high prevalence of pandemic H1N1, as well as seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 human flu virus infection (22.5%, 33.0%, and 43.5%, respectively). In this study, we extended the serosurvey of influenza viruses in cat sera collected post-pandemic (June 2011-August 2012). A total of 432 cat sera were tested using the hemagglutination inhibition assay. The results showed an increase in pandemic H1N1 prevalence (33.6%) and a significant reduction in both seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 prevalence (10.9% and 17.6%, respectively) compared to our previous survey conducted during the pandemic wave. The pandemic H1N1 prevalence in cats showed an irregular seasonality pattern in the post-pandemic phase. Pandemic H1N1 reactivity was more frequent among female cats than male cats. In contrast to our earlier finding, no significant association between clinical respiratory disease and influenza virus infection was observed. Our study highlights a high susceptibility among cats to human influenza virus infection that is correlated with influenza prevalence in the human population.

  7. Prophylactic and therapeutic activity of fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against Influenza A M2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwerder Myriam

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influenza virus infection is a prevalent disease in humans. Antibodies against hemagglutinin have been shown to prevent infection and hence hemagglutinin is the major constituent of current vaccines. Antibodies directed against the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 have also been shown to mediate protection against Influenza A infection in various animal models. Active vaccination is generally considered the best approach to combat viral diseases. However, passive immunization is an attractive alternative, particularly in acutely exposed or immune compromized individuals, young children and the elderly. We recently described a novel method for the rapid isolation of natural human antibodies by mammalian cell display. Here we used this approach to isolate human monoclonal antibodies directed against the highly conserved extracellular domain of the Influenza A M2 protein. The identified antibodies bound M2 peptide with high affinities, recognized native cell-surface expressed M2 and protected mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Moreover, therapeutic treatment up to 2 days after infection was effective, suggesting that M2-specific monoclonals have a great potential as immunotherapeutic agents against Influenza infection.

  8. Virus-neutralizing antibody response of mice to consecutive infection with human and avian influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulíková, J; Stropkovská, A; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Varečková, E

    2015-06-01

    In this work we simulated in a mouse model a naturally occurring situation of humans, who overcame an infection with epidemic strains of influenza A, and were subsequently exposed to avian influenza A viruses (IAV). The antibody response to avian IAV in mice previously infected with human IAV was analyzed. We used two avian IAV (A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) and the attenuated virus rA/Viet Nam/1203-2004 (H5N1)) as well as two human IAV isolates (virus A/Mississippi/1/1985 (H3N2) of medium virulence and A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) of high virulence). Two repeated doses of IAV of H4 or of H5 virus elicited virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice. Exposure of animals previously infected with human IAV (of H3 or H1 subtype) to IAV of H4 subtype led to the production of antibodies neutralizing H4 virus in a level comparable with the level of antibodies against the human IAV used for primary infection. In contrast, no measurable levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies specific to H5 virus were detected in mice infected with H5 virus following a previous infection with human IAV. In both cases the secondary infection with avian IAV led to a significant increase of the titer of VN antibodies specific to the corresponding human virus used for primary infection. Moreover, cross-reactive HA2-specific antibodies were also induced by sequential infection. By virtue of these results we suggest that the differences in the ability of avian IAV to induce specific antibodies inhibiting virus replication after previous infection of mice with human viruses can have an impact on the interspecies transmission and spread of avian IAV in the human population.

  9. Prolonged excretion of a low-pathogenicity H5N2 avian influenza virus strain in the Pekin duck

    OpenAIRE

    Carranza-Flores, José Manuel; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; García-Espinosa, Gary

    2013-01-01

    H5N2 strains of low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) have been circulating for at least 17 years in some Mexican chicken farms. We measured the rate and duration of viral excretion from Pekin ducks that were experimentally inoculated with an H5N2 LPAIV that causes death in embryonated chicken eggs (A/chicken/Mexico/2007). Leghorn chickens were used as susceptible host controls. The degree of viral excretion was evaluated with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactio...

  10. rRNA gene restriction patterns of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains associated with Brazilian purpuric fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irino, K; Grimont, F; Casin, I; Grimont, P A

    1988-08-01

    The rRNA gene restriction patterns of 92 isolates of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius, associated with conjunctivitis or Brazilian purpuric fever in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were studied with 16 + 23S rRNA from Escherichia coli as a probe. All strains were classified into 15 patterns. Isolates from Brazilian purpuric fever cases were seen only in patterns 3 (most frequently) and 4 (rarely), whereas isolates from conjunctivitis were found in all 15 patterns. The study demonstrated that rRNA from E. coli can serve as a probe for molecular epidemiology.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF TEST KIT FOR DETECTION OF PANDEMIC STRAIN INFLUENZA VIRUS A (H1N1 2009 BY REAL TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Stepaniuk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses A play an important role in the structure of the incidence of people with acute respiratory viral infection, which make up 90% from all other infectious diseases. According to the World Health Organization, only severe flu worldwide suffer annually 3.5 million, of which 45–60% are children. An economic loss from seasonal flu epidemic is in average about 85% of economic losses from infectious diseases in general. The experience of fighting the flu, accumulated over the years, has shown that to develop and deliver effective preventive measures necessary to build a system of permanent monitoring for influenza virus circulation, based on use of laboratory methods for accurate and rapid dentification and characterization of circulating strains of influenza virus A. Among the methods of laboratory diagnosis of influenza, the most effective is a method of polymerase chain reaction. Data on the evelopment of diagnostic test kits in the format of two-stage multiplex RTPCR-analysis for detection and genotyping of pandemic influenza virus A (H1N12009 are given. The results of laboratory and experimental research of «DIA Influenza H1N1» test system showed that it is effective and specific for detection of California pandemic influenza virus A (H1N12009 strains and can be used to diagnose disease caused by this strain of virus. Clinical trial of the course of the State registration by Ministry of Health of Ukraine have shown sensitivity and specificity of «DIA Influenza H1N1» test systems up to 100%.

  12. Prevalence of antibodies to European porcine influenza viruses in humans living in high pig density areas of Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumbholz, Andi; Lange, Jeannette; Dürrwald, Ralf; Walther, Mario; Müller, Thomas H; Kühnel, Detlef; Wutzler, Peter; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Zell, Roland

    2014-02-01

    The risk of zoonotic human infection caused by European porcine influenza virus strains was estimated in German regions with a high pig density. Sera from 622 healthy volunteers were collected between April 2009 and November 2011, mainly in Westphalia and western Lower Saxony. These included 362 subjects with occupational contact to pigs and 260 blood donors without any direct exposition to pigs. Samples were analysed by the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay against a panel of six swine viruses of subtypes avian-like H1N1 and human-like H3N2 as well as against human H1N1 and H3N2 viruses including the pandemic H1N1 strain of 2009. Reciprocal HI titres ≥20 were quoted as seroreactive. Compared to the control group, a significantly higher proportion of subjects with direct contact to pigs exhibited seroreactivity against porcine antigens of the avian-like H1N1 (37.0 %/7.7 %), the human-like H3N2 (59.7 %/43.1 %), the pandemic H1N1 strain of 2009 (51.7 %/26.5 %) and against a historic seasonal H3N2 strain that is closely related antigenetically to currently circulating human-like H3N2 viruses of European pigs (57.5 %/36.5 %). This trend was also observed when a reciprocal HI titre ≥40 was chosen as cut-off. Particularly, in younger subjects, the differences in seroreactivity against porcine strains between the exposed and non-exposed group were significant. The data indicate a higher risk of infection in the exposed individuals.

  13. Theoretical and practical exploration of vision building in human influenza pandemic prevention & control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PengKong; YanKong; XuJiang; XiaohuaWang

    2010-01-01

    This article introduced the vision building concept about human influenza pandemic prevention and control. Different visions were built by creating different shapes of building blocks which also represented different organizations and physical facilities, respectively. The around-view reflection is required to be developed in the process of building so as to search for the ideal pattern. The correlation of all sectors and systems are established to combine different kinds of things, from one family to another, from communities, towns, counties, cities, rural areas, provinces to the state to handle trivial problems. These training objectives have been successfully accomplished, which has not only enriched the knowledge about prevention and control of influenza pandemic between different departments but also clarified the roles and responsibility. It lays the firm foundation for next cooperation between different departments, and make a bridge for the objective and choice of channel over human influenza pandemic prevention and control.

  14. A new model for simulating evolution of human influenza virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Understanding the evolution of influenza A virus, which poses a global challenge to public health, is of special significance for its control and prevention. Although the genome structure of the virus is seemingly simple, their evolutionary patterns and molecular mechanisms are difficult to reveal.

  15. Reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus with circulating human and avian influenza viruses: public health risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stincarelli, Maria; Arvia, Rosaria; De Marco, Maria Alessandra; Clausi, Valeria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Cotti, Claudia; Delogu, Mauro; Donatelli, Isabella; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Exploring the reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A/H1N1pdm09) influenza virus with other circulating human or avian influenza viruses is the main concern related to the generation of more virulent or new variants having implications for public health. After different coinfection experiments in human A549 cells, by using the A/H1N1pdm09 virus plus one of human seasonal influenza viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtype or one of H11, H10, H9, H7 and H1 avian influenza viruses, several reassortant viruses were obtained. Among these, the HA of H1N1 was the main segment of human seasonal influenza virus reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Conversely, HA and each of the three polymerase segments, alone or in combination, of the avian influenza viruses mainly reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Of note, A/H1N1pdm09 viruses that reassorted with HA of H1N1 seasonal human or H11N6 avian viruses or carried different combination of avian origin polymerase segments, exerted a higher replication effectiveness than that of the parental viruses. These results confirm that reassortment of the A/H1N1pdm09 with circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses should not be misjudged in the prediction of the next pandemic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria in the human airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Influenza is an acute infection of the respiratory tract, which affects each year millions of people. Influenza virus infection is initiated by the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) through receptor binding and fusion of viral and endosomal membranes. HA is synthesized as a precursor protein and requires cleavage by host cell proteases to gain its fusion capacity. Although cleavage of HA is crucial for virus infectivity, little was known about relevant proteases in the human airways for a long time. Recent progress in the identification and characterization of HA-activating host cell proteases has been considerable however and supports the idea of targeting HA cleavage as a novel approach for influenza treatment. Interestingly, certain bacteria have been demonstrated to support HA activation either by secreting proteases that cleave HA or due to activation of cellular proteases and thereby may contribute to virus spread and enhanced pathogenicity. In this review, we give an overview on activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria with the main focus on recent progress on HA cleavage by proteases HAT and TMPRSS2 in the human airway epithelium. In addition, we outline investigations of HA-activating proteases as potential drug targets for influenza treatment. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influenza B-cells protective epitope characterization: a passkey for the rational design of new broad-range anti-influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Nicola; Criscuolo, Elena; Castelli, Matteo; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-11-14

    The emergence of new influenza strains causing pandemics represents a serious threat to human health. From 1918, four influenza pandemics occurred, caused by H1N1, H2N2 and H3N2 subtypes. Moreover, in 1997 a novel influenza avian strain belonging to the H5N1 subtype infected humans. Nowadays, even if its transmission is still circumscribed to avian species, the capability of the virus to infect humans directly from avian reservoirs can result in fatalities. Moreover, the risk that this or novel avian strains could adapt to inter-human transmission, the development of resistance to anti-viral drugs and the lack of an effective prevention are all incumbent problems for the world population. In this scenario, the identification of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against conserved regions shared among influenza isolates has raised hopes for the development of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy and "universal" anti-influenza vaccines.

  18. Novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus attaches to epithelium in both upper and lower respiratory tract of humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); M.T. de Graaf (Marieke); J.Y. Siegers (Jurre); K.R. Short (Kirsty); M.I. Spronken (Monique); E.J.A. Schrauwen (Eefje); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza A viruses from animal reservoirs have the capacity to adapt to humans and cause influenza pandemics. The occurrence of an influenza pandemic requires efficient virus transmission among humans, which is associated with virus attachment to the upper respiratory tract. Pandemic se

  19. An integrated, multistudy analysis of the safety of Ann Arbor strain live attenuated influenza vaccine in children aged 2–17 years

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrose, Christopher S.; Yi, Tingting; Falloon, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Background Trivalent, Ann Arbor strain, live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is approved in several countries for use in eligible children aged ≥2 years. Objective To describe the safety of Ann Arbor strain LAIV in children aged 2–17 years. Methods An integrated analysis of randomized, controlled trials of LAIV. Results A total of 4245 and 10 693 children received ≥1 dose of LAIV in year 1 of 6 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV)-controlled and 14 placebo-controlled studies, res...

  20. Bird Flu Strain May Have Jumped from Cat to Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162717.html Bird Flu Strain May Have Jumped From Cat to ... would be the first known transmission of this bird flu strain from cat to human, officials said. ...

  1. Pandemic Influenza and Canada's Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne M Langley

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatricians and others who care for children are familiar with the regular epidemic of respiratory illnesses that accompanies the annual visit of influenza virus each winter. In recent years, media interest in new strains of influenza has generated much public interest in, and often anxiety about, the threat of an influenza pandemic. Around the world, local, regional and national jurisdictions are engaged in contingency planning for the inevitable surge of illness, shortage of human and material resources, and societal disruption that is expected to accompany this event. In the present Paediatric Infectious Disease Note, we review briefly the potential implications of pandemic influenza for Canadian children, and the actions that paediatricians and others who care for children can take to prepare for this inevitable event.

  2. Infection and pathogenesis of canine, equine, and human influenza viruses in canine tracheas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gaelle; Marshall, John F; Morrell, Joanna; Robb, David; McCauley, John W; Perez, Daniel R; Parrish, Colin R; Murcia, Pablo R

    2014-08-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) can jump species barriers and occasionally cause epidemics, epizootics, pandemics, and panzootics. Characterizing the infection dynamics at the target tissues of natural hosts is central to understanding the mechanisms that control host range, tropism, and virulence. Canine influenza virus (CIV; H3N8) originated after the transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) into dogs. Thus, comparing CIV and EIV isolates provides an opportunity to study the determinants of influenza virus emergence. Here we characterize the replication of canine, equine, and human IAVs in the trachea of the dog, a species to which humans are heavily exposed. We define a phenotype of infection for CIV, which is characterized by high levels of virus replication and extensive tissue damage. CIV was compared to evolutionarily distinct EIVs, and the early EIV isolates showed an impaired ability to infect dog tracheas, while EIVs that circulated near the time of CIV emergence exhibited a CIV-like infection phenotype. Inoculating dog tracheas with various human IAVs (hIAVs) showed that they infected the tracheal epithelium with various efficiencies depending on the virus tested. Finally, we show that reassortant viruses carrying gene segments of CIV and hIAV are viable and that addition of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of CIV to the 2009 human pandemic virus results in a virus that replicates at high levels and causes significant lesions. This provides important insights into the role of evolution on viral emergence and on the role of HA and NA as determinants of pathogenicity. Influenza A viruses (IAVs) have entered new host species in recent history, sometimes with devastating consequences. Canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N8 originated from a direct transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) in the early 2000s. We studied the infection patterns of IAVs that circulate in dogs or to which dogs are commonly exposed and showed that CIV emergence was likely

  3. Innate immune response to influenza A virus in differentiated human alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieru; Nikrad, Mrinalini P; Phang, Tzulip; Gao, Bifeng; Alford, Taylor; Ito, Yoko; Edeen, Karen; Travanty, Emily A; Kosmider, Beata; Hartshorn, Kevan; Mason, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Alveolar Type II (ATII) cells are important targets for seasonal and pandemic influenza. To investigate the influenza-induced innate immune response in those cells, we measured the global gene expression profile of highly differentiated ATII cells infected with the influenza A virus at a multiplicity of infection of 0.5 at 4 hours and 24 hours after inoculation. Infection with influenza stimulated a significant increase in the mRNA concentrations of many host defense-related genes, including pattern/pathogen recognition receptors, IFN, and IFN-induced genes, chemokines, and suppressors of cytokine signaling. We verified these changes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. At the protein level, we detected a robust virus-induced secretion of the three glutamic acid-leucine-arginine (ELR)-negative chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, according to ELISA. The ultraviolet inactivation of virus abolished the chemokine and cytokine response. Viral infection did not appear to alter the differentiation of ATII cells, as measured by cellular mRNA and concentrations of surfactant proteins. However, viral infection significantly reduced the secretion of surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D. In addition, influenza A virus triggered a time-dependent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling in ATII cells. The inhibition of this pathway significantly decreased the release of infectious virus and the chemokine response, but did not alter virus-induced cell death. This study provides insights into influenza-induced innate immunity in differentiated human ATII cells, and demonstrates that the alveolar epithelium is a critical part of the initial innate immune response to influenza.

  4. Final analysis of Netherlands avian influenza outbreaks reveals much higher levels of transmission to humans than previously thought.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, A.; Meijer, A.; Koopmans, M.

    2005-01-01

    Between March and May 2003, an unprecedented outbreak of avian influenza occurred in humans in the Netherlands. During an extensive epizootic of influenza A virus H7N7 on commercial poultry farms, 86 cases in poultry workers and 3 cases in people with no poultry contact were initially confirmed by P

  5. Molecular characterization of severe and mild cases of influenza A (H1N1 2009 strain from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Baumeister

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available While worldwide pandemic influenza A(H1N1 pdm case fatality rate (CFR was 0.4%, Argentina's was 4.5%. A total of 34 strains from mild and severe cases were analyzed. A full genome sequencing was carried out on 26 of these, and a partial sequencing on the remaining eight. We observed no evidence that the high CFR can be attributed to direct virus changes. No evidence of re-assortment, mutations associated with resistance to antiviral drugs, or genetic drift that might contribute to virulence was observed. Although the mutation D225G associated with severity in the latest reports from the Ukraine and Norway is not observed among the Argentine strains, an amino acid change in the area (S206T surrounding the HA receptor binding domain was observed, the same previously established worldwide.

  6. Repair of ultraviolet-damaged transforming DNA in a mismatch repair-deficient strain of Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagci, H.; Stuy, J.H. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA). Dept. of Biological Science)

    1982-03-01

    Ultraviolet inactivation of Haemophilus influenzae transforming DNA followed inverse square root kinetics in both mismatch repair-proficient (hex/sup +/) and deficient (hex-1) recipients. No DNA concentration effect was seen with UV-excision repair-deficient (uvr/sup -/) strains. Low-efficiency genetic markers remained more sensitive than high-efficiency ones when they were assayed on excision repair-deficient hex/sup +/ uvr/sup -/ strains. They were equally resistant when hex/sup -/ uvr/sup -/ recipients were used. This was explained by assuming that recombinational repair of UV lesions in the donor strand and mismatch repair of the recipient strand may overlap and cause double strand interruptions. This will eliminate low-efficiency transformants.

  7. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with Increased respiratory morbiditses and susceptibility to Infections Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet Its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known ‘the greater Mexico City area was the pri...

  8. Human influenza A(H7N9) virus infection associated with poultry farm, Northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming; Huang, Biao; Wang, Ao; Deng, Liquan; Wu, Donglin; Lu, Xinrong; Zhao, Qinglong; Xu, Shuang; Havers, Fiona; Wang, Yanhui; Wu, Jing; Yin, Yuan; Sun, Bingxin; Yao, Jianyi; Xiang, Nijuan

    2014-11-01

    We report on a case of human infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus in Jilin Province in northeastern China. This case was associated with a poultry farm rather than a live bird market, which may point to a new focus for public health surveillance and interventions in this evolving outbreak.

  9. Genomic and Phylogenetic Characterization of Novel, Recombinant H5N2 Avian Influenza Virus Strains Isolated from Vaccinated Chickens with Clinical Symptoms in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiying Xu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Infection of poultry with diverse lineages of H5N2 avian influenza viruses has been documented for over three decades in different parts of the world, with limited outbreaks caused by this highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. In the present study, three avian H5N2 influenza viruses, A/chicken/Shijiazhuang/1209/2013, A/chicken/Chiping/0321/2014, and A/chicken/Laiwu/0313/2014, were isolated from chickens with clinical symptoms of avian influenza. Complete genomic and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that all three isolates are novel recombinant viruses with hemagglutinin (HA and matrix (M genes derived from H5N1, and remaining genes derived from H9N2-like viruses. The HA cleavage motif in all three strains (PQIEGRRRKR/GL is characteristic of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus strain. These results indicate the occurrence of H5N2 recombination and highlight the importance of continued surveillance of the H5N2 subtype virus and reformulation of vaccine strains.

  10. Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in infants and children: relationship with attendance at a paediatric emergency unit and characteristics of the circulating strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Durando, P; Ansaldi, F; Sticchi, L; Banfi, F; Amicizia, D; Panatto, D; Esposito, S; Principi, N; Icardi, G; Crovari, P

    2007-09-01

    A study was carried out on 2,696 Italian children, aged 0-14 years. The goals were: (1) to define the age-related impact of acute respiratory infections (ARI), measured as the risk of attendance at the Paediatric Emergency Room, (2) to better define the importance and proportion of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections and (3) to acquire deeper knowledge of the influenza strains circulating in infants and children. A standardised emergency unit attendance risk (EUAR) was calculated, by age group for ARI. Specific EUARs were also calculated for the two pathogens. Pharyngeal swabs were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for influenza and RSVs. Isolation in Madine-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK) and Hep cells, haemagglutination inhibition (HI) testing and HA1 gene sequence analysis were performed for influenza viruses. Most of the patients enrolled were aged 0-5 years, 1,139 (84.6%) and 1,061 (78.5%) in the two seasons, respectively. The most represented age class was that of 1 year olds (331 cases in 2001-2002 and 301 in 2002-2003). The highest EUAR for ARI was in patients aged 0-3 years (16.8 and 12.9 during the two seasons). The same was observed on calculating this risk by specific pathogens: 17.4 and 5.5 for influenza and 13.0 and 12.7 for RSV. Virological analysis was performed on 2,696 samples, 595 of which proved positive (22%). The highest number of isolates (326) came from patients aged 1-3 years. RSVs were more often identified than influenza viruses in infants aged up to 1 year (32 vs. 20 isolates). Of 265 strains isolated in 2001-2002, 103 were RSVs (87 type A, 16 B) and 162 were influenza (90 type A, 72 B). HI showed that influenza B viruses were related to two lineages, B/Victoria/2/87 (32%) and B/Yamagata/16/88 (68%). Of 330 strains isolated in 2002-2003, 102 were RSVs (91 type A, 11 B) and 228 were influenza viruses (220 type A, 8 B). A/H3N2 strains belonged to two clusters, A/Panama/2007/99-like and A/Fujian/411/02-like

  11. Staphylococcus aureus and influenza A virus stimulate human bronchoalveolar cells to release histamine and leukotrienes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clementsen, P; Bisgaard, H; Pedersen, M

    1989-01-01

    Mediator release was examined from superficially lying cells in the airway epithelium obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in 13 non-atopic individuals. The BAL-cells were incubated (20 min, 37 degrees C) with Staphylococcus (Staph.) aureus or with human influenza A virus Staph. aureus...... was found to release histamine from cells from 7 of the 13 individuals and influenza A virus in 3 of 5 persons. Furthermore, Staph, aureus stimulated the BAL-cells to release leukotriene B4 in 7 of 11 subjects, whereas no release was found by influenza A virus in 7 examined persons. When cells from 4...... persons were stimulated with Staph. aureus no release of leukotriene C4 was found. The mediator release caused by bacteria and virus might be of importance for the exacerbation of bronchial asthma in upper respiratory tract infections, since histamine is assumed to increase the epithelial permeability...

  12. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yang [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, Yuji [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, Akifumi; Ramadhany, Ririn; Arai, Yasuha [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Du, Anariwa [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Ibrahim, Madiha S. [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Damanhour University, Damanhour (Egypt); and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Influenza infection can elicit heterosubtypic antibodies to group 1 influenza virus. • Three human monoclonal antibodies were generated from an H1N1-infected patient. • The antibodies predominantly recognized α-helical stem of viral hemagglutinin (HA). • The antibodies inhibited HA structural activation during the fusion process. • The antibodies are potential candidates for future antibody therapy to influenza. - Abstract: Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short α-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the α-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses.

  13. Effect of influenza-induced fever on human bioimpedance values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Marini

    Full Text Available Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA is a widely used technique to assess body composition and nutritional status. While bioelectrical values are affected by diverse variables, there has been little research on validation of BIA in acute illness, especially to understand prognostic significance. Here we report the use of BIA in acute febrile states induced by influenza.Bioimpedance studies were conducted during an H1N1 influenza A outbreak in Venezuelan Amerindian villages from the Amazonas. Measurements were performed on 52 subjects between 1 and 40 years of age, and 7 children were re-examined after starting Oseltamivir treatment. Bioelectrical Impedance Vector Analysis (BIVA and permutation tests were applied.For the entire sample, febrile individuals showed a tendency toward greater reactance (p=0.058 and phase angle (p=0.037 than afebrile individuals, while resistance and impedance were similar in the two groups. Individuals with repeated measurements showed significant differences in bioimpedance values associated with fever, including increased reactance (p<0.001 and phase angle (p=0.007, and decreased resistance (p=0.007 and impedance (p<0.001.There are bioelectrical variations induced by influenza that can be related to dehydration, with lower extracellular to intracellular water ratio in febrile individuals, or a direct thermal effect. Caution is recommended when interpreting bioimpedance results in febrile states.

  14. Destruction of human microvascular endothelial cell capillary-like microtubules by Brazilian purpuric fever-associated Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, F D; Weyant, R S; Candal, F J; Ades, E W

    1994-01-01

    When grown in the presence of Matrigel, monolayers of an immortalized human microvascular cell line (HMEC-1) form capillary-like microtubule networks. Previous work, using HMEC-1 monolayers, demonstrated a significant difference in in vitro cytotoxicity between Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF)-associated Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (HAE) strains and non-BPF-associated HAE strains. The present study demonstrates that BPF-related cytotoxic differences can also be observed in HMEC-1 microtubule networks. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 2 x 10(-2) bacteria/tissue culture cell, BPF-associated strain F3031 disrupted the microtubule network, producing random clumps of rounded cells at 48 h of incubation. Infection with non-BPF-associated strain F1947 at the same MOI produced no observable microtubule disruption. The ability of HMEC-1 microtubule model to differentiate virulent and avirulent HAE in vitro will further aid in the study of BPF pathogenesis. In addition, the fact that the HMEC-1 cells can be induced to form microtubules make it an excellent model system for the general study of many of the agents of vascular purpura.

  15. [Colorimetric detection of human influenza A H1N1 virus by reverse transcription loop mediated isothermal amplification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Kai; Wang, Da-Yan; Qin, Meng; Gao, Rong-Bao; Wang, Miao; Zou, Shu-Mei; Han, Feng; Zhao, Xiang; Li, Xi-Yan; Shu, Yue-Long; Ma, Xue-Jun

    2010-03-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive colorimetric Reverse Transcription Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (RT-LAMP) method was established to detect human influenza A H1N1 virus. The method employed a set of six specially designed primers that recognized eight distinct sequences of the HA gene for amplification of nucleic acid under isothermal conditions at 65 degrees C for one and half hour. The amplification process of RT-LAMP was monitored by the addition of HNB (Hydroxy naphthol blue) dye prior to amplification. A positive reaction was indicated by a color change from violet to sky blue and confirmed by agarose electrophoresis. The specificity of the RT-LAMP assay was validated by cross-reaction with different swine and human influenza virus including human seasonal influenza A /H1N1 A /H3N2, influenza B and swine A /H1N1. The sensitivity of this assay was evaluated by serial dilutions of RNA molecules from in vitro transcription of human influenza A H1N1 HA gene. The assay was further evaluated with 30 clinical specimens with suspected pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus infection in parallel with RT-PCR detection and 26 clinical specimens with seasonal influenza virus infection. Our results showed that the RT-LAMP was able to achieve a sensitivity of 60 RNA copies with high specificity, and detection rate was comparable to that of the RT-PCR with the clinical samples of pandemic influenza A H1N1 infection. The RT-LAMP reaction with HNB could also be measured at 650nm in a microplate reader for quantitative analysis. Thus, we concluded that this colorimetric RT-LAMP assay had potential for the rapid screening of the human influenza A H1N1 virus infection in National influenza monitoring network laboratories and sentinel hospitals of provincial and municipal region in China.

  16. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection.

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    Matthew J Kesic

    Full Text Available Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with increased respiratory morbidities and susceptibility to infections. Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known. The greater Mexico City area was the primary site for the spring 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, which also coincided with high levels of environmental ozone. Proteolytic cleavage of the viral membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA is essential for influenza virus infectivity. Recent studies suggest that HA cleavage might be cell-associated and facilitated by the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2, whose activities are regulated by antiproteases, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI. Based on these observations, we sought to determine how acute exposure to ozone may modulate cellular protease/antiprotease expression and function, and to define their roles in a viral infection. We utilized our in vitro model of differentiated human nasal epithelial cells (NECs to determine the effects of ozone on influenza cleavage, entry, and replication. We show that ozone exposure disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance within the airway liquid. We also determined that functional forms of HAT, TMPRSS2, and SLPI are secreted from human airway epithelium, and acute exposure to ozone inversely alters their expression levels. We also show that addition of antioxidants significantly reduces virus replication through the induction of SLPI. In addition, we determined that ozone-induced cleavage of the viral HA protein is not cell-associated and that secreted endogenous proteases are sufficient to activate HA leading to a significant increase in viral replication. Our data indicate that pre-exposure to ozone disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance found in the human airway, leading to increased influenza susceptibility.

  17. 6SLN-lipo PGA specifically catches (coats) human influenza virus and synergizes neuraminidase-targeting drugs for human influenza therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwilaijaroen, Nongluk; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Takashita, Emi; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Kanie, Osamu; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new compound to overcome influenza epidemics and pandemics as well as drug resistance. We synthesized a new compound carrying: (i) Neu5Acα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc (6SLN) for targeting immutable haemagglutinins (HAs) unless switched from human-type receptor preference; (ii) an acyl chain (lipo) for locking the compound with the viral HA via hydrophobic interactions; and (iii) a flexible poly-α-L-glutamic acid (PGA) for enhancing the compound solubility and for coating the viral surface, precluding accessibility of the PGA-coated virus to the negatively charged sialic acid on the host cell surface. 6SLN-lipo PGA appears to subvert binding of pandemic H1 and seasonal H3 HAs to receptors, as assessed by using guinea pig erythrocytes, which is critical for virus entry into host cells for multiplication. It shows high potency with IC50 values in the range of 300-500 nM against multiplication of both influenza pandemic H1N1/2009 and seasonal H3N2/2004 viruses in cell culture. It acts in synergism with either of the two FDA-approved neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) clinical drugs, zanamivir (Relenza(®)) and oseltamivir carboxylate (active form of Tamiflu(®)), and it has the potential to aid NAI drugs to achieve complete clearance of the virus from the culture. 6SLN-lipo PGA is a new potential candidate drug for influenza control and is an attractive candidate for use in combination with an NAI drug for minimized toxicity, delayed development of resistance, prevention and treatment with the potential for eradication of human influenza. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Differential RNA silencing suppression activity of NS1 proteins from different influenza A virus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. de Vries; J. Haasnoot; R. Fouchier; P. de Haan; B. Berkhout

    2009-01-01

    The NS1 gene of influenza A virus encodes a multi-functional protein that plays an important role in counteracting cellular antiviral mechanisms such as the interferon (IFN), protein kinase R and retinoic acid-inducible gene product I pathways. In addition, NS1 has recently been shown to have RNA in

  19. Genetic diversity of the haemagglutinin (HA) of human influenza a (H1N1) virus in montenegro: Focus on its origin and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugosa, Boban; Vujosevic, Danijela; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Valli, Maria Beatrice; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Lai, Alessia; Angeletti, Silvia; Scarpa, Fabio; Terzić, Dragica; Vratnica, Zoran

    2016-11-01

    In 2009 an influenza A epidemic caused by a swine origin H1N1strain, unusual in human hosts, has been described. The present research is aimed to perform the first phylogenetic investigation on the influenza virus A (H1N1) strains circulating in Montenegro, from December 1, 2009, when the first case of death due to H1N1 was confirmed, and the epidemic began causing a total of four fatalities. The phylogenetic analysis of the strains circulating showed the absence of a pure Montenegrin cluster, suggesting the occurrence of multiple re-introductions in that population from different areas till as far as the early 2010. The time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for the complete dataset has been dated in early 2008, pre-dating the first Montenegrin identification of H1N1 infection. These data suggest that virus was spreading undetected, may be as a consequence of unidentified infections in returning travelers. Anyhow, the estimated TMRCA of Montenegrin strains is fully consistent to that found in different areas. Compatibly with the time coverage of the study period here analyzed, molecular dynamic of Montenegrin strains follows similar trend as in other countries. J. Med. Virol. 88:1905-1913, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Serial histopathological examination of the lungs of mice infected with influenza A virus PR8 strain.

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    Masaya Fukushi

    Full Text Available Avian influenza H5N1 and pandemic (H1N1 2009 viruses are known to induce viral pneumonia and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD. The mortality rate of ARDS/DAD is extremely high, at approximately 60%, and no effective treatment for ARDS/DAD has been established. We examined serial pathological changes in the lungs of mice infected with influenza virus to determine the progress from viral pneumonia to ARDS/DAD. Mice were intranasally infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 virus, and their lungs were examined both macro- and micro-pathologically every 2 days. We also evaluated general condition, survival rate, body weight, viral loads in lung, and surfactant proteins in serum. As a result, all infected mice died within 9 days postinfection. At 2 days postinfection, inflammation in alveolar septa, i.e., interstitial pneumonia, was observed around bronchioles. From 4 to 6 days postinfection, interstitial pneumonia with alveolar collapse expanded throughout the lungs. From 6 to 9 days postinfection, DAD with severe alveolar collapse was observed in the lungs of all of dying and dead mice. In contrast, DAD was not observed in the live infected-mice from 2 to 6 days postinfection, despite their poor general condition. In addition, histopathological analysis was performed in mice infected with a dose of PR8 virus which was 50% of the lethal dose for mice in the 20-day observation period. DAD with alveolar collapse was observed in all dead mice. However, in the surviving mice, instead of DAD, glandular metaplasia was broadly observed in their lungs. The present study indicates that DAD with severe alveolar collapse is associated with death in this mouse infection model of influenza virus. Inhibition of the development of DAD with alveolar collapse may decrease the mortality rate in severe viral pneumonia caused by influenza virus infection.

  1. Serotype and genetic diversity of human rhinovirus strains that circulated in Kenya in 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanoi, Sylvia; Ongus, Juliette R; Gachara, George; Coldren, Rodney; Bulimo, Wallace

    2016-05-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are a well-established cause of the common cold and recent studies indicated that they may be associated with severe acute respiratory illnesses (SARIs) like pneumonia, asthma, and bronchiolitis. Despite global studies on the genetic diversity of the virus, the serotype diversity of these viruses across diverse geographic regions in Kenya has not been characterized. This study sought to characterize the serotype diversity of HRV strains that circulated in Kenya in 2008. A total of 517 archived nasopharyngeal samples collected in a previous respiratory virus surveillance program across Kenya in 2008 were selected. Participants enrolled were outpatients who presented with influenza-like (ILI) symptoms. Real-time RT-PCR was employed for preliminary HRV detection. HRV-positive samples were amplified using RT-PCR and thereafter the nucleotide sequences of the amplicons were determined followed by phylogenetic analysis. Twenty-five percent of the samples tested positive for HRV. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Kenyan HRVs clustered into three main species comprising HRV-A (54%), HRV-B (12%), and HRV-C (35%). Overall, 20 different serotypes were identified. Intrastrain sequence homology among the Kenyan strains ranged from 58% to 100% at the nucleotide level and 55% to 100% at the amino acid level. These results show that a wide range of HRV serotypes with different levels of nucleotide variation were present in Kenya. Furthermore, our data show that HRVs contributed substantially to influenza-like illness in Kenya in 2008. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effect of Infection with a Mesogenic Strain of Newcastle Disease Virus on Infection with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus in Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known on the interactions between avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) when coinfecting the same poultry host. In a previous study we found that infection of chickens with a mesogenic strain of NDV (mNDV) can reduce highly pathogenic AIV (HPAIV) replication, clinic...

  3. Analysis of antigenically important residues in human influenza A virus in terms of B-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, William D; Moss, David S; Shepherd, Adrian J

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we undertake an analysis of the antigenicity of influenza A virus hemagglutinin. We developed a novel computational approach to the identification of antigenically active regions and showed that the amino acid substitutions between successive predominant seasonal strains form clusters that are consistent, in terms of both their location and their size, with the properties of B-cell epitopes in general and with those epitopes that have been identified experimentally in influenza A virus hemagglutinin to date. Such an interpretation provides a biologically plausible framework for an understanding of the location of antigenically important substitutions that is more specific than the canonical "antigenic site" model and provides an effective basis for deriving models that predict antigenic escape in the H3N2 subtype. Our results support recent indications that antibodies binding to the "stalk" region of hemagglutinin are found in the human population and exert evolutionary pressure on the virus. Our computational approach provides a possible method for identifying antigenic escape through evolution in this region, which in some cases will not be identified by the hemagglutinin inhibition assay.

  4. Increase in IFNγ(-IL-2(+ cells in recent human CD4 T cell responses to 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Weaver

    Full Text Available Human CD4 T cell recall responses to influenza virus are strongly biased towards Type 1 cytokines, producing IFNγ, IL-2 and TNFα. We have now examined the effector phenotypes of CD4 T cells in more detail, particularly focusing on differences between recent versus long-term, multiply-boosted responses. Peptides spanning the proteome of temporally distinct influenza viruses were distributed into pools enriched for cross-reactivity to different influenza strains, and used to stimulate antigen-specific CD4 T cells representing recent or long-term memory. In the general population, peptides unique to the long-circulating influenza A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1 induced Th1-like responses biased toward the expression of IFNγ(+TNFα(+ CD4 T cells. In contrast, peptide pools enriched for non-cross-reactive peptides of the pandemic influenza A/California/04/09 (H1N1 induced more IFNγ(-IL-2(+TNFα(+ T cells, similar to the IFNγ(-IL-2(+ non-polarized, primed precursor T cells (Thpp that are a predominant response to protein vaccination. These results were confirmed in a second study that compared samples taken before the 2009 pandemic to samples taken one month after PCR-confirmed A/California/04/09 infection. There were striking increases in influenza-specific TNFα(+, IFNγ(+, and IL-2(+ cells in the post-infection samples. Importantly, peptides enriched for non-cross-reactive A/California/04/09 specificities induced a higher proportion of Thpp-like IFNγ(-IL-2(+TNFα(+ CD4 T cells than peptide pools cross-reactive with previous influenza strains, which induced more Th1 (IFNγ(+TNFα(+ responses. These IFNγ(-IL-2(+TNFα(+ CD4 T cells may be an important target population for vaccination regimens, as these cells are induced upon infection, may have high proliferative potential, and may play a role in providing future effector cells during subsequent infections.

  5. Risk factors for avian influenza virus contamination of live poultry markets in Zhejiang, China during the 2015–2016 human influenza season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qimei; Cheng, Wei; Yu, Zhao; Ling, Feng; Mao, Haiyan; Chen, Enfu

    2017-01-01

    Live bird markets (LBMs), being a potential source of avian influenza virus, require effective environmental surveillance management. In our study, a total of 2865 environmental samples were collected from 292 LBMs during the 2015–2016 human influenza season from 10 cities in Zhejiang province, China. The samples were tested by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Field investigations were carried out to investigate probable risk factors. Of the environmental samples, 1519 (53.0%) were contaminated by A subtype. The highest prevalence of the H9 subtype was 30.2%, and the frequencies of the H5 and H7 subtype were 9.3% and 17.3%, respectively. Hangzhou and Jinhua cities were contaminated more seriously than the others. The prevalence of H5/H7/H9 in drinking water samples was highest, at 50.9%, and chopping board swabs ranked second, at 49.3%. Duration of sales per day, types of live poultry, LBM location and the number of live poultry were the main risk factors for environmental contamination, according to logistic regression analysis. In conclusion, LBMs in Zhejiang were contaminated by avian influenza. Our study has provided clues for avian influenza prevention and control during the human influenza season, especially in areas where LBMs are not closed. PMID:28256584

  6. Risk factors for avian influenza virus contamination of live poultry markets in Zhejiang, China during the 2015-2016 human influenza season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qimei; Cheng, Wei; Yu, Zhao; Ling, Feng; Mao, Haiyan; Chen, Enfu

    2017-03-03

    Live bird markets (LBMs), being a potential source of avian influenza virus, require effective environmental surveillance management. In our study, a total of 2865 environmental samples were collected from 292 LBMs during the 2015-2016 human influenza season from 10 cities in Zhejiang province, China. The samples were tested by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Field investigations were carried out to investigate probable risk factors. Of the environmental samples, 1519 (53.0%) were contaminated by A subtype. The highest prevalence of the H9 subtype was 30.2%, and the frequencies of the H5 and H7 subtype were 9.3% and 17.3%, respectively. Hangzhou and Jinhua cities were contaminated more seriously than the others. The prevalence of H5/H7/H9 in drinking water samples was highest, at 50.9%, and chopping board swabs ranked second, at 49.3%. Duration of sales per day, types of live poultry, LBM location and the number of live poultry were the main risk factors for environmental contamination, according to logistic regression analysis. In conclusion, LBMs in Zhejiang were contaminated by avian influenza. Our study has provided clues for avian influenza prevention and control during the human influenza season, especially in areas where LBMs are not closed.

  7. H9N2 avian influenza virus antibody titers in human population in fars province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Hadipour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the avian influenza A virus subtypes, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses have the potential to cause an influenza pandemic because they are widely prevalent in avian species in Asia and have demonstrated the ability to infect humans. This study was carried out to determined the seroprevalence of H9N2 avian influenza virus in different human populations in Fars province, which is situated in the south of Iran. Antibodies against H9N2 avian influenza virus were measured using hemagglutination-inhibition (HI test in sera from 300 individuals in five different population in Fars province, including poultry-farm workers, slaughter-house workers, veterinarians, patients with clinical signs of respiratory disease, and clinically normal individuals, who were not or rarely in contact with poultry. Mean antibody titers of 7.3, 6.8, 6.1, 4.5, and 2.9 and seroprevalences of 87%, 76.2%, 72.5%, 35.6%, and 23% were determined in those groups, respectively. Higher prevalences were detected in poultry-farm workers, slaughter-house workers, and veterinarians, possibly due to their close and frequent contact with poultry.

  8. An Avian Connection as a Catalyst to the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The 1918 Influenza pandemic was one of the most virulent strains of influenza in history. This strain quickly dispatched previously held theories on influenza. World War One introduced new environmental stresses and speed of dissemination logistics never experienced by humans. In light of new phylogenic evidence the cause of this influenza outbreak is now being considered to have linkage to the avian influenza. Animals act as reservoirs for this influenza virus and research indicates the influenza virus often originates in the intestines of aquatic wildfowl. The virus is shed into the environment, which in turns infects domestic poultry, which in turn infects mammalian hosts. These animals, usually pigs, act as a transformer or converters; creating a strain that can more readily infect humans. Therefore swine can be infected with both avian and human influenza A viruses and serve as a source for infection for a number of species as the incidents of direct infection from birds to humans have been rare. Increased human habitation near poultry and swine raising facilities pose greater influenza outbreak risk. It was this combination of environmental factors that may have contributed to the greatest pandemic of recent times, and, moreover, similar conditions exist throughout Southeast Asia today.

  9. Genomic sequences of human infection of avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) virus in Zhejiang province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈寅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the etiology and genomic sequences of human infection of avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus from Zhejiang province.Methods Viral RNA was extracted from patients of suspected H7N9

  10. On state-space reduction in multi-strain pathogen models, with an application to antigenic drift in influenza A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryazhimskiy, Sergey; Dieckmann, Ulf; Levin, Simon A; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2007-08-01

    Many pathogens exist in phenotypically distinct strains that interact with each other through competition for hosts. General models that describe such multi-strain systems are extremely difficult to analyze because their state spaces are enormously large. Reduced models have been proposed, but so far all of them necessarily allow for coinfections and require that immunity be mediated solely by reduced infectivity, a potentially problematic assumption. Here, we suggest a new state-space reduction approach that allows immunity to be mediated by either reduced infectivity or reduced susceptibility and that can naturally be used for models with or without coinfections. Our approach utilizes the general framework of status-based models. The cornerstone of our method is the introduction of immunity variables, which describe multi-strain systems more naturally than the traditional tracking of susceptible and infected hosts. Models expressed in this way can be approximated in a natural way by a truncation method that is akin to moment closure, allowing us to sharply reduce the size of the state space, and thus to consider models with many strains in a tractable manner. Applying our method to the phenomenon of antigenic drift in influenza A, we propose a potentially general mechanism that could constrain viral evolution to a one-dimensional manifold in a two-dimensional trait space. Our framework broadens the class of multi-strain systems that can be adequately described by reduced models. It permits computational, and even analytical, investigation and thus serves as a useful tool for understanding the evolution and ecology of multi-strain pathogens.

  11. On State-Space Reduction in Multi-Strain Pathogen Models, with an Application to Antigenic Drift in Influenza A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryazhimskiy, Sergey; Dieckmann, Ulf; Levin, Simon A; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Many pathogens exist in phenotypically distinct strains that interact with each other through competition for hosts. General models that describe such multi-strain systems are extremely difficult to analyze because their state spaces are enormously large. Reduced models have been proposed, but so far all of them necessarily allow for coinfections and require that immunity be mediated solely by reduced infectivity, a potentially problematic assumption. Here, we suggest a new state-space reduction approach that allows immunity to be mediated by either reduced infectivity or reduced susceptibility and that can naturally be used for models with or without coinfections. Our approach utilizes the general framework of status-based models. The cornerstone of our method is the introduction of immunity variables, which describe multi-strain systems more naturally than the traditional tracking of susceptible and infected hosts. Models expressed in this way can be approximated in a natural way by a truncation method that is akin to moment closure, allowing us to sharply reduce the size of the state space, and thus to consider models with many strains in a tractable manner. Applying our method to the phenomenon of antigenic drift in influenza A, we propose a potentially general mechanism that could constrain viral evolution to a one-dimensional manifold in a two-dimensional trait space. Our framework broadens the class of multi-strain systems that can be adequately described by reduced models. It permits computational, and even analytical, investigation and thus serves as a useful tool for understanding the evolution and ecology of multi-strain pathogens. PMID:17708677

  12. Glycan-functionalized graphene-FETs toward selective detection of human-infectious avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takao; Oe, Takeshi; Kanai, Yasushi; Ikuta, Takashi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Watanabe, Yohei; Nakakita, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kawahara, Toshio; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-01

    There are global concerns about threat of pandemic caused by the human-infectious avian influenza virus. To prevent the oncoming pandemic, it is crucial to analyze the viral affinity to human-type or avian-type sialoglycans with high sensitivity at high speed. Graphene-FET (G-FET) realizes such high-sensitive electrical detection of the targets, owing to graphene’s high carrier mobility. In the present study, G-FET was functionalized using sialoglycans and employed for the selective detection of lectins from Sambucus sieboldiana and Maackia amurensis as alternatives of the human and avian influenza viruses. Glycan-functionalized G-FET selectively monitored the sialoglycan-specific binding reactions at subnanomolar sensitivity.

  13. The clinical usefulness of lymphocyte:monocyte ratios in differentiating influenza from viral non-influenza-like illnesses in hospitalized adults during the 2015 influenza A (H3N2) epidemic: the uniqueness of HPIV-3 mimicking influenza A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, B A; Connolly, J J; Irshad, N

    2016-01-01

    During influenza epidemics, influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) viruses cocirculate with influenza strains. If positive, rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) identify influenza A/B, but false-negative RIDTs require retesting by viral polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Patient volume limits testing during influenza epidemics, and non-specific laboratory findings have been used for presumptive diagnosis pending definitive viral testing. In adults, the most useful laboratory abnormalities in influenza include relative lymphopenia, monocytosis, and thrombocytopenia. Lymphocyte:monocyte (L:M) ratios may be even more useful. L:M ratios ILIs. During the 2015 influenza A (H3N2) epidemic at our hospital, we reviewed our experience with L:M ratios in 37 hospitalized adults with non-influenza viral ILIs. In hospitalized adults with non-influenza A ILIs, the L:M ratios were >2 with human metapneumovirus (hMPV), rhinoviruses/enteroviruses (R/E), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), but not human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV-3), which had L:M ratios 3 days, whereas with HPIV-3, L:M ratios 3 days of hospitalization.

  14. Comparison of mucosal lining fluid sampling methods and influenza-specific IgA detection assays for use in human studies of influenza immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Thushan I; Gould, Victoria; Mohammed, Nuredin I; Cope, Alethea; Meijer, Adam; Zutt, Ilse; Reimerink, Johan; Kampmann, Beate; Hoschler, Katja; Zambon, Maria; Tregoning, John S

    2017-10-01

    We need greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying protection against influenza virus to develop more effective vaccines. To do this, we need better, more reproducible methods of sampling the nasal mucosa. The aim of the current study was to compare levels of influenza virus A subtype-specific IgA collected using three different methods of nasal sampling. Samples were collected from healthy adult volunteers before and after LAIV immunization by nasal wash, flocked swabs and Synthetic Absorptive Matrix (SAM) strips. Influenza A virus subtype-specific IgA levels were measured by haemagglutinin binding ELISA or haemagglutinin binding microarray and the functional response was assessed by microneutralization. Nasosorption using SAM strips lead to the recovery of a more concentrated sample of material, with a significantly higher level of total and influenza H1-specific IgA. However, an equivalent percentage of specific IgA was observed with all sampling methods when normalized to the total IgA. Responses measured using a recently developed antibody microarray platform, which allows evaluation of binding to multiple influenza strains simultaneously with small sample volumes, were compared to ELISA. There was a good correlation between ELISA and microarray values. Material recovered from SAM strips was weakly neutralizing when used in an in vitro assay, with a modest correlation between the level of IgA measured by ELISA and neutralization, but a greater correlation between microarray-measured IgA and neutralizing activity. In conclusion we have tested three different methods of nasal sampling and show that flocked swabs and novel SAM strips are appropriate alternatives to traditional nasal washes for assessment of mucosal influenza humoral immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The epidemiology and spread of drug resistant human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Significant changes in the circulation of antiviral-resistant influenza viruses have occurred over the last decade. The emergence and continued circulation of adamantane-resistant A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses mean that the adamantanes are no longer recommended for use. Resistance to the newer class of drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors, is typically associated with poorer viral replication and transmission. But 'permissive' mutations, that compensated for impairment of viral function in A(H1N1) viruses during 2007/2008, enabled them to acquire the H275Y NA resistance mutation without fitness loss, resulting in their rapid global spread. Permissive mutations now appear to be present in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses thereby increasing the risk that oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses may also spread globally, a concerning scenario given that oseltamivir is the most widely used influenza antiviral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Emerging influenza viruses and the prospect of a universal influenza virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and pandemics at irregular intervals. Several cases of human infections with avian and swine influenza viruses have been detected recently, warranting enhanced surveillance and the development of more effective countermeasures to address the pandemic potential of these viruses. The most effective countermeasure against influenza virus infection is the use of prophylactic vaccines. However, vaccines that are currently in use for seasonal influenza viruses have to be re-formulated and re-administered in a cumbersome process every year due to the antigenic drift of the virus. Furthermore, current seasonal vaccines are ineffective against novel pandemic strains. This paper reviews zoonotic influenza viruses with pandemic potential and technological advances towards better vaccines that induce broad and long lasting protection from influenza virus infection. Recent efforts have focused on the development of broadly protective/universal influenza virus vaccines that can provide immunity against drifted seasonal influenza virus strains but also against potential pandemic viruses. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Prolonged excretion of a low-pathogenicity H5N2 avian influenza virus strain in the Pekin duck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-Flores, José Manuel; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    H5N2 strains of low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) have been circulating for at least 17 years in some Mexican chicken farms. We measured the rate and duration of viral excretion from Pekin ducks that were experimentally inoculated with an H5N2 LPAIV that causes death in embryonated chicken eggs (A/chicken/Mexico/2007). Leghorn chickens were used as susceptible host controls. The degree of viral excretion was evaluated with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) using samples from oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs. We observed prolonged excretion from both species of birds lasting for at least 21 days. Prolonged excretion of LPAIV A/chicken/Mexico/2007 is atypical. PMID:23820212

  18. Prolonged excretion of a low-pathogenicity H5N2 avian influenza virus strain in the Pekin duck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-Flores, José Manuel; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; García-Espinosa, Gary

    2013-01-01

    H5N2 strains of low-pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) have been circulating for at least 17 years in some Mexican chicken farms. We measured the rate and duration of viral excretion from Pekin ducks that were experimentally inoculated with an H5N2 LPAIV that causes death in embryonated chicken eggs (A/chicken/Mexico/2007). Leghorn chickens were used as susceptible host controls. The degree of viral excretion was evaluated with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) using samples from oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs. We observed prolonged excretion from both species of birds lasting for at least 21 days. Prolonged excretion of LPAIV A/chicken/ Mexico/2007 is atypical.

  19. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. de Vries (Rory); A.F. Altenburg; G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically

  20. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. de Vries (Rory); A.F. Altenburg; G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically disti

  1. Human influenza A H5N1 in Indonesia: health care service-associated delays in treatment initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adisasmito, Wiku; Aisyah, Dewi Nur; Aditama, Tjandra Yoga; Kusriastuti, Rita; Trihono; Suwandono, Agus; Sampurno, Ondri Dwi; Prasenohadi; Sapada, Nurshanty A; Mamahit, M J N; Swenson, Anna; Dreyer, Nancy A; Coker, Richard

    2013-06-11

    Indonesia has had more recorded human cases of influenza A H5N1 than any other country, with one of the world's highest case fatality rates. Understanding barriers to treatment may help ensure life-saving influenza-specific treatment is provided early enough to meaningfully improve clinical outcomes. Data for this observational study of humans infected with influenza A H5N1 were obtained primarily from Ministry of Health, Provincial and District Health Office clinical records. Data included time from symptom onset to presentation for medical care, source of medical care provided, influenza virology, time to initiation of influenza-specific treatment with antiviral drugs, and survival. Data on 124 human cases of virologically confirmed avian influenza were collected between September 2005 and December 2010, representing 73% of all reported Indonesia cases. The median time from health service presentation to antiviral drug initiation was 7.0 days. Time to viral testing was highly correlated with starting antiviral treatment (p influenza H5N1 in Indonesia appear related to delays in diagnosis rather than presentation to health care settings. Either cases are not suspected of being H5N1 cases until nearly one week after presenting for medical care, or viral testing and/or antiviral treatment is not available where patients are presenting for care. Health system delays have increased since 2007.

  2. Influenza A H5N1 clade 2.3.4 virus with a different antiviral susceptibility profile replaced clade 1 virus in humans in northern Vietnam.

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    Mai T Q Le

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior to 2007, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses isolated from poultry and humans in Vietnam were consistently reported to be clade 1 viruses, susceptible to oseltamivir but resistant to amantadine. Here we describe the re-emergence of human HPAI H5N1 virus infections in Vietnam in 2007 and the characteristics of the isolated viruses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Respiratory specimens from patients suspected to be infected with avian influenza in 2007 were screened by influenza and H5 subtype specific polymerase chain reaction. Isolated H5N1 strains were further characterized by genome sequencing and drug susceptibility testing. Eleven poultry outbreak isolates from 2007 were included in the sequence analysis. Eight patients, all of them from northern Vietnam, were diagnosed with H5N1 in 2007 and five of them died. Phylogenetic analysis of H5N1 viruses isolated from humans and poultry in 2007 showed that clade 2.3.4 H5N1 viruses replaced clade 1 viruses in northern Vietnam. Four human H5N1 strains had eight-fold reduced in-vitro susceptibility to oseltamivir as compared to clade 1 viruses. In two poultry isolates the I117V mutation was found in the neuraminidase gene, which is associated with reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir. No mutations in the M2 gene conferring amantadine resistance were found. CONCLUSION: In 2007, H5N1 clade 2.3.4 viruses replaced clade 1 viruses in northern Vietnam and were susceptible to amantadine but showed reduced susceptibility to oseltamivir. Combination antiviral therapy with oseltamivir and amantadine for human cases in Vietnam is recommended.

  3. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  4. Universal immunity to influenza must outwit immune evasion

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    Sergio Manuel Quinones-Parra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although an influenza vaccine has been available for 70 years, influenza virus still causes seasonal epidemics and worldwide pandemics. Currently available vaccines elicit strain-specific antibody responses to the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA proteins, but these can be ineffective against serologically-distinct viral variants and novel subtypes. Thus, there is a need for cross-protective or universal influenza vaccines to overcome the necessity for annual immunisation against seasonal influenza and to provide immunity to reduce the severity of infection with pandemic or outbreak viruses. It is well established that natural influenza infection can provide cross-reactive immunity that can reduce the impact of infection with distinct influenza type A strains and subtypes, including H1N1, H3N2, H2N2, H5N1 and H7N9. The key to generating universal influenza immunity via vaccination is to target functionally-conserved regions of the virus, which include epitopes on the internal proteins for cross-reactive T cell immunity or on the HA stem for broadly reactive antibody responses. In the wake of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, broadly neutralizing antibodies have been characterized and isolated from convalescent and vaccinated individuals, inspiring development of new vaccination techniques to elicit such responses. Induction of influenza-specific T cell responses through vaccination has also been examined in clinical trials. Strong evidence is available from human and animal models of influenza to show that established influenza-specific T cell memory can reduce viral shedding and symptom severity. However, the published evidence also shows that CD8+ T cells can efficiently select immune escape mutants early after influenza virus infection. Here, we discuss universal immunity to influenza viruses mediated by both cross-reactive T cells and antibodies, the mechanisms of immune evasion in influenza, and how to counteract commonly occurring

  5. In Silico Prediction and Experimental Confirmation of HA Residues Conferring Enhanced Human Receptor Specificity of H5N1 Influenza A Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Sonja; Mostafa, Ahmed; Haarmann, Thomas; Bannert, Norbert; Ziebuhr, John; Veljkovic, Veljko; Dietrich, Ursula; Pleschka, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Newly emerging influenza A viruses (IAV) pose a major threat to human health by causing seasonal epidemics and/or pandemics, the latter often facilitated by the lack of pre-existing immunity in the general population. Early recognition of candidate pandemic influenza viruses (CPIV) is of crucial importance for restricting virus transmission and developing appropriate therapeutic and prophylactic strategies including effective vaccines. Often, the pandemic potential of newly emerging IAV is only fully recognized once the virus starts to spread efficiently causing serious disease in humans. Here, we used a novel phylogenetic algorithm based on the informational spectrum method (ISM) to identify potential CPIV by predicting mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene that are likely to (differentially) affect critical interactions between the HA protein and target cells from bird and human origin, respectively. Predictions were subsequently validated by generating pseudotyped retrovirus particles and genetically engineered IAV containing these mutations and characterizing potential effects on virus entry and replication in cells expressing human and avian IAV receptors, respectively. Our data suggest that the ISM-based algorithm is suitable to identify CPIV among IAV strains that are circulating in animal hosts and thus may be a new tool for assessing pandemic risks associated with specific strains.

  6. Molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of HA gene of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain during 2010-2014 in Dalian, North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Sun, Nan; Lv, Qiu-Yue; Liu, Dan-Hong; Liu, Da-Peng

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the epidemiology of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and its hemagglutinin (HA) molecular and phylogenetic analysis during 2010-2014 in Dalian, North China. A total of 3717 influenza-like illness (ILI) cases were tested by real-time PCR and 493 were found to be positive. Out of these 493 cases, 121 were subtype influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, of which 14 cases were reported in 2010-2011, 29 in 2012-2013, and 78 in 2013-2014. HA coding regions of 45 isolates were compared to that of the vaccine strain A/California/7/09(H1N1), and a number of variations were detected. P83S, S185T, S203T, R223Q, and I321V mutations were observed in all of the Dalian isolates. Furthermore, a high proportion >71 % of the strains possessed the variation D97N and K283E. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the close match of the majority of circulating strains with the vaccine strains. However, it also reveals a trend of strains to accumulate amino acid variations and form new phylogenetic groups.

  7. Shielding of a lipooligosaccharide IgM epitope allows evasion of neutrophil-mediated killing of an invasive strain of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langereis, Jeroen D; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2014-07-22

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is a frequent cause of noninvasive mucosal inflammatory diseases but may also cause invasive diseases, such as sepsis and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Infection by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is characterized by recruitment of neutrophilic granulocytes. Despite the presence of a large number of neutrophils, infections with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae are often not cleared effectively by the antimicrobial activity of these immune cells. Herein, we examined how nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae evades neutrophil-mediated killing. Transposon sequencing (Tn-seq) was used on an isolate resistant to neutrophil-mediated killing to identify genes required for its survival in the presence of human neutrophils and serum, which provided a source of complement and antibodies. Results show that nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae prevents complement-dependent neutrophil-mediated killing by expression of surface galactose-containing oligosaccharide structures. These outer-core structures block recognition of an inner-core lipooligosaccharide epitope containing glucose attached to heptose HepIII-β1,2-Glc by replacement with galactose attached to HepIII or through shielding HepIII-β1,2-Glc by phase-variable attachment of oligosaccharide chain extensions. When the HepIII-β1,2-Glc-containing epitope is expressed and exposed, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is opsonized by naturally acquired IgM generally present in human serum and subsequently phagocytosed and killed by human neutrophils. Clinical nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates containing galactose attached to HepIII that are not recognized by this IgM are more often found to cause invasive infections. Importance: Neutrophils are white blood cells that specialize in killing pathogens and are recruited to sites of inflammation. However, despite the presence of large numbers of neutrophils in the middle ear cavity and lungs of patients with

  8. Integrative genomic analysis of the human immune response to influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Luis M; Bucasas, Kristine L; Wells, Janet M; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E; Arden, Nancy; Renwick, Alexander; Yu, Peng; Quarles, John M; Bray, Molly S; Couch, Robert B; Belmont, John W; Shaw, Chad A

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the host genetic factors that contribute to variation in vaccine responsiveness may uncover important mechanisms affecting vaccine efficacy. We carried out an integrative, longitudinal study combining genetic, transcriptional, and immunologic data in humans given seasonal influenza vaccine. We identified 20 genes exhibiting a transcriptional response to vaccination, significant genotype effects on gene expression, and correlation between the transcriptional and antibody responses. The results show that variation at the level of genes involved in membrane trafficking and antigen processing significantly influences the human response to influenza vaccination. More broadly, we demonstrate that an integrative study design is an efficient alternative to existing methods for the identification of genes involved in complex traits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00299.001 PMID:23878721

  9. Molecular basis of live-attenuated influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen He

    Full Text Available Human influenza is a seasonal disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most effective means for controlling infection and thereby reducing morbidity and mortality is vaccination with a three inactivated influenza virus strains mixture, or by intranasal administration of a group of three different live attenuated influenza vaccine strains. Comparing to the inactivated vaccine, the attenuated live viruses allow better elicitation of a long-lasting and broader immune (humoral and cellular response that represents a naturally occurring transient infection. The cold-adapted (ca influenza A/AA/6/60 (H2N2 (AA ca virus is the backbone for the live attenuated trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine licensed in the United States. Similarly, the influenza A components of live-attenuated vaccines used in Russia have been prepared as reassortants of the cold-adapted (ca H2N2 viruses, A/Leningrad/134/17/57-ca (Len/17 and A/Leningrad/134/47/57-ca (Len/47 along with virulent epidemic strains. However, the mechanism of temperature-sensitive attenuation is largely elusive. To understand how modification at genetic level of influenza virus would result in attenuation of human influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1,A/PR8, we investigated the involvement of key mutations in the PB1 and/or PB2 genes in attenuation of influenza virus in vitro and in vivo. We have demonstrated that a few of residues in PB1 and PB2 are critical for the phenotypes of live attenuated, temperature sensitive influenza viruses by minigenome assay and real-time PCR. The information of these mutation loci could be used for elucidation of mechanism of temperature-sensitive attenuation and as a new strategy for influenza vaccine development.

  10. Triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) in humans in the United States, 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vivek; Bridges, Carolyn B; Uyeki, Timothy M; Shu, Bo; Balish, Amanda; Xu, Xiyan; Lindstrom, Stephen; Gubareva, Larisa V; Deyde, Varough; Garten, Rebecca J; Harris, Meghan; Gerber, Susan; Vagasky, Susan; Smith, Forrest; Pascoe, Neal; Martin, Karen; Dufficy, Deborah; Ritger, Kathy; Conover, Craig; Quinlisk, Patricia; Klimov, Alexander; Bresee, Joseph S; Finelli, Lyn

    2009-06-18

    Triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses--containing genes from avian, human, and swine influenza viruses--emerged and became enzootic among pig herds in North America during the late 1990s. We report the clinical features of the first 11 sporadic cases of infection of humans with triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, occurring from December 2005 through February 2009, until just before the current epidemic of swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) among humans. These data were obtained from routine national influenza surveillance reports and from joint case investigations by public and animal health agencies. The median age of the 11 patients was 10 years (range, 16 months to 48 years), and 4 had underlying health conditions. Nine of the patients had had exposure to pigs, five through direct contact and four through visits to a location where pigs were present but without contact. In another patient, human-to-human transmission was suspected. The range of the incubation period, from the last known exposure to the onset of symptoms, was 3 to 9 days. Among the 10 patients with known clinical symptoms, symptoms included fever (in 90%), cough (in 100%), headache (in 60%), and diarrhea (in 30%). Complete blood counts were available for four patients, revealing leukopenia in two, lymphopenia in one, and thrombocytopenia in another. Four patients were hospitalized, two of whom underwent invasive mechanical ventilation. Four patients received oseltamivir, and all 11 recovered from their illness. From December 2005 until just before the current human epidemic of swine-origin influenza viruses, there was sporadic infection with triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses in persons with exposure to pigs in the United States. Although all the patients recovered, severe illness of the lower respiratory tract and unusual influenza signs such as diarrhea were observed in some patients, including

  11. Probiotic Potential of Lactobacillus Strains with Antimicrobial Activity against Some Human Pathogenic Strains

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    Parisa Shokryazdan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16 S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3 h, 0.3% bile salts for 4 h, and 1.9 mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3 h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits.

  12. Influenza at the animal-human interface: a review of the literature for virological evidence of human infection with swine or avian influenza viruses other than A(H5N1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidl, G S; Meijer, A; de Bruin, E; de Nardi, M; Munoz, O; Capua, I; Breed, A C; Harris, K; Hill, A; Kosmider, R; Banks, J; von Dobschuetz, S; Stark, K; Wieland, B; Stevens, K; van der Werf, S; Enouf, V; van der Meulen, K; Van Reeth, K; Dauphin, G; Koopmans, M

    2014-05-08

    Factors that trigger human infection with animal influenza virus progressing into a pandemic are poorly understood. Within a project developing an evidence-based risk assessment framework for influenza viruses in animals, we conducted a review of the literature for evidence of human infection with animal influenza viruses by diagnostic methods used. The review covering Medline, Embase, SciSearch and CabAbstracts yielded 6,955 articles, of which we retained 89; for influenza A(H5N1) and A(H7N9), the official case counts of t he World Health Organization were used. An additional 30 studies were included by scanning the reference lists. Here, we present the findings for confirmed infections with virological evidence. We found reports of 1,419 naturally infected human cases, of which 648 were associated with avian influenza virus (AIV) A(H5N1), 375 with other AIV subtypes, and 396 with swine influenza virus (SIV). Human cases naturally infected with AIV spanned haemagglutinin subtypes H5, H6, H7, H9 and H10. SIV cases were associated with endemic SIV of H1 and H3 subtype descending from North American and Eurasian SIV lineages and various reassortants thereof. Direct exposure to birds or swine was the most likely source of infection for the cases with available information on exposure.

  13. The Regulation of Autophagy by Influenza A Virus

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    Rong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a dreadful pathogen of animals and humans, causing widespread infection and severe morbidity and mortality. It is essential to characterize the influenza A virus-host interaction and develop efficient counter measures against the viral infection. Autophagy is known as a catabolic process for the recycling of the cytoplasmic macromolecules. Recently, it has been shown that autophagy is a critical mechanism underlying the interaction between influenza A virus and its host. Autophagy can be induced by the infection with influenza A virus, which is considered as a necessary process for the viral proliferation, including the accumulation of viral elements during the replication of influenza A virus. On the other hand, influenza A virus can inhibit the autophagic formation via interaction with the autophagy-related genes (Atg and signaling pathways. In addition, autophagy is involved in the influenza virus-regulated cell deaths, leading to significant changes in host apoptosis. Interestingly, the high pathogenic strains of influenza A virus, such as H5N1, stimulate autophagic cell death and appear to interplay with the autophagy in distinct ways as compared with low pathogenic strains. This review discusses the regulation of autophagy, an influenza A virus driven process.

  14. Influenza A Virus with a Human-Like N2 Gene Is Circulating in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Trebbien, Ramona

    2013-01-01

    A novel reassortant influenza A virus, H1avN2hu, has been found in Danish swine. The virus contains an H1 gene similar to the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of H1N1 avian-like swine viruses and an N2 gene most closely related to the neuraminidase (NA) gene of human H3N2 viruses from the mid-1990s....

  15. Comparison of whole genome sequences from human and non-human Escherichia coli O26 strains

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    Keri N Norman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC O26 is the second leading E. coli serogroup responsible for human illness outbreaks behind E. coli O157:H7. Recent outbreaks have been linked to emerging pathogenic O26:H11 strains harboring stx2 only. Cattle have been recognized as an important reservoir of O26 strains harboring stx1; however the reservoir of these emerging stx2 strains is unknown. The objective of this study was to identify nucleotide polymorphisms in human and cattle-derived strains in order to compare differences in polymorphism derived genotypes and virulence gene profiles between the two host species. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 182 epidemiologically unrelated O26 strains, including 109 human-derived strains and 73 non-human-derived strains. A panel of 289 O26 strains (241 STEC and 48 non-STEC was subsequently genotyped using a set of 283 polymorphisms identified by whole genome sequencing, resulting in 64 unique genotypes. Phylogenetic analyses identified seven clusters within the O26 strains. The seven clusters did not distinguish between isolates originating from humans or cattle; however, clusters did correspond with particular virulence gene profiles. Human and non-human-derived strains harboring stx1 clustered separately from strains harboring stx2, strains harboring eae, and non-STEC strains. Strains harboring stx2 were more closely related to non-STEC strains and strains harboring eae than to strains harboring stx1. The finding of human and cattle-derived strains with the same polymorphism derived genotypes and similar virulence gene profiles, provides evidence that similar strains are found in cattle and humans and transmission between the two species may occur.

  16. Cross-neutralizing antibodies to pandemic 2009 H1N1 and recent seasonal H1N1 influenza A strains influenced by a mutation in hemagglutinin subunit 2.

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    Wei Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus (2009 H1N1 differs from H1N1 strains that circulated in the past 50 years, but resembles the A/New Jersey/1976 H1N1 strain used in the 1976 swine influenza vaccine. We investigated whether sera from persons immunized with the 1976 swine influenza or recent seasonal influenza vaccines, or both, neutralize 2009 H1N1. Using retroviral pseudovirions bearing hemagglutinins on their surface (HA-pseudotypes, we found that 77% of the sera collected in 1976 after immunization with the A/New Jersey/1976 H1N1 swine influenza vaccine neutralized 2009 H1N1. Forty five percent also neutralized A/New Caledonia/20/1999 H1N1, a strain used in seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2000/01-2006/07 seasons. Among adults aged 48-64 who received the swine influenza vaccine in 1976 and recent seasonal influenza vaccines during the 2004/05-2008/09 seasons, 83% had sera that neutralized 2009 H1N1. However, 68% of age-matched subjects who received the same seasonal influenza vaccines, but did not receive the 1976 swine influenza vaccine, also had sera that neutralized 2009 H1N1. Sera from both 1976 and contemporary cohorts frequently had cross-neutralizing antibodies to 2009 H1N1 and A/New Caledonia/20/1999 that mapped to hemagglutinin subunit 2 (HA2. A conservative mutation in HA2 corresponding to a residue in the A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 and A/Brisbane/59/2007 H1N1 strains that circulated in the 2006/07 and 2007/08 influenza seasons, respectively, abrogated this neutralization. These findings highlight a cross-neutralization determinant influenced by a point mutation in HA2 and suggest that HA2 may be evolving under direct or indirect immune pressure.

  17. Avirulent Marek's disease virus type 1 strain 814 vectored vaccine expressing avian influenza (AI virus H5 haemagglutinin induced better protection than turkey herpesvirus vectored AI vaccine.

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    Hongyu Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Herpesvirus of turkey (HVT as a vector to express the haemagglutinin (HA of avian influenza virus (AIV H5 was developed and its protection against lethal Marek's disease virus (MDV and highly pathogenic AIV (HPAIV challenges was evaluated previously. It is well-known that avirulemt MDV type 1 vaccines are more effective than HVT in prevention of lethal MDV infection. To further increase protective efficacy against HPAIV and lethal MDV, a recombinant MDV type 1 strain 814 was developed to express HA gene of HPAIV H5N1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A recombinant MDV-1 strain 814 expressing HA gene of HPAIV H5N1 virus A/goose/Guangdong/3/96 at the US2 site (rMDV-HA was developed under the control of a human CMV immediate-early promoter. The HA expression in the rMDV-HA was tested by immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses, and in vitro and in vivo growth properties of rMDV-HA were also analyzed. Furthermore, we evaluated and compared the protective immunity of rMDV-HA and previously constructed rHVT-HA against HPAIV and lethal MDV. Vaccination of chickens with rMDV-HA induced 80% protection against HPAIV, which was better than the protection rate by rHVT-HA (66.7%. In the animal study with MDV challenge, chickens immunized with rMDV-HA were completely protected against virulent MDV strain J-1 whereas rHVT-HA only induced 80% protection with the same challenge dose. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The rMDV-HA vaccine was more effective than rHVT-HA vaccine for protection against lethal MDV and HPAIV challenges. Therefore, avirulent MDV type 1 vaccine is a better vector than HVT for development of a recombinant live virus vaccine against virulent MDV and HPAIV in poultry.

  18. Protection against multiple influenza A virus strains induced by candidate recombinant vaccine based on heterologous M2e peptides linked to flagellin.

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    Liudmila A Stepanova

    Full Text Available Matrix 2 protein ectodomain (M2e is considered a promising candidate for a broadly protective influenza vaccine. M2e-based vaccines against human influenza A provide only partial protection against avian influenza viruses because of differences in the M2e sequences. In this work, we evaluated the possibility of obtaining equal protection and immune response by using recombinant protein on the basis of flagellin as a carrier of the M2e peptides of human and avian influenza A viruses. Recombinant protein was generated by the fusion of two tandem copies of consensus M2e sequence from human influenza A and two copies of M2e from avian A/H5N1 viruses to flagellin (Flg-2M2eh2M2ek. Intranasal immunisation of Balb/c mice with recombinant protein significantly elicited anti-M2e IgG in serum, IgG and sIgA in BAL. Antibodies induced by the fusion protein Flg-2M2eh2M2ek bound efficiently to synthetic peptides corresponding to the human consensus M2e sequence as well as to the M2e sequence of A/Chicken/Kurgan/05/05 RG (H5N1 and recognised native M2e epitopes exposed on the surface of the MDCK cells infected with A/PR/8/34 (H1N1 and A/Chicken/Kurgan/05/05 RG (H5N1 to an equal degree. Immunisation led to both anti-M2e IgG1 and IgG2a response with IgG1 prevalence. We observed a significant intracellular production of IL-4, but not IFN-γ, by CD4+ T-cells in spleen of mice following immunisation with Flg-2M2eh2M2ek. Immunisation with the Flg-2M2eh2M2ek fusion protein provided similar protection from lethal challenge with human influenza A viruses (H1N1, H3N2 and avian influenza virus (H5N1. Immunised mice experienced significantly less weight loss and decreased lung viral titres compared to control mice. The data obtained show the potential for the development of an M2e-flagellin candidate influenza vaccine with broad spectrum protection against influenza A viruses of various origins.

  19. Protection against Multiple Influenza A Virus Strains Induced by Candidate Recombinant Vaccine Based on Heterologous M2e Peptides Linked to Flagellin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Anna A.; Potapchuk, Marina V.; Korotkov, Alexandr V.; Sergeeva, Mariia V.; Kasianenko, Marina A.; Kuprianov, Victor V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Tsybalova, Liudmila M.; Skryabin, Konstantin G.; Kiselev, Oleg I.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix 2 protein ectodomain (M2e) is considered a promising candidate for a broadly protective influenza vaccine. M2e-based vaccines against human influenza A provide only partial protection against avian influenza viruses because of differences in the M2e sequences. In this work, we evaluated the possibility of obtaining equal protection and immune response by using recombinant protein on the basis of flagellin as a carrier of the M2e peptides of human and avian influenza A viruses. Recombinant protein was generated by the fusion of two tandem copies of consensus M2e sequence from human influenza A and two copies of M2e from avian A/H5N1 viruses to flagellin (Flg-2M2eh2M2ek). Intranasal immunisation of Balb/c mice with recombinant protein significantly elicited anti-M2e IgG in serum, IgG and sIgA in BAL. Antibodies induced by the fusion protein Flg-2M2eh2M2ek bound efficiently to synthetic peptides corresponding to the human consensus M2e sequence as well as to the M2e sequence of A/Chicken/Kurgan/05/05 RG (H5N1) and recognised native M2e epitopes exposed on the surface of the MDCK cells infected with A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) and A/Chicken/Kurgan/05/05 RG (H5N1) to an equal degree. Immunisation led to both anti-M2e IgG1 and IgG2a response with IgG1 prevalence. We observed a significant intracellular production of IL-4, but not IFN-γ, by CD4+ T-cells in spleen of mice following immunisation with Flg-2M2eh2M2ek. Immunisation with the Flg-2M2eh2M2ek fusion protein provided similar protection from lethal challenge with human influenza A viruses (H1N1, H3N2) and avian influenza virus (H5N1). Immunised mice experienced significantly less weight loss and decreased lung viral titres compared to control mice. The data obtained show the potential for the development of an M2e-flagellin candidate influenza vaccine with broad spectrum protection against influenza A viruses of various origins. PMID:25799221

  20. Highly Predictive Model for a Protective Immune Response to the A(H1N1)pdm2009 Influenza Strain after Seasonal Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürchott, Karsten; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Bozzetti, Cecilia; Pohlmann, Dominika; Stervbo, Ulrik; Warth, Sarah; Mälzer, Julia Nora; Waldner, Julian; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Olek, Sven; Grützkau, Andreas; Babel, Nina; Thiel, Andreas; Neumann, Avidan Uriel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the immune response after vaccination against new influenza strains is highly important in case of an imminent influenza pandemic and for optimization of seasonal vaccination strategies in high risk population groups, especially the elderly. Models predicting the best sero-conversion response among the three strains in the seasonal vaccine were recently suggested. However, these models use a large number of variables and/or information post- vaccination. Here in an exploratory pilot study, we analyzed the baseline immune status in young (H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus strain and correlated it with the serological response to that specific strain after seasonal influenza vaccination. Extensive multi-chromatic FACS analysis (36 lymphocyte sub-populations measured) was used to quantitatively assess the cellular immune status before vaccination. We identified CD4+ T cells, and amongst them particularly naive CD4+ T cells, as the best correlates for a successful A(H1N1)pdm09 immune response. Moreover, the number of influenza strains a donor was sero-negative to at baseline (NSSN) in addition to age, as expected, were important predictive factors. Age, NSSN and CD4+ T cell count at baseline together predicted sero-protection (HAI≥40) to A(H1N1)pdm09 with a high accuracy of 89% (p-value = 0.00002). An additional validation study (N = 43 vaccinees sero-negative to A(H1N1)pdm09) has confirmed the predictive value of age, NSSN and baseline CD4+ counts (accuracy = 85%, p-value = 0.0000004). Furthermore, the inclusion of donors at ages 31-50 had shown that the age predictive function is not linear with age but rather a sigmoid with a midpoint at about 50 years. Using these results we suggest a clinically relevant prediction model that gives the probability for non-protection to A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza strain after seasonal multi-valent vaccination as a continuous function of age, NSSN and baseline CD4 count.

  1. Highly Predictive Model for a Protective Immune Response to the A(H1N1pdm2009 Influenza Strain after Seasonal Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Jürchott

    Full Text Available Understanding the immune response after vaccination against new influenza strains is highly important in case of an imminent influenza pandemic and for optimization of seasonal vaccination strategies in high risk population groups, especially the elderly. Models predicting the best sero-conversion response among the three strains in the seasonal vaccine were recently suggested. However, these models use a large number of variables and/or information post- vaccination. Here in an exploratory pilot study, we analyzed the baseline immune status in young (<31 years, N = 17 versus elderly (≥50 years, N = 20 donors sero-negative to the newly emerged A(H1N1pdm09 influenza virus strain and correlated it with the serological response to that specific strain after seasonal influenza vaccination. Extensive multi-chromatic FACS analysis (36 lymphocyte sub-populations measured was used to quantitatively assess the cellular immune status before vaccination. We identified CD4+ T cells, and amongst them particularly naive CD4+ T cells, as the best correlates for a successful A(H1N1pdm09 immune response. Moreover, the number of influenza strains a donor was sero-negative to at baseline (NSSN in addition to age, as expected, were important predictive factors. Age, NSSN and CD4+ T cell count at baseline together predicted sero-protection (HAI≥40 to A(H1N1pdm09 with a high accuracy of 89% (p-value = 0.00002. An additional validation study (N = 43 vaccinees sero-negative to A(H1N1pdm09 has confirmed the predictive value of age, NSSN and baseline CD4+ counts (accuracy = 85%, p-value = 0.0000004. Furthermore, the inclusion of donors at ages 31-50 had shown that the age predictive function is not linear with age but rather a sigmoid with a midpoint at about 50 years. Using these results we suggest a clinically relevant prediction model that gives the probability for non-protection to A(H1N1pdm09 influenza strain after seasonal multi-valent vaccination as a

  2. Highly Predictive Model for a Protective Immune Response to the A(H1N1)pdm2009 Influenza Strain after Seasonal Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzetti, Cecilia; Pohlmann, Dominika; Stervbo, Ulrik; Warth, Sarah; Mälzer, Julia Nora; Waldner, Julian; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Olek, Sven; Grützkau, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the immune response after vaccination against new influenza strains is highly important in case of an imminent influenza pandemic and for optimization of seasonal vaccination strategies in high risk population groups, especially the elderly. Models predicting the best sero-conversion response among the three strains in the seasonal vaccine were recently suggested. However, these models use a large number of variables and/or information post- vaccination. Here in an exploratory pilot study, we analyzed the baseline immune status in young (<31 years, N = 17) versus elderly (≥50 years, N = 20) donors sero-negative to the newly emerged A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus strain and correlated it with the serological response to that specific strain after seasonal influenza vaccination. Extensive multi-chromatic FACS analysis (36 lymphocyte sub-populations measured) was used to quantitatively assess the cellular immune status before vaccination. We identified CD4+ T cells, and amongst them particularly naive CD4+ T cells, as the best correlates for a successful A(H1N1)pdm09 immune response. Moreover, the number of influenza strains a donor was sero-negative to at baseline (NSSN) in addition to age, as expected, were important predictive factors. Age, NSSN and CD4+ T cell count at baseline together predicted sero-protection (HAI≥40) to A(H1N1)pdm09 with a high accuracy of 89% (p-value = 0.00002). An additional validation study (N = 43 vaccinees sero-negative to A(H1N1)pdm09) has confirmed the predictive value of age, NSSN and baseline CD4+ counts (accuracy = 85%, p-value = 0.0000004). Furthermore, the inclusion of donors at ages 31–50 had shown that the age predictive function is not linear with age but rather a sigmoid with a midpoint at about 50 years. Using these results we suggest a clinically relevant prediction model that gives the probability for non-protection to A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza strain after seasonal multi-valent vaccination as a continuous

  3. Serologic cross-reactivity among humans and birds infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza A subtype H5N1 viruses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Ma, Chi; Liu, Zhonghua; He, Wei

    2011-03-30

    To study immunogenicity and serologic cross-reactivity of hemagglutinins (HAs) among humans and birds infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, four representative H5N1 HA genes from humans and birds infected with distinct genetic clusters of H5N1 viruses in China were cloned, and several H5N1 infected human serum and H5N1 positive bird serum samples were used. Recombinant HA proteins were generated for ELISA assays and pseudotype viruses containing HAs were produced for neutralization assays and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests. We found significant differences among clades compared to species in binding, neutralization and HI activity of H5N1 strains isolated from birds. While significant differences were observed among species in H5N1 isolated from humans, investigation of H5N1 infected human and avian sera provided evidence that the pressure from nAb may be a driving force for positive selection. Therefore, improved anti-viral nAb therapies could block avian influenza transmission in humans.

  4. Efficacy of an inactivated bivalent vaccine against the prevalent strains of Newcastle disease and H9N2 avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Huiming; Xu, Hongjun; Ma, Zengbin; Zhang, Guozhong

    2017-03-16

    Newcastle disease (ND) and avian influenza subtype H9N2 (H9N2 AI) are two of the most important diseases of poultry, causing severe economic losses in the global poultry industry. Vaccination is an effective way to prevent and control the spread of ND virus (NDV) and H9N2 AI virus (AIV), but the antigenic differences between the current circulating strains and the vaccine strains might account for recent ND and H9N2 AI outbreaks in vaccinated poultry flocks. We developed an inactivated bivalent H9N2 and NDV vaccine based on the current prevalent strains of H9N2 AIV and NDV in China and evaluated its efficacy in chickens in this study. The results indicated that the inactivated bivalent vaccine could induce a fast antibody response in vaccinated chickens. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer in the sera increased rapidly, and the highest HI titer was observed at 4 weeks post-vaccination (wpv) with a mean titre of 8.6 log2 for NDV and 9.5 log2 for H9N2. Up until 15 wpv, HI titers were still detectable at a high level of over 6 log2. The immunized chickens showed no signs of disease after challenge at 3 wpv with the prevalent strains of NDV and H9N2 AIV isolated in 2012-2014. Moreover, viral shedding was completely inhibited in vaccinated chickens after challenge with H9N2 AIV and inhibited by at least 90% with NDV compared to the controls at 5dpc. Our findings suggest that the inactivated NDV and H9N2 vaccine induces a fast and strong antibody response in vaccinated chickens and is efficacious in poultry against NDVs and H9N2 AIVs.

  5. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Inoue, Yuji; Yasugi, Mayo; Yamashita, Akifumi; Ramadhany, Ririn; Arai, Yasuha; Du, Anariwa; Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Ibrahim, Madiha S; Daidoji, Tomo; Nakaya, Takaaki; Ono, Ken-ichiro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Yohei

    2014-07-18

    Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short α-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the α-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. CROSSREACTIVE ANTIBODIES AND MEMORY T CELLS TO HUMAN AND ZOONOTIC INFLUENZA A VIRUSES IN VOLUNTEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Losev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists a real hazard of transferring zoonotic influenza A viruses, either swine, or avian, into human population. In such case, severity of such pandemics depends on the pathogen-specific immunity in the population. Virtual absence of such immunity in humans was declared in the literature. In this work, we assessed systemic, local, and T-cell immunity to potentially pandemic H3N2sw, H5N1, H5N2, H7N3, H7N9 and H2N2 influenza A viruses in a group of healthy adults of different age. Our results indicate that these subjects develop the following immune reactions: (i local (i.e., nasal IgA and cellular (CD4+ and CD8v memory T cells heterosubtypic immunity, in absence of detectable virus-specific serum antibodies to avian influenza A viruses; (ii Local immune responses (as nasal IgA to human A (H2N2 virus which circulated in 1957-1968 were detected both in subjects who could be primed at that time, but also in subjects born after 1968; (iii full-scale systemic and local immunity to potentially pandemic А (H3N2sw swine virus was found in the group. Conclusion. In order of proper epidemiological forecasts and planning appropriate preventive measures for potentially pandemic Influenza A viruses, a regular monitoring of collective immunity should be performed using different adaptive markers. In this respect, any conclusion based on molecular analysis only could lead to considerable mistakes, and should be accomplished by the mentioned immunological studies.

  7. Characterization and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies developed for typing influenza A and influenza B viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Walls, H H; Harmon, M W; Slagle, J J; Stocksdale, C; Kendal, A P

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that are broadly reactive with influenza A or influenza B viruses were produced as stable reagents for typing influenza viruses. Monoclonal antibodies to influenza A were specific for either matrix protein or nucleoprotein. The antibodies to influenza B were specific for nucleoprotein or hemagglutinin protein. In an enzyme immunoassay procedure, influenza A antibodies detected H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza A virus strains collected between 1934 and 1984. Each of the inf...

  8. High mannose-specific lectin (KAA-2) from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii potently inhibits influenza virus infection in a strain-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Hirayama, Makoto; Hori, Kanji

    2011-02-11

    The carbohydrate binding profile of the red algal lectin KAA-2 from Kappaphycus alvarezii was evaluated by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method using pyridylaminated oligosaccharides. KAA-2 bound exclusively to high mannose type N-glycans, but not to other glycans such as complex type, hybrid type, or the pentasaccharide core of N-glycans. This lectin exhibited a preference for an exposed α1-3 Man on a D2 arm in a similar manner to Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA-2), which shows various biological activities, such as anti-HIV and anti-carcinogenic activity. We tested the anti-influenza virus activity of KAA-2 against various strains including the recent pandemic H1N1-2009 influenza virus. KAA-2 inhibited infection of various influenza strains with EC50s of low nanomolar levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy using an anti-influenza antibody demonstrated that the antiviral activity of KAA-2 was exerted by interference with virus entry into host cells. This mechanism was further confirmed by the evidence of direct binding of KAA-2 to a viral envelope protein, hemagglutinin (HA), using an ELISA assay. These results indicate that this lectin would be useful as a novel antiviral reagent for the prevention of infection.

  9. Is avian influenza virus A(H5N1) a real threat to human health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, A; Ranghiero, A; Zanetti, A; Pariani, E

    2011-09-01

    The A(H5N1) influenza remains a disease of birds with a significant species barrier: in the presence of some tens million cases of infection in poultry--with a wide geographical spread--, only a few hundreds cases have occurred in humans. To date, human cases have been reported in 15 countries--mainly in Asia--and all were related to the onset of outbreaks in poultry. A peak of H5N1 human cases was recorded in 2006, then decreasing in subsequent years. Despite this trend, the H5N1 virus still represents a possible threat to human health, considering that more than half of human cases of H5N1 have been fatal. Moreover, despite the drop in the number of cases, the risk of a novel pandemic cannot be excluded, since H5N1 continues to circulate in poultry in countries with elevated human population density and where monitoring systems are not fully appropriate. In addition, there is a major global concern about the potential occurrence of a reassortment between the 2009 pandemic H1N1 and the highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses following a co-infection in a susceptible host. Therefore, the implementation of appropriate surveillance and containment measures is crucial in order to minimize such risk. In conclusion, H5N1 avian influenza is still a rare disease in humans but its clinical severe outcome requires a careful monitoring of the virus's ability to evolve and to trigger a new pandemic.

  10. The asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 outcompetes uropathogenic E. coli strains in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.; Schembri, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). In contrast to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which causes symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI), very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the human urinary tract....... The prototype ABU E. coli strain 83972 was originally isolated from a girl who had carried it asymptomatically for 3 years. Deliberate colonization of UTI-susceptible individuals with E. coli 83972 has been used successfully as an alternative approach for the treatment of patients who are refractory...... to conventional therapy. Colonization with strain 83972 appears to prevent infection with UPEC strains in such patients despite the fact that this strain is unable to express the primary adhesins involved in UTI, viz. P and type 1 fimbriae. Here we investigated the growth characteristics of E. coli 83972 in human...

  11. Single Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differential Identification of Human and Avian Influenza Virus Types, Subtypes, and Emergent Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    novel A/H1N1 outbreak strain, raising immediate concerns for public health as well as for pork and poultry production industries worldwide. As with...outbreak management have reviewed the pathology of influenza with respect to rapid deterioration and patient deaths attributable to secondary

  12. The Genomic Contributions of Avian H1N1 Influenza A Viruses to the Evolution of Mammalian Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçer, Zeynep A; Carter, Robert; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Webster, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Among the influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild aquatic birds, only H1, H2, and H3 subtypes have caused epidemics in humans. H1N1 viruses of avian origin have also caused 3 of 5 pandemics. To understand the reappearance of H1N1 in the context of pandemic emergence, we investigated whether avian H1N1 IAVs have contributed to the evolution of human, swine, and 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we concluded that the polymerase gene segments (especially PB2 and PA) circulating in North American avian H1N1 IAVs have been reintroduced to swine multiple times, resulting in different lineages that led to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. Moreover, the similar topologies of hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein and neuraminidase and matrix gene segments suggest that each surface glycoprotein coevolved with an internal gene segment within the H1N1 subtype. The genotype of avian H1N1 IAVs of Charadriiformes origin isolated in 2009 differs from that of avian H1N1 IAVs of Anseriformes origin. When the antigenic sites in the hemagglutinin of all 31 North American avian H1N1 IAVs were considered, 60%-80% of the amino acids at the antigenic sites were identical to those in 1918 and/or 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Thus, although the pathogenicity of avian H1N1 IAVs could not be inferred from the phylogeny due to the small dataset, the evolutionary process within the H1N1 IAV subtype suggests that the circulation of H1N1 IAVs in wild birds poses a continuous threat for future influenza pandemics in humans.

  13. Differentiation of human influenza A viruses including the pandemic subtype H1N1/2009 by conventional multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Yuki; Odagiri, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Khandaker, Irona; Shimabukuro, Kozue; Sawayama, Rumi; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2010-09-01

    April 2009 witnessed the emergence of a novel H1N1 influenza A virus infecting the human population. Currently, pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses are co-circulating in human populations. Understanding the course of the emerging pandemic virus is important. It is still unknown how the novel virus co-circulates with or outcompetes seasonal viruses. Sustainable and detailed influenza surveillance is required throughout the world including developing countries. In the present study, a multiplex PCR using four primers was developed, which was designed to differentiate the pandemic H1N1 virus from the seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 viruses, to obtain amplicons of different sizes. Multiplex PCR analysis could clearly differentiate the three subtypes of human influenza A virus. This assay was performed using 206 clinical samples collected in 2009 in Japan. Between February and April, four samples were subtyped as seasonal H1N1 and four as seasonal H3N2. All samples collected after July were subtyped as pandemic H1N1. Currently, pandemic viruses seem to have replaced seasonal viruses almost completely in Japan. This is a highly sensitive method and its cost is low. Influenza surveillance using this assay would provide significant information on the epidemiology of both pandemic and seasonal influenza.

  14. Chalcones as novel influenza A (H1N1) neuraminidase inhibitors from Glycyrrhiza inflata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Lee, Hong Sik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of highly pathogenic influenza A virus strains, such as the new H1N1 swine influenza (novel influenza), represents a serious threat to global human health. During our course of an anti-influenza screening program on natural products, one new licochalcone G (1) and seven known (2......-8) chalcones were isolated as active principles from the acetone extract of Glycyrrhiza inflata. Compounds 3 and 6 without prenyl group showed strong inhibitory effects on various neuraminidases from influenza viral strains, H1N1, H9N2, novel H1N1 (WT), and oseltamivir-resistant novel H1N1 (H274Y) expressed...... in 293T cells. In addition, the efficacy of oseltamivir with the presence of compound 3 (5 μM) was increased against H274Y neuraminidase. This evidence of synergistic effect makes this inhibitor to have a potential possibility for control of pandemic infection by oseltamivir-resistant influenza virus....

  15. Molecular Characterization of China Human Rabies Vaccine Strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan Tao; Na Han; Zhenyang Guo; Qing Tang; Simon Rayner; Guodong Liang

    2013-01-01

    To understand the molecular characteristics of China human rabies vaccine strains,we report the full-length genome of the aG strain and present a comprehensive analysis of this strain and almost all available lyssavirus genomes (58 strains) from GenBank (as of Jan 6,2011).It is generally considered that the G protein plays a predominant role in determining the pathogenicity of the virus,to this end we predicted the tertiary structure of the G protein of aG strain,CTN 181 strain and wild type strain HN 10 based on the crystal structure of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G.The predicted RABV G structure has a similar topology to VSV G and the ectodomain can be divided into 4 distinct domains DI-DIV.By mapping the characterized mutations to this structure between China vaccine strains and their close street strains,we speculate that the G303(P-H) mutations of CTN181 and HN10 causing D Ⅱ 3D change may be associated with the attenuated virulence in both strains.Specifically,the two signature mutations (G165P and G231P) in the aG strain are withinβsheets,suggesting that both sites are of structural importance.

  16. Human Phase 1 trial of low-dose inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David L; Sajkov, Dimitar; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Wilks, Samuel H; Aban, Malet; Barr, Ian G; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-07-19

    Influenza vaccines are usually non-adjuvanted but addition of adjuvant may improve immunogenicity and permit dose-sparing, critical for vaccine supply in the event of an influenza pandemic. The aim of this first-in-man study was to determine the effect of delta inulin adjuvant on the safety and immunogenicity of a reduced dose seasonal influenza vaccine. Healthy male and female adults aged 18-65years were recruited to participate in a randomized controlled study to compare the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a reduced-dose 2007 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant (LTIV+Adj) when compared to a full-dose of the standard TIV vaccine which does not contain an adjuvant. LTIV+Adj provided equivalent immunogenicity to standard TIV vaccine as assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays against each vaccine strain as well as against a number of heterosubtypic strains. HI responses were sustained at 3months post-immunisation in both groups. Antibody landscapes against a large panel of H3N2 influenza viruses showed distinct age effects whereby subjects over 40years old had a bimodal baseline HI distribution pattern, with the highest HI titers against the very oldest H3N2 isolates and with a second HI peak against influenza isolates from the last 5-10years. By contrast, subjects >40years had a unimodal baseline HI distribution with peak recognition of H3N2 isolates from approximately 20years ago. The reduced dose TIV vaccine containing Advax adjuvant was well tolerated and no safety issues were identified. Hence, delta inulin may be a useful adjuvant for use in seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12607000599471.

  17. Changing selective pressure during antigenic changes in human influenza H3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Blackburne

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution of influenza viruses presents difficulties in maintaining the optimal efficiency of vaccines. Amino acid substitutions result in antigenic drift, a process whereby antisera raised in response to one virus have reduced effectiveness against future viruses. Interestingly, while amino acid substitutions occur at a relatively constant rate, the antigenic properties of H3 move in a discontinuous, step-wise manner. It is not clear why this punctuated evolution occurs, whether this represents simply the fact that some substitutions affect these properties more than others, or if this is indicative of a changing relationship between the virus and the host. In addition, the role of changing glycosylation of the haemagglutinin in these shifts in antigenic properties is unknown. We analysed the antigenic drift of HA1 from human influenza H3 using a model of sequence change that allows for variation in selective pressure at different locations in the sequence, as well as at different parts of the phylogenetic tree. We detect significant changes in selective pressure that occur preferentially during major changes in antigenic properties. Despite the large increase in glycosylation during the past 40 years, changes in glycosylation did not correlate either with changes in antigenic properties or with significantly more rapid changes in selective pressure. The locations that undergo changes in selective pressure are largely in places undergoing adaptive evolution, in antigenic locations, and in locations or near locations undergoing substitutions that characterise the change in antigenicity of the virus. Our results suggest that the relationship of the virus to the host changes with time, with the shifts in antigenic properties representing changes in this relationship. This suggests that the virus and host immune system are evolving different methods to counter each other. While we are able to characterise the rapid increase in

  18. Animal Models for Influenza Virus Pathogenesis and Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anice C. Lowen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus infection of humans results in a respiratory disease that ranges in severity from sub-clinical infection to primary viral pneumonia that can result in death. The clinical effects of infection vary with the exposure history, age and immune status of the host, and also the virulence of the influenza strain. In humans, the virus is transmitted through either aerosol or contact-based transfer of infectious respiratory secretions. As is evidenced by most zoonotic influenza virus infections, not all strains that can infect humans are able to transmit from person-to-person. Animal models of influenza are essential to research efforts aimed at understanding the viral and host factors that contribute to the disease and transmission outcomes of influenza virus infection in humans. These models furthermore allow the pre-clinical testing of antiviral drugs and vaccines aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality in the population through amelioration of the virulence or transmissibility of influenza viruses. Mice, ferrets, guinea pigs, cotton rats, hamsters and macaques have all been used to study influenza viruses and therapeutics targeting them. Each model presents unique advantages and disadvantages, which will be discussed herein.

  19. Animal Models for Influenza Virus Pathogenesis and Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, Nicole M.; Lowen, Anice C.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza virus infection of humans results in a respiratory disease that ranges in severity from sub-clinical infection to primary viral pneumonia that can result in death. The clinical effects of infection vary with the exposure history, age and immune status of the host, and also the virulence of the influenza strain. In humans, the virus is transmitted through either aerosol or contact-based transfer of infectious respiratory secretions. As is evidenced by most zoonotic influenza virus infections, not all strains that can infect humans are able to transmit from person-to-person. Animal models of influenza are essential to research efforts aimed at understanding the viral and host factors that contribute to the disease and transmission outcomes of influenza virus infection in humans. These models furthermore allow the pre-clinical testing of antiviral drugs and vaccines aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality in the population through amelioration of the virulence or transmissibility of influenza viruses. Mice, ferrets, guinea pigs, cotton rats, hamsters and macaques have all been used to study influenza viruses and therapeutics targeting them. Each model presents unique advantages and disadvantages, which will be discussed herein. PMID:21442033

  20. Absence of detectable influenza RNA transmitted via aerosol during various human respiratory activities--experiments from Singapore and Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian W Tang

    Full Text Available Two independent studies by two separate research teams (from Hong Kong and Singapore failed to detect any influenza RNA landing on, or inhaled by, a life-like, human manikin target, after exposure to naturally influenza-infected volunteers. For the Hong Kong experiments, 9 influenza-infected volunteers were recruited to breathe, talk/count and cough, from 0.1 m and 0.5 m distance, onto a mouth-breathing manikin. Aerosolised droplets exhaled from the volunteers and entering the manikin's mouth were collected with PTFE filters and an aerosol sampler, in separate experiments. Virus detection was performed using an in-house influenza RNA reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay. No influenza RNA was detected from any of the PTFE filters or air samples. For the Singapore experiments, 6 influenza-infected volunteers were asked to breathe (nasal/mouth breathing, talk (counting in English/second language, cough (from 1 m/0.1 m away and laugh, onto a thermal, breathing manikin. The manikin's face was swabbed at specific points (around both eyes, the nostrils and the mouth before and after exposure to each of these respiratory activities, and was cleaned between each activity with medical grade alcohol swabs. Shadowgraph imaging was used to record the generation of these respiratory aerosols from the infected volunteers and their impact onto the target manikin. No influenza RNA was detected from any of these swabs with either team's in-house diagnostic influenza assays. All the influenza-infected volunteers had diagnostic swabs taken at recruitment that confirmed influenza (A/H1, A/H3 or B infection with high viral loads, ranging from 10(5-10(8 copies/mL (Hong Kong volunteers/assay and 10(4-10(7 copies/mL influenza viral RNA (Singapore volunteers/assay. These findings suggest that influenza RNA may not be readily transmitted from naturally-infected human source to susceptible recipients via these natural respiratory activities, within

  1. Entry Properties and Entry Inhibitors of a Human H7N9 Influenza Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Youhui Si; Jianguo Li; Yuqiang Niu; Xiuying Liu; Lili Ren; Li Guo; Min Cheng; Hongli Zhou; Jianwei Wang; Qi Jin; Wei Yang

    2014-01-01

    The recently identified human infections with a novel avian influenza H7N9 virus in China raise important questions regarding possible risk to humans. However, the entry properties and tropism of this H7N9 virus were poorly understood. Moreover, neuraminidase inhibitor resistant H7N9 isolates were recently observed in two patients and correlated with poor clinical outcomes. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the entry properties of H7N9 virus, design and evaluate inhibitors for H7N9 virus e...

  2. Preferential recognition of avian-like receptors in human influenza A H7N9 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; de Vries, Robert P; Zhu, Xueyong; Nycholat, Corwin M; McBride, Ryan; Yu, Wenli; Paulson, James C; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-12-06

    The 2013 outbreak of avian-origin H7N9 influenza in eastern China has raised concerns about its ability to transmit in the human population. The hemagglutinin glycoprotein of most human H7N9 viruses carries Leu(226), a residue linked to adaptation of H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic viruses to human receptors. However, glycan array analysis of the H7 hemagglutinin reveals negligible binding to humanlike α2-6-linked receptors and strong preference for a subset of avian-like α2-3-linked glycans recognized by all avian H7 viruses. Crystal structures of H7N9 hemagglutinin and six hemagglutinin-glycan complexes have elucidated the structural basis for preferential recognition of avian-like receptors. These findings suggest that the current human H7N9 viruses are poorly adapted for efficient human-to-human transmission.

  3. Influenza em animais heterotérmicos Influenza in heterothermics

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    Dalva Assunção Portari Mancini

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi pesquisar Ortomyxovirus em animais heterotérmicos. Coletou-se sangue de serpentes dos gêneros Bothrops e Crotalus e de sapo e rãs dos gêneros Bufo e Rana, para a detecção dos receptores de hemácias e anticorpos específicos, ao vírus influenza, pelos testes de hemaglutinação e inibição da hemaglutinação, respectivamente. Pelo teste de hemaglutinação, verificou-se que serpentes e sapos em cativeiro apresentaram receptores em suas hemácias para o vírus influenza, humano e eqüino do tipo A e tipo B. O mesmo ocorreu com serpentes recém chegadas. Quanto ao teste de inibição da hemaglutinação dos soros dos répteis observou-se títulos protetores de anticorpos aos vírus influenza tipo A (origens humana e eqüina e tipo B. Com soro de sapo não se observou reação de inibição da hemaglutinação porém, 83,3% das rãs obtiveram médias de 40UIH para algumas cepas. Conclui-se que animais heterotérmicos podem oferecer condições de hospedeiros aos vírus influenza, assim como susceptibilidade à infecção.The objective was to study Orthomyxovirus in heterothermic animals. Blood samples from snakes (genus Bothrops and Crotalus and from toads and frogs (genus Bufo and Rana were collected to evaluate the red cell receptors and antibodies specific to influenza virus by the hemagglutination and hemagglutination inhibition tests, respectively. Both snakes and toads kept in captivity presented receptors in their red cells and antibodies specific to either influenza virus type A (human and equine origin or influenza type B. The same was observed with recently captured snakes. Concerning the influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibodies protective levels were observed in the reptiles' serum, against influenza type A and type B. Unlike the toads, 83.3% of the frogs presented mean levels of Ab 40HIU for some influenza strains. It was concluded that heterothermic animals could offer host conditions to the influenza

  4. Protection of human influenza vaccines against a reassortant swine influenza virus of pandemic H1N1 origin using a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunorat, Jirapat; Charoenvisal, Nataya; Woonwong, Yonlayong; Kedkovid, Roongtham; Jittimanee, Supattra; Sitthicharoenchai, Panchan; Kesdangsakonwut, Sawang; Poolperm, Pariwat; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2017-02-28

    Since the pandemic H1N1 emergence in 2009 (pdmH1N1), many reassortant pdmH1N1 viruses emerged and found circulating in the pig population worldwide. Currently, commercial human subunit vaccines are used commonly to prevent the influenza symptom based on the WHO recommendation. In case of current reassortant swine influenza viruses transmitting from pigs to humans, the efficacy of current human influenza vaccines is of interest. In this study, influenza A negative pigs were vaccinated with selected commercial human subunit vaccines and challenged with rH3N2. All sera were tested with both HI and SN assays using four representative viruses from the surveillance data in 2012 (enH1N1, pdmH1N1, rH1N2 and rH3N2). The results showed no significant differences in clinical signs and macroscopic and microscopic findings among groups. However, all pig sera from vaccinated groups had protective HI titers to the enH1N1, pdmH1N1 and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward and had protective SN titers only to pdmH1N1and rH1N2 at 21DPV onward. SN test results appeared more specific than those of HI tests. All tested sera had no cross-reactivity against the rH3N2. Both studied human subunit vaccines failed to protect and to stop viral shedding with no evidence of serological reaction against rH3N2. SIV surveillance is essential for monitoring a novel SIV emergence potentially for zoonosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic characterization of an adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus that reveals improved replication rates in human lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wörmann, Xenia [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Lesch, Markus [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Steinbeis Innovation gGmbH, Center for Systems Biomedicine, Falkensee (Germany); Welke, Robert-William [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Abdurishid, Mirshat [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Sieben, Christian [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Geissner, Andreas [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Brinkmann, Volker [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Kastner, Markus [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Karner, Andreas [Center for Advanced Bioanalysis GmbH (CBL), Linz (Austria); Zhu, Rong; Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Anish, Chakkumkal [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Seeberger, Peter H. [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, Andreas [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); and others

    2016-05-15

    The 2009 influenza pandemic originated from a swine-origin H1N1 virus, which, although less pathogenic than anticipated, may acquire additional virulence-associated mutations in the future. To estimate the potential risk, we sequentially passaged the isolate A/Hamburg/04/2009 in A549 human lung epithelial cells. After passage 6, we observed a 100-fold increased replication rate. High-throughput sequencing of viral gene segments identified five dominant mutations, whose contribution to the enhanced growth was analyzed by reverse genetics. The increased replication rate was pinpointed to two mutations within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene segment (HA{sub 1} D130E, HA{sub 2} I91L), near the receptor binding site and the stem domain. The adapted virus also replicated more efficiently in mice in vivo. Enhanced replication rate correlated with increased fusion pH of the HA protein and a decrease in receptor affinity. Our data might be relevant for surveillance of pre-pandemic strains and development of high titer cell culture strains for vaccine production. - Highlights: • We observed a spontaneous mutation of a 2009-pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in vitro. • The adaptation led to a 100-fold rise in replication rate in human A549 cells. • Adaptation was caused by two mutations in the HA gene segment. • Adaptation correlates with increased fusion pH and decreased receptor affinity.

  6. Detection of Seasonal Influenza H1N1 and H3N2 Viruses using RT-PCR Assay during 2009 Pandemic Influenza in Golestan Province

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    Zhand, S. (MSc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The emergence of a novel H1N1influenza A virus of animal origin with transmissibility from human to human poses pandemic concern. Current subtypes of Seasonal influenza A viruses spread in human are influenza A H1N1 influenza A H3N2 and influenza type B viruses. The aim of this study was to determine current strains of the H3N2 and new H1N1 subtypes of influenza A virus from patients suspected influenza infection in 2009 flu pandemic in Golestan province, Iran. Material and Methods: In this descriptive study, respiratory samples (n = 153 from patients with acute respiratory symptoms were collected in 2009 flu pandemic applied during 2009 pandemic influenza in Golestan province. After reverse transcription of extracted viral RNA, PCR was developed for both H1N1and H3N2subtypes using CDC specific primers. Results: The mean age of patients was 16.59. Of them 45.1% were male. Thirteen (8.49% were infected with seasonal influenza H1N1 and 25(16.33% with seasonal H3N2influenza. Conclusion: The rate of infection with seasonal H1N1and H3N2is similar to other studies reported from Iran, but lower than the rate reported from other parts of the world

  7. The Therapeutic Effect of Pamidronate on Lethal Avian Influenza A H7N9 Virus Infected Humanized Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinping; Xiang, Zheng; Liu, Ming; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Lau, Siu-Ying; Lam, Kwok-Tai; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Li, Lanjuan; Chen, Honglin; Lau, Yu-Lung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Tu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    A novel avian influenza virus H7N9 infection occurred among human populations since 2013. Although the lack of sustained human-to-human transmission limited the epidemics caused by H7N9, the late presentation of most patients and the emergence of neuraminidase-resistant strains made the development of novel antiviral strategy against H7N9 in urgent demands. In this study, we evaluated the potential of pamidronate, a pharmacological phosphoantigen that can specifically boost human Vδ2-T-cell, on treating H7N9 virus-infected humanized mice. Our results showed that intraperitoneal injection of pamidronate could potently decrease the morbidity and mortality of H7N9-infected mice through controlling both viral replication and inflammation in affected lungs. More importantly, pamidronate treatment starting from 3 days after infection could still significantly ameliorate the severity of diseases in infected mice and improve their survival chance, whereas orally oseltamivir treatment starting at the same time showed no therapeutic effects. As for the mechanisms underlying pamidronate-based therapy, our in vitro data demonstrated that its antiviral effects were partly mediated by IFN-γ secreted from human Vδ2-T cells. Meanwhile, human Vδ2-T cells could directly kill virus-infected host cells in a perforin-, granzyme B- and CD137-dependent manner. As pamidronate has been used for osteoporosis treatment for more than 20 years, pamidronate-based therapy represents for a safe and readily available option for clinical trials to treat H7N9 infection. PMID:26285203

  8. The Therapeutic Effect of Pamidronate on Lethal Avian Influenza A H7N9 Virus Infected Humanized Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zheng

    Full Text Available A novel avian influenza virus H7N9 infection occurred among human populations since 2013. Although the lack of sustained human-to-human transmission limited the epidemics caused by H7N9, the late presentation of most patients and the emergence of neuraminidase-resistant strains made the development of novel antiviral strategy against H7N9 in urgent demands. In this study, we evaluated the potential of pamidronate, a pharmacological phosphoantigen that can specifically boost human Vδ2-T-cell, on treating H7N9 virus-infected humanized mice. Our results showed that intraperitoneal injection of pamidronate could potently decrease the morbidity and mortality of H7N9-infected mice through controlling both viral replication and inflammation in affected lungs. More importantly, pamidronate treatment starting from 3 days after infection could still significantly ameliorate the severity of diseases in infected mice and improve their survival chance, whereas orally oseltamivir treatment starting at the same time showed no therapeutic effects. As for the mechanisms underlying pamidronate-based therapy, our in vitro data demonstrated that its antiviral effects were partly mediated by IFN-γ secreted from human Vδ2-T cells. Meanwhile, human Vδ2-T cells could directly kill virus-infected host cells in a perforin-, granzyme B- and CD137-dependent manner. As pamidronate has been used for osteoporosis treatment for more than 20 years, pamidronate-based therapy represents for a safe and readily available option for clinical trials to treat H7N9 infection.

  9. Characterization of the IgA1 protease from the Brazilian purpuric fever strain F3031 of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, Glen; Smoot, Laura M; Actis, Luis A

    2005-09-15

    Brazilian purpuric fever is a severe vascular disease caused by an invasive clone of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius, which normally causes self-limiting eye infections. A previous genome subtraction procedure resulted in the isolation of a DNA fragment, which encodes a putative IgA1 protease, specific to the F3031 Brazilian purpuric fever type strain. Cloning and sequencing of the entire F3031 iga1 gene showed that the subtracted DNA fragment encompasses the iga1 region encoding the active site and the cleavage specificity determinant of the protein, which are different from the cognate regions of the proteases produced by other H. influenzae strains. Western and IgA cleavage assays together with clustering analysis showed that the F3031 IgA1 protease is most similar to the type 2 proteases produced by H. influenzae type c and e strains. Analysis of the promoter region of the F3031 iga1 gene revealed the presence of Fur binding sites. However, real-time PCR analysis and transcriptional fusion assays showed that the expression of iga1 is not regulated by iron or hemin under the conditions tested.

  10. Serological characterization of guinea pigs infected with H3N2 human influenza or immunized with hemagglutinin protein

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    Bushnell Ruth V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent and previous studies have shown that guinea pigs can be infected with, and transmit, human influenza viruses. Therefore guinea pig may be a useful animal model for better understanding influenza infection and assessing vaccine strategies. To more fully characterize the model, antibody responses following either infection/re-infection with human influenza A/Wyoming/03/2003 H3N2 or immunization with its homologous recombinant hemagglutinin (HA protein were studied. Results Serological samples were collected and tested for anti-HA immunoglobulin by ELISA, antiviral antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HI, and recognition of linear epitopes by peptide scanning (PepScan. Animals inoculated with infectious virus demonstrated pronounced viral replication and subsequent serological conversion. Animals either immunized with the homologous HA antigen or infected, showed a relatively rapid rise in antibody titers to the HA glycoprotein in ELISA assays. Antiviral antibodies, measured by HI assay, were detectable after the second inoculation. PepScan data identified both previously recognized and newly defined linear epitopes. Conclusions Infection and/or recombinant HA immunization of guinea pigs with H3N2 Wyoming influenza virus resulted in a relatively rapid production of viral-specific antibody thus demonstrating the strong immunogenicity of the major viral structural proteins in this animal model for influenza infection. The sensitivity of the immune response supports the utility of the guinea pig as a useful animal model of influenza infection and immunization.

  11. Impact of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus strain on generation and transmission of bioaerosols during simulated slaughter of infected chickens and ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human infections with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus occur following exposure to H5N1 virus-infected poultry, often during home slaughter or live-poultry market slaughter processes. Using bioaerosol samplers, we demonstrated that infectious H5N1 airborne particles were produced ...

  12. Sustained live poultry market surveillance contributes to early warnings for human infection with avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shisong; Bai, Tian; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Peng, Bo; Liu, Hui; Geng, Yijie; Zhang, Renli; Ma, Hanwu; Zhu, Wenfei; Wang, Dayan; Cheng, Jinquan; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-08-03

    Sporadic human infections with the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N6) virus have been reported in different provinces in China since April 2014. From June 2015 to January 2016, routine live poultry market (LPM) surveillance was conducted in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province. H5N6 viruses were not detected until November 2015. The H5N6 virus-positive rate increased markedly beginning in December 2015, and viruses were detected in LPMs in all districts of the city. Coincidently, two human cases with histories of poultry exposure developed symptoms and were diagnosed as H5N6-positive in Shenzhen during late December 2015 and early January 2016. Similar viruses were identified in environmental samples collected in the LPMs and the patients. In contrast to previously reported H5N6 viruses, viruses with six internal genes derived from the H9N2 or H7N9 viruses were detected in the present study. The increased H5N6 virus-positive rate in the LPMs and the subsequent human infections demonstrated that sustained LPM surveillance for avian influenza viruses provides an early warning for human infections. Interventions, such as LPM closures, should be immediately implemented to reduce the risk of human infection with the H5N6 virus when the virus is widely detected during LPM surveillance.

  13. Identification of a siderophore utilization locus in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

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    Seale Thomas W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae has an absolute aerobic growth requirement for either heme, or iron in the presence of protoporphyrin IX. Both iron and heme in the mammalian host are strictly limited in their availability to invading microorganisms. Many bacterial species overcome iron limitation in their environment by the synthesis and secretion of small iron binding molecules termed siderophores, which bind iron and deliver it into the bacterial cell via specific siderophore receptor proteins on the bacterial cell surface. There are currently no reports of siderophore production or utilization by H. influenzae. Results Comparative genomics revealed a putative four gene operon in the recently sequenced nontypeable H. influenzae strain R2846 that encodes predicted proteins exhibiting significant identity at the amino acid level to proteins involved in the utilization of the siderophore ferrichrome in other bacterial species. No siderophore biosynthesis genes were identified in the R2846 genome. Both comparative genomics and a PCR based analysis identified several additional H. influenzae strains possessing this operon. In growth curve assays strains containing the genes were able to utilize ferrichrome as an iron source. H. influenzae strains lacking the operon were unable to obtain iron from ferrichrome. An insertional mutation in one gene of the operon abrogated the ability of strains to utilize ferrichrome. In addition transcription of genes in the identified operon were repressible by high iron/heme levels in the growth media. Conclusions We have identified an iron/heme-repressible siderophore utilization locus present in several nontypeable H. influenzae strains. The same strains do not possess genes encoding proteins associated with siderophore synthesis. The siderophore utilization locus may enable the utilization of siderophores produced by other microorganisms in the polymicrobial environmental niche of the human nasopharynx

  14. Structural and functional bases for broad-spectrum neutralization of avian and human influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jianhua; Hwang, William C; Perez, Sandra; Wei, Ge; Aird, Daniel; Chen, Li-mei; Santelli, Eugenio; Stec, Boguslaw; Cadwell, Greg; Ali, Maryam; Wan, Hongquan; Murakami, Akikazu; Yammanuru, Anuradha; Han, Thomas; Cox, Nancy J; Bankston, Laurie A; Donis, Ruben O; Liddington, Robert C; Marasco, Wayne A

    2009-03-01

    Influenza virus remains a serious health threat, owing to its ability to evade immune surveillance through rapid genetic drift and reassortment. Here we used a human non-immune antibody phage-display library and the H5 hemagglutinin ectodomain to select ten neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) that were effective against all group 1 influenza viruses tested, including H5N1 'bird flu' and the H1N1 'Spanish flu'. The crystal structure of one such nAb bound to H5 shows that it blocks infection by inserting its heavy chain into a conserved pocket in the stem region, thus preventing membrane fusion. Nine of the nAbs employ the germline gene VH1-69, and all seem to use the same neutralizing mechanism. Our data further suggest that this region is recalcitrant to neutralization escape and that nAb-based immunotherapy is a promising strategy for broad-spectrum protection against seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses.

  15. Highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1: pathways of exposure at the animal-human interface, a systematic review.

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    Maria D Van Kerkhove

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The threat posed by highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses to humans remains significant, given the continued occurrence of sporadic human cases (499 human cases in 15 countries with a high case fatality rate (approximately 60%, the endemicity in poultry populations in several countries, and the potential for reassortment with the newly emerging 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain. Therefore, we review risk factors for H5N1 infection in humans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Several epidemiologic studies have evaluated the risk factors associated with increased risk of H5N1 infection among humans who were exposed to H5N1 viruses. Our review shows that most H5N1 cases are attributed to exposure to sick poultry. Most cases are sporadic, while occasional limited human-to-human transmission occurs. The most commonly identified factors associated with H5N1 virus infection included exposure through contact with infected blood or bodily fluids of infected poultry via food preparation practices; touching and caring for infected poultry; [corrected] exposure to H5N1 via swimming or bathing in potentially virus laden ponds; and exposure to H5N1 at live bird markets. CONCLUSIONS: Research has demonstrated that despite frequent and widespread contact with poultry, transmission of the H5N1 virus from poultry to humans is rare. Available research has identified several risk factors that may be associated with infection including close direct contact with poultry and transmission via the environment. However, several important data gaps remain that limit our understanding of the epidemiology of H5N1 in humans. Although infection in humans with H5N1 remains rare, human cases continue to be reported and H5N1 is now considered endemic among poultry in parts of Asia and in Egypt, providing opportunities for additional human infections and for the acquisition of virus mutations that may lead to more efficient spread among humans and other mammalian species

  16. A human monoclonal antibody with neutralizing activity against highly divergent influenza subtypes.

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    Nicola Clementi

    Full Text Available The interest in broad-range anti-influenza A monoclonal antibodies (mAbs has recently been strengthened by the identification of anti-hemagglutinin (HA mAbs endowed with heterosubtypic neutralizing activity to be used in the design of "universal" prophylactic or therapeutic tools. However, the majority of the single mAbs described to date do not bind and neutralize viral isolates belonging to highly divergent subtypes clustering into the two different HA-based influenza phylogenetic groups: the group 1 including, among others, subtypes H1, H2, H5 and H9 and the group 2 including, among others, H3 subtype. Here, we describe a human mAb, named PN-SIA28, capable of binding and neutralizing all tested isolates belonging to phylogenetic group 1, including H1N1, H2N2, H5N1 and H9N2 subtypes and several isolates belonging to group 2, including H3N2 isolates from the first period of the 1968 pandemic. Therefore, PN-SIA28 is capable of neutralizing isolates belonging to subtypes responsible of all the reported pandemics, as well as other subtypes with pandemic potential. The region recognized by PN-SIA28 has been identified on the stem region of HA and includes residues highly conserved among the different influenza subtypes. A deep characterization of PN-SIA28 features may represent a useful help in the improvement of available anti-influenza therapeutic strategies and can provide new tools for the development of universal vaccinal strategies.

  17. The PB1 segment of an influenza A virus H1N1 2009pdm isolate enhances the replication efficiency of specific influenza vaccine strains in cell culture and embryonated eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Ahmed; Kanrai, Pumaree; Ziebuhr, John; Pleschka, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Influenza vaccine strains (IVSs) contain the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genome segments of relevant circulating strains in the genetic background of influenza A/PR/8/1934 virus (PR8). Previous work has shown that the nature of the PB1 segment may be a limiting factor for the efficient production of IVSs. Here, we showed that the PB1 segment (PB1Gi) from the 2009 pandemic influenza A virus (IAV) A/Giessen/06/2009 (Gi wt, H1N1pdm) may help to resolve (some of) these limitations. We produced a set of recombinant PR8-derived viruses that contained (i) the HA and NA segments from representative IAV strains (H3N2, H5N1, H7N9, H9N2); (ii) the PB1 segment from PR8 or Gi wt, respectively; and (iii) the remaining five genome segments from PR8. Viruses containing the PB1Gi segment, together with the heterologous HA/NA segments and five PR8 segments (5+2+1), replicated to higher titres compared with their 6+2 counterparts containing six PR8 segments and the equivalent heterologous HA/NA segments. Compared with PB1PR8-containing IVSs, viruses with the PB1Gi segment replicated to higher or similar titres in both cell culture and embryonated eggs, most profoundly IVSs of the H5N1 and H7N9 subtype, which are known to grow poorly in these systems. IVSs containing either the PB1Gi or the cognate PB1 segment of the respective specific HA/NA donor strain showed enhanced or similar virus replication levels. This study suggests that substitution of PB1PR8 with the PB1Gi segment may greatly improve the large-scale production of PR8-derived IVSs, especially of those known to replicate poorly in vitro.

  18. CURRENT APPROACHES TO UNIVERSAL VACCINE AGAINST INFLUENZA VIRUS

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    I. B. Esmagambetov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a seasonal infectious disease widespread across the globe. In Russia the share of influenza and other acute respiratory viral infections account for up to 90% of all infectious diseases. Scientific and reasonable method of influenza prevention is vaccination. However, traditional current influenza vaccines can’t induce protection against various virus strains that differ substantially in terms of their antigenic structure, and thus require periodic updates to its immunogenic components. In addition, there is the risk of a pandemic caused by an entirely new antigen in relation to variants of influenza virus A. Attempts to improve on traditional approaches to vaccination have focused primarily on improving production technologies and to increase immunogenicity of vaccines. Therefore, the urgent task is the creation of vaccines able to induce immune response a broad spectrum against different influenza virus strains and human strains of avian influenza, also can cause disease in humans. Protective effect of universal vaccine should be the induction of integrated immune response, based on the formulation of cross-reactive antibodies and T cells. The development of such universal vaccine could remove the need for periodical strain composition update of existing vaccines and, accor dingly, will be able to give the vaccine manufacturer itself, production planning regardless of epidemic seasons. Currently, the most widely studied antigens as key components of flu vaccines are proteins M2 and NP as well as the hemagglutinin of influenza virus. This review summarizes and lists some data of domestic and foreign research on a universal influenza virus vaccine.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of serum resistance of human influenza H3N2 virus and their involvement in virus adaptation in a new host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosovich, M; Gao, P; Kawaoka, Y

    1998-08-01

    H3N2 human influenza viruses that are resistant to horse, pig, or rabbit serum possess unique amino acid mutations in their hemagglutinin (HA) protein. To determine the molecular mechanisms of this resistance, we characterized the receptor-binding properties of these mutants by measuring their affinity for total serum protein inhibitors and for soluble receptor analogs. Pig serum-resistant variants displayed a markedly decreased affinity for total pig serum sialylglycoproteins (which contain predominantly 2-6 linkage between sialic acid and galactose residues) and for the sialyloligosaccharide 6'-sialyl(N-acetyllactosamine). These properties correlated with the substitution 186S-->I in HA1. The major inhibitory activity in rabbit serum was found to be a beta inhibitor with characteristics of mannose-binding lectins. Rabbit serum-resistant variants exhibited decreased sensitivity to this inhibitor due to the loss of a glycosylation sequon at positions 246 to 248 of the HA. In addition to a somewhat reduced affinity for 6'-sialyl(N-acetyllactosamine)-containing receptors, horse serum-resistant variants lost the ability to bind the viral neuraminidase-resistant 4-O-acetylated sialic acid moieties of equine alpha2-macroglobulin because of the mutation 145N-->K/D in their HA1. These results indicate that influenza viruses become resistant to serum inhibitors because their affinity for these inhibitors is reduced. To determine whether natural inhibitors play a role in viral evolution during interspecies transmission, we compared the receptor-binding properties of H3N8 avian and equine viruses, including two strains isolated during the 1989 to 1990 equine influenza outbreak, which was caused by an avian virus in China. Avian strains bound 4-O-acetylated sialic acid residues of equine alpha2-macroglobulin, whereas equine strains did not. The earliest avian-like isolate from a horse influenza outbreak bound to this sialic acid with an affinity similar to that of avian

  20. Using Zebrafish Models of Human Influenza A Virus Infections to Screen Antiviral Drugs and Characterize Host Immune Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Con; Jurcyzszak, Denise; Goody, Michelle F; Gabor, Kristin A; Longfellow, Jacob R; Millard, Paul J; Kim, Carol H

    2017-01-20

    Each year, seasonal influenza outbreaks profoundly affect societies worldwide. In spite of global efforts, influenza remains an intractable healthcare burden. The principle strategy to curtail infections is yearly vaccination. In individuals who have contracted influenza, antiviral drugs can mitigate symptoms. There is a clear and unmet need to develop alternative strategies to combat influenza. Several animal models have been created to model host-influenza interactions. Here, protocols for generating zebrafish models for systemic and localized human influenza A virus (IAV) infection are described. Using a systemic IAV infection model, small molecules with potential antiviral activity can be screened. As a proof-of-principle, a protocol that demonstrates the efficacy of the antiviral drug Zanamivir in IAV-infected zebrafish is described. It shows how disease phenotypes can be quantified to score the relative efficacy of potential antivirals in IAV-infected zebrafish. In recent years, there has been increased appreciation for the critical role neutrophils play in the human host response to influenza infection. The zebrafish has proven to be an indispensable model for the study of neutrophil biology, with direct impacts on human medicine. A protocol to generate a localized IAV infection in the Tg(mpx:mCherry) zebrafish line to study neutrophil biology in the context of a localized viral infection is described. Neutrophil recruitment to localized infection sites provides an additional quantifiable phenotype for assessing experimental manipulations that may have therapeutic applications. Both zebrafish protocols described faithfully recapitulate aspects of human IAV infection. The zebrafish model possesses numerous inherent advantages, including high fecundity, optical clarity, amenability to drug screening, and availability of transgenic lines, including those in which immune cells such as neutrophils are labeled with fluorescent proteins. The protocols detailed here

  1. Isolation and characteristic analysis of a novel strain H7N9 of avian influenza virus A from a patient with influenza-like symptoms in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faming Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel H7N9 virus (A/Changsha/1/2013(H7N9 identified through routine examination in the influenza network laboratory was analyzed retrospectively. The gene sequences of A/Changsha/1/2013(H7N9 were highly homologous to other viruses isolated in mainland China. Mutations of Q226L and G186 V were found in the hemagglutinin protein (HA. Amino acid deletions were found at positions 69–73 of the neuraminidase protein (NA and 218–230 of the non-structural protein (NS1. All viral genes except PB1 were essentially identical to the sequences of other Chinese influenza A H7N9 isolates. Overall, A/Changsha/1/2013(H7N9 is highly homologous to other H7N9 avian influenza viruses isolated in mainland China.

  2. Genetic evolution of recently emerged novel human-like swine H3 influenza A viruses (IAV) in United States swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in swine. IAV transmission from humans to swine is a major contributor to swine IAV diversity. In 2012, a novel H3N2 with an HA (hu-H3) and NA derived from human seasonal H3N2 was detected in United States (US) swine. The h...

  3. 76 FR 51374 - Direct Discovery of HLA Associated Influenza Epitopes Isolated From Human Cells for Vaccine and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Direct Discovery of HLA Associated Influenza Epitopes Isolated From Human Cells for Vaccine and Therapeutic Evaluation and Development (U01) AGENCY: Food and... will provide the regulatory science to facilitate development and evaluation of direct discovery of...

  4. Functional variants regulating LGALS1 (Galectin 1) expression affect human susceptibility to influenza A(H7N9)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zhongshan; Yang, Shigui; Chu, Hin; Fan, Yanhui; Li, Cun; Wong, Bosco Ho-Yin; Zheng, Shufa; Zhu, Yixin; Yu, Fei; Wang, Yiyin; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Hainv; Yu, Liang; Tang, Linglin; Cui, Dawei; Hao, Ke; Bosse, Yohan; Obeidat, Maen; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Song, You-Qiang; Kai-Wang, Kelvin; Sham, Pak Chung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The fatality of avian influenza A(H7N9) infection in humans was over 30%. To identify human genetic susceptibility to A(H7N9) infection, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) involving 102 A(H7N9) patients and 106 heavily-exposed healthy poultry workers, a sample size critically restri

  5. Global dynamic analysis of a H7N9 avian-human influenza model in an outbreak region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongxue; Wen, Yongxian

    2015-02-21

    In 2013 in China a new type of avian influenza virus, H7N9, began to infect humans and had aroused severe fatality in the infected humans. We know that the spread is from poultry to humans, and the H7N9 avian influenza is low pathogenic in the poultry world but highly pathogenic in the human world, but the transmission mechanism is unclear. Since it has no signs of human-to-human transmission and outbreaks are isolated in some cities in China, in order to investigate the transmission mechanism of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza, an eco-epidemiological model in an outbreak region is proposed and analyzed dynamically. Researches and reports show that gene mutation makes the new virus be capable of infecting humans, therefore the mutation factor is taken into account in the model. The global dynamic analysis is conducted, different thresholds are identified, persistence and global qualitative behaviors are obtained. The impact of H7N9 avian influenza on the people population is concerned. Finally, the numerical simulations are carried out to support the theoretical analysis and to investigate the disease control measures. It seems that we may take people׳s hygiene and prevention awareness factor as a significant policy to achieve the aim of both the disease control and the economic returns.

  6. Functional variants regulating LGALS1 (Galectin 1) expression affect human susceptibility to influenza A(H7N9)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zhongshan; Yang, Shigui; Chu, Hin; Fan, Yanhui; Li, Cun; Wong, Bosco Ho-Yin; Zheng, Shufa; Zhu, Yixin; Yu, Fei; Wang, Yiyin; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Hainv; Yu, Liang; Tang, Linglin; Cui, Dawei; Hao, Ke; Bosse, Yohan; Obeidat, Maen; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Song, You-Qiang; Kai-Wang, Kelvin; Sham, Pak Chung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The fatality of avian influenza A(H7N9) infection in humans was over 30%. To identify human genetic susceptibility to A(H7N9) infection, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) involving 102 A(H7N9) patients and 106 heavily-exposed healthy poultry workers, a sample size critically restri

  7. Wipes coated with a singlet-oxygen-producing photosensitizer are effective against human influenza virus but not against norovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaelen, Katharina; Bouwknegt, Martijn; Rutjes, Saskia; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Duizer, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Transmission of enteric and respiratory viruses, including human norovirus (hNoV) and human influenza virus, may involve surfaces. In food preparation and health care settings, surfaces are cleaned with wipes; however, wiping may not efficiently reduce contamination or may even spread viruses,

  8. An integrated multi-study analysis of serum HAI antibody responses to Ann Arbor strain live attenuated influenza vaccine in children and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen L. Coelingh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI antibodies have been associated with protection from influenza infection. HAI antibody responses to live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs and their role in protection are not fully elucidated. This study characterizes HAI titers for LAIV. Serum HAI data were pooled from 40 LAIV clinical trials enrolling subjects aged 2–49 years. Using pre- and postvaccination titers, geometric mean fold rises (GMFRs and seroresponse rates (⩾4-fold rise were determined by age and baseline serostatus (seronegative ⩽8, seropositive >8. Responses were generally evaluated after 2 doses for those 2–8 years of age and after 1 dose for those 9–49 years of age. Data were available for 6909 children and 3444 adults. A total of 20 different LAIV formulations were used, representing 6 H1N1 strains, 9 H3N2 strains, 7 B/Yamagata lineage strains and 2 B/Victoria lineage strains. GMFRs were modest overall; GMFRs were higher in children versus adults and higher in baseline seronegatives versus baseline seropositives. This difference was greatest among children, with GMFRs ranging from 2.2 to 5.9 among seronegative and 1.2–1.5 among seropositive children. HAI responses were modest overall, higher in seronegative individuals (10.8–61.6% relative to seropositive (1.9–17.0%, and higher in children relative to adults. Postvaccination HAI titers were below those associated with protection for inactivated influenza vaccines. The results suggest that LAIV-induced protection is mediated primarily by mucosal antibody and T-cell immunity, although serum HAI has value as strain-specific marker of response to vaccination, particularly among seronegative individuals.

  9. Re-engaging cross-reactive memory B Cells: The influenza puzzle

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    Ali H. eEllebedy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of a novel influenza A virus strain into humans poses a continuous public health threat. Vaccination is the most effective means of protection against influenza. The generation of memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells (PCs that can maintain protective levels of influenza-specific antibodies for protracted periods of time is the foundation for the success of such vaccines. Influenza vaccines elicit an antibody response that is primarily targeting viral surface glycoproteins. However, frequent amino acid mutations within the immunodominant epitopes allow the virus to efficiently escape neutralization by pre-existing antibodies and consequently cause annual epidemics and occasional pandemics. Recently, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that target subdominant influenza epitopes have been extensively characterized. These epitopes are immunogenic, can mediate virus neutralization, and most importantly are conserved among different influenza strains. It remains puzzling, however, that despite being repeatedly exposed to such conserved domains of influenza HA either in the form of vaccination or natural infection, most humans do not develop immunological memory that can provide broad protection against emerging virus strains. Here we will discuss the conditions that may be required for engaging such cross-reactive memory B cells in the immune response to influenza infection and vaccination in humans.

  10. Functional Evolution of Influenza Virus NS1 Protein in Currently Circulating Human 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amelia M; Nogales, Aitor; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J; DeDiego, Marta L

    2017-09-01

    In 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus emerged in humans, causing a global pandemic. It was previously shown that the NS1 protein from this human 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus was an effective interferon (IFN) antagonist but could not inhibit general host gene expression, unlike other NS1 proteins from seasonal human H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. Here we show that the NS1 protein from currently circulating pH1N1 viruses has evolved to encode 6 amino acid changes (E55K, L90I, I123V, E125D, K131E, and N205S) with respect to the original protein. Notably, these 6 residue changes restore the ability of pH1N1 NS1 to inhibit general host gene expression, mainly by their ability to restore binding to the cellular factor CPSF30. This is the first report describing the ability of the pH1N1 NS1 protein to naturally acquire mutations that restore this function. Importantly, a recombinant pH1N1 virus containing these 6 amino acid changes in the NS1 protein (pH1N1/NSs-6mut) inhibited host IFN and proinflammatory responses to a greater extent than that with the parental virus (pH1N1/NS1-wt), yet virus titers were not significantly increased in cell cultures or in mouse lungs, and the disease was partially attenuated. The pH1N1/NSs-6mut virus grew similarly to pH1N1/NSs-wt in mouse lungs, but infection with pH1N1/NSs-6mut induced lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines, likely due to a general inhibition of gene expression mediated by the mutated NS1 protein. This lower level of inflammation induced by the pH1N1/NSs-6mut virus likely accounts for the attenuated disease phenotype and may represent a host-virus adaptation affecting influenza virus pathogenesis.IMPORTANCE Seasonal influenza A viruses (IAVs) are among the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans. In addition, occasional pandemics are caused when IAVs circulating in other species emerge in the human population. In 2009, a swine-origin H1N1 IAV (pH1N1) was transmitted to humans, infecting people then and up

  11. Expression of IgA Proteases by Haemophilus influenzae in the Respiratory Tract of Adults With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F; Kirkham, Charmaine; Jones, Megan M; Sethi, Sanjay; Kong, Yong; Pettigrew, Melinda M

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)A proteases of Haemophilus influenzae are highly specific endopeptidases that cleave the hinge region of human IgA1 and also mediate invasion and trafficking in human respiratory epithelial cells, facilitating persistence of H. influenzae. Little is known about the expression of IgA proteases in clinical settings of H. influenzae infection. We identified and characterized IgA protease genes in H. influenzae and studied their expression and proteolytic specificity, in vitro and in vivo in 169 independent strains of H. influenzae collected longitudinally over 10 years from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The H. influenzae pangenome has 2 alleles of IgA protease genes; all strains have igaA, and 40% of strains have igaB. Each allele has 2 variants with differing proteolytic specificities for human IgA1. A total of 88% of 169 strains express IgA protease activity. Expression of the 4 forms of IgA protease varies among strains. Based on the presence of IgA1 fragments in sputum samples, each of the different forms of IgA protease is selectively expressed in the human airways during infection. Four variants of IgA proteases are variably expressed by H. influenzae during infection of the human airways. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Prospects of HA-Based Universal Influenza Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar M. Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines afford substantial protection in humans by inducing strain-specific neutralizing antibodies (Abs. Most of these Abs target highly variable immunodominant epitopes in the globular domain of the viral hemagglutinin (HA. Therefore, current vaccines may not be able to induce heterosubtypic immunity against the divergent influenza subtypes. The identification of broadly neutralizing Abs (BnAbs against influenza HA using recent technological advancements in antibody libraries, hybridoma, and isolation of single Ab-secreting plasma cells has increased the interest in developing a universal influenza vaccine as it could provide life-long protection. While these BnAbs can serve as a source for passive immunotherapy, their identification represents an important step towards the design of such a universal vaccine. This review describes the recent advances and approaches used in the development of universal influenza vaccine based on highly conserved HA regions identified by BnAbs.

  13. Avian Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur.

  14. The emergence of influenza A H7N9 in human beings 16 years after influenza A H5N1: a tale of two cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Chen, Honglin; Li, Lanjuan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-09-01

    Infection with either influenza A H5N1 virus in 1997 or avian influenza A H7N9 virus in 2013 caused severe pneumonia that did not respond to typical or atypical antimicrobial treatment, and resulted in high mortality. Both viruses are reassortants with internal genes derived from avian influenza A H9N2 viruses that circulate in Asian poultry. Both viruses have genetic markers of mammalian adaptation in their haemagglutinin and polymerase PB2 subunits, which enhanced binding to human-type receptors and improved replication in mammals, respectively. Hong Kong (affected by H5N1 in 1997) and Shanghai (affected by H7N9 in 2013) are two rapidly flourishing cosmopolitan megacities that were increasing in human population and poultry consumption before the outbreaks. Both cities are located along the avian migratory route at the Pearl River delta and Yangtze River delta. Whether the widespread use of the H5N1 vaccine in east Asia-with suboptimum biosecurity measures in live poultry markets and farms-predisposed to the emergence of H7N9 or other virus subtypes needs further investigation. Why H7N9 seems to be more readily transmitted from poultry to people than H5N1 is still unclear.

  15. United States of America Department of Health and Human Services support for advancing influenza vaccine manufacturing in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, Michael L; Bright, Rick A

    2011-07-01

    five years of age. In addition to achievements described in this issue of Vaccine, the programme has been successful from the US perspective because the working relationships established between the US Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) and its partners have assisted in advancing influenza vaccine development at many different levels. A few examples of BARDA's support include: establishment of egg-based influenza vaccine production from "scratch", enhancement of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) production techniques and infrastructure, completion of fill/finish operations for imported bulk vaccine, and training in advanced bio-manufacturing techniques. These HHS-supported programmes have been well-received internationally, and we and our partners hope the successes will stimulate even more interest within the international community in maximizing global production levels for influenza vaccines.

  16. Protection from Severe Influenza Virus Infections in Mice Carrying the Mx1 Influenza Virus Resistance Gene Strongly Depends on Genetic Background.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus infections represent a serious threat to human health. Both extrinsic and intrinsic factors determine the severity of influenza. The MX dynamin-like GTPase 1 (Mx1) gene has been shown to confer strong resistance to influenza A virus infections in mice. Most laboratory mouse strains, including C57BL/6J, carry nonsense or deletion mutations in Mx1 and thus a nonfunctional allele, whereas wild-derived mouse strains carry a wild-type Mx1 allele. Congenic C57BL/6J (B6-Mx1 ...

  17. Phase-variable expression of the 145-kDa surface protein of Brazilian purpuric fever case-clone strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, L G

    1995-03-01

    Clonally related strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius have recently been associated with Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF). Antibodies to a 145-kDa minor outer membrane protein (P145) are bactericidal and protect against experimental bacteremia. To determine if P145 is conserved among case-clone strains, case-clone strains were screened for P145 expression. Assays of a large number of colonies of each strain using colony immunoblot revealed colonies reactive with anti-P145 sera in all 17 case-clone strains. P145 was expressed at a low frequency (0.08%-2.2% of colonies) in 14 strains and at a high frequency (> 98%) in 3 strains. Expression of P145 by reactive colonies was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. Also, anti-P145-nonreactive variant colonies of P145-expressing strains were detected in 0.4%-1.5% of colonies. These findings indicate P145 is conserved among BPF case-clone strains and is subject to phase-variable expression.

  18. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  19. Genetic diversity of the 2013–14 human isolates of influenza H7N9 in China

    OpenAIRE

    Farooqui, Amber; Leon, Alberto J.; Huang, Linxi; Wu, Suwu; Cai, Yingmu; Lin, Pengzhou; Chen, Weihong; Fang, Xibin; Zeng, Tiansheng; Liu, Yisu; Li ZHANG; Su, Ting; Chen, Weibin; Ghedin, Elodie; Zhu, Huachen

    2015-01-01

    Background Influenza H7N9 has become an endemic pathogen in China where circulating virus is found extensively in wild birds and domestic poultry. Two epidemic waves of Human H7N9 infections have taken place in Eastern and South Central China during the years of 2013 and 2014. In this study, we report on the first four human cases of influenza H7N9 in Shantou, Guangdong province, which occurred during the second H7N9 wave, and the subsequent analysis of the viral isolates. Methods Viral genom...

  20. Virological Surveillance of Influenza Viruses during the 2008–09, 2009–10 and 2010–11 Seasons in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moussi, Awatef; Pozo, Francisco; Ben Hadj Kacem, Mohamed Ali; Ledesma, Juan; Cuevas, Maria Teresa; Casas, Inmaculada; Slim, Amine

    2013-01-01

    Background The data contribute to a better understanding of the circulation of influenza viruses especially in North-Africa. Objective The objective of this surveillance was to detect severe influenza cases, identify their epidemiological and virological characteristics and assess their impact on the healthcare system. Method We describe in this report the findings of laboratory-based surveillance of human cases of influenza virus and other respiratory viruses' infection during three seasons in Tunisia. Results The 2008–09 winter influenza season is underway in Tunisia, with co-circulation of influenza A/H3N2 (56.25%), influenza A(H1N1) (32.5%), and a few sporadic influenza B viruses (11.25%). In 2010–11 season the circulating strains are predominantly the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (70%) and influenza B viruses (22%). And sporadic viruses were sub-typed as A/H3N2 and unsubtyped influenza A, 5% and 3%, respectively. Unlike other countries, highest prevalence of influenza B virus Yamagata-like lineage has been reported in Tunisia (76%) localised into the clade B/Bangladesh/3333/2007. In the pandemic year, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 predominated over other influenza viruses (95%). Amino acid changes D222G and D222E were detected in the HA gene of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in two severe cases, one fatal case and one mild case out of 50 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses studied. The most frequently reported respiratory virus other than influenza in three seasons was RSV (45.29%). Conclusion This article summarises the surveillance and epidemiology of influenza viruses and other respiratory viruses, showing how rapid improvements in influenza surveillance were feasible by connecting the existing structure in the health care system for patient records to electronic surveillance system for reporting ILI cases. PMID:24069267

  1. An Intranasal Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Broadly Protects Mice from Multiple Subtypes of Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Louis M; Cathcart, Andrea L; Pujanauski, Lindsey M; Qi, Li; Kash, John C; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2015-07-21

    Influenza virus infections are a global public health problem, with a significant impact of morbidity and mortality from both annual epidemics and pandemics. The current strategy for preventing annual influenza is to develop a new vaccine each year against specific circulating virus strains. Because these vaccines are unlikely to protect against an antigenically divergent strain or a new pandemic virus with a novel hemagglutinin (HA) subtype, there is a critical need for vaccines that protect against all influenza A viruses, a so-called "universal" vaccine. Here we show that mice were broadly protected against challenge with a wide variety of lethal influenza A virus infections (94% aggregate survival following vaccination) with a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine cocktail. The vaccine consisted of a mixture of VLPs individually displaying H1, H3, H5, or H7 HAs, and vaccinated mice showed significant protection following challenge with influenza viruses expressing 1918 H1, 1957 H2, and avian H5, H6, H7, H10, and H11 hemagglutinin subtypes. These experiments suggest a promising and practical strategy for developing a broadly protective "universal" influenza vaccine. The rapid and unpredictable nature of influenza A virus evolution requires new vaccines to be produced annually to match circulating strains. Human infections with influenza viruses derived from animals can cause outbreaks that may be associated with high mortality, and such strains may also adapt to humans to cause a future pandemic. Thus, there is a large public health need to create broadly protective, or "universal," influenza vaccines that could prevent disease from a wide variety of human and animal influenza A viruses. In this study, a noninfectious virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine was shown to offer significant protection against a variety of influenza A viruses in mice, suggesting a practical strategy to develop a universal influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Schwartzman et al.

  2. Poultry food products--a source of avian influenza virus transmission to humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, T C; Buda, S; Hengel, H; Beer, M; Mettenleiter, T C

    2016-02-01

    Global human mobility and intercontinental connectivity, expansion of livestock production and encroachment of wildlife habitats by invasive agricultural land use contribute to shape the complexity of influenza epidemiology. The OneHealth approach integrates these and further elements into considerations to improve disease control and prevention. Food of animal origin for human consumption is another integral aspect; if produced from infected livestock such items may act as vehicles of spread of animal pathogens, and, in case of zoonotic agents, as a potential human health hazard. Notifiable zoonotic avian influenza viruses (AIV) have become entrenched in poultry populations in several Asian and northern African countries since 2003. Highly pathogenic (HP) AIV (e.g. H5N1) cause extensive poultry mortality and severe economic losses. HPAIV and low pathogenic AIV (e.g. H7N9) with zoonotic propensities pose risks for human health. More than 1500 human cases of AIV infection have been reported, mainly from regions with endemically infected poultry. Intense human exposure to AIV-infected poultry, e.g. during rearing, slaughtering or processing of poultry, is a major risk factor for acquiring AIV infection. In contrast, human infections through consumption of AIV-contaminated food have not been substantiated. Heating poultry products according to kitchen standards (core temperatures ≥70°C, ≥10 s) rapidly inactivates AIV infectivity and renders fully cooked products safe. Nevertheless, concerted efforts must ensure that poultry products potentially contaminated with zoonotic AIV do not reach the food chain. Stringent and sustained OneHealth measures are required to better control and eventually eradicate, HPAIV from endemic regions.

  3. Novel Polymerase Gene Mutations for Human Adaptation in Clinical Isolates of Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuha; Kawashita, Norihito; Daidoji, Tomo; Ibrahim, Madiha S; El-Gendy, Emad M; Takagi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nakaya, Takaaki; Shioda, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Yohei

    2016-04-01

    A major determinant in the change of the avian influenza virus host range to humans is the E627K substitution in the PB2 polymerase protein. However, the polymerase activity of avian influenza viruses with a single PB2-E627K mutation is still lower than that of seasonal human influenza viruses, implying that avian viruses require polymerase mutations in addition to PB2-627K for human adaptation. Here, we used a database search of H5N1 clade 2.2.1 virus sequences with the PB2-627K mutation to identify other polymerase adaptation mutations that have been selected in infected patients. Several of the mutations identified acted cooperatively with PB2-627K to increase viral growth in human airway epithelial cells and mouse lungs. These mutations were in multiple domains of the polymerase complex other than the PB2-627 domain, highlighting a complicated avian-to-human adaptation pathway of avian influenza viruses. Thus, H5N1 viruses could rapidly acquire multiple polymerase mutations that function cooperatively with PB2-627K in infected patients for optimal human adaptation.

  4. Replication of avian, human and swine influenza viruses in porcine respiratory explants and association with sialic acid distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauwynck Hans J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the history of human influenza pandemics, pigs have been considered the most likely "mixing vessel" for reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses (AIVs. However, the replication efficiencies of influenza viruses from various hosts, as well as the expression of sialic acid (Sia receptor variants in the entire porcine respiratory tract have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we established porcine nasal, tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, which cover the entire porcine respiratory tract with maximal similarity to the in vivo situation. Subsequently, we assessed virus yields of three porcine, two human and six AIVs in these explants. Since our results on virus replication were in disagreement with the previously reported presence of putative avian virus receptors in the trachea, we additionally studied the distribution of sialic acid receptors by means of lectin histochemistry. Human (Siaα2-6Gal and avian virus receptors (Siaα2-3Gal were identified with Sambucus Nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins respectively. Results Compared to swine and human influenza viruses, replication of the AIVs was limited in all cultures but most strikingly in nasal and tracheal explants. Results of virus titrations were confirmed by quantification of infected cells using immunohistochemistry. By lectin histochemistry we found moderate to abundant expression of the human-like virus receptors in all explant systems but minimal binding of the lectins that identify avian-like receptors, especially in the nasal, tracheal and bronchial epithelium. Conclusions The species barrier that restricts the transmission of influenza viruses from one host to another remains preserved in our porcine respiratory explants. Therefore this system offers a valuable alternative to study virus and/or host properties required for adaptation or reassortment of influenza viruses. Our results indicate that, based on the expression of Sia

  5. Low 2012-13 influenza vaccine effectiveness associated with mutation in the egg-adapted H3N2 vaccine strain not antigenic drift in circulating viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta M Skowronski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE is generally interpreted in the context of vaccine match/mismatch to circulating strains with evolutionary drift in the latter invoked to explain reduced protection. During the 2012-13 season, however, detailed genotypic and phenotypic characterization shows that low VE was instead related to mutations in the egg-adapted H3N2 vaccine strain rather than antigenic drift in circulating viruses. METHODS/FINDINGS: Component-specific VE against medically-attended, PCR-confirmed influenza was estimated in Canada by test-negative case-control design. Influenza A viruses were characterized genotypically by amino acid (AA sequencing of established haemagglutinin (HA antigenic sites and phenotypically through haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay. H3N2 viruses were characterized in relation to the WHO-recommended, cell-passaged vaccine prototype (A/Victoria/361/2011 as well as the egg-adapted strain as per actually used in vaccine production. Among the total of 1501 participants, influenza virus was detected in 652 (43%. Nearly two-thirds of viruses typed/subtyped were A(H3N2 (394/626; 63%; the remainder were A(H1N1pdm09 (79/626; 13%, B/Yamagata (98/626; 16% or B/Victoria (54/626; 9%. Suboptimal VE of 50% (95%CI: 33-63% overall was driven by predominant H3N2 activity for which VE was 41% (95%CI: 17-59%. All H3N2 field isolates were HI-characterized as well-matched to the WHO-recommended A/Victoria/361/2011 prototype whereas all but one were antigenically distinct from the egg-adapted strain as per actually used in vaccine production. The egg-adapted strain was itself antigenically distinct from the WHO-recommended prototype, and bore three AA mutations at antigenic sites B [H156Q, G186V] and D [S219Y]. Conversely, circulating viruses were identical to the WHO-recommended prototype at these positions with other genetic variation that did not affect antigenicity. VE was 59% (95%CI:16-80% against A(H1N1pdm09

  6. Dynamic transcriptional signatures and network responses for clinical symptoms in influenza-infected human subjects using systems biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linel, Patrice; Wu, Shuang; Deng, Nan; Wu, Hulin

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that human blood transcriptional signatures may be used to support diagnosis and clinical decisions for acute respiratory viral infections such as influenza. In this article, we propose to use a newly developed systems biology approach for time course gene expression data to identify significant dynamically response genes and dynamic gene network responses to viral infection. We illustrate the methodological pipeline by reanalyzing the time course gene expression data from a study with healthy human subjects challenged by live influenza virus. We observed clear differences in the number of significant dynamic response genes (DRGs) between the symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects and also identified DRG signatures for symptomatic subjects with influenza infection. The 505 common DRGs shared by the symptomatic subjects have high consistency with the signature genes for predicting viral infection identified in previous works. The temporal response patterns and network response features were carefully analyzed and investigated.

  7. Human avian influenza A (H5N1) virus infection in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza A (H5N1) virus causes a widespread poultry deaths worldwide. The first human H5N1 infected case was reported in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China in 1997. Since then, the virus re-emerged in 2003 and continues to infect people worldwide. Currently, over 400 human infections have been reported in more than 15 countries and mortality rate is greater than 60%. H5N1 viruses still pose a potential pandemic threat in the future because of the continuing global spread and evolution. Here, we summarize the epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristics of human H5N1 infection in China monitored and identified by our national surveillance systems.

  8. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D; Altenburg, Arwen F; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-01-01

    Currently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. Because of an ever-present threat of the next influenza pandemic and the continuous emergence of drift variants of seasonal influenza A viruses, there is a need for an universal influenza vaccine that induces protective immunity against all influenza A viruses. Here, we summarize some of the efforts that are ongoing to develop universal influenza vaccines.

  9. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Cai

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses and reference antisera (antibodies. Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS. In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses, we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  10. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  11. The asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 outcompetes uropathogenic E. coli strains in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.; Schembri, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). In contrast to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which causes symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI), very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the human urinary tract...

  12. The study of antiviral activity of the dietary supplement «Immuno-viral with vitamin C» against influenza A/Victoria virus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ганна Сергіївна Шумова

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of combined remedies, having in their composition herbal material, that shows anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, restorative, and immunotropic action, is one of promising directions in the search of effective agents for acute respiratory infections prevention and treatment.Aim. The purpose of our research was to determine antiviral activity of the dietary supplement «Immuno-viral with Vitamin C» in the form of hard capsules against influenza A/Victoria virus strains.Methods. Classic virological method of chick embryos contamination in the chorioallantoic membrane, immunofluorescence method for the obtained virus identification, and neutralization reaction in chick embryos has been used.Results. It has been determined that the dietary supplement components were non-toxic for chick embryos in dilution of 1:10 to 1:80; had antiviral activity against influenza A/Victoria prototype virus strain in dilution of 1:10 to 1:20; lethal toxic dose in dilution of 1:40. After administration of influenza A/Victoria prototype virus strain in chick embryos without incubation with the test remedy (passaging, the medicinal agent retained its initial properties, confirmed by infected embryo cells fluorescence and the further study of the subcultered strain in the inhibition hemagglutination test with chick erythrocytes.Conclusion. As a result of the carried out in experiment neutralization reaction in 9–11 days chick embryos by the method of contamination in the chorioallantoic membrane with further visualization and identification of material, containing the virus, by the immunofluorescence method of the infected cells specific fluorescence, antiviral properties of the dietary supplement «Immuno-viral with Vitamin C» components have been determined

  13. Ability of recombinant human catalase to suppress inflammation of the murine lung induced by influenza A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xunlong; Shi, Zhihui; Huang, Hai; Zhu, Hongguang; Zhou, Pei; Zhu, Haiyan; Ju, Dianwen

    2014-06-01

    Influenza A virus pandemics and emerging antiviral resistance highlight the urgent need for novel generic pharmacological strategies that reduce both viral replication and inflammation of the lung. We have previously investigated the therapeutic efficacy of recombinant human catalase (rhCAT) against viral pneumonia in mice, but the protection mechanisms involved were not explored. In the present study, we have performed a more in-depth analysis covering survival, lung inflammation, immune cell responses, production of cytokines, and inflammation signaling pathways in mice. Male imprinting control region mice were infected intranasally with high pathogenicity (H1N1) influenza A virus followed by treatment with recombinant human catalase. The administration of rhCAT resulted in a significant reduction in inflammatory cell infiltration (e.g., macrophages and neutrophils), inflammatory cytokine levels (e.g., IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ), the level of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 chemokine and the mRNA levels of toll-like receptors TLR-4, TLR-7, and NF-κB, as well as partially maintaining the activity of the antioxidant enzymes system. These findings indicated that rhCAT might play a key protective role in viral pneumonia of mice via suppression of inflammatory immune responses.

  14. Epidemiology of human avian influenza in Indonesia, 2005-2009: a descriptive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiku Adisasmito

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim The study set out to better understand the epidemiology, natural history, therapeutic management and outcomes associated with confirmed human cases of Avian Influenza (AI in Indonesia.Methods This observational study utilized data from 93 cases with laboratory-confirmed H5N1 Influenza between September 2005 and August 2009. Cases were identified through records obtained from the Ministry of Health, as well as the Provincial health office and district health office records. Categorical data were analyzed with frequency tables, chi-square tests, and relative risks, and continuous data were analyzed using univariate statistics and Wilcoxon tests.Results Most subjects (54% first presented to a physician’s office or clinic. All of the subjects were hospitalized, and the vast majority (85% had respiratory symptoms as their predominant symptom at presentation. There was no clear association of any of these case characteristics with survival. Cases with direct poultry exposure were 2.8 times more likely to receive oseltamivir treatment than those without direct exposure (RR = 2.89, 95% CI 1.44 – 5.78. While the overall number of survivors was small, cases with documented oseltamivir treatment were approximately 24% more likely to survive than cases for which oseltamivir treatment was not documented (RR 1.24; 95% CI: 0.34-4.58. In oseltamivir treated cases, the median time from symptom onset to start of antiviral treatment was 2.5 days in survivors compared to 7.0 days for those who died. Fatality, therefore, may be related to delay in initiation of treatment after presentation.Conclusions The data suggest that early treatment with the antiviral drug oseltamivir may play an important role in survival. However, a low clinical suspicion of disease likely remains an important impediment to early diagnosis. Therefore, a clear policy for the protocol of early diagnosis & treatment of febrile illness including influenza is necessary. (Med J Indones

  15. Synthesis of multivalent sialyllactosamine-carrying glyco-nanoparticles with high affinity to the human influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Makoto; Umemura, Seiichiro; Sugiyama, Naohiro; Kuwano, Natsuki; Koizumi, Ami; Sawada, Tadakazu; Yanase, Michiyo; Takaha, Takeshi; Kadokawa, Jun-Ichi; Usui, Taichi

    2016-11-20

    A series of multivalent sialoglyco-conjugated nanoparticles were efficiently synthesized by using highly-branched α-glucuronic acid-linked cyclic dextrins (GlcA-HBCD) as a backbone. The sialoglycoside-moieties, with varying degrees of substitution, could be incorporated onto the preformed nanoparticles. These synthesized particles, which are highly soluble in aqueous solution, were shown to have a spherical nanostructure with a diameter of approximately 15nm. The interactions of the sialoglyco-nanoparticles (Neu5Acα2,6LacNAc-GlcA-HBCDs) with human influenza virus strain A/Beijing/262/95 (H1N1) were investigated using a hemagglutination inhibition assay. The sialoglyco-nanoparticle, in which the number of sialic acid substitution is 30, acted as a powerful inhibitor of virus binding activity. We show that both distance and multiplicity of effective ligand-virus formation play important roles in enhancing viral inhibition. Our results indicate that the GlcA-HBCD backbone can be used as a novel spherical nanocluster material for preparing a variety of glyco-nanoparticles to facilitate molecular recognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tannins from Hamamelis virginiana bark extract: characterization and improvement of the antiviral efficacy against influenza A virus and human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Linda L; Erdelmeier, Clemens A J; Spoden, Gilles A; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Sausy, Aurélie; Florin, Luise; Muller, Claude P

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral activity has been demonstrated for different tannin-rich plant extracts. Since tannins of different classes and molecular weights are often found together in plant extracts and may differ in their antiviral activity, we have compared the effect against influenza A virus (IAV) of Hamamelis virginiana L. bark extract, fractions enriched in tannins of different molecular weights and individual tannins of defined structures, including pseudotannins. We demonstrate antiviral activity of the bark extract against different IAV strains, including the recently emerged H7N9, and show for the first time that a tannin-rich extract inhibits human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infection. As the best performing antiviral candidate, we identified a highly potent fraction against both IAV and HPV, enriched in high molecular weight condensed tannins by ultrafiltration, a simple, reproducible and easily upscalable method. This ultrafiltration concentrate and the bark extract inhibited early and, to a minor extent, later steps in the IAV life cycle and tannin-dependently inhibited HPV attachment. We observed interesting mechanistic differences between tannin structures: High molecular weight tannin containing extracts and tannic acid (1702 g/mol) inhibited both IAV receptor binding and neuraminidase activity. In contrast, low molecular weight compounds (tannins and, to a lesser extent, the unfractionated bark extract was preferable over individual isolated compounds. These results are of interest for developing and improving plant-based antivirals.

  17. The origin of novel avian influenza A (H7N9) and mutation dynamics for its human-to-human transmissible capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jin; Yang, Hao; Jiang, Hua; Lin, Yi-xiao; Lu, Charles Damien; Xu, Ya-wei; Zeng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In February 2013, H7N9 (A/H7N9/2013_China), a novel avian influenza virus, broke out in eastern China and caused human death. It is a global priority to discover its origin and the point in time at which it will become transmittable between humans. We present here an interdisciplinary method to track the origin of H7N9 virus in China and to establish an evolutionary dynamics model for its human-to-human transmission via mutations. After comparing influenza viruses from China since 1983, we established an A/H7N9/2013_China virus evolutionary phylogenetic tree and found that the human instances of virus infection were of avian origin and clustered into an independent line. Comparing hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences of A/H7N9/2013_China viruses with all human-to-human, avian, and swine influenza viruses in China in the past 30 years, we found that A/H7N9/2013_China viruses originated from Baer's Pochard H7N1 virus of Hu Nan Province 2010 (HA gene, EPI: 370846, similarity with H7N9 is 95.5%) and duck influenza viruses of Nanchang city 2000 (NA gene, EPI: 387555, similarity with H7N9 is 97%) through genetic re-assortment. HA and NA gene sequence comparison indicated that A/H7N9/2013_China virus was not similar to human-to-human transmittable influenza viruses. To simulate the evolution dynamics required for human-to-human transmission mutations of H7N9 virus, we employed the Markov model. The result of this calculation indicated that the virus would acquire properties for human-to-human transmission in 11.3 years (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.2-11.3, HA gene).

  18. Survey of radiosensitivity in a variety of human cell strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlett, C.F.; Harcourt, S.A.

    1980-03-01

    Gamma-ray sensitivity for cell killing was assayed in 54 human cell strains, including some derived from individuals suffering from certain hereditary diseases. The overall range of Do values in this study was 38 to 180 rads, indicating a considerable range of variability in humans. The normal sensitivity was described by a range of Do values of 97 to 180 rads. All ten ataxia telangiectasia cell strains tested proved radiosensitive and gave a mean Do value of 57 +- 15 (S.E.) rads, and these represent the most radiosensitive human skin fibroblasts currently available. Representative cell strains from familial retinoblastoma, Fanconi's anemia, and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria occupied positions of intermediate sensitivity, as did one of two ataxia telangiectasia heterozygotes. Six xeroderma pigmentosum cell strains together with two Cockayne's syndrome cell strains (all known to be sensitive to ultraviolet light) fell into the normal range, indicating an absence of cross-sensitivity between ultraviolet light and gamma-irradiation.

  19. The Role of Punctuated Evolution in the Pathogenicity of Influenza Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCullers, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an acute respiratory disease caused by influenza viruses. Evolutionarily, all influenza viruses are zoonoses, arising in the animal reservoir and spilling over into the human population...

  20. A predictive fitness model for influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuksza, Marta; Lässig, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The seasonal human influenza A/H3N2 virus undergoes rapid evolution, which produces significant year-to-year sequence turnover in the population of circulating strains. Adaptive mutations respond to human immune challenge and occur primarily in antigenic epitopes, the antibody-binding domains of the viral surface protein haemagglutinin. Here we develop a fitness model for haemagglutinin that predicts the evolution of the viral population from one year to the next. Two factors are shown to determine the fitness of a strain: adaptive epitope changes and deleterious mutations outside the epitopes. We infer both fitness components for the strains circulating in a given year, using population-genetic data of all previous strains. From fitness and frequency of each strain, we predict the frequency of its descendent strains in the following year. This fitness model maps the adaptive history of influenza A and suggests a principled method for vaccine selection. Our results call for a more comprehensive epidemiology of influenza and other fast-evolving pathogens that integrates antigenic phenotypes with other viral functions coupled by genetic linkage.

  1. Comparative analysis of Haemophilus influenzae hifA (pilin) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemans, D L; Marrs, C F; Patel, M; Duncan, M; Gilsdorf, J R

    1998-02-01

    Adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to epithelial cells plays a central role in colonization and is the first step in infection with this organism. Pili, which are large polymorphic surface proteins, have been shown to mediate the binding of H. influenzae to cells of the human respiratory tract. Earlier experiments have demonstrated that the major epitopes of H. influenzae pili are highly conformational and immunologically heterogenous; their subunit pilins are, however, immunologically homogenous. To define the extent of structural variation in pilins, which polymerize to form pili, the pilin genes (hifA) of 26 type a to f and 16 nontypeable strains of H. influenzae were amplified by PCR and subjected to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with AluI and RsaI. Six different RFLP patterns were identified. Four further RFLP patterns were identified from published hifA sequences from five nontypeable H. influenzae strains. Two patterns contained only nontypeable isolates; one of these contained H. influenzae biotype aegyptius strains F3031 and F3037. Another pattern contained predominantly H. influenzae type f strains. All other patterns were displayed by a variety of capsular and noncapsular types. Sequence analysis of selected hifA genes confirmed the 10 RFLP patterns and showed strong identity among representatives displaying the same RFLP patterns. In addition, the immunologic reactivity of pili with antipilus antisera correlated with the groupings of strains based on hifA RFLP patterns. Those strains that show greater reactivity with antiserum directed against H. influenzae type b strain M43 pili tend to fall into one RFLP pattern (pattern 3); while those strains that show equal or greater reactivity with antiserum directed against H. influenzae type b strain Eagan pili tend to fall in a different RFLP pattern (pattern 1). Sequence analysis of representative HifA pilins from typeable and nontypeable H. influenzae identified several highly

  2. Measurements of airborne influenza virus in aerosol particles from human coughs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Lindsley

    Full Text Available Influenza is thought to be communicated from person to person by multiple pathways. However, the relative importance of different routes of influenza transmission is unclear. To better understand the potential for the airborne spread of influenza, we measured the amount and size of aerosol particles containing influenza virus that were produced by coughing. Subjects were recruited from patients presenting at a student health clinic with influenza-like symptoms. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from the volunteers and they were asked to cough three times into a spirometer. After each cough, the cough-generated aerosol was collected using a NIOSH two-stage bioaerosol cyclone sampler or an SKC BioSampler. The amount of influenza viral RNA contained in the samplers was analyzed using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qPCR targeting the matrix gene M1. For half of the subjects, viral plaque assays were performed on the nasopharyngeal swabs and cough aerosol samples to determine if viable virus was present. Fifty-eight subjects were tested, of whom 47 were positive for influenza virus by qPCR. Influenza viral RNA was detected in coughs from 38 of these subjects (81%. Thirty-five percent of the influenza RNA was contained in particles>4 µm in aerodynamic diameter, while 23% was in particles 1 to 4 µm and 42% in particles<1 µm. Viable influenza virus was detected in the cough aerosols from 2 of 21 subjects with influenza. These results show that coughing by influenza patients emits aerosol particles containing influenza virus and that much of the viral RNA is contained within particles in the respirable size range. The results support the idea that the airborne route may be a pathway for influenza transmission, especially in the immediate vicinity of an influenza patient. Further research is needed on the viability of airborne influenza viruses and the risk of transmission.

  3. In silico analysis of genes nucleoprotein, neuraminidase and hemagglutinin: a comparative study on different strains of influenza A (Bird flu) virus sub-type H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Tamanna; Lal, Sunil K; Khan, Asad U

    2006-01-01

    The avian influenza (bird flu) is an infectious disease of birds, ranging from a mild to a severe form of illness. Influenza viruses pose significant challenges to both human and animal health. The proteins, nucleoprotein (NP), neuraminidase (NA) and hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus (Bird flu virus) sub-type A/Hatay/2004/(H5N1) from chicken were selected for this study. Our in silico analysis predicted that HA of influenza A virus is highly sensitive to mutations and hence it is significant for its pathogenic nature. None of the mutations was detected as an important change except in NA where K332R was at a PKC phosphorylation site. Analysis of the sequence comparison showed that the maximum number of mutations were observed in HA. These mutations are significant as they are involved in change in polarity or hydrophobicity as well as in propensity of each amino acid residue to stabilize the secondary structure. The program MAPMUTATION can be used to monitor the mutations, and predict the trend of mutations.

  4. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute...

  5. Pre- and Postexposure Use of Human Monoclonal Antibody against H5N1 and H1N1 Influenza Virus in Mice: Viable Alternative to Oseltamivir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, W.; Koldijk, M.H.; Brakenhoff, J.P.J.; Cornelissen, A.H.M.; Weverling, G.J.; Friesen, R.H.E.; Goudsmit, J.

    2009-01-01

    New strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infections are urgently needed. A recently discovered class of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) neutralizing an unprecedented spectrum of influenza virus subtypes may have the potential for future use in humans. Here, we assess the efficacies of CR6261

  6. Avian influenza A virus (H7N7) associated with human conjunctivitis and a fatal case of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); P.M. Schneeberger (Peter); F.W. Rozendaal (Frans); J.M. Broekman (Jan); S.A. Kemink (Stiena); V.J. Munster (Vincent); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M. Schutten (Martin); G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard); G. Koch (Guus); A. Bosman (Arnold); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractHighly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses of subtypes H5 and H7 are the causative agents of fowl plague in poultry. Influenza A viruses of subtype H5N1 also caused severe respiratory disease in humans in Hong Kong in 1997 and 2003, including at least seven fatal cases, posing a serious

  7. Children with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine failure have long-term bactericidal antibodies against virulent Hib strains with multiple capsular loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Payne, Kelly; Ladhani, Shamez N; Findlow, Helen; Slack, Mary; Borrow, Ray

    2016-07-25

    Children who develop invasive Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) disease after immunisation with a highly-effective conjugate vaccine are more likely to have been infected with Hib strains possessing multiple copies of the capsulation locus. Using a recently-validated serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assay, we tested convalescent sera from 127 Hib vaccine failure cases against clinical Hib strains expressing 1-5 copies of the capsulation locus. SBA titres correlated weakly with anti-capsular IgG antibody concentrations and there was no association between SBA geometric mean titres and number of capsulation locus copies. After infection, children with Hib vaccine failure were equally protected against Hib strains with 1-5 copies of the capsulation locus.

  8. Clinical severity of human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus, China, 2013/14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, L; Wu, J T; Liu, X; Yang, P; Tsang, T K; Jiang, H; Wu, P; Yang, J; Fang, V J; Qin, Y; Lau, E H; Li, M; Zheng, J; Peng, Z; Xie, Y; Wang, Q; Li, Z; Leung, G M; Gao, G F; Yu, H; Cowling, B J

    2014-12-11

    Assessing the severity of emerging infections is challenging because of potential biases in case ascertainment. The first human case of infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus was identified in China in March 2013; since then, the virus has caused two epidemic waves in the country. There were 134 laboratory-confirmed cases detected in the first epidemic wave from January to September 2013. In the second epidemic wave of human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in China from October 2013 to October 2014, we estimated that the risk of death among hospitalised cases of infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus was 48% (95% credibility interval: 42-54%), slightly higher than the corresponding risk in the first wave. Age-specific risks of death among hospitalised cases were also significantly higher in the second wave. Using data on symptomatic cases identified through national sentinel influenza-like illness surveillance, we estimated that the risk of death among symptomatic cases of infection with influenza A(H7N9) virus was 0.10% (95% credibility interval: 0.029-3.6%), which was similar to previous estimates for the first epidemic wave of human infections with influenza A(H7N9) virus in 2013. An increase in the risk of death among hospitalised cases in the second wave could be real because of changes in the virus, because of seasonal changes in host susceptibility to severe infection, or because of variation in treatment practices between hospitals, while the increase could be artefactual because of changes in ascertainment of cases in different areas at different times.

  9. LGP2 downregulates interferon production during infection with seasonal human influenza A viruses that activate interferon regulatory factor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malur, Meghana; Gale, Michael; Krug, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    LGP2, a member of the RIG-I-like receptor family, lacks the amino-terminal caspase activation recruitment domains (CARDs) required for initiating the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and interferon (IFN) transcription. The role of LGP2 in virus infection is controversial, and the only LGP2 experiments previously carried out with mammalian influenza A viruses employed an attenuated, mouse-adapted H1N1 A/PR/8/34 (PR8) virus that does not encode the NS1 protein. Here we determine whether LGP2 has a role during infection with wild-type, nonattenuated influenza A viruses that have circulated in the human population, specifically two types of seasonal influenza A viruses: (i) H3N2 and H1N1 viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription and (ii) recent H1N1 viruses that block these two activations. In human cells infected with an H3N2 virus that activates IRF3, overexpression of LGP2 or its repressor domain decreased STAT1 activation and IFN-β transcription approximately 10-fold. Overexpression of LGP2 also caused a 10-fold decrease of STAT1 activation during infection with other seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3. Using LGP2(+/+) and LGP2(-/-) mouse cells, we show that endogenous LGP2 decreased IFN production during H3N2 virus infection 3- to 4-fold. In contrast, in both mouse and human cells infected with H1N1 viruses that do not activate IRF3, LGP2 had no detectable role. These results demonstrate that LGP2 downregulates IFN production during infection by seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription. It is intriguing that LGP2, a host protein induced during influenza A virus infection, downregulates the host antiviral IFN response.

  10. Passive immune neutralization strategies for prevention and control of influenza A infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianqiang; Shao, Hongxia; Perez, Daniel R

    2012-02-01

    Although vaccination significantly reduces influenza severity, seasonal human influenza epidemics still cause more than 250,000 deaths annually. Vaccine efficacy is limited in high-risk populations such as infants, the elderly and immunosuppressed individuals. In the event of an influenza pandemic (such as the 2009 H1N1 pandemic), a significant delay in vaccine availability represents a significant public health concern, particularly in high-risk groups. The increasing emergence of strains resistant to the two major anti-influenza drugs, adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors, and the continuous circulation of avian influenza viruses with pandemic potential in poultry, strongly calls for alternative prophylactic and treatment options. In this review, we focus on passive virus neutralization strategies for the prevention and control of influenza type A viruses.

  11. Radiological description about the globally first case of human infected avian influenza virus (H10N8 induced pneumonia

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    Jian He

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human infected avian influenza (H10N8 is an acute infectious respiratory tract infection caused by JX346-H10N8. The reported case in this paper is the globally first case report about radiological description of human infected avian influenza (H10N8 virus related pneumonia. The patient showed an epidemiological history of contacts to living poultries and the incubation period lasted for 4 days. The condition was clinically characterized by fever, cough, chest distress and obvious hypoxia. CT scan demonstrated the lungs with large flake of hyper-intense consolidation, confined patch of ground glass opacity, dilated bronchi, predominantly dorsal thickening of the interlobular septum, and other types of lesions related to interstitial pulmonary edema. Meanwhile, accompanying interlobar effusion, infrapulmonary effusion and pleural effusion were demonstrated in a small quantity by CT scan. Human infected avian influenza (H10N8 related pneumonia should be differentiated from pneumonia induced by human infected avian influenza viruses H5N1 and H7N9. No characteristic key points for radiological differentiation have been found. And its definitive diagnosis should be based on the etiological examination.

  12. Isolation and characterization of H7N9 avian influenza A virus from humans with respiratory diseases in Zhejiang, China.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Mao, H.; Yan, J.; Zhang, L.; Sun, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, Y.; Lu, Y.; Chen, E.; Lv, H.; Gong, L.; Li, Z.; Gao, J.; Xu, C.; Feng, Y.; Ge, Q.; Xu, B.; Xu, F.; Yang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Han, J.; Koch, G.; Li, H.; Shu, Y.L.; Chen, Z.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the novel reassortant avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus was reported in China. Through enhanced surveillance, infection by the H7N9 virus in humans was first identified in Zhejiang Province. Real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) was used to confirm the infec

  13. Mx1 gene protects mice against the highly lethal human H5N1 influenza virus.

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    Salomon, Rachelle; Staeheli, Peter; Kochs, Georg; Yen, Hui-Ling; Franks, John; Rehg, Jerold E; Webster, Robert G; Hoffmann, Erich

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the importance of the host Mx1 gene in protection against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Mice expressing the Mx1 gene survived infection with the lethal human H5N1 isolate A/Vietnam/1203/04 and with reassortants combining its genes with those of the non-lethal virus A/chicken/Vietnam/C58/04, while all Mx1-/- mice succumbed. Mx1-expressing mice showed lower organ virus titers, fewer lesions, and less pulmonary inflammation. Our data support the hypothesis that Mx1 expression protects mice against the high pathogenicity of H5N1 virus through inhibition of viral polymerase activity ultimately resulting in reduced viral growth and spread. Drugs that mimic this mechanism may be protective in humans.

  14. Nrf2 protects human alveolar epithelial cells against injury induced by influenza A virus

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    Kosmider Beata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza A virus (IAV infection primarily targets respiratory epithelial cells and produces clinical outcomes ranging from mild upper respiratory infection to severe pneumonia. Recent studies have shown the importance of lung antioxidant defense systems against injury by IAV. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2 activates the majority of antioxidant genes. Methods Alveolar type II (ATII cells and alveolar macrophages (AM were isolated from human lungs not suitable for transplantation and donated for medical research. In some studies ATII cells were transdifferentiated to alveolar type I-like (ATI-like cells. Alveolar epithelial cells were infected with A/PR/8/34 (PR8 virus. We analyzed PR8 virus production, influenza A nucleoprotein levels, ROS generation and expression of antiviral genes. Immunocytofluorescence was used to determine Nrf2 translocation and western blotting to detect Nrf2, HO-1 and caspase 1 and 3 cleavage. We also analyzed ingestion of PR8 virus infected apoptotic ATII cells by AM, cytokine levels by ELISA, glutathione levels, necrosis and apoptosis by TUNEL assay. Moreover, we determined the critical importance of Nrf2 using adenovirus Nrf2 (AdNrf2 or Nrf2 siRNA to overexpress or knockdown Nrf2, respectively. Results We found that IAV induced oxidative stress, cytotoxicity and apoptosis in ATI-like and ATII cells. We also found that AM can ingest PR8 virus-induced apoptotic ATII cells (efferocytosis but not viable cells, whereas ATII cells did not ingest these apoptotic cells. PR8 virus increased ROS production, Nrf2, HO-1, Mx1 and OAS1 expression and Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus. Nrf2 knockdown with siRNA sensitized ATI-like cells and ATII cells to injury induced by IAV and overexpression of Nrf2 with AdNrf2 protected these cells. Furthermore, Nrf2 overexpression followed by infection with PR8 virus decreased virus replication, influenza A nucleoprotein expression, antiviral response and

  15. Oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum strain AYA enhances IgA secretion and provides survival protection against influenza virus infection in mice.

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    Yosuke Kikuchi

    Full Text Available The mucosal immune system provides the first line of defense against inhaled and ingested pathogenic microbacteria and viruses. This defense system, to a large extent, is mediated by the actions of secretory IgA. In this study, we screened 140 strains of lactic acid bacteria for induction of IgA production by murine Peyer's patch cells. We selected one strain and named it Lactobacillus plantarum AYA. We found that L. plantarum AYA-induced production of IL-6 in Peyer's patch dendritic cells, with this production promoting IgA(+ B cells to differentiate into IgA-secreting plasma cells. We also observed that oral administration of L. plantarum AYA in mice caused an increase in IgA production in the small intestine and lung. This production of IgA correlated strongly with protective ability, with the treated mice surviving longer than the control mice after lethal influenza virus infection. Our data therefore reveals a novel immunoregulatory role of the L. plantarum AYA strain which enhances mucosal IgA production and provides protection against respiratory influenza virus infection.

  16. Effects of two commonly found strains of influenza A virus on developing dopaminergic neurons, in relation to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

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    Fernando Landreau

    Full Text Available Influenza virus (InfV infection during pregnancy is a known risk factor for neurodevelopment abnormalities in the offspring, including the risk of schizophrenia, and has been shown to result in an abnormal behavioral phenotype in mice. However, previous reports have concentrated on neuroadapted influenza strains, whereas increased schizophrenia risk is associated with common respiratory InfV. In addition, no specific mechanism has been proposed for the actions of maternal infection on the developing brain that could account for schizophrenia risk. We identified two common isolates from the community with antigenic configurations H3N2 and H1N1 and compared their effects on developing brain with a mouse modified-strain A/WSN/33 specifically on the developing of dopaminergic neurons. We found that H1N1 InfV have high affinity for dopaminergic neurons in vitro, leading to nuclear factor kappa B activation and apoptosis. Furthermore, prenatal infection of mothers with the same strains results in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the offspring, and in an abnormal behavioral phenotype. We propose that the well-known contribution of InfV to risk of schizophrenia during development may involve a similar specific mechanism and discuss evidence from the literature in relation to this hypothesis.

  17. Effects of Two Commonly Found Strains of Influenza A Virus on Developing Dopaminergic Neurons, in Relation to the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreau, Fernando; Galeano, Pablo; Caltana, Laura R.; Masciotra, Luis; Chertcoff, Agustín; Pontoriero, A.; Baumeister, Elsa; Amoroso, Marcela; Brusco, Herminia A.; Tous, Mónica I.; Savy, Vilma L.; Lores Arnaiz, María del Rosario; de Erausquin, Gabriel A.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus (InfV) infection during pregnancy is a known risk factor for neurodevelopment abnormalities in the offspring, including the risk of schizophrenia, and has been shown to result in an abnormal behavioral phenotype in mice. However, previous reports have concentrated on neuroadapted influenza strains, whereas increased schizophrenia risk is associated with common respiratory InfV. In addition, no specific mechanism has been proposed for the actions of maternal infection on the developing brain that could account for schizophrenia risk. We identified two common isolates from the community with antigenic configurations H3N2 and H1N1 and compared their effects on developing brain with a mouse modified-strain A/WSN/33 specifically on the developing of dopaminergic neurons. We found that H1N1 InfV have high affinity for dopaminergic neurons in vitro, leading to nuclear factor kappa B activation and apoptosis. Furthermore, prenatal infection of mothers with the same strains results in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the offspring, and in an abnormal behavioral phenotype. We propose that the well-known contribution of InfV to risk of schizophrenia during development may involve a similar specific mechanism and discuss evidence from the literature in relation to this hypothesis. PMID:23251423

  18. Changes in human Langerhans cells following intradermal injection of influenza virus-like particle vaccines.

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    Marc Pearton

    Full Text Available There is a significant gap in our fundamental understanding of early morphological and migratory changes in human Langerhans cells (LCs in response to vaccine stimulation. As the vast majority of LCs studies are conducted in small animal models, substantial interspecies variation in skin architecture and immunity must be considered when extrapolating the results to humans. This study aims to determine whether excised human skin, maintained viable in organ culture, provides a useful human model for measuring and understanding early immune response to intradermally delivered vaccine candidates. Excised human breast skin was maintained viable in air-liquid-interface organ culture. This model was used for the first time to show morphological changes in human LCs stimulated with influenza virus-like particle (VLP vaccines delivered via intradermal injection. Immunohistochemistry of epidermal sheets and skin sections showed that LCs in VLP treated skin lost their typical dendritic morphology. The cells were more dispersed throughout the epidermis, often in close proximity to the basement membrane, and appeared vertically elongated. Our data provides for increased understanding of the complex morphological, spatial and temporal changes that occur to permit LC migration through the densely packed keratinocytes of the epidermis following exposure to vaccine. Significantly, the data not only supports previous animal data but also provides new and essential evidence of host response to this vaccination strategy in the real human skin environment.

  19. Receptor binding specificity of recent human H3N2 influenza viruses

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    Cummings Richard D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human influenza viruses are known to bind to sialic acid linked α2-6 to galactose, but the binding specificity beyond that linkage has not been systematically examined. H3N2 human influenza isolates lost binding to chicken red cells in the 1990s but viruses isolated since 2003 have re-acquired the ability to agglutinate chicken erythrocytes. We have investigated specificity of binding, changes in hemagglutinin sequence of the recent viruses and the role of sialic acid in productive infection. Results Viruses that agglutinate, or do not agglutinate, chicken red cells show identical binding to a Glycan Array of 264 oligosaccharides, binding exclusively to a subset of α2-6-sialylsaccharides. We identified an amino acid change in hemagglutinin that seemed to correlate with chicken red cell binding but when tested by mutagenesis there was no effect. Recombinant hemagglutinins expressed on Sf-9 cells bound chicken red cells but the released recombinant baculoviruses agglutinated only human red cells. Similarly, an isolate that does not agglutinate chicken red cells show hemadsorption of chicken red cells to infected MDCK cells. We suggest that binding of chicken red cells to cell surface hemagglutinin but not to virions is due to a more favorable hemagglutinin density on the cell surface. We investigated whether a virus specific for α2-6 sialyloligosaccharides shows differential entry into cells that have varying proportions of α2-6 and α2-3 sialic acids, including human A549 and HeLa cells with high levels of α2-6 sialic acid, and CHO cells that have only α2-3 sialic acid. We found that the virus enters all cell types tested and synthesizes viral nucleoprotein, localized in the nucleus, and hemagglutinin, transported to the cell surface, but infectious progeny viruses were released only from MDCK cells. Conclusion Agglutination of chicken red cells does not correlate with altered binding to any oligosaccharide on the Glycan

  20. Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. The Grupo Andaluz para el Estudio de las Enfermedades Infecciosas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, E; Pachón, J; Rivero, A; Girón, J A; Gómez-Mateos, J; Merino, M D; Torres-Tortosa, M; González-Serrano, M; Aliaga, L; Collado, A; Hernández-Quero, J; Barrera, A; Nuño, E

    2000-03-01

    Although Haemophilus influenzae is a common etiologic agent of pneumonia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the characteristics of this pneumonia have not been adequately assessed. We have prospectively studied features of H. influenzae pneumonia in 26 consecutive HIV-infected inpatients. Most of these patients were severely immunosuppressed; 73.1% had a CD4+ cell count <100/microL. A subacute clinical presentation was observed in 27% of the patients and was associated with a higher degree of immunosuppression (P=.04). Bilateral lung infiltrates were noted radiographically in 57.7% of the cases. The mortality attributable to H. influenzae pneumonia was 11.5%. Thus, pneumonia caused by H. influenzae affects mainly patients with advanced HIV disease, and since its clinical and radiological features may be diverse, this etiology should be considered when pneumonia occurs in patients with advanced HIV infection. The mortality rate associated with H. influenzae pneumonia is not higher than that occurring in the general population.

  1. A flow-through chromatography process for influenza A and B virus purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Thomas; Solomaier, Thomas; Peuker, Alessa; Pathapati, Trinath; Wolff, Michael W; Reichl, Udo

    2014-10-01

    Vaccination is still the most efficient measure to protect against influenza virus infections. Besides the seasonal wave of influenza, pandemic outbreaks of bird or swine flu represent a high threat to human population. With the establishment of cell culture-based processes, there is a growing demand for robust, economic and efficient downstream processes for influenza virus purification. This study focused on the development of an economic flow-through chromatographic process avoiding virus strain sensitive capture steps. Therefore, a three-step process consisting of anion exchange chromatography (AEC), Benzonase(®) treatment, and size exclusion chromatography with a ligand-activated core (LCC) was established, and tested for purification of two influenza A virus strains and one influenza B virus strain. The process resulted in high virus yields (≥68%) with protein contamination levels fulfilling requirements of the European Pharmacopeia for production of influenza vaccines for human use. DNA was depleted by ≥98.7% for all strains. The measured DNA concentrations per dose were close to the required limits of 10ng DNA per dose set by the European Pharmacopeia. In addition, the added Benzonase(®) could be successfully removed from the product fraction. Overall, the presented downstream process could potentially represent a simple, robust and economic platform technology for production of cell culture-derived influenza vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. First human case of avian influenza A (H5N6 in Yunnan province, China

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    Jibo He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report clinical, virological, and epidemiological features of the first death caused by a H5N6 avian influenza virus in Yunnan Province, China. Method: The case was described in clinical expression, chest radiography, blood test and treatment. Real-time RT-PCR was used to detect H5N6 virus RNA in clinical and environment samples. Epidemiological investigation was performed including case exposure history determinant, close contacts follow up, and environment sample collection. Results: The patient initially developed sore throat and coughs on 27 January 2015. The disease progressed to severe pneumonia, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. And the patient died on 6 February. A highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N6 virus was isolated from the tracheal aspirate specimen of the patient. The viral genome analyses revealed that the H5 hemmagglutinin gene belongs to 2.3.4.4 clade. Epidemiological investigation showed that the patient had exposure to wild bird. All close contacts of the patient did not present the same disease in seven consecutive days. A high H5 positive rate was detected in environmental samples from local live poultry markets. Conclusion: The findings suggest that studies on the source of the virus, transmission models, serologic investigations, vaccines, and enhancing surveillance in both humans and birds are necessary.

  3. The rapid and sustained responses of dendritic cells to influenza virus infection in a non-human primate model.

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    Jie, Zhijun; Sun, Wei; Wang, Shanze; Koster, Frederick; Li, Bilan; Harrod, Kevin S

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are readily infected by influenza viruses and play a crucial role in regulating host innate and adaptive immune responses to viral infection. The aims of this study are to characterize the dynamic changes in the numbers and maturation status of dendritic cells present in the lung and lung-associated lymph nodes (LALNs) in the model of a non-human primate (NHP) infected by influenza A virus (IAV). Cynomolgus macaques were infected with influenza A virus (H3N2) via bronchoscopy. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the DC numbers, maturation status and subsets during the time of acute infection (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7) and the resolution phase (day 30). A dramatic increase in the numbers of influenza A virus-infected CD11c+CD14- myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and CD11c-CD123+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were observed from day 1 to day 4 and peak up from day 7 post-infection. In lung and lung-associated lymph nodes, the numbers and maturation status of myeloid dendritic cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells increased more slowly than those in the lung tissues. On day 30 post-infection, influenza A virus challenge increased the number of myeloid dendritic cells, but not plasmacytoid dendritic cells, compared with baseline. These findings indicate that dendritic cells are susceptible to influenza A virus infection, with the likely purpose of increasing mature myeloid dendritic cells numbers in the lung and lung and lung-associated lymph nodes, which provides important new insights into the regulation of dendritic cells in a non-human primate model.

  4. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Avian and other zoonotic influenza Fact sheet Updated November 2016 Key ... A(H3) subtypes. Clinical features of avian and other zoonotic influenza infections in humans Avian and other ...

  5. Swine-origin influenza-virus-induced acute lung injury:Novel or classical pathogenesis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoyoshi; Maeda; Toshimitsu; Uede

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses are common respiratory pathogens in humans and can cause serious infection that leads to the development of pneumonia.Due to their hostrange diversity,genetic and antigenic diversity,and potential to reassort genetically in vivo,influenza A viruses are continual sources of novel influenza strains that lead to the emergence of periodic epidemics and outbreaks in humans.Thus,newly emerging viral diseases are always major threats to public health.In March 2009,a novel influenza virus suddenly emerged and caused a worldwide pandemic.The novel pandemic influenza virus was genetically and antigenically distinct from previous seasonal human influenza A/H1N1 viruses;it was identified to have originated from pigs,and further genetic analysis revealed it as a subtype of A/H1N1,thus later called a swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1.Since the novel virus emerged,epidemiological surveys and research on experimental animal models have been conducted,and characteristics of the novel influenza virus have been determined but the exact mechanisms of pulmonary pathogenesis remain to be elucidated.In this editorial,we summa-rize and discuss the recent pandemic caused by the novel swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1 with a focus on the mechanism of pathogenesis to obtain an insight into potential therapeutic strategies.

  6. An overview of the regulation of influenza vaccines in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Jerry P; Gruber, Marion F

    2016-09-01

    Influenza virus vaccines are unique among currently licensed viral vaccines. The vaccines designed to protect against seasonal influenza illness must be updated periodically in an effort to match the vaccine strain with currently circulating viruses, and the vaccine manufacturing timeline includes multiple, overlapping processes with a very limited amount of flexibility. In the United States (U.S.), over 150 million doses of seasonal trivalent and quadrivalent vaccine are produced annually, a mammoth effort, particularly in the context of a vaccine with components that usually change on a yearly basis. In addition, emergence of an influenza virus containing an HA subtype that has not recently circulated in humans is an ever present possibility. Recently, pandemic influenza vaccines have been licensed, and the pathways for licensure of pandemic vaccines and subsequent strain updating have been defined. Thus, there are formidable challenges for the regulation of currently licensed influenza vaccines, as well as for the regulation of influenza vaccines under development. This review describes the process of licensing influenza vaccines in the U.S., the process and steps involved in the annual updating of seasonal influenza vaccines, and some recent experiences and regulatory challenges faced in development and evaluation of novel influenza vaccines.

  7. Optimisations and challenges involved in the creation of various bioluminescent and fluorescent influenza a virus strains for in vitro and in vivo applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.I. Spronken (Monique); K.R. Short (Kirsty); S. Herfst (Sander); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); Vaes, V.P. (Vincent P.); Van Der Hoeven, B. (Barbara); A.J. Koster (Abraham J.); G.J. Kremers (Gert-Jan); D.P. Scott (Dana P.); A.P. Gultyaev (Alexander); Sorell, E.M. (Erin M.); M.T. de Graaf (Marieke); M. Bárcena (Montserrat); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBioluminescent and fluorescent influenza A viruses offer new opportunities to study influenza virus replication, tropism and pathogenesis. To date, several influenza A reporter viruses have been described. These strategies typically focused on a single reporter gene (either

  8. Nationwide survey of the development of drug resistance in the pediatric field in 2007, 2010, and 2012: drug sensitivity of Haemophilus influenzae serotype b strain in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Hiroaki; Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2015-04-01

    Based on the results of surveillance in the pediatric field conducted in 2007, 2010, and 2012, we examined the frequency of Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) strains, the susceptibility for Hib strains to various types of antimicrobial agent, and the relations to patients' background factors. Among all of Haemophilus influenzae, the frequency of Hib strains was 3.6% (14/386 strains) in 2007, 4.8% (23/484 strains) in 2010, 1.2% (5/411 strains) in 2012, and decreasing in 2012. Hib strains were isolated in patients with the following infections: nine patients with respiratory tract infections (upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis, and pneumonia), three patients with sepsis, one patient with meningitis, and one patient with purulent inflammation of a tendon sheath in 2007; 11 patients with respiratory tract infections (upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis, and pneumonia), four patients with sepsis, and eight patients with meningitis in 2010, demonstrating a relatively high frequency in patients with invasive infections. However, in 2012, Hib strains were isolated in only four patients with respiratory tract infections (upper respiratory tract infection) and one patient with bronchial asthma. Evaluation of background factors with pediatric patients in whom Hib strains were isolated showed that approximately 70% were male; majority was children under three years of age; and higher detection rates were also related to the background of patients who were attendant to daycare center, had siblings, had received no antimicrobial agents within the previous one month before collecting specimens. Throughout the surveillance between 2007 and 2012, antimicrobial agents with all phases' MICs ≤ 1 μg/mL were cefditoren, cefcapene, and cefteram in the oral β-lactams; tazobactam/piperacillin, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, and meropenem in the injectable β-lactams; azithromycin in the macrolide; and levofloxacin in the quinolone. After 2010, MIC ranges were

  9. Human Streptococcus agalactiae strains in aquatic mammals and fish

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    Delannoy Christian MJ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, Streptococcus agalactiae or group B streptococcus (GBS is a frequent coloniser of the rectovaginal tract, a major cause of neonatal infectious disease and an emerging cause of disease in non-pregnant adults. In addition, Streptococcus agalactiae causes invasive disease in fish, compromising food security and posing a zoonotic hazard. We studied the molecular epidemiology of S. agalactiae in fish and other aquatic species to assess potential for pathogen transmission between aquatic species and humans. Methods Isolates from fish (n = 26, seals (n = 6, a dolphin and a frog were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing and standardized 3-set genotyping, i.e. molecular serotyping and profiling of surface protein genes and mobile genetic elements. Results Four subpopulations of S. agalactiae were identified among aquatic isolates. Sequence type (ST 283 serotype III-4 and its novel single locus variant ST491 were detected in fish from Southeast Asia and shared a 3-set genotype identical to that of an emerging ST283 clone associated with invasive disease of adult humans in Asia. The human pathogenic strain ST7 serotype Ia was also detected in fish from Asia. ST23 serotype Ia, a subpopulation that is normally associated with human carriage, was found in all grey seals, suggesting that human effluent may contribute to microbial pollution of surface water and exposure of sea mammals to human pathogens. The final subpopulation consisted of non-haemolytic ST260 and ST261 serotype Ib isolates, which belong to a fish-associated clonal complex that has never been reported from humans. Conclusions The apparent association of the four subpopulations of S. agalactiae with specific groups of host species suggests that some strains of aquatic S. agalactiae may present a zoonotic or anthroponotic hazard. Furthermore, it provides a rational framework for exploration of pathogenesis and host

  10. Entry properties and entry inhibitors of a human H7N9 influenza virus.

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    Youhui Si

    Full Text Available The recently identified human infections with a novel avian influenza H7N9 virus in China raise important questions regarding possible risk to humans. However, the entry properties and tropism of this H7N9 virus were poorly understood. Moreover, neuraminidase inhibitor resistant H7N9 isolates were recently observed in two patients and correlated with poor clinical outcomes. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the entry properties of H7N9 virus, design and evaluate inhibitors for H7N9 virus entry. We optimized and developed an H7N9-pseudotyped particle system (H7N9pp that could be neutralized by anti-H7 antibodies and closely mimicked the entry process of the H7N9 virus. Avian, human and mouse-derived cultured cells showed high, moderate and low permissiveness to H7N9pp, respectively. Based on influenza virus membrane fusion mechanisms, a potent anti-H7N9 peptide (P155-185-chol corresponding to the C-terminal ectodomain of the H7N9 hemagglutinin protein was successfully identified. P155-185-chol demonstrated H7N9pp-specific inhibition of infection with IC50 of 0.19 µM. Importantly, P155-185-chol showed significant suppression of A/Anhui/1/2013 H7N9 live virus propagation in MDCK cells and additive effects with NA inhibitors Oseltamivir and Zanamivir. These findings expand our knowledge of the entry properties of the novel H7N9 viruses, and they highlight the potential for developing a new class of inhibitors targeting viral entry for use in the next pandemic.

  11. An atypical Clostridium strain related to the Clostridium botulinum group III strain isolated from a human blood culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Philippe; Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes.

  12. Influenza viruses and the evolution of avian influenza virus H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeik, Nedaa; Jabr, Fadi I

    2008-05-01

    Although small in size and simple in structure, influenza viruses are sophisticated organisms with highly mutagenic genomes and wide antigenic diversity. They are species-specific organisms. Mutation and reassortment have resulted in newer viruses such as H5N1, with new resistance against anti-viral medications, and this might lead to the emergence of a fully transmissible strain, as occurred in the 1957 and 1968 pandemics. Influenza viruses are no longer just a cause of self-limited upper respiratory tract infections; the H5N1 avian influenza virus can cause severe human infection with a mortality rate exceeding 50%. The case death rate of H5N1 avian influenza infection is 20 times higher than that of the 1918 infection (50% versus 2.5%), which killed 675000 people in the USA and almost 40 million people worldwide. While the clock is still ticking towards what seems to be inevitable pandemic influenza, on April 17, 2007 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first vaccine against the avian influenza virus H5N1 for humans at high risk. However, more research is needed to develop a more effective and affordable vaccine that can be given at lower doses.

  13. Rapid generation of a well-matched vaccine seed from a modern influenza A virus primary isolate without recourse to eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartgroves, L.C.S.; Koudstaal, W.; McLeod, C.; Moncorgé, O.; Thompson, C.I.; Ellis, J.; Bull, C.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Goudsmit, J.; Barclay, W.S.

    2010-01-01

    Most influenza vaccines are produced in chicken eggs but recent human influenza strains often do not grow well in this substrate. The PER.C6® cell line is an alternative platform for vaccine production. Here we demonstrate that PER.C6 cells faithfully propagate recent clinical isolates, without sele

  14. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of severe Haemophilus influenza infections, such as sepsis and meningitis, has declined substantially since the introduction of the H. influenzae serotype b vaccine. However, the H. influenzae type b vaccine fails to protect against nontypeable H. influenzae strains, which have become increasingly frequent causes of invasive disease, especially among children and the elderly. We summarize recent literature supporting the emergence of invasive nontypeable H. influenzae and describe mechanisms that may explain its increasing prevalence over the past 2 decades. PMID:26407156

  15. Possible role of songbirds and parakeets in transmission of influenza A(H7N9) virus to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeremy C; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Koçer, Zeynep A; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Seiler, Patrick; Shu, Yuelong; Zhu, Huachen; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Malik; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2014-03-01

    Avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) recently emerged in China, causing severe human disease. Several subtype H7N9 isolates contain influenza genes previously identified in viruses from finch-like birds. Because wild and domestic songbirds interact with humans and poultry, we investigated the susceptibility and transmissibility of subtype H7N9 in these species. Finches, sparrows, and parakeets supported replication of a human subtype H7N9 isolate, shed high titers through the oropharyngeal route, and showed few disease signs. Virus was shed into water troughs, and several contact animals seroconverted, although they shed little virus. Our study demonstrates that a human isolate can replicate in and be shed by such songbirds and parakeets into their environment. This finding has implications for these birds' potential as intermediate hosts with the ability to facilitate transmission and dissemination of A(H7N9) virus.

  16. Evaluation of dengue virus strains for human challenge studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, M P; Lyons, A; Innis, B L; Sun, W; McKinney, D; Chung, R C Y; Eckels, K H; Putnak, R; Kanesa-thasan, N; Scherer, J M; Statler, J; Asher, L V; Thomas, S J; Vaughn, D W

    2014-03-14

    Discordance between the measured levels of dengue virus neutralizing antibody and clinical outcomes in the first-ever efficacy study of a dengue tetravalent vaccine (Lancet, Nov 2012) suggests a need to re-evaluate the process of pre-screening dengue vaccine candidates to better predict clinical benefit prior to large-scale vaccine trials. In the absence of a reliable animal model and established correlates of protection for dengue, a human dengue virus challenge model may provide an approach to down-select vaccine candidates based on their ability to reduce risk of illness following dengue virus challenge. We report here the challenge of flavivirus-naïve adults with cell culture-passaged dengue viruses (DENV) in a controlled setting that resulted in uncomplicated dengue fever (DF). This sets the stage for proof-of-concept efficacy studies that allow the evaluation of dengue vaccine candidates in healthy adult volunteers using qualified DENV challenge strains well before they reach field efficacy trials involving children. Fifteen flavivirus-naïve adult volunteers received 1 of 7 DENV challenge strains (n=12) or placebo (n=3). Of the twelve volunteers who received challenge strains, five (two DENV-1 45AZ5 and three DENV-3 CH53489 cl24/28 recipients) developed DF, prospectively defined as ≥2 typical symptoms, ≥48h of sustained fever (>100.4°F) and concurrent viremia. Based on our study and historical data, we conclude that the DENV-1 and DENV-3 strains can be advanced as human challenge strains. Both of the DENV-2 strains and one DENV-4 strain failed to meet the protocol case definition of DF. The other two DENV-4 strains require additional testing as the illness approximated but did not satisfy the case definition of DF. Three volunteers exhibited effusions (1 pleural/ascites, 2 pericardial) and 1 volunteer exhibited features of dengue (rash, lymphadenopathy, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia), though in the absence of fever and symptoms. The occurrence of

  17. High conservation level of CD8(+) T cell immunogenic regions within an unusual H1N2 human influenza variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komadina, Naomi; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Kedzierska, Katherine; McCaw, James M; Kelso, Anne; Leder, Karin; McVernon, Jodie

    2016-10-01

    Current seasonal influenza vaccines require regular updates due to antigenic drift causing loss of effectiveness and therefore providing little or no protection against novel influenza A subtypes. Next generation vaccines capable of eliciting CD8(+) T cell (CTL) mediated cross-protective immunity may offer a long-term alternative strategy. However, measuring pre- and existing levels of CTL cross-protection in humans is confounded by differences in infection histories across individuals. During 2000-2003, H1N2 viruses circulated persistently in the human population for the first time and we hypothesized that the viral nucleoprotein (NP) contained novel CTL epitopes that may have contributed to the survival of the viruses. This study describes the immunogenic NP peptides of H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza viruses isolated from humans over the past century, 1918-2003, by comparing this historical dataset to reference NP peptides from H1N2 that circulated in humans during 2000-2003. Observed peptides sequences ranged from highly conserved (15%) to highly variable (12%), with variation unrelated to reported immunodominance. No unique NP peptides which were exclusive to the H1N2 viruses were noted. However, the virus had inherited the NP from a recently emerged H3N2 variant containing novel peptides, which may have assisted its persistence. Any advantage due to this novelty was subsequently lost with emergence of a newer H3N2 variant in 2003. Our approach has potential to provide insight into the population context in which influenza viruses emerge, and may help to inform immunogenic peptide selection for CTL-inducing influenza vaccines. J. Med. Virol. 88:1725-1732, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Low immunogenicity predicted for emerging avian-origin H7N9: implication for influenza vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, Anne S; Ardito, Matthew; Terry, Frances; Levitz, Lauren; Ross, Ted; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William

    2013-05-01

    A new avian-origin influenza virus emerged near Shanghai in February 2013, and by the beginning of May it had caused over 130 human infections and 36 deaths. Human-to-human transmission of avian-origin H7N9 influenza A has been limited to a few family clusters, but the high mortality rate (27%) associated with human infection has raised concern about the potential for this virus to become a significant human pathogen. European, American, and Asian vaccine companies have already initiated the process of cloning H7 antigens such as hemagglutinin (HA) into standardized vaccine production vehicles. Unfortunately, previous H7 HA-containing vaccines have been poorly immunogenic. We used well-established immunoinformatics tools to analyze the H7N9 protein sequences and compare their T cell epitope content to other circulating influenza A strains as a means of estimating the immunogenic potential of the new influenza antigen. We found that the HA proteins derived from closely related human-derived H7N9 strains contain fewer T cell epitopes than other recently circulating strains of influenza, and that conservation of T cell epitopes with other strains of influenza was very limited. Here, we provide a detailed accounting of the type and location of T cell epitopes contained in H7N9 a