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Sample records for human infections caused

  1. [Bacterial infection as a cause of infertility in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleha, Radek; Boštíková, Vanda; Salavec, Miloslav; Mosio, Petra; Kusáková, Eva; Kukla, Rudolf; Mazurová, Jaroslava; Spliňo, Miroslav

    2013-04-01

    Microorganisms which are present in the human urogenital tract may be involved in the development of inflammatory changes negatively affecting the genitals in both men and women. Pathological conditions due to inflammatory alterations may result in complete loss of fertility. Infections of the urogenital tract are responsible for 15% of all cases of infertility in couples. Negative impact on the human reproduction is mainly caused by direct damage to the genital tract mucosa by metabolic products of microorganisms or by induction of pro-inflammatory responses of the body. Another mechanism is indirect impact of microorganisms on the genital function. Moreover, the effect of bacteria on spermatogenesis and semen quality is important in men. Infections mainly caused by Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae represent the greatest risk in terms of permanent consequences for human reproduction. As for other sexually transmitted disorders, such as infections caused by Gardnerella vaginalis, urogenital mycoplasmas or ureaplasmas, the link between infection and infertility has been intensively researched.

  2. Human parasitic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Chin; Chen, Yao-Shen; Yen, Chuan-Min

    2013-06-01

    The major cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Taiwan is Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Humans are infected by ingesting terrestrial and freshwater snails and slugs. In 1998 and 1999, two outbreaks of eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection were reported among 17 adult male immigrant Thai laborers who had eaten raw golden apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata). Another outbreak associated with consuming a health drink consisting of raw vegetable juice was reported in 2001. These adult cases differed from reports in the 1970s and 1980s, in which most of the cases were in children. With improvements in public health and education of foreign laborers, there have since been only sporadic cases in Taiwan. Review of clinical research indicates inconsistent association of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results with clinical features of eosinophilic meningitis. MRI features were nonspecific but there was an association between the presence of high brain MRI signal intensities and severity of peripheral and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia. Inflammatory markers have been identified in the CSF of patients with eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and the matrix metalloproteinase system may be associated with blood-brain barrier disruption. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection is not a reportable disease in Taiwan. It is important that a public advisory and education program be developed to reduce future accidental infection.

  3. Malakoplakia of the esophagus caused by human papillomavirus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Li Yang; Yu-Cheng Xie; Xiao-Ling Li; Jing Guo; Tao Sun; Jing Tang

    2012-01-01

    Malakoplakia is a rare granulomatous disease probably caused by infection and characterized histologically by Michaelis-Gutmann bodies.We report a more rarely seen case esophageal malakoplakia in a 54-year-old woman.She presented with coughing while eating and drinking.Gastroscopy showed yellow nodules in the esophagus,and endoscopic ultrasonography showed a space-occupying lesion in the substratum of the esophageal mucosa.All findings highly resembled esophageal cancer.Histopathological examination finally indentified this space-occupying lesion as malakoplakia and not cancer.Immunohistochemistry showed that she had human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the esophagus,which indicates that infection was responsible for the malakoplakia.This is believed to be the first case of malakoplakia in the esophagus,and more importantly,we established that HPV infection was the initiator of esophageal malakoplakia.

  4. HUMAN RHINOVIRUS CAUSES SEVERE INFECTION IN PRETERM INFANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Piggelen, Renee O.; van Loon, Anton M.; Krediet, Tanette G.; Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata A.

    2010-01-01

    Data of 11 infants (median gestational age and birth weight 30 weeks and 1520 g, respectively) with severe human rhinovirus infection (HRV) are described. Nine of 11 (82%) were preterm infants and 7 of these 9 (78%) became infected during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. All infants p

  5. Bacteroides pyogenes causing serious human wound infection from animal bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jillian S Y; Korman, Tony M; Yeung, Alex; Streitberg, Richard; Francis, Michelle J; Graham, Maryza

    2016-12-01

    Bacteroides pyogenes is part of the normal oral flora of domestic animals. There is one previous report of human infection, with B. pyogenes bacteremia following a cat bite (Madsen 2011). We report seven severe human infections where B. pyogenes was identified by Bruker matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDTI-TOF MS), but not by VITEK MS and was misidentified by VITEK ANC card. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Review: Environmental mycobacteria as a cause of human infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Halstrom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are recognized as a problem in immunodeficient individuals and are increasingly common in older people with no known immune defects. NTM are found in soil and water, but factors influencing transmission from the environment to humans are mostly unknown. Studies of the epidemiology of NTM disease have matched some clinical isolates of NTM with isolates from the patient's local environment. Definitive matching requires strain level differentiation based on molecular analyses, including partial sequencing, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD PCR, repetitive element (rep- PCR and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE of large restriction fragments. These approaches have identified hospital and residential showers and faucets, hot-tubs and garden soil as sources of transmissible pathogenic NTM. However, gaps exist in the literature, with many clinical isolates remaining unidentified within environments that have been tested, and few studies investigating NTM transmission in developing countries. To understand the environmental reservoirs and transmission routes of pathogenic NTM, different environments, countries and climates must be investigated.

  7. Cluster of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in humans in a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starlander, Gustaf; Börjesson, Stefan; Grönlund-Andersson, Ulrika; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Melhus, Asa

    2014-08-01

    The dog-associated Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a rare pathogen in humans. Here we describe a cluster of infections caused by the methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius clone ST71-J-t02-II-III. It involved four elderly patients at a tertiary hospital. Three patients had wound infections, and the strain had a tendency to cause bullous skin lesions.

  8. Plasmodium falciparum infection causes proinflammatory priming of human TLR responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCall, M.B.B.; Netea, M.G.; Hermsen, C.C.; Jansen, T.; Jacobs, L.; Golenbock, D.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    TLRs are a major group of pattern recognition receptors that are crucial in initiating innate immune responses and are capable of recognizing Plasmodium ligands. We have investigated TLR responses during acute experimental P. falciparum (P.f.) infection in 15 malaria-naive volunteers. TLR-4 response

  9. Tatumella ptyseos causing severe human infection: report of the first two Brazilian cases

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    Paulo Sérgio Gonçalves da Costa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Tatumella ptyseos is the type species of the Tatumella genus (Enterobacteriaceae. This fermentative Gram-negative rod has only rarely been reported as a cause of human infections; there is very little information about it in the medical literature. We report here the first two Brazilian cases of T. ptyseos infections, both evolving to severe sepsis.

  10. DNA barcoding of fungi causing infections in humans and animals.

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    Irinyi, Laszlo; Lackner, Michaela; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meyer, Wieland

    2016-02-01

    Correct species identification is becoming increasingly important in clinical diagnostics. Till now, many mycological laboratories rely on conventional phenotypic identification. But this is slow and strongly operator-dependent. Therefore, to improve the quality of pathogen identification, rapid, reliable, and objective identification methods are essential. One of the most encouraging approaches is molecular barcoding using the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the rDNA, which is rapid, easily achievable, accurate, and applicable directly from clinical specimens. It relies on the comparison of a single ITS sequence with a curated reference database. The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM) working group for DNA barcoding has recently established such a database, focusing on the majority of human and animal pathogenic fungi (ISHAM-ITS, freely accessible at http://www.isham.org/ or directly from http://its.mycologylab.org). For some fungi the use of secondary barcodes may be necessary.

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Different Bordetella sp. Isolates Causing Human Respiratory Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Bowden, Katherine E.; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Davis, Jamie K.; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Miner, Christine E.; Rowe, Lori; Sheth, Mili; Tondella, M. Lucia; Williams, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Species of the genus Bordetella associate with various animal hosts, frequently causing respiratory disease. Bordetella pertussis is the primary agent of whooping cough and other Bordetella species can cause similar cough illness. Here, we report four complete genome sequences from isolates of different Bordetella species recovered from human respiratory infections.

  12. Human Coronavirus in the 2014 Winter Season as a Cause of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu Yeun; Han, Song Yi; Kim, Ho Seong; Cheong, Hyang Min; Kim, Sung Soon; Kim, Dong Soo

    2017-01-01

    During the late autumn to winter season (October to December) in the Republic of Korea, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common pathogen causing lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Interestingly, in 2014, human coronavirus (HCoV) caused not only upper respiratory infections but also LRTIs more commonly than in other years. Therefore, we sought to determine the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, outcomes, and severity of illnesses associated with HCoV infections at a single center in Korea. We retrospectively identified patients with positive HCoV respiratory specimens between October 2014 and December 2014 who were admitted to Severance Children's Hospital at Yonsei University Medical Center for LRTI. Charts of the patients with HCoV infection were reviewed and compared with RSV infection. During the study period, HCoV was the third most common respiratory virus and accounted for 13.7% of infections. Coinfection was detected in 43.8% of children with HCoV. Interestingly, one patient had both HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63. Mild pneumonia was most common (60.4%) with HCoV, and when combined with RSV, resulted in bronchiolitis. Two patients required care in the intensive care unit. However, compared with that of RSV infection, the disease course HCoV was short. Infections caused by HCoVs are common, and can cause LRTIs. During an epidemic season, clinicians should be given special consideration thereto. When combined with other medical conditions, such as neurologic or cardiologic diseases, intensive care unit (ICU) care may be necessary.

  13. Microbiological diagnosis of infections caused by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Rokosz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are Gram-negative, microaerophilic bacteria which are worldwide in distribution, causing a zoonotic disease in humans called campylobacteriosis. These infections are mainly caused by eating contaminated food products, most often improperly prepared poultry meat. Campylobacteriosis usually takes the form of gastroenteritis, or inflammation of the intestines, and the characteristic symptoms are watery-mucous diarrhea often with the presence of blood in stool, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and fever. The epidemiological data suggest that in Europe, as well as in North America, bacteria of the genus Campylobacter, especially C. jejuni and C. coli, are the most commonly isolated pathogens in infections of the gastrointestinal tract in humans. Epidemiological data indicate that these organisms are a much more common cause of acute diarrhea, mostly in young children, than Salmonella and Yersinia. The lack of specific symptoms makes the diagnosis of campylobacteriosis necessary to carry out specialized microbiological diagnostics. Because so far these studies are performed in our country only in a few laboratories, the overwhelming number of cases of campylobacteriosis are not recorded in Polish epidemiological statistics. The purpose of this paper is to discuss issues related to the microbiological diagnosis of infections caused by C. jejuni and C. coli. It also describes the basic epidemiological and clinical data, as well as current treatment of campylobacteriosis.

  14. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Neglected Cause of Human Enteric Infections in Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraka, Daniel; Savin, Cyril; Kouassi, Stephane; Cissé, Bakary; Koffi, Eugène; Cabanel, Nicolas; Brémont, Sylvie; Faye-Kette, Hortense; Dosso, Mireille; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic Yersinia circulate in the pig reservoir and are the third bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal infections in Europe. In West Africa, reports of human yersiniosis are rare. This study was conducted to determine whether pathogenic Yersinia are circulating in pig farms and are responsible for human infections in the Abidjan District. Methodology/Principal findings From June 2012 to December 2013, pig feces were collected monthly in 41 swine farms of the Abidjan district. Of the 781 samples collected, 19 Yersinia strains were isolated in 3 farms: 7 non-pathogenic Yersinia intermedia and 12 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3. Farm animals other than pigs and wild animals were not found infected. Furthermore, 2 Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains were isolated from 426 fecal samples of patients with digestive disorders. All 14 Y. enterocolitica strains shared the same PFGE and MLVA profile, indicating their close genetic relationship. However, while 6 of them displayed the usual phage type VIII, the other 8 had the highly infrequent phage type XI. Whole genome sequencing and SNP analysis of individual colonies revealed that phage type XI strains had unusually high rates of mutations. These strains displayed a hypermutator phenotype that was attributable to a large deletion in the mutS gene involved in DNA mismatch repair. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that pathogenic Y. enterocolitica circulate in the pig reservoir in Côte d'Ivoire and cause human infections with a prevalence comparable to that of many developed countries. The paucity of reports of yersiniosis in West Africa is most likely attributable to a lack of active detection rather than to an absence of the microorganism. The identification of hypermutator strains in pigs and humans is of concern as these strains can rapidly acquire selective advantages that may increase their fitness, pathogenicity or resistance to commonly used treatments. PMID

  15. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Neglected Cause of Human Enteric Infections in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraka, Daniel; Savin, Cyril; Kouassi, Stephane; Cissé, Bakary; Koffi, Eugène; Cabanel, Nicolas; Brémont, Sylvie; Faye-Kette, Hortense; Dosso, Mireille; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia circulate in the pig reservoir and are the third bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal infections in Europe. In West Africa, reports of human yersiniosis are rare. This study was conducted to determine whether pathogenic Yersinia are circulating in pig farms and are responsible for human infections in the Abidjan District. From June 2012 to December 2013, pig feces were collected monthly in 41 swine farms of the Abidjan district. Of the 781 samples collected, 19 Yersinia strains were isolated in 3 farms: 7 non-pathogenic Yersinia intermedia and 12 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3. Farm animals other than pigs and wild animals were not found infected. Furthermore, 2 Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains were isolated from 426 fecal samples of patients with digestive disorders. All 14 Y. enterocolitica strains shared the same PFGE and MLVA profile, indicating their close genetic relationship. However, while 6 of them displayed the usual phage type VIII, the other 8 had the highly infrequent phage type XI. Whole genome sequencing and SNP analysis of individual colonies revealed that phage type XI strains had unusually high rates of mutations. These strains displayed a hypermutator phenotype that was attributable to a large deletion in the mutS gene involved in DNA mismatch repair. This study demonstrates that pathogenic Y. enterocolitica circulate in the pig reservoir in Côte d'Ivoire and cause human infections with a prevalence comparable to that of many developed countries. The paucity of reports of yersiniosis in West Africa is most likely attributable to a lack of active detection rather than to an absence of the microorganism. The identification of hypermutator strains in pigs and humans is of concern as these strains can rapidly acquire selective advantages that may increase their fitness, pathogenicity or resistance to commonly used treatments.

  16. Saffold virus, a human Theiler's-like cardiovirus, is ubiquitous and causes infection early in life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zoll

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The family Picornaviridae contains well-known human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and parechovirus. In addition, this family contains a number of viruses that infect animals, including members of the genus Cardiovirus such as Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV and Theiler's murine encephalomyelits virus (TMEV. The latter are important murine pathogens that cause myocarditis, type 1 diabetes and chronic inflammation in the brains, mimicking multiple sclerosis. Recently, a new picornavirus was isolated from humans, named Saffold virus (SAFV. The virus is genetically related to Theiler's virus and classified as a new species in the genus Cardiovirus, which until the discovery of SAFV did not contain human viruses. By analogy with the rodent cardioviruses, SAFV may be a relevant new human pathogen. Thus far, SAFVs have sporadically been detected by molecular techniques in respiratory and fecal specimens, but the epidemiology and clinical significance remained unclear. Here we describe the first cultivated SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3 isolate, its growth characteristics, full-length sequence, and epidemiology. Unlike the previously isolated SAFV-1 and -2 viruses, SAFV-3 showed efficient growth in several cell lines with a clear cytopathic effect. The latter allowed us to conduct a large-scale serological survey by a virus-neutralization assay. This survey showed that infection by SAFV-3 occurs early in life (>75% positive at 24 months and that the seroprevalence reaches >90% in older children and adults. Neutralizing antibodies were found in serum samples collected in several countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia. In conclusion, this study describes the first cultivated SAFV-3 isolate, its full-length sequence, and epidemiology. SAFV-3 is a highly common and widespread human virus causing infection in early childhood. This finding has important implications for understanding the impact of these ubiquitous viruses and their possible

  17. Saffold virus, a human Theiler's-like cardiovirus, is ubiquitous and causes infection early in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Jan; Erkens Hulshof, Sandra; Lanke, Kjerstin; Verduyn Lunel, Frans; Melchers, Willem J G; Schoondermark-van de Ven, Esther; Roivainen, Merja; Galama, Jochem M D; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2009-05-01

    The family Picornaviridae contains well-known human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and parechovirus). In addition, this family contains a number of viruses that infect animals, including members of the genus Cardiovirus such as Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and Theiler's murine encephalomyelits virus (TMEV). The latter are important murine pathogens that cause myocarditis, type 1 diabetes and chronic inflammation in the brains, mimicking multiple sclerosis. Recently, a new picornavirus was isolated from humans, named Saffold virus (SAFV). The virus is genetically related to Theiler's virus and classified as a new species in the genus Cardiovirus, which until the discovery of SAFV did not contain human viruses. By analogy with the rodent cardioviruses, SAFV may be a relevant new human pathogen. Thus far, SAFVs have sporadically been detected by molecular techniques in respiratory and fecal specimens, but the epidemiology and clinical significance remained unclear. Here we describe the first cultivated SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3) isolate, its growth characteristics, full-length sequence, and epidemiology. Unlike the previously isolated SAFV-1 and -2 viruses, SAFV-3 showed efficient growth in several cell lines with a clear cytopathic effect. The latter allowed us to conduct a large-scale serological survey by a virus-neutralization assay. This survey showed that infection by SAFV-3 occurs early in life (>75% positive at 24 months) and that the seroprevalence reaches >90% in older children and adults. Neutralizing antibodies were found in serum samples collected in several countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia. In conclusion, this study describes the first cultivated SAFV-3 isolate, its full-length sequence, and epidemiology. SAFV-3 is a highly common and widespread human virus causing infection in early childhood. This finding has important implications for understanding the impact of these ubiquitous viruses and their possible role in acute

  18. Saffold virus, a human Theiler's-like cardiovirus, is ubiquitous and causes infection early in life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zoll

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The family Picornaviridae contains well-known human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and parechovirus. In addition, this family contains a number of viruses that infect animals, including members of the genus Cardiovirus such as Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV and Theiler's murine encephalomyelits virus (TMEV. The latter are important murine pathogens that cause myocarditis, type 1 diabetes and chronic inflammation in the brains, mimicking multiple sclerosis. Recently, a new picornavirus was isolated from humans, named Saffold virus (SAFV. The virus is genetically related to Theiler's virus and classified as a new species in the genus Cardiovirus, which until the discovery of SAFV did not contain human viruses. By analogy with the rodent cardioviruses, SAFV may be a relevant new human pathogen. Thus far, SAFVs have sporadically been detected by molecular techniques in respiratory and fecal specimens, but the epidemiology and clinical significance remained unclear. Here we describe the first cultivated SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3 isolate, its growth characteristics, full-length sequence, and epidemiology. Unlike the previously isolated SAFV-1 and -2 viruses, SAFV-3 showed efficient growth in several cell lines with a clear cytopathic effect. The latter allowed us to conduct a large-scale serological survey by a virus-neutralization assay. This survey showed that infection by SAFV-3 occurs early in life (>75% positive at 24 months and that the seroprevalence reaches >90% in older children and adults. Neutralizing antibodies were found in serum samples collected in several countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia. In conclusion, this study describes the first cultivated SAFV-3 isolate, its full-length sequence, and epidemiology. SAFV-3 is a highly common and widespread human virus causing infection in early childhood. This finding has important implications for understanding the impact of these ubiquitous viruses and their possible

  19. Human and nonhuman infections caused by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Canada from 1962 to 1985.

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, S.

    1986-01-01

    The incidence of human and nonhuman infections of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Canada is presented on the basis of a literature review and serotyping of 101 cultures referred to the Canadian National Reference Center for Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

  20. Incidence rate of external genital lesions (EGL) caused by human papillomavirus infection in Czech population

    OpenAIRE

    Petráš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of external genital lesions (EGL) caused by human papillomaviruses in the Czech population Marek Petráš Abstract Genital warts (condyloma acuminate) caused up to 90% cases by two human papillomaviruses of type 6 and 11 are not life-threatening diseases but can cause not only clinical symptoms (burning, itching, bleeding, and pain) but also psychosocial stress, embarrassment, and anxiety making for impaired quality of life. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the p...

  1. Thirty years of human infections caused by Yersinia enterocolitica in northern Spain: 1985-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimon, J M; Figueroa, R; Idigoras, P; Gomariz, M; Alkorta, M; Cilla, G; Pérez-Trallero, E

    2017-08-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica infection is a zoonosis with worldwide distribution, gastroenteritis being by far the most common clinical manifestation of human infection. In Gipuzkoa, northern Spain, human Y. enterocolitica infections increased from the mid-1980s to the beginning of the 21st century (from 7·9 to 23·2 annual episodes per 100 000 population) to decrease to 7·2 annual episodes per 100 000 population in the last years of the study. The hospital admission rate due to yersiniosis during the last 15 years of the study was 7·3%. More than 99% of isolates were serotype O:3. Infection affected mainly children under 5 years of age (average rate: 140 episodes per 100 000 population). The incidence in adults was low but hospitalisation increased with age, exceeding 50% in people over 64 years old.

  2. Saffold virus, a human Theiler's-like cardiovirus, is ubiquitous and causes infection early in life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoll, J.; Erkens Hulshof, S.; Lanke, K.H.W.; Verduyn Lunel, F.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Schoondermark-van de Ven, E.M.E.; Roivainen, M.; Galama, J.M.D.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The family Picornaviridae contains well-known human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and parechovirus). In addition, this family contains a number of viruses that infect animals, including members of the genus Cardiovirus such as Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and

  3. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Gary M; de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-11-01

    HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 3846 HIV-negative (89.6%) ICC, but HIV-positive ICC harbored significantly more multiple HPV infections (PR = 1.75, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18 to 2.58), which were significantly more prevalent in ICC tested from cells than from biopsies. HPV16 was the most frequently detected type in HIV-positive ICC (42.5%), followed by HPV18 (22.2%), HPV45 (14.4%), and HPV35 (7.1%). Nevertheless, HIV-positive ICC were significantly less frequently infected with HPV16 than HIV-negative ICC (PR = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals: 0.79 to 0.99). Other high-risk types were significantly more prevalent in HIV-positive ICC, but only for HPV18 was there a significantly higher prevalence of both single and multiple infections in HIV-positive ICC. Increases for other high-risk types were primarily accounted for by multiple infections. The proportion of HPV-positive ICC estimated attributable to HPV16/18 (71.8% in HIV positive, 73.4% in HIV negative) or HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 (88.8%, 89.5%) was not affected by HIV. HIV alters the relative carcinogenicity of HPV types, but prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines may nevertheless prevent a similar proportion of ICC, irrespective of HIV infection.

  4. Fatal Case of Polymicrobial Meningitis Caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patient.

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    Conde-Pereira, César; Rodas-Rodríguez, Lia; Díaz-Paz, Manuel; Palacios-Rivera, Hilda; Firacative, Carolina; Meyer, Wieland; Alcázar-Castillo, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    We describe a fatal case of polymicrobial meningitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient from Guatemala caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Central nervous system infections caused concurrently by these species are extremely rare. This is also the first report of disseminated disease caused by C. liquefaciens.

  5. Escherichia coli isolates from commercial chicken meat and eggs cause sepsis, meningitis and urinary tract infection in rodent models of human infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellata, M; Johnson, J R; Curtiss, R

    2017-07-13

    The zoonotic potential of Escherichia coli from chicken-source food products is important to define for public health purposes. Previously, genotypic and phenotypic screening of E. coli isolates from commercial chicken meat and shell eggs identified some E. coli strains that by molecular criteria resembled human-source extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Here, to clarify the zoonotic risk of such chicken-source E. coli, we compared selected E. coli isolates from chicken meat and eggs, stratified by molecularly defined ExPEC status, to human-source ExPEC and to laboratory E. coli for virulence in rodent models of sepsis, meningitis and UTI, and evaluated whether specific bacterial characteristics predict experimental virulence. Multiple chicken-source E. coli resembled human-source ExPEC in their ability to cause one or multiple different ExPEC-associated infections. Swimming ability corresponded with urovirulence, K1 capsule corresponded with ability to cause neonatal meningitis, and biofilm formation in urine corresponded with ability to cause sepsis. In contrast, molecularly defined ExPEC status and individual genotypic traits were uncorrelated with ability to cause sepsis, and neither complement sensitivity nor growth in human urine corresponded with virulence in any infection model. These findings establish that chicken-derived food products contain E. coli strains that, in rodent models of multiple human-associated ExPEC infections, are able to cause disease comparably to human-source E. coli clinical isolates, which suggests that they may pose a significant food safety threat. Further study is needed to define the level of risk they pose to human health, which if appreciable would justify efforts to monitor for and reduce or eliminate them. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Proteflazid® and local immunity in diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpesvirus and mixed urogenital infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Vjacheslav; Chernyshov, Viktor; Grynevych, Oleksandr; Benyuk, Vasil; Kornatskaya, Alla; Shalko, Miroslava; Usevich, Igor; Revenko, Oleg; Shepetko, Maxim; Solomakha, Ludmila

    2017-03-21

    Reporting of clinical trials results for Proteflazid® in the drug formulation suppositories and vaginal swabs soaked in the solution of the drug to the local immunity of the female reproductive tract. The aim of study was to examine the state of local immunity in the reproductive tract of women with sexually transmitted diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpes viruses (Type 1, 2) and mixed infection (herpes viruses + chlamydia). The trials involved 216 women with viral sexually transmitted diseases: Cervical Dysplasia associated with papillomavirus infection (HPV) (Group 1); Herpes genitalis type 1 (HSV- 1) and type 2 (HSV-1) (Group 2); mixed infection - HSV-1, HSV-2 and chlamydia (Group 3). Treatment results have confirmed that Proteflazid® contributes to sustainable performance improvement of basic factors of local immunity - sIgA, lysozyme and complement component C3 in the cervical mucus for all three groups of women. Proteflazid® enhances level of local immunity markers (sIgA, lysozyme, C3 complement component) and improves their ratios. Also it intensifies anticontagious activity of mucosal protection and female reproductive system as whole, during treatment diseases caused by human papillomavirus, herpesvirus and mixed urogenital infections (herpesvirus and chlamydia).

  7. Slaughterhouse pigs are a major reservoir of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 capable of causing human infection in southern Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Hoa Ngo

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a pathogen of major economic significance to the swine industry and is increasingly recognized as an emerging zoonotic agent in Asia. In Vietnam, S. suis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in adult humans. Zoonotic transmission is most frequently associated with serotype 2 strains and occupational exposure to pigs or consumption of infected pork. To gain insight into the role of pigs for human consumption as a reservoir for zoonotic infection in southern Vietnam, we determined the prevalence and diversity of S. suis carriage in healthy slaughterhouse pigs. Nasopharyngeal tonsils were sampled from pigs at slaughterhouses serving six provinces in southern Vietnam and Ho Chi Minh City area from September 2006 to November 2007. Samples were screened by bacterial culture. Isolates of S. suis were serotyped and characterized by multi locus sequence typing (MLST and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles and associated genetic resistance determinants, and the presence of putative virulence factors were determined. 41% (222/542 of pigs carried S. suis of one or multiple serotypes. 8% (45/542 carried S. suis serotype 2 which was the most common serotype found (45/317 strains, 14%. 80% of serotype 2 strains belonged to the MLST clonal complex 1,which was previously associated with meningitis cases in Vietnam and outbreaks of severe disease in China in 1998 and 2005. These strains clustered with representative strains isolated from patients with meningitis in PFGE analysis, and showed similar antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor profiles. Slaughterhouse pigs are a major reservoir of S. suis serotype 2 capable of causing human infection in southern Vietnam. Strict hygiene at processing facilities, and health education programs addressing food safety and proper handling of pork should be encouraged.

  8. Avian influenza viruses that cause highly virulent infections in humans exhibit distinct replicative properties in contrast to human H1N1 viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Philippe F.; de La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Paradis, Éric; Mendoza, Emelissa; Coombs, Kevin M.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Avian influenza viruses present an emerging epidemiological concern as some strains of H5N1 avian influenza can cause severe infections in humans with lethality rates of up to 60%. These have been in circulation since 1997 and recently a novel H7N9-subtyped virus has been causing epizootics in China with lethality rates around 20%. To better understand the replication kinetics of these viruses, we combined several extensive viral kinetics experiments with mathematical modelling of in vitro infections in human A549 cells. We extracted fundamental replication parameters revealing that, while both the H5N1 and H7N9 viruses replicate faster and to higher titers than two low-pathogenicity H1N1 strains, they accomplish this via different mechanisms. While the H7N9 virions exhibit a faster rate of infection, the H5N1 virions are produced at a higher rate. Of the two H1N1 strains studied, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain exhibits the longest eclipse phase, possibly indicative of a less effective neuraminidase activity, but causes infection more rapidly than the seasonal strain. This explains, in part, the pandemic strain’s generally slower growth kinetics and permissiveness to accept mutations causing neuraminidase inhibitor resistance without significant loss in fitness. Our results highlight differential growth properties of H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses.

  9. Infection of human endothelium in vitro by cytomegalovirus causes enhanced expression of purinergic receptors : A potential virus escape mechanism?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandberg, Mariet; van Son, Willem J.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Bakker, Winston W.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) uses different strategies to escape from human host defense reactions. Previously we have observed that infection of endothelial cells with CMV in vitro leads to enhanced activity of endothelial ectonucleotidases. These ectoenzymes are responsible for hydrolys

  10. Infection of human endothelium in vitro by cytomegalovirus causes enhanced expression of purinergic receptors : A potential virus escape mechanism?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandberg, Mariet; van Son, Willem J.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Bakker, Winston W.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) uses different strategies to escape from human host defense reactions. Previously we have observed that infection of endothelial cells with CMV in vitro leads to enhanced activity of endothelial ectonucleotidases. These ectoenzymes are responsible for

  11. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia

  12. Chaetomium-like fungi causing opportunistic infections in humans: a possible role for extremotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; Khan, Ziauddin; Wang, Xue-wei; Moussa, Tarek A. A.; Al-Zahrani, Hassan S.; Almaghrabi, Omar A.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Ahmad, S.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Diepeningen, Anne; Menken, S. B. J.; Najafzadeh, M. J.; Crous, Pedro W.; Cornely, Oliver; Hamprecht, Axel; Vehreschild, Maria J. G. T.; Kindo, A. J.; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family Chaetomiaceae are ubiquitous ascosporulating fungi commonly, which reside in soil enriched with manure or cellulosic materials. Their role as human pathogens is largely ignored. However, the ability of some species to grow at high temperature enables them to play an important r

  13. Chaetomium-like fungi causing opportunistic infections in humans: a possible role for extremotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; Khan, Ziauddin; Wang, Xue-wei; Moussa, Tarek A. A.; Al-Zahrani, Hassan S.; Almaghrabi, Omar A.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Ahmad, S.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Diepeningen, Anne; Menken, S. B. J.; Najafzadeh, M. J.; Crous, Pedro W.; Cornely, Oliver; Hamprecht, Axel; Vehreschild, Maria J. G. T.; Kindo, A. J.; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    Members of the family Chaetomiaceae are ubiquitous ascosporulating fungi commonly, which reside in soil enriched with manure or cellulosic materials. Their role as human pathogens is largely ignored. However, the ability of some species to grow at high temperature enables them to play an important

  14. Chaetomium-like fungi causing opportunistic infections in humans: a possible role for extremotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, S.A.; Khan, Z.; Wang, X.; Moussa, T.A.A.; Al-Zahrani, H.S.; Almaghrabi, O.A.; Sutton, D.A.; Ahmad, S.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; van Diepeningen, A.; Menken, S.B.J.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Crous, P.W.; Cornely, O.; Hamprecht, A.; Vehreschild, M.J.G.T.; Kindo, A.J.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the family Chaetomiaceae are ubiquitous ascosporulating fungi commonly, which reside in soil enriched with manure or cellulosic materials. Their role as human pathogens is largely ignored. However, the ability of some species to grow at high temperature enables them to play an important

  15. Human Papillomavirus Infection as a Possible Cause of Spontaneous Abortion and Spontaneous Preterm Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambühl, Lea Maria Margareta; Baandrup, Ulrik; Dybkær, Karen;

    2016-01-01

    Based on the current literature, we aimed to provide an overview on Human Papillomavirus prevalence in normal pregnancies and pregnancies with adverse outcome. We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed and Embase. Data extracted from the articles and used for analysis included HPV pre...

  16. “Infectobesity: viral infections (especially with human adenovirus-36: Ad-36) may be a cause of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, van V.J.T.; Sitnyakowsky, L.; Jeffery, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years viral infections have been recognized as possible cause of obesity, alongside the traditionally recognized causes (genetic inheritance, and behaviour/environmental causes such as diet exercise, cultural practices and stress). Although four viruses have been reported to induce obesity

  17. “Infectobesity: viral infections (especially with human adenovirus-36: Ad-36) may be a cause of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, van V.J.T.; Sitnyakowsky, L.; Jeffery, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years viral infections have been recognized as possible cause of obesity, alongside the traditionally recognized causes (genetic inheritance, and behaviour/environmental causes such as diet exercise, cultural practices and stress). Although four viruses have been reported to induce obesity

  18. Infections caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choroszy-Król, Irena; Frej-Mądrzak, Magdalena; Hober, Martyna; Sarowska, Jolanta; Jama-Kmiecik, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    High affinity to the epithelial lining of the airways makes Chlamydophila pneumoniae a common etiological agent of respiratory tract infections (RTI). It causes among others: pharyngitis, tracheitis, sinusitis, otitis media, bronchitis and bronchiolitis, and pneumonia. It is estimated that Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection is responsible for about 20% of lower respiratory tract infections. Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection may play an important role in the pathogenesis and course of bronchial asthma. The recent results indicate that Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection may be a factor responsible for 4-16% of COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) exacerbations. A relationship of chlamydial infection with atherosclerosis raises huge interest. A connection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection with other non-communicable diseases such as lung cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis and erythema nodosum is also recognized, although the role of these bacteria has not been fully understood in any of the listed diseases.

  19. Infection with fully mature Corynosoma cf. validum causes ulcers in the human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keitaro; Ito, Takahiro; Sato, Tomonobu; Goto, Mitsuru; Kawamoto, Toru; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yoshinori; Nakao, Minoru; Hasegawa, Hideo; Fujiya, Mikihiro

    2016-06-01

    Corynosoma is a parasite that can normally be found in the intestinal tract of fish-eating mammals, particularly in seals and birds. The present case proposed that Corynosoma could attain full maturity in the human intestine. A 70-year-old female complained of abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a swelling of the intraperitoneal lymph nodes with no responsible lesion. Video capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy detected several ulcerations and one parasite in the ileum, which was tightly attached at the bottom of the ulcerations. The parasite was cylindrical and measured approximately 10 mm (long) x 3 mm (wide). Pathologically, the worm had a four-layered body wall and contained embryonated eggs. The sequences of the parasite-derived nuclear ribosomal DNA fragment and mitochondrial DNA fragment of cox1 were almost identical to those of Corynosoma validum. The patient's abdominal pain immediately improved after the administration of pyrantel pamoate (1,500 mg). Corynosoma was possibly the responsible disease in a patient who complained of abdominal pain and in whom no responsible lesion was detected by CT, gastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. Examinations of the small intestines should be aggressively performed in such cases.

  20. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA as causes of human infection and colonization in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Köck

    Full Text Available Pigs, cattle and poultry are colonized with MRSA and the zoonotic transmission of such MRSA to humans via direct animal contact, environmental contaminations or meat are a matter of concern. Livestock-associated (LA MRSA are mostly belonging to clonal complex (CC 398 as defined by multilocus sequence typing. However, MRSA of other clonal lineages including CC5, CC9 and CC97 have also been detected in livestock animals in Germany. Within the framework of a Dutch-German network project (EUREGIO, 14,036 MRSA isolated from clinical and screening specimens (January 2008 - June 2012 derived from human patients in hospitals as well as general or specialized practices in a German region characterized by a high density of livestock production, were subjected to S. aureus protein A (spa sequence typing. The prevalence of putative LA-MRSA among the human MRSA isolates was determined by analyzing the detection of livestock-indicator (LI spa types which had already been reported in German livestock. Overall, 578 spa types were detected among the MRSA isolates. LI spa types t011, t034, t108, t1451, t2011, t571, t1456, t1250, t1255, t1580, t2970, t2346, t1344, t2576, t2330 and t2510 (all of which are indicative for LA-MRSA CC398 accounted for 18.6% of all human isolates. The LI spa types t1430 (CC9, t3992 (CC97, t002 (CC5 and t007 (CC30 were found in 0.14%, 0.01%, 1.01% and 0.04% of all human MRSA isolates, respectively. LI spa types associated with CC398 represented 23% of all MRSA from screening samples and a varying proportion among isolates from clinical specimens ranging between 0% in cerebrospinal fluid, 8% in blood cultures and 14% in deep respiratory fluids. Our findings indicate that LA-MRSA are a major cause for human infection and stress the need for close surveillance. Although LA-MRSA CC398 predominates, the occurrence of putative LA-MRSA from other clonal lineages should be monitored.

  1. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  2. Experimental chronic hepatitis B infection of neonatal tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis: A model to study molecular causes for susceptibility and disease progression to chronic hepatitis in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection continues to be an escalating global health problem. Feasible and effective animal models for HBV infection are the prerequisite for developing novel therapies for this disease. The tree shrew (Tupaia is a small animal species evolutionary closely related to humans, and thus is permissive to certain human viral pathogens. Whether tree shrews could be chronically infected with HBV in vivo has been controversial for decades. Most published research has been reported on adult tree shrews, and only small numbers of HBV infected newborn tree shrews had been observed over short time periods. We investigated susceptibility of newborn tree shrews to experimental HBV infection as well as viral clearance over a protracted time period. Results Forty-six newborn tree shrews were inoculated with the sera from HBV-infected patients or tree shrews. Serum and liver samples of the inoculated animals were periodically collected and analyzed using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Southern blot, and immunohistochemistry. Six tree shrews were confirmed and four were suspected as chronically HBV-infected for more than 48 (up to 228 weeks after inoculation, including three that had been inoculated with serum from a confirmed HBV-infected tree shrew. Conclusions Outbred neonatal tree shrews can be long-term chronically infected with HBV at a frequency comparable to humans. The model resembles human disease where also a smaller proportion of infected individuals develop chronic HBV related disease. This model might enable genetic and immunologic investigations which would allow determination of underlying molecular causes favoring susceptibility for chronic HBV infection and disease establishment vs. viral clearance.

  3. Enterococcus faecalis infection causes inflammation, intracellular oxphos-independent ROS production, and DNA damage in human gastric cancer cells.

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    Jesper A B Strickertsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Achlorhydria caused by e.g. atrophic gastritis allows for bacterial overgrowth, which induces chronic inflammation and damage to the mucosal cells of infected individuals driving gastric malignancies and cancer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis can colonize achlohydric stomachs and we therefore wanted to study the impact of E. faecalis infection on inflammatory response, reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial genetic stability in gastric mucosal cells. METHODS: To separate the changes induced by bacteria from those of the inflammatory cells we established an in vitro E. faecalis infection model system using the gastric carcinoma cell line MKN74. Total ROS and superoxide was measured by fluorescence microscopy. Cellular oxygen consumption was characterized non-invasively using XF24 microplate based respirometry. Gene expression was examined by microarray, and response pathways were identified by Gene Set Analysis (GSA. Selected gene transcripts were verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Mitochondrial mutations were determined by sequencing. RESULTS: Infection of MKN74 cells with E. faecalis induced intracellular ROS production through a pathway independent of oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos. Furthermore, E. faecalis infection induced mitochondrial DNA instability. Following infection, genes coding for inflammatory response proteins were transcriptionally up-regulated while DNA damage repair and cell cycle control genes were down-regulated. Cell growth slowed down when infected with viable E. faecalis and responded in a dose dependent manner to E. faecalis lysate. CONCLUSIONS: Infection by E. faecalis induced an oxphos-independent intracellular ROS response and damaged the mitochondrial genome in gastric cell culture. Finally the bacteria induced an NF-κB inflammatory response as well as impaired DNA damage response and cell cycle control gene

  4. Enterococcus faecalis Infection Causes Inflammation, Intracellular Oxphos-Independent ROS Production, and DNA Damage in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A. B; Desler, Claus; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas;

    2013-01-01

    Background Achlorhydria caused by e.g. atrophic gastritis allows for bacterial overgrowth, which induces chronic inflammation and damage to the mucosal cells of infected individuals driving gastric malignancies and cancer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) can colonize achlohydric stomachs and we...... therefore wanted to study the impact of E. faecalis infection on inflammatory response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial genetic stability in gastric mucosal cells. Methods To separate the changes induced by bacteria from those of the inflammatory cells...... we established an in vitro E. faecalis infection model system using the gastric carcinoma cell line MKN74. Total ROS and superoxide was measured by fluorescence microscopy. Cellular oxygen consumption was characterized non-invasively using XF24 microplate based respirometry. Gene expression...

  5. Slaughterhouse Pigs Are a Major Reservoir of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Capable of Causing Human Infection in Southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngo, T.H; Tran, T.B.C.; Tran, T.T.N.; Nguyen, V.D.; Campbell, J.; Pham, H.A.; Huynh, H.T.; Nguyen, V.V.C.; Bryant, J.E.; Tran, T.H.; Farrar, J.; Schultsz, C.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a pathogen of major economic significance to the swine industry and is increasingly recognized as an emerging zoonotic agent in Asia. In Vietnam, S. suis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in adult humans. Zoonotic transmission is most frequently associated with serot

  6. A potential camel reservoir for extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli causing human infection in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadlelmula, Ali; Al-Hamam, Naser Abdallah; Al-Dughaym, Abdulla Mohamed

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance is continuing to increase. Consequently, efficient approaches to identify sources of resistance are required. This study aimed to compare Escherichia coli isolates from the intestinal tract of camels with isolates from human urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Al Ahsa Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), for antimicrobial resistance and identification of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). A microbiological study was conducted on 100 samples of cecal contents from camels and 100 urine samples from female UTI patients, to isolate and confirm E. coli using the VITEK 2 Automated System. Sensitivity patterns and identification of ESBLs were analyzed using the antimicrobial susceptibility test. Molecular techniques were used to detect E. coli drug-resistant clones. The presence rate of E. coli in camels was 26.0 % (n = 26/100), and in human samples, the rate of E. coli was 33.0 % (n = 33/100). ESBLs were reported for the first time in KSA, in 26.9 % (n = 5/26) of camel samples and 36.4 % (n = 8/33) of human samples. The multi-drug resistance (MDR) index was 0.13 and 0.17, for camels and humans, respectively. Escherichia coli drug-resistant O25b:H4-sequence type 131(ST131) clone was detected in two camel and two human isolates. This study demonstrates a high presence rate of ESBL-producing E. coli (ESBL-EC) in camels for the first time in KSA. Confirmation of MDR strains and E. coli ST131 clone in human and camel isolates suggests that camels could be a potential reservoir for resistant E. coli strains contributing to the increase in antimicrobial resistance in KSA.

  7. LOW MOLECULAR MASS POLYPEPTIDE AND TRANSPORTER ANTIGEN PEPTIDE GENES POLYMORPHISM AS THE RISK FACTORS OF CERVICAL CANCER WHICH CAUSED BY HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE-16 INFECTION IN BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N. B. Mahendra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until recently, cervical cancer is one of the major problem in women’s health issue related to its high incidence and mortality rate. The etiology of cervical cancer is the high risk oncogenic group of Human Papillomavirus (HPV, especially HPV-16 and 18 and its phylogenies. Meanwhile in Bali, more than 50% of infection are caused by HPV-16 infection. The main objective of this study was to investigate the role of LMP-2, LMP-7, TAP-1 and TAP-2 gene polymorphism as the risk factor in the cervical cancer carcinogenesis that is caused by HPV-16 infection. Method: A nested non-paired case-control study was conducted at Obstetric and Gynecologic Department Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia from March 1 until August 31, 2013. Laboratory testing was carried out at Laboratory of Histopathology Leiden University Medical Centre, Netherlands,. Results: A total of 40 samples were collected, consist of 20epithelial cervical cancer patients with positive HPV-16 infection as the case group and 20 non-cervical cancer patients with positive HPV-16 infection as the control group. Women infected by HPV-16 with LMP-7 gene polymorphism had a higher risk (OR=7.36, CI 95%=1.38-40.55, p=0.013 to be diagnosed with cervical cancer. Balinese women who were infected by HPV-16 with TAP-2 gene polymorphism had a higher risk (OR= 9.33, CI 95%=2.18-39.96, p=0.001 to be diagnosed with cervical cancer. Meanwhile, Balinese women who were infected by HPV-16 with LMP-7 and TAP-2 genes polymorphism had a higher risk (OR=12.67, CI 95%=1.40-114.42, p=0.020 to be diagnosed with cervical cancer. As the result, it was shown that both of this gene polymorphism was working synergistically. Conclusion: TAP-2 and LMP-7 genes polymorphism play a role in the carcinogenesis mechanism of cervical cancer that is caused by HPV-16 infection in Bali. Meanwhile, LMP-2 and TAP-1 genes polymorphism were not found to play a role in the immunology pathway of cervical cancer that is

  8. Presence of histopathological premalignant lesions and infection caused by high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus in patients with suspicious cytological and colposcopy results: A prospective study

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    Golubović Mileta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In patients with premalignant cervical lesions, human papillomavirus (HPV infection, at any moment, may be spontaneously eliminated, or may persist or transform cervical epithelium from a lower to a higher degree. Due to that, it is necessary to wisely select the patients who are at high risk of cancer development. The aim of the study was to establish the interdependence between a suspicious Papanicolaou (Pap test and colposcopy with the infection caused by high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus and the presence of premalignant cervical lesions. Methods. This prospective study used cytological, colposcopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR of high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus and histopathological analysis of cervical biopsy specimen. Out of 2,578 female patients sent to cytological analyses in Clinical Center of Montenegro, during 2012, 2013 and 2014, the study included 80 women who had to submit their biopsy specimens due to a suspicious Pap test and atypical colposcopy results. Results. In the group of 80 (3.1%; n = 80/2,578 of the selected female patients with suspicious Pap test and colposcopy, 2/3 or 56 (70% of them had cervicitis, and 1/3 or 24 (30% had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The most common type in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was HPV16 in 8 female patients, ie 61.53% out of the number of infected, or 33.33% out of the total number of premalignant lesions. Conclusion. Patients with suspicious Papanicolaou test, colposcopy results and infection which is caused by high-risk HPV infection (HPV 16 in particular often have premalignant cervical lesions. In these cases, histopathological confirmation of lesions is mandatory, since it serves as a definitive diagnostic procedure.

  9. Development of a multiplex PCR-ligase detection reaction assay for diagnosis of infection by the four parasite species causing malaria in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, David T; Thomson, Jodi M; Kasehagen, Laurin J; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2004-06-01

    The diagnosis of infections caused by Plasmodium species is critical for understanding the nature of malarial disease, treatment efficacy, malaria control, and public health. The demands of field-based epidemiological studies of malaria will require faster and more sensitive diagnostic methods as new antimalarial drugs and vaccines are explored. We have developed a multiplex PCR-ligase detection reaction (LDR) assay that allows the simultaneous diagnosis of infection by all four parasite species causing malaria in humans. This assay exhibits sensitivity and specificity equal to those of other PCR-based assays, identifying all four human malaria parasite species at levels of parasitemias equal to 1 parasitized erythrocyte/microl of blood. The multiplex PCR-LDR assay goes beyond other PCR-based assays by reducing technical procedures and by detecting intraindividual differences in species-specific levels of parasitemia. Application of the multiplex PCR-LDR assay will provide the sensitivity and specificity expected of PCR-based diagnostic assays and will contribute new insight regarding relationships between the human malaria parasite species and the human host in future epidemiological studies.

  10. Eumycetoma caused by Diaporthe phaseolorum (Phomopsis phaseoli): a case report and a mini-review of Diaporthe/Phomopsis spp invasive infections in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriart, X; Binois, R; Fior, A; Blanchet, D; Berry, A; Cassaing, S; Amazan, E; Papot, E; Carme, B; Aznar, C; Couppié, P

    2011-10-01

    Diaporthe phaseolorum (syn. Phomopsis phaseoli) is a frequent fungal parasite of plants, present on all continents around the world. It has rarely been involved in human diseases. We report a case of eumycetoma with osteomyelitis of the forefoot caused by this fungus and diagnosed by molecular biology. The patient had positive HTLV-1 serology and was a farmer from French Guiana who walked barefoot. He was successfully treated with long-term oral itraconazole (400 mg/day). A review of the literature underlines the essential roles of plants and host immunosuppression in this infection and the favourable outcome with a triazole antifungal treatment. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  11. Food-borne origins of Escherichia coli causing extraintestinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manges, Amee R; Johnson, James R

    2012-09-01

    Most human extraintestinal Escherichia coli infections, including those involving antimicrobial resistant strains, are caused by the members of a limited number of distinctive E. coli lineages, termed extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), that have a special ability to cause disease at extraintestinal sites when they exit their usual reservoir in the host's intestinal tract. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that many of the ExPEC strains encountered in humans with urinary tract infection, sepsis, and other extraintestinal infections, especially the most extensively antimicrobial-resistant strains, may have a food animal source, and may be transmitted to humans via the food supply. This review summarizes the evidence that food-borne organisms are a significant cause of extraintestinal E. coli infections in humans.

  12. Cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infection as a cause of hospitalization: a case-series in a General Hospital in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Rodríguez, Germán; Mezones-Holguín, Edward; Mendo-Urbina, Fernando; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in the context of human immunodeficiency virus infection has become a major clinical concern in recent years. In the current report we assess hospitalizations due to cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus patients in a Social Security reference hospital in Peru. A retrospective study was carried out between January 1996 and December 2012 in a General Hospital in Lima, Peru. We included 26 patients hospitalized due to cardiovascular disease. Mean age was 46.3 years (SD 12.5), predominantly male (57.7%). Ten patients (38.4%) were in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome stages. Seventeen (65.4%) received high-active-antiretroviral therapy. Eleven (42.3%) had cardiac involvement and 15 (57.7%) had non-cardiac vascular involvement. The most frequent causes of cardiac involvement were pericardial effusion and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, deep vein thrombosis and stroke were the most frequent for non-cardiac vascular involvement. Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of hospitalization in Peruvian human immunodeficiency virus patients, with differences between immunosuppression stages. Further studies analyzing associated factors are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. A false case of infection caused by Dicrocoelium dendriticum

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    Cinzia Rossi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a false case of infection caused by Dicrocoelium dendriticum, a cosmopolite trematode that can infect human bile ducts but tends to live in cattle or other grazing mammals. Our aim is to stress the relevance of adequate diagnostic methods and of exact medical history in order to detect any possible clinical case.

  14. [Postoperative heart infection caused by M. fortuitum (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, K H; Schassan, H H

    1980-01-01

    Shortly after an open-heart operation a 5-year-old girl died of an infection caused by M. fortuitum. Strains of this species are often isolated from human specimens, but generally they are not correlated with pulmonary tuberculosis. Nevertheless M. fortuitum produces relatively often infections after transplantations of different kind. The diagnosis is difficult to find, especially because nobody thinks of the possibility that a rapid growing mycobacterium is able to cause such infections. -- The therapy is very problematical. That is why these infections are not seldom fatal.

  15. Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as Causes of Human Infection and Colonization in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeck, Robin; Schaumburg, Frieder; Mellmann, Alexander; Koeksal, Mahir; Jurke, Annette; Becker, Karsten; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2013-01-01

    Pigs, cattle and poultry are colonized with MRSA and the zoonotic transmission of such MRSA to humans via direct animal contact, environmental contaminations or meat are a matter of concern. Livestock-associated (LA) MRSA are mostly belonging to clonal complex (CC) 398 as defined by multilocus seque

  16. Avian Influenza infection in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan. M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks caused by the H5N1 strain are presently of the greatest concern for human health. In assessing risks to human health, it is important to know exactly which avian virus strains are causing the outbreaks in birds.All available evidence points to an increased risk of transmission to humans when outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza are widespread in poultry. There is mounting evidence that this strain has a unique capacity to jump the species barrier and cause severe disease, with high mortality, in humans. There is no evidence, to date that efficient human to human transmission of H5N1 strain has occurred and very often. Efficient transmission among humans is a key property of pandemic strains and a property that the avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses apparently lacked. The biological and molecular basis for effective aerosol transmission among humans is not known. The virus can improve its transmissibility among humans via two principal mechanisms. The first is a “reassortment” event, in which genetic material is exchanged between human and avian viruses during co-infection of a human or pig.Reassortment could result in a fully transmissible pandemic virus, announced by a sudden surge of cases with explosive spread. The second mechanism is a more gradual process of adaptive mutation, whereby the capability of the virus to bind to human cells increases during subsequent infections of humans. Adaptive mutation, expressed initially as small clusters of human cases with some evidence of human-to-human transmission, would probably give the world some time to take defensive action, if detected sufficiently early. As the number of human infections grows, the risk increases that a new virus subtype could emerge, triggering an influenza pandemic. Humans as well as swine must now be considered a potential mixing vessel for the generation of such a virus. This link between widespread infection in poultry and increased risk of human

  17. Human metapneumovirus infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Terho; Osterback, Riikka; Peltola, Ville; Jartti, Tuomas; Vainionpää, Raija

    2008-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children, but the age-related incidence and effect of hMPV in unselected children in the community have not been evaluated. We studied a cohort of 1,338 children <13 years of age throughout 1 respiratory season in Finland during 2000-2001. We examined children and obtained a nasal swab for viral detection at any sign of respiratory infection. hMPV was detected in 47 (3.5%) of the 1,338 children. The age-related incidence of hMPV infection was highest (7.6%) in children <2 years of age, in whom hMPV accounted for 1.7% of all infections during the season. During the epidemic peak, hMPV caused 7.1% of all respiratory infections in the cohort. Acute otitis media developed in 61% of hMPV-infected children <3 years of age. Our findings demonstrate that the effect of hMPV in the community is greatest in children <2 years of age.

  18. Human Caused Fire and Acres

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — Number of wildland fires and acres burned as a result of human causes, from 2001 through 2008 (updated annually). Displayed by the eleven Geographic Areas used by...

  19. Infecções humanas causadas por poxvirus relacionados ao vírus vaccinia no Brasil Human infections caused by vaccinia-like poxviruses in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann G. Schatzmayr

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de 1999, infecções humanas por Orthopoxvirus vem sendo observadas em pelo menos oito estados no país, com a formação de vesículas as quais evoluem para pústulas e crostas, principalmente nos membros superiores e face, após contacto com bovinos apresentando lesões semelhantes no úbere. Alem das lesões na pele, foram descritas nos pacientes reações ganglionares axilares por vezes dolorosas, febre, cefaléia, fadiga, desidratação, anorexia, sudorese, artralgia e mialgia, evoluindo o quadro por três a quatro semanas. Lesão vulvar bem como transmissão intrafamiliar foram igualmente descritas. Estudos moleculares demonstraram que os poxvirus identificados são geneticamente relacionados a amostras do vírus vaccinia utilizadas no passado, nas campanhas de vacinação. Especimens clínicos de 80 infecções humanas foram estudados no laboratório e a infecção por orthopoxvirus confirmada em 68 casos. São apresentadas lesões observadas em pacientes bem como discutidas as implicações desta zoonose no Brasil.Since 1999, human infection caused by Orthopoxvirus has been observed in at least eight Brazilian states, with the presence of vesicles that evolve to pustules and crusts, especially on the hands, arms and face, after contact with cows showing comparable lesions on the udder. In addition to the skin lesions, there have been descriptions of patients with axillary ganglionic reactions that are sometimes painful, along with fever, headache, fatigue, dehydration, anorexia, sudoresis, arthralgia and muscle pain. The condition evolves over a three to four-week period. Vulvar lesions and transmission within families have also been described. Molecular studies have shown that the poxviruses identified are genetically related to vaccinia virus samples that were used in vaccination campaigns in the past. Clinical specimens from 80 human infections were studied in the laboratory, and orthopoxvirus infections were confirmed in 68

  20. Necrotizing Lung Infection Caused by the Protozoan Balantidium coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sat Sharma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B coli in large numbers. Treatment with doxycycline hyclate led to marked improvement. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan B coli should be considered in individuals who report contact with pigs.

  1. Cidofovir and brincidofovir reduce the pathology caused by systemic infection with human type 5 adenovirus in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters, while ribavirin is largely ineffective in this model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Ann E; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Ying, Baoling; Buller, R Mark L; Wold, William S M; Toth, Karoly

    2014-12-01

    There are no drugs approved specifically to treat disseminated adenovirus (Ad) infections in humans. Cidofovir is active against Ad in cell culture, and it is used frequently in the clinic with disseminated infection in pediatric transplant patients; however, controlled clinical studies have not been conducted to prove the anti-Ad efficacy of cidofovir. Brincidofovir, a lipid-linked derivative of cidofovir, which has strong activity against Ad in cell culture and in animal models, is a promising new drug currently in clinical trials. Ribavirin, which has modest activity against some Ad types in cell culture, has been used in the clinic against disseminated Ad, but the efficacy of ribavirin is unknown. In the current study, we have examined the activity of cidofovir, brincidofovir, and ribavirin against disseminated Ad5 infection in the immunosuppressed Syrian hamster model. Hamsters are immunosuppressed by treatment with cyclophosphamide, then infected intravenously with Ad5, leading to disseminated Ad5 infection, especially in the liver. We found that cidofovir and brincidofovir have excellent activity against Ad5 pathology and replication in the liver, even when administered therapeutically starting at 3 days post-challenge with Ad5. Ribavirin did not have anti-Ad5 activity in our model. Our data support the use of cidofovir and brincidofovir in humans for the treatment of disseminated Ad infections in humans.

  2. Amebic infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Gourdas; Rangan, Murali

    2012-07-01

    Clinical human infections with the protozoa Entamoeba histolytica is still estimated to occur in 50 million people worldwide, of which approximately 100,000 die annually. Although most clinical symptoms are due to involvement of the large intestine, 1 % present with involvement of the liver in the form of a liver abscess, a potentially fatal condition. Distinguishing an invasive form (E. histolytica) from a morphologically identical non-invasive one (E. dispar) requires molecular or enzymatic characterization. Further, the pattern of infection, interpretation of presence of antibodies in the host, manifestations of disease, approach to investigations and strategies for management remain complex. This article also provides a comprehensive review of the parasite and host factors that govern the complex relationship of the prozoa and humans, and tries to explain why some develop a particular form of the disease in endemic zones. Application of modern imaging and image guided therapy seems to be playing a major role in diagnosis and management of the potentially most serious form of the disease, amebic liver abscess. Despite lack of controlled studies there is a tendency to lower the threshold of their use in clinical practice, and indeed in-hospital mortality rate seems to be falling for amebic liver abscess. In a world getting increasingly swamped by non-infectious metabolic diseases, awareness of amebic infections, its bed-side diagnosis, the use of appropriate laboratory tests, and decision making in management are shrinking. This review tries to update the scientific developments in amebiasis.

  3. Catheter-related blood stream infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella spp. representatives are Gram-negative capsulated, nonmotile rods. These bacteria are found in the natural environment: plants, water, soil and insects. R. ornithinolytica is one of the three species of Raoultella. R. ornithinolytica is the only species within the genus which has the ability to produce ornithine decarboxylase. Human infections related to R. ornithinolytica are exceedingly rare. The present case report describes catheter-related blood stream infection caused by R. o...

  4. Catheter-related blood stream infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sękowska, Alicja; Dylewska, Katarzyna; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Bogiel, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    Raoultella spp. representatives are Gram-negative capsulated, nonmotile rods. These bacteria are found in the natural environment: plants, water, soil and insects. R. ornithinolytica is one of the three species of Raoultella. R. ornithinolytica is the only species within the genus which has the ability to produce ornithine decarboxylase. Human infections related to R. ornithinolytica are exceedingly rare. The present case report describes catheter-related blood stream infection caused by R. ornithinolytica and successfully treated with antibiotic therapy.

  5. Human infections and detection of Plasmodium knowlesi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balbir; Daneshvar, Cyrus

    2013-04-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a malaria parasite that is found in nature in long-tailed and pig-tailed macaques. Naturally acquired human infections were thought to be extremely rare until a large focus of human infections was reported in 2004 in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Human infections have since been described throughout Southeast Asia, and P. knowlesi is now recognized as the fifth species of Plasmodium causing malaria in humans. The molecular, entomological, and epidemiological data indicate that human infections with P. knowlesi are not newly emergent and that knowlesi malaria is primarily a zoonosis. Human infections were undiagnosed until molecular detection methods that could distinguish P. knowlesi from the morphologically similar human malaria parasite P. malariae became available. P. knowlesi infections cause a spectrum of disease and are potentially fatal, but if detected early enough, infections in humans are readily treatable. In this review on knowlesi malaria, we describe the early studies on P. knowlesi and focus on the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical aspects, and treatment of knowlesi malaria. We also discuss the gaps in our knowledge and the challenges that lie ahead in studying the epidemiology and pathogenesis of knowlesi malaria and in the prevention and control of this zoonotic infection.

  6. An Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) mutant with enhanced BZLF1 expression causes lymphomas with abortive lytic EBV infection in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Yu, Xianming; Mertz, Janet E; Gumperz, Jenny E; Reinheim, Erik; Zhou, Ying; Tang, Weihua; Burlingham, William J; Gulley, Margaret L; Kenney, Shannon C

    2012-08-01

    Immunosuppressed patients are at risk for developing Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-positive lymphomas that express the major EBV oncoprotein, LMP1. Although increasing evidence suggests that a small number of lytically infected cells may promote EBV-positive lymphomas, the impact of enhanced lytic gene expression on the ability of EBV to induce lymphomas is unclear. Here we have used immune-deficient mice, engrafted with human fetal hematopoietic stem cells and thymus and liver tissue, to compare lymphoma formation following infection with wild-type (WT) EBV versus infection with a "superlytic" (SL) mutant with enhanced BZLF1 (Z) expression. The same proportions (2/6) of the WT and SL virus-infected animals developed B-cell lymphomas by day 60 postinfection; the remainder of the animals had persistent tumor-free viral latency. In contrast, all WT and SL virus-infected animals treated with the OKT3 anti-CD3 antibody (which inhibits T-cell function) developed lymphomas by day 29. Lymphomas in OKT3-treated animals (in contrast to lymphomas in the untreated animals) contained many LMP1-expressing cells. The SL virus-infected lymphomas in both OKT3-treated and untreated animals contained many more Z-expressing cells (up to 30%) than the WT virus-infected lymphomas, but did not express late viral proteins and thus had an abortive lytic form of EBV infection. LMP1 and BMRF1 (an early lytic viral protein) were never coexpressed in the same cell, suggesting that LMP1 expression is incompatible with lytic viral reactivation. These results show that the SL mutant induces an "abortive" lytic infection in humanized mice that is compatible with continued cell growth and at least partially resistant to T-cell killing.

  7. Coccidian infection causes oxidative damage in greenfinches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuul Sepp

    Full Text Available The main tenet of immunoecology is that individual variation in immune responsiveness is caused by the costs of immune responses to the hosts. Oxidative damage resulting from the excessive production of reactive oxygen species during immune response is hypothesized to form one of such costs. We tested this hypothesis in experimental coccidian infection model in greenfinches Carduelis chloris. Administration of isosporan coccidians to experimental birds did not affect indices of antioxidant protection (TAC and OXY, plasma triglyceride and carotenoid levels or body mass, indicating that pathological consequences of infection were generally mild. Infected birds had on average 8% higher levels of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA, a toxic end-product of lipid peroxidation than un-infected birds. The birds that had highest MDA levels subsequent to experimental infection experienced the highest decrease in infection intensity. This observation is consistent with the idea that oxidative stress is a causative agent in the control of coccidiosis and supports the concept of oxidative costs of immune responses and parasite resistance. The finding that oxidative damage accompanies even the mild infection with a common parasite highlights the relevance of oxidative stress biology for the immunoecological research.

  8. Biliary tract infections caused by Aeromonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, C M; Lai, C C; Tang, H J; Ko, W C; Hsueh, P-R

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract. Patients with bile cultures positive for Aeromonas species during the period July 2004 to December 2011 were identified from a computerized database of a hospital in Taiwan. Patients with Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract were further identified. During the study period, a total of 1,142 isolates of Aeromonas species were obtained from 750 patients. Of those patients, 91 (12.1 %) had Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract. The annual incidence (episodes per 10,000 patient-days) of biliary tract infections caused by all Aeromonas species was 0.31 in 2007, 0.12 in 2010, and 0.27 in 2011. A. hydrophila was the most common species isolated (n = 41, 45.1 %), followed by A. caviae (n = 30, 33.0 %), A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 15, 16.5 %), and A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 5, 5.5 %). The majority of patients (n = 77, 84.6 %) had polymicrobial infections. Hepatobiliary stones (n = 50, 54.9 %) and hepatobiliary cancer (n = 38, 41.8 %) were the most common underlying diseases, followed by diabetes mellitus (n = 29, 31.9 %) and liver cirrhosis (n = 7, 7.7 %). The in-hospital mortality rate was 8.8 %. Infection-related mortality was associated with underlying immunocompromised condition (p = 0.044) and use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.004), but was not associated with inappropriate antibiotic usage or concomitant bacteremia (n = 8, 8.8 %). In conclusion, biliary tract infections caused by Aeromonas species are not uncommon and can develop in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients; however, patients with underlying hepatobiliary diseases are particularly susceptible to these infections.

  9. Enterococcus faecalis Infection Causes Inflammation, Intracellular Oxphos-Independent ROS Production, and DNA Damage in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A. B; Desler, Claus; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Achlorhydria caused by e.g. atrophic gastritis allows for bacterial overgrowth, which induces chronic inflammation and damage to the mucosal cells of infected individuals driving gastric malignancies and cancer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) can colonize achlohydric stomachs and we...

  10. Treatment of Infections Caused by Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Steeve

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi remains an important cause of disease and death in foals. The combination of a macrolide (erythromycin, azithromycin, or clarithromycin) with rifampin remains the recommended therapy for foals with clinical signs of infection caused by R equi. Most foals with small, subclinical ultrasonographic pulmonary lesions associated with R equi recover without therapy, and administration of antimicrobial agents to these subclinically affected foals does not hasten lesion resolution relative to administration of a placebo. Resistance to macrolides and rifampin in isolates of R equi is increasing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the in vitro growth of urinary tract infection-causing gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in a proposed synthetic human urine (SHU) medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipe, Deepak S; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriuria is a hallmark of urinary tract infection (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which are among the most frequent infections in humans. A variety of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are associated with these infections but Escherichia coli contributes up to 80% of cases. Multiple bacterial species including E. coli can grow in human urine as a means to maintain colonization during infections. In vitro bacteriuria studies aimed at modeling microbial growth in urine have utilized various compositions of synthetic human urine (SHU) and a Composite SHU formulation was recently proposed. In this study, we sought to validate the recently proposed Composite SHU as a medium that supports the growth of several bacterial species that are known to grow in normal human urine and/or artificial urine. Comparative growth assays of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus faecalis were undertaken using viable bacterial count and optical density measurements over a 48h culture period. Three different SHU formulations were tested in various culture vessels, shaking conditions and volumes and showed that Composite SHU can support the robust growth of gram-negative bacteria but requires supplementation with 0.2% yeast extract to support the growth of gram-positive bacteria. Experiments are also presented that show an unexpected but major influence of P. mirabilis towards the ability to measure bacterial growth in generally accepted multiwell assays using absorbance readings, predicted to have a basis in the release of volatile organic compound(s) from P. mirabilis during growth in Composite SHU medium. This study represents an essential methodological validation of a more chemically defined type of synthetic urine that can be applied to study mechanisms of bacteriuria and we conclude will offer a useful in vitro model to investigate the

  12. Bilateral amaurosis caused by Salmonella enteritidis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerovski, Branimir; Barisić, Nina; Vidović, Tomislav; Petricek, Igor; Cerovski, Jasenka

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to show the potential of Salmonella enteritidis infection to eventually result in visual impairment. A case of salmonellosis in a 6-year-old boy, caused by intake of a cake made from eggs infected with Salmonella enteritidis, is presented. Prolonged duration of the disease was followed by complete remission of neurologic complications and persistent amaurosis with bilateral optic nerve atrophy. A severe form of Salmonella enterocolitis with neurologic involvement can lead to optic nerve lesion with consequential loss of vision.

  13. Rickettsial infection caused by accidental conjunctival inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissos, Joao; de Sousa, Rita; Santos, Ana Sofia; Gouveia, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    The most common transmission route of tick-borne Rickettsia is through tick bite; nevertheless, other transmission routes should also be considered. We report a case of rickettsial infection in a 15-year-old boy caused by accidental contamination of the conjunctiva through the infected fluid of a crushed engorged tick removed from a dog. Right eye pain, conjunctival hyperaemia with mucopurulent exudate, chemosis and eyelid oedema were the first signs and symptoms. Two days later, the boy developed fever, myalgia, headache, abdominal pain and was vomiting; physical examination showed multiple cervical adenopathies but no rash. He was treated with doxycycline (200 mg/day) for 7 days with progressive resolution of clinical signs. Rickettsial infection was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay with serological seroconversion in two consecutive samples. Rickettsia conorii or Rickettsia massiliae were the possible causal agents since they are the Rickettsia spp found in the Rhipicephalus sanguineus dog tick in Portugal. PMID:25568272

  14. Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Shenyi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic infection of humans and animals, caused by the opportunistic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa. Infection in pregnant women may lead to abortion, stillbirth or other serious consequences in newborns. Infection in immunocompromised patients can be fatal if not treated. On average, one third of people are chronically infected worldwide. Although very limited information from China has been published in the English journals, T. gondii infection is actually a significant human health problem in China. In the present article, we reviewed the clinical features, transmission, prevalence of T. gondii infection in humans in China, and summarized genetic characterizations of reported T. gondii isolates. Educating the public about the risks associated with unhealthy food and life style habits, tracking serological examinations to special populations, and measures to strengthen food and occupational safety are discussed.

  15. Cytomegalovirus infection causes an increase of arterial blood pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilin Cheng

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is a common infection in adults (seropositive 60-99% globally, and is associated with cardiovascular diseases, in line with risk factors such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Several viral infections are linked to hypertension, including human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8 and HIV-1. The mechanisms of how viral infection contributes to hypertension or increased blood pressure are not defined. In this report, the role of CMV infection as a cause of increased blood pressure and in forming aortic atherosclerotic plaques is examined. Using in vivo mouse model and in vitro molecular biology analyses, we find that CMV infection alone caused a significant increase in arterial blood pressure (ABp (p<0.01 approximately 0.05, measured by microtip catheter technique. This increase in blood pressure by mouse CMV (MCMV was independent of atherosclerotic plaque formation in the aorta, defined by histological analyses. MCMV DNA was detected in blood vessel samples of viral infected mice but not in the control mice by nested PCR assay. MCMV significantly increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-alpha, and MCP-1 in mouse serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Using quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR (Q-RT-PCR and Western blot, we find that CMV stimulated expression of renin in mouse and human cells in an infectious dose-dependent manner. Co-staining and immunofluorescent microscopy analyses showed that MCMV infection stimulated renin expression at a single cell level. Further examination of angiotensin-II (Ang II in mouse serum and arterial tissues with ELISA showed an increased expression of Ang II by MCMV infection. Consistent with the findings of the mouse trial, human CMV (HCMV infection of blood vessel endothelial cells (EC induced renin expression in a non-lytic infection manner. Viral replication kinetics and plaque formation assay showed that an active, CMV persistent infection in

  16. Spectrum of Disease Caused by Rhodococcus equi in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra K Willsie-Ediger

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first report of Rhodococcus equi infection in an acquired immune deficiency syndrome patient in 1986, seven additional cases have been described. A patient is described in whom the diagnosis was delayed due to misidentification of the organism as an atypical mycobacterial species. The literature regarding R equi infection in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus is reviewed. The most common presentation is one of a chronic, indolent pulmonary infiltrative disease (78%. Fever (78%, cough (67%, and hemoptysis (44% are frequently present. Coexistent opportunistic illnesses are common (67%. In the laboratory identification of this organism, it is important to communicate the clinical setting to the microbiologist and to recognize the potential for the organism to be overlooked as normal flora or a contaminant, or misidentified as an organism with similar phenotypic characteristics (Nocardia species or a rapidly growing mycobacterium. Based on experience in foals, therapy with erythromycin and rifampin is suggested.

  17. Chronic hepatitis caused by persistent parvovirus B19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogensen Trine H

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human infection with parvovirus B19 may lead to a diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations, including benign erythema infectiosum in children, transient aplastic crisis in patients with haemolytic anaemia, and congenital hydrops foetalis. These different diseases represent direct consequences of the ability of parvovirus B19 to target the erythroid cell lineage. However, accumulating evidence suggests that this virus can also infect other cell types resulting in diverse clinical manifestations, of which the pathogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. This has prompted important questions regarding the tropism of the virus and its possible involvement in a broad range of infectious and autoimmune medical conditions. Case Presentation Here, we present an unusual case of persistent parvovirus B19 infection as a cause of chronic hepatitis. This patient had persistent parvovirus B19 viraemia over a period of more than four years and displayed signs of chronic hepatitis evidenced by fluctuating elevated levels of ALAT and a liver biopsy demonstrating chronic hepatitis. Other known causes of hepatitis and liver damage were excluded. In addition, the patient was evaluated for immunodeficiency, since she had lymphopenia both prior to and following clearance of parvovirus B19 infection. Conclusions In this case report, we describe the current knowledge on the natural history and pathogenesis of parvovirus B19 infection, and discuss the existing evidence of parvovirus B19 as a cause of acute and chronic hepatitis. We suggest that parvovirus B19 was the direct cause of this patient's chronic hepatitis, and that she had an idiopathic lymphopenia, which may have predisposed her to persistent infection, rather than bone marrow depression secondary to infection. In addition, we propose that her liver involvement may have represented a viral reservoir. Finally, we suggest that clinicians should be aware of parvovirus B19 as an unusual

  18. [Periprosthetic joint infection caused by Rhodococcus equi. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallai, Imre; Péterfy, Nóra; Sanatkhani, Mohammad; Bejek, Zoltán; Antal, Imre; Prinz, Gyula; Kristóf, Katalin; Skaliczki, Gábor

    2017-07-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a rare pathogen in humans causing infections mostly in immunocompromised hosts. We present the first case of periprosthetic joint infection caused by Rhodococcus equi. An 88-year-old male patient was referred to our clinic with a history of fever and right hip pain. The patient had multiple hip surgeries including total joint arthroplasty and revision for aseptic loosening on the right side. He was immunocompetent, but his additional medical history was remarkable for diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy and stroke with hemiplegia resulting in immobilization. Radiography showed stable components, joint aspirate yielded Rhodococcus equi. Irrigation and debridement was proposed, but the patient refused any surgical intervention. Therefore antibiotic therapy was administered. At the last follow-up the patient is free of complaints but the C-reactive protein level is still elevated. This case illustrates the possible role of Rhodococcus equi in medical device-associated infections. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(27): 1071-1074.

  19. Infected neonatal cephalohematomas caused by anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2005-01-01

    To present the microbiological and clinical features of six children with infected cephalohematomas (IC) caused by anaerobic bacteria. Presentation of a case series. Polymicrobial infection was present in all instances, where the number of isolates varied from two to four. Two patients had anaerobes only and the other four had mixed flora of strict anaerobes and facultatives. There were 16 bacterial isolates (12 anaerobic, 4 aerobic). The anaerobic isolates were Peptostreptococcus spp. (5 isolates), Prevotella spp. (4), Bacteroides fragilis group (2), and Propionibacterium acnes (1). The aerobic isolates were E. coli (2), Staphylococcus aureus (1) and group B streptococci (1). Blood cultures were positive for three patients. The most common predisposing conditions were vacuum extraction and amnionitis (4 instances of each), instrumental delivery (3), electronic fetal monitoring (2), prolonged delivery (1), and premature rupture of membranes (1). All patients underwent drainage, and four also had surgical incision and drainage of the IC. Osteomyelitis developed in one instance and scalp abscess developed in two patients, both of whom had electronic fetal monitoring. All patients eventually recovered from infection after receiving parenteral and subsequent oral antibiotic therapy for a total of 14-38 days. This study highlights the polymicrobial nature and potential importance of anaerobic bacteria in IC in newborns.

  20. The cause of urinary symptoms among Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type I (HLTV-I infected patients: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgado Katia

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HTLV-I infected patients often complain of urinary symptomatology. Epidemiological studies have suggested that these individuals have a higher prevalence and incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI than seronegative controls. However, the diagnosis of UTI in these studies relied only on patient information and did not require confirmation by urine culture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of urinary tract infection (UTI as the cause of urinary symptoms in HTLV-I infected patients. Methods In this cross sectional study we interviewed, and cultured urine from, 157 HTLV-I seropositive individuals followed regularly at a specialized clinic. All patients were evaluated by a neurologist and classified according to the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS. Urodynamic studies were performed at the discretion of the treating physician. Results Sixty-four patients complained of at least one active urinary symptom but UTI was confirmed by a positive urine culture in only 12 of these patients (19%; the majority of symptomatic patients (81% had negative urine cultures. To investigate the mechanism behind the urinary complaints in symptomatic individuals with negative urine cultures, we reviewed the results of urodynamic studies performed in 21 of these patients. Most of them (90.5% had abnormal findings. The predominant abnormalities were detrusor sphincter hyperreflexia and dyssynergia, findings consistent with HTLV-I-induced neurogenic bladder. On a multivariate logistic regression, an abnormal EDSS score was the strongest predictor of urinary symptomatology (OR 9.87, 95% CI 3.465 to 28.116, P Conclusion Urinary symptomatology suggestive of UTI is highly prevalent among HTLV-I seropositive individuals but true UTI is responsible for the minority of cases. We posit that the main cause of urinary symptoms in this population is neurogenic bladder. Our data imply that HLTV-I infected patients with urinary

  1. Increased risk for Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli infection of pet origin in dog owners and evidence for genetic association between strains causing infection in humans and their pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughini Gras, L; Smid, J H; Wagenaar, J A; Koene, M G J; Havelaar, A H; Friesema, I H M; French, N P; Flemming, C; Galson, J D; Graziani, C; Busani, L; VAN Pelt, W

    2013-12-01

    We compared Campylobacter jejuni/coli multilocus sequence types (STs) from pets (dogs/cats) and their owners and investigated risk factors for pet-associated human campylobacteriosis using a combined source-attribution and case-control analysis. In total, 132/687 pet stools were Campylobacter-positive, resulting in 499 strains isolated (320 C. upsaliensis/helveticus, 100 C. jejuni, 33 C. hyointestinalis/fetus, 10 C. lari, 4 C. coli, 32 unidentified). There were 737 human and 104 pet C. jejuni/coli strains assigned to 154 and 49 STs, respectively. Dog, particularly puppy, owners were at increased risk of infection with pet-associated STs. In 2/68 cases vs. 0.134/68 expected by chance, a pet and its owner were infected with an identical ST (ST45, ST658). Although common sources of infection and directionality of transmission between pets and humans were unknown, dog ownership significantly increased the risk for pet-associated human C. jejuni/coli infection and isolation of identical strains in humans and their pets occurred significantly more often than expected.

  2. Efficacy of Urtoxazumab (TMA-15 Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Specific for Shiga Toxin 2) Against Post-Diarrheal Neurological Sequelae Caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection in the Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglet Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxley, Rodney A; Francis, David H; Tamura, Mizuho; Marx, David B; Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Zhao, Mojun

    2017-01-26

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is the most common cause of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in human patients, with brain damage and dysfunction the main cause of acute death. We evaluated the efficacy of urtoxazumab (TMA-15, Teijin Pharma Limited), a humanized monoclonal antibody against Shiga toxin (Stx) 2 for the prevention of brain damage, dysfunction, and death in a piglet EHEC infection model. Forty-five neonatal gnotobiotic piglets were inoculated orally with 3 × 10⁸ colony-forming units of EHEC O157:H7 strain EDL933 (Stx1⁺, Stx2⁺) when 22-24 h old. At 24 h post-inoculation, piglets were intraperitoneally administered placebo or TMA-15 (0.3, 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg body weight). Compared to placebo (n = 10), TMA-15 (n = 35) yielded a significantly greater probability of survival, length of survival, and weight gain (p TMA-15 against brain lesions and death was 62.9% (p = 0.0004) and 71.4% (p = 0.0004), respectively. These results suggest that TMA-15 may potentially prevent or reduce vascular necrosis and infarction of the brain attributable to Stx2 in human patients acutely infected with EHEC. However, we do not infer that TMA-15 treatment will completely protect human patients infected with EHEC O157:H7 strains that produce both Stx1 and Stx2.

  3. Tsukamurella: a cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, E; Pérez-Parra, A; Rosal, M; Martín-Rabadán, P; Rodríguez-Créixems, M; Marín, M

    2009-02-01

    Tsukamurellae are strictly aerobic Gram-positive rods that can be easily misidentified as Corynebacterium species, Rhodococcus species, Nocardia species, Mycobacterium species, or other Gram-positive aerobic rods. They have been uncommonly reported as a cause of different human infections, including bloodstream infections. We describe 2 new cases of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) caused by Tsukamurella species and review 12 similar cases reported in the literature. Conventional procedures have often misidentified Tsukamurella species as other aerobic Gram-positive rods. This misidentification could be avoided using genotyping. All cases ultimately required the withdrawal of the infected line. The literature provides no firm conclusions regarding ideal choice or duration of antimicrobial therapy for this infection. Tsukamurella species should be added to the list of agents able to produce CR-BSI. Genotypic methods such as PCR 16S rRNA can allow a reliable identification at the genus level of Tsukamurella strains faster than a combination of conventional phenotypic methods.

  4. 巨细胞病毒感染所致脑性瘫痪的临床特征%Analysis of the clinical characteristics of cerebral palsy caused by human cytomegalovirus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈星; 陈见南; 杨路; 陈春花; 邱纪方

    2015-01-01

    Objective To Analyze the clinical characteristics of cerebral palsy caused by human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection.Methods Fifty-one cases of CMV infection were studied by analyzeing related clinical symptoms of cerebral palsy,finding its characteristics,and analyzing its causes by comparing with control group of 50 patients with cerebral palsy caused by other etiologies.Results The clinical symptoms of cerebral palsy caused by CMV infection were similar to those of cerebral palsy caused by other etiologies,however,the clinical symptoms of cerebral palsy caused by other reasons were more severe; 37.25% of cases with cerebral palsy caused by CMV infection showed damage to liver function.Developmental quotient determination of cerebral palsy caused by CMV infection was 90.20% which was moderate to severe,whereas that of 52.6% of cases with cerbral palsy caused by other causes were moderate to severe.There was a significant difference between the two groups with respect to their developmental quotient.The motor function in 88.23% of patients with cerebral palsy caused by human CMV infection was class Ⅱ-Ⅲ,which was mainly in mild to moderate damage.Conclusions The motor function of cerebral palsy caused by CMV was mostly in the slight to moderat damage,however the mental development obviously was mostly in moderate to severe defects,which showed that the mental damage was much greater than the motor function damage.In patients with cerebral palsy caused by other causes,the degree of motor function damage was higher than the degree of intelligence damage.Besides,the children with cerebral palsy caused by CMV infection were easy to suffer multiple organ injury such as liver damage.%目的 对临床证实由巨细胞病毒(CMV)感染所致的脑性瘫痪的患儿进行临床特点分析.方法 对51例明确由CMV感染的脑性瘫痪进行相关临床症状分析,找出其特性,并分析其发生的原因.结果 在CMV感染所致的脑性瘫痪的临床

  5. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  6. Diagnosis of hantavirus infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Salim; Guzmán, Camilo; Figueiredo, Luis Tadeu

    2015-08-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the Americas and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Europe and Asia. The viruses are transmitted to humans mainly by inhalation of virus-contaminated aerosols of rodent excreta and secreta. Classic clinical hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome occurs in five phases: fever, hypotension, oliguria, polyuria, and convalescence. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome is a severe acute disease that is associated with respiratory failure, pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock. The diagnosis of hantavirus infections in humans is based on clinical and epidemiological information as well as laboratory tests. We review diagnosis for hantavirus infections based on serology, PCR, immunochemistry and virus culture.

  7. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator infection caused by Tsukamurella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almehmi, Ammar; Pfister, Alfred K; McCowan, Ronald; Matulis, Susie

    2004-01-01

    Human infections with Tsukamurella are very rare with only 13 reported cases in the literature. Certain conditions, such as immunosuppression, an indwelling foreign body, and postoperative wounds predispose humans to Tsukamurella infections. The rarity of Tsukamurella infection in humans makes its diagnosis and treatment very difficult. This article describes the first case of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) infection related to Tsukamurella in the literature.

  8. Typhoid fever as a cause of opportunistic infection: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumminia Salvatore

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typhoid fever is a systemic infection caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype typhi, which is acquired by ingestion of contaminated food and water. Each year the disease affects at least 16 million persons world-wide, most of whom reside in the developing countries of Southeast Asia and Africa. In Italy the disease is uncommon with a greater number of cases in Southern regions than in Northern ones. Case presentation We report on a 57-year-old Sri-Lankan male affected by typhoid fever, the onset of which was accompanied by oropharyngeal candidiasis. This clinical sign was due to a transient cell-mediated immunity depression (CD4+ cell count was 130 cells/mm3 probably caused by Salmonella typhi infection. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was ruled out. Diagnosis of typhoid fever was made by the isolation of Salmonella typhi from two consecutive blood cultures. The patient recovered after a ten days therapy with ciprofloxacin and his CD4+ cell count improved gradually until normalization within 3 weeks. Conclusion Our patient is the first reported case of typhoid fever associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis. This finding suggests a close correlation between Salmonella typhi infection and transitory immunodepression.

  9. Cryptic diversity in hymenolepidid tapeworms infecting humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkouawa, Agathe; Haukisalmi, Voitto; Li, Tiaoying; Nakao, Minoru; Lavikainen, Antti; Chen, Xingwang; Henttonen, Heikki; Ito, Akira

    2016-04-01

    An adult hymenolepidid tapeworm was recovered from a 52-year-old Tibetan woman during a routine epidemiological survey for human taeniasis/cysticercosis in Sichuan, China. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of nuclear 28S ribosomal DNA and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 showed that the human isolate is distinct from Hymenolepis diminuta and Hymenolepis nana, the common parasites causing human hymenolepiasis. Proglottids of the human isolate were unfortunately unsuitable for morphological identification. However, the resultant phylogeny demonstrated the human isolate to be a sister species to Hymenolepis hibernia from Apodemus mice in Eurasia. The present data clearly indicate that hymenolepidid tapeworms causing human infections are not restricted to only H. diminuta and H. nana.

  10. Geographic distribution of Staphylococcus aureus causing invasive infections in Europe : a molecular-epidemiological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, Hajo; Aanensen, David M; van den Wijngaard, Cees C; Spratt, Brian G; Harmsen, Dag; Friedrich, Alexander W; Tami, Adriana

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs) are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe.

  11. Saffold virus infection associated with human myocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Nielsen, Alex Yde; Banner, Jytte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Saffold virus was described in 2007 as one of the first human viruses within the genus cardioviruses. Cardioviruses may cause severe infections of the myocardium in animals, and several studies have associated saffold virus with human disease. As a result, saffold virus has been...... isolated from different anatomical compartments, including the myocardium, but, until now, it has not been possible to demonstrate the accompanying histopathological signs of inflammation. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to examine if saffold virus is capable of causing invasive infection in the human...... myocardium. STUDY DESIGN: Using real-time PCR, we retrospectively examined formalin-fixed paraffin embedded cardiac tissue specimens from 150 deceased individuals diagnosed with myocarditis at autopsy. The results were compared with histological findings. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Saffold virus was detected...

  12. neonatal infections caused by escherichia coli at the national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Knowledge about common infections caused by E.coli as well as its antibiotics susceptibility pattern will guide ... Keywords: Neonates, E.coli Infections, Antibiotics Resistance, Abuja. ..... Resistance in E.coli 0157 Strains and the Public Health.

  13. [Infections as causes of fever of unknown origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneidewind, A; Ehrenstein, B; Salzberger, B

    2009-06-01

    Infectious diseases are important causes of fever of unknown origin (FUO). The spectrum of infectious agents is broad and diagnosis depends on careful evaluation of individual risk factors. Infectious diseases presenting as FUO are frequently atypical presentations of well known infections, e.g. tuberculosis or infectious endocarditis. In this review we present an overview of infectious causes of FUO classified into community acquired infections, nosocomial infections, and infections in immunocompromised hosts.

  14. A Study of Brucella Infection in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanjani Roushan Mohammad Reza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brucellosis is the most usual zoonotic disease around the world especially in the Middle East, Mediterranean and Indian sub-continent areas. This bacterium has ten species that Brucella melitensis among them recognized as the most important cause of human brucellosis. This infection transfer ways to human include of wounds, bacteria inhalation and consumption of septic dairy such as raw milk, cream and butter. Brucellosis as a systemic disease can involve more organs of patients that have symptoms such as fever, night sweating, and backache. This infection can be divided as acute, sub-acute and chronic forms according to the manner of clinical presentation. Materials and Methods: This research is a review study and conducted by reviewing of the literature, which is related to this issue and also visiting, PubMed, and other linked websites. Results: In human brucellosis domestic animals are the main natural reservoir of infection. Whenever incidence rate of this infection in domestic and wild animals is reduced on the other hand incidence rate in human also will reduce. Conclusion: Blood cultures, serological tests and molecular tests are common laboratory methods of this infection. Diminution of relapse and therapeutic failure rates are as most important aim, which is researcher’s regards.

  15. Submasseteric Infection: A Rare, Deep Space Cheek Infection Causing Trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard H; Bahadori, Robert S; Willis, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Submasseteric space infections are rare at any age but particularly so in primary school children. The origin of the infection is usually odontogenic, from pericoronitis in a third molar. Submasseteric inflammation is a deep facial space inflammation, often progressing to mature abscess, and usually misdiagnosed as staphylococcal or streptococcal lymphadenitis or pyogenic parotitis. The hallmark of a masticatory space infection is trismus. The cardinal signs of this infection include a firm mass in the body of the masseter muscle with overlying cellulitis with trismus.

  16. Asymptomatic brucellosis infection in humans: implications for diagnosis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Q; Lu, Y; Yuan, X; Qiu, Y; Xu, J; Li, W; Ke, Y; Yu, Y; Huang, L; Wang, Y; Chen, Z

    2013-09-01

    Human brucellosis is mainly caused by contact with Brucella-infected animals and their secretions and carcasses. Individuals who are continuously in contact with animals are considered to be at a high risk but only some show symptoms and are diagnosed as cases of brucellosis. Here, we showed that asymptomatic brucellosis infections occur among humans. Asymptomatic infections mainly result from less frequent contact with Brucella and/or contact with low-virulence Brucella. In our study, patients with asymptomatic infection had low antibody titres and different contact patterns. Awareness of asymptomatic infection is important for early diagnosis of brucellosis and prevention of chronic infection.

  17. Absence of human metapneumovirus co-infection in cases of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J B M; Bos, A P; Lutter, R; Rossen, J W A; Schuurman, R

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that co-infection of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in severe respiratory syncytial (RSV) virus bronchiolitis is very common. To evaluate the epidemiology of hMPV co-infection in children with severe lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV virus. This was an observational

  18. Interstitial nephritis caused by HIV infection by itself: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Asako; Iwata, Kentaro; Hara, Shigeo; Imai, Yukihiro; Hasuike, Toshikazu; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common cause of renal dysfunction. It is primarily caused by drugs, infections, or autoimmune disorders. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can develop interstitial nephritis, although it typically occurs because of the aforementioned etiologies and not as a direct consequence of HIV infection. Interstitial lesions may occur in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). However, interstitial nephritis without the glomerular injuries characteristic of HIVAN, and without the risk factors described earlier, is very rare. Here, we describe a rare case of interstitial nephritis that was likely caused directly by HIV infection and not by other etiologies.

  19. Peptide inhibition of human cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Cindy A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the most prevalent congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe causing significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. HCMV is also an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV- infected patients with AIDS, and solid organ and allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Current treatments for HCMV-associated diseases are insufficient due to the emergence of drug-induced resistance and cytotoxicity, necessitating novel approaches to limit HCMV infection. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic peptides targeting glycoprotein B (gB, a major glycoprotein of HCMV that is highly conserved across the Herpesviridae family, that specifically inhibit fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane preventing HCMV entry and infection. Results Using the Wimley-White Interfacial Hydrophobicity Scale (WWIHS, several regions within gB were identified that display a high potential to interact with lipid bilayers of cell membranes and hydrophobic surfaces within proteins. The ability of synthetic peptides analogous to WWIHS-positive sequences of HCMV gB to inhibit viral infectivity was evaluated. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF were infected with the Towne-GFP strain of HCMV (0.5 MOI, preincubated with peptides at a range of concentrations (78 nm to 100 μM, and GFP-positive cells were visualized 48 hours post-infection by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by flow cytometry. Peptides that inhibited HCMV infection demonstrated different inhibitory concentration curves indicating that each peptide possesses distinct biophysical properties. Peptide 174-200 showed 80% inhibition of viral infection at a concentration of 100 μM, and 51% and 62% inhibition at concentrations of 5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Peptide 233-263 inhibited infection by 97% and 92% at concentrations of 100

  20. An unusual cause for recurrent chest infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, Ronstan

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of an elderly non-smoking gentleman who, since 2005, had been admitted multiple times for recurrent episodes of shortness of breath, wheeze, cough and sputum. The patient was treated as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and\\/or lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchoscopy was done which revealed multiple hard nodules in the trachea and bronchi with posterior tracheal wall sparing. Biopsies confirmed this as tracheopathia osteochondroplastica (TO). He had increasing frequency of admission due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas infections, which failed to clear despite intravenous, prolonged oral and nebulised antibiotics. The patient developed increasing respiratory distress and respiratory failure. The patient died peacefully in 2012. This case report highlights the typical pathological and radiological findings of TO and the pitfalls of misdiagnosing patients with recurrent chest infections as COPD.

  1. Human Lymphadenopathy Caused by Ratborne Bartonella, Tbilisi, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandelaki, George; Malania, Lile; Bai, Ying; Chakvetadze, Neli; Katsitadze, Guram; Imnadze, Paata; Nelson, Christina; Harrus, Shimon; Kosoy, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Lymphadenopathy and fever that developed in a woman in Tbilisi, Georgia, most likely were caused by a ratborne Bartonella strain related B. tribocorum and B. elizabethae. The finding suggests that this Bartonella strain could be spread by infected rats and represents a potential human risk.

  2. Enterococcus faecalis Infection Causes Inflammation, Intracellular Oxphos-Independent ROS Production, and DNA Damage in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A. B; Desler, Claus; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas;

    2013-01-01

    therefore wanted to study the impact of E. faecalis infection on inflammatory response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial genetic stability in gastric mucosal cells. Methods To separate the changes induced by bacteria from those of the inflammatory cells...... we established an in vitro E. faecalis infection model system using the gastric carcinoma cell line MKN74. Total ROS and superoxide was measured by fluorescence microscopy. Cellular oxygen consumption was characterized non-invasively using XF24 microplate based respirometry. Gene expression...

  3. Saffold virus infection associated with human myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Nielsen, Alex Yde; Banner, Jytte; Hansen, Jakob; Baandrup, Ulrik; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Saffold virus was described in 2007 as one of the first human viruses within the genus cardioviruses. Cardioviruses may cause severe infections of the myocardium in animals, and several studies have associated saffold virus with human disease. As a result, saffold virus has been isolated from different anatomical compartments, including the myocardium, but, until now, it has not been possible to demonstrate the accompanying histopathological signs of inflammation. The aim of the study was to examine if saffold virus is capable of causing invasive infection in the human myocardium. Using real-time PCR, we retrospectively examined formalin-fixed paraffin embedded cardiac tissue specimens from 150 deceased individuals diagnosed with myocarditis at autopsy. The results were compared with histological findings. Saffold virus was detected in the myocardium, lung tissue and blood of one child and was accompanied by histopathological inflammation in the heart and lungs, which was supportive of a viral infection. These findings suggest that cardioviruses may be associated with myocarditis in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus infection, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, H W; Telzak, E E; Sepkowitz, K A; Wormser, G P

    1998-12-01

    The acceptance of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) among patients and health care providers has had a dramatic impact on the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of many opportunistic infections associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Previously intractable opportunistic infections and syndromes are now far less common. In addition, effective antibiotic prophylactic therapies have had a profound impact on the risk of patients developing particular infections and on the incidence of these infections overall. Most notable among these are Pneumocystis carinii, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex, tuberculosis, and toxoplasmosis. Nevertheless, infections continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality among patients who are infected with HIV. The role of HAART in many clinical situations is unquestioned. Compelling data from clinical trials support the use of these therapies during pregnancy to prevent perinatal transmission of HIV. HAART is also recommended for health care workers who have had a "significant" exposure to the blood of an HIV-infected patient. Both of these situations are discussed in detail in this article. In addition, although more controversial, increasing evidence supports the use of HAART during the acute HIV seroconversion syndrome. An "immune reconstitution syndrome" has been newly described for patients in the early phases of treatment with HAART who develop tuberculosis, M avium complex, and cytomegalovirus disease. Accumulating data support the use of hydroxyurea, an agent with a long history in the field of myeloproliferative disorders, for the treatment of HIV. Newer agents, particularly abacavir and adefovir dipivoxil, are available through expanded access protocols, and their roles are being defined and clarified.

  5. Deep Neck Space Infection Caused by Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji-Su; Kim, Su-Gwan; You, Jae-Seek; Min, Hong-Gi; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Eun-Sik; Kim, Cheol-Man; Lim, Kyung-Seop

    2014-03-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign cystic intraosseous tumor of odontogenic origin. An infection of a KCOT is not common because KCOT is a benign developmental neoplasm. Moreover, a severe deep neck space infection with compromised airway caused by infected KCOT is rare. This report presents a 60-year-old male patient with a severe deep neck space infection related to an infected KCOT due to cortical bone perforation and rupture of the exudate. Treatment of the deep neck space infection and KCOT are reported.

  6. Cardiovascular implications from untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with access to antiretroviral medications, as the risk for AIDS has fallen and life expectancy improved. Traditional CVD risk...

  7. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cokyaman Turgay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian-Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs cause common cold, upper and lower respiratory tract disease, but in the literature presentation with the lower respiratory tract infection and AFP has not been reported previously. In this study, pediatric case admitted with lower respiratory tract infection and AFP, who detected for HCoV 229E and OC43 co-infection by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, has been reported for the first time.

  8. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang van Tong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity.

  9. Human laryngitis caused by Clinostomum complanatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hirotaka; Miyauchi, Yuji; Tahara, Shinsaku; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    A 64-year-old Japanese man visited our outpatient department complaining of an irritable sensation in the throat, occurring two days after eating raw freshwater fish (carp sashimi) at a Japanese-style inn. During laryngeal endoscopy, a slow-moving worm (fluke) was found attached to the surface of the right aryepiglottic fold. After inhalation of 4% lidocaine, the fluke was removed using endoscopic forceps. Patient's throat symptoms immediately improved. The worm was microscopically identified as Clinostomum complanatum. C. complanatum is a digenetic trematode that usually infects fish-eating water birds. Clinostomum infections in humans are rare, and only 21 cases have been described in Japan and Korea. C. complanatum infection is known to occur after eating raw freshwater fish, which is a secondary intermediate host. In humans, the metacercariae are released into the stomach and migrate through the esophagus before lodging in the throat. Primary therapy involves endoscopic removal of the worm.

  10. Human herpesvirus 6 infections after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rima Camille Abdel Massih; Raymund R Razonable

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infections occur in > 95% of humans. Primary infection, which occurs in early childhood as an asymptomatic illness or manifested clinically as roseola infantum, leads to a state of subclinical viral persistence and latency. Reactivation of latent HHV-6 is common after liver transplantation, possibly induced and facilitated by allograft rejection and immunosuppressive therapy. Since the vast majority of humans harbor the virus in a latent state, HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are believed to be mostly due to endogenous reactivation or superinfection (reactivation in the transplanted organ). In a minority of cases, however,primary HHV-6 infection may occur when an HHV-6 negative individual receives a liver allograft from an HHV-6 positive donor. The vast majority of documented HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are asymptomatic. In a minority of cases, HHV-6 has been implicated as a cause of febrile illness with rash and myelosuppression, hepatitis, pneumonitis, and encephalitis after liver transplantation. In addition,HHV-6 has been associated with a variety of indirect effects such as allograft rejection, and increased predisposition and severity of other infections including cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis C virus, and opportunistic fungi. Because of the uncommon nature of the clinical illnesses directly attributed to HHV-6, there is currently no recommended HHV-6- specific approach to prevention. However, ganciclovir and valganciclovir, which are primarily intended for the prevention of CMV disease, are also active against HHV-6 and may prevent its reactivation after transplantation. The treatment of established HHV-6 disease is usually with intravenous ganciclovir, cidofovir,or foscarnet, complemented by reduction in the degree of immunosuppression. This article reviews the current advances in the pathogenesis, clinical diagnosis, and therapeutic modalities against HHV6 in the setting of liver transplantation.

  11. Genes Causing Male Infertility in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lawrence C. Layman

    2002-01-01

    There are an accumulating number of identified gene mutations that cause infertility in humans. Most of the known gene mutations impair normal puberty and subsequently cause infertility by either hypothalamic /pituitary deficiency of important tropic factors to the gonad or by gonadal genes.

  12. Multidrug-resistant Achromobacter animicus causing wound infection in a street child in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moremi, Nyambura; Claus, Heike; Hingi, Marko; Vogel, Ulrich; Mshana, Stephen E

    2017-02-10

    Achromobacter animicus (A. animicus) is an aerobic, motile, gram-negative, non-fermenting small bacillus that can also grow anaerobically with potassium nitrate. It has been isolated from sputum of humans suffering from respiratory infections. Literature regarding the role of A. animicus in wound infections is limited. We report a first case of a chronic post-traumatic wound infection caused by a multidrug-resistant A. animicus in a street child from Africa and accompanied diagnostic challenges.

  13. Central nervous system infection caused by Morganella morganii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Jehad; Saad, Mustafa; Samnani, Imran; Lee, Prescott; Moorman, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection with Morganella morganii is very rare. We describe a 38-year-old female patient with frontal brain abscess caused by M morganii who was unsuccessfully treated. We also review all reported cases of Morganella CNS infections with an emphasis on treatment modalities and outcomes. Aggressive surgical management and appropriate antimicrobial therapy can lead to cure, but the mortality rate for these infections remains high.

  14. Allovahlkampfia spelaea Causing Keratitis in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Mohammed Essa Marghany; Huseein, Enas Abdelhameed Mahmoud; Farrag, Haiam Mohamed Mahmoud; Mohamed, Hanan El Deek; Kobayashi, Seiki; Suzuki, Jun; Ali, Tarek Ahmed Mohamed; Sugano, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    Background Free-living amoebae are present worldwide. They can survive in different environment causing human diseases in some instances. Acanthamoeba sp. is known for causing sight-threatening keratitis in humans. Free-living amoeba keratitis is more common in developing countries. Amoebae of family Vahlkampfiidae are rarely reported to cause such affections. A new genus, Allovahlkampfia spelaea was recently identified from caves with no data about pathogenicity in humans. We tried to identify the causative free-living amoeba in a case of keratitis in an Egyptian patient using morphological and molecular techniques. Methods Pathogenic amoebae were culture using monoxenic culture system. Identification through morphological features and 18S ribosomal RNA subunit DNA amplification and sequencing was done. Pathogenicity to laboratory rabbits and ability to produce keratitis were assessed experimentally. Results Allovahlkampfia spelaea was identified as a cause of human keratitis. Whole sequence of 18S ribosomal subunit DNA was sequenced and assembled. The Egyptian strain was closely related to SK1 strain isolated in Slovenia. The ability to induce keratitis was confirmed using animal model. Conclusions This the first time to report Allovahlkampfia spelaea as a human pathogen. Combining both molecular and morphological identification is critical to correctly diagnose amoebae causing keratitis in humans. Use of different pairs of primers and sequencing amplified DNA is needed to prevent misdiagnosis. PMID:27415799

  15. Allovahlkampfia spelaea Causing Keratitis in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Essa Marghany Tolba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Free-living amoebae are present worldwide. They can survive in different environment causing human diseases in some instances. Acanthamoeba sp. is known for causing sight-threatening keratitis in humans. Free-living amoeba keratitis is more common in developing countries. Amoebae of family Vahlkampfiidae are rarely reported to cause such affections. A new genus, Allovahlkampfia spelaea was recently identified from caves with no data about pathogenicity in humans. We tried to identify the causative free-living amoeba in a case of keratitis in an Egyptian patient using morphological and molecular techniques.Pathogenic amoebae were culture using monoxenic culture system. Identification through morphological features and 18S ribosomal RNA subunit DNA amplification and sequencing was done. Pathogenicity to laboratory rabbits and ability to produce keratitis were assessed experimentally.Allovahlkampfia spelaea was identified as a cause of human keratitis. Whole sequence of 18S ribosomal subunit DNA was sequenced and assembled. The Egyptian strain was closely related to SK1 strain isolated in Slovenia. The ability to induce keratitis was confirmed using animal model.This the first time to report Allovahlkampfia spelaea as a human pathogen. Combining both molecular and morphological identification is critical to correctly diagnose amoebae causing keratitis in humans. Use of different pairs of primers and sequencing amplified DNA is needed to prevent misdiagnosis.

  16. Postmortem Investigations Following Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Bychkov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS is a global disease and despite intensive research it is one of the main causes of human death. Postmortem studies have proven accurate in determining the various pathologies in these patients. Aims & Objectives: Our aim was to analyze the post mortem results of individuals who died after HIV infection in the same geographical region. We evaluated the most frequent opportunistic diseases and their clinical and morphological outcomes. Methods: We studied case reports and autopsy research data from 32 patients who died after HIV infection in Smolensk, Russian Federation, between 2003 and 2008. All patients had been diagnosed with HIV infection before death, using HIV-specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunoblotting. Autopsy specimens of various organs were examined histologically and microbiologically. Findings: The mean survival period from the moment of detection of seropositivity in all the patients was less than five years. Twelve patients had a parenteral mode of contact, six had been infected by sexual contact, and 14 patients had unknown modes of infection. Most patients (69% had chronic hepatitis C. The main causes of death were various infectious diseases. The most common were generalized miliary tuberculosis and progressive secondary tuberculosis of the lungs. Three (9% patients had tuberculosis of the meninges and five (16% had peritoneal infections, but tuberculous peritonitis had not been diagnosed before death. Six patients had pulmonary tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonia simultaneously. Two (6% patients died from bacterial sepsis as a result of cervical lymphadenitis, and eight (12.5% from abscess-forming pneumonia. The opportunistic infections revealed were Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (eight patients, cytomegaloviral pneumonia (three, bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (one and mucosal candidiasis (three. In three patients, the causes of death were advanced neoplastic processes: two cases

  17. [Soft tissue infection associated with bacteremia caused by Shewanella putrefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzic, N; Héry-Arnaud, G; Jaffuel, S; Garo, B; Payan, C; Garré, M

    2012-06-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is rarely involved in human infectious disease. We report here a case of soft tissue infection with bacteremia on a patient with risk factors (liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Subconjunctival mycetoma caused by Scedosporium apiospermum infection in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzina, Inese; Trumble, Nicole Scotty; Novicki, Thomas; Sharkey, Leslie C

    2011-03-01

    An 11-year-old American Saddlebred gelding was presented for evaluation of a nonpainful subconjunctival mass involving the lateral canthus of the left eye. Other findings included a central corneal scar and a small central cataract of the lens in the left eye. Fine-needle aspiration of the mass was performed and cytologic examination revealed marked pyogranulomatous inflammation with intralesional fungal hyphae, consistent with mycetoma. The fungal structures were elongated and characterized by nonstaining walls; several bulbous yeast-like structures were also observed. The mycetoma was surgically removed and submitted for histopathologic examination and fungal culture. The histopathologic diagnosis was subconjunctival phaeohyphomycosis. Scedosporium apiospermum was identified based on macroscopic and microscopic features of the organism in culture. Scedosporium spp. have been reported as causes of mycetomatous and nonmycetomatous infections in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent people and animals. S. apiospermum and Pseudallescheria boydii, which is its teleomorphic counterpart, have been implicated as potentially emerging human and veterinary pathogens. Timely diagnosis is essential as the organism is often resistant to commonly used antifungal drugs. This report provides a detailed cytologic description of the organism and recent information on the taxonomy of this fungus and the diagnostic peculiarities of this particular infection. © 2011 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  19. Emergence of unusual species of enterococci causing infections, South India

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    Rao Sambasiva R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococci tend to be one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, with E. faecalis and E. faecium accounting up to 90% of the clinical isolates. Nevertheless, the incidence of other species of enterococci from clinical sources shows an alarming increase with the properties of intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics including beta-lactams and glycopeptides. Thus proper identification of enterococci to species level is quintessential for management and prevention of these bacteria in any healthcare facility. Hence this work was undertaken to study the prevalence of unusual species of enterococci causing human infections, in a tertiary care hospital in South India. Methods The study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in South India from July 2001 to June 2003. Isolates of enterococci were collected from various clinical specimens and speciated using extensive phenotypic and physiological tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed and interpreted as per NCCLS guidelines. Whole cell protein (WCP fingerprinting of enterococci were done for species validation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and analyzed computationally. Results Our study showed the prevalence of unusual (non-faecalis and non-faecium enterococci and atypical (biochemical variant species of enterococci as 19% (46 isolates and 5% (12 isolates respectively. The 7 unusual species (46 isolates isolated and confirmed by phenotypic characterization includes: 15 E. gallinarum (6.2%, 10 E. avium (4.1%, 6 E. raffinosus (2.5%, 6 E. hirae (2.5%, 4 E. mundtii (1.7%, 3 E. casseliflavus-including the two atypical isolates (1.2% and 2 E. durans (0.8%. The 12 atypical enterococcal species (5% that showed aberrant sugar reactions in conventional phenotyping were confirmed as E. faecalis, E. faecium and E. casseliflavus respectively by WCP fingerprinting. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing depicted the

  20. Ascariasis in Japan: is pig-derived Ascaris infecting humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizono, Naoki; Yoshimura, Yuta; Tohzaka, Naoki; Yamada, Minoru; Tegoshi, Tatsuya; Onishi, Kotaro; Uchikawa, Ryuichi

    2010-11-01

    Human ascariasis is caused by infection with the common roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides, although the pig roundworm Ascaris suum has also been reported to infect humans and develop into the adult stage. To elucidate whether pig-derived Ascaris infects humans in Japan, 9 Ascaris isolates obtained from Japanese patients and a further 9 Ascaris isolates of pig origin were analyzed to determine their internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences. Six of the 9 clinical isolates showed the Ascaris genotype which predominantly infects humans in endemic countries, while the other 3 clinical isolates and 9 pig-derived isolates showed the genotype predominant in pigs worldwide. These results suggest that at least some cases of human ascariasis in Japan are a result of infection with pig-derived Ascaris.

  1. Phialophora richardsiae infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrak, D L; Koneman, E W; Estupinan, R C; Jackson, J

    1988-01-01

    Phialophora richardsiae infection in humans is rare. The first human isolate was recovered from a patient with a phaeomycotic cyst in 1968. Since 1975 seven other cases have appeared in the world literature, and an additional case is reported here. The mean age of these nine patients was 61.4 years. Two patients had diabetes mellitus, one had diabetes mellitus and disseminated adrenocortical carcinoma, and one had a myeloproliferative disorder. The mode of acquisition was presumed to be inoculation with contaminated plant material, but a history consistent with an inoculation injury was obtained in only four patients and a retained splinter was found in the lesion of only one patient. Infection with P. richardsiae was not associated with systemic symptoms or signs. Six patients presented with a single subcutaneous cystic granulomatous lesion. One patient had chronic dacryocystitis. More extensive or invasive disease occurred in two patients, both with an ultimately fatal underlying neoplastic process. A specific etiologic diagnosis was made by culture of purulent material obtained by excisional biopsy in six patients, incision and drainage in one patient, aspiration in one, and spontaneous drainage in one. Subcutaneous nodules were cured with surgical excision. There is insufficient information concerning antifungal therapy to recommend its use.

  2. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkuri, Niina; Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-05-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001-2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children.

  3. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailao, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo; Silva Ferreira, Marcia Eliana da; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Leon-Narvaez, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasi...

  4. Candida Infections, Causes, Targets, and Resistance Mechanisms: Traditional and Alternative Antifungal Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Spampinato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Candida includes about 200 different species, but only a few species are human opportunistic pathogens and cause infections when the host becomes debilitated or immunocompromised. Candida infections can be superficial or invasive. Superficial infections often affect the skin or mucous membranes and can be treated successfully with topical antifungal drugs. However, invasive fungal infections are often life-threatening, probably due to inefficient diagnostic methods and inappropriate initial antifungal therapies. Here, we briefly review our current knowledge of pathogenic species of the genus Candida and yeast infection causes and then focus on current antifungal drugs and resistance mechanisms. An overview of new therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of Candida infections is also provided.

  5. Pulmonary disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, J D; Orholm, Marianne; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    Pulmonary disease is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All parts of the hospital system are expected to be involved in the diagnosis and treatment of HIV infected patients in the coming years. Many different processes...... cause pulmonary disease alone or in combination. Bilateral interstitial infiltrates are the most frequent chest x-ray abnormality and are most frequently caused by infection with Pneumocystis carinii. Cytomegalovirus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis and pulmonary Kaposi...

  6. Rickettsioses as causes of CNS infection in southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Carole Eldin; Philippe Parola

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In The Lancet Global Health, Sabine Dittrich and colleagues 1 report that scrub typhus caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, murine typhus caused by Rickettsia typhi, and leptospirosis caused by various Leptospira species account for more than a third of CNS infections diagnosed over 8 years in Vientiane Hospital in Laos. The study is one more great contribution from this team in their investigation of undocumented syndromes, as well as in the public health challenge of ri...

  7. [Microbiological diagnosis of human papilloma virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Lindemann, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Pérez-Gracia, Maria Teresa

    2016-06-25

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the leading cause of sexually transmitted infection worldwide. This virus generally causes benign lesions, such as genital warts, but persistent infection may lead to cervical cancer, anal cancer, vaginal cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer, although less frequently. Cervical cancer is a severe disease with a high mortality in some countries. Screening with cytology has been very successful in the last few years, but nowadays there are numerous studies that confirm that cytology should be replaced with the detection of HPV as a first line test in population based screening. There are several commercially available FDA approved tests for screening of cervical cancer. A new strategy, based on individual detection of the high risk genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, present in 70% of cervical cancer biopsies, has been proposed by some experts, and is going to be implemented in most countries in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. High prevalence of human parvovirus 4 infection in HBV and HCV infected individuals in shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuelian; Zhang, Jing; Hong, Liang; Wang, Jiayu; Yuan, Zhengan; Zhang, Xi; Ghildyal, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been detected in blood and diverse tissues samples from HIV/AIDS patients who are injecting drug users. Although B19 virus, the best characterized human parvovirus, has been shown to co-infect patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus (HBV, HCV) infection, the association of PARV4 with HBV or HCV infections is still unknown.The aim of this study was to characterise the association of viruses belonging to PARV4 genotype 1 and 2 with chronic HBV and HCV infection in Shanghai.Serum samples of healthy controls, HCV infected subjects and HBV infected subjects were retrieved from Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention (SCDC) Sample Bank. Parvovirus-specific nested-PCR was performed and results confirmed by sequencing. Sequences were compared with reference sequences obtained from Genbank to derive phylogeny trees.The frequency of parvovirus molecular detection was 16-22%, 33% and 41% in healthy controls, HCV infected and HBV infected subjects respectively, with PARV4 being the only parvovirus detected. HCV infected and HBV infected subjects had a significantly higher PARV4 prevalence than the healthy population. No statistical difference was found in PARV4 prevalence between HBV or HCV infected subjects. PARV4 sequence divergence within study groups was similar in healthy subjects, HBV or HCV infected subjects.Our data clearly demonstrate that PARV4 infection is strongly associated with HCV and HBV infection in Shanghai but may not cause increased disease severity.

  9. RISK FACTORS AND NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS CAUSED BY ENTEROCOCCI

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Aim: to analyze nosocomial infections and risk factors caused by enterococci. Review of the foreign and domestic literature on biology and virulence factors of enterococci being the leading causative agents of nosocomial infections is done. Information on risk factors and postoperative infectious complications, pathogens of which are enterococci, in surgical hospitals and hospitals for organ transplantations is provided. The growth of antibiotic resistance in enterococci and the relationship ...

  10. Combined pericarditis and pneumonia caused by Legionella infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Jønsson, V; Niebuhr, U

    1987-01-01

    During a one year period acute pericarditis was diagnosed in 16 consecutive patients without acute infarction or malignancy. In two of these patients with both pericarditis and pneumonia Legionella infection was present. One case was caused by Legionella longbeachae and the other by both Legionella...... longbeachae and Legionella jordanis. When pericarditis is associated with pneumonia Legionella infection should be sought so that effective treatment with erythromycin may be started early....

  11. Intestinal obstruction caused by Taenia taeniaeformis infection in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Rebbecca S; Bowman, Dwight D; Barr, Stephen C; Euclid, James M

    2009-01-01

    An adult domestic shorthair (DSH) cat was presented with acute vomiting, anorexia, lethargy, and dyspnea. The cat's clinical status worsened over 24 hours with conservative medical management. An exploratory celiotomy was performed. Acute intestinal obstruction resulting from infection with Taenia (T.) taeniaeformis was diagnosed. Surgical removal of the cestodes via multiple enterotomies resolved the obstruction. This paper reports, for the first time, small intestinal obstruction caused by T. taeniaeformis infection in a cat.

  12. Modeling human influenza infection in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radigan KA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn A Radigan,1 Alexander V Misharin,2 Monica Chi,1 GR Scott Budinger11Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 2Division of Rheumatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Influenza is the leading cause of death from an infectious cause. Because of its clinical importance, many investigators use animal models to understand the biologic mechanisms of influenza A virus replication, the immune response to the virus, and the efficacy of novel therapies. This review will focus on the biosafety, biosecurity, and ethical concerns that must be considered in pursuing influenza research, in addition to focusing on the two animal models – mice and ferrets – most frequently used by researchers as models of human influenza infection.Keywords: mice, ferret, influenza, animal model, biosafety

  13. Inner ear infections as cause of perinatal deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the role of infective agents as cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL in children. Setting: Tertiary care center actively involved in management of hearing impairment through cochlear implant program and other rehabilitation program. Materials and Methods: Retrospective chart review of 213 patients who underwent cochlear implantation at our center from 2007 to 2011 was carried out. Out of these, 185 were children. We have done the data analysis with regard to etiology of hearing loss in these 185 children. An etiology for SNHL could be established in 100 out of these 185 cases. Out of these 100 cases, we have further segregated cases where an infectious etiology was implicated. Results: Out of 185 prelingual cochlear implantees, etiology could be determined in 100 cases. Etiology was of infective origin in 26 of these 100 cases. Infective agents implicated in congenital acquired hearing loss were Toxoplasma, Rubella, Cytomegalovirus, and Herpes (TORCH infections ( n = 9 including Rubella ( n = 7 and Cytomegalovirus (CMV ( n = 2. Meningitis ( n = 11 and other infections ( n = 6 were responsible for secondary acquired hearing loss. Conclusions: Results showed that among the identified causes, infective agents were responsible in one-fourth cases of profound SNHL. Building awareness about such existence and their major role in causing SNHL among the otolaryngologists, pediatricians, obstetricians, physicians, audiologists and public is considered essential so that such preventable and controllable maladies are reduced by combined efforts from all these stakeholders.

  14. In Vitro Infection of Trypanosoma cruzi Causes Decrease in Glucose Transporter Protein-1 (GLUT1 Expression in Explants of Human Placental Villi Cultured under Normal and High Glucose Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mezzano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic Chagas' disease agent, induces changes in protein pattern of the human placenta syncytiotrophoblast. The glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 is the primary isoform involved in transplacental glucose transport. We carried out in vitro assays to determine if T. cruzi infection would induce changes in placental GLUT1 protein expression under normal and high concentration of glucose. Using Western blot and immunohistological techniques, GLUT1 expression was determined in normal placental villi cultured under normal or high concentrations of glucose, with or without in vitro T. cruzi infection, for 24 and 48 hours. High glucose media or T. cruzi infection alone reduced GLUT1 expression. A yet more accentuated reduction was observed when infection and high glucose condition took place together. We inform, for the first time, that T. cruzi infection may induce reduction of GLUT1 expression under normal and high glucose concentrations, and this effect is synergic to high glucose concentrations.

  15. Staphylococcus lugdunensis: novel organism causing cochlear implant infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Bhumbra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A majority of cochlear implant infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reported here is a pediatric patient with a cochlear implant infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus that has only recently been determined to be clinically relevant (1988. Unlike other coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, it is more aggressive, carrying a greater potential for tissue destruction. In pediatrics, the organism is uncommon, poorly described, and generally pan-susceptible. Described herein is the presentation and management of this unusual organism in a pediatric setting.

  16. Treatment of infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Cisneros, José Miguel; Gudiol, Carlota; Martínez, José Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Treatment of infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) is currently one of the most important challenges of infectious diseases. The available information is based on in vitro studies, some animal model data and a few case studies and retrospective cohorts; appropriate data are lacking or are very scarce for some old antibiotics that are still occasionally used. Because of the heterogeneity in clinical situations, in specific carbapenemases and in the susceptibility of isolates, individualized treatment decisions must usually be made. Here we review the different antibiotics that might be useful for treating infections caused by CPE.

  17. Clinical characteristics of infections caused by Roseomonas species and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Min; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Tan, Che-Kim; Huang, Yu-Chuang; Chung, Kuei-Pin; Lee, Meng-Rui; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-03-01

    Human infections due to Roseomonas species are uncommon and the vast majority of reported infections are opportunistic and easy to treat. We retrospectively reviewed the computerized database of the Bacteriology Laboratory at the National Taiwan University Hospital to identify patients with infections caused by Roseomonas species during the period January 2000 to December 2010. Isolates of Roseomonas species were confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. During the study period, 20 patients had cultures positive for Roseomonas species. R. mucosa was the most prevalent isolate (n = 18), followed by 1 each of R. gilardii and Roseomonas genomospecies 5. True infection caused by Roseomonas species was confirmed in 17 (85%) patients. Most (n = 12, 71%) of these infections were health care-associated infection. The majority of the patients (n = 12, 71%) had underlying diseases. Malignancy was the most common underlying disease, and catheter-related bloodstream infection was the most common type of infection. The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns varied among the different Roseomonas species. In conclusion, Roseomonas species can cause infection in children and adults regardless of immune status. Because different Roseomonas species may have different clinical features and susceptibility profiles, molecular studies are necessary to identify Roseomonas isolates to the species level.

  18. Pleural malakoplakia caused by Rhodoccocus equi infection in a patient after stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnes Carl

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malakoplakia is a disease especially of the urinary tract with typical plaques most frequently observed in the urinary bladder's mucosa. In the context of immunosuppression malakoplakia can also occur in other organs. Some of these extravesical malakoplakias are associated with an infection by Rhodococcus equi, a rare human pathogen well known from veterinary medicine. Here we present the first case of a pleural malakoplakia without lung involvement caused by a proved Rhodococcus equi infection.

  19. [Human factors caused the third plague epidemic in Harbin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Dong-Ying; Li, Zhi-Ping

    2011-03-01

    The third plague epidemic in Harbin broke out in 1946 and ended in 1954. Different from the first two plague epidemics (imported), the third prevalence was both imported and idiopathic infectious disease which was caused by human factors. Japanese troops set forbidden zones to build a biological weapon center, which destroyed the natural environment and offered a good growth condition for Citellus Undulatus. In 1945, on the eve of surrender, the Japanese blew up the Unit 731 germ factory located in a bungalow district, which caused diffusion of infected plague fleas. Mice of the district were infected and a man-made plague focus was created. During the prevalence of the third plague, prevention departments at all levels took a series of actions and with people's efforts, the plague was effectively controlled.

  20. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, Aranka; Boşca, Bianca; Miclăuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; Băbţan, Anida Maria; Mesaros, Anca; Crişan, Bogdan; Câmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-02-01

    Oral human papillomavirus infection is rare in children, but the presence of a villous lesion with slow but continuous growth concerns parents, who need information and therapeutic solutions from the physician. All these aspects are discussed based on a case report of a 9-year-old child with an oral human papillomavirus infection.

  1. Chlamydophila psittaci infection of birds and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Baş

    2015-04-01

    seen in infected birds. Transmission of infection to humans occurs through inhalation or direct contact and transmission through bird bites or human-to-human is rare. C. psittaci usually leads to the systemic infection associated with pneumonia in humans. In recent years, PCR based molecular methods are used as well as serological methods such as ELISA, CFT, MIF in diagnosis. Both of infected birds and humans, tetracyclines and macrolides are preferred for treatment of infection. In order to prevent the disease, due to there isn't any commercial vaccine for especially using in birds, applying biosafety rules is very important in terms of human health and economical aspects. Especially, veterinarians, bird breeders and dealers, poultry farmers and slaughterhouse workers are at high risk for C. psittaci infection. Due to the transmission to humans of psittacosis infection and accepting it as a potential biological weapon, it is thought to be important for public health. In this review, it is aimed to give detailed information about infection in human and birds, because it can be missed at the diagnosis, hence there is low awareness about disease and it has got variable clinical symptoms.

  2. Comparative Genomics of Escherichia coli Strains Causing Urinary Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli have been studied extensively over the years, but relatively little is known about what differentiates isolates causing various types of urinary tract infections. In this study, we compared the genomic profiles of 45 strains from a range...

  3. Case report: Infective endocarditis caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tun-Chieh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few reports in the literature of invasive infection caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis in patients without immunosuppression or other predisposing factors. The choice of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia caused by the pathogen requires more case experience to be determined. Case presentation The case of a 40-year-old previously healthy man with subacute endocarditis proposed to be contributed from an occult dental abscess is described. The infection was found to be caused by B. vesicularis on blood culture results. The patient recovered without sequelae after treatment with ceftriaxone followed by subsequent ciprofloxacin therapy owing to an allergic reaction to ceftriaxone and treatment failure with ampicillin/sulbactam. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of B. vesicularis as a cause of infective endocarditis. According to an overview of the literature and our experience, we suggest that third-generation cephalosporins, piperacillin/tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin are effective in treating invasive B. vesicularis infections, while the efficacy of ampicillin-sulbactam needs further evaluation.

  4. Salmonella Infections Caused by Reptiles and Amphibians in Childcare Centers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-07

    Dr. Neil Vora, an EIS Officer at CDC, discusses his article about Salmonella infections in childcare centers caused by reptiles and amphibians.  Created: 2/7/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/7/2013.

  5. Clouds caused by human activities: the anthropoclouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, Jordi; Costa, Marcel; Pino, David; Lorente, Jeroni

    2013-04-01

    The classification of clouds is based on the pioneering classification carried out by Howard (1804). In this classification, and also in the successive editions of the International Classification of Clouds published by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO, 1975, 1987) 10 basic cloud genera are included and described. In all cases, the cause that leads to the formation of clouds remains as a secondary issue. It is assumed that all of them are exclusively produced by natural mechanisms without any human intervention. However, aerosol and water vapour emissions produced by human activity may increase cloud formation having an increasing importance in the atmospheric energy budget and consequently in the earth's climate. Effectively, since the end of the Nineteenth century, human activity has been injecting large amounts of water vapour into the atmosphere, cloud condensation nuclei and hot air mainly generated in the combustion processes that under certain spatial and temporal conditions can enhance cloud formation. These anthropogenic aerosols are linked to the climate and the water cycle (Kaufman et al, 2002). The aim of this communication is to point out the anthropic origin of some clouds in the cloud classification. Several cases of the 7 basic genera cloud caused by human activities will be shown to discuss the importance of differentiating the origin of clouds in weather observations. This differentiation would improve the understanding the contribution of these clouds to climate change. To differentiate the clouds formed by human activity, we propose to use the prefix anthropo- before the scientific name (and a- before the abbreviation) in some of the 10 basic clouds defined by the International Classification of Clouds, those which could have an anthropic origin, and thus begin new data of cloud observations that could help future research to improve the effect of human activity in the troposphere.

  6. Parasite Infection, Carcinogenesis and Human Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tong, Hoang; Brindley, Paul J; Meyer, Christian G; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2017-02-01

    Cancer may be induced by many environmental and physiological conditions. Infections with viruses, bacteria and parasites have been recognized for years to be associated with human carcinogenicity. Here we review current concepts of carcinogenicity and its associations with parasitic infections. The helminth diseases schistosomiasis, opisthorchiasis, and clonorchiasis are highly carcinogenic while the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causing agent of Chagas disease, has a dual role in the development of cancer, including both carcinogenic and anticancer properties. Although malaria per se does not appear to be causative in carcinogenesis, it is strongly associated with the occurrence of endemic Burkitt lymphoma in areas holoendemic for malaria. The initiation of Plasmodium falciparum related endemic Burkitt lymphoma requires additional transforming events induced by the Epstein-Barr virus. Observations suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis may be a relevant co-factor in HTLV-1-related T cell lymphomas. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms of parasitic infection-induced carcinogenicity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. HCMV Infection Depress NGF Expression in Human Glioma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-tao WANG; Bin WANG; Zhi-jun LIU; Zhi-qiang BAI; Ling LI; Dong-meng QIAN; Zhi-yong YAN; Xu-xia SONG

    2009-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection, resulting in birth defects such as microcephaly. In this study, RT-PCR and Western Blotting were performed to quantify the regulation of endogenic nerve growth factor expression in neuroglia cells by HCMV infection. The results showed that basal, endogenous NGF expression in U251 was unchanged during early HCMV infection. NGF expression is strongly down-regulated during the latent phase of infection. These results suggest that HCMV can depress the NGF expression in U251 cells.

  8. The Spectrum of Fungi That Infects Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia R.; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John

    2015-01-01

    Few among the millions of fungal species fulfill four basic conditions necessary to infect humans: high temperature tolerance, ability to invade the human host, lysis and absorption of human tissue, and resistance to the human immune system. In previously healthy individuals, invasive fungal disease is rare because animals’ sophisticated immune systems evolved in constant response to fungal challenges. In contrast, fungal diseases occur frequently in immunocompromised patients. Paradoxically, successes of modern medicine have put increasing numbers of patients at risk for invasive fungal infections. Uncontrolled HIV infection additionally makes millions vulnerable to lethal fungal diseases. A concerted scientific and social effort is needed to meet these challenges. PMID:25367975

  9. Neurotropic virus infections as the cause of immediate and delayed neuropathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ludlow (Martin); J. Kortekaas, J. (Jeroen); C. Herden, C. (Christiane); B. Hoffmann (Bernd); D. Tappe, D. (Dennis); C. Trebst, C. (Corinna); D.E. Griffin, D.E. (Diane); H.E. Brindle, H.E. (Hannah); T. Solomon, T. (Tom); A.S. Brown (Alan S.); D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); K.C. Wolthers (Katja); D. Pajkrt (Dasja); P. Wohlsein (Peter); B.E.E. Martina (Byron); W. Baumgärtner (Wolfgang); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA wide range of viruses from different virus families in different geographical areas, may cause immediate or delayed neuropathological changes and neurological manifestations in humans and animals. Infection by neurotropic viruses as well as the resulting immune response can irreversibl

  10. Neurotropic virus infections as the cause of immediate and delayed neuropathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ludlow (Martin); J. Kortekaas (Jeroen); C. Herden (Christiane); B. Hoffmann (Bernd); D. Tappe (Dennis); C. Trebst (Corinna); D.E. Griffin (Diane E.); H.E. Brindle (Hannah E.); T. Solomon (Tom); A.S. Brown (Alan S.); D.A.J. van Riel (Debby); K.C. Wolthers (Katja); D. Pajkrt (Dasja); P. Wohlsein (Peter); B.E.E. Martina (Byron); W. Baumgärtner (Wolfgang); G.M. Verjans (Georges M.); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractA wide range of viruses from different virus families in different geographical areas, may cause immediate or delayed neuropathological changes and neurological manifestations in humans and animals. Infection by neurotropic viruses as well as the resulting immune response can irreversibl

  11. Neurotropic virus infections as the cause of immediate and delayed neuropathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludlow, Martin; Kortekaas, Jeroen; Herden, Christiane; Hoffmann, Bernd; Tappe, Dennis; Trebst, Corinna; Griffin, Diane E.; Brindle, Hannah E.; Solomon, Tom; Brown, Alan S.; Riel, van Debby; Wolthers, Katja C.; Pajkrt, Dasja; Wohlsein, Peter; Martina, Byron E.E.; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Verjans, Georges M.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of viruses from different virus families in different geographical areas, may cause immediate or delayed neuropathological changes and neurological manifestations in humans and animals. Infection by neurotropic viruses as well as the resulting immune response can irreversibly disrupt

  12. Prevalence of bacterial pathogens causing ocular infections in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background / Aims: The eye may be infected from external sources or through intra-ocular invasion of micro-organisms carried by the blood stream. This study was undertaken to isolate and identify the specific bacterial pathogens causing ocular infections and to determine their in-vitro antibacterial susceptibilities to commonly used antibacterial agents. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of all patients with clinically diagnosed bacterial ocular infections such as blepharitis, conjunctivitis, internal and external hordeolum, suppurative scleritis, canaliculitis, keratitis, dacryocystitis, preseptal cellulitis, endophthalmitis and panophthalmitis presenting between January 2005 and December 2005 was performed. Extra-ocular and intra-ocular specimens were collected and were subjected to direct microscopy and culture. Results: A total of 756 patients with bacterial ocular infections were analyzed, of which 462(61% eyes had adnexal bacterial infection, 217(28.7% had corneal infection, 6 (0.8% had scleral involvement and the remaining 71(9.39% eyes had infection of the intra-ocular tissues. The predominant bacterial species isolated was S. aureus (195 of 776; 25% followed by S. pneumoniae (169 of 776; 21.78% and coagulase negative staphylococci (142 of 776; 18.3%. The largest number of gram-positive isolates were susceptible to cefazolin (545 of 624; 87.34%, chloramphenicol (522 of 624; 83.65% and gatifloxacin (511 of 624; 81.89% and gram-negative isolates were to amikacin (127 of 136; 93.38%, gatifloxacin (125 of 136; 91.91% and ofloxacin (119 of 136; 87.5%, while aerobic actinomycetes were to amikacin (100%, gatifloxacin (14 of 16; 87.5%, chloramphenicol (14 of 16; 87.5% and ofloxacin (13 of 16; 81.25%. Conclusions: S. aureus frequently causes infections of eyelids and conjunctiva, S. pneumoniae of lacrimal apparatus and cornea and coagulase negative staphylococci causes intra-ocular infections. Of all routinely used antibacterials

  13. Imipenem resistance in nonfermenters causing nosocomial urinary tract infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taneja N

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised hosts. These organisms show high level of resistance to b-lactam agents, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Imipenem is a carbapenem antibiotic, which can be very useful for treatment of infections caused by nonfermenters. Eighty-five nonfermenters causing nosocomial UTI were tested for MIC to imipenem by agar dilution method. Resistance to other antimicrobial agents was compared between imipenem sensitive (S and resistance (R groups. Overall 36.4% of nonfermenters were resistant to imipenem. Forty two percent of P. aeruginosa and 18.5% of Acinetobacter baumanii were imipenem resistant. Other nonfermenters showed variable resistance, resistance in Alcaligenes spp. being very high. More than 70% of the nonfermenters were resistant to ceftazidime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Piperacillin and amikacin had the best in vitro susceptibility. No significant difference was found in the antibiotic susceptibility profile among imipenem sensitive (S or resistant (R strains.

  14. [Latent infection of human herpes virus in hematopoietic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke-Fu; Ma, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Song, Yu-Hua

    2008-12-01

    Up to date, eight types of human herpes viruses have been identified, all of which are ubiquitous, and usually establish latent infection in the host after primary infection. Since most of the herpes viruses are maintained in an asymptomatic form, they are often neglected. However, under some circumstances, these herpes viruses can cause fatal or severe diseases. Furthermore, the association of herpes viruses with hematopoietic malignancies is attracting researchers' attention. With the extensive development of hematopoietic stem cell and organ transplantation, reports regarding transplantation failure and complication caused by infection of human herpes virus has been increasing. Cytokine storm was firstly suggested as the mechanism of graft-versus-host diseases. In recent years, which has also been applied in the pathogenesis research of inflammation, and is supposed to play an important role in severe virus infection. In this paper, through discussing the possible role of latent infection of human herpes virus in the failure or complication of bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in refractory leukemia, the function and significance of latent infection of human herpes virus and the cytokine storm it caused were investigated.

  15. Increased risk for Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli infection of pet origin in dog owners and evidence for genetic association between strains causing infection in humans and their pets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, L.M.; Smid, J.H.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Koene, M.G.J.; Havelaar, A.H.; Friesema, I.H.M.; French, N.P.; Flemming, C.; Galson, J.D.; Graziani, C.; Busani, L.; Pelt, van W.

    2013-01-01

    We compared Campylobacter jejuni/coli multilocus sequence types (STs) from pets (dogs/cats) and their owners and investigated risk factors for pet-associated human campylobacteriosis using a combined source-attribution and case-control analysis. In total, 132/687 pet stools were Campylobacter-positi

  16. Disseminated mycotic infection caused by Colletotrichum acutatum in a Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manire, Charles A; Rhinehart, Howard L; Sutton, Deanna A; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Rinaldi, Michael G; Buck, John D; Jacobson, Elliott

    2002-11-01

    Colletotrichum acutatum is a cosmopolitan plant pathogen with a wide host range. While the organism's phytopathogenic potential has been well documented, it has never been reported as an etiologic agent of disease in either animals or humans. In this case, a juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtle, Lepidochelys kempi, probably with immune compromise following cold stunning (extended hypothermia), developed a disseminated mycotic infection in the lungs and kidneys. Prophylactic treatment with oral itraconazole did not prevent or cure the infection. This report of a Colletotrichum acutatum infection in an animal extends the range of disease caused by this organism beyond that of a phytopathogen.

  17. Polymicrobial infective endocarditis caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoloz Koshkelashvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is a common clinical problem in industrialized countries. Risk factors include abnormal cardiac valves, a history of endocarditis, intracardiac devices, prosthetic valves and intravenous drug use. We report a case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis in a 33 year-old female with a history chronic heroin use caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. We believe the patient was exposed to these microbes by cleansing her skin with saliva prior to injection. Pairing a detailed history with the consideration of atypical agents is crucial in the proper diagnosis and management of endocarditis in patients with high-risk injection behaviors.

  18. Modelling the cause of dependency with application to filaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwing-Duistermaat, J J; Van Houwelingen, H C; Terhell, A

    1998-12-30

    A preliminary data set is analysed containing filaria specific IgG4 and IgE levels and the presence of microfilariae of 196 people from families of a village in Indonesia. Since filaria infected people may not be microfilaria positive, a filaria infection can easily be missed. First, the probabilities of a filaria infection are estimated from the IgG4 levels and the presence of microfilariae using the EM algorithm. By dichotomizing these probabilities, infection status is estimated for each person. Then for IgG4, IgE and infection status, the correlations between observations are modelled. Three causes for a correlation are considered, namely genetic, intra-uterine or environmental effects. The correlation structure of the genetic and the intra-uterine effects are quite similar and consequently it may be difficult to disentangle them. Empirical variograms are plotted and the various variance components are estimated by maximizing the log-likelihood. For infection status an environmental effect is found and for IgG4 and IgE levels genetic effects are found.

  19. New treatments for human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Santos, C; Pigem, R; Alsina, M

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is very common. In this article, we review the latest developments in the treatment of lesions caused by this virus, with a particular focus on anogenital warts. Sinecatechins and new imiquimod formulations are among the most significant new developments. Others include photodynamic therapy and intralesional immunotherapy, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use. Finally, while therapeutic vaccines and inhibitory molecules appear to hold great promise, they are still in the early phases of investigation. More studies are needed, and these should have similar designs, larger samples, and sufficiently long follow-up periods to enable the direct comparison of the short-term and long-term effectiveness of different treatment options. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Miyamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings.

  1. [Gastrointestinal human myiasis caused by Eristalis tenax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, M; Kreiter, A; Semenas, L

    1998-08-01

    The myiasis observed in Bariloche are characterized and the probable conditions under which the infestations took place established. The larvae obtained from faeces of 2 patients were identified as Eristalis tenax (Diptera: Syrphidae) according to Hartley (1961) and Organización Panamericana de la Salud keys (1962). These 2 cases of human gastrointestinal myiasis were the first to be registered in Bariloche (Patagonia, Argentina) and their characteristics were similar to those described for this species in other parts of the world. The lack of specific control measures in the domestic water supply system was the most probable cause of the infestation. This event extends the distribution of E. tenax and human gastrointestinal myiasis in South America to 41 degrees 03' S.

  2. Parvovirus B19 Infection in Human Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Ronald F.; Sobel, Jack; Vaisbuch, Edi; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Kim, Sun Kwon; Uldbjerg, Niels; Romero, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 infection is widespread. Approximately 30-50% of pregnant women are non-immune and vertical transmission is common following maternal infection in pregnancy. Fetal infection may be associated with a normal outcome but fetal death may also occur without ultrasound evidence of infections sequelae. B19 infection should be considered in any case of non-immune hydrops. Diagnosis is mainly through serology and PCR. Surveillance requires sequential ultrasound and Doppler screening for signs of fetal anemia, heart failure, and hydrops. Immunoglobulins antiviral and vaccination are not yet available but intrauterine transfusion in selected cases can be lifesaving. PMID:21040396

  3. Human Dermatitis Caused by Ophionyssus natricis, a Snake Mite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Amanatfard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ophionyssus natricis is a purely blood sucking parasite of snakes and of worldwide distribution. Infected snakes often exhibit lethargy, pruritus, crusting dermatitis, and behavioral changes. Ophionyssus natricis can also attack humans, causing popular vesiculo-bullous eruption of the skin. A 29 years old man working in zoo, Sari, Mazandaran, Iran, presented itchy papullar eruption of the skin. He had noticed small insects fixed on his skin and large numbers of these same insects on a python and its cage in the zoo. Regarding totheir morphological characteristics they were diagnosed as O. natricis (Geravis, 1844, a snake mite. It is the first report of O. natricis from Iran.

  4. [Cause and prevention of surgical site infection and hypertrophic scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Rei

    2012-03-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) occurs at the site of surgery within 1 month of an operation or within 1 year of an operation if a foreign body is implanted as part of the surgery. Most SSIs (about 70%) are superficial infections involving the skin and subcutaneous tissues only. The remaining infections are more serious and can involve tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material. Hypertrophic scars( HSs) occur frequently on particular sites, including the anterior chest wall. The anterior chest wall is frequently subjected to skin stretching caused by the natural daily movements of the body. Most cases of SSIs and HSs can be prevented by (1) suture technique modification to prevent high stretching tension and ischemia, and (2) appropriate wound care after surgery. It would be useful to avoid subjecting wounded skin to sustained mechanical force, thereby permitting the wound to rest and heal normally.

  5. Transient Oral Human Cytomegalovirus Infections Indicate Inefficient Viral Spread from Very Few Initially Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bryan T; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Swan, David; Ferrenberg, James; Simmons, Karen; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Schiffer, Joshua T; Gantt, Soren

    2017-06-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is acquired by the oral route in children, and primary infection is associated with abundant mucosal replication, as well as the establishment of latency in myeloid cells that results in lifelong infection. The efficiency of primary CMV infection in humans following oral exposure, however, is unknown. We consistently detected self-limited, low-level oral CMV shedding events, which we termed transient CMV infections, in a prospective birth cohort of 30 highly exposed CMV-uninfected infants. We estimated the likelihood of transient oral CMV infections by comparing their observed frequency to that of established primary infections, characterized by persistent high-level shedding, viremia, and seroconversion. We developed mathematical models of viral dynamics upon initial oral CMV infection and validated them using clinical shedding data. Transient infections comprised 76 to 88% of oral CMV shedding events. For this high percentage of transient infections to occur, we identified two mathematical prerequisites: a very small number of initially infected oral cells (1 to 4) and low viral infectivity (<1.5 new cells infected/cell). These observations indicate that oral CMV infection in infants typically begins with a single virus that spreads inefficiently to neighboring cells. Thus, although the incidence of CMV infection is high during infancy, our data provide a mechanistic framework to explain why multiple CMV exposures are typically required before infection is successfully established. These findings imply that a sufficiently primed immune response could prevent CMV from establishing latent infection in humans and support the achievability of a prophylactic CMV vaccine.IMPORTANCE CMV infects the majority of the world's population and is a major cause of birth defects. Developing a vaccine to prevent CMV infection would be extremely valuable but would be facilitated by a better understanding of how natural human CMV infection is acquired. We

  6. Infected bronchogenic cyst causing dysphagia and retrosternal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva Bjerre; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Kleive, Dyre Berg

    2013-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are congenital. They are typically discovered in infancy or early childhood. Secondary infection of the cyst is uncommon. We present the case of a 17-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with intermediate onset of upper abdominal, and retrosternal chest pain...... and fever. Subsequent X-ray and computerised tomography scan showed a bronchogenic cyst. The patient underwent subacute thoracotomy where a bronchogenic cyst filled with pus was located and excised. Bronchogenic cysts can be a rare cause of retrosternal pain. Please cite this paper as: Søndergaard EB......, Pedersen JH and Kleive D. Infected bronchogenic cyst causing dysphagia and retrosternal pain. Clin Respir J 2012; DOI:10.1111/j.1752-699X.2012.00296.x....

  7. A case report of intracranial infection caused by Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Mengxi; Wang, Dali; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Xiaoguang; Han, Lixia; Zhang, Fenghua

    2015-04-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is as yet reputed to be a rare conditional pathogen. In recent years, some clinical infections caused by Shewanella putrefaciens came into view, and it was possible for the bacteria to be isolated from blood, pus, urine, sputum, and wound secretions, etc. A transferred patient who suffered from intracranial infection after operation of cerebral hemorrhage was admitted in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University. To ascertain the cause, we assessed her blood, cerebrospinal fluid and sputum specimen, and succeeded in isolating one strain of bacteria from her cerebrospinal fluid. To circumvent the potential problem, further detection by Dade Behring Microscan WalkAway 96SI system and drug sensitivity identification plate was performed. Corresponding results indicated that the bacteria were certain pseudomonas with high drug resistance, only sensitive to ticarcillin/clavulanic acid and Imipenem. Eventually by 16S rDNA amplification assay, a new technique to identify pathogens genome, Shewanella putrefaciens infection was confirmed with 99 % coincidence rate. This is the first time in our hospital that Shewanella putrefaciens in the cerebrospinal fluid specimen was detected. When considering the increase of opportunistic infection, it is noteworthy to pay more attention to such situations in clinical diagnoses.

  8. Juxtarenal Modular Aortic Stent Graft Infection Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Novotný

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We are presenting a case report of an infected modular abdominal stent graft. Case Presentation. A 67-year-old male patient three years after Cook’s modular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA graft implantation for juxtarenal AAA with an implantation of a stent extension into the right common iliac artery for type Ib endoleak. The patient was admitted into our center in severe condition with suspected retroperitoneal bleeding. Computed tomography angiography (CTAG confirmed retroperitoneal bleeding in the right common iliac artery. An urgent surgical revision was indicated; destructed arterial wall around the stent extension in the right common iliac artery was discovered. Due to the severe state of health of the patient, a resection of the infected stent and affected arterial wall was performed, followed by an iliac-femoral crossover bypass. The patient was transported to the intensive care unit with hepatic and renal failure, with maximal catecholamine support. Combined antibiotic treatment was started. The patient died five hours after the procedure. The cause of death was multiorgan failure caused by sepsis. Hemocultures and perioperative microbiological cultures showed the infection agent to be Staphylococcus aureus methicillin sensitive. Conclusion. Stent graft infection is a rare complication. Treatment is associated with high mortality and morbidity.

  9. Brain abscess caused by Citrobacter koseri infection in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng-Wei; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2015-04-01

    Citrobacter koseri is a gram-negative bacillus that causes mostly meningitis and brain abscesses in neonates and infants. However, brain abscess caused by Citrobacter koseri infection in an adult is extremely rare, and only 2 cases have been described. Here, we reported a 73-year-old male presenting with a 3-week headache. A history of diabetes mellitus was noted. The images revealed a brain abscess in the left frontal lobe and pus culture confirmed the growth of Citrobacter koseri. The clinical symptoms improved completely postoperatively.

  10. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus mitis caused by accidental human bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Aliye; Kislak, Sumeyye; Mutlu, Nevzat Mehmet; Akcaboy, Zeynep Nur; Koksal, Asude; Sertcelik, Ahmet; Ünlü, Ramazan Erkin; Akinci, Esragul; Bodur, Hurrem

    2016-01-31

    Human bite wounds are more prone to infection than animal bites, which may cause necrotizing soft tissue infections such as myositis, fasciitis. Both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms may be responsible, including Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Peptostreptococcus spp. Necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by serious tissue destruction and systemic toxicity with high morbidity and mortality. We report a patient with Streptococcus mitis associated necrotizing fasciitis on the upper extremity resulting from an accidental human bite, which caused nearly fatal infection. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment should be given after a human bite to prevent infection. If the infection signs and symptoms develop, rapid diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic and surgical therapy should be administered immediately. Streptococcus mitis is a viridans streptococcus, usually known as a relatively benign oral streptococcus. To our knowledge, this is the first necrotizing fasciitis case due to Streptococcus mitis after human bite.

  11. Seroprevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis infection among humans, Santa Barbara County, California, USA, 2014–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Sara B.; Lake, Camille M.; Chastain, Holly M.; Fisk, David; Handali, Sukwan; Kahn, Philip L.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis (raccoon roundworm) infection is common in raccoons and can cause devastating pathology in other animals, including humans. Limited information is available on the frequency of asymptomatic human infection. We tested 150 adults from California, USA, for B. procyonis antibodies; 11 were seropositive, suggesting that subclinical infection does occur.

  12. Evaluation of Human Body Fluids for the Diagnosis of Fungal Infections

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    Parisa Badiee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Because the etiologic agents of these infections are abundant in nature, their isolation from biopsy material or sterile body fluids is needed to document infection. This review evaluates and discusses different human body fluids used to diagnose fungal infections.

  13. Human cytomegalovirus infections in premature infants by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    clinical importance of CMV infection in premature infants by breast-feeding is still unclear. This mini- ... Transmission of CMV by natural routes relates ... infection from the fresh breast milk containing the virus. ... As a result of transmission during the course of delivery ... hepatitis was speculated to be caused by primary.

  14. Human hantavirus infections in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Jussi; Reimerink, Johan; Harms, Margriet; Bakker, Jacinta; Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Schimmer, Barbara; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2014-12-01

    We report the recent epidemiology and estimated seroprevalence of human hantavirus infections in the Netherlands. Sixty-two cases were reported during December 2008-December 2013. The estimated seroprevalence in the screened municipalities in 2006-2007 was 1.7% (95% CI 1.3%-2.3%). Findings suggest that hantavirus infections are underdiagnosed in the Netherlands.

  15. Rickettsia slovaca infection in humans, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Rita; Pereira, Branca Isabel; Nazareth, Claúdia; Cabral, Susana; Ventura, Conceição; Crespo, Pedro; Marques, Nuno; da Cunha, Saraiva

    2013-10-01

    Fifteen years after the initial detection of Rickettsia slovaca in ticks in Portugal, 3 autochthonous cases of R. slovaca infection were diagnosed in humans. All patients had an eschar on the scalp and lymphadenopathy; 2 patients had facial edema. R. slovaca infection was confirmed by serologic testing, culture, and PCR.

  16. Complement activation in experimental human malaria infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roestenberg, M.; McCall, M.B.B.; Mollnes, T.E.; Deuren, M. van; Sprong, T.; Klasen, I.S.; Hermsen, C.C.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate complement activation in uncomplicated, early phases of human malaria. Fifteen healthy volunteers were experimentally infected with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Parasitemia and complement activation products were assessed. During blood stage parasitem

  17. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their saliva, mucous and feces. Human infections with bird flu viruses can happen when enough virus gets into ... Virus (CVV) for a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (Bird Flu) Virus ” for more information on this process. ...

  18. Malaria infected mosquitoes express enhanced attraction to human odor.

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    Renate C Smallegange

    Full Text Available There is much evidence that some pathogens manipulate the behaviour of their mosquito hosts to enhance pathogen transmission. However, it is unknown whether this phenomenon exists in the interaction of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto with the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum--one of the most important interactions in the context of humanity, with malaria causing over 200 million human cases and over 770 thousand deaths each year. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that infection with P. falciparum causes alterations in behavioural responses to host-derived olfactory stimuli in host-seeking female An. gambiae s.s. mosquitoes. In behavioural experiments we showed that P. falciparum-infected An. gambiae mosquitoes were significantly more attracted to human odors than uninfected mosquitoes. Both P. falciparum-infected and uninfected mosquitoes landed significantly more on a substrate emanating human skin odor compared to a clean substrate. However, significantly more infected mosquitoes landed and probed on a substrate emanating human skin odor than uninfected mosquitoes. This is the first demonstration of a change of An. gambiae behaviour in response to olfactory stimuli caused by infection with P. falciparum. The results of our study provide vital information that could be used to provide better predictions of how malaria is transmitted from human being to human being by An. gambiae s.s. females. Additionally, it highlights the urgent need to investigate this interaction further to determine the olfactory mechanisms that underlie the differential behavioural responses. In doing so, new attractive compounds could be identified which could be used to develop improved mosquito traps for surveillance or trapping programmes that may even specifically target P. falciparum-infected An. gambiae s.s. females.

  19. Human infection with Dirofilaria repens in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, K C; Pathmanathan, R; Krishnan, R

    1996-09-01

    Human dirofilariasis is a rare infection in Malaysia. Thus far, only two human cases have been reported viz. Dirofilaria immitis and D. (Nochtiella) repens and in both instances, adult worms were recovered from infected patients. The two cases reported in the present study, one from Melaka and the other from Penang, were diagnosed histologically. Based on the diagnostic criteria for identifying Dirofilaria in tissue sections, the parasites were identified as D. (Nochtiella) repens.

  20. Human skin Langerhans cells are targets of dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, SJL; Grouard-Vogel, G; Mascola, [No Value; Brachtel, E; Putvatana, R; Louder, MK; Filgueira, L; Marovich, MA; Wong, HK; Blauvelt, A; Murphy, GS; Robb, ML; Innes, BL; Birx, DL; Hayes, CG; Frankel, SS

    2000-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV), an arthropod-borne flavivirus, causes a febrile illness for which there is no antiviral treatment and no vaccine(1,2). Macrophages are important in dengue pathogenesis; however, the initial target cell for DV infection remains unknown. As DV is introduced into human skin by mosqui

  1. Human Dirofilaria repens Infection in Romania: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Popescu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human dirofilariasis is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by the filarial nematodes of dogs Dirofilaria repens and Dirofilaria immitis. Depending on the species involved, human infections usually manifest as one cutaneous or visceral larva migrans that forms a painless nodule in the later course of disease. Dirofilariae are endemic in the Mediterranean, particularly in Italy. They are considered as emerging pathogens currently increasing their geographical range. We present one of the few known cases of human dirofilariasis caused by D. repens in Romania. The patient developed unusual and severe clinical manifestations that mimicked pathological conditions like cellulitis or deep venous thrombosis.

  2. Diagnosis of infections caused by pathogenic free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2009-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris, and Sappinia sp. are pathogenic free-living amoebae. N. fowleri causes Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis, a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while Acanthamoeba spp. and B. mandrillaris cause chronic granulomatous encephalitis. Acanthamoeba spp. also can cause cutaneous lesions and Amoebic Keratitis, a sight-threatening infection of the cornea that is associated with contact lens use or corneal trauma. Sappinia pedata has been identified as the cause of a nonlethal case of amoebic encephalitis. In view of the potential health consequences due to infection with these amoebae, rapid diagnosis is critical for early treatment. Microscopic examination and culture of biopsy specimens, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and corneal scrapings have been used in the clinical laboratory. For amoebic keratitis, confocal microscopy has been used to successfully identify amoebae in corneal tissue. More recently, conventional and real-time PCR assays have been developed that are sensitive and specific for the amoebae. In addition, multiplex PCR assays are available for the rapid identification of these pathogens in biopsy tissue, CSF, and corneal specimens.

  3. Diagnosis of Infections Caused by Pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno da Rocha-Azevedo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris, and Sappinia sp. are pathogenic free-living amoebae. N. fowleri causes Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis, a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while Acanthamoeba spp. and B. mandrillaris cause chronic granulomatous encephalitis. Acanthamoeba spp. also can cause cutaneous lesions and Amoebic Keratitis, a sight-threatening infection of the cornea that is associated with contact lens use or corneal trauma. Sappinia pedata has been identified as the cause of a nonlethal case of amoebic encephalitis. In view of the potential health consequences due to infection with these amoebae, rapid diagnosis is critical for early treatment. Microscopic examination and culture of biopsy specimens, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF, and corneal scrapings have been used in the clinical laboratory. For amoebic keratitis, confocal microscopy has been used to successfully identify amoebae in corneal tissue. More recently, conventional and real-time PCR assays have been developed that are sensitive and specific for the amoebae. In addition, multiplex PCR assays are available for the rapid identification of these pathogens in biopsy tissue, CSF, and corneal specimens.

  4. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF ORGANISMS CAUSING SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS (SSI

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    Rohini Murlidhar Gajbhiye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND CDC defines surgical site infection as ‘Infections related to operative procedure that occurs at or near surgical incision within 30 days of operative procedure or within one year if the implant is left in situ’. Surgical site infection (SSI is 3 rd most frequently reported nosocomial infection (12%-16% as per National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of organisms causing SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS During a two year study period in a tertiary care hospital, 19,127 patients underwent surgeries in various surgical departments. Of these 517 (2.7% developed surgical site infection. The surgical wounds were classified by CDC & NNIS criteria into 4 classes. Two wound swabs were taken and processed by standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility along with testing of ESBLs, MBLs, AmpCβ lactamases was done for all isolates causing SSI. RESULTS Among 19,127 patients, 517 (2.7% developed SSI. It was highest in patients of perforation peritonitis (11.99%.Among 517 specimens, 340 (65.76% showed growth and 177 (34.23% were culture negative. E.coli (23.33% was the commonest organism isolated followed by Acinetobacter spp. (16%, Klebsiella spp. (15.66%, Pseudomonas spp. (15.33%, S. aureus (10.33%, S. epidermidis(7.3%, Proteus spp. (6.00% and Citrobacter spp. (2.66%.Staphylococcus spp. were 100 % sensitive to Vancomycin & Linezolid. (27.5% S. aureus were MRSA and (17.5% were Inducible Clindamycin resistant (ICR. Enterobacteriaceae isolates showed maximum sensitivity towards Imipenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Amikacin. Klebsiella spp. (40.62%, E.coli (35.89%, Citrobacter spp. (33.33%, Proteus spp. (26.08% were ESBL producers. Klebsiella spp. (17.18%, E.coli (10.25%, Proteus spp. (11.11% and Citrobacter spp. (8.69% were AmpC producers. Acinetobacter spp. (28.57% was commonest MBL producer followed by Klebsiella spp. (20

  5. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinet, Frédéric; Casetti, Luana; François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude; Pillet, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Case of Apparent Contact Dermatitis Caused by Toxocara Infection

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    Rosanna Qualizza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection from Toxocara species may give rise to a large array of clinical symptoms, including apparent manifestations of allergy such as asthma, urticaria/angioedema, and dermatitis. We report a case, thus far not described, of contact dermatitis attributed to nickel allergy but caused by Toxocara infection. The patient was a 53-year-old woman presenting from 10 years a dermatitis affecting head, neck, and thorax. Patch tests initially performed gave a positive result to nickel, but avoidance of contact with nickel did not result in recovery. The patient referred to our Allergy Service in 2010 because of dermatitis to feet. Patch testing confirmed the positive result for nickel, but expanding the investigation a positive result for IgG antibodies to Toxocara was detected by Western blotting and ELISA. Treatment with mebendazole achieved immediate efficacy on feet dermatitis. Then, two courses of treatment with albendazole resulted in complete regression of dermatitis accompanied by development of negative ELISA and Western blotting for Toxocara antibodies. This report adds another misleading presentation of Toxocara infection as apparent contact dermatitis caused by nickel and suggests bearing in mind, in cases of contact dermatitis not responding to avoidance of the responsible hapten and to medical treatment, the possible causative role of Toxocara.

  7. Infective endocarditis caused by Veillonella of dental origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prpić-Mehicić, G; Marsan, T; Miletić, I; Buntak-Kobler, D

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether Veillonella could cause transitory bacteriemia and endocarditis in both pure and mixed cultures when the port of entrance for infection was made in rats' incisors. Incisors of 54 male Zgr: whistar conventional rats were inoculated with pure culture of Veillonella (18 animals) and with mixed culture of S. mutans and Veillonella (18 animals). Remaining 18 incisors (the control group) were treated with saline solution. The animals were sacrificed after 7, 21 and 52 days respectively. Two positive hemocultures were obtained in mixed infection after 21 days of experimental procedure. Histopatological analysis of endocardial tissue revealed changes in 7 (12.96%) cases. Occurrence of acute endocarditis (one case) and chronical (four cases) ones depended on duration of mixed infections. For chronical endocarditis that appears in two animals with pure Veillonela culture we are at a loss of explanation. In conclusion, on the rats model Veillonella can penetrate into circulation in association with S. mutans via the pulp tissue and could be involved in infective endocarditis.

  8. Vaccination approaches against opportunistic fungal infections caused by Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Utz; Herrmann, Sahra; Asif, Abdul R

    2014-01-01

    Although innate immunity primarily combats systemic infections of opportunistic fungi such as Aspergillus and Candida spp., acquired and protective immunoreactions were observed long ago in animal trials following sublethal systemic infections caused by viable fungi or after challenging animals with inactivated fungal cells. Based on these observations, fungal antigens should exist which mediate such protective immunoreactions and have in part already been identified. In this context, this review focuses primarily on the various approaches that have been used to identify protection-mediating Aspergillus-antigens and their rationale. Emphasis is placed on screening methods that have exploited genetic or proteomic approaches on the basis of the corresponding fungal genome projects. Thereby, a survey and description is given of the antigens so far known to be capable of inducing immune responses that protect animals against acquiring lethal systemic aspergillosis.

  9. A PULMONARY INFECTION CAUSED BY MYCOBACTERIUM PEREGRINUM– A CASE REPORT.

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    Tatina T. Todorova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium peregrinum is a member of the group of rapidly growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. It can be found in high frequency in natural and laboratory environments and is considered to be uncommonrare pathogen for both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. Currently, pulmonary infections caused by Mycobacterium peregrinum are unusual and diagnosed only in limited number of cases. Here, we present a clinical case of elderly man (72 years with 1 month history of non-specific respiratory symptomatic. The patient was without underlying immunosuppressive condition or lung disease. Chest X-ray demonstrated persistent pleural effusion, opacities and cavitations in the right lobe. One of the sputum culturesgrewa rapidly growing mycobacterium and the isolated strain was found to be Mycobacterium peregrinumas identified by molecular genetic detection (PCR and DNA strip technology. To our knowledge, this is the third case in the world to report Mycobacterium peregrinumas a possible causative agent of pulmonary infection.

  10. Infective endocarditis caused by Listeria monocytogenes forming a pseudotumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara Yonekawa, Akiko; Iwasaka, Sho; Nakamura, Hisataka; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Kadowaki, Masako; Uchida, Yujiro; Odashiro, Keita; Shimoda, Shinji; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Akashi, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman with breast cancer and metastasis under chemotherapy suffered from fever, pleural effusion and pericardial effusion. Despite the administration of treatment with cefozopran and prednisolone, the patient's fever relapsed. An electrocardiogram identified a new complete atrioventricular block and an echocardiogram revealed vegetation with an unusual pseudotumoral mass in the right atrium. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient was eventually diagnosed with right-sided infective endocarditis, which improved following the six-week administration of ampicillin and gentamicin. Homemade yoghurt was suspected to be the cause of infection in this case. Listeria endocarditis is rare; however, physicians should pay more attention to preventing this fatal disease in immunocompromised patients.

  11. Effect of selected antiasthmatic plant constituents against micro organism causing upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilani, P; Duraisamy, B; Dhamodaran, P; Ravichandran, S; Elango, K

    2010-01-01

    Most exacerbations of asthma can be proven to be associated with bacterial infections and there is scientific evidence that frequent respiratory infections particularly bacterial infections provoke asthma attack. Considering these facts different plant extracts and phytoconstituents with proven anti asthmatic property had been selected for screening anti microbial activity in in-vitro models. In the present study, Coleus forskohlii Willd. extract (10% Forskolin), Piper Longum L. Extract (20% Piperine), Adathoda vasica Nees. extract (30% Vasicinone), Curcuma longa L. extract (60% Curcumin) were screened for the antibacterial activity against human pathogens causing upper respiratory infection namely Haemophilus influenzae , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Streptococcus pyrogene and Staphylococcus aureus, by taking Gentamycin, Optochin, Bacitracin and Amoxicillin as reference standards. Except for Adathoda vasica Nees. extract, all the other selected plant extracts exhibited a moderate activity antibacterial activity against selected strains.

  12. Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy in Mice Causes Placental Damage and Fetal Demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jonathan J; Cao, Bin; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Cabrera, Omar H; Garber, Charise; Noll, Michelle; Klein, Robyn S; Noguchi, Kevin K; Mysorekar, Indira U; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women causes intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we describe two mouse models of placental and fetal disease associated with in utero transmission of ZIKV. Female mice lacking type I interferon signaling (Ifnar1(-/-)) crossed to wild-type (WT) males produced heterozygous fetuses resembling the immune status of human fetuses. Maternal inoculation at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) or E7.5 resulted in fetal demise that was associated with ZIKV infection of the placenta and fetal brain. We identified ZIKV within trophoblasts of the maternal and fetal placenta, consistent with a trans-placental infection route. Antibody blockade of Ifnar1 signaling in WT pregnant mice enhanced ZIKV trans-placental infection although it did not result in fetal death. These models will facilitate the study of ZIKV pathogenesis, in utero transmission, and testing of therapies and vaccines to prevent congenital malformations.

  13. Human parasitic protozoan infection to infertility: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiadeh, Malihe Nourollahpour; Niyyati, Maryam; Fallahi, Shirzad; Rostami, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasitic diseases are endemic in many countries worldwide, especially in developing countries, where infertility is a major burden. It has been reported that such infections may cause infertility through impairment in male and female reproductive systems. We searched Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases and Google scholar to identify the potentially relevant studies on protozoan parasitic infections and their implications in human and animal model infertility. Literature described that some of the protozoan parasites such as Trichomonas vaginalis may cause deformities of the genital tract, cervical neoplasia, and tubal and atypical pelvic inflammations in women and also non-gonoccocal urethritis, asthenozoospermia, and teratozoospermia in men. Toxopalasma gondii could cause endometritis, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, vasculitis, and cessation of estrus cycling in female and also decrease in semen quality, concentration, and motility in male. Trypanosoma cruzi inhibits cell division in embryos and impairs normal implantation and development of placenta. Decrease in gestation rate, infection of hormone-producing glands, parasite invasion of the placenta, and overproduction of inflammatory cytokines in the oviducts and uterine horns are other possible mechanisms induced by Trypanosoma cruzi to infertility. Plasmodium spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause damage in pituitary gland, hormonal disorders, and decreased semen quality. Entamoeba histolytica infection leads to pelvic pain, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, and genital ulcers. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis can induce genital lesion, testicular amyloidosis, inflammation of epididymis, prostatitis, and sperm abnormality in human and animals. In addition, some epidemiological studies have reported that rates of protozoan infections in infertile patients are higher than healthy controls. The current review indicates that protozoan parasitic

  14. Respiratory infections cause the release of extracellular vesicles: implications in exacerbation of asthma/COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suffwan Eltom

    Full Text Available Infection-related exacerbations of respiratory diseases are a major health concern; thus understanding the mechanisms driving them is of paramount importance. Despite distinct inflammatory profiles and pathological differences, asthma and COPD share a common clinical facet: raised airway ATP levels. Furthermore, evidence is growing to suggest that infective agents can cause the release of extracellular vesicle (EVs in vitro and in bodily fluids. ATP can evoke the P2X7/caspase 1 dependent release of IL-1β/IL-18 from EVs; these cytokines are associated with neutrophilia and are increased during exacerbations. Thus we hypothesized that respiratory infections causes the release of EVs in the airway and that the raised ATP levels, present in respiratory disease, triggers the release of IL-1β/IL-18, neutrophilia and subsequent disease exacerbations.To begin to test this hypothesis we utilised human cell-based assays, ex vivo murine BALF, in vivo pre-clinical models and human samples to test this hypothesis.Data showed that in a murine model of COPD, known to have increased airway ATP levels, infective challenge causes exacerbated inflammation. Using cell-based systems, murine models and samples collected from challenged healthy subjects, we showed that infection can trigger the release of EVs. When exposed to ATP the EVs release IL-1β/IL-18 via a P2X7/caspase-dependent mechanism. Furthermore ATP challenge can cause a P2X7 dependent increase in LPS-driven neutrophilia.This preliminary data suggests a possible mechanism for how infections could exacerbate respiratory diseases and may highlight a possible signalling pathway for drug discovery efforts in this area.

  15. Erythema caused by a localised skin infection with Arthrobacter mysorens

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    Chakraborty Trinad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin erythemas of unknown origin are a frequent reason for consulting the general practitioner or dermatologist. Case presentation Here we report a case of an erythema resembling the erythema migrans manifestation of Lyme disease, but with atypical symptoms like persistent pruritus. The patient had no history of a recent tick-bite but displayed a positive serology for an advanced stage of Lyme borreliosis, which stood in contrast to the clinical manifestation of erythema migrans as a symptom of early Lyme disease. Three skin swabs and soil samples, collected in the area where the patient possibly acquired the infection, were examined by bacterial and fungal culture methods. Microorganisms were identified by using 16 S rRNA gene sequencing and bioinformatics. The patient and soil isolates were compared by employing RAPD analysis. The serum samples of the patient were examined by immunoblotting. Arthrobacter mysorens, a soil bacterium, was isolated from the collected skin and soil samples. The identity of both isolates was determined by molecular fingerprinting methods. A. mysorens was proven to be causative for the erythema by direct isolation from the affected skin and a positive serology, thus explaining the atypical appearance of the erythema compared to erythema migrans caused by Borrelia infection. Conclusions Infections with A.mysorens might be underreported and microbiological diagnostic techniques should be applied in cases of patients with unclear erythemas, resembling erythema migrans, without a history of tick bites.

  16. Strongyloides hyper-infection causing life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lajos Csermely; Hassan Jaafar; Jorgen Kristensen; Antonio Castella; Waldemar Gorka; Ahmed Ali Chebli; Fawaz Trab; Hussain Alizadeh; Béla Hunyady

    2006-01-01

    A 55-year old male patient was diagnosed with strongyloides hyper-infection with stool analysis and intestinal biopsy shortly after his chemotherapy for myeloma.He was commenced on albendazole anthelmintic therapy. After initiation of the treatment he suffered lifethreatening gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Repeated endoscopies showed diffuse multi-focal intestinal bleeding. The patient required huge amounts of red blood cells and plasma transfusions and correction of haemostasis with recombinant activated factor Ⅶ.Abdominal aorto-angiography showed numerous microinferior mesenteric arteries' territories. While the biopsy taken prior to the treatment with albendazole did not show evidence of vasculitis, the biopsy taken after initiation of therapy revealed leukoclastic aggregations around the vessels. These findings suggest that, in addition to direct destruction of the mucosa, vasculitis could be an important additive factor causing the massive GI bleeding during the anthelmintic treatment.This might result from substances released by the worms that have been killed with anthelmintic therapy.Current guidelines advise steroids to be tapered and stopped in case of systematic parasitic infections as they might reduce immunity and precipitate parasitic hyper-infection. In our opinion, steroid therapy might be of value in the management of strongyloides hyperinfection related vasculitis, in addition to the anthelmintic treatment. Indeed, steroid therapy of vasculitis with other means of supportive care resulted in cessation of the bleeding and recovery of the patient.

  17. Skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Aeromonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, C M; Lai, C C; Tang, H J; Ko, W C; Hsueh, P-R

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs) due to Aeromonas species. Patients with SSTIs caused by Aeromonas species during the period from January 2009 to December 2011 were identified from a computerized database of a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 129 patients with SSTIs due to Aeromonas species were identified. A. hydrophila (n = 77, 59.7 %) was the most common pathogen, followed by A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 22, 17.1 %), A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 20, 15.5 %), A. caviae (n = 9, 7.0 %), and A. schubertii (n = 1, 0.8 %). The most common isolates obtained from patients with polymicrobial infections were Klebsiella species (n = 33), followed by Enterococcus spp. (n = 24), Enterobacter spp. (n = 21), Escherichia coli (n = 17), Staphylococcus spp. (n = 17), Streptococcus spp. (n = 17), and Acinetobacter spp. (n = 15). Liver cirrhosis and concomitant bacteremia were more common among patients with monomicrobial Aeromonas SSTIs than among patients with polymicrobial SSTIs. Nine (7 %) patients required limb amputations. The in-hospital mortality rate was 1.6 %. In conclusion, Aeromonas species should be considered as important causative pathogens of SSTIs, and most infections are polymicrobial. In addition, the clinical presentation differs markedly between patients with monomicrobial and those with polymicrobial Aeromonas SSTIs.

  18. Interstitial nephritis caused by HIV infection by itself: a case report

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    Doi A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Asako Doi,1,2 Kentaro Iwata,3 Shigeo Hara,4 Yukihiro Imai,5 Toshikazu Hasuike,1,2 Hiroaki Nishioka,1,2 1Department of Infectious Diseases, 2Department of General Internal Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, 4Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kobe University Hospital, 5Department of Pathology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan Abstract: Interstitial nephritis is a common cause of renal dysfunction. It is primarily caused by drugs, infections, or autoimmune disorders. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection can develop interstitial nephritis, although it typically occurs because of the aforementioned etiologies and not as a direct consequence of HIV infection. Interstitial lesions may occur in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN. However, interstitial nephritis without the glomerular injuries characteristic of HIVAN, and without the risk factors described earlier, is very rare. Here, we describe a rare case of interstitial nephritis that was likely caused directly by HIV infection and not by other etiologies. Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, interstitial nephritis, HIV-associated nephropathy

  19. Human Trichinella infection outbreaks in Slovakia, 1980-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinský, Pavol; Antolová, Daniela; Reiterová, Katarína

    2016-03-01

    Trichinellosis, a parasitic zoonosis with world-wide distribution, causes serious health problems in humans and is also of economic importance. In Slovakia the most frequent species is T. britovi, causing disease mainly in wild life species. T. spiralis occurs less frequently and T. pseudospiralis only sporadically. The paper describes the epidemiology of six human Trichinella infection outbreaks recorded in Slovakia between 1980 and 2008. Before 1990 wild boar meat was the main source of infection. Later, risk farm practices, especially feeding of pigs with the wild animal´s offal contributed to the formation of synanthropic cycle and pig meat caused the epidemics in 1990, 2001 and 2008. Sausages prepared from pork and T. britovi infected dog meat and offered as a local food specialty on traditional folk festival in 1998 (Brezno district, Central Slovakia) were the source of the largest human outbreak recorded in Slovakia. The anti-Trichinella antibodies were detected in 336 event visitors. The main reason of repeated human epidemics in Slovakia has been the permanent circulation of Trichinella spp. in sylvatic cycle, especially in red foxes and wild boars. High population density of both animal species, persistent prevalence of trichinellosis in wild boars and even increasing positivity of red foxes suggest that the risk of human outbreaks in Slovakia persists.

  20. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O78:H10, the Cause of an Outbreak of Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Olesen, Bente; Scheutz, Flemming; Andersen, Rebecca L.; Menard, Megan; Boisen, Nadia; Johnston, Brian; Hansen, Dennis S.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Nataro, James P.; Johnson, James R

    2012-01-01

    In 1991, multiresistant Escherichia coli O78:H10 strains caused an outbreak of urinary tract infections in Copenhagen, Denmark. The phylogenetic origin, clonal background, and virulence characteristics of the outbreak isolates, and their relationship to nonoutbreak O78:H10 strains according to these traits and resistance profiles, are unknown. Accordingly, we extensively characterized 51 archived E. coli O78:H10 isolates (48 human isolates from seven countries, including 19 Copenhagen outbrea...

  1. 女性生殖道人乳头状瘤病毒感染亚型分布分析%Subtypes of human papilloma virus causing female genital tract infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 刘志英; 王博; 张朋军

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate and analyze HPV-infected populations, and study the population distribution of different subtypes of HPV infections and the status of the infections. METHODS By the means of flow-through hybridization technology, the screening of subtypes of HPV infections in 236 women from department of gynecology and obstetrics who were diagnosed with chronic cervicitis and abnormal vaginal bleeding was performed. RESULTS Of 236 patients investigated, a total of 172 cases were tested positive for HPV-DNA, the young people were the major population infected with HPV; HPV 16, HPV 52, HPV 56, and HPV 58 were the subtypes causing the highest prevalence of infections in Chinese female, accounting for 37. 0% among the common subtypes detected; and compared with other subtypes, HPV16 and HPV18 were more likely to lead to multiple-type HPV infections; the study indicated that the prevalence of HPV subtype infections was the highest among the population aged over 55 years. CONCLUSION HPV infections tend to be in younger female, the development of cervical cancer is closely related 10 HPV persistent infections and the interaction of various subtypes, and elderly women are at higher risk of cervical cancer, so it is necessary to intensify the screening of HPV-DNA.%目的 对人乳头状瘤病毒(HPV)感染人群进行调查分析,并对不同亚型HPV感染的人群分布及合并感染状况进行分析.方法 采用导流杂交技术,对妇产科门诊确诊的236例慢性宫颈炎及阴道异常出血妇女,进行阴道拭子HPV感染分型筛查.结果 在236例检测者中,HPV-DNA检测阳性172例,感染人群呈年轻化趋势;HPV 16、52、56、58亚型是中国女性中感染率较高的HPV亚型,占研究所检测常见亚型的37.0%;与其他亚型相比,HPV16和HPV18可能更容易引发多型HPV感染;在对各年龄段患者感染亚型数目的调查分析中,发现>55岁人群中感染的HPV亚型最高.结论 HPV的感染趋于年轻化趋势,

  2. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  3. Tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzak, E E

    1997-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects one third of the world's population, and tuberculosis remains one of the most common infectious diseases of humans. From a global perspective, tuberculosis may be one of the most common HIV-related opportunistic infections. HIV immunosuppression has had a dramatic influence on the epidemiology, natural history and clinical presentation of tuberculosis. Treatment is highly effective for drug susceptible tuberculosis and has been shown to have a significant impact on resistant, especially multidrug-resistant, tuberculosis if started promptly. Directly observed therapy and rigorous adherence to infection control principles have helped control the tuberculosis epidemic in the United States.

  4. Human Infection in Wild Mountain Gorillas

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-25

    This podcast discusses a study about the transmission of Human Metapneumovirus Infection to wild mountain gorillas in Rwanda in 2009, published in the April 2011 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases. Dr. Ian Lipkin, Director of the Center for Infection and Immunity and Dr. Gustavo Palacios, investigator in the Center of Infection & Immunity share details of this study.  Created: 4/25/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/2/2011.

  5. EBV Infection of Mice with Reconstituted Human Immune System Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was discovered 50 years ago as the first candidate human tumor virus. Since then, we have realized that this human γ-herpesvirus establishes persistent infection in the majority of adult humans, but fortunately causes EBV-associated diseases only in few individuals. This is an incredible success story of the human immune system, which controls EBV infection and its transforming capacity for decades. A better understanding of this immune control would not only benefit patients with EBV-associated malignancies, but could also provide clues how to establish such a potent, mostly cell-mediated immune control against other pathogens and tumors. However, the functional relevance of EBV-specific immune responses can only be addressed in vivo, and mice with reconstituted human immune system components (huMice) constitute a small animal model to interrogate the protective value of immune compartments during EBV infection, but also might provide a platform to test EBV-specific vaccines. This chapter will summarize the insights into EBV immunobiology that have already been gained in these models and provide an outlook into promising future avenues to develop this in vivo model of EBV infection and human immune responses further.

  6. Acute Parasitic Infections as a Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    patients with acute Fasciola and Beeson, 1961) and tuberculosis was hepatica infection, 9 patients with acute the most common infection causing FUO...fascioliasis Safwat Y and Woody JN. (1990b): in Egypt. Am. J. Trop. Med. -,9g. 32, The treatment of acute Fasciola hepatica 550: 554. infection in children...infection. Clinically, acute Fasciola and patients with an infection. 32 were caused acute Schistosoma infection present a by tuberculosis and of these 32

  7. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  8. A human lung xenograft mouse model of Nipah virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Valbuena

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a member of the genus Henipavirus (family Paramyxoviridae that causes severe and often lethal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans with high mortality rates (up to 92%. NiV can cause Acute Lung Injury (ALI in humans, and human-to-human transmission has been observed in recent outbreaks of NiV. While the exact route of transmission to humans is not known, we have previously shown that NiV can efficiently infect human respiratory epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms of NiV-associated ALI in the human respiratory tract are unknown. Thus, there is an urgent need for models of henipavirus infection of the human respiratory tract to study the pathogenesis and understand the host responses. Here, we describe a novel human lung xenograft model in mice to study the pathogenesis of NiV. Following transplantation, human fetal lung xenografts rapidly graft and develop mature structures of adult lungs including cartilage, vascular vessels, ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium, and primitive "air" spaces filled with mucus and lined by cuboidal to flat epithelium. Following infection, NiV grows to high titers (10(7 TCID50/gram lung tissue as early as 3 days post infection (pi. NiV targets both the endothelium as well as respiratory epithelium in the human lung tissues, and results in syncytia formation. NiV infection in the human lung results in the production of several cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IP-10, eotaxin, G-CSF and GM-CSF on days 5 and 7 pi. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that NiV can replicate to high titers in a novel in vivo model of the human respiratory tract, resulting in a robust inflammatory response, which is known to be associated with ALI. This model will facilitate progress in the fundamental understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis and virus-host interactions; it will also provide biologically relevant models for other respiratory viruses.

  9. Bloodstream infection caused by nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae in an immunocompromised host in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojewoda, Christina M; Koval, Christine E; Wilson, Deborah A; Chakos, Mary H; Harrington, Susan M

    2012-06-01

    Corynebacterium species are well-known causes of catheter-related bloodstream infections. Toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae cause respiratory diphtheria. We report a bloodstream infection caused by a nontoxigenic strain of C. diphtheriae and discuss the epidemiology, possible sources of the infection, and the implications of rapid species identification of corynebacteria.

  10. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection: a Mozambique overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzol, Damiano; Putoto, Giovanni; Chhaganlal, Kajal D

    2016-06-01

    Human Papillomavirus is agent of the most common sexually transmitted disease which is able to infect mucosal and cutaneous membranes of the anogenital region, upper aerodigestive tract, and other head and neck mucosal regions. Although mainly HPV infection can be asymptomatic and transient, it may persist and give rise to various lesions such as warts, condyloma dysplasia and cancers depending on low or high risk type of HPV infection. Moreover, growing recent evidence suggests a role of this virus in male and female fertility. To date no effective prevention, test, treatment and control strategies are provided for people in developing countries despite the reported high incidence of HPV both in women and men. This paper reviews the more recent literature about HPV infection highlighting epidemiology, related pathologies and possible fertility effects of HPV in male and female with particular attention to the Mozambique context.

  11. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  12. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  13. Human papillomavirus infections in laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, M.C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Dikkers, F.G.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Olofsson, J.; Ferlito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we revie

  14. Human papillomavirus infections in laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, M.C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Dikkers, F.G.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.; Olofsson, J.; Ferlito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we

  15. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN LARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrente, Mariela C.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Haigentz, Missak; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Takes, Robert P.; Olofsson, Jan; Ferlito, Alfio

    Although the association and clinical significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections with a subset of head and neck cancers, particularly for oropharyngeal carcinoma, has recently been well documented, the involvement of HPV in laryngeal cancer has been inadequately evaluated. Herein we

  16. In vitro Study on Human Trophoblast Cells Infected with HCMV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖娟; 张丹丹; 陈娟娟; 尹宗智; 刘涛; 艾继辉; 陈素华

    2010-01-01

    Human trophoblast cells were isolated and cultured in vitro in order to investigate possible pathogenesis of intrauterine infection caused by HCMV.Trophoblast cells were obtained by compound enzymes digestion and discontinuous percoll gradient.Cells and purity were identified by using immunocytochemistry assay with anti-CK7,Vim and β-hCG antibodies.HCMV AD169 strain replication in isolated trophoblast cells and cell apoptosis were detected at different time points post infection(p.i.).The results showed tha...

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells: viral shedding and cell contact-mediated infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asin, Susana N; Wildt-Perinic, Dunja; Mason, Sarah I; Howell, Alexandra L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-15

    We examined the mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells to gain a clearer understanding of the events by which HIV-1 infects cells within the female reproductive tract. We demonstrated that these cells can be productively infected by HIV-1 and that infection is associated with viral RNA reverse transcription, DNA transcription, and secretion of infectious virus. Levels of viral DNA and secreted virus decreased gradually after infection. Moreover, virus released by the uterine epithelial cells shortly after infection was able to infect human T cell lines, but virus released later did not. In contrast, human CD4(+) T cell lines were infected after cocultivation with epithelial cells at both early and late stages of infection. These data demonstrated that HIV-1 infects human epithelial cells of upper reproductive tract origin and that productive viral infection of epithelial cells may be an important mechanism of transmission of HIV-1 infection in women.

  18. Campylobacter fetus infections in humans : exposure and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Bergen, Marcel A P; Blaser, Martin J; Tauxe, Robert V; Newell, Diane G; van Putten, Jos P M

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus can cause intestinal illness and, occasionally, severe systemic infections. Infections mainly affect persons at higher risk, including elderly and immunocompromised individuals and those with occupational exposure to infected animals. Outbreaks are infrequent but have provided in

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus infection in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Corinne; D'Angelo, Lawrence J

    2010-08-01

    Despite advances in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment and discovery of effective prevention programs, HIV infection in American youth continues to rise, especially in minority youth. The crisis underscores the lack of access to care and wellness of our adolescent and young adult populations. Primary care practitioners who care for young adults will diagnose and/or encounter HIV-infected patients in their practice. Providers need to become familiar with the basics of HIV prevention and treatment, as well as how adolescence presents unique challenges in HIV care.

  20. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors in duodenal ulceration: A primary cause or a secondary infection causing chronicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank I Tovey; Michael Hobsley; John Holton

    2006-01-01

    Reports from countries with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection do not show a proportionately high prevalence of duodenal ulceration,suggesting the possibility that H pylori cannot be a primary cause of duodenal ulceration. It has been mooted that this discrepancy might be explained by variations in the prevalence of virulence factors in different populations. The aim of this paper is to determine whether the published literature gives support to this possibility. The relevant literature was reviewed and analyzed separately for countries with a high and low prevalence of H pylori infection and virulence factors. Although virulent strains of H pylori were significantly more often present in patients with duodenal ulcer than without the disease in countries with a low prevalence of H pyloriinfection in the population, there was no difference in the prevalence of virulence factors between duodenal ulcer, non- ulcer dyspepsia or normal subjects in many countries, where the prevalence of both H pylori infection and of virulence factors was high.In these countries, the presence of virulence factors was not predictive the clinical outcome. To explain the association between virulence factors and duodenal ulcer in countries where H pylori prevalence is low,only two papers were found that give little support to the usual model proposed, namely that organisms with the virulence factors are more likely than those without them to initiate a duodenal ulcer. We offer an alternative hypothesis that suggests virulence factors are more likely to interfere with the healing of a previously produced ulcer. The presence of virulence factors only correlates with the prevalence of duodenal ulcer in countries where the prevalence of H pylori is low. There is very little evidence that virulence factors initiate duodenal ulceration, but they may be related to failure of the ulcer to heal.

  1. Mycoplasma infections and different human carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Huang; Ji You Li; Jan Wu; Lin Meng; Cheng Chao Shou

    2001-01-01

    AIM To explore relationships between human carcinomas and mycoplasma infection.METHODS Monoclonal antibody PD4, which specifically recognizes a distinct protein from mycoplasma hyorhinis, was used to detect mycoplasma infection in different paraffinembedded carcinoma tissues with immunohistochemistry. PCR was applied to amplify the mycoplasma DNA from the positive samples for confirming immunohistochemistry.RESULTS Fifty of 90 cases (56%) of gastric carcinoma were positive for mycoplasma hyorhinis. In other gastric diseases, the mycoplasma infection ratio was 28% (18/49) in chronic superficial gastritis, 30% (14/ 46) in gastric ulcer and 37% (18/ 49) in intestinal metaplasia. The difference is significant with gastric cancer (X2=12.06, P<0.05). In colon carcinoma, the mycoplasma infection ratio was 55.1% (32/58), but it was 20.9% (10/49) in adenomarous polyp (X2=13.46, P<0.005).Gastric and colon cancers with high differentiation had a higher mycoplasma infection ratio than those with low differentiation (P< 0.05). Mycoplasma infection in esophageal cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer and glioma was 50.9% (27/53), 52.6% (31/ 59), 39.7%(25/63) and 41% (38/91), respectively. The mycoplasma DNA was successfully amplified with the DNA extracted from the cancer tissues that were positive for mycoplasma infection (detected with antibody PD4).CONCLUSION There was high correlation between mycoplasma infection and different cancers, which suggests the possibility of an association between the two. The mechanism involved in oncogenesis by mycoplasma remains unknown.

  2. Chronic Trichuris muris infection causes neoplastic change in the intestine and exacerbates tumour formation in APC min/+ mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly S Hayes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Incidences of infection-related cancers are on the rise in developing countries where the prevalence of intestinal nematode worm infections are also high. Trichuris muris (T. muris is a murine gut-dwelling nematode that is the direct model for human T. trichiura, one of the major soil-transmitted helminth infections of humans. In order to assess whether chronic infection with T. muris does indeed influence the development of cancer hallmarks, both wild type mice and colon cancer model (APC min/+ mice were infected with this parasite. Parasite infection in wild type mice led to the development of neoplastic change similar to that seen in mice that had been treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane. Additionally, both chronic and acute infection in the APCmin/+ mice led to an enhanced tumour development that was distinct to the site of infection suggesting systemic control. By blocking the parasite induced T regulatory response in these mice, the increase in the number of tumours following infection was abrogated. Thus T. muris infection alone causes an increase in gut pathologies that are known to be markers of cancer but also increases the incidence of tumour formation in a colon cancer model. The influence of parasitic worm infection on the development of cancer may therefore be significant.

  3. Chronic Trichuris muris infection causes neoplastic change in the intestine and exacerbates tumour formation in APC min/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Kelly S; Cliffe, Laura J; Bancroft, Alison J; Forman, Simon P; Thompson, Seona; Booth, Cath; Grencis, Richard K

    2017-06-01

    Incidences of infection-related cancers are on the rise in developing countries where the prevalence of intestinal nematode worm infections are also high. Trichuris muris (T. muris) is a murine gut-dwelling nematode that is the direct model for human T. trichiura, one of the major soil-transmitted helminth infections of humans. In order to assess whether chronic infection with T. muris does indeed influence the development of cancer hallmarks, both wild type mice and colon cancer model (APC min/+) mice were infected with this parasite. Parasite infection in wild type mice led to the development of neoplastic change similar to that seen in mice that had been treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane. Additionally, both chronic and acute infection in the APCmin/+ mice led to an enhanced tumour development that was distinct to the site of infection suggesting systemic control. By blocking the parasite induced T regulatory response in these mice, the increase in the number of tumours following infection was abrogated. Thus T. muris infection alone causes an increase in gut pathologies that are known to be markers of cancer but also increases the incidence of tumour formation in a colon cancer model. The influence of parasitic worm infection on the development of cancer may therefore be significant.

  4. [Anaphylaxis caused by human seminal fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubira, N; Roger, A; Nogueiras, C; Server, T; Guspi, R; Cadahia, A

    1995-01-01

    Anaphylaxis to human seminal fluid (HSF) is rare. We present an atopic woman with postcoital cutaneous and respiratory symptoms. Prick by prick to HSF was positive. CAP to FSH was also positive (4 KU/l). The clinical findings, differential diagnosis and different treatments are discussed.

  5. Serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing major pneumococcal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available First in Russia prospective non-interventional hospital-based study on Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes causing meningitis and acute otitis media (AOM in children and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in children and adults, as well as serotype coverage by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV’s of different composition has been conducted. Serotypes 19F, 14 and serogroup 6 are the leading in meningitis; serotype coverage is 70,6% for PCV7, and 76,5% – for PCV10 and PCV13. Among S. pneumoniae serotypes causing AOM 19F, 3, 23F and serogroup 6 have been the most prevalent in Saint Petersburg. PCV7 and PCV10 provide equal serotypes coverage in AOM – 63,2% among children 0–2 years old, and 32,5% among children 5–17 years old. PCV13 covers up to 79% of serotypes in infants. In CAP PCV7 and PCV10 provide 57,1% serotype coverage in children and 56,1% – in adults. Serotype coverage in CAP for PCV13 has been 14,3% and 34,5% higher for children and adults, correspondingly. Obtained data supports PCV inclusion in children immunization program in Saint Petersburg, whereas PCV13 provides the broadest serotype coverage. In the course PCV’s implementation continued pneumococcal infection surveillance is advisable.

  6. Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zar Heather J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections caused by human rhinoviruses (HRVs are important triggers of wheezing in young children. Wheezy illness has increasingly been recognised as an important cause of morbidity in African children, but there is little information on the contribution of HRV to this. The aim of this study was to determine the role of HRV as a cause of acute wheezing in South African children. Methods Two hundred and twenty children presenting consecutively at a tertiary children's hospital with a wheezing illness from May 2004 to November 2005 were prospectively enrolled. A nasal swab was taken and reverse transcription PCR used to screen the samples for HRV. The presence of human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus and human coronavirus-NL63 was assessed in all samples using PCR-based assays. A general shell vial culture using a pool of monoclonal antibodies was used to detect other common respiratory viruses on 26% of samples. Phylogenetic analysis to determine circulating HRV species was performed on a portion of HRV-positive samples. Categorical characteristics were analysed using Fisher's Exact test. Results HRV was detected in 128 (58.2% of children, most (72% of whom were under 2 years of age. Presenting symptoms between the HRV-positive and negative groups were similar. Most illness was managed with ambulatory therapy, but 45 (35% were hospitalized for treatment and 3 (2% were admitted to intensive care. There were no in-hospital deaths. All 3 species of HRV were detected with HRV-C being the most common (52% followed by HRV-A (37% and HRV-B (11%. Infection with other respiratory viruses occurred in 20/128 (16% of HRV-positive children and in 26/92 (28% of HRV-negative samples. Conclusion HRV may be the commonest viral infection in young South African children with acute wheezing. Infection is associated with mild or moderate clinical disease.

  7. Morphology and infectivity of virus that persistently caused infection in an AGS cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Yukimasa; Daikoku, Eriko; Wu, Hong; Aoki, Hiroaki; Morita, Chizuko; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takehiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Sano, Kouichi

    2011-12-01

    A recent report has indicated that proteins and genes of simian virus 5 (SV5) are detected in a human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line, which is widely provided for oncology, immunology, and microbiology research. However, the production of infective virions has not been determined in this cell line. In this study, the morphology and infectivity of the virus particles of the AGS cell line were studied by light and electron microscopy and virus transmission assay. The virus particles were approximately 176.0 ± 41.1 nm in diameter. The particles possessed projections 8-12 nm long on the surface and contained a nucleocapsid determined to be 13-18 nm in width and less than 1,000 nm in length. The virus was transmissible to the Vero cell line, induced multinuclear giant cell formation, and reproduced the same shape of antigenic virions. In this study, the persistently infected virus in the AGS cell line was determined to be infective and form reproducible virions, and a new morphological feature of SV5 was determined.

  8. Productive infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by feline immunodeficiency virus: implications for vector development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J; Power, C

    1999-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 10(1.3) to 10(2.1) 50% tissue culture infective doses/10(6) cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy.

  9. Leishmania major infection in humanized mice induces systemic infection and provokes a nonprotective human immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kathrin Wege

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania (L. species are the causative agent of leishmaniasis. Due to the lack of efficient vaccine candidates, drug therapies are the only option to deal with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Unfortunately, chemotherapeutic interventions show high toxicity in addition to an increased risk of dissemination of drug-resistant parasites. An appropriate laboratory animal based model is still missing which allows testing of new drug strategies in the context of human immune cells in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Humanized mice were infected subcutaneously with stationary phase promastigote L. major into the footpad. The human immune response against the pathogen and the parasite host interactions were analyzed. In addition we proved the versatility of this new model to conduct drug research studies by the inclusion of orally given Miltefosine. We show that inflammatory human macrophages get infected with Leishmania parasites at the site of infection. Furthermore, a Leishmania-specific human-derived T cell response is initiated. However, the human immune system is not able to prevent systemic infection. Thus, we treated the mice with Miltefosine to reduce the parasitic load. Notably, this chemotherapy resulted in a reduction of the parasite load in distinct organs. Comparable to some Miltefosine treated patients, humanized mice developed severe side effects, which are not detectable in the classical murine model of experimental leishmaniasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes for the first time L. major infection in humanized mice, characterizes the disease development, the induction of human adaptive and innate immune response including cytokine production and the efficiency of Miltefosine treatment in these animals. In summary, humanized mice might be beneficial for future preclinical chemotherapeutic studies in systemic (visceral leishmaniasis allowing the investigation of human immune response, side effects of the drug

  10. Increased cytotoxicity and streptolysin O activity in group G streptococcal strains causing invasive tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemens, Nikolai; Kittang, Bård R; Chakrakodi, Bhavya

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has emerged as an important cause of severe skin and soft tissue infections, but little is known of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying tissue pathology. Patient samples and a collection of invasive and non-invasive group G SDSE strains (n = 6...... infiltration and pro-inflammatory markers. Our findings suggest the contribution of SLO to epithelial cytotoxicity and tissue pathology in SDSE tissue infections.......Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has emerged as an important cause of severe skin and soft tissue infections, but little is known of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying tissue pathology. Patient samples and a collection of invasive and non-invasive group G SDSE strains (n = 69......) were analyzed with respect to virulence factor expression and cytotoxic or inflammatory effects on human cells and 3D skin tissue models. SDSE strains efficiently infected the 3D-skin model and severe tissue pathology, inflammatory responses and altered production of host structural framework proteins...

  11. [Human papillomavirus infection in male genitalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Garfias, R; Villarreal Peral, C; Juárez Azpilcueta, A

    1995-10-01

    A prospective and transversal study in 100 patients since January to December of 1994, was done, to know the human papiloma virus infection prevalence in male genitals. The patients were studied by a clinical history, genital area colposcopic revision after acetic acid 5% application, biopsy of the lesion and histopathology study. The patients age was among 16 to 71 years old, with a media of 38.8 years old. The sexual activity beginning was from 12 to 27 years old, with an average of 18 years old. Forty one percent of the patients have had sexual relations with prostitutes, 26% have had sexually transmitted diseases, 9% of the patients referred only 1 sexual mate and 82% had human papiloma virus infection.

  12. Intra-cellular Staphylococcus aureus alone causes infection in vivo

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    T Hamza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and recurrent bone infections occur frequently but have not been explained. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is often found among chronic and recurrent infections and may be responsible for such infections. One possible reason is that S. aureus can internalize and survive within host cells and by doing so, S. aureus can evade both host defense mechanisms and most conventional antibiotic treatments. In this study, we hypothesized that intra-cellular S. aureus could induce infections in vivo. Osteoblasts were infected with S. aureus and, after eliminating extra-cellular S. aureus, inoculated into an open fracture rat model. Bacterial cultures and radiographic observations at post-operative day 21 confirmed local bone infections in animals inoculated with intra-cellular S. aureus within osteoblasts alone. We present direct in vivo evidence that intra-cellular S. aureus could be sufficient to induce bone infection in animals; we found that intra-cellular S. aureus inoculation of as low as 102 colony forming units could induce severe bone infections. Our data may suggest that intra-cellular S. aureus can “hide” in host cells during symptom-free periods and, under certain conditions, they may escape and lead to infection recurrence. Intra-cellular S. aureus therefore could play an important role in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, especially those chronic and recurrent infections in which disease episodes may be separated by weeks, months, or even years.

  13. Cardiovascular pathology in patients with human immune deficiency virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela-Rodríguez, Germán; Fellow of the American College of Physicians

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection increases both morbidity and mortality by inducing severe immunosupression that generates opportunistic infections. Following use of high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in infected patients, infection-related mortality has decreased and both survival and cardiovascular disease have increased. The etiology of cardiovascular disease could be related to either infection itself, proatherogenic conditions associated with antiretroviral therapy or...

  14. West Nile virus infection causes endocytosis of a specific subset of tight junction membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaikun Xu

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a blood-borne pathogen that causes systemic infections and serious neurological disease in human and animals. The most common route of infection is mosquito bites and therefore, the virus must cross a number of polarized cell layers to gain access to organ tissue and the central nervous system. Resistance to trans-cellular movement of macromolecules between epithelial and endothelial cells is mediated by tight junction complexes. While a number of recent studies have documented that WNV infection negatively impacts the barrier function of tight junctions, the intracellular mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. In the present study, we report that endocytosis of a subset of tight junction membrane proteins including claudin-1 and JAM-1 occurs in WNV infected epithelial and endothelial cells. This process, which ultimately results in lysosomal degradation of the proteins, is dependent on the GTPase dynamin and microtubule-based transport. Finally, infection of polarized cells with the related flavivirus, Dengue virus-2, did not result in significant loss of tight junction membrane proteins. These results suggest that neurotropic flaviviruses such as WNV modulate the host cell environment differently than hemorrhagic flaviviruses and thus may have implications for understanding the molecular basis for neuroinvasion.

  15. Association of human immunodeficiency virus-induced immunosuppression with human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, M J; Stanley, M W; Cruikshank, S; Carson, L

    1989-02-01

    Human papillomavirus infection plays an important causal role in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma. The rate of infection with human papillomavirus as well as the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma are increased in immunosuppressed patients. We report a possible association between infection with human immunodeficiency virus and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with human papillomavirus infection.

  16. Mycobacterium marinum causes a latent infection that can be reactivated by gamma irradiation in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mataleena Parikka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to latency and reactivation of human tuberculosis are still unclear, mainly due to the lack of standardized animal models for latent mycobacterial infection. In this longitudinal study of the progression of a mycobacterial disease in adult zebrafish, we show that an experimental intraperitoneal infection with a low dose (≈ 35 bacteria of Mycobacterium marinum, results in the development of a latent disease in most individuals. The infection is characterized by limited mortality (25%, stable bacterial loads 4 weeks following infection and constant numbers of highly organized granulomas in few target organs. The majority of bacteria are dormant during a latent mycobacterial infection in zebrafish, and can be activated by resuscitation promoting factor ex vivo. In 5-10% of tuberculosis cases in humans, the disease is reactivated usually as a consequence of immune suppression. In our model, we are able to show that reactivation can be efficiently induced in infected zebrafish by γ-irradiation that transiently depletes granulo/monocyte and lymphocyte pools, as determined by flow cytometry. This immunosuppression causes reactivation of the dormant mycobacterial population and a rapid outgrowth of bacteria, leading to 88% mortality in four weeks. In this study, the adult zebrafish presents itself as a unique non-mammalian vertebrate model for studying the development of latency, regulation of mycobacterial dormancy, as well as reactivation of latent or subclinical tuberculosis. The possibilities for screening for host and pathogen factors affecting the disease progression, and identifying novel therapeutic agents and vaccine targets make this established model especially attractive.

  17. Systemic fungal infections in patients with human inmunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cerdeira, C; Arenas, R; Moreno-Coutiño, G; Vásquez, E; Fernández, R; Chang, P

    2014-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. In immunocompromised patients, primary pulmonary infection can spread to the skin and meninges. Clinical manifestations appear in patients with a CD4(+) lymphocyte count of less than 150 cells/μL. Coccidioidomycosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii. It can present as diffuse pulmonary disease or as a disseminated form primarily affecting the central nervous system, the bones, and the skin. Cryptococcosis is caused by Cryptococcus neoformans (var. neoformans and var. grubii) and Cryptococcus gattii, which are members of the Cryptococcus species complex and have 5 serotypes: A, B, C, D, and AD. It is a common opportunistic infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, even those receiving antiretroviral therapy. Histopathologic examination and culture of samples from any suspicious lesions are essential for the correct diagnosis of systemic fungal infections in patients with HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  18. Measles, mumps, rubella, and human parvovirus B19 infections and neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, James F

    2014-01-01

    While the systemic disorders associated with measles, mumps, and rubella viruses and human parvovirus B19 tend to be mild, each virus can produce potentially life-threatening neurologic disease in human hosts, especially when these viruses infect young children. Two of the viruses, rubella and parvovirus B19, can be vertically transmitted to fetuses during maternal infection and cause congenital infection. Neurologic complications are common after intrauterine infection with the rubella virus, a condition known as the congenital rubella syndrome. Two, measles and rubella viruses, can induce "slow viral" infections, serious, disorders that can occur several years after the initial exposure to the virus and typically have fatal outcomes.

  19. Soft tissue infection caused by Kingella kingae in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, U; Schille, R; Hörmann, D; Friedrich, T; Handrick, W

    2001-06-01

    During the last years an increasing number of reports concerning Kingella kingae infections in children has been published. Most cases were osteoarticular infections. The authors report the clinical and laboratory findings from a 3-year-old child with a presternal soft tissue infection due to K kingae. After surgical excochleation and antibiotic treatment there was an uneventful recovery. J Pediatr Surg 36:946-947.

  20. Palpebral myiasis in a Danish traveler caused by the human bot-fly (Dermatobia hominis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Regitze; Holst, Bengt; Krogh, Erik

    2000-01-01

    ophthalmology, dermatobia hominis, human bot-fly, palpebral myiasis, parasite infection, myiasis......ophthalmology, dermatobia hominis, human bot-fly, palpebral myiasis, parasite infection, myiasis...

  1. Necrotic Ulcerated Lesion in a Young Boy Caused by Cowpox Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Favier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The case presented here points towards the fact that skin lesion observed with a cowpox virus is a rare event but should be considered more as the number of cases has increased in the last years. Cowpox virus (CPXV belongs to the Poxviridae family. The transmission of CPXV to humans is caused by wild rodents or mostly by domestic animals and pet rats. In humans, CPXV is responsible for localized skin lesions regularly accompanied by lymphadenopathy. The lesions remain localized but self-inoculation from the primary lesions could occur. Then physicians have to be vigilant concerning bandages. In this case report, a necrotic and ulcerated lesion of a CPXV infection in a young boy is reported. The CPXV was possibly transmitted by wild rodents. The importance of performing the diagnosis is also pointed out. Virus information was obtained from phylogenetic analyses showing that the CPXV isolate was distinct from outbreaks of human cowpox which occurred in 2009 in France and Germany but was close to the CPXV Brighton Red strain. For several years, cases of viral zoonosis caused by CPXV have increased and physicians should be made aware that people could be infected without history of direct contact with animals.

  2. Severe Acute Infection Due to Serratia marcescens Causing Respiratory Distress in An Immunocompetent Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Sada, Pablo; Escalante, Mikel; Lizarralde, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The role of Serratia marcescens changed from a harmless saprophytic microorganism to an important opportunistic human pathogen. It often causes nosocomial device-associated outbreaks and rarely serious invasive community acquired infections. We present a case of a community-acquired Serratia marcescens bacteremia leading to Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a previously healthy 51-year-old man without identifiable risk factors. Full recovery was achieved with solely medical treatment and observation in ICU during three days. To our knowledge it is an extremely uncommon presentation and just few cases have been previously reported in the literature.

  3. First Cases of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi Infection in Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.A.M. van Thiel; T. van Gool; P.A. Kager; A. Bart

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Surinam is generally caused by infection by Leishmania guyanensis. We report three cases of infection with Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi, a Leishmania species not described from Surinam before. Treatment with pentamidine proved to be effective

  4. Human Infection with MERS Coronavirus after Exposure to Infected Camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Memish, Ziad A.; Cotten, Matthew; Meyer, Benjamin; Simon J Watson; Alsahafi, Abdullah J.; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A.; Corman, Victor Max; Sieberg, Andrea; Makhdoom, Hatem Q.; Assiri, Abdullah; Al Masri, Malaki; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Beer, Martin; Müller, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a case of human infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after exposure to infected camels. Analysis of the whole human-derived virus and 15% of the camel-derived virus sequence yielded nucleotide polymorphism signatures suggestive of cross-species transmission. Camels may act as a direct source of human MERS-CoV infection.

  5. Proteomic differences between Escherichia coli strains that cause transient versus persistent intramammary infections [abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bacterial mastitis in dairy cattle. Typically this infection is transient in nature and lasts 2-3 days. However, in a minority of cases, E. coli can cause a persistent intramammary infection. The mechanisms that enable certain strains of E. coli to cause a p...

  6. Second Fatal Case of Infective Endocarditis caused by Gemella bergeriae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijan Ukudeeva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Our case illustrates a fatal course of infection with Gemella bergeriae endocarditis that was complicated by cardiogenic shock due to perforation of the mitral valve with severe mitral regurgitation, extension of infection into the myocardium adjacent to the mitral valve, and coronary sinus thrombosis.

  7. Invasive infection caused by Pseudallescheria boydii in an immunocompetent patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bibashi, E.; de Hoog, G.S.; Kostopoulou, E.; Tsivitanidou, M.; Sevastidou, J.; Geleris, P.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudallescheria boydii is a saprophytic fungus frequently isolated from agricultural soil and polluted water. Disseminated and invasive infections with this organism are seen primarily in the immunocompromised host. We present an unusual case of invasive P. boydii infection in an immunocompetent pa

  8. The infectious hypoxia: occurrence and causes during Shigella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ellen T; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Marteyn, Benoit S

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxia is defined as a tissue oxygenation status below physiological needs. During Shigella infection, an infectious hypoxia is induced within foci of infection. In this review, we discuss how Shigella physiology and virulence are modulated and how the main recruited immune cells, the neutrophils, adapt to this environment. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial agents as a cause of infertility in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Melania; Cannas, Sara; Cubeddu, Marina; Molicotti, Paola; Piras, Gennarina Laura; Dessole, Salvatore; Zanetti, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    Infertility is a problem affecting almost 15% of couples. There are many causes for this condition, among which urogenital bacterial infections seem to play an important role. Many studies have explained the mechanisms by which bacteria cause infertility both in men and women. Therefore we undertook this study to evaluate the presence of genito-urinary infections in infertile couples who sought counselling to investigate their condition. Microbiological analysis was performed on semen and vaginal/cervical samples of both partners of each couple. The percentage of individuals affected by a urogenital bacterial infection was between 14 and 20%. More significantly, most of the species isolated both in men and women have been described in the literature as potential causes of infertility.

  10. A Rare Case of Soft-Tissue Infection Caused by Raoultella planticola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina O' Connell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Raoultella species are Gram-negative, non-motile bacilli primarily considered to be environmental bacteria. Raoultella planticola is a rare cause of human infections. We report a case of serious soft-tissue infection in a young male tiler who presented with cellulitis of his left thumb. He had sustained a crush injury to his left thumb 10 days earlier in a soiled environment. He noted a minor break in the skin and he washed the wound out with running water. One week later, he experienced pain, erythema, and swelling of his thumb and attended his general practitioner who prescribed oral flucloxacillin and penicillin V. Despite this treatment, he noticed progressive erythema and swelling of his thumb requiring hospital admission 3 days later. He underwent washout and debridement of his thumb. Tissue obtained intraoperatively cultured Raoultella planticola. He was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics including ciprofloxacin and made a full and rapid recovery.

  11. A Rare Case of Soft-Tissue Infection Caused by Raoultella planticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Connell, Karina; Kelly, Jack; Niriain, Una

    2010-01-01

    Raoultella species are Gram-negative, non-motile bacilli primarily considered to be environmental bacteria. Raoultella planticola is a rare cause of human infections. We report a case of serious soft-tissue infection in a young male tiler who presented with cellulitis of his left thumb. He had sustained a crush injury to his left thumb 10 days earlier in a soiled environment. He noted a minor break in the skin and he washed the wound out with running water. One week later, he experienced pain, erythema, and swelling of his thumb and attended his general practitioner who prescribed oral flucloxacillin and penicillin V. Despite this treatment, he noticed progressive erythema and swelling of his thumb requiring hospital admission 3 days later. He underwent washout and debridement of his thumb. Tissue obtained intraoperatively cultured Raoultella planticola. He was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics including ciprofloxacin and made a full and rapid recovery.

  12. Plasma Soluble CD163 Level Independently Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Ertner, Gideon; Petersen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Background: CD163, a monocyte- and macrophage-specific scavenger receptor, is shed as soluble CD163 (sCD163) during the proinflammatory response. Here, we assessed the association between plasma sCD163 levels and progression to AIDS and all-cause mortality among individuals infected with human...... immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). Methods: Plasma sCD163 levels were measured in 933 HIV–infected individuals. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with mortality were computed by Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: At baseline, 86% were receiving antiretroviral treatment......, 73% had plasma a HIV RNA level of CD163 levels were higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors (4.92 mg/L [interquartile range {IQR}, 3.29–8.65 mg/L] vs 3.16 mg/L [IQR, 2...

  13. Plasma Soluble CD163 Level Independently Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Ertner, Gideon; Petersen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD163, a monocyte- and macrophage-specific scavenger receptor, is shed as soluble CD163 (sCD163) during the proinflammatory response. Here, we assessed the association between plasma sCD163 levels and progression to AIDS and all-cause mortality among individuals infected with human...... immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). METHODS: Plasma sCD163 levels were measured in 933 HIV-infected individuals. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with mortality were computed by Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: At baseline, 86% were receiving antiretroviral treatment......, 73% had plasma a HIV RNA level of CD163 levels were higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors (4.92 mg/L [interquartile range {IQR}, 3.29-8.65 mg/L] vs 3.16 mg/L [IQR, 2...

  14. Congenital echovirus 21 infection causing fulminant hepatitis in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Cristina; Lage, Maria João; Virella, Daniel

    2013-04-09

    Enteroviral infection in pregnancy is common and there is growing evidence relating it to congenital anomalies and neonatal mortality. Neonatal disease may range from unapparent infection to overwhelming systemic illness. Passively acquired maternal serotype specific antibodies determine the severity of the disease in the newborn. A fatal case of congenital echovirus 21 infection, confirmed by PCR in the patient's blood and positive culture of the mother's stools, is reported. A sibling had symptoms of respiratory tract infection and their mother had fever, which prompted iatrogenic delivery that same day. The newborn presented with bradycardia and hypotonia in the first minutes of life and later developed respiratory distress, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, fulminant hepatitis, acute renal failure and necrotising enterocolitis. Death occurred on the 8 day of life. This case highlights the potential severity of Enteroviral infection in the newborn. Since only supportive treatment is available, prevention is paramount.

  15. Human Dobrava-Belgrade hantavirus infection, Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, Petra; Müller, Nicole; Heinemann, Patrick; Rother, Enno; Jakupi, Xhevat; Günther, Stephan; Cadar, Daniel; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas

    2014-11-01

    Here we describe an acute Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) infection that presented as severe hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in an active-duty U.S. soldier. The infection was acquired in northern Kosovo in spring 2013. Amplification of DOBV genome segments directly from the patient's serum sample was successfully performed. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the strain belong to DOBV genotype Dobrava and is closely related to strains circulating in Southeast Europe and Slovakia. Thus, our case confirms that DOBV genotype Dobrava is able to cause a severe form of HFRS, especially when compared to the other less pathogenic DOBV genotypes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevention of infection caused by Pneumocystis carinii in transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, J A

    2001-10-15

    Pneumocystis carinii remains an important pathogen in patients who undergo solid-organ and hematopoietic transplantation. Infection results from reactivation of latent infection and via de novo acquisition of infection from environmental sources. The risk of infection depends on the intensity and duration of immunosuppression and underlying immune deficits. The risk is greatest after lung transplants, in individuals with invasive cytomegalovirus disease, during intensive immunosuppression for allograft rejection, and during periods of neutropenia. Prophylaxis with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) prevents many opportunistic infections, including infection with P. carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, and community-acquired respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tract pathogens. Intolerance of TMP-SMZ is common; desensitization is useful less often in transplant patients than in patients with AIDS. Alternative agents provide a narrower spectrum of protection than does TMP-SMZ and less adequate protection against Pneumocystis species. Clinically, the diagnosis of breakthrough Pneumocystis pneumonia often requires invasive procedures. Strategies for the prevention of Pneumocystis infection must be individualized on the basis of a stratification of risk for each patient.

  17. The Mathematical Biology of Human Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Nowak

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans are constant victims of infectious diseases. Biomedical research during this century has led to important insights into the molecular details of immune defense. Yet, many questions relating to disease require a quantitative understanding of the complex systems that arise from the nonlinear interactions between populations of immune cells and infectious agents. Exploration of such questions has lead to a newly emerging field of mathematical biology describing the spread of infectious agents both within and between infected individuals. This essay will discuss simple and complex models of evolution, and the propagation of virus and prion infections. Such models provide new perspectives for our understanding of infectious disease and provide guidelines for interpreting experimental observation; they also define what needs to be measured to improve understanding.

  18. H pylori infection causes chronic pancreatitis in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether chronic H pylori infection has the potential to induce pancreatitis in the Mongolian gerbil model, and whether it is dependent on an intact type Ⅳ secretion system.METHODS: Mongolian gerbils were infected with wild type (WT) H pyloritype Ⅰ strain B128 or its isogenic mutant B128 Acag Y (defective type Ⅳ secretion). After seven months of infection, H pylori was reisolated from antrum and corpus and H pylori DNA was analyzed by seminested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Inflammation and histological changes were documented in the gastric antrum, corpus, and pancreas by immunohistochemistry.Cytokine mRNA, gastric pH, plasma gastrin, amylase,lipase, and glucose levels were determined.RESULTS: The H pylori infection rate was 95%.Eight infected animals, but none of the uninfected group, developed transmural inflammation and chronic pancreatitis. Extensive interstitial fibrosis and inflammation of the pancreatic lobe adjacent to the antrum was confirmed by trichrome stain, and immunohistochemically. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was significantly increased in the antral mucosa of all infected gerbils. In the corpus, only cytokine levels of WT-infected animals and those developing transmural inflammation and pancreatitis were significantly increased.Levels of lipase, but not glucose or amylase levels, were significantly reduced in the pancreatitis group. H pylori DNA was detected in infected antral and corpus tissue,but not in the pancreas.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection is able to induce chronic pancreatitis in Mongolian gerbils independently of the type Ⅳ secretion system, probably by an indirect mechanism associated with a penetrating ulcer.

  19. Causes for switch-infected patients: the NEXT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Casado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: NNRTIs are commonly used to initiate HAART. Despite their demonstrated efficacy, tolerability and resistance issues could lead to a treatment change. The objective of the NEXT study was to evaluate the reasons for switching an initial non-nucleoside based regimen in the clinical setting, and the alternative regimen selected. Methods: A retrospective multicentre study was undertaken between April and October 2009. Patients from 38 Spanish centres who had changed the initial EFV or NVP-based regimen in the previous six-month period were included. Social-demographic and HIV-related data was collected from medical records. Responsible physicians were interviewed about reasons for switching the non-nucleoside and the alternative regimen of choice. Summary of results: A total of 391 HIV-1 infected patients had changed the initial EFV or NVP-based regimen in the previous six months. Data were available for 316 (80.8% of them. 245/316 patients received EFV as first line (77.5%. Median time to switch the NNRTI regimen was 16.9 months, shorter in case of EFV-based regimen, 15.4 months, than NVP-based regimen, 20.8 months. Most of changes were observed in the first month after initiation, representing 51.3% of the discontinuations, especially in case of EFV (57.1% EFV; 31% NVP. 9.2% of the patients switched due to chronic toxicity (after the first month of treatment. CNS toxicity was the most common reason for switching therapy in the acute term in 63% of the patients. Other tolerability issues that led to treatment discontinuation in the short term were lipid abnormalities due to EFV (4.1% and liver enzyme elevations related to NVP (7%. Rash led to a similar rate discontinuation with both NNRTIs (12%. The second reason to discontinue the first-generation NNRTI was virological/immunological failure in 40.5% of the patients (128/316. The new regimen selected was a boosted PI regimen in 52% of the cases, and was another NNRTI based

  20. Fulminant infection and toxic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kevin L; Born, Michael W; Cohen, Merrill A

    2002-05-01

    Two patients presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with features of toxic shock syndrome, including hypotension, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), renal and hepatic insufficiency and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Computed tomography (CT) scan identified the source of infection in one patient. At laparotomy, pelvic peritonitis and massive edema of the pelvic retroperitoneal tissue was found. The other patient had myonecrosis of the forearm necessitating amputation. Intra-operative cultures of tissue in each case yielded Streptococcus pyogenes, Group A. These patients were treated early with clindamycin and intensive supportive care as well as surgery, and both made a full recovery. Because of the necessity of early recognition of the varied presentation of these infections, the clinical features as well as essential interventions are emphasized. We review the pathophysiology of invasive Group A streptococcal infection to increase awareness of these uncommon but fulminant and often lethal infections.

  1. Apparent effect of chronic Plasmodium infections on disease severity caused by experimental infections with Mycoplasma gallisepticum in house finches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André A. Dhondt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An epidemic caused by a successful host jump of the bacterial pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum from poultry to house finches in the 1990s has by now spread across most of North America. M. gallisepticum causes severe conjunctivitis in house finches. We experimentally show that M. gallisepticum transmission to birds with or without chronic Plasmodium infection does not differ. However, once infected with M. gallisepticum house finches chronically infected with Plasmodium develop more severe clinical disease than birds without such infection. We speculate as to possible effects of coinfection.

  2. Differential Mucin Expression by Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus Infection in Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Del Rocío Baños-Lara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucins (MUC constitute an important component of the inflammatory and innate immune response. However, the expression of these molecules by respiratory viral infections is still largely unknown. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV are two close-related paramyxoviruses that can cause severe low respiratory tract disease in infants and young children worldwide. Currently, there is not vaccine available for neither virus. In this work, we explored the differential expression of MUC by RSV and hMPV in human epithelial cells. Our data indicate that the MUC expression by RSV and hMPV differs significantly, as we observed a stronger induction of MUC8, MUC15, MUC20, MUC21, and MUC22 by RSV infection while the expression of MUC1, MUC2, and MUC5B was dominated by the infection with hMPV. These results may contribute to the different immune response induced by these two respiratory viruses.

  3. Tick-borne ehrlichiosis infection in human beings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ganguly

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is a tick-borne infectious disease transmitted by several tick species, especially Amblyomma spp caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis. E. chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular, tick-transmitted bacterium that is maintained in nature in a cycle involving at least one and perhaps several vertebrate reservoir hosts. Two additional Ehrlichia spp, Anaplasma (formerly Ehrlichia phagocytophila (the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis [HGE] and E. ewingii (a cause of granulocytic ehrlichiosis in dogs act as human pathogens. Human E. chaffeensis infections have generally been reported in North America, Asia and Europe, but recently human cases have been reported in Brazil only. Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is diagnosed by demonstration of a four-fold or greater change in antibody titer to E. chaffeensis antigen by IFA in paired serum samples, or a positive PCR assay and confirmation of E. chaffeensis DNA, or identification of morulae in leukocytes and a positive IFA titer to E. chaffeensis antigen, or immunostaining of E. chaffeensis antigen in a biopsy or autopsy sample, or culture of E. chaffeensis from a clinical specimen.

  4. Mixed Cutaneous Infection Caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and Mycobacterium intermedium in a Healthy Adult Female: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amresh Kumar; Marak, Rungmei S K; Maurya, Anand Kumar; Das, Manaswini; Nag, Vijaya Lakshmi; Dhole, Tapan N

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs) are ubiquitous and are being increasingly reported as human opportunistic infection. Cutaneous infection caused by mixed NTM is extremely rare. We encountered the case of a 46-year-old female, who presented with multiple discharging sinuses over the lower anterior abdominal wall (over a previous appendectomy scar) for the past 2 years. Microscopy and culture of the pus discharge were done to isolate and identify the etiological agent. Finally, GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS assay proved it to be a mixed infection caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and M. intermedium. The patient was advised a combination of rifampicin 600 mg once daily, ethambutol 600 mg once daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily to be taken along with periodic follow-up based upon clinical response as well as microbiological response. We emphasize that infections by NTM must be considered in the etiology of nonhealing wounds or sinuses, especially at postsurgical sites.

  5. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bility, Moses T; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system's contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mouse model engrafted with both human immune and human liver cells is needed to study infection and immunopathogenesis of HBV/HCV infection in vivo. We have recently developed the humanized mouse model with both human immune and human liver cells (AFC8-hu HSC/Hep) to study immunopathogenesis and therapy of HCV infection in vivo. In this review, we summarize the current models of HBV/HCV infection and their limitations in immunopathogenesis. We will then present our recent findings of HCV infection and immunopathogenesis in the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse, which supports HCV infection, human T-cell response and associated liver pathogenesis. Inoculation of humanized mice with primary HCV isolates resulted in long-term HCV infection. HCV infection induced elevated infiltration of human immune cells in the livers of HCV-infected humanized mice. HCV infection also induced HCV-specific T-cell immune response in lymphoid tissues of humanized mice. Additionally, HCV infection induced liver fibrosis in humanized mice. Anti-human alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) staining showed elevated human hepatic stellate cell activation in HCV-infected humanized mice. We discuss the limitation and future improvements of the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse model and its application in evaluating novel therapeutics, as well as studying both HCV and HBV infection, human immune responses, and associated human liver fibrosis and cancer.

  6. Human Parechovirus 3: The Most Common Viral Cause of Meningoencephalitis in Young Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Christian; Harrison, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) were initially classified as echoviruses. HPeVs occur worldwide, comprising up to 17 genotypes. HPeV1 and HPeV3 are most common. Clinical disease varies somewhat among genotypes. HPeV1 causes mostly gastrointestinal infections. HPeV3's prominence is due to its causing sepsis syndromes and central nervous system (CNS) infections in young infants. Currently, HPeV3 is the most common single cause of aseptic meningitis/meningoencephalitis in infants less than 90 days old in North America, usually with biannual summer-fall seasonality. HPeV3 CNS infections usually lack cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Mortality and sequelae are uncommon, usually accompanying initially severe or neurologically complicated acute illnesses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Glanders: an overview of infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zandt, Kristopher E; Greer, Marek T; Gelhaus, H Carl

    2013-09-03

    Glanders is a highly contagious and often fatal zoonotic disease, primarily of solipds. In the developed world, glanders has been eradicated. However, prior use of B. mallei as a biological weapon and its high mortality in inhalation animal studies has affirmed B. mallei as a biodefense concern. This threat requires the development of new glanders medical countermeasures (MCMs), as there is a lack of an effective vaccine and lengthy courses of multiple antibiotics needed to eradicate B. mallei. Here, we present a literature review of human glanders in which we discuss the clinical epidemiology and risk factors, potential routes of exposure, symptoms, the incubation period, and specific diagnostics. This review focuses on pulmonary glanders, as this is the most likely outcome of a biological weapons attack. Additionally, we outline current treatment regimens and propose a clinical definition of human pulmonary glanders infection.

  8. Subcutaneous dirofilariasis caused by (Nochtiella in Sri Lanka: A potential risk of transmitting human dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana Gunathilaka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Dirofilariasis is a parasitic infection caused by filarial nematodes belonging to the genus Dirofilaria . Human dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens has been widely reported from European countries. Sri Lanka is the most affected country in Asia with an infection rate of almost 60% in dog population. However, human infection of D. repens remains undiagnosed and many of the cases are not scientifically documented. Therefore, the objective of the present investigation is to document the presence of dirofilariasis infections in humans. Method: A 1 year and 10 months old boy from Ragama, Gampaha District, Western Province of Sri Lanka, was presented to a private hospital with a painless, non-pruritic and ill-defined subcutaneous nodule on his right hypochondrial region of the anterior abdominal wall for 1 week. On examination, there was a non-tender swelling measuring 2 cm × 2 cm in the anterior abdominal wall, with surrounding mild redness. The patient was referred for ultrasound confirmation. Results: The ultrasound scan revealed a hypoechoic nodular lesion measuring 11 mm × 6 mm in the anterior abdominal wall. Parasitological examination on the excised nodule confirmed the presence of D. repens measuring 10.5 cm in length having characteristic cuticle with longitudinal ridges. Conclusion: It is essential to record the human infections and increase the awareness about this infection, diagnostic tests and vector controlling measures, in order to reduce the disease prevalence through suppressing vector densities, proper diagnosis and patient care.

  9. Human papilloma virus infection prior to coitarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Daniela; Bernhaus, Astrid; Kottmel, Andrea; Sam, Christine; Koelle, Dieter; Joura, Elmar A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence and the natural course of anogenital human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in girls prior to coitarche attending an outpatient gynecological unit. Specimens were taken from the anogenital region of 114 unselected 4-15 year old girls who were referred consecutively for various gynecological problems. Four girls were excluded because of sexual abuse. Low-risk HPV-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was detected in 4 girls (3.6%) and high-risk HPV DNA in 15 children (13.6%). Two girls testing positive for HPV DNA had clinical apparent warts. After 1 year, 2 children had persistent high-risk HPV DNA, and in 1 case we found a switch from high-risk to low-risk HPV DNA. Subclinical genital low- and high-risk HPV infections are common in girls without any history of sexual abuse or sexual activity. We found persistence of genital HPV infection in children, which could be a reservoir for HPV-associated diseases later in life.

  10. Emerging infections caused by non-Aspergillus filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, A P; Chen, S C-A; Slavin, M A

    2016-08-01

    There are three broad groups of non-Aspergillus moulds: the mucormycetes, the hyalohyphomycetes and the phaeohyphomycetes. Infections with these pathogens are increasingly reported, particularly in the context of increasing use of immunosuppressant agents and improved diagnostics. The epidemiology of non-Aspergillus mould infections varies with geography, climate and level of immunosuppression. Skin and soft-tissue infections are the predominant presentation in the immunocompetent host and pulmonary and other invasive infections in the immunocompromised host. The more common non-Aspergillus moulds include Rhizopus, Mucor, Fusarium and Scedosporium species; however, other emerging pathogens are Rasamsonia and Verruconis species, which are discussed in this article. Outbreaks of non-Aspergillus mould infections have been increasingly reported, with contaminated medical supplies and natural disasters as common sources. Currently culture and other conventional diagnostic methods are the cornerstone of diagnosis. Molecular methods to directly detect and identify mould pathogens in tissue and body fluids are increasingly used. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Causes of mortality among tuberculosis and HIV co-infected patients in Chiang Rai, Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantipong P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pacharee Kantipong,1 Kuniko Murakami,2 Saiyud Moolphate,3 Myo Nyein Aung,4,5 Norio Yamada21Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital, Thailand; 2Japan Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, Tokyo, Japan; 3TB/HIV Research Project, Chiang Rai, Thailand; 4Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan; 5Department of Epidemiology, University of Public Health, Yangon, MyanmarBackground: The case fatality rate in patients with tuberculosis (TB associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has been particularly high in Chiang Rai, Northern Thailand. It was almost 50% before the introduction of antiretroviral therapy in the last decade, and was still at 28% in 2008, despite expanding access to antiretroviral therapy. Reviewing the causes of death may lead to further understanding of the timeline and natural history of TB-HIV coinfection, and in so doing help to devise an effective prevention strategy in Chiang Rai. In this study, we aimed to investigate the distribution of confirmed causes of death in patients coinfected with TB and HIV in Chiang Rai, describe the causes of such deaths along the timeline of TB treatment, and identify predictors of each cause of death.Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the causes of death for 331 patients who died of TB-HIV coinfection at Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital from 2005 to 2008. Causes of death were confirmed by reviewing medical records, vital registration, and the TB register in the province, as well as obtaining reconfirmation by two experienced HIV physicians.Results: The confirmed causes of death were TB (39%, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-related opportunistic infections other than TB (AOI (29%, and other systemic diseases which were neither TB nor AIDS-related opportunistic infections (nonTB-nonAOI (16%. The definitive cause could not be confirmed in the remaining 16% of deaths. After starting the TB

  12. [HIV infection as a cause of accelerated aging and frailty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Zaida; Sánchez-Conde, Matilde; Brañas, Fátima

    2017-06-07

    The HIV-infected population is aging due to the success of combination antiretroviral therapy, which prolongs survival, as well as the growing number of newly diagnosed cases in adults 50 years old and over. HIV-infected individuals suffer from an accelerated aging due to the persistent and chronic activation of the immune system that leads to immune exhaustion and accelerated immunosenescence, even when on optimal immuno-virological control treatment. The clinical expression of the immunosenescence state is an increased prevalence of aging-related non-HIV associated comorbidities and a rising prevalence of frailty occurring earlier than in the general population. Thus, HIV-infected patients are biologically older than their chronological age, and they suffer from aging-related problems, such as frailty, which should be assessed. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavige G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%, electrolyte imbalances (80% and shock (40%. Five (33.3% patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%. Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3% of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  14. Subcutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae: probable nosocomial acquired infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio de Queiroz Telles Filho

    1985-08-01

    Full Text Available The Authors present a case of subcutaneous mucormycosis occurring in a patient with clinical and biochemical evidence of diabetic ketoacidosis. The clinical, mycological and histopathological features are described, emphasizing the relevance of a rapid diagnosis in order to stablish early treatment. The clinical forms of mucormycosis and the main associated conditions are briefly reviewed as well as the most probable conditions which may lead to the enhanced susceptibility to infection in the diabetic patient in ketoacidosis. The recovery of Rhizopus oryzae from the air of the room of the patient suggests a nosocomial infection acquired through contamination of venous puncture site by air borne spores.

  15. Malignant syphilis with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiby Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant syphilis or Lues maligna, commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, has now seen a resurgence with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Immunosuppression and sexual promiscuity set the stage for this deadly association of HIV and Treponema pallidum that can manifest atypically and can prove to cause diagnostic problems. We report one such case in a 30-year-old female who responded favorably to treatment with penicillin.

  16. Risk Factors for Acquisition and Clearance of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachler, Daniel C.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Weber, Kathleen M.; Strickler, Howard D.; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Cranston, Ross D.; Burk, Robert D.; Minkoff, Howard; Reddy, Susheel; Xiao, Weihong; Guo, Yingshi; Gillison, Maura L.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes the majority of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, yet the risk factors for and natural history of oral HPV infection are largely unknown. In 2010–2011, a US-based longitudinal cohort study of 761 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and 469 at-risk HIV-uninfected participants from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and the Women's Interagency HIV Study was initiated. Semiannually collected oral rinses were evaluated for 37 HPV genotypes using the Roche LINEAR ARRAY HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, California), and factors associated with oral HPV incidence and clearance were explored using adjusted Wei-Lin-Weissfeld modeling. Through 2013, the 2-year cumulative incidence of any type of oral HPV infection was 34% in HIV-infected persons and 19% in HIV-uninfected persons. However, many of these infections cleared. Seven percent of incident infections and 35% of prevalent infections persisted for at least 2 years. After adjustment for other risk factors, HIV infection (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.2), reduced current CD4 cell count, and increased numbers of oral sex and “rimming” partners increased the risk of incident oral HPV infection, whereas male sex, older age, and current smoking increased the risk of oral HPV persistence (each P < 0.05). This helps explain the consistent associations observed between these factors and prevalent oral HPV infection in previous cross-sectional studies. PMID:25480823

  17. Bioactive molecules released from cells infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eLuganini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Following primary infection in humans, the Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV persists in a latent state throughout the host’s lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive

  18. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV. ... Journal Home > Vol 14, No 4 (2013) > ... HIV infection increases HPV prevalence, incidence and persistence and is strongly associated with the development of anogenital ...

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and female lower genital tract malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, L; Sun, X W; Wright, T C

    1999-02-01

    The risk of lower genital tract neoplasia is increased in women infected with HIV. This has been best demonstrated in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions, but has also been observed in vulvar and perianal intraepithelial lesions in some studies. Alterations in the prevalence and natural history of human papillomavirus infections of the lower genital tract appear to account for much of the increase. HIV-infected women are approximately four times more likely to be infected with human papillomavirus (including infection with high oncogenic risk human papillomavirus types) than are HIV-uninfected women, and these infections are more likely to be persistent. Human papilomavirus-associated lesions may be more difficult to treat in HIV-infected women. These data highlight the need to develop effective cervical cancer prevention programs for HIV-infected women.

  20. A case of chronic appendicopathy caused by parasitic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Ramsaransing; R.R. Postema (Roelf); J.L. Simons

    2010-01-01

    textabstractParasitic infection of the appendix is rarely seen, but should be considered in patients with symptoms of chronic appendicitis. It is rarely associated with histological inflammation of the appendix, therefore radiographic imaging, performed during initial workup, remains unremarkable mo

  1. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapman, M.; Ingen, J. van; Keijman, J.; Swanink, C.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient

  2. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapman, M.; Ingen, J. van; Keijman, J.; Swanink, C.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient

  3. Brevibacterium otitidis: an elusive cause of neurosurgical infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fe Talento, Alida

    2013-03-01

    Coryneform bacteria are usually considered as non-pathogenic when isolated from clinical specimens. We present a case of Brevibacterium otitidis neurosurgical infection in an immunocompetent patient, and highlight the difficulty with identification and interpretation of antimicrobial susceptibility results for this unusual pathogen.

  4. Nosema spp. infections cause no energetic stress in tolerant honeybees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurze, Christoph; Mayack, Christopher; Hirche, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Host-pathogen coevolution leads to reciprocal adaptations, allowing pathogens to increase host exploitation or hosts to minimise costs of infection. As pathogen resistance is often associated with considerable costs, tolerance may be an evolutionary alternative. Here, we examined the effect of tw...... as well as healthy bees, maintaining colony efficiency and productivity....

  5. Geographic distribution of Staphylococcus aureus causing invasive infections in Europe: a molecular-epidemiological analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajo Grundmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In each country, staphylococcal reference laboratories secured the participation of a sufficient number of hospital laboratories to achieve national geo-demographic representation. Participating laboratories collected successive methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection using an agreed protocol. All isolates were sent to the respective national reference laboratories and characterised by quality-controlled sequence typing of the variable region of the staphylococcal spa gene (spa typing, and data were uploaded to a central database. Relevant genetic and phenotypic information was assembled for interactive interrogation by a purpose-built Web-based mapping application. Between September 2006 and February 2007, 357 laboratories serving 450 hospitals in 26 countries collected 2,890 MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection. A wide geographical distribution of spa types was found with some prevalent in all European countries. MSSA were more diverse than MRSA. Genetic diversity of MRSA differed considerably between countries with dominant MRSA spa types forming distinctive geographical clusters. We provide evidence that a network approach consisting of decentralised typing and visualisation of aggregated data using an interactive mapping tool can provide important information on the dynamics of MRSA populations such as early signalling of emerging strains, cross border spread, and importation by travel. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to MSSA, MRSA spa types have a predominantly regional distribution in Europe. This finding is indicative of the selection and spread

  6. Intrauterine device infection causing concomitant streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and pelvic abscess with Actinomyces odontolyticus bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Carolyn M Yu; Noska, Amanda

    2016-03-10

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are rarely associated with serious infections. We report an unusual concomitant infection of group A Streptococcus (GAS) causing toxic shock syndrome and pelvic abscess with Actinomyces odontolyticus associated with an IUD in a healthy 50-year-old patient. The IUD was subsequently removed and the patient recovered on the appropriate antibiotics. This case highlights the importance of clinicians' high index of suspicion of an IUD infection and prompt removal of the infected foreign body to obtain source control.

  7. Human Toxoplasma gondii-specific secretory immunoglobulin A reduces T. gondii infection of enterocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, D G; McLeod, R

    1992-12-01

    Whey from 17 women (four acutely infected with Toxoplasma gondii, eight chronically infected, and five uninfected) was studied. T. gondii-specific secretory IgA antibodies were demonstrated by ELISA in whey from acutely infected and one of eight chronically infected women. Such antibodies to tachyzoite proteins of 100 kD (eliminated by protease but not periodate or neuraminidase treatment) were demonstrated in whey from acutely infected subjects when Western blots were probed with their whey and antibodies to human secretory IgA or IgA or secretory piece. Secretory IgA from four of eight chronically infected women recognized the 46- and 69-kD epitopes. Other whey samples were negative. Incubation of T. gondii tachyzoites with whey or purified secretory IgA from acutely infected (but not seronegative) women caused 50-75% reduction in infection of enterocytes in vitro. Whey reactive with the 46-kD epitope from three of six chronically infected women caused less (> or = 40%) inhibition. Whey and purified secretory IgA from two of three acutely infected women agglutinated tachyzoites. Whey did not result in complement-dependent lysis of T. gondii. These results indicate that it may be possible to produce human secretory IgA to T. gondii capable of reducing initial infection of enterocytes, as such IgA is present during natural infection. They also demonstrate candidate epitopes for such protection.

  8. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants

    OpenAIRE

    Jacek Dutkiewicz; Barbara Mackiewicz; Marta Kinga Lemieszek; Marcin Golec; Janusz Milanowski

    2016-01-01

    [i]Pantoea agglomerans[/i], a bacterium associated with plants, is not an obligate infectious agent in humans. However, it could be a cause of opportunistic human infections, mostly by wound infection with plant material, or as a hospital-acquired infection, mostly in immunocompromised individuals. Wound infection with [i]P. agglomerans[/i] usually follow piercing or laceration of skin with a plant thorn, wooden splinter or other plant material and subsequent inoculation of the plant-residing...

  9. [Advances in humans and animals opportunistic pathogens from environment infecting plants by crossing kingdoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min; Wu, Yixin; He, Pengfei

    2016-02-04

    Some pathogenic microorganisms ubiquitous in the environment could cross kingdoms to infect diverse hosts. Several cross-kingdom human pathogens were summarized in this paper, including Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeuriginosa. They are ubiquitous in the nature and could cause plant diseases using the same or different infection strategies with which they infect humans and broaden host range. Among these bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae causes top rot disease of maize in the nature, revealing some plants in the environment could serve as a reservoir of various pathogens which might infect animals and probably humans when conditions are favorable, and even potentially harm food. Research on these cross-kingdom pathogens may play a very important role in the epidemiology of human, animal and plant diseases and be a hot topic in environment science.

  10. A review of Candida species causing blood stream infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Giri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of candidemia has been on a rise worldwide. The epidemiology of invasive fungal infections in general and of candidemia in particular has changed in the past three decades because of a variety of factors like the AIDS epidemic, increased number of patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy for transplantation and the increasing use of antimicrobials in the hospital setups and even in the community. The important risk factors for candidemia include use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials, cancer chemotherapy, mucosal colonization by Candida species, indwelling vascular catheters like central venous catheters, etc. More than 90% of the invasive infections due to Candida species are attributed to five species-Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. However, the list of new species of Candida isolated from clinical specimens continues to grow every year. Early diagnosis and proper treatment is the key for management of candidemia cases.

  11. Regional aggressive root resorption caused by neuronal virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger; Strøm, Carsten; Worsaae, Nils

    2012-01-01

    of the patients was treated with dental implants. Virus spreading along nerve paths is a possible explanation for the unexpected resorptions. In both cases, the resorptions began cervically. The extent of the resorption processes in the dentition followed the virus infected nerve paths and the resorption process...... occurring regionally. Two cases of female patients, 26 and 28 years old, referred with aggressive root resorption were investigated clinically and radiographically. Anamnestic information revealed severe virus diseases during childhood, meningitis in one case and whooping cough in the other. One...... stopped when reaching regions that were innervated differently and not infected by virus. In one case, histological examination revealed multinuclear dentinoclasts. The pattern of resorption in the two cases indicates that innervation is a factor, which under normal conditions may protect the root surface...

  12. Evidence that human papillomavirus causes inverted papilloma is sparse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Jeb M; Davis, Kern M; Saenz, Daniel A; Lanza, Donald C

    2014-12-01

    Controversy exists regarding the pathogenesis of inverted papilloma as it relates to the involvement of human papillomavirus (HPV). The purpose of this report is to describe the prevalence of HPV in nondysplastic, "early inverted papilloma" and to summarize HPV detection rates in the general population and in other HPV related neoplasia. This case series report characterizes consecutive inverted papilloma patients from January 2005 to August 2012 with regard to smoking history, dysplasia, and HPV detection rates. Presence or absence of low/high risk HPV was determined by standardized in situ hybridization DNA probes. Medline literature review was performed to determine the prevalence of HPV in inverted papilloma without moderate or severe dysplasia. Thirty-six consecutive patients were identified with an average age of 63.6 (range, 40-84) years; gender: 23 men, 13 women. More than half (55%) were active or former smokers (14% active and 41% former). High/low risk HPV was present in 1 in 36 (2.7%) patients and 1 in 36 (2.7%) had mild dysplasia. In the literature review: (1) HPV was detected in 16.4% of inverted papilloma without dysplasia; (2) oral cavity HPV detection was 4.2% to 11.4% in the normal population; and (3) HPV was normally detected in 85% to 95% of HPV-related neoplasia. Given histological features of inverted papilloma and comparatively low detection rates of HPV in inverted papilloma without dysplasia (2.7%), as well as the summary of the world literature, HPV is not related to the initial pathogenesis of inverted papilloma or inverted papilloma's tendency to persist or recur. It is postulated that since inverted papilloma is more an inflammatory polyp, it is susceptible to secondary HPV infection because of its metaplasia. Tobacco and other causes of respiratory epithelium remodeling are more plausible explanations for the initial tissue transformation to inverted papilloma. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  13. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Christopher A.; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo; Ferreira, Márcia Eliana da Silva; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; León-Narváez, Henry; Longo, Larissa V. G.; Ma, Li-Jun; Malavazi, Iran; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Morais, Flavia V.; Pereira, Maristela; Rodríguez-Brito, Sabrina; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salem-Izacc, Silvia M.; Sykes, Sean M.; Teixeira, Marcus Melo; Vallejo, Milene C.; Walter, Maria Emília Machado Telles; Yandava, Chandri; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zucker, Jeremy; Felipe, Maria Sueli; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Haas, Brian J.; McEwen, Juan G.; Nino-Vega, Gustavo; Puccia, Rosana; San-Blas, Gioconda; Soares, Celia Maria de Almeida; Birren, Bruce W.; Cuomo, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18) and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01). These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic species of

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of human fungal pathogens causing paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Desjardins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18 and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01. These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic

  15. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamour, Sabrina D; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Alibu, Vincent P; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease.

  16. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier Bosch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI. The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs. The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC, the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95% of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2. Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer.

  17. Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection among HIV-Infected Men in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Shinwon; Cho, Heerim; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Eun Ju; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Ki Hyung; Moon, Eunsoo; Cho, Hong Je

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among HIV-infected men in Korea. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, genotype distribution and risk factors associated with anal HPV infection among HIV-infected men in Korea. A single-center cross-sectional study was conducted with HIV-infected men in Korea. Participants completed a detailed sexual behavior risk factor questionnaire. Anal samples were collected for cytology and HPV genotyping. Factors associated with anal HPV infection were assessed using multivariable logistic regression, stratifying by sexual behaviour. A total of 201 HIV-infected men were included in the study: 133 were from men who have sex with men (MSM) and 68 from men who have sex with women (MSW). Any anal HPV infection was detected in 82.7% of HIV-infected MSM and in 51.5% of HIV- infected MSW (P infected MSM, higher number of lifetime male sex partners was significantly associated with any anal HPV infection, but age was a significant risk factor associated with anal HR-HPV infection. Anal HPV infection was highly prevalent in HIV-infected MSM in Korea, and also commonly found in HIV-infected MSW. In HIV-infected MSM, the significant risk factor for being infected with any HPV infection was lifetime number of male sexual partners, and with anal oncogenic HPV infection was age.

  18. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Bility, Moses T.; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system’s contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mous...

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Arikan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in women of child-bearing age continue to increase both internationally and in Canada. The care of HIV-infected pregnant women is complex, and multiple issues must be addressed, including the current and future health of the woman, minimization of the risk of maternal-infant HIV transmission, and maintenance of the well-being of the fetus and neonate. Vertical transmission of HIV can occur in utero, intrapartum and postpartum, but current evidence suggests that the majority of transmission occurs toward end of term, or during labour and delivery. Several maternal and obstetrical factors influence transmission rates, which can be reduced by optimal medical and obstetrical care. Zidovudine therapy has been demonstrated to reduce maternal-infant transmission significantly, but several issues, including the short and long term safety of antiretrovirals and the optimal use of combination antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy, remain to be defined. It is essential that health care workers providing care to these women fully understand the natural history of HIV disease in pregnancy, the factors that affect vertical transmission and the management issues during pregnancy. Close collaboration among a multidisciplinary team of knowledgeable health professionals and, most importantly, the woman herself can improve both maternal and infant outcomes.

  20. A Trichophyton Rubrum Infection Model Based on the Reconstructed Human Epidermis-Episkin(R)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan-Pan Liang; Xin-Zhu Huang; Jin-Ling Yi; Zhi-Rui Chen; Han Ma; Cong-Xiu Ye; Xian-Yan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trichophyton rubrum represents the most common infectious fungus responsible for dermatophytosis in human, but the mechanism involved is still not completely understood.An appropriate model constructed to simulate host infection is the prerequisite to study the pathogenesis of dermatophytosis caused by T.rubrum.In this study, we intended to develop a new T.rubrum infection model in vitro, using the three-dimensional reconstructed epidermis-EpiSkin(R), and to pave the way for further investigation of the mechanisms involved in T.rubrum infection.Methods: The reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) was infected by inoculating low-dose (400 conidia) and high-dose (4000 conidia) T.rubrum conidia to optimize the infection dose.During the various periods after infection, the samples were processed for pathological examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation.Results: The histological analysis of RHE revealed a fully differentiated epidermis with a functional stratum corneum, which was analogous to the normal human epidermis.The results of hematoxylin and eosin staining and the periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that the infection dose of 400 conidia was in accord with the pathological characteristics of host dermatophytosis caused by T.rubrum.SEM observations further exhibited the process of T.rubrum infection in an intuitionistic way.Conclusions: We established the T.rubrum infection model on RHE in vitro successfully.It is a promising model for further investigation of the mechanisms involved in T.rubrum infection.

  1. A Trichophyton Rubrum Infection Model Based on the Reconstructed Human Epidermis - Episkin®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Pan Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trichophyton rubrum represents the most common infectious fungus responsible for dermatophytosis in human, but the mechanism involved is still not completely understood. An appropriate model constructed to simulate host infection is the prerequisite to study the pathogenesis of dermatophytosis caused by T. rubrum. In this study, we intended to develop a new T. rubrum infection model in vitro, using the three-dimensional reconstructed epidermis - EpiSkin ®, and to pave the way for further investigation of the mechanisms involved in T. rubrum infection. Methods: The reconstructed human epidermis (RHE was infected by inoculating low-dose (400 conidia and high-dose (4000 conidia T. rubrum conidia to optimize the infection dose. During the various periods after infection, the samples were processed for pathological examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM observation. Results: The histological analysis of RHE revealed a fully differentiated epidermis with a functional stratum corneum, which was analogous to the normal human epidermis. The results of hematoxylin and eosin staining and the periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that the infection dose of 400 conidia was in accord with the pathological characteristics of host dermatophytosis caused by T. rubrum. SEM observations further exhibited the process of T. rubrum infection in an intuitionistic way. Conclusions: We established the T. rubrum infection model on RHE in vitro successfully. It is a promising model for further investigation of the mechanisms involved in T. rubrum infection.

  2. Prognostic Value Of Immunoglobulin Profile In Human Papilloma Virus Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chattopadhyay S P

    2001-01-01

    Present study aimed at defining the prognostic value of immunoglobulin profile in human papilloma virus infection by assessing and correlating the levels of immunoglobulin with type, number, duration...

  3. A murine herpesvirus closely related to ubiquitous human herpesviruses causes T-cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Swapneel J; Zhao, Guoyan; Penna, Vinay R; Park, Eugene; Lauron, Elvin J; Harvey, Ian B; Beatty, Wandy L; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Poursine-Laurent, Jennifer; Fremont, Daved H; Wang, David; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2017-02-08

    Mouse models of human herpesvirus infections The human roseoloviruses HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7 comprise the Roseolovirus genus of the human Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. Infections with these viruses have been implicated in many diseases; however, it has been challenging to establish infections with Roseoloviruses as direct drivers of pathology because they are nearly ubiquitous and display species-specific tropism. Furthermore, controlled study of infection has been hampered by the lack of experimental models, and until now, a mouse roseolovirus has not been identified. Herein we describe a virus that causes severe thymic necrosis in neonatal mice, characterized by a loss of CD4(+) T-cells. These phenotypes resemble those caused by the previously described mouse thymic virus (MTV), a putative herpesvirus that has not been molecularly characterized. By Next Generation sequencing of infected tissue homogenates, we assembled a contiguous 174Kb genome sequence encoding 128 unique predicted open reading frames (ORFs), many of which were most closely related to herpesvirus genes. Moreover, the structure of the virus genome and phylogenetic analysis of multiple genes strongly suggested that this virus is a betaherpesvirus more closely related to the roseoloviruses, HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7, than another murine betaherpesvirus, mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). As such, we have named this virus murine roseolovirus (MRV) because these data strongly suggest that MRV is a mouse homolog of HHV6A/HHV6B/HHV7.Importance: Herein we describe the complete genome sequence of a novel murine herpesvirus. By sequence and phylogenetic analyses, we show that it is a betaherpesvirus most closely related to the roseoloviruses, human herpesvirus 6A, 6B, and 7. These data combined with physiological similarities with human roseoloviruses collectively suggest that this virus is a murine roseolovirus (MRV), the first definitively described rodent roseolovirus, to our knowledge. Many biological and

  4. SERATTIA AS THE CAUSE OF AN INTRAHOSPITAL INFECTION AT THE NEUROCHIRURGICAL CLINIC IN NIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Novak

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Intrahospital infections represent a serious problem in medicine. Withneurochirurgical patients infections can seriously damage the quality of treatmentwhile in some cases they can threaten patients' lives. Meningitis, brain abscess,osteomyelitis or secondary wound healing are complications caused by infection. Inthe period between October, 28, to December, 24, 1999, at the Neurochirurgicalclinic in Niš there was an intrahospital infection caused by the bacteria Serattia. Thesource of the infection was not discovered. Comprehensive measures wereundertaken for disinfecting the operation block and the intensive treatment unit aswell as a sanitary examination of the staff. In 2000 there was no record of any newčaše of the infection caused by the bacteria.

  5. Fulminant hepatic failure caused by Salmonella paratyphi A infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi Yousef Khan; Ahmed A Kamha; Ibrahim Y Alomary

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of fulminant hepatic failure associated with Salmonella paratyphi A infection, in a 29-yearold patient who was admitted to the intensive care unit (TCU) with fever of two days, headache and vomiting followed by behavioural changes and disorientation. On examination, the patient appeared acutely ill, agitated, confused, and deeply jaundiced. Temperature 38.5℃,pulse 92/min, blood pressure 130/89 mmHg. Both samples of blood grew S. paratyphi A, which was sensitive to ceftriaxone and ciprofioxacin. Ceftriaxon was administered with high-dose dexamethasone. Two weeks after treatment with ceftriaxon, the patient was discharged in satisfactory condition.

  6. A review on human influenza A H5N1 infections in Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN Paul K S

    2009-01-01

    Avian influenza A H5N1 remains the most threatening virus that may cause another devastating pan-demic in the foreseeable future, In 1997, Hong Kong was the first place to detect human infections due to this virus originated from birds. The experience and lessons learnt provide important information for controlling further outbreaks caused by avian influenza viruses.

  7. A review on human influenza A H5N1 infections in Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN; Paul; K; S

    2009-01-01

    Avian influenza A H5N1 remains the most threatening virus that may cause another devastating pandemic in the foreseeable future. In 1997, Hong Kong was the first place to detect human infections due to this virus originated from birds. The experience and lessons learnt provide important information for controlling further outbreaks caused by avian influenza viruses.

  8. Cardioviruses Are Genetically Diverse and Cause Common Enteric Infections in South Asian Children▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkova, Olga; Kapoor, Amit; Victoria, Joseph; Jones, Morris; Wolfe, Nathan; Naeem, Asif; Shaukat, Shahzad; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Angez, Mehar; Zaidi, Sohail; Delwart, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardioviruses cause enteric infections in mice and rats which when disseminated have been associated with myocarditis, type 1 diabetes, encephalitis, and multiple sclerosis-like symptoms. Cardioviruses have also been detected at lower frequencies in other mammals. The Cardiovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family is currently made up of two viral species, Theilovirus and Encephalomyocarditis virus. Until recently, only a single strain of cardioviruses (Vilyuisk virus within the Theilovirus species) associated with a geographically restricted and prevalent encephalitis-like condition had been reported to occur in humans. A second theilovirus-related cardiovirus (Saffold virus [SAFV]) was reported in 2007 and subsequently found in respiratory secretions from children with respiratory problems and in stools of both healthy and diarrheic children. Using viral metagenomics, we identified RNA fragments related to SAFV in the stools of Pakistani and Afghani children with nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). We sequenced three near-full-length genomes, showing the presence of divergent strains of SAFV and preliminary evidence of a distant recombination event between the ancestors of the Theiler-like viruses of rats and those of human SAFV. Further VP1 sequencing showed the presence of five new SAFV genotypes, doubling the reported genetic diversity of human and animal theiloviruses combined. Both AFP patients and healthy children in Pakistan were found to be excreting SAFV at high frequencies of 9 and 12%, respectively. Further studies are needed to examine the roles of these highly common and diverse SAFV genotypes in nonpolio AFP and other human diseases. PMID:19193786

  9. Cardioviruses are genetically diverse and cause common enteric infections in South Asian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkova, Olga; Kapoor, Amit; Victoria, Joseph; Jones, Morris; Wolfe, Nathan; Naeem, Asif; Shaukat, Shahzad; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Angez, Mehar; Zaidi, Sohail; Delwart, Eric L

    2009-05-01

    Cardioviruses cause enteric infections in mice and rats which when disseminated have been associated with myocarditis, type 1 diabetes, encephalitis, and multiple sclerosis-like symptoms. Cardioviruses have also been detected at lower frequencies in other mammals. The Cardiovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family is currently made up of two viral species, Theilovirus and Encephalomyocarditis virus. Until recently, only a single strain of cardioviruses (Vilyuisk virus within the Theilovirus species) associated with a geographically restricted and prevalent encephalitis-like condition had been reported to occur in humans. A second theilovirus-related cardiovirus (Saffold virus [SAFV]) was reported in 2007 and subsequently found in respiratory secretions from children with respiratory problems and in stools of both healthy and diarrheic children. Using viral metagenomics, we identified RNA fragments related to SAFV in the stools of Pakistani and Afghani children with nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). We sequenced three near-full-length genomes, showing the presence of divergent strains of SAFV and preliminary evidence of a distant recombination event between the ancestors of the Theiler-like viruses of rats and those of human SAFV. Further VP1 sequencing showed the presence of five new SAFV genotypes, doubling the reported genetic diversity of human and animal theiloviruses combined. Both AFP patients and healthy children in Pakistan were found to be excreting SAFV at high frequencies of 9 and 12%, respectively. Further studies are needed to examine the roles of these highly common and diverse SAFV genotypes in nonpolio AFP and other human diseases.

  10. Pulmonary Infection Caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in a Patient with Carcinoma of Epiglottis: A Rare Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Priyamvada

    2014-05-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, oxidase and catalase positive, non-fermenting, gram negative bacillus. It is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for various nosocomial and community-acquired infections. However, there are only very few reports of pulmonary infections caused by this bacterium in cancer patients. We are presenting a case of a patient with carcinoma of epiglottis, who developed pulmonary infection caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans. According to the available literature, this is the first case of pulmonary infection caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans, which was detected in a cancer patient in India. Since Achromobacter xylosoxidans demonstrates resistance to many classes of antimicrobials, vigilant and efficient microbiological work-ups and surveillances are needed, to diagnose infections caused by this rare pathogen in clinical settings.

  11. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  12. Attributing the human disease burden of foodborne infections to specific sources.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pires, S.M.; Evers, E.G.; van Pelt, W.; Ayers, T.; Scallan, E.; Angulo, F.J.; Havelaar, A.H.; Hald, T.

    2009-01-01

    Foodborne diseases are an important cause of human illness worldwide. Humans acquire these infections from a variety of sources and routes of transmission. Many efforts have been made in the last decades to prevent and control foodborne diseases, particularly foodborne zoonoses. However, information

  13. Attributing the human disease burden of foodborne infections to specific sources.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pires, S.M.; Evers, E.G.; van Pelt, W.; Ayers, T.; Scallan, E.; Angulo, F.J.; Havelaar, A.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072306122; Hald, T.

    2009-01-01

    Foodborne diseases are an important cause of human illness worldwide. Humans acquire these infections from a variety of sources and routes of transmission. Many efforts have been made in the last decades to prevent and control foodborne diseases, particularly foodborne zoonoses. However, information

  14. Regional Aggressive Root Resorption Caused by Neuronal Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Kjær

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During orthodontic treatment, root resorption can occur unexplainably. No clear distinction has been made between resorption located within specific regions and resorption occurring generally in the dentition. The purpose is to present cases with idiopathic (of unknown origin root resorption occurring regionally. Two cases of female patients, 26 and 28 years old, referred with aggressive root resorption were investigated clinically and radiographically. Anamnestic information revealed severe virus diseases during childhood, meningitis in one case and whooping cough in the other. One of the patients was treated with dental implants. Virus spreading along nerve paths is a possible explanation for the unexpected resorptions. In both cases, the resorptions began cervically. The extent of the resorption processes in the dentition followed the virus infected nerve paths and the resorption process stopped when reaching regions that were innervated differently and not infected by virus. In one case, histological examination revealed multinuclear dentinoclasts. The pattern of resorption in the two cases indicates that innervation is a factor, which under normal conditions may protect the root surface against resorption. Therefore, the normal nerve pattern is important for diagnostics and for predicting the course of severe unexpected root resorption.

  15. Postkeratoplasty Keratitis Caused by Abiotrophia defectiva: An Unusual Cause of Graft Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderwad, Guru Prasad; Murthy, Somasheila I; Motukupally, Swapna Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Abiotrophia defectiva is a nutritional variant of Streptococci. We describe a case of microbial keratitis due to A. defectiva in a patient who had undergone penetrating keratoplasty and was on corticosteroid therapy for recent graft rejection. Isolation of this organism confirmed this to be an opportunistic infection.

  16. Cryptosporidium infection in infancy as a cause of malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, Kare; Andersen, M; Aaby, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum causes persistent diarrhea in young children in developing countries. To determine the interaction between nutritional status and cryptosporidiosis, an open cohort of 1064 children younger than 3 y of age was followed for 1441 child-years by weekly diarrhea recall visits. A...

  17. Tsukamurella infection: a rare cause of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yatin B; Goswami, Raktima; Bhanot, Nitin; Mehta, Zankhana; Simonelli, Paul

    2011-06-01

    A 79-year-old Asian man was admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Antimycobacterial therapy was initiated when sputum smears revealed acid fast bacilli. The patient was, however, diagnosed to have pneumonia secondary to Tsukamurella spp. This is an exceedingly rare cause of pneumonia, especially in immunocompetent individuals. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies of Tsukamurella pneumonia are discussed with a literature review.

  18. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  19. Long-term absolute risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse following human papillomavirus infection: role of persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Susanne K; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Plum, Christian Edinger Munk;

    2010-01-01

    Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. It has been suggested that information about high-risk HPV type-specific infection might make cervical cancer screening more effective. Persistent HPV infection...

  20. Plasma Soluble CD163 Level Independently Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-1-Infected Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Ertner, Gideon; Petersen, Janne; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren K; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Kronborg, Gitte; Benfield, Thomas

    2016-10-15

    CD163, a monocyte- and macrophage-specific scavenger receptor, is shed as soluble CD163 (sCD163) during the proinflammatory response. Here, we assessed the association between plasma sCD163 levels and progression to AIDS and all-cause mortality among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). Plasma sCD163 levels were measured in 933 HIV-infected individuals. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with mortality were computed by Cox proportional hazards regression. At baseline, 86% were receiving antiretroviral treatment, 73% had plasma a HIV RNA level of Plasma sCD163 levels were higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors (4.92 mg/L [interquartile range {IQR}, 3.29-8.65 mg/L] vs 3.16 mg/L [IQR, 2.16-4.64 mg/L]; P = .0001). The cumulative incidence of death increased with increasing plasma sCD163 levels, corresponding to a 6% or 35% increased risk of death for each milligram per liter or quartile increase, respectively, in baseline plasma sCD163 level (adjusted HR, 1.06 [95% CI, 1.03-1.09] and 1.35 [95% CI, 1.13-1.63], respectively). Plasma sCD163 was an independent marker of all-cause mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals, suggesting that monocyte/macrophage activation may play a role in HIV pathogenesis and be a target of intervention. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. [Protozoa and protozoan infections of humans in Central Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walochnik, Julia; Aspöck, Horst

    2014-10-01

    This article is a condensed review of the medically relevant protozoa in Central Europe and the infections and diseases caused by them. Information is given on modes and sources of infection, organs involved in the disease, prevalence, diagnostics, therapy, and prophylaxis. Moreover, travel-associated infections with protozoa are briefly outlined.

  2. Comparison of Staphylococcus aureus strains for ability to cause infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Adam R.; Satterwhite, Erin A.; Lin, Ying-Chi; Chuang-Smith, Olivia N.; Frank, Kristi L.; Merriman, Joseph A.; Schaefers, Matthew M.; Yarwood, Jeremy M.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of infective endocarditis (IE) and sepsis. Both methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) strains cause these illnesses. Common S. aureus strains include pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types USA200, 300, and 400 types where we hypothesize that secreted virulence factors contribute to both IE and sepsis. Rabbit cardiac physiology is considered similar to humans, and rabbits exhibit susceptibility to S. aureus superantigens (SAgs) and cytolysins. As such, rabbits are an excellent model for studying IE and sepsis, which over the course of four days develop IE vegetations and/or fatal septicemia. We examined the ability of MRSA and MSSA strains (4 USA200, 2 USA300, 2 USA400, and three additional common strains, FRI1169, Newman, and COL) to cause vegetations and lethal sepsis in rabbits. USA200, TSST-1+ strains that produce only low amounts of α-toxin, exhibited modest LD50 in sepsis (1 × 108 – 5 × 108) colony-forming units (CFUs), and 3/4 caused significant IE. USA200 strain MNPE, which produces high-levels of α-toxin, was both highly lethal (LD50 5 × 106 CFUs) and effective in causing IE. In contrast, USA300 strains were highly effective in causing lethal sepsis (LD50s 1 × 106 and 5 × 107 CFUs) but were minimally capable of causing IE. Strain Newman, which is phylogenetically related to USA300 strains, was not highly lethal (LD50 of 2 × 109 CFUs) and was effective in causing IE. USA400 strains were both highly lethal (LD50s of 1 × 107 and 5 × 107 CFUs) and highly effective causes of IE. The menstrual TSS isolate FRI1169, that is TSST-1+, produces high-levels of α-toxin, but is not USA200, was both highly lethal and effective in causing IE. Additional studies showed that phenol soluble modulins (PSMs) produced by FRI1169 were important for sepsis but did not contribute to IE. Our studies show that these clonal groups of S. aureus differ in abilities to cause IE and lethal sepsis and

  3. Infective endocarditis caused by Scedosporium prolificans infection in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing induction chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Yotaro; Hiramoto, Nobuhiro; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Yonetani, Noboru; Doi, Asako; Ichikawa, Chihiro; Imai, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    Disseminated Scedosporium prolificans infection occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. The mortality rate is high, as the fungus is resistant to most antifungal agents. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old female with acute myeloid leukemia who developed infective endocarditis caused by S. prolificans infection during induction chemotherapy. Her 1,3-β-D-glucan levels were elevated and computed tomography revealed bilateral sinusitis and disseminated small nodular masses within the lungs and spleen; it nonetheless took 6 days to identify S. prolificans by blood culture. The patient died of multi-organ failure despite the combined use of voriconazole and terbinafine. Autopsy revealed numerous mycotic emboli within multiple organs (caused by mitral valve vegetation) and endocarditis (caused by S. prolificans). The geographic distribution of this infection is limited to Australia, the United States, and southern Europe, particularly Spain. The first Japanese case was reported in 2011, and four cases have been reported to date, including this one. Recently, the incidence of S. prolificans-disseminated infection in immunocompromised patients has increased in Japan. Therefore, clinicians should consider S. prolificans infection as a differential diagnosis when immunocompromised patients suffer disseminated infections with elevated 1,3-β-D-glucan levels.

  4. Cryptosporidium infection in infancy as a cause of malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, Kare; Andersen, M; Aaby, Peter

    1997-01-01

    . A total of 5072 weight and 4264 height measurements was made. There were no tendencies of low weight (P = 0.38) or height (P = 0.16) in children who acquired cryptosporidiosis. Cryptosporidiosis in infancy was accompanied by an estimated weight loss of 392 g (95% CI: 247, 538 g) in boys and 294 g (95% CI......: 109, 479 g) in girls, corresponding to 3.7% and 2.9% of mean weight, respectively, at 2 y of age. No significant catch-up growth covered for this loss in weight. A similar effect in linear growth was shown (P = 0.02). Although it has been suggested that the effect of infections on nutrition is usually...

  5. Human papillomavirus genital infections among men, China, 2007-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhonghu; Liu, Ying; Sun, Yuan; Xi, Long Fu; Chen, Ke; Zhao, Yiqiang; Gao, Lei; Liu, Fangfang; Pan, Yaqi; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Lixin; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

    2013-06-01

    To determine prevalence of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among men in rural China, we analyzed genital swab specimens. Among 2,236 male residents of rural Henan Province, HPV infection prevalence was 17.5%. The most common oncogenic and nononcogenic types were HPV-16 and HPV-3, respectively. Infection was associated with younger age and multiple sex partners.

  6. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vincent F. Tablang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a severe and life-threatening complication in patients with ascites caused by advanced liver disease. The organisms most commonly involved are coliform bacteria and third-generation cephalosporins are the empiric antibiotics of choice. This is an uncommon case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a female patient with liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis. She did not improve with ceftriaxone and her course was complicated by hepatic encephalopathy, seizures and multi-organ failure. This case emphasizes that a high index of suspicion should be maintained for timely diagnosis and treatment. Listerial peritonitis should be suspected in patients with end-stage liver disease and inadequate response to conventional antibiotics within 48–72 h. Ampicillin/sulbactam should be initiated while awaiting results of ascitic fluid or blood culture.

  7. Disease course of lower respiratory tract infection with a bacterial cause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teepe, Jolien; Broekhuizen, Berna D L; Loens, Katherine; Lammens, Christine; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; Little, Paul; Butler, Christopher C.; Coenen, Samuel; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Verheij, Theo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Bacterial pathogens are assumed to cause an illness course different from that of nonbacterial causes of acute cough, but evidence is lacking. We evaluated the disease course of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) with a bacterial cause in adults with acute cough. METHODS We conducted a

  8. Zika virus infects cells lining the blood-retinal barrier and causes chorioretinal atrophy in mouse eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Guest, John-Michael; Kanwar, Mamta; Gao, Nan; Juzych, Mark S.; Abrams, Gary W.; Yu, Fu-Shin

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an important pathogen that causes not only neurologic, but also ocular, abnormalities. Thus, it is imperative that models to study ZIKV pathogenesis in the eye are developed to identify potential targets for interventions. Here, we studied ZIKV interactions with human retinal cells and evaluated ZIKV’s pathobiology in mouse eyes. We showed that cells lining the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), the retinal endothelium, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were highly permissive and susceptible to ZIKV-induced cell death. Direct inoculation of ZIKV in eyes of adult C57BL/6 and IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) KO mice caused chorioretinal atrophy with RPE mottling, a common ocular manifestation of congenital ZIKV infection in humans. This response was associated with induced expression of multiple inflammatory and antiviral (IFNs) response genes in the infected mouse retina. Interestingly, ISG15 KO eyes exhibited severe chorioretinitis, which coincided with increased retinal cell death and higher ZIKV replication. Collectively, our study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that ZIKV causes retinal lesions and infects the cells lining the BRB and that ISG15 plays a role in retinal innate defense against ZIKV infection. Our mouse model can be used to study mechanisms underlying ZIKV-induced chorioretinitis and to gauge ocular antiviral therapies. PMID:28239662

  9. BK virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, J; Muñoz, P; Garcia de Viedma, D; Cabrero, I; Loeches, B; Montilla, P; Gijon, P; Rodriguez-Sanchez, B; Bouza, E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in our hospital. The presence of BKV was analysed in urine and plasma samples from 78 non-selected HIV-infected patients. Clinical data were recorded using a pre-established protocol. We used a nested PCR to amplify a specific region of the BKV T-large antigen. Positive samples were quantified using real-time PCR. Mean CD4 count in HIV-infected patients was 472 cells/mm3 and median HIV viral load was 500 cells/mm3 (74.3% vs 25.7%; p=0.007). Viruria was present in 21.7% of healthy controls (5 out of 23 samples, p=0.02). All viral loads were low (<100 copies/mL), and we could not find any association between BKV infection and renal or neurological manifestations. We provide an update on the prevalence of BKV in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART. BKV viruria was more common in HIV-infected patients; however, no role for BKV has been demonstrated in this population.

  10. Statistical aspects and risks of human-caused earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    The seismological community invests ample human capital and financial resources to research and predict risks associated with earthquakes. Industries such as the insurance and re-insurance sector are equally interested in using probabilistic risk models developed by the scientific community to transfer risks. These models are used to predict expected losses due to naturally occurring earthquakes. But what about the risks associated with human-caused earthquakes? Such risk models are largely absent from both industry and academic discourse. In countries around the world, informed citizens are becoming increasingly aware and concerned that this economic bias is not sustainable for long-term economic growth, environmental and human security. Ultimately, citizens look to their government officials to hold industry accountable. In the Netherlands, for example, the hydrocarbon industry is held accountable for causing earthquakes near Groningen. In Switzerland, geothermal power plants were shut down or suspended because they caused earthquakes in canton Basel and St. Gallen. The public and the private non-extractive industry needs access to information about earthquake risks in connection with sub/urban geoengineeing activities, including natural gas production through fracking, geothermal energy production, carbon sequestration, mining and water irrigation. This presentation illuminates statistical aspects of human-caused earthquakes with respect to different geologic environments. Statistical findings are based on the first catalog of human-caused earthquakes (in Klose 2013). Findings are discussed which include the odds to die during a medium-size earthquake that is set off by geomechanical pollution. Any kind of geoengineering activity causes this type of pollution and increases the likelihood of triggering nearby faults to rupture.

  11. The Role of Nuclear Medicine in the Staging and Management of Human Immune Deficiency Virus Infection and Associated Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Klein, Hans C; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Sathekge, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Human immune deficiency virus (HIV) is a leading cause of death. It attacks the immune system, thereby rendering the infected host susceptible to many HIV-associated infections, malignancies and neurocognitive disorders. The altered immune system affects the way the human host responds to disease, r

  12. A Role for Human Skin Mast Cells in Dengue Virus Infection and Systemic Spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupin, Andrea; Shirley, Devon; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Watson, Alan M; McHale, Cody; Hall, Alex; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Klimstra, William B; Gomez, Gregorio; Colpitts, Tonya M

    2016-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes serious global human disease and mortality. Skin immune cells are an important component of initial DENV infection and systemic spread. Here, we show that mast cells are a target of DENV in human skin and that DENV infection of skin mast cells induces degranulation and alters cytokine and growth factor expression profiles. Importantly, to our knowledge, we also demonstrate for the first time that DENV localizes within secretory granules in infected skin mast cells. In addition, DENV within extracellular granules was infectious in vitro and in vivo, trafficking through lymph to draining lymph nodes in mice. We demonstrate an important role for human skin mast cells in DENV infection and identify a novel mechanism for systemic spread of DENV infection from the initial peripheral mosquito injection site. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Dengue human infection models to advance dengue vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Christian P; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P

    2015-12-10

    Dengue viruses (DENV) currently infect approximately 400 million people each year causing millions to seek care and overwhelming the health care infrastructure in endemic areas. Vaccines to prevent dengue and therapeutics to treat dengue are not currently available. The efficacy of the most advanced candidate vaccine against symptomatic dengue in general and DENV-2 in particular was much lower than expected, despite the ability of the vaccine to induce neutralizing antibody against all four DENV serotypes. Because seroconversion to the DENV serotypes following vaccination was thought to be indicative of induced protection, these results have made it more difficult to assess which candidate vaccines should or should not be evaluated in large studies in endemic areas. A dengue human infection model (DHIM) could be extremely valuable to down-select candidate vaccines or therapeutics prior to engaging in efficacy trials in endemic areas. Two DHIM have been developed to assess the efficacy of live attenuated tetravalent (LATV) dengue vaccines. The first model, developed by the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases at the U. S. National Institutes of Health, utilizes a modified DENV-2 strain DEN2Δ30. This virus was derived from the DENV-2 Tonga/74 that caused only very mild clinical infection during the outbreak from which it was recovered. DEN2Δ30 induced viremia in 100%, rash in 80%, and neutropenia in 27% of the 30 subjects to whom it was given. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is developing a DHIM the goal of which is to identify DENV that cause symptomatic dengue fever. WRAIR has evaluated seven viruses and has identified two that meet dengue fever criteria. Both of these models may be very useful in the evaluation and down-selection of candidate dengue vaccines and therapeutics.

  14. Chromosomal inversions between human and chimpanzee lineages caused by retrotransposons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungnam Lee

    Full Text Available The long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1 and Alu elements are the most abundant mobile elements comprising 21% and 11% of the human genome, respectively. Since the divergence of human and chimpanzee lineages, these elements have vigorously created chromosomal rearrangements causing genomic difference between humans and chimpanzees by either increasing or decreasing the size of genome. Here, we report an exotic mechanism, retrotransposon recombination-mediated inversion (RRMI, that usually does not alter the amount of genomic material present. Through the comparison of the human and chimpanzee draft genome sequences, we identified 252 inversions whose respective inversion junctions can clearly be characterized. Our results suggest that L1 and Alu elements cause chromosomal inversions by either forming a secondary structure or providing a fragile site for double-strand breaks. The detailed analysis of the inversion breakpoints showed that L1 and Alu elements are responsible for at least 44% of the 252 inversion loci between human and chimpanzee lineages, including 49 RRMI loci. Among them, three RRMI loci inverted exonic regions in known genes, which implicates this mechanism in generating the genomic and phenotypic differences between human and chimpanzee lineages. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of mobile element bases inversion breakpoints between human and chimpanzee lineages, and highlights their role in primate genome evolution.

  15. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Antibiotic Resistance in Patients with Nosocomial Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Meliha Cagla Sonmezer; Gunay Ertem; Fatma Sebnem Erdinc; Esra Kaya Kilic; Necla Tulek; Ali Adiloglu; Cigdem Hatipoglu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is resistant to various antibiotics and can cause serious nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality. In this clinical study, we investigated the risk factors in patients who were diagnosed with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Methods. A retrospective case control study including patients with P. aeruginosa-related nosocomial infection. Patients who were resistant to any of the six antibiotics (imipenem, meropenem, pi...

  16. The possible use of V. parahaemolyticus - specific bacteriophages for prevention and therapy of infections caused by V. parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tskhvediani, A; Khukhunashvili, T; Eliashvili, T; Tsertsvadze, G; Gachechiladze, N; Tediashvili, M

    2014-06-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common halophilic Vibrio species causing serious gastroenteritis in humans. The main source of infection is consumption of undercooked or raw seafood or exposure to contaminated water. The monitoring conducted in 2006-2008 demonstrated that warm, subtropical climate and low- to moderate salinity of water in the Black Sea coastal zone provides a favorable environment for growth and spread of V. parahaemolyticus bacteria. Antibiotics are commonly applied for control V.parahaemolyticus infections in humans. However, with the growing problem with bacterial antibiotic-resistance search for alternative biological anti-infectives, such as bacteriophages, becomes more actual. The aim of the presented work was characterization of V. parahamolyticus- specific bacteriophages in relation with their possible use for treatment and prevention of food and waterborne gastroenteritis in humans infected with V.parahaemolyticus. 69 bacteriophages specific to V.parahaemolyticus were isolated from different water sources and 5 of them were characterized according to their virion morphology, host-range, temperature and pH dependence. Stability of phages in different media and solutions, also susceptibility to action of a number of protolithic enzymes was studied as well. Obtained results showed that studied bacteriophages can be used for preparation of phage mixture as a potential therapeutic preparation against V.parahaemolyticus associated infections.

  17. Infective endocarditis caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: A report of two cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Shaik; Patnaik, Amar N; Barik, Ramachandra; Nemani, Lalita

    2016-09-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is known for nosocomial habitat. Infective endocarditis due to this organism is rare and challenging because of resistance to multiple broad-spectrum antibiotic regimens. Early detection and appropriate antibiotic based on culture sensitivity reports are the key to its management. We report the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of two cases of infective endocarditis caused by S. maltophilia.

  18. A Case of Infective Endocarditis and Pulmonary Septic Emboli Caused by Lactococcus lactis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Adib; Asli, Nazih; Geffen, Yuval; Miron, Dan; Elias, Nael

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a rare condition in children with normal hearts. We present here a case of previously healthy eleven-year-old girl with infective endocarditis and pulmonary septic emboli caused by a very rare bacterial etiology (Lactococcus lactis). Identification of this pathogen was only made by polymerase chain reaction.

  19. [Inflammation of the small pelvis caused by Actinomycosis infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltai, M; Barkai, L; Hardonyi, A

    1991-02-03

    Authors report their observations obtained in the course of treatment of 36 patients suffered from pelvic Actinomycosis. The course of disease of patients treated with pelvic inflammatory disease during a period of five years was compared with the occurrence at IUD users and non-users. The interdependence of occurrence of Actinomycosis, as well as previous deliveries, abortions and the period of use of IUD was investigated retrospectively. Difference was made between primary and secondary Actinomycosis. Authors investigated the methods of diagnostics of Actinomycosis and those of prevention and treatment. It was stated that because of pelvic Actinomycosis at IUD users the surgical intervention was not higher than the PID caused by other pathogenic. microorganisms.

  20. Unerupted lower third molar as a cause of acute infection in soldiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijević Stevo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To record the frequency of infections as complications accompanying the unerupted lower third molars and to determine if there was a significant level of the relationship between the frequency and the severity of infections and the age of patients. Methods. This study included 100 soldiers of the Army of Serbia & Montenegro, with the unerupted third molars, of male sex, 18 to 25 years old, who were receiving clinical treatment. Results. In 73% of the patients the infection was caused with the unerupted lower third molars. The highest frequency of infection was observed in the group of 20−23 years of age (75.3%. Mild infection occurred in 49 (67.1% of the patients. Conclusion. The frequency of infection was significantly higher in the older patients. Because of the high frequency of the infection recorded, the unerupted lower third molars should be surgically removed before the age of 20.

  1. Bacterial characteristics of importance for recurrent urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejrnæs, Karen

    2011-04-01

    quiescent intracellular reservoirs that may represent stable reservoirs for RUTIs. The IBC pathogenic cycle has not been studied in humans; however, recently exfoliated IBCs were detected in urine from women with acute uncomplicated cystitis supporting the presence of the IBC pathway and occurrence of an intracellular bacterial niche in some women with UTI. Based on a triplex PCR E. coli can be divided into four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D). Phylogenetic group B2 was the most predominant group among the primary infecting E. coli followed by group D, A and B1. The majority of the tested 29 VFGs were associated with phylogenetic group B2, whereas only a few VFGs were more broadly distributed among the phylogenetic groups (Paper III). Primary infecting E. coli causing persistence or relapse of the infection were associated with phylogenetic group B2, whereas primary infecting E. coli followed by cure or reinfection were associated with group D (Paper II). Phylogenetic group B2 was associated with susceptibility to many of the tested antimicrobials, whereas group A was associated with resistance to many of these antimicrobials and multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, and group D with MDR strains. Phylogenetic group A and D were associated with carriage of IncH and IncI plasmids, respectively. Resistance patterns or plasmid profiles of the primary infecting E. coli were not associated with outcome during follow-up (cure, persistence, reinfection or relapse) (Paper II). Resistance to ampicillin, sulfamethizole, streptomycin and tetracycline was associated with a lower prevalence of some VFGs (sfa/focDE, agn43bCFT073, chuA, iroN, cnf1, hlyD, ibeA, malX, usp) and higher prevalence of other VFGs (afa/draBC, agn43aCFT073, iha, iutA, sat) but the aggregate VFG score did not differ among the resistant and susceptible strains of these antimicrobials (Paper III). Primary infecting E. coli causing persistence or relapse showed to have a higher biofilm formation capacity in

  2. Sp110 transcription is induced and required by Anaplasma phagocytophilum for infection of human promyelocytic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naranjo Victoria

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tick-borne intracellular pathogen, Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis after infection of polymorphonuclear leucocytes. The human Sp110 gene is a member of the nuclear body (NB components that functions as a nuclear hormone receptor transcriptional coactivator and plays an important role in immunoprotective mechanisms against pathogens in humans. In this research, we hypothesized that Sp110 may be involved in the infection of human promyelocytic HL-60 cells with A. phagocytophilum. Methods The human Sp110 and A. phagocytophilum msp4 mRNA levels were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR in infected human HL-60 cells sampled at 0, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post-infection. The effect of Sp110 expression on A. phagocytophilum infection was determined by RNA interference (RNAi. The expression of Sp110 was silenced in HL-60 cells by RNAi using pre-designed siRNAs using the Nucleofector 96-well shuttle system (Amaxa Biosystems, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. The A. phagocytophilum infection levels were evaluated in HL-60 cells after RNAi by real-time PCR of msp4 and normalizing against human Alu sequences. Results While Sp110 mRNA levels increased concurrently with A. phagocytophilum infections in HL-60 cells, the silencing of Sp110 expression by RNA interference resulted in decreased infection levels. Conclusion These results demonstrated that Sp110 expression is required for A. phagocytophilum infection and multiplication in HL-60 cells, and suggest a previously undescribed mechanism by which A. phagocytophilum modulates Sp110 mRNA levels to facilitate establishment of infection of human HL-60 cells.

  3. Detection of intracellular bacterial communities in human urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Rosen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs. These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18% urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41% urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29% of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001. Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22% had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45% had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The

  4. Prevalence and prognostic significance of infection with TT virus in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, JK; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Sørensen, M;

    2000-01-01

    No clear association between human disease and TT virus (TTV) has been documented. A possible pathogenic role of TTV was investigated in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). TTV serum concentrations were estimated in 185 HIV-infected patients by dilution polymerase chain...

  5. Human Infection with MERS coronavirus after exposure to infected camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Memish, Ziad A.; Cotten, Matthew; Meyer, Benjamin; Watson, Simon J.; Alsahafi, Abdullah J.; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A.; Corman, Victor Max; Sieberg, Andrea; Makhdoom, Hatem Q.; Assiri, Abdullah; Al Masri, Malaki; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Bosch, Berend Jan; Beer, Martin; Müller, Marcel A.; Kellam, Paul; Drosten, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a case of human infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after exposure to infected camels. Analysis of the whole human-derived virus and 15% of the camel-derived virus sequence yielded nucleotide polymorphism signatures suggestive of cross-species trans

  6. Human papillomavirus: cause of epithelial lacrimal sac neoplasia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjö, Nicolai Christian; von Buchwald, Christian; Cassonnet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epithelial tumours of the lacrimal sac are rare but important entities that may carry grave prognoses. In this study the prevalence and possible role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in epithelial tumours of the lacrimal sac were evaluated. METHODS: Five papillomas and six...... 11 RNA was demonstrated in two papillomas. CONCLUSIONS: By analysing 11 epithelial lacrimal sac papillomas and carcinomas using PCR, DNA ISH and RNA ISH, we found HPV DNA in all investigated transitional epithelium tumours of the lacrimal sac. HPV RNA was present in two of eight epithelial lacrimal...... sac tumours positive for HPV DNA. As RNA degrades fast in paraffin-embedded tissue, only a small fraction of DNA-positive tumours can be expected to be RNA-positive. We therefore suggest that HPV infection is associated with the development of lacrimal sac papillomas and carcinomas....

  7. Infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: risk factors, clinical features and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paño Pardo, José Ramón; Serrano Villar, Sergio; Ramos Ramos, Juan Carlos; Pintado, Vicente

    2014-12-01

    Infections caused by carbapenem-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) can present as several infectious syndromes, but they primarily present as respiratory, urinary and blood stream infections (primary or catheter-related) that are usually found as nosocomial or healthcare-associated infections. The risk of CPE infection is influenced by individual factors, such as the length of the hospital stay and their exposure to invasive procedures and/or to antimicrobials. Of note, exposure to several antimicrobials, not only carbapenems, has been linked to CPE colonization; the duration of antibiotic exposure is one of the primary drivers of CPE acquisition. Individual risk factors must be considered jointly with the local epidemiology of these microorganisms in healthcare institutions. Overall, these infections have a high associated mortality. Mortality is influenced by host factors (e.g., age, comorbidity and immune deficiency), infection-related variables (e.g., type and severity of the infection) and treatment-related factors such as the delay in the initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and the use or monotherapy or combined antimicrobial therapy. Gaining knowledge concerning the epidemiology, clinical features and prognostic features of CPE infection could be useful for improving infection prevention and for the management of patients with infections caused by these microorganisms.

  8. Acinetobacter infection--an emerging threat to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visca, Paolo; Seifert, Harald; Towner, Kevin J

    2011-12-01

    The genus Acinetobacter comprises a complex and heterogeneous group of bacteria, many of which are capable of causing a range of opportunistic, often catheter-related, infections in humans. However, Acinetobacter baumannii, as well as its close relatives belonging to genomic species 3 ("Acinetobacter pittii") and 13TU ("Acinetobacter nosocomialis"), are important nosocomial pathogens, often associated with epidemic outbreaks of infection, that are only rarely found outside of a clinical setting. These organisms are frequently pandrug-resistant and are capable of causing substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with severe underlying disease, both in the hospital and in the community. Several epidemic clonal lineages of A. baumannii have disseminated worldwide and seem to have a selective advantage over non-epidemic strains. The reasons for the success of these epidemic lineages remain to be elucidated, but could be related to the potential of these organisms to achieve very dynamic reorganization and rapid evolution of their genome, including the acquisition and expression of additional antibiotic resistance determinants, under fluctuating environmental and selective conditions.

  9. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUMAN PARVOVIRUS B19 INFECTION AND APLASTIC ANEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱新宏; 郑跃杰; 张国成; 焦西英; 李佐华

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To explore the relationship between human parvovirus B 19 (HPV B 19) infection and aplastic anemia (AA) and to investigate the role of HPV B19 in the occurrence of AA.``Methods. The presence of HPV B19 DNA was detected in the peripheral blood samples of 60 patients with AA (children 38 and adults 22) by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, and 30 healthy persons were selected as control.``Results. Sixteen (26. 7 % ) of 60 AA cases were HPV B19 DNA positive, while all the samples in the control group were negative for HPV B19 ( P = 0. 000914). Among the case group, the positive rates of HPV B19DNA were 21.4% (6 /28), 30.0% (3 / 10), 20.0% (1 / 5) and 35.3 % (6 / 17) in children acute AA (AAA), children chronic AA (CAA), adults AAA and adults CAA patients respectively, which were significantly higher than that in the control group. Furthermore, there was no remarkable difference between children AA and adults AA in the 16 HPV B19 DNA positive patients; neither was there between AAA and CAA.``Conclusions. HPV B19 infection is not only correlated with the occurrence of children AAA and CAA, but also with adults AAA and CAA, and might be an important viral cause for AA in humans.

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUMAN PARVOVIRUS B19 INFECTION AND APLASTIC ANEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱新宏; 郑跃杰; 张国成; 焦西英; 李佐华

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To explore the relationship between human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection and aplastic anemia (AA) and to investigate the role of HPV B19 in the occurrence of AA. Methods. The presence of HPV B19 DNA was detected in the peripheral blood samples of 60 patients with AA (children 38 and adults 22) by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, and 30 healthy persons were selected as control. Results. Sixteen (26. 7 % ) of 60 AA cases were HPV B19 DNA positive, while all the samples in the control group were negative for HPV B19 (P = 0. 000914). Among the case group, the positive rates of HPV B19 DNA were21.4% (6 /28), 30.0% (3 / 10), 20.0% (1 /5) and 35.3% (6 / 17) in children acute AA (AAA), children chronic AA (CAA), adults AAA and adults CAA patients respectively, which were significant-ly higher than that in the control group, Furthermore, there was no remarkable difference between children AA and adults AA in the 16 HPV B19 DNA positive patients; neither was there between AAA and CAA. Conclusions. HPV B19 infection is not only correlated with the occurrence of children AAA and CAA, but also with adults AAA and CAA, and might be an important viral cause for AA in humans.

  11. Causes of death in HIV-1-infected patients treated with antiretroviral therapy, 1996-2006: collaborative analysis of 13 HIV cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2010-01-01

    We examined specific causes of mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Europe and North America from 1996 through 2006, and we quantified associations of prognostic factors with cause-specific mortality....

  12. Rhombencephalitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes in Humans and Ruminants: A Zoonosis on the Rise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oevermann, Anna; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Vandevelde, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Listeriosis is an emerging zoonotic infection of humans and ruminants worldwide caused by Listeria monocytogenes (LM). In both host species, CNS disease accounts for the high mortality associated with listeriosis and includes rhombencephalitis, whose neuropathology is strikingly similar in humans and ruminants. This review discusses the current knowledge about listeric encephalitis, and involved host and bacterial factors. There is an urgent need to study the molecular mechanisms of neuropathogenesis, which are poorly understood. Such studies will provide a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies that aim to prevent LM from invading the brain and spread within the CNS. PMID:20204066

  13. Rhombencephalitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes in Humans and Ruminants: A Zoonosis on the Rise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oevermann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeriosis is an emerging zoonotic infection of humans and ruminants worldwide caused by Listeria monocytogenes (LM. In both host species, CNS disease accounts for the high mortality associated with listeriosis and includes rhombencephalitis, whose neuropathology is strikingly similar in humans and ruminants. This review discusses the current knowledge about listeric encephalitis, and involved host and bacterial factors. There is an urgent need to study the molecular mechanisms of neuropathogenesis, which are poorly understood. Such studies will provide a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies that aim to prevent LM from invading the brain and spread within the CNS.

  14. Orientia, rickettsia, and leptospira pathogens as causes of CNS infections in Laos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Lee, Sue J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scrub typhus (caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi), murine typhus (caused by Rickettsia typhi), and leptospirosis are common causes of febrile illness in Asia; meningitis and meningoencephalitis are severe complications. However, scarce data exist for the burden of these pathogens......, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, S suis) and O tsutsugamushi, Rickettsia typhi/Rickettsia spp, and Leptospira spp infections in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We analysed and compared causes and clinical and CSF characteristics between patient groups. FINDINGS: 1051 (95%) of 1112...... patients who presented had CSF available for analysis, of whom 254 (24%) had a CNS infection attributable to a bacterial or fungal pathogen. 90 (35%) of these 254 infections were caused by O tsutsugamushi, R typhi/Rickettsia spp, or Leptospira spp. These pathogens were significantly more frequent than...

  15. Attributing the Human Disease Burden of Foodborne Infections to Specific Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pires, Sara Monteiro; Evers, Eric E.; Van Pely, Wilfrid;

    2009-01-01

    for understanding and improving attribution methodologies and for sharing knowledge within the scientific community. We propose harmonized nomenclature, and describe the various approaches for human illness source attribution and their usefulness to address specific public health questions.......Foodborne diseases are an important cause of human illness worldwide. Humans acquire these infections from a variety of sources and routes of transmission. Many efforts have been made in the last decades to prevent and control foodborne diseases, particularly foodborne zoonoses. However...

  16. Bilateral optic neuritis in acute human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M; Toft, P.B.; Bernhard, P;

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report a case of acute viral disease accompanied by bilateral optic neuritis with substantial paraclinical evidence that human immunodeficiency virus was the causative agent. METHODS: Clinical and paraclinical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Virus and antibody titers...... as well as reverse lymphocytosis were consistent with acute infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-1. CONCLUSIONS: Human immunodeficiency virus infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute optic neuritis...

  17. Diarrheagenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infection and bacteremia leading to sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, K; Engeler Dusel, J; Hugentobler, M; Beutin, L; Sägesser, G; Stephan, R; Hächler, H; Nüesch-Inderbinen, M

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of a 55-year-old immunocompromised female who presented to the emergency department with severe diarrhea and vomiting following travel to the Philippines. Stool bacteriology revealed a mixed infection involving an enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and two distinct strains of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC). During hospitalization, urine and blood culture tested positive for one of the diarrheagenic EAEC strains, necessitating urinary catheterization, intensive care, and antimicrobial treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, followed by meropenem. Although known to occasionally cause urinary tract infections, EAEC have not been previously associated with sepsis. Our report highlights the potential of EAEC to cause severe extraintestinal infections.

  18. Human Liver Infection in a Dish: Easy-To-Build 3D Liver Models for Studying Microbial Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora B Petropolis

    Full Text Available Human liver infection is a major cause of death worldwide, but fundamental studies on infectious diseases affecting humans have been hampered by the lack of robust experimental models that accurately reproduce pathogen-host interactions in an environment relevant for the human disease. In the case of liver infection, one consequence of this absence of relevant models is a lack of understanding of how pathogens cross the sinusoidal endothelial barrier and parenchyma. To fill that gap we elaborated human 3D liver in vitro models, composed of human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC and Huh-7 hepatoma cells as hepatocyte model, layered in a structure mimicking the hepatic sinusoid, which enable studies of key features of early steps of hepatic infection. Built with established cell lines and scaffold, these models provide a reproducible and easy-to-build cell culture approach of reduced complexity compared to animal models, while preserving higher physiological relevance compared to standard 2D systems. For proof-of-principle we challenged the models with two hepatotropic pathogens: the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica and hepatitis B virus (HBV. We constructed four distinct setups dedicated to investigating specific aspects of hepatic invasion: 1 pathogen 3D migration towards hepatocytes, 2 hepatocyte barrier crossing, 3 LSEC and subsequent hepatocyte crossing, and 4 quantification of human hepatic virus replication (HBV. Our methods comprise automated quantification of E. histolytica migration and hepatic cells layer crossing in the 3D liver models. Moreover, replication of HBV virus occurs in our virus infection 3D liver model, indicating that routine in vitro assays using HBV or others viruses can be performed in this easy-to-build but more physiological hepatic environment. These results illustrate that our new 3D liver infection models are simple but effective, enabling new investigations on infectious disease mechanisms. The

  19. Growth in agarose of human cells infected with cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, D J; Montagnier, L; Latarjet, R

    1974-08-01

    After infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV), human diploid fibroblasts could grow in agarose medium for several generations. Clones of infected cells grew for weeks, although in every case they ultimately underwent lysis owing to the cytopathic effect of the virus. Virus was inoculated at high dilution and after UV irradiation in an effort to derive cells infected with noninfectious defective particles still capable of inducing cell stimulation. Dilute or irradiated virus occasionally yielded large colonies of replicating cells, although permanent transformation was not observed. One clone derived from UV-CMV-infected cells was passaged four times before undergoing lysis. During these passages the cells exhibited alterations in morphology and orientation.

  20. [Treatment of chronic prostatitis caused by chlamydial and ureaplasmic infection and complicated with male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, S N; Tiktinskiĭ, O L

    2010-01-01

    Etiologically, chronic prostatitis can result from urogenital latent infections caused by chlamydia, ureaplasma and others. First of all, such patients should be examined for urethritis. We examined 306 patients aged 23-45 years with chronic prostatitis caused by chlamydial and ureaplasmic infection. The samples were taken from the urethra, urine, prostatic secretion, ejaculate and were examined using direct immunofluorescence, polymerase chain reaction, culturing. We found spermatogenetic disorders in 50% patients, 35 (11.4%) patients had a deferent duct obstruction. The patients had also immunointerferon deficiency and alterations in prostatic echostructure. In chronic prostatitis caused by chlamydial-ureaplasmic infection the treatment must combine antibacterial drugs (vilprophen, unidox, solutab) with interferons (lavomax, genferon). Male infertility treatment should be started only after elimination of the bacterial infection.

  1. Esophago-pleural fistula with multiple esophageal ulcers in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Soo Hee; Lee, Young Kyung; Choi, Jae Phil; Son, Jin Sung [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Esophagitis is a common complication in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Esophagitis in HIV infected patient is caused by candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, or idiopathic esophagitis with no detectable etiology. Esophagitis in HIV infected patient is occasionally combined with esophageal ulcers. We report chest CT findings and clinical manifestation of esophago-pleural fistula with pneumothorax in a HIV infected patient, who was treated for aspiration pneumonia and esophageal ulcers.

  2. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  3. On Latest Developments in China's Human Rights Cause

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG CHENG; TAN MINZHEN

    2011-01-01

    @@ China's human rights cause has undergone a new phase of development under the reform and opening-up policy that became official in the late 1970s.The changes include a shift from protection of human rights by law to Constitutional protection, an expansion of protection in scope not only for social rights but also for the right to freedoms, an extension from domestic protection to international protection, an increase in the intensity of protection, and a practice for protecting not only protection of the collective but also protection of the individual.

  4. Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a Common Cause of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in the Community▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcher, Sidsel; Tønning, Birgitte; Skov, Robert L.; Prag, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a rare cause of severe infections such as native valve endocarditis, often causes superficial skin infections similar to Staphylococcus aureus infections. We initiated a study to optimize the identification methods in the routine laboratory, followed by a population-based epidemiologic analysis of patients infected with S. lugdunensis in Viborg County, Denmark. Recognition of a characteristic Eikenella corrodens-like odor on Columbia sheep blood agar combined with colony pleomorphism and prominent β-hemolysis after 2 days of incubation, confirmed by API-ID-32 Staph, led to an 11-fold increase in the detection of S. lugdunensis. By these methods we found 491 S. lugdunensis infections in 4 years, corresponding to an incidence of 53 per 100,000 per year, an increase from 5 infections per 100,000 inhabitants in the preceding years. Seventy-five percent of the cases were found in general practice; these were dominated by skin abscesses (36%), wound infections (25%), and paronychias (13%). Fifty-six percent of the infections occurred below the waist, and toes were the most frequently infected site (21%). Only 3% of the patients suffered from severe invasive infections. The median age was 52 years, and the male/female ratio was 0.69. Our study shows that S. lugdunensis is a common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI) and is probably underrated by many laboratories. S. lugdunensis should be accepted as a significant pathogen in SSTI and should be looked for in all routine bacteriological examinations, and clinicians should be acquainted with the name and the pathology of the bacterium. PMID:19244465

  5. Comparison of severe pneumonia caused by Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the incidence and clinical characteristics of severe pneumonia caused by Human metapneumovirus (hMPV to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection in children. Patients and Methods: A total of 151 children hospitalized with severe pneumonia, were tested for hMPV using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. At the same time, samples were tested for RSV and other common respiratory viruses. Medical records, including clinical, laboratory data, and chest radiography findings, were reviewed for all children. Results: Of the 151 samples, 88 (58.3% were positive for respiratory viruses. Of the 88 positive, there were 6 (4.0% with hMPV, 66 (43.7% with RSV, 13 (8.6% with influenza A, 2 (1.3% with parainfluenza virus III, 1 (0.7% with parainfluenza virus I, 1 (0.7% with adenovirus and 1 (0.7% with influenza B. hMPV-infected patients were significantly older than RSV-infected patients (P < 0.001. Children with hMPV pneumonia had fever more frequently (P = 0.03. Two hMPV-positive patients (33.3% required admission to an intensive care unit, and two patients (33.3% required mechanical ventilation. The duration of illness was 18.33 ± 7.09 days. These characteristics of hMPV infections were similar to patients with RSV infections. Conclusion: Human metapneumovirus is an infrequent viral pathogen causing severe pneumonia in children. Children with hMPV were older than those with RSV. The disease caused by hMPV was similar in presentation and severity to RSV, with a minority of children requiring additional respiratory support.

  6. RESPIRATORY VIRAL-INFECTIONS AGGRAVATE AIRWAY DAMAGE CAUSED BY CHRONIC REJECTION IN RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; GOUW, ASH; GROEN, M; WILDEVUUR, C; PROP, J

    1994-01-01

    Airway damage resulting in bronchiolitis obliterans occurs frequently in patients after heart-lung and lung transplantation. Generally, chronic rejection is assumed to be the most important cause of bronchiolitis obliterans. However, viral infections might also be potential causes of airway damage a

  7. Vasoconstriction in horses caused by endophyte-infected tall fescue seed is detected with Doppler ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hypotheses that endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum)-infected tall fescue (TF) seed causes vasoconstriction in horses in vivo and that ground seed would cause more pronounced vasoconstriction than whole seed were tested. Ten horses each received 1 of 3 treatments: endophyte-free ground (E–G; n ...

  8. The first cases of human bacteremia caused by Acinetobacter seifertii in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishii, Kozue; Kikuchi, Ken; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter seifertii, a novel species of Acinetobacter, was first reported in 2015. A. seifertii strains were isolated from human clinical specimens (blood, respiratory tract, and ulcer) and hospital environments. Here, we report the first cases of bacteremia caused by A. seifertii in patients with catheter-related bloodstream infection in Japan. The patients favorably recovered, without any complications, after removal of the peripheral intravenous catheters and administration of antibiotics. The pathogens were initially identified as Acinetobacter baumannii, using phenotypic methods and the MicroScan Walkaway System; however, rpoB gene sequence analysis indicated 99.54% similarity to A. seifertii. Moreover, antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that one of the strains was not susceptible to gentamicin and ceftazidime. Our report shows that Acinetobacter species other than A. baumannii can also cause nosocomial infections and that accurate methods for the identification of causative agents should be developed.

  9. Necrotizing soft-tissue infections and sepsis caused by Vibrio vulnificus compared with those caused by Aeromonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yao-Hung; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Li, Yen-Yao; Peng, Kuo-Ti

    2007-03-01

    Vibrio and Aeromonas species, which can cause necrotizing fasciitis and primary septicemia, are members of the Vibrionaceae family and thrive in aquatic environments. Because the clinical symptoms and signs of necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis caused by these two bacteria are similar, the purposes of this study were to describe the clinical characteristics of Vibrio vulnificus and Aeromonas infections, to analyze the risk factors for death, and to compare the effects of surgical treatment on the outcome. The cases of thirty-two patients with necrotizing soft-tissue infections and sepsis caused by Vibrio vulnificus (seventeen patients) and Aeromonas species (fifteen patients) were retrospectively reviewed over a four-year period. Surgical débridement or immediate limb amputation was initially performed in all patients. Demographic data, underlying diseases, laboratory results, and clinical outcome were analyzed for each patient in both groups. Six patients in the Vibrio vulnificus group and four patients in the Aeromonas group died. The patients who died had significantly lower serum albumin levels than did the patients who survived (p pressure at presentation (p = 0.006). The patients with Aeromonas infections who died had significantly lower white blood-cell counts (p = 0.03) with significantly fewer numbers of segmented white blood cells than those who died in the Vibrio vulnificus group (p = 0.01). The contact history of patients with a rapid onset of cellulitis can alert clinicians to a differential diagnosis of soft-tissue infection with Vibrio vulnificus (contact with seawater or raw seafood) or Aeromonas species (contact with fresh or brackish water, soil, or wood). Early fasciotomy and culture-directed antimicrobial therapy should be aggressively performed in those patients with hypotensive shock, leukopenia, severe hypoalbuminemia, and underlying chronic illness, especially a combination of hepatic dysfunction and diabetes mellitus.

  10. Neopterin and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B

    1993-01-01

    Neopterin concentrations increase in serum and urine within the first week of infection with HIV and remain increased throughout the infection. In particular, changes in neopterin concentration precede decreases in CD4 T cell numbers and the development of clinical disease, and they can be used...

  11. Laboratory diagnosis of persistent human chlamydial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirja ePuolakkainen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic assays for persistent chlamydial infection are much needed to conduct high-quality, large-scale studies investigating the persistent state in vivo, its disease associations and the response to therapy. Yet in most studies the distinction between acute and persistent infection is based on the interpretation of the data obtained by the assays developed to diagnose acute infections or on complex assays available for research only and/or difficult to establish for clinical use. Novel biomarkers for detection of persistent chlamydial infection are urgently needed. Chlamydial whole genome proteome arrays are now available and they can identify chlamydial antigens that are differentially expressed between acute infection and persistent infection. Utilizing these data will lead to the development of novel diagnostic assays. Carefully selected specimens from well-studied patient populations are clearly needed in the process of translating the proteomic data into assays useful for clinical practice. Before such antigens are identified and validated assays become available, we face a challenge of deciding whether the persistent infection truly induced appearance of the proposed marker or do we just base our diagnosis of persistent infection on the presence of the suggested markers. Consequently, we must bear this in mind when interpreting the available data.

  12. Risk factors for acquisition and clearance of oral human papillomavirus infection among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachler, Daniel C; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Margolick, Joseph B; Weber, Kathleen M; Strickler, Howard D; Wiley, Dorothy J; Cranston, Ross D; Burk, Robert D; Minkoff, Howard; Reddy, Susheel; Xiao, Weihong; Guo, Yingshi; Gillison, Maura L; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes the majority of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, yet the risk factors for and natural history of oral HPV infection are largely unknown. In 2010-2011, a US-based longitudinal cohort study of 761 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and 469 at-risk HIV-uninfected participants from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and the Women's Interagency HIV Study was initiated. Semiannually collected oral rinses were evaluated for 37 HPV genotypes using the Roche LINEAR ARRAY HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, California), and factors associated with oral HPV incidence and clearance were explored using adjusted Wei-Lin-Weissfeld modeling. Through 2013, the 2-year cumulative incidence of any type of oral HPV infection was 34% in HIV-infected persons and 19% in HIV-uninfected persons. However, many of these infections cleared. Seven percent of incident infections and 35% of prevalent infections persisted for at least 2 years. After adjustment for other risk factors, HIV infection (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.2), reduced current CD4 cell count, and increased numbers of oral sex and "rimming" partners increased the risk of incident oral HPV infection, whereas male sex, older age, and current smoking increased the risk of oral HPV persistence (each P infection in previous cross-sectional studies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Challenges to communicate risks of human-caused earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    The awareness of natural hazards has been up-trending in recent years. In particular, this is true for earthquakes, which increase in frequency and magnitude in regions that normally do not experience seismic activity. In fact, one of the major concerns for many communities and businesses is that humans today seem to cause earthquakes due to large-scale shale gas production, dewatering and flooding of mines and deep geothermal power production. Accordingly, without opposing any of these technologies it should be a priority of earth scientists who are researching natural hazards to communicate earthquake risks. This presentation discusses the challenges that earth scientists are facing to properly communicate earthquake risks, in light of the fact that human-caused earthquakes are an environmental change affecting only some communities and businesses. Communication channels may range from research papers, books and class room lectures to outreach events and programs, popular media events or even social media networks.

  14. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  15. Septic arthritis and subsequent fatal septic shock caused by Vibrio vulnificus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup;

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a rare but potential fatal bacterium that can cause severe infections. Wound infections, primary sepsis and gastroenteritis are the most common clinical features. Septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus is an atypical presentation that has been reported in only two case...... reports; however, it has not been previously noted in Denmark. The authors report a case of septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus in an immunocompromised patient. The disease progressed to severe sepsis and subsequent death within 10 h of admission....

  16. Septic arthritis and subsequent fatal septic shock caused by Vibrio vulnificus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamifar, Amir; Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Skaarup Andersen, Nanna; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a rare but potential fatal bacterium that can cause severe infections. Wound infections, primary sepsis and gastroenteritis are the most common clinical features. Septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus is an atypical presentation that has been reported in only two case reports; however, it has not been previously noted in Denmark. The authors report a case of septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus in an immunocompromised patient. The disease progressed to severe sepsis and subsequent death within 10 h of admission.

  17. A rare case of human trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powar R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human trypanosoma infections like the ones seen in Africa and South America are unknown in India. The only exception in literature is of two documented cases of a self-limiting febrile illness, being attributed to Trypanosoma lewisi like parasites. We are reporting an unusual case of trypanosomiasis from the rural parts of Chandrapur district in Maharashtra. An adult male farmhand who used to practice veterinary medicine also, presented with history of febrile episodes on and off since five months and drowsiness before admission to this Institute. Though routine blood and other investigations were within normal limits, the peripheral smear showed a large number of trypanosomes which morphologically resembled the species Trypanosoma evansi , the aetiological agent of surra - a form of animal trypanosomiasis. A battery of assays covering the spectrum of parasitology, serology, and molecular biology confirmed the infecting parasite to be T. evansi . Failure to demonstrate the central nervous system (CNS involvement, as evidenced by the absence of parasite in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF advocated the use of suramin - the drug of choice in early stage African trypanosomiasis without any CNS involvement. Suramin achieved cure in our patient. The case is being reported because of its unique nature as the patient was not immunocompromised and showed infestation with a parasite which normally does not affect human beings.

  18. [Drug interactions and their management in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarcos Ortíz de Barrón, A; Martínez Vázquez, J M; Lorenzo Zúñiga, V; Barrio Gómez, E

    1998-03-01

    In fact patients with human immune deficiency virus infection are in treatment with multidrugs regimen, also in antiretrovirical therapy as profilaxis and treatment opportunist infections and other problems, in other fact the high tase of intravenous drugs users in meta-done programming (one of the principal transmission cause). Consequently is necessary an rational approximation to this problem also in the deepth knowledgment of his mechanisms and his management in the daily clinical practice.

  19. Bilateral peripheral facial palsy in a patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Su; Yoon, Hee Jung; Kim, Hai Jin; Nam, Ji Sun; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, June Myung; Song, Young Goo

    2006-10-31

    Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported. In this paper, we present the first case in Korea, of a bilateral facial palsy occurring as the first clinical manifestation of HIV infection.

  20. Interleukin-13–Induced Mucous Metaplasia Increases Susceptibility of Human Airway Epithelium to Rhinovirus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Infection of airway epithelium by rhinovirus is the most common cause of asthma exacerbations. Even in mild asthma, airway epithelium exhibits mucous metaplasia, which increases with increasing severity of the disease. We previously showed that squamous cultures of human airway epithelium manifest rhinoviral infection at levels many times higher than in well-differentiated cultures of a mucociliary phenotype. Here we tested the hypothesis that mucous metaplasia is also associated with increas...

  1. Human and Avian Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli: Infections, Zoonotic Risks, and Antibiotic Resistance Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) constitutes ongoing health concerns for women, newborns, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals due to increased numbers of urinary tract infections (UTIs), newborn meningitis, abdominal sepsis, and septicemia. E. coli remains the leading cause of UTIs, with recent investigations reporting the emergence of E. coli as the predominant cause of nosocomial and neonatal sepsis infections. This shift from the traditional Gram-positive bacterial causes of nosocomial and neonatal sepsis infections could be attributed to the use of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis against Gram-positive bacteria and the appearance of antibiotic (ATB) resistance in E. coli. While ExPEC strains cause significant healthcare concerns, these bacteria also infect chickens and cause the poultry industry economic losses due to costs of containment, mortality, and disposal of carcasses. To circumvent ExPEC-related costs, ATBs are commonly used in the poultry industry to prevent/treat microbial infections and promote growth and performance. In an unfortunate linkage, chicken products are suspected to be a source of foodborne ExPEC infections and ATB resistance in humans. Therefore, the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents) among avian E. coli has created major economic and health concerns, affecting both human healthcare and poultry industries. Increased numbers of immunocompromised individuals, including the elderly, coupled with MDR among ExPEC strains, will continue to challenge the treatment of ExPEC infections and likely lead to increased treatment costs. With ongoing complications due to emerging ATB resistance, novel treatment strategies are necessary to control ExPEC infections. Recognizing and treating the zoonotic risk posed by ExPEC would greatly enhance food safety and positively impact human health. PMID:23962019

  2. Varicella zoster virus infection causing urinary retention in a child with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Wessels

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old boy receiving antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection and antibacterial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis presented with urinary retention due to varicella zoster virus infection involving the sacral nerves, confirmed on serological testing. The perineum over dermatomes S2 - S4 on the left was involved with a vesicular and superficially erosive rash. A transurethral catheter was inserted and the patient was treated with acyclovir (300 mg 6-hourly for 5 days. At follow-up 4 weeks later, the perineal skin lesions had healed, the catheter was removed and the patient was able to pass urine.

  3. 78 FR 33848 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... No. FDA-2013-D-0589] Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection... guidance for industry entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral Drugs... guidance for industry entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral...

  4. Human-caused Indo-Pacific warm pool expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Evan; Min, Seung-Ki; Cai, Wenju; Zwiers, Francis W; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Donghyun

    2016-07-01

    The Indo-Pacific warm pool (IPWP) has warmed and grown substantially during the past century. The IPWP is Earth's largest region of warm sea surface temperatures (SSTs), has the highest rainfall, and is fundamental to global atmospheric circulation and hydrological cycle. The region has also experienced the world's highest rates of sea-level rise in recent decades, indicating large increases in ocean heat content and leading to substantial impacts on small island states in the region. Previous studies have considered mechanisms for the basin-scale ocean warming, but not the causes of the observed IPWP expansion, where expansion in the Indian Ocean has far exceeded that in the Pacific Ocean. We identify human and natural contributions to the observed IPWP changes since the 1950s by comparing observations with climate model simulations using an optimal fingerprinting technique. Greenhouse gas forcing is found to be the dominant cause of the observed increases in IPWP intensity and size, whereas natural fluctuations associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation have played a smaller yet significant role. Further, we show that the shape and impact of human-induced IPWP growth could be asymmetric between the Indian and Pacific basins, the causes of which remain uncertain. Human-induced changes in the IPWP have important implications for understanding and projecting related changes in monsoonal rainfall, and frequency or intensity of tropical storms, which have profound socioeconomic consequences.

  5. Comprehensive Control of Human Papillomavirus Infections and Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, F. Xavier; Broker, Thomas R.; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L.; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L.; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E.; Schiller, John T.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Fisher, William A.; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A.; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J.; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  6. Interleukin-13-induced mucous metaplasia increases susceptibility of human airway epithelium to rhinovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E; Boushey, Homer A; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Widdicombe, Jonathan H

    2010-12-01

    Infection of airway epithelium by rhinovirus is the most common cause of asthma exacerbations. Even in mild asthma, airway epithelium exhibits mucous metaplasia, which increases with increasing severity of the disease. We previously showed that squamous cultures of human airway epithelium manifest rhinoviral infection at levels many times higher than in well-differentiated cultures of a mucociliary phenotype. Here we tested the hypothesis that mucous metaplasia is also associated with increased levels of rhinoviral infection. Mucous metaplasia was induced with IL-13, which doubled the numbers of goblet cells. In both control (mucociliary) and IL-13- treated (mucous metaplastic) cultures, goblet cells were preferentially infected by rhinovirus. IL-13 doubled the numbers of infected cells by increasing the numbers of infected goblet cells. Furthermore, IL-13 increased both the maturity of goblet cells and the probability that a goblet cell would be infected. The infection of cells other than goblet cells was unaltered by IL-13. Treatment with IL-13 did not alter the levels of rhinovirus receptor ICAM-1, nor did the proliferative effects of IL-13 enhance infection, because rhinovirus did not colocalize with dividing cells. However, the induction of mucous metaplasia caused changes in the apical membrane structure, notably a marked decrease in overall ciliation, and an increase in the overall flatness of the apical surface. We conclude that mucous metaplasia in asthma increases the susceptibility of airway epithelium to infection by rhinovirus because of changes in the overall architecture of the apical surface.

  7. Human avian influenza A (H5N1) virus infection in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Highly pathogenic influenza A (H5N1) virus causes a widespread poultry deaths worldwide. The first human H5N1 infected case was reported in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China in 1997. Since then, the virus re-emerged in 2003 and continues to infect people worldwide. Currently, over 400 human infections have been reported in more than 15 countries and mortality rate is greater than 60%. H5N1 viruses still pose a potential pandemic threat in the future because of the continuing global spread and evolution. Here, we summarize the epidemiological, clinical and virological characteristics of human H5N1 infection in China monitored and identified by our national surveillance systems.

  8. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Wesula Lwande

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures.

  9. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Obanda, Vincent; Bucht, Göran; Mosomtai, Gladys; Otieno, Viola; Ahlm, Clas; Evander, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures.

  10. Studying the immune response to human viral infections using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Michelle F; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H

    2014-09-01

    Humans and viruses have a long co-evolutionary history. Viral illnesses have and will continue to shape human history: from smallpox, to influenza, to HIV, and beyond. Animal models of human viral illnesses are needed in order to generate safe and effective antiviral medicines, adjuvant therapies, and vaccines. These animal models must support the replication of human viruses, recapitulate aspects of human viral illnesses, and respond with conserved immune signaling cascades. The zebrafish is perhaps the simplest, most commonly used laboratory model organism in which innate and/or adaptive immunity can be studied. Herein, we will discuss the current zebrafish models of human viral illnesses and the insights they have provided. We will highlight advantages of early life stage zebrafish and the importance of innate immunity in human viral illnesses. We will also discuss viral characteristics to consider before infecting zebrafish with human viruses as well as predict other human viruses that may be able to infect zebrafish.

  11. No evidence for ape Plasmodium infections in humans in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Délicat-Loembet, Lucresse; Rougeron, Virginie; Ollomo, Benjamin; Arnathau, Céline; Roche, Benjamin; Elguero, Eric; Moukodoum, Nancy Diamella; Okougha, Alain-Prince; Mve Ondo, Bertrand; Boundenga, Larson; Houzé, Sandrine; Galan, Maxime; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Leroy, Eric M; Durand, Patrick; Paupy, Christophe; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2015-01-01

    African great apes are naturally infected by a multitude of Plasmodium species most of them recently discovered, among which several are closely related to human malaria agents. However, it is still unknown whether these animals can serve as source of infections for humans living in their vicinity. To evaluate this possibility, we analysed the nature of Plasmodium infections from a bank of 4281 human blood samples collected in 210 villages of Gabon, Central Africa. Among them, 2255 were detected positive to Plasmodium using molecular methods (Plasmodium Cytochrome b amplification). A high throughput sequencing technology (454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, Roche) was then used to identify the Plasmodium species present within each positive sample. Overall, we identified with confidence only three species infecting humans in Gabon: P. falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale. None of the species known to infect non-human primates in Central Africa was found. Our study shows that ape Plasmodium parasites of the subgenus Laverania do not constitute a frequent source of infection for humans. It also suggests that some strong host genetic barriers must exist to prevent the cross species transmission of ape Plasmodium in a context of ever increasing contacts between humans and wildlife.

  12. Comparison of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with food intoxication with isolates from human nasal carriers and human infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattinger, L; Stephan, R; Layer, F; Johler, S

    2012-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus represents an organism of striking versatility. While asymptomatic nasal colonization is widespread, it can also cause serious infections, toxinoses and life-threatening illnesses in humans and animals. Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP), one of the most prevalent causes of foodborne intoxication worldwide, results from oral intake of staphylococcal enterotoxins leading to violent vomiting, diarrhea and cramps shortly upon ingestion. The aim of the present study was to compare isolates associated with SFP to isolates collected from cases of human nasal colonization and clinical infections in order to investigate the role of S. aureus colonizing and infecting humans as a possible source of SFP. Spa typing and DNA microarray profiling were used to characterize a total of 120 isolates, comprising 50 isolates collected from the anterior nares of healthy donors, 50 isolates obtained from cases of clinical infections in humans and 20 isolates related to outbreaks of staphylococcal food poisoning. Several common spa types were found among isolates of all three sources (t015, t018, t056, t084). DNA microarray results showed highly similar virulence gene profiles for isolates from all tested sources. These results suggest contamination of foodstuff with S. aureus colonizing and infecting food handlers to represent a source of SFP.

  13. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  14. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-06

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection in Cameroon: ... were analyzed using molecular biology techniques that involved RT-PCR, ... There is evidence of genetic diversity of HIV and HCV; virulent hepatitis C virus ...

  16. Determining the cause of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection using whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, James Heng Chiak; Truong, Cynthia; Minot, Samuel S; Greenfield, Nick; Budvytiene, Indre; Lohith, Akshar; Anikst, Victoria; Pourmand, Nader; Banaei, Niaz

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of relapse and reinfection to recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has implications for therapy and infection prevention, respectively. We used whole genome sequencing to determine the relation of C. difficile strains isolated from patients with recurrent CDI at an academic medical center in the United States. Thirty-five toxigenic C. difficile isolates from 16 patients with 19 recurrent CDI episodes with median time of 53.5days (range, 13-362) between episodes were whole genome sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. In 84% (16) of recurrences, the cause of recurrence was relapse with prior strain of C. difficile. In 16% (3) of recurrent episodes, reinfection with a new strain of C. difficile was the cause. In conclusion, the majority of CDI recurrences at our institution were due to infection with the same strain rather than infection with a new strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human infections caused by free-living amoebae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Król-Turmińska

    2017-05-01

    Amoebic diseases are difficult to diagnose which leads to delayed treatment, and result in a high mortality rate. Considering those issues, there is an urgent need to draw more attention to this type of diseases.

  18. A review of methods for detect human Papillomavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu André L P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus (HPV is the most common sexually transmitted virus. Worldwide, the most common high-risk (HR-HPV are -16/18, and approximately 70% of cervical cancers (CC are due to infection by these genotypes. Persistent infection by HR-HPV is a necessary but not sufficient cause of this cancer, which develops over a long period through precursor lesions, which can be detected by cytological screening. Although this screening has decreased the incidence of CC, HPV-related cervical disease, including premalignant and malignant lesions, continues to be a major burden on health-care systems. Although not completely elucidated, the HPV-driven molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cervical lesions have provided a number of potential biomarkers for both diagnostic and prognostic use in the clinical management of women with HPV-related cervical disease, and these biomarkers can also be used to increase the positive predictive value of current screening methods. In addition, they can provide insights into the biology of HPV-induced cancer and thus lead to the development of nonsurgical therapies. Considering the importance of detecting HPV and related biomarkers, a variety of methods are being developed for these purposes. This review summarizes current knowledge of detection methods for HPV, and related biomarkers that can be used to discriminate lesions with a high risk of progression to CC.

  19. Effect of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection on Nerve Growth Factor Expression in Human Glioma U251 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAI-TAO WANG; BIN WANG; ZHI-JUN LIU; ZHI-QIANG BAI; LING LI; HAI-YAN LIU; DONG-MENG QIAN; ZHI-YONG YAN; XU-XIA SONG

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To explore the change of endogenic nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in human glioma cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Methods U251 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 culture medium and infected with HCMV AD169 strain in vitro to establish a cell model of viral infection. Morphologic changes of U251 cells were observed under inverted microscope before and after infection with HCMV. Expression of NGF gene and protein of cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting before and after infection with HCMV. Results The cytopathic effects of HCMV-infected cells appeared on day 5 after infection. However, differential NGF expression was evident on day 7. NGF expression was decreased significantly in U251 cells on day 7 after infection in comparison with control group (P<0.05). Conclusion HCMV can down-regulate endogenous NGF levels in human glioma cell line U251.

  20. Human neurocysticercosis: immunological features involved in the host's susceptibility to become infected and to develop disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciutto, Edda; Cárdenas, Graciela; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Fleury, Agnes

    2013-06-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous disease caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. Herein, the immunological and endocrinological features involved in resistance to infection and severe forms of the disease are reviewed, and their clinical relevance is discussed.

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis and genital human papillomavirus infections in female university students in Honduras.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabora, N.; Zelaya, A.; Bakkers, J.; Melchers, W.J.; Ferrera, A.

    2005-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections are a serious health problem in Honduras. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases. To determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis and HPV in young women, 100 female university students in Honduras were assa

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis and genital human papillomavirus infections in female university students in Honduras.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabora, N.; Zelaya, A.; Bakkers, J.; Melchers, W.J.; Ferrera, A.

    2005-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections are a serious health problem in Honduras. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases. To determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis and HPV in young women, 100 female university students in Honduras were assa

  3. Human parechovirus as a minor cause of acute otitis media in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Saara; Oikarinen, Sami; Sipilä, Markku; Seppälä, Elina; Nurminen, Noora; Rautiainen, Markus; Laranne, Jussi; Hyöty, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) cause mild upper respiratory infections, gastrointestinal symptoms, central nervous system infections and some studies have linked them with acute otitis media (AOM). The aim of the present study was to study further the role of HPeV infections in AOM by detecting these viruses directly from middle ear fluid (MEF), respiratory and stool samples collected from children during AOM episodes. A total of 91 MEF samples, 98 nasal swab (NS) samples and 92 stool samples were collected during 100 AOM episodes in a total of 87 children aged between five to 42 months. All specimens were analyzed by real time RT-PCR for the presence of HPeV RNA. HPeV infection was diagnosed in 12 (14%) patients. HPeV RNA was detected in altogether 13 samples, including four MEF samples, three NS samples and six stool samples. One patient was positive in both stool and MEF samples. The results suggest that HPeV may play a role in some AOM cases, but it is not a major cause of AOM in children.

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Ginsenoside Rb1 on Apoptosis Caused by HSV-1 in Human Glioma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Liang; Bin Wang; Dong-Meng Qian; Ling Li; Zhi-Hao Wang; Ming Hu; Xu-Xia Song

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effects of Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1) on apoptosis caused by Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) in Human Glioma Cells (U251),U251 cells were infected by HSV-1 at a multiplicity of infection of 5 and GRb1,GRb1+HSV-1,HSV-1 and control groups.MTT and cell apoptosis assays were used to detect the inhibitory effects of GRbl on the apoptosis of U251 cells that caused by HSV-1 infection for various concentrations of drug and virus treatments by MTT assay.We found that in the 400 μg/mL GRbl and 400 μg/mL GRbl+HSV-1 groups,MTT values were higher than control group at all times (P<0.05).Moreover,the apoptosis rate in the 400 μg/mL GRb1+HSV-1 group was lower than the HSV-1 group (P<0.05).These results confirmed that,at appropriate concentrations,GRb 1 could inhibit nerve cell apoptosis in HSV-1 infections.

  5. HSV-2 Infection as a Cause of Female/Male and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don C Des Jarlais

    Full Text Available To examine the potential contribution of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 infection to female/male and racial/ethnic disparities in HIV among non-injecting heroin and cocaine drug users. HSV-2 infection increases susceptibility to HIV infection by a factor of two to three.Subjects were recruited from entrants to the Beth Israel drug detoxification program in New York City 2005-11. All subjects reported current use of heroin and/or cocaine and no lifetime injection drug use. A structured questionnaire was administered and serum samples collected for HIV and HSV-2 testing. Population-attributable risk percentages (PAR%s were calculated for associations between HSV-2 infection and increased susceptibility to HIV.1745 subjects were recruited from 2005-11. Overall HIV prevalence was 14%. Females had higher prevalence than males (22% vs. 12% (p<0.001, African-Americans had the highest prevalence (15%, Hispanics an intermediate prevalence (12%, and Whites the lowest prevalence (3% (p<.001. There were parallel variations in HSV-2 prevalence (females 86%, males 51%, African-Americans 66%, Hispanics 47%, Whites 36%, HSV-2 prevalence was strongly associated with HIV prevalence (OR  =  3.12 95% CI 2.24 to 4.32. PAR%s for HSV-2 as a cause of HIV ranged from 21% for Whites to 50% for females. Adjusting for the effect of increased susceptibility to HIV due to HSV-2 infection greatly reduced all disparities (adjusted prevalence  =  males 8%, females 11%; Whites 3%, African-Americans 10%, Hispanics 9%.Female/male and racial/ethnic variations in HSV-2 infection provide a biological mechanism that may generate female/male and racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection among non-injecting heroin and cocaine users in New York City. HSV-2 infection should be assessed as a potential contributing factor to disparities in sexually transmitted HIV throughout the US.

  6. Cytokine secretion profiles of human keratinocytes during Trichophyton tonsurans and Arthroderma benhamiae infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Yumi; Ishibashi, Yoshio; Hiruma, Masataro; Nishikawa, Akemi; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2006-09-01

    Dermatophytes cause intractable superficial infections in humans. Arthroderma benhamiae, a zoophilic dermatophyte, triggers severe inflammatory responses in humans, while Trichophyton tonsurans, an anthropophilic dermatophyte, triggers minimal ones. Cytokines and other factors derived from keratinocytes play important roles in inflammatory and immune responses in the skin. The authors performed an in vitro investigation to determine the human keratinocyte cytokine profiles during dermatophyte infection. The human keratinocyte cell line PHK16-0b was infected with A. benhamiae or T. tonsurans for 24 h, and the cytokines secreted were analysed using a human cytokine antibody array. Marked differences were observed in the cytokine profiles of the cells infected with the two dermatophytes. A. benhamiae infection resulted in the secretion of a broad spectrum of cytokines, including proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and immunomodulatory cytokines. In contrast, T. tonsurans-infected keratinocytes secreted only limited cytokines, including eotaxin-2, interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-16. cDNA microarray analysis confirmed that A. benhamiae infection upregulated genes encoding IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-15, IL-16, IL-17 and interferon (IFN)-gamma, while T. tonsurans infection upregulated only a few genes, such as those encoding IL-1beta and IL-16. RT-PCR demonstrated that infection by both dermatophytes enhanced IL-8 mRNA expression in keratinocytes. These results suggest that A. benhamiae-induced secretion of several cytokines from keratinocytes may be involved in a severe inflammatory response, and that the limited cytokine secretion from keratinocytes in response to T. tonsurans infection may result in a minimal inflammatory response in the skin. These cytokine profiles may aid in proving the clinical features of dermatophytosis.

  7. Risk factors for nosocomial burn wound infection caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Recep; Dal, Tuba; Bozkurt, Fatma; Deveci, Ozcan; Palanc, Ylmaz; Arslan, Eyüp; Selçuk, Caferi Tayyar; Hoşoğlu, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii infections in burn patients may lead to delays in wound healing, graft losses, and development of sepsis. Determining the risk factors for multidrug resistant A. baumannii (MDR-AB) infections is essential for infection control. In the present study, the authors aimed to evaluate risk factors for wound infections caused by A. baumannii in burn patients. The study was conducted at Dicle University Hospital Burn Center, from April 2011 to July 2012, to investigate the risk factors for MDR-AB infections. The data of both the case and control group patients and the result of wound cultures were recorded on a daily basis, on individual forms given for each patient, and analyzed. A total of 30 cases infected with MDR-AB, and 60 uninfected control patients, were included in the study. The mean age (±SD) was 7.7 ± 15.4 years in infected patients and 11.4 ± 16.5 years in uninfected patients. The mean total burn surface area was 13.5 ± 10.9% in uninfected patients and 34.7 ± 16.2% in infected patients. The mean total burn surface area, the abbreviated burn severity index, acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, day of admission to hospital, length of hospital stay, first excision day, prior usage of third-generation cephalosporins, and stay in intensive care unit of the infected patients were significantly higher (P infection. Univariate analysis found that high acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, first excision time of wound, invasive device usage, admission day to hospital, and prior usage of broad-spectrum antibiotics were risk factors for nosocomial infections. This study showed that multiple factors contribute to multidrug resistance in A. baumannii. A combination of an early diagnosis of wound infections, appropriate antimicrobial treatments, surgical debridement, and early wound closure may be effective in the management.

  8. Permissive human cytomegalovirus infection of a first trimester extravillous cytotrophoblast cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaMarca Heather L

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the leading cause of congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe. Despite the significant morbidity associated with prenatal HCMV infection, little is known about how the virus infects the fetus during pregnancy. To date, primary human cytotrophoblasts (CTBs have been utilized to study placental HCMV infection and replication; however, the minimal mitotic potential of these cells restricts experimentation to a few days, which may be problematic for mechanistic studies of the slow-replicating virus. The aim of this study was to determine whether the human first trimester CTB cell line SGHPL-4 was permissive for HCMV infection and therefore could overcome such limitations. HCMV immediate early (IE protein expression was detected as early as 3 hours post-infection in SGHPL-4 cells and progressively increased as a function of time. HCMV growth assays revealed the presence of infectious virus in both cell lysates and culture supernatants, indicating that viral replication and the release of progeny virus occurred. Compared to human fibroblasts, viral replication was delayed in CTBs, consistent with previous studies reporting delayed viral kinetics in HCMV-infected primary CTBs. These results indicate that SGHPL-4 cells are fully permissive for the complete HCMV replicative cycle. Our findings suggest that these cells may serve as useful tools for future mechanistic studies of HCMV pathogenesis during early pregnancy.

  9. The Review Systematic and Meta Analysis of Prevalence and Causes of Nosocomial Infection in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezhman Bagheri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The variation of reported nosocomial infection is very high respectively. It seems review systematic and Meta analysis of related documents gives precise estimate of this subject for correct politisize. So tha aim of this study the review systematic and meta analysis of prevalence and causes of nosocomial infection in iran. Materials and Methods: For this study all articles published in Iranian journals and international journals, Final Report of Research Projects, related papers presented at congresses and thesis were reviewed with using standard and sensitive keywords. Then, all articles published between 1997-2010 years that had eligibility Inclusion criteria after quality control, using random model, intered to process of meta-analysis. Results: The finding show that the best estimate of total prevalence of nosocomial infection in Iran is 30.43% and the most common infections of nosocomial infection are respiratory infection 39.4%%, urinary infection 23.88%, bacteremia 21.98% and the most common factors of nosocomial infection are Pseudomonas aeroginosa 26.78%, klebsiella 31.42%, Staphylococcus 23.6% and E.coli 30.93%. The research also found a substantial heterogeneity that using meta regression method the main cause of produce of this heterogeneity, participants people, sample size, average age of the samples, time of study and gender were introduced. Conclusions: The simple review of studied documents in this survey show that prevalence rate of different nosocomial infection in Iran is high relatively. Hence make appropriate and evidence-based educational and control programs to reduce nosocomial infections prevalence rate in Iran should be considered by policy makers.

  10. A rare cause of infection, Raoultella planticola: emerging threat and new reservoir for carbapenem resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiray, Tayfur; Koroglu, Mehmet; Ozbek, Ahmet; Altindis, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    Severe cases of infections caused by Raoultella planticola are constantly being reported from all over the world with the increase in drug-resistance patterns. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the clinical characteristics of R. planticola infections with patients' demographics and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the R. planticola isolates. R. planticola isolates were retrospectively evaluated. VITEK 2(®) automated system was used for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Verification of the low-discriminated isolates was analyzed with MALDI-TOF method using VITEK MS(®) system. Gene-Xpert(®) system was used for detection of bla IMP-1-, bla KPC-, bla NDM-1-, bla OXA-48- and bla VIM-type carbapenemases. The data of the patients with R. planticola infection were collected from hospital records. During the 4-year period, 42 episodes of R. planticola infections were detected. MALDI-TOF was used for 11 of the low-discriminated isolates, and 1 of which identified as R. terrigena was excluded. Carbapenems and aminoglycosides were the most effective antimicrobial agents. Extended spectrum beta-lactamases were detected in seven of the isolates. Three carbapenem-resistant isolates were detected as bla OXA-48-type carbapenemase carrier. Nosocomial R. planticola infections constituted 80.9 % (n = 34) of the infections. Most common infections related with R. planticola were blood stream infections (n = 24) (p  0.005). Challenging infections caused by Raoultella spp., like those of multidrug resistant Klebsiella spp., will probably become a concern for clinicians as well as microbiologists . In literature, there were few cases, but we believe that the incidence of Raoultella spp. infections, which may result from misidentification, are more common than expected , and it is not unlikely that there will be a gradual increase and spread in multidrug-resistant isolates.

  11. Chrpsomva bezziana, The Cause of Myiasis on animal And Human : Problem and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April H Wardhana

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is an infestation of larvae (Diptera into the live host tissue of warm-blooded animals including humans . This disease is often found in tropical countries, particularly in the community with low socio-economic level. From many flies causing myiasis, Chrysomya bezziana is medically the most important agent due to its obligate parasite property and causing economies losses . Some myiasis cases on humans and animals in Indonesia are caused by C. bezziana larvae infestation or mixed infestation with Sarcophaga sp . Sulawesi, East Sumba, Lombok, Sumbawa, Papua and Java islands were reported as myiasis endemic areas . Myiasis cases on animals occurred after parturition (vulval myiasis then is followed by umbilical myiasis on their calf or traumatic wounds, while myiasis on humans are caused by untreated fresh wounds or chronic wounds such as leprosy, diabetes, etc . Besides, nature holes like nose, eyes, ears or mouth are also reported as entry port for those larvae . Clinical signs of myiasis are various and non-specific depends on location of infested part of body, i.e . fever, inflammation, pruritus, headache, vertigo, swelling and hipereosinophilia . There would be serious conditions with secondary infection by bacteria . Myiasis treatment on animals is simpler than humans . Surgical operation is often carried out on infested human part of bodies . Insecticides were used to treat animal myiasis but had raised resistant . Myiasis treatment on humans may be done locally or systemically . Antibiotic broad spectrum or which is suitable with culture and resistance status of bacteria were given for systemic treatment . Chloroform and turpentine with ratio 1 : 4 were used for local treatment . Some of essential oils have also been tested in laboratory as an alternative medicine for both humans and animals myiasis .

  12. Two Atypical Cases of Kingella kingae Invasive Infection with Concomitant Human Rhinovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmaci, Romain; Ilharreborde, Brice; Doit, Catherine; Presedo, Ana; Lorrot, Mathie; Alison, Marianne; Mazda, Keyvan; Bidet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We describe two atypical cases of Kingella kingae infection in children diagnosed by PCR, one case involving a soft tissue abscess and one case a femoral Brodie abscess. Both patients had concomitant human rhinovirus infection. K. kingae strains, isolated from an oropharyngeal swab, were characterized by multilocus sequence typing and rtxA sequencing. PMID:23784119

  13. Serodiagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the established role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in gastritis and duodenal ulcer in general, conflicting results have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The seroprevalence during early HIV...

  14. Alteration or adaptation, the two roads for human gastric mucin glycosylation infected by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joncquel Chevalier Curt, Marie; Lecointe, Karine; Mihalache, Adriana; Rossez, Yannick; Gosset, Pierre; Léonard, Renaud; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the mucus niche of the gastric mucosa and infects more than half of the world's human population. Chronic infection may cause gastritis, duodenal ulcer, intestinal metaplasia or gastric cancer. In the stomach, H. pylori interacts with O-glycans of gastric mucins but the mechanism by which the bacteria succeed in altering the mucosa remains mainly unknown. To better understand the physiopathology of the infection, inhibitory adhesion assays were performed with various O-glycans expressed by human gastric mucins, and topographic expression of gastric mucins MUC5AC and MUC6 was analyzed for healthy uninfected individuals, for infected asymptomatic individuals and for patients infected by H. pylori and having the incomplete type of intestinal metaplasia. The glycosylation of the gastric mucosa of asymptomatic individuals infected by H. pylori was determined and compared with the glycosylation pattern found for patients with the incomplete type of intestinal metaplasia. Results show that H. pylori manages to modulate host's glycosylation during the course of infection in order to create a favorable niche, whereas asymptomatic infected individuals seem to counteract further steps of infection development by adapting their mucus glycosylation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A Rare Human Case of Dirofilaria repens Infection in the Subcutaneous Posterior Thorax with Molecular Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tran Anh; Vi, Thuat Thang; Nguyen, Khac Luc; Le, Thanh Hoa

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of Dirofilarial infections in Asia including Vietnam is a clinically significant threat to the community. We here report a rare case of subcutaneous Dirofilaria repens infection on the posterior thoracic wall in a young woman presenting a painful, itchy, and palpable nodule. The adult worm was identified by mitochondrial cox1 and nuclear ITS-2 sequence determination. The diagnosis was additionally confirmed by 16S rRNA sequencing of the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis commonly co-existing with D. repens. This is a rare case of subcutaneous human infection on the posterior thoracic region caused by D. repens.

  16. MAMMOMONOGAMUS LARYNGEUS (HUMAN SYNGAMOSIS) INFECTION IN CHINA: REPORT OF THREE CASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周燕斌; 谢灿茂; 张锡煌; 李道宁

    2001-01-01

    Objective To report and study Mammomonogamus laryngeus (human Syngamosis) parasite infection.Methods To describe three cases of Mammomonogamus laryngeus parasite infection in China.Results Mammomonogamus laryngeus was characterized by paroxysms of nonproductive coughing, hemoptysis, and weight loss, not responsive to antibiotic therapy. Diagnosis depended on recovering bloody red worms in the bronchus seen under fiberbronchoscope. Levemizole was effective in eradicating the parasites.Conclusion The Mammomonogamus laryngeus infection should be suspected in patients who have an unknown cause of paroxysms of nonproductive coughing, hemoptysis, and weight loss, and have a history of taking uncooked food.

  17. Mixed Cutaneous Infection Caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and Mycobacterium intermedium in a Healthy Adult Female: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amresh Kumar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs are ubiquitous and are being increasingly reported as human opportunistic infection. Cutaneous infection caused by mixed NTM is extremely rare. We encountered the case of a 46-year-old female, who presented with multiple discharging sinuses over the lower anterior abdominal wall (over a previous appendectomy scar for the past 2 years. Microscopy and culture of the pus discharge were done to isolate and identify the etiological agent. Finally, GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS assay proved it to be a mixed infection caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and M. intermedium. The patient was advised a combination of rifampicin 600 mg once daily, ethambutol 600 mg once daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily to be taken along with periodic follow-up based upon clinical response as well as microbiological response. We emphasize that infections by NTM must be considered in the etiology of nonhealing wounds or sinuses, especially at postsurgical sites.

  18. Water as Source of Francisella tularensis Infection in Humans, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Selcuk; Birdsell, Dawn N; Karagöz, Alper; Çelebi, Bekir; Bakkaloglu, Zekiye; Arikan, Muzaffer; Sahl, Jason W; Mitchell, Cedar; Rivera, Andrew; Maltinsky, Sara; Keim, Paul; Üstek, Duran; Durmaz, Rıza; Wagner, David M

    2015-12-01

    Francisella tularensis DNA extractions and isolates from the environment and humans were genetically characterized to elucidate environmental sources that cause human tularemia in Turkey. Extensive genetic diversity consistent with genotypes from human outbreaks was identified in environmental samples and confirmed water as a source of human tularemia in Turkey.

  19. Vibrio cholerae Infection of Drosophilamelanogaster Mimics the Human Disease Cholera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholera, the pandemic diarrheal disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae, continues to be a major public health challenge in the developing world. Cholera toxin, which is responsible for the voluminous stools of cholera, causes constitutive activation of adenylyl cyclase, resulting in the export of ions into the intestinal lumen. Environmental studies have demonstrated a close association between V. cholerae and many species of arthropods including insects. Here we report the susceptibility of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to oral V. cholerae infection through a process that exhibits many of the hallmarks of human disease: (i death of the fly is dependent on the presence of cholera toxin and is preceded by rapid weight loss; (ii flies harboring mutant alleles of either adenylyl cyclase, Gsalpha, or the Gardos K channel homolog SK are resistant to V. cholerae infection; and (iii ingestion of a K channel blocker along with V. cholerae protects wild-type flies against death. In mammals, ingestion of as little as 25 mug of cholera toxin results in massive diarrhea. In contrast, we found that ingestion of cholera toxin was not lethal to the fly. However, when cholera toxin was co-administered with a pathogenic strain of V. cholerae carrying a chromosomal deletion of the genes encoding cholera toxin, death of the fly ensued. These findings suggest that additional virulence factors are required for intoxication of the fly that may not be essential for intoxication of mammals. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time the mechanism of action of cholera toxin in a whole organism and the utility of D. melanogaster as an accurate, inexpensive model for elucidation of host susceptibility to cholera.

  20. Haploinsufficiency of TAB2 causes congenital heart defects in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thienpont, Bernard; Zhang, Litu; Postma, Alex V;

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common major developmental anomalies and the most frequent cause for perinatal mortality, but their etiology remains often obscure. We identified a locus for CHDs on 6q24-q25. Genotype-phenotype correlations in 12 patients carrying a chromosomal deletion...... in cardiac development was further supported by its conserved expression in the developing human and zebrafish heart. Moreover, a critical, dosage-sensitive role during development was demonstrated by the cardiac defects observed upon titrated knockdown of tab2 expression in zebrafish embryos...

  1. Human bacterial arthritis caused by Streptococcus zooepidemicus: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederichs, Jan; Hungerer, Sven; Werle, Regina; Militz, Matthias; Bühren, Volker

    2010-09-01

    Septic arthritis caused by Streptococcus zooepidemicus is a rare event in humans. Of the four cases reported in the literature, only two patients had direct animal contact, and the portal of entry remained unclear in all cases. We report herein the case of a patient who suffered a purulent arthritis of the left shoulder caused by S. zooepidemicus, successfully treated in our department. A diagnostic FDG-PET-CT scan ruled out other foci of infection, but detected a hyperkeratotic plantar chronic soft tissue lesion of the left foot, acquired in a paragliding accident 10 years earlier. The fact that the patient habitually took care of his horses barefoot in boots, identifies the cutaneous portal of entry as most likely. To our knowledge this is the first report of a septic arthritis caused by S. zooepidemicus where a cutaneous entry route is described.

  2. Clinical presentation of infective endocarditis caused by different groups of non-beta haemolytic streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, B; Olaison, L; Rasmussen, M

    2016-02-01

    Streptococci are common causes of infective endocarditis (IE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has provided a practical tool for their species determination. We aimed to investigate if particular groups of non-beta heamolytic streptococci were associated with IE or to specific presentations thereof. The Swedish Registry of Infective Endocarditis was used to identify cases of IE caused by streptococci and a local database to identify cases of streptococcal bacteremia. The bacteria were grouped using MALDI-TOF MS and the clinical characteristics of IE caused by different groups were compared. We identified a group of 201 streptococcal IE isolates: 18 isolates belonged to the anginosus, 19 to the bovis, 140 to the mitis, 17 to the mutans, and seven to the salivarius groups. The mitis and mutans groups were significantly more common and the anginosus group less common among IE cases as compared to all cause bacteremia. Patients infected with the bovis group isolates were older, had more cardiac devices, and had more commonly prosthetic valve IE compared to IE caused by streptococci of the other groups. Twenty-one percent of patients needed surgery, and in-hospital mortality was 8% with no significant differences between the groups. Grouping of non-beta haemolytic streptococci using MALDI-TOF MS can provide a basis for decision-making in streptococcal bacteremia. IE caused by bovis group isolates have clinical characteristics distinguishing them from IE caused by other groups of Streptococcus.

  3. Diagnosis and Management of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in the Mother, Fetus, and Newborn Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revello, Maria Grazia; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the leading cause of congenital viral infection and mental retardation. HCMV infection, while causing asymptomatic infections in most immunocompetent subjects, can be transmitted during pregnancy from the mother with primary (and also recurrent) infection to the fetus. Hence, careful diagnosis of primary infection is required in the pregnant woman based on the most sensitive serologic assays (immunoglobulin M [IgM] and IgG avidity assays) and conventional virologic and molecular procedures for virus detection in blood. Maternal prognostic markers of fetal infection are still under investigation. If primary infection is diagnosed in a timely manner, prenatal diagnosis can be offered, including the search for virus and virus components in fetal blood and amniotic fluid, with fetal prognostic markers of HCMV disease still to be defined. However, the final step for definite diagnosis of congenital HCMV infection is detection of virus in the blood or urine in the first 1 to 2 weeks of life. To date, treatment of congenital infection with antiviral drugs is only palliative both prior to and after birth, whereas the only efficacious preventive measure seems to be the development of a safe and immunogenic vaccine, including recombinant, subunit, DNA, and peptide-based vaccines now under investigation. The following controversial issues are discussed in the light of the most recent advances in the field: the actual perception of the problem; universal serologic screening before pregnancy; the impact of correct counseling on decision making by the couple involved; the role of prenatal diagnosis in ascertaining transmission of virus to the fetus; the impact of preconceptional and periconceptional infections on the prevalence of congenital infection; and the prevalence of congenitally infected babies born to mothers who were immune prior to pregnancy compared to the number born to mothers undergoing primary infection during pregnancy. PMID

  4. New features of fascioliasis in human and animal infections in Ilam province, Western Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Abdi, Jahangir; Naserifar, Razi; Nejad, Mohammad Rostami; Mansouri, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of human and animal fascioliasis in Ilam Province, Iran. Background Fascioliasis, caused by Fasciola hepatica, is one of the most important zoonotic diseases. Snails are an intermediate host. Human infection with the parasite can led to hypertrophy and hyperplasia in bile duct. It also economic importance and further information is essential about the epidemiology of the parasite in Ilam province. Patients and methods The study on an...

  5. Natural variation of the nef gene in human immunodeficiency virus type 2 infections in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Pádua, E.; Jenkins, A.; S. Brown; Bootman, J.; Paixão, M T; Almond, N; Berry, N

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infections cause severe immunodeficiency in humans, although HIV-2 is associated frequently with reduced virulence and pathogenicity compared to HIV-1. Genetic determinants that play a role in HIV pathogenesis are relatively poorly understood but nef has been implicated in inducing a more pathogenic phenotype in vivo. However, relatively little is known about the role of nef in HIV-2 pathogenesis. To address this, the genetic composition of 44 nef a...

  6. Genetic battle between Helicobacter pylori and humans. The mechanism underlying homologous recombination in bacteria, which can infect human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Katsuhiro; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that colonises the human stomach. The chronic infection it causes results in peptic ulcers and gastric cancers. H. pylori can easily establish a chronic infection even if the immune system attacks this pathogen with oxidative stress agents and immunoglobulins. This is attributed to bacterial defence mechanisms against these stresses. As a defence mechanism against oxidative stresses, in bacterial genomes, homologous recombination can act as a repair pathway of DNA's double-strand breaks (DSBs). Moreover, homologous recombination is also involved in the antigenic variation in H. pylori. Gene conversion alters genomic structures of babA and babB (encoding outer membrane proteins), resulting in escape from immunoglobulin attacks. Thus, homologous recombination in bacteria plays an important role in the maintenance of a chronic infection. In addition, H. pylori infection causes DSBs in human cells. Homologous recombination is also involved in the repair of DSBs in human cells. In this review, we describe the roles of homologous recombination with an emphasis on the maintenance of a chronic infection.

  7. Zika virus infection during the period of maximal brain growth causes microcephaly and corticospinal neuron apoptosis in wild type mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Chin; Abraham, Rachy; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Choe, Hyeryun; Page, Damon T.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women has been established as a cause of microcephaly in newborns. Here we test the hypothesis that neurodevelopmental stages when the brain is undergoing rapid growth are particularly vulnerable to the effects of ZIKV infection. We injected ZIKV intracranially into wild type C57BL/6 mice at two different time points: early postnatal development, when the brain is growing at its maximal rate, and at weaning, when the brain has largely reached adult size. Both time points showed widespread immunoreactivity for ZIKV and cleaved caspase 3 (CC3, a marker of apoptosis) throughout the brain. However, in early postnatal ZIKV injected mice, some brain areas and cell types display particularly large increases in apoptosis that we did not observe in older animals. Corticospinal pyramidal neurons, a cell type implicated in human microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection, are an example of one such cell type. Proliferating cells in the ventricular zone stem cell compartment are also depleted. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that periods of rapid brain growth are especially susceptible to neurodevelopmental effects of ZIKV infection, and establish a valuable model to investigate mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental effects of ZIKV infection and explore candidate therapeutics. PMID:27713505

  8. Human infections with Rickettsia raoultii, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Na; Zheng, Yuan-Chun; Ma, Lan; Huo, Qiu-Bo; Ni, Xue-Bing; Jiang, Bao-Gui; Chu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Rui-Ruo; Jiang, Jia-Fu; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2014-05-01

    We used molecular methods to identify Rickettsia raoultii infections in 2 persons in China. These persons had localized rashes around sites of tick bites. R. raoultii DNA was detected in 4% of Dermacentor silvarum ticks collected in the same area of China and in 1 feeding tick detached from 1 patient.

  9. AZF Microdeletions in Human Semen Infected with Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayfa H Hassani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are associated with infertility in men. This study was aimed to investigate microdeletions on Yq chromosome in semen infected with bacteria by using bacteriological, biochemical, and serological assays. The investigation showed that 107 of 300 (84.80% semen samples collected from infertile men with primary or secondary infertility were infected with different species of bacteria. Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrheae were the most frequently diagnosed bacteria in the infected semen samples. The percentages of infections of semen samples with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhea were 42.31% and 35.28% respectively. Genomic DNA from each semen sample infected with predominant bacteria was analyzed for AZF deletions by using multiplex PCR. Different patterns of AZF microdeletions were obtained. It can be concluded that sexually transmitted bacteria may contribute in microdeletions of Yq chromosome by indirectly producing reactive oxygen species and causing gene defect in AZF regions.

  10. Zoonotic tuberculosis in human beings caused by Mycobacterium bovis-a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Muwonge, Adrian; Perera, Alejandro; Dean, Anna S; Mumford, Elizabeth; Erlacher-Vindel, Elisabeth; Forcella, Simona; Silk, Benjamin J; Ditiu, Lucica; El Idrissi, Ahmed; Raviglione, Mario; Cosivi, Ottorino; LoBue, Philip; Fujiwara, Paula I

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is recognised as the primary cause of human tuberculosis worldwide. However, substantial evidence suggests that the burden of Mycobacterium bovis, the cause of bovine tuberculosis, might be underestimated in human beings as the cause of zoonotic tuberculosis. In 2013, results from a systematic review and meta-analysis of global zoonotic tuberculosis showed that the same challenges and concerns expressed 15 years ago remain valid. These challenges faced by people with zoonotic tuberculosis might not be proportional to the scientific attention and resources allocated in recent years to other diseases. The burden of zoonotic tuberculosis in people needs important reassessment, especially in areas where bovine tuberculosis is endemic and where people live in conditions that favour direct contact with infected animals or animal products. As countries move towards detecting the 3 million tuberculosis cases estimated to be missed annually, and in view of WHO's end TB strategy endorsed by the health authorities of WHO Member States in 2014 to achieve a world free of tuberculosis by 2035, we call on all tuberculosis stakeholders to act to accurately diagnose and treat tuberculosis caused by M bovis in human beings. Copyright © 2017 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd/Inc/BV. All rights reserved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Human papillomavirus infection and fertility alteration: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souho, Tiatou; Benlemlih, Mohamed; Bennani, Bahia

    2015-01-01

    HPV is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection and its effect in cancer induction is well documented. HPV infections are mostly asymptomatic, but it is unclear whether HPV infections can result in alterations of reproductive health. To determine the relationship between human papillomavirus infections and reproductive health in both men and women. A systematic literature review was performed in PubMed and ScienceDirect data bases from January 1994 through August 2014. HPV infections are shown to be significantly associated to many adverse effects in the reproductive function. These adverse effects were reported in different levels from cells production to pregnancy and may be related to the infecting genotype. It appears from this study that HPV detection and genotyping could be of great value in infertility diagnosis at least in idiopathic infertility cases. Like for the risk of carcinogenesis, another classification of HPV regarding the risk of fertility alteration may be considered after deep investigations.

  12. Successful treatment of an invasive fungal infection caused by Talaromyces sp. with voriconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uluhan Sili

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections (IFI are on the rise due to increasing numbers of immunosuppressed and critically ill patients. A malignant-looking pulmonary nodule in an immunosuppressed patient may indeed be caused by a fungal organism. We report a patient, who was eventually diagnosed with an IFI caused by an agent of hyalohyphomycosis, Talaromyces sp. determined via molecular methods and succesfully treated with voriconazole.

  13. Bacteriophages to combat foodborne infections caused by food contamination by bacteria of the Campylobacter genus

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    Magdalena Myga-Nowak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that each year more than 2 million people suffer from diarrheal diseases, resulting from the consumption of contaminated meat. Foodborne infections are most frequently caused by small Gram-negative rods Campylobacter. The hosts of these bacteria are mainly birds wherein they are part of the normal intestinal flora. During the commercial slaughter, there is a likelihood of contamination of carcasses by the bacteria found in the intestinal content. In Europe, up to 90% of poultry flocks can be a reservoir of the pathogen. According to the European Food Safety Authority report from 2015, the number of reported and confirmed cases of human campylobacteriosis exceeds 200 thousands per year, and such trend remains at constant level for several years. The occurrence of growing antibiotic resistance in bacteria forces the limitation of antibiotic use in the animal production. Therefore, the European Union allows only using stringent preventive and hygienic treatment on farms. Achieving Campylobacter free chickens using these methods is possible, but difficult to implement and expensive. Utilization of bacterial viruses – bacteriophages, can be a path to provide the hygienic conditions of poultry production and food processing. Formulations applied in the food protection should contain strictly lytic bacteriophages, be non-pyrogenic and retain long lasting biological activity. Currently, on the market there are available commercial bacteriophage preparations for agricultural use, but neither includes phages against Campylobacter. However, papers on the application of bacteriophages against Campylobacter in chickens and poultry products were published in the last few years. In accordance with the estimates, 2-logarithm reduction of Campylobacter in poultry carcases will contribute to the 30-fold reduction in the incidence of campylobacteriosis in humans. Research on bacteriophages against Campylobacter have cognitive and economic

  14. Has solar variability caused climate change that affected human culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feynman, Joan

    If solar variability affects human culture it most likely does so by changing the climate in which the culture operates. Variations in the solar radiative input to the Earth's atmosphere have often been suggested as a cause of such climate change on time scales from decades to tens of millennia. In the last 20 years there has been enormous progress in our knowledge of the many fields of research that impinge on this problem; the history of the solar output, the effect of solar variability on the Earth's mean climate and its regional patterns, the history of the Earth's climate and the history of mankind and human culture. This new knowledge encourages revisiting the question asked in the title of this talk. Several important historical events have been reliably related to climate change including the Little Ice Age in northern Europe and the collapse of the Classical Mayan civilization in the 9th century AD. In the first section of this paper we discus these historical events and review the evidence that they were caused by changes in the solar output. Perhaps the most important event in the history of mankind was the development of agricultural societies. This began to occur almost 12,000 years ago when the climate changed from the Pleistocene to the modern climate of the Holocene. In the second section of the paper we will discuss the suggestion ( Feynman and Ruzmaikin, 2007) that climate variability was the reason agriculture developed when it did and not before.

  15. Increase human metapneumovirus mediated morbidity following pandemic influenza infection.

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    Liora Regev

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is a recently discovered respiratory pathogen, infecting mainly young children. The infected patients suffer from influenza like symptoms (ILS. In Israel the virus is mainly circulating in February to March. Here we report on an increased rate of hMPV infection in the winter season of 2009-10. The 2009-10 infection had several unique characteristics when compared to previous seasons; it started around January and a large number of infants were infected by the virus. Genetic analysis based on the viral L and F genes of hMPV showed that only subtypes A2 and B2 circulated in Israel. Additionally, we have identified a novel variant of hMPV within subgroup A2b, which subdivide it into A2b1 and A2b2. Finally, we showed that the hMPV infection was detected in the country soon after the infection with the pandemic influenza virus had declined, that infection with the pandemic influenza virus was dominant and that it interfered with the infection of other respiratory viruses. Thus, we suggest that the unusual increase in hMPV infection observed in 2009-10 was due to the appearance of the pandemic influenza virus in the winter season prior to 2009-10.

  16. Salmonella, a cross-kingdom pathogen infecting humans and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schikora, Adam

    2013-06-01

    Infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella strains are constant and are a non-negligible threat to the human population. In the last two decades, salmonellosis outbreaks have increasingly been associated with infected fruits and vegetables. For a long time, Salmonellae were assumed to survive on plants after a more or less accidental infection. However, this notion has recently been challenged. Studies on the infection mechanism in vegetal hosts, as well as on plant immune systems, revealed an active infection process resembling in certain features the infection in animals. On one hand, Salmonella requires the type III secretion systems to effectively infect plants and to suppress their resistance mechanisms. On the other hand, plants recognize these bacteria and react to the infection with an induced defense mechanism similar to the reaction to other plant pathogens. In this review, we present the newest reports on the interaction between Salmonellae and plants. We discuss the possible ways used by these bacteria to infect plants as well as the plant responses to the infection. The recent findings indicate that plants play a central role in the dissemination of Salmonella within the ecosystem.

  17. Potential Therapy for Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Infections With Human Chorionic Gonadotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C V

    2015-12-01

    The scientific evidence suggests that Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) infects human fallopian tubes by molecular mimicry in which pathogens act like a ligand to bind to epithelial cell surface human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG)/luteinizing hormone (LH) receptors. The hCG-like molecule has been identified as ribosomal protein L12 in NG coat surface. Human fallopian tube epithelial cells have been shown to contain functional hCG/LH receptors. As previously shown in human fallopian tube organ and cell culture studies, cellular invasion and infection can be prevented by exposing the cells to excess hCG, which would outnumber and outcompete NG for receptor binding. Based on these data, we suggest testing hCG in clinical trials on infected women.

  18. Non-Human Primate Models of Orthopoxvirus Infections

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    Anne Schmitt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox, one of the most destructive diseases, has been successfully eradicated through a worldwide vaccination campaign. Since immunization programs have been stopped, the number of people with vaccinia virus induced immunity is declining. This leads to an increase in orthopoxvirus (OPXV infections in humans, as well as in animals. Additionally, potential abuse of Variola virus (VARV, the causative agent of smallpox, or monkeypox virus, as agents of bioterrorism, has renewed interest in development of antiviral therapeutics and of safer vaccines. Due to its high risk potential, research with VARV is restricted to two laboratories worldwide. Therefore, numerous animal models of other OPXV infections have been developed in the last decades. Non-human primates are especially suitable due to their close relationship to humans. This article provides a review about on non-human primate models of orthopoxvirus infections.

  19. Cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium avium after an aesthetic abdominoplasty: Case report

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    Aline Rodrigues

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports an extremely rare complication followinga cosmetic abdominoplasty. A skin infection caused byMycobacterium avium was manifested as multiple skin nodules inthe abdominal flap that were clinically and surgically treated. Theauthors report the case and its clinical course, and present acorrelation with the literature.

  20. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O78:H10, the cause of an outbreak of urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bente; Scheutz, Flemming; Andersen, Rebecca L

    2012-01-01

    In 1991, multiresistant Escherichia coli O78:H10 strains caused an outbreak of urinary tract infections in Copenhagen, Denmark. The phylogenetic origin, clonal background, and virulence characteristics of the outbreak isolates, and their relationship to nonoutbreak O78:H10 strains according...

  1. Genome analysis of Listeria ivanovii strain G770 that caused a deadly aortic prosthesis infection

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    M. Beye

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We sequenced the genome of Listeria ivanovii strain G770, which caused a deadly infection of the thoracic aortic prosthesis of a 78-year-old man. The 2.9 Mb genome exhibited 21 specific genes among L. ivanovii strains, including five genes encoding a type I restriction modification system and one glycopeptide resistance gene.

  2. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus : current management and new therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazur, Natalie; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Baraldi, Eugenio; Fauroux, Brigitte; Greenough, Anne; Heikkinen, Terho; Manzoni, Paolo; Mejias, Asuncion; Nair, Harish; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Polack, Fernando P.; Ramilo, Octavio; Sharland, Mike; Stein, Renato; Madhi, Shabir A.; Bont, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Evidence-based management guidelines suggest that there is no effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and that supportive care, ie, hydration and

  3. Infections caused by Fusobacterium in children: a 14-year single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamriz, Oded; Engelhard, Dan; Temper, Violeta; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Benenson, Shmuel; Brooks, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Ariel; Stepensky, Polina; Koplewitz, Benjamin; Kaufmann, Michal; Averbuch, Diana

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at reviewing our experience with infections caused by Fusobacterium in children. A retrospective analysis of medical records of children admitted to Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center from 2000 to 2013, in whom Fusobacterium spp. was identified in any specimen. A total of 22 patients (males = 12) at a mean ± SE age of 5 ± 1 (range 1-17) years, were identified. The most common complication was abscess formation (n = 11, 50 %). Eight children (36.4 %) had intracranial complications, including brain abscess (n = 4), meningitis (n = 4) and cerebral sinus vein thrombosis (CSVT, n = 5). Seventeen children (77 %) had bacteremia. Primary site of infection was otogenic (n = 9), oropharyngeal (n = 7), respiratory (n = 2), sinuses (n = 2), intra-abdominal (n = 1) and mucositis (n = 1). Fourteen cases were caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, including four cases with CSVT, 7/8 cases of mastoiditis, four of them with subperiosteal abscess formation; all four cases with meningitis and two brain abscesses. Fifteen (68 %) patients required surgical intervention and 3 (14 %) received anti-coagulation therapy. Excluding one patient with overwhelming sepsis with fatal outcome, all patients recovered. Fusobacterium infections in children can cause a diverse spectrum of disease and is associated with high rates of abscess formation and intracranial complications. Although Fusobacterium nucleatum is abundant in the oral cavity, F. necrophorum is the main pathogen that causes severe infections in healthy children.

  4. Infection and disease progress of motile Aeromonas septicemia caused by virulent Aeromonas hydrophila in channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motile Aeromonas septicemia (MAS), caused by virulent clonal isolates of Aeromonas hydrophila (vAh), is emerging as a major disease in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) aquaculture in the Southeastern United States. Predisposing conditions leading to vAh infection in catfish were however largely...

  5. Dual infection with dengue virus 3 and human immunodeficiency virus 1 in Havana, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Limonta, Daniel; Bandera, Juan Francisco; Perez, Jorge; Kouri, Gustavo; Guzman, Maria G

    2009-05-01

    Although dengue virus (DEN) endemic regions overlap with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV) high incidence areas, little has been documented on HIV and DEN mixed infection. Here we report DEN/HIV concurrent infections recorded during the DEN-3 epidemic in 2001-2002 in Havana. Serologic-confirmed DEN is described in two HIV-infected subjects with dengue fever symptoms. Although patients had dengue disease, the CD4+ cells remained within normal levels and no accelerated progression of HIV disease was observed. To our knowledge, DEN cases caused by DEN-3 in HIV-infected individuals have not been reported previously. Further research is needed to diagnose this likely underreported mixed viral infection in DEN endemic areas.

  6. Phlebotomine sand fly-borne pathogens in the Mediterranean Basin: Human leishmaniasis and phlebovirus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriconi, Martina; Rugna, Gianluca; Calzolari, Mattia; Bellini, Romeo; Albieri, Alessandro; Angelini, Paola; Cagarelli, Roberto; Landini, Maria P; Charrel, Remi N; Varani, Stefania

    2017-08-01

    Pathogens transmitted to humans by phlebotomine sand flies are neglected, as they cause infectious diseases that are not on the priority list of national and international public health systems. However, the infections caused by protozoa of the Leishmania genus and viruses belonging to the Phlebovirus genus (family Phenuiviridae)-the most significant group of viruses transmitted by sand flies-have a relevant role for human pathology. These infections are emerging in the Mediterranean region and will likely spread in forthcoming decades, posing a complex threat to human health. Four species and 2 hybrid strains of Leishmania are pathogenic for humans in the Mediterranean Basin, with an estimated annual incidence of 239,500-393,600 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and 1,200-2,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis. Among the phleboviruses, Toscana virus can cause neuroinvasive infections, while other phleboviruses are responsible for a typical "3-day fever"; the actual incidence of Phlebovirus infections in the Mediterranean area is unknown, although at least 250 million people are exposed. Here, we reviewed the current literature on epidemiology of sand fly-borne infections in the Mediterranean Basin, with a focus on humans. Our analysis indicates the need for increased public health activities directed to determine the disease burden of these infections as well as to improve their surveillance. Among the emerging challenges concerning sand fly-borne pathogens, the relationships between sand fly-borne protozoa and viruses should be considered in future studies, including epidemiological links between Leishmania and phleboviruses as well as the conditional capacity for these pathogens to be involved in interactions that may evolve towards increased virulence.

  7. Immunodominant SARS Coronavirus Epitopes in Humans Elicited both Enhancing and Neutralizing Effects on Infection in Non-human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qidi; Zhang, Lianfeng; Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Li, Li; Liu, Zijie; Li, Taisheng; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Jiangning; Xu, Yanfeng; Xie, Jing; Morioka, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Qin, Chuan; Liu, Gang

    2016-05-13

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by a coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and has the potential to threaten global public health and socioeconomic stability. Evidence of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of SARS-CoV infection in vitro and in non-human primates clouds the prospects for a safe vaccine. Using antibodies from SARS patients, we identified and characterized SARS-CoV B-cell peptide epitopes with disparate functions. In rhesus macaques, the spike glycoprotein peptides S471-503, S604-625, and S1164-1191 elicited antibodies that efficiently prevented infection in non-human primates. In contrast, peptide S597-603 induced antibodies that enhanced infection both in vitro and in non-human primates by using an epitope sequence-dependent (ESD) mechanism. This peptide exhibited a high level of serological reactivity (64%), which resulted from the additive responses of two tandem epitopes (S597-603 and S604-625) and a long-term human B-cell memory response with antisera from convalescent SARS patients. Thus, peptide-based vaccines against SARS-CoV could be engineered to avoid ADE via elimination of the S597-603 epitope. We provide herein an alternative strategy to prepare a safe and effective vaccine for ADE of viral infection by identifying and eliminating epitope sequence-dependent enhancement of viral infection.

  8. The Human Stomach in Health and Disease: Infection Strategies by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Karen; Letley, Darren P; Kaneko, Kazuyo

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a bacterial pathogen which commonly colonizes the human gastric mucosa from early childhood and persists throughout life. In the vast majority of cases, the infection is asymptomatic. H. pylori is the leading cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, however, and these outcomes occur in 10-15% of those infected. Gastric adenocarcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer-associated death, and peptic ulcer disease is a significant cause of morbidity. Disease risk is related to the interplay of numerous bacterial host and environmental factors, many of which influence chronic inflammation and damage to the gastric mucosa. This chapter summarizes what is known about health and disease in H. pylori infection, and highlights the need for additional research in this area.

  9. HIV-1 infection causes a down-regulation of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis.

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    Claudia L Kleinman

    Full Text Available HIV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T cells, causing fundamental changes that eventually lead to the release of new viral particles and cell death. To investigate in detail alterations in the transcriptome of the CD4+ T cells upon viral infection, we sequenced polyadenylated RNA isolated from Jurkat cells infected or not with HIV-1. We found a marked global alteration of gene expression following infection, with an overall trend toward induction of genes, indicating widespread modification of the host biology. Annotation and pathway analysis of the most deregulated genes showed that viral infection produces a down-regulation of genes associated with the nucleolus, in particular those implicated in regulating the different steps of ribosome biogenesis, such as ribosomal RNA (rRNA transcription, pre-rRNA processing, and ribosome maturation. The impact of HIV-1 infection on genes involved in ribosome biogenesis was further validated in primary CD4+ T cells. Moreover, we provided evidence by Northern Blot experiments, that host pre-rRNA processing in Jurkat cells might be perturbed during HIV-1 infection, thus strengthening the hypothesis of a crosstalk between nucleolar functions and viral pathogenesis.

  10. Failed Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Caused by Recurrent Candida glabrata Infection with Prior Serratia marcescens Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedros, John G.; Keenan, Kendra E.; Updike, Wanda S.; Oliver, Marquam R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 58-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic male patient who initially sustained a proximal humerus fracture from a fall. The fracture fixation failed and then was converted to a humeral hemiarthroplasty, which became infected with Candida glabrata and Serratia marcescens. After these infections were believed to be cured with antibacterial and antifungal treatments and two-stage irrigation and debridement, he underwent conversion to a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Unfortunately, the C. glabrata infection recurred and, nearly 1.5 years after implantation of the reverse total shoulder, he had a resection arthroplasty (removal of all implants and cement). His surgical and pharmacologic treatment concluded with (1) placement of a tobramycin-impregnated cement spacer also loaded with amphotericin B, with no plan for revision arthroplasty (i.e., the spacer was chronically retained), and (2) chronic use of daily oral fluconazole. We located only three reported cases of Candida species causing infection in shoulder arthroplasties (two C. albicans, one C. parapsilosis). To our knowledge, a total shoulder arthroplasty infected with C. glabrata has not been reported, nor has a case of a C. glabrata and S. marcescens periprosthetic coinfection in any joint. In addition, it is well known that S. marcescens infections are uncommon in periprosthetic joint infections. PMID:25431708

  11. Failed Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Caused by Recurrent Candida glabrata Infection with Prior Serratia marcescens Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Skedros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a 58-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic male patient who initially sustained a proximal humerus fracture from a fall. The fracture fixation failed and then was converted to a humeral hemiarthroplasty, which became infected with Candida glabrata and Serratia marcescens. After these infections were believed to be cured with antibacterial and antifungal treatments and two-stage irrigation and debridement, he underwent conversion to a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Unfortunately, the C. glabrata infection recurred and, nearly 1.5 years after implantation of the reverse total shoulder, he had a resection arthroplasty (removal of all implants and cement. His surgical and pharmacologic treatment concluded with (1 placement of a tobramycin-impregnated cement spacer also loaded with amphotericin B, with no plan for revision arthroplasty (i.e., the spacer was chronically retained, and (2 chronic use of daily oral fluconazole. We located only three reported cases of Candida species causing infection in shoulder arthroplasties (two C. albicans, one C. parapsilosis. To our knowledge, a total shoulder arthroplasty infected with C. glabrata has not been reported, nor has a case of a C. glabrata and S. marcescens periprosthetic coinfection in any joint. In addition, it is well known that S. marcescens infections are uncommon in periprosthetic joint infections.

  12. Experimental evolution can unravel the complex causes of natural selection in clinical infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    It is increasingly clear that rapid evolutionary dynamics are an important process in microbial ecology. Experimental evolution, wherein microbial evolution is observed in real-time, has revealed many instances of appreciable evolutionary change occurring on very short timescales of a few days or weeks in response to a variety of biotic and abiotic selection pressures. From clinical infections, including the chronic bacterial lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis that form a focus of my research, there is now abundant evidence suggesting that rapid evolution by infecting microbes contributes to host adaptation, treatment failure and worsening patient prognosis. However, disentangling the drivers of natural selection in complex infection environments is extremely challenging and limits our understanding of the selective pressures acting upon microbes in infections. Controlled evolution experiments can make a vital contribution to this by determining the causal links between predicted drivers of natural selection and the evolutionary responses of microbes. Integration of experimental evolution into studies of clinical infections is a key next step towards a better understanding of the causes and consequences of rapid microbial evolution in infections, and discovering how these evolutionary processes might be influenced to improve patient health.A video of this Prize Lecture, presented at the Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference 2015, can be viewed via this link: Michael A. Brockhurst https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1bodVSl27E.

  13. Risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by multidrug resistant gram-negative bacilli in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana V. Arnoni

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections by multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli. From November 2001 to December 2003, in the Pediatric Department of the Santa Casa de São Paulo, a retrospective case-control study was developed concerning patients who had nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by Gram-negative bacilli. Patients with multidrug resistant infections were designated as case patients, and control patients were those with an infection that did not meet the criteria for multidrug resistance. Previous use of central venous catheter and previous use of vancomycin plus third generation cephalosporins were associated to a higher chance of infections by multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli (Odds ratio - 5.8 and 5.2, respectively. Regarding sensitivity of the isolated agents, 47.8% were multidrug resistant, 54.2% were Klebsiella spp. ESBL producers and 36.4% were imipenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The lethality rate was 36.9% in the studied cases and this rate was significantly higher in the group of patients with multidrug resistant infections (p=0.013. Risk factor identification as well as the knowledge of the susceptibility of the nosocomial infectious agents gave us the possibility to perform preventive and control strategies to reduce the costs and mortality related to these infections.

  14. Neutrophil elastase causes tissue damage that decreases host tolerance to lung infection with burkholderia species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoranjan Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Two distinct defense strategies can protect the host from infection: resistance is the ability to destroy the infectious agent, and tolerance is the ability to withstand infection by minimizing the negative impact it has on the host's health without directly affecting pathogen burden. Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects macrophages and causes melioidosis. We have recently shown that inflammasome-triggered pyroptosis and IL-18 are equally important for resistance to B. pseudomallei, whereas IL-1β is deleterious. Here we show that the detrimental role of IL-1β during infection with B. pseudomallei (and closely related B. thailandensis is due to excessive recruitment of neutrophils to the lung and consequent tissue damage. Mice deficient in the potentially damaging enzyme neutrophil elastase were less susceptible than the wild type C57BL/6J mice to infection, although the bacterial burdens in organs and the extent of inflammation were comparable between C57BL/6J and elastase-deficient mice. In contrast, lung tissue damage and vascular leakage were drastically reduced in elastase-deficient mice compared to controls. Bradykinin levels were higher in C57BL/6 than in elastase-deficient mice; administration of a bradykinin antagonist protected mice from infection, suggesting that increased vascular permeability mediated by bradykinin is one of the mechanisms through which elastase decreases host tolerance to melioidosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that absence of neutrophil elastase increases host tolerance, rather than resistance, to infection by minimizing host tissue damage.

  15. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  16. Serodiagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the established role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in gastritis and duodenal ulcer in general, conflicting results have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The seroprevalence during early HIV...... infection is unknown. We retrospectively studied 102 patients with HIV infection early during the infection and in most cases in asymptomatic patients. Serological IgG antibody response to H. pylori was assessed by ELISA. Compared with an age-matched control group the seroprevalence of H. pylori positivity......) and 2 patients had H. pylori seroconverted, indicating an incidence of new infection of 2%/year. In conclusion, previous reports have underestimated the prevalence of H. pylori infection in HIV patients, which seems to be similar to that in an HIV-negative population....

  17. Clinical characteristics of infections caused by Tsukamurella spp. and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Meng-Rui; Lee, Yi-Chieh; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the clinical and microbiological characteristics of infections caused by Tsukamurella spp., the computerised database of the Bacteriology Laboratory at National Taiwan University Hospital (Taipei, Taiwan) was reviewed retrospectively to identify patients with infections caused by this species during the period January 1997 to December 2008. All of the isolates had been initially misidentified as Rhodococcus spp. Identification of Tsukamurella isolates to species level was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the heat shock protein gene (hsp65) as well as 16S rRNA gene sequencing. During the study period, a total of eight patients with Tsukamurella infection and two patients with Tsukamurella colonisation were identified. Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens (n=6) was the most prevalent species, followed by Tsukamurella spumae (n=3) and Tsukamurella pulmonis (n=1). Keratitis was the most common type of infection (n=3), followed by catheter-related bloodstream infection (n=2). One of the patients with Tsukamurella infection died due to bacteraemia; the other seven patients with Tsukamurella infection had favourable outcomes. The three species had different drug susceptibility patterns; T. pulmonis was the most resistant pathogen, with higher minimum inhibitory concentrations of clindamycin (>2 mg/L), erythromycin (2 mg/L) and tetracycline (8 mg/L) than those for the other Tsukamurella spp. In conclusion, strains of Tsukamurella spp., including T. spumae, are uncommon causative agents of ocular infections and bacteraemia in cancer patients. Molecular diagnostic methods are essential to distinguish species in the Tsukamurella genus from species in other phylogenetically related genera such as Rhodococcus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. First Case Report of a Late Onset Knee Periprosthetic Joint Infection Caused by Lactococcus garvieae

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    V.-I. Neagoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus garvieae is known as a Gram-positive, catalase-negative, and facultatively anaerobic fish pathogen. The association between Lactococcus spp. and human infectious diseases is described as being mainly associated with lumbar osteomyelitis, hepatic abscess, and infective endocarditis. In the literature of orthopedic post-prosthetic infections, L. garvieae was associated with a case of hip prosthetic infection in a fishmonger woman. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient with multiple comorbidities, who is admitted to our center with a 5-day history of pain, swelling, and motility disorder of the right knee by the presence of a bicondylar knee replacement surgery, which was performed due to gonarthrosis 17 years ago. The radiographies of the right knee revealed no signs of displacement or loosening of the prothesis. After multiple radical debridements including VAC therapy and targeted antibiotic therapy we have managed to defeat the infection without exchange arthroplasty. Although we could not demonstrate the source of infection, we can only presume that in our case the source of infection was represented by the ingestion of possibly contaminated food. The patient had a habit of eating Nile perch fish (Lates niloticus every 4 weeks. We illustrated once more the possibility of a late onset L. garvieae related orthopedic periprosthetic joint infection by multiple comorbidities.

  19. A spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by host immune responses against Epstein-Barr virus infections.

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    Iwatsuki K

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, or human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4, infects the vast majority of adults worldwide, and establishes both nonproductive (latent and productive (lytic infections. Host immune responses directed against both the lytic and latent cycle-associated EBV antigens induce a diversity of clinical symptoms in patients with chronic active EBV infections who usually contain an oligoclonal pool of EBV-infected lymphocyte subsets in their blood. Episomal EBV genes in the latent infection utilize an array of evasion strategies from host immune responses: the minimized expression of EBV antigens targeted by host cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, the down-regulation of cell adhesion molecule expression, and the release of virokines to inhibit the host CTLs. The oncogenic role of latent EBV infection is not yet fully understood, but latent membrane proteins (LMPs expressed during the latency cycle have essential biological properties leading to cellular gene expression and immortalization, and EBV-encoded gene products such as viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10 and bcl-2 homologue function to survive the EBV-infected cells. The subsequent oncogenic DNA damage may lead to the development of neoplasms. EBV-associated NK/T cell lymphoproliferative disorders are prevalent in Asia, but quite rare in Western countries. The genetic immunological background, therefore, is closely linked to the development of EBV-associated neoplasms.

  20. First report of two asymptomatic cases of human infection with Babesia microti (Franca, 1910 in Poland

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    Renata Welc-Falęciak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human infection by Babesia microti has been recognized as an emerging zoonosis with important public health implications worldwide. In Europe the reported cases of human babesiosis have been attributed mostly to B. divergens infection, with only sporadic cases of the disease caused by B. microti or B. venatorum. This study, based on molecular methods (PCR, R-T PCR, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, reveals for the first time in Poland, asymptomatic infection with . microti in immunocompetent healthy individuals working in forest ecosystems. Of the 58 professional foresters examined, two (3.4% were identified as B. microti-positive by specific PCR. The results of this study also provide strong evidence that in eastern Poland, where tick-borne diseases (TBDs are endemic, there is a potential risk of acquiring human babesiosis due to zoonotic B. microti parasites commonly found in rodents and I. ricinus ticks. The potential public health importance of this finding is discussed.

  1. Evidence that neomycin inhibits human cytomegalovirus infection of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobert, P E; Hober, D; Delannoy, A S; Wattré, P

    1996-01-01

    The effect of phosphoinositide-binding aminoglycosides, such as neomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin, on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection of human fibroblasts MRC-5 was studied. The inhibition of HCMV infection was obtained with all of these molecules but neomycin was more effective than the others. We showed that the inoculation of the cells with cell-free viral suspension in presence of neomycin concentrations above 5 mM at 37 degrees C, inhibited more than 98% the HCMV infection. However, the preincubation of the fibroblasts with neomycin at 4 degrees C, before the removal of the drug and the inoculation of the cells, induced only a 30% decrease in the number of infected cells. Addition of neomycin after the HCMV-binding at 4 degrees C or the infection of the cells was less efficient to inhibit HCMV infection than the standard incubation of neomycin during inoculation of the fibroblasts. Indeed, 1 hour after the inoculation of the cells at 37 degrees C, neomycin still inhibited HCMV infection, but 4 hours after the inoculation, this drug had no effect on HCMV infection. Our findings demonstrated that neomycin must be present at the time of infection in order to exert a full inhibiting effect. The effect of neomycin on the HCMV infection was almost immediate upon the addition of the drug (binding and/or internalization) and after the virus internalization (inhibition of immediate-early events). We suggest that neomycin and other aminoglycoside antibiotics may interact with HCMV glycoproteins for binding to similar structural features of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans and may inhibit HCMV infection in fibroblasts by disrupting phosphoinositide-mediated events in the cells.

  2.  Mycolic acids – potential biomarkers of opportunistic infections caused by bacteria of the suborder Corynebacterineae

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    Konrad Kowalski

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  Mycolic acids are one of the basic elements of the cell wall structure of bacteria belonging to the suborder Corynebacterineae, constituting from 20�0to 40�0of dry weight. Additionally, they show high structural diversity within each family and species. Nowadays, profiles of mycolic acids are widely described for the genus Mycobacterium, the causative agent of tuberculosis. However, the suborder Corynebacterineae also includes many representatives of opportunistic human pathogens, e.g. Dietzia, Gordonia, Nocardia and Rhodococcus. Currently, an increased infection risk caused by this group of microorganisms especially in immunocompromised patients has been observed. Better knowledge of mycolic acid profiles for Corynebacterineae may allow identification of mycolic acids as diagnostic markers in the detection of opportunistic bacterial infections. Modern techniques of chemical analysis, including mass spectrometry, may enable the development of new chemotaxonomic methods for the detection and differentiation of bacteria within the suborder Corynebacterineae.

  3. Causes of death in the human immunodeficiency virus population in Western Jamaica

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    Nikkiah Forbes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monitoring the causes of death in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV in the era of expanding access to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings has implications as more deaths are reported for reasons other than AIDS. Aims: To determine the causes of mortality in HIV-infected adults in Western Jamaica. Materials and Methods: Patients with HIV infection with a death certificate with a known cause of death between 2005 and 2010 were reviewed. Results: There were 189 patients. Co-morbidities were present in 25.3%. The mean age at death was 42.4 years. Early disease (World Health Organization [WHO] stages 1 or 2 was the presentation in 21.5% while 78.6% presented with advanced disease (WHO stages 3 or 4. The mean CD4 count at diagnosis was 95 cells/mm 3 . In patients presenting with early disease, 14.2% presented with sexually transmitted infections, 22.8% skin manifestations, and 14.2% lymphadenopathy. In patients presenting with late disease, 41.7% had Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP, 18.9% central nervous system (CNS toxoplasmosis, 11.3% HIV-associated nephropathy, and 5% cryptococcal meningitis. At death, 72.6% were in WHO class 4, and 21.2% class 3. The average CD4 count at death was 75.5 cells/mm 3 . Overall, 55.2% of the patients had received highly active antiretroviral therapy. PCP accounted for 42.9% of deaths, 27.3% had CNS opportunistic infections, HIV nephropathy 16.4%, and 4.6% had malignancies. About 52.3% of patients died within 1 year of diagnosis with HIV, while 68.3% died within 2 years. Conclusion: Patients with HIV are presenting with late disease and dying of conditions that are AIDS-related. Efforts to improve early diagnosis and treatment are urgently needed in Jamaica.

  4. Risk of zidovudine-induced anemia on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection patients with different CD4 cell counts

    OpenAIRE

    wedayani, anak agung ayu niti; Sholikhah, Eti Nurwening; Kristin, Erna; Triyono, Erwin Astha

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is the most common hematologic abnormality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This abnormality is associated with HIV infection itself, HIV-related opportunities infections or drug use. Zidovudine (AZT) is the most common cause of anemia in HIV patients. Recent study showed anemia in HIV patients is also associated with CD4 cell counts. Aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of anemia on HIV patients with different CD4 cell counts after AZT-based antiret...

  5. Twenty-year summary of surveillance for human hantavirus infections, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knust, Barbara; Rollin, Pierre E

    2013-12-01

    In the past 20 years of surveillance for hantavirus in humans in the United States, 624 cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) have been reported, 96% of which occurred in states west of the Mississippi River. Most hantavirus infections are caused by Sin Nombre virus, but cases of HPS caused by Bayou, Black Creek Canal, Monongahela, and New York viruses have been reported, and cases of domestically acquired hemorrhagic fever and renal syndrome caused by Seoul virus have also occurred. Rarely, hantavirus infections result in mild illness that does not progress to HPS. Continued testing and surveillance of clinical cases in humans will improve our understanding of the etiologic agents involved and the spectrum of diseases.

  6. Streptococcus agalactiae clones infecting humans were selected and fixed through the extensive use of tetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cunha, Violette; Davies, Mark R; Douarre, Pierre-Emmanuel; Rosinski-Chupin, Isabelle; Margarit, Immaculada; Spinali, Sebastien; Perkins, Tim; Lechat, Pierre; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Sauvage, Elisabeth; Ma, Laurence; Romi, Benedetta; Tichit, Magali; Lopez-Sanchez, Maria-José; Descorps-Declere, Stéphane; Souche, Erika; Buchrieser, Carmen; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Moszer, Ivan; Clermont, Dominique; Maione, Domenico; Bouchier, Christiane; McMillan, David J; Parkhill, Julian; Telford, John L; Dougan, Gordan; Walker, Mark J; Holden, Matthew T G; Poyart, Claire; Glaser, Philippe

    2014-08-04

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a commensal of the digestive and genitourinary tracts of humans that emerged as the leading cause of bacterial neonatal infections in Europe and North America during the 1960s. Due to the lack of epidemiological and genomic data, the reasons for this emergence are unknown. Here we show by comparative genome analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction of 229 isolates that the rise of human GBS infections corresponds to the selection and worldwide dissemination of only a few clones. The parallel expansion of the clones is preceded by the insertion of integrative and conjugative elements conferring tetracycline resistance (TcR). Thus, we propose that the use of tetracycline from 1948 onwards led in humans to the complete replacement of a diverse GBS population by only few TcR clones particularly well adapted to their host, causing the observed emergence of GBS diseases in neonates.

  7. Growth in Agarose of Human Cells Infected with Cytomegalovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, David J.; Montagnier, Luc; Latarjet, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    After infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV), human diploid fibroblasts could grow in agarose medium for several generations. Clones of infected cells grew for weeks, although in every case they ultimately underwent lysis owing to the cytopathic effect of the virus. Virus was inoculated at high dilution and after UV irradiation in an effort to derive cells infected with noninfectious defective particles still capable of inducing cell stimulation. Dilute or irradiated virus occasionally yielded large colonies of replicating cells, although permanent transformation was not observed. One clone derived from UV-CMV-infected cells was passaged four times before undergoing lysis. During these passages the cells exhibited alterations in morphology and orientation. Images PMID:4367907

  8. Dynamics of the cellular metabolome during human cytomegalovirus infection.

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    Joshua Munger

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral replication requires energy and macromolecular precursors derived from the metabolic network of the host cell. Despite this reliance, the effect of viral infection on host cell metabolic composition remains poorly understood. Here we applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure the levels of 63 different intracellular metabolites at multiple times after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection of human fibroblasts. Parallel microarray analysis provided complementary data on transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways. As the infection progressed, the levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis markedly increased. HCMV-induced transcriptional upregulation of specific glycolytic and citric acid cycle enzymes mirrored the increases in metabolite levels. The peak levels of numerous metabolites during infection far exceeded those observed during normal fibroblast growth or quiescence, demonstrating that HCMV markedly disrupts cellular metabolic homeostasis and institutes its own specific metabolic program.

  9. Haemophilus influenzae serotype a as a cause of serious invasive infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanova, Marina; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae, particularly H influenzae serotype b (Hib), is an important pathogen that causes serious diseases like meningitis and septicaemia. Since the introduction of Hib conjugate vaccines in the 1990s, the epidemiology of invasive H influenzae disease has changed substantially, with most infections now caused by non-Hib strains. We discuss the importance of H influenzae serotype a (Hia) as a cause of serious morbidity and mortality and its global epidemiology, clinical presentation, microbiology, immunology, prevention, and control. Much like Hib, the capsule of Hia is an important virulence factor contributing to the development of invasive disease. Molecular typing of Hia has identified distinct clonal groups, with some linked to severe disease and high case-fatality rates. Similarities between Hia and Hib capsules, their clinical presentation, and immunology of infection suggest that a bivalent Hia-Hib capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine could offer protection against these two important serotypes of H influenzae.

  10. Tuberculous meningitis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Sinha, Manish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. HIV-infected patients have a high incidence of tuberculous meningitis as well. The exact incidence and prevalence of tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected patients are not known. HIV infection does not significantly alter the clinical manifestations, laboratory, radiographic findings, or the response to therapy. Still, some differences have been noted. For example, the histopathological examination of exudates in HIV-infected patients shows fewer lymphocytes, epithelioid cells, and Langhan's type of giant cells. Larger numbers of acid-fast bacilli may be seen in the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. The chest radiograph is abnormal in up to 46% of patients with tuberculous meningitis. Tuberculous meningitis is likely to present with cerebral infarcts and mass lesions. Cryptococcal meningitis is important in differential diagnosis. The recommended duration of treatment in HIV-infected patients is 9-12 months. The benefit of adjunctive corticosteroids is uncertain. Antiretroviral therapy and antituberculosis treatment should be initiated at the same time, regardless of CD4 cell counts. Tuberculous meningitis may be a manifestation of paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Some studies have demonstrated a significant impact of HIV co-infection on mortality from tuberculous meningitis. HIV-infected patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have significantly higher mortality. The best way to prevent HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis is to diagnose and isolate infectious cases of tuberculosis promptly and administer appropriate treatment.

  11. Fatal attraction phenomenon in humans: cat odour attractiveness increased for toxoplasma-infected men while decreased for infected women.

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    Jaroslav Flegr

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Latent toxoplasmosis, a lifelong infection with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, has cumulative effects on the behaviour of hosts, including humans. The most impressive effect of toxoplasmosis is the "fatal attraction phenomenon," the conversion of innate fear of cat odour into attraction to cat odour in infected rodents. While most behavioural effects of toxoplasmosis were confirmed also in humans, neither the fatal attraction phenomenon nor any toxoplasmosis-associated changes in olfactory functions have been searched for in them. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty-four Toxoplasma-infected and 134 noninfected students rated the odour of urine samples from cat, horse, tiger, brown hyena and dog for intensity and pleasantness. The raters were blind to their infection status and identity of the samples. No signs of changed sensitivity of olfaction were observed. However, we found a strong, gender dependent effect of toxoplasmosis on the pleasantness attributed to cat urine odour (p = 0.0025. Infected men rated this odour as more pleasant than did the noninfected men, while infected women rated the same odour as less pleasant than did noninfected women. Toxoplasmosis did not affect how subjects rated the pleasantness of any other animal species' urine odour; however, a non-significant trend in the same directions was observed for hyena urine. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of the effects of toxoplasmosis on the odour pleasantness score attributed to large cats would suggest that the amino acid felinine could be responsible for the fatal attraction phenomenon. Our results also raise the possibility that the odour-specific threshold deficits observed in schizophrenia patients could be caused by increased prevalence of Toxoplasma-infected subjects in this population rather than by schizophrenia itself. The trend observed with the hyena urine sample suggests that this carnivore, and other representatives of the Feliformia suborder, should be studied

  12. Human Causes of Aeolian Desertification in Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian desertification has rapidly developed in the past 50 years in Northern China,covered an area of 0.386 million km2 by 2000,affected nearly 170 million population,and caused the direct and indirect economic loss of about $6.75(U.S.dollar) billion per year.Here we present several lines of evidence to demonstrate that human activities guided by policy shifts have been a major force to drive aeolian desertification via changes in land-use patterns and intensity.It is suggested that the desertification can be curbed or even reversed by adopting prevention and control measures with ecologically sound land-use practices in China.

  13. Kingella kingae: an emerging cause of invasive infections in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagupsky, P; Dagan, R

    1997-05-01

    Kingella kingae, a fastidious hemolytic gram-negative bacillus once considered to be an exceptional cause of disease, has emerged in recent years as an important invasive pathogen in children. When synovial fluid and other exudates were inoculated into blood culture bottles, enhanced recovery of the organism was observed, and an annual incidence of invasive K. kingae infections of 27.4 per 100,000 children younger than age 24 months was demonstrated in southern Israel. Skeletal infections are the most common clinical presentation of K. kingae, and studies conducted in that region have shown that this organism is the most common etiology of septic arthritis in children below the age of 24 months. Other invasive diseases caused by K. kingae include bacteremia, endocarditis, and infections involving the lower respiratory tract, the eyes, or the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated that K. kingae is part of the normal oropharyngeal flora of young children. Clinical data suggest that the organism may gain access to the bloodstream in the course of an upper respiratory infection or stomatitis. The organism is susceptible to a wide range of antimicrobial drugs, and with the exception of some cases of endocarditis, K. kingae infections in children usually run a benign clinical course.

  14. Nosocomial Infections Caused by Acinetobacter baumannii: Are We Losing the Battle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protic, Dragana; Pejovic, Aleksa; Andjelkovic, Dragana; Djukanovic, Nina; Savic, Dragana; Piperac, Pavle; Markovic Denic, Ljiljana; Zdravkovic, Marija; Todorovic, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of nosocomial infections caused by multi-drug- and extended-drug resistant strains of Acinetobacter is constantly increasing all over the world, with a high mortality rate. We analyzed the in-hospital data on the sensitivity of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates and correlated them with antibiotic treatment and clinical outcomes of nosocomial infections over a 17-mo period. Retrospective analysis was performed at the Clinical Center "Bezanijska kosa," Belgrade, Serbia. Microbiologic data (number and sensitivity of A. baumannii isolates) and clinical data (medical records of 41 randomly selected patients who developed nosocomial infection caused by A. baumannii) were matched. Acinetobacter baumannii, detected in 279 isolates and obtained from 19 patients (12% of all samples), was resistant to almost all antibiotics tested, including carbapenems, with the exception of colistin and tigecycline. It was obtained most often from the respiratory tract samples. Empiric treatment of the nosocomial infections (pneumonia in 75% of cases) involved cephalosporins, metronidazole, and carbapenems (80%, 66%, and 61% of patients, respectively), whereas tigecyclin and colistin were used primarily in targeted therapy (20% and 12% of patients, respectively). The mortality rate of patients treated empirically was significantly higher (p Nosocomial A. baumannii infections represent a significant clinical problem because of their high incidence, lack of susceptibility to the most commonly used antibiotics, and the often inappropriate treatment, which favors the development of multi-drug-resistant strains.

  15. Evolution of Staphylococcus aureus during human colonization and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    The diversification of bacterial pathogens during infection is central to their capacity to adapt to different anatomical niches, evade the host immune system, and overcome therapeutic challenges. For example, antimicrobial treatment may fail due to the development of resistance during infection, which is often accompanied by transition to a less virulent state during chronic, persistent infection. In this review, the adaptation of the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus to its host environment during infection will be discussed, particularly in the context of new sequencing technologies which have opened a gateway towards understanding of the molecular processes underlying those adaptations. We now have the capacity to address previously intractable questions regarding bacterial diversification during infection which will ultimately lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and the nature of epidemics, and will inform the design of effective therapeutic measures.

  16. Human rhinovirus 16 causes Golgi apparatus fragmentation without blocking protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousnier, Aurelie; Swieboda, Dawid; Pinto, Anaïs; Guedán, Anabel; Rogers, Andrew V; Walton, Ross; Johnston, Sebastian L; Solari, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    The replication of picornaviruses has been described to cause fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus that blocks the secretory pathway. The inhibition of major histocompatibility complex class I upregulation and cytokine, chemokine and interferon secretion may have important implications for host defense. Previous studies have shown that disruption of the secretory pathway can be replicated by expression of individual nonstructural proteins; however the situation with different serotypes of human rhinovirus (HRV) is unclear. The expression of 3A protein from HRV14 or HRV2 did not cause Golgi apparatus disruption or a block in secretion, whereas other studies showed that infection of cells with HRV1A did cause Golgi apparatus disruption which was replicated by the expression of 3A. HRV16 is the serotype most widely used in clinical HRV challenge studies; consequently, to address the issue of Golgi apparatus disruption for HRV16, we have systematically and quantitatively examined the effect of HRV16 on both Golgi apparatus fragmentation and protein secretion in HeLa cells. First, we expressed each individual nonstructural protein and examined their cellular localization and their disruption of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus architecture. We quantified their effects on the secretory pathway by measuring secretion of the reporter protein Gaussia luciferase. Finally, we examined the same outcomes following infection of cells with live virus. We demonstrate that expression of HRV16 3A and 3AB and, to a lesser extent, 2B caused dispersal of the Golgi structure, and these three nonstructural proteins also inhibited protein secretion. The infection of cells with HRV16 also caused significant Golgi apparatus dispersal; however, this did not result in the inhibition of protein secretion. Importance: The ability of replicating picornaviruses to influence the function of the secretory pathway has important implications for host defense. However, there appear to be

  17. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  18. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

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    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  19. Microglia activation: one of the checkpoints in the CNS inflammation caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Wu, Feng; He, Ai; Zeng, Xin; Ouyang, Li-si; Liu, Ming-she; Zheng, Huan-qin; Lei, Wan-long; Wu, Zhong-dao; Lv, Zhi-yue

    2015-09-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is a rodent nematode. Adult worms of A. cantonensis live in the pulmonary arteries of rats; humans are non-permissive hosts like the mice. The larva cannot develop into an adult worm and only causes serious eosinophilic meningitis or meningo-encephalitis if humans or mice eat food containing larva of A. cantonensis in the third stage. The differing consequences largely depend on differing immune responses of hosts to parasite during A. cantonensis invasion and development. To further understand the reasons why mice and rats attain different outcomes in A. cantonensis infection, we used the HE staining to observe the pathological changes of infected mice and rats. In addition, we measured mRNA levels of some cytokines (IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, Eotaxin, IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β, IFN-γ, IL-17A, TNF-α, IL-1β, and iNOS) in brain tissues of mice and rats by real-time PCR. The result showed that brain inflammation in mice was more serious than in rats. Meanwhile, mRNA expression levels of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS increased after mice were infected. In contrast, mRNA levels of these cytokines in rats brain tissues decreased at post- infection 21 days. These cytokines mostly were secreted by activated microglia in central nervous system. Microglia of mice and rats were showed by Iba-1 (microglia marker) staining. In micee brains, microglia got together and had more significant activation than in rats brains. The results demonstrate that mice and rats have different CNS inflammation after infection by A. cantonensis, and it is in line with other researchers' reported findings. In conclusion, it is suggested that microglia activation is probably to be one of the most important factors in angiostrongyliasis from our study.

  20. Laguna Negra Virus Infection Causes Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in Turkish Hamsters (Mesocricetus brandti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, K; Scott, D; Safronetz, D; Brining, D L; Ebihara, H; Feldmann, H; LaCasse, R A

    2016-01-01

    Laguna Negra virus (LNV) is a New World hantavirus associated with severe and often fatal cardiopulmonary disease in humans, known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Five hamster species were evaluated for clinical and serologic responses following inoculation with 4 hantaviruses. Of the 5 hamster species, only Turkish hamsters infected with LNV demonstrated signs consistent with HPS and a fatality rate of 43%. Clinical manifestations in infected animals that succumbed to disease included severe and rapid onset of dyspnea, weight loss, leukopenia, and reduced thrombocyte numbers as compared to uninfected controls. Histopathologic examination revealed lung lesions that resemble the hallmarks of HPS in humans, including interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary edema, as well as generalized infection of endothelial cells and macrophages in major organ tissues. Histologic lesions corresponded to the presence of viral antigen in affected tissues. To date, there have been no small animal models available to study LNV infection and pathogenesis. The Turkish hamster model of LNV infection may be important in the study of LNV-induced HPS pathogenesis and development of disease treatment and prevention strategies.

  1. Decreased prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus infection is associated with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, U S; Choi, J S; Ko, J H; Lee, J H; Park, S Y; Park, S H

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is correlated with low education, low economic status, and lower rates of Pap smears, which are known as socio-demographic risk factors for cervical cancer. However, the association between obesity and high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection, the necessary cause of cervical cancer, and its related precursors, is not established. The authors examined the association between obesity and HR-HPV infection in 6,868 patients, who participated in annual health examinations at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from January through December 2007. The prevalence of HR-HPV infection was 14.8%. Women infected with HR-HPV had a lower body mass index (BMI), when compared with non-infected women. After adjustment for alcohol intake, cigarette smoking, and marital status, HR-HPV infection was found to be negatively associated with BMI. When the analysis was stratified according to BMI, the risk of HR-HPV infection was significantly lower among those who were overweight (OR = 0.817, 95% CI = 0.680-0.982), or obese (OR = 0.688, 95% CI = 0.556-0.851), when compared with women with normal weight. HR-HPV infection was associated with obesity defined by BMI, with a lower prevalence of infection observed in obese women.

  2. Epidemiology and identification of potential fungal pathogens causing invasive fungal infections in a tertiary care hospital in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faksri, Kiatichai; Kaewkes, Wanlop; Chaicumpar, Kunyaluk; Chaimanee, Prajuab; Wongwajana, Suwin

    2014-11-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are life threatening and associated with a high mortality rate. Here, we describe the distribution of pathogens, host risk factors, and significance of fungi isolated from patients with IFIs. The study included 861 fungal isolates recovered between 2006 and 2011 from 802 patients at Srinagarind Hospital, Thailand. Based on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group 2008 criteria, 28.5% (245/861 isolates) of the fungal isolates were considered to be causative agents of IFIs. The most common fungus was Candida albicans (46%, 396/861 isolates). However, the most common yeast causing IFIs was Cryptococcus neoformans (34.7%, 85/245 isolates), while the most common mould was Penicillium marneffei (10.6%, 26/245 isolates). Cryptococcosis was significantly associated with human immunodeficiency virus infections (P 95%), moderate (5%-95%), and rare (<5%) pathogens. This classification system could facilitate the prediction of the likelihood of diseases caused by the isolated fungi.

  3. Mortality by causes in HIV-infected adults: comparison with the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floristan Yugo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared mortality by cause of death in HIV-infected adults in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy with mortality in the general population in the same age and sex groups. Methods Mortality by cause of death was analyzed for the period 1999-2006 in the cohort of persons aged 20-59 years diagnosed with HIV infection and residing in Navarre (Spain. This was compared with mortality from the same causes in the general population of the same age and sex using standardized mortality ratios (SMR. Results There were 210 deaths among 1145 persons diagnosed with HIV (29.5 per 1000 person-years. About 50% of these deaths were from AIDS. Persons diagnosed with HIV infection had exceeded all-cause mortality (SMR 14.0, 95% CI 12.2 to 16.1 and non-AIDS mortality (SMR 6.9, 5.7 to 8.5. The analysis showed excess mortality from hepatic disease (SMR 69.0, 48.1 to 78.6, drug overdose or addiction (SMR 46.0, 29.2 to 69.0, suicide (SMR 9.6, 3.8 to 19.7, cancer (SMR 3.2, 1.8 to 5.1 and cardiovascular disease (SMR 3.1, 1.3 to 6.1. Mortality in HIV-infected intravenous drug users did not change significantly between the periods 1999-2002 and 2003-2006, but it declined by 56% in non-injecting drug users (P = 0.007. Conclusions Persons with HIV infection continue to have considerable excess mortality despite the availability of effective antiretroviral treatments. However, excess mortality in the HIV patients has declined since these treatments were introduced, especially in persons without a history of intravenous drug use.

  4. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Microbes Causing Bloodstream Infections in Unguja, Zanzibar.

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    Annette Onken

    Full Text Available Bloodstream infections (BSI are frequent and cause high case-fatality rates. Urgent antibiotic treatment can save patients' lives, but antibiotic resistance can render antibiotic therapy futile. This study is the first to collect epidemiological data on BSI from Unguja, Zanzibar.Clinical data and blood for culturing and susceptibility testing of isolated microbes were obtained from 469 consecutively enrolled neonates, children and adults presenting with signs of systemic infections at Mnazi Mmoja Hospital (MMH, Zanzibar.Pathogenic bacteria were recovered from the blood of 14% of the patients (66/469. The most frequently isolated microbes were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp. and Staphylococcus aureus. Infections were community-acquired in 56 patients (85% and hospital-acquired in 8 (12% (data missing for 2 patients. BSI caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (E. coli, K. pneumoniae was found in 5 cases, of which 3 were community-acquired and 2 hospital-acquired. Three of these patients died. Six of 7 Salmonella Typhi isolates were multidrug resistant. Streptococcus pneumoniae was found in one patient only.This is the first report of ESBL-producing bacteria causing BSI from the Zanzibar archipelago. Our finding of community-acquired BSI caused by ESBL-producing bacteria is alarming, as it implies that these difficult-to-treat bacteria have already spread in the society. In the local setting these infections are virtually impossible to cure. The findings call for increased awareness of rational antibiotic use, infection control and surveillance to counteract the problem of emerging antimicrobial resistance.

  5. Acute pylephlebitis following gastrointestinal infection: an unrecognized cause of septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, José; Zapata, Laura; Poblano, Manuel; Rodríguez, Agustín; Camargo, Leonardo; Martínez, Belinda; Bataller, Ramón

    2010-09-01

    Pylephlebitis is the septic thrombosis of the portal vein. Hypercoagulability and intra-abdominal sepsis are the main predisposing factors. A 25-year-old man presented to a primary health care center complaining of fever, epigastric pain, and jaundice. He was initially diagnosed with a gastrointestinal infection and alcoholic hepatitis and, due to his unstable clinical status, was referred to the emergency room. A diagnosis of acute pylephlebitis complicated with septic shock was made. Treatment with a wide-spectrum antibiotic and anticoagulation was initiated. Fifteen days later, recanalization of the portal vein was achieved and clinical status was improved. Pylephlebitis following gastrointestinal infection is a potential cause of septic shock.

  6. Human Hemorrhagic Fever Causing Arenaviruses: Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to Virus Virulence and Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Shao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses include multiple human pathogens ranging from the low-risk lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV to highly virulent hemorrhagic fever (HF causing viruses such as Lassa (LASV, Junin (JUNV, Machupo (MACV, Lujo (LUJV, Sabia (SABV, Guanarito (GTOV, and Chapare (CHPV, for which there are limited preventative and therapeutic measures. Why some arenaviruses can cause virulent human infections while others cannot, even though they are isolated from the same rodent hosts, is an enigma. Recent studies have revealed several potential pathogenic mechanisms of arenaviruses, including factors that increase viral replication capacity and suppress host innate immunity, which leads to high viremia and generalized immune suppression as the hallmarks of severe and lethal arenaviral HF diseases. This review summarizes current knowledge of the roles of each of the four viral proteins and some known cellular factors in the pathogenesis of arenaviral HF as well as of some human primary cell-culture and animal models that lend themselves to studying arenavirus-induced HF disease pathogenesis. Knowledge gained from these studies can be applied towards the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines against these deadly human pathogens.

  7. Longitudinal assessment of fractional anisotropy alterations caused by simian immunodeficiency virus infection: a preliminary diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenchao; Dong, Enqing; Liu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Wang, Bo; Li, Hongjun; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies found that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to white matter (WM) microstructure degeneration. Most of the DTI studies were cross-sectional and thus merely investigated only one specific point in the disease. In order to systematically study the WM impairments caused by HIV infection, more longitudinal studies are needed. However, longitudinal studies on HIV patients are very difficult to conduct. To address this question, we employed the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkeys model to carry out a longitudinal DTI study. We aimed to longitudinally access the WM abnormalities of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys by studying the fractional anisotropy (FA) alterations with Tract Based Spatial Statistic (TBSS) analysis. Four rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239 were utilized in the study. DTI scans and peripheral blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts were acquired prior to virus inoculation (as the baseline) and in the 12th and 24th week postvirus inoculation. Significant FA alterations were found in the two areas of the inferotemporal regions (iTE), respectively located in the ventral subregion of posterior iTE (iTEpv) and the dorsal subregion of iTE (iTEpd). The decreased FA values in iTEpd were found significantly negatively correlated with the elevated peripheral blood CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios. It might suggest that WM in iTEpd was still impaired even though the immune dysfunction alleviated temporally.

  8. Dysregulated Type I Interferon and Inflammatory Monocyte-Macrophage Responses Cause Lethal Pneumonia in SARS-CoV-Infected Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fehr, Anthony R; Vijay, Rahul; Mack, Matthias; Zhao, Jincun; Meyerholz, David K; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-02-10

    Highly pathogenic human respiratory coronaviruses cause acute lethal disease characterized by exuberant inflammatory responses and lung damage. However, the factors leading to lung pathology are not well understood. Using mice infected with SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV, we show that robust virus replication accompanied by delayed type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling orchestrates inflammatory responses and lung immunopathology with diminished survival. IFN-I remains detectable until after virus titers peak, but early IFN-I administration ameliorates immunopathology. This delayed IFN-I signaling promotes the accumulation of pathogenic inflammatory monocyte-macrophages (IMMs), resulting in elevated lung cytokine/chemokine levels, vascular leakage, and impaired virus-specific T cell responses. Genetic ablation of the IFN-αβ receptor (IFNAR) or IMM depletion protects mice from lethal infection, without affecting viral load. These results demonstrate that IFN-I and IMM promote lethal SARS-CoV infection and identify IFN-I and IMMs as potential therapeutic targets in patients infected with pathogenic coronavirus and perhaps other respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antifungal activity of caspofungin in experimental infective endocarditis caused by Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorio, Gerardo Becerra; Bourdon, Lorena Michele Brennan; Benavides, Leonel García; Huerta-Olvera, Selene G; Plascencia, Arturo; Villanueva, José; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Hernández-Cañaveral, Iván Isidro

    2017-05-01

    Infective endocarditis is a disease characterised by heart valve lesions, which exhibit extracellular matrix proteins that act as a physical barrier to prevent the passage of antimicrobial agents. The genus Candida has acquired clinical importance given that it is increasingly being isolated from cases of nosocomial infections. To evaluate the activity of caspofungin compared to that of liposomal amphotericin B against Candida albicans in experimental infective endocarditis. Wistar rats underwent surgical intervention and infection with strains of C. albicans to develop infective endocarditis. Three groups were formed: the first group was treated with caspofungin, the second with liposomal amphotericin B, and the third received a placebo. In vitro sensitivity was first determined to further evaluate the effect of these treatments on a rat experimental model of endocarditis by semiquantitative culture of fibrinous vegetations and histological analysis. Our semiquantitative culture of growing vegetation showed massive C. albicans colonisation in rats without treatment, whereas rats treated with caspofungin showed significantly reduced colonisation, which was similar to the results obtained with liposomal amphotericin B. The antifungal activity of caspofungin is similar to that of liposomal amphotericin B in an experimental model of infective endocarditis caused by C. albicans.

  10. MICROBIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF BILE IN CHOLELITHIASIS AND THEIR IMPLICATION IN CAUSING POST OPERATIVE WOUND INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cholecystitis is a common indication for major abdominal surgeries. It may occur with or without obstruction of common bile duct. Obstruction leads to secondary bacterial infection of bile. Bactibilia is an important predisposing factor for post-operative complications. Hence, this study was designed to determine the prevalence of bacteria in bile samples of cholecystitis patients and to correlate bactibilia and post-operative wound infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Bile samples collected intra-operatively were subjected to gram stain, culture, and antibiotic sensitivity testing. The patients were followed-up for post-operative complications. If post-operative wound infection was found, cultures were done and correlated with bacteria isolated from bile samples. RESULTS: Bactibilia was found in 43/100 (43% of patients. Polymicrobial flora was found in 7% of bile samples. Escherichia coli, citrobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae and pseudomonas were the predominant organisms isolated. Post-operative wound infection was found in ten (10% patients who had bactibilia. Amikacin, gentamicin, ceftriaxone sulbatum, pipracillin tazobactum, imipenem were among most effective in prophylactic regimen. CONCLUSION: The organisms responsible for bactibilia were found to cause post-operative infections in the same patient warranting the use of prophylactic antibiotics in every patient undergoing cholecystectomy. All patients undergoing cholecystectomy should receive prophylactic antibiotic to prevent post-operative wound infections.

  11. Cause-specific excess mortality in siblings of patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Lohse, Nicolai; Gerstoft, Jan;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Co-infection with hepatitis C in HIV-infected individuals is associated with 3- to 4-fold higher mortality among these patients' siblings, compared with siblings of mono-infected HIV-patients or population controls. This indicates that risk factors shared by family members partially...... account for the excess mortality of HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. We aimed to explore the causes of death contributing to the excess sibling mortality. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrieved causes of death from the Danish National Registry of Deaths and estimated cause-specific excess mortality...... rates (EMR) for siblings of HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals (n = 436) and siblings of HIV mono-infected individuals (n = 1837) compared with siblings of population controls (n = 281,221). Siblings of HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals had an all-cause EMR of 3.03 (95% CI, 1.56-4.50) per 1,000 person...

  12. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C. E. P.; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  13. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo de Abreu Manso

    Full Text Available The yellow fever (YF 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system.

  14. Treatment Strategies for Human Arboviral Infections Applicable to Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-16

    0 Lf Reprintod from Tropical Veterinary Medicine : Current Issues and Perspectives 1• • Volume 653 of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences...June 16, 1992 _ Treatment Strategies for Human = __ Arboviral Infections Applicable to I= ’ Veterinary Medicine = ! Chlh. MEIR KENDE (A) U •Department...A 3 0. C . U. 2 * >. U u U>1 it 020 ce*. 0. , -,r- 8 C- ed U a - .; U~u0.M KENDE: HUMAN ARBOVIRAL INFECTIONS AND VETERINARY MEDICINE 299 TABLE 2

  15. Comparative genomics of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 isolates differing in virulence and propensity to cause systemic infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Anne; Loof, Torsten G; Babbar, Anshu; Itzek, Andreas; Koehorst, Jasper J; Schaap, Peter J; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M1 is a frequent cause of severe infections in humans. Some M1 isolates are pathogenic in mice and used in studies on infection pathogenesis. We observed marked differences in murine infections caused by M1 strain SF370, 5448, 5448AP or AP1 which prompted us to sequence the whole genome of isolates 5448 and AP1 for comparative analysis. Strain 5448 is known to acquire inactivating mutations in the CovRS two-component system during mouse infection, producing hypervirulent progeny such as 5448AP. Isolates AP1 and 5448AP, more than 5448, caused disseminating infections that became systemic and lethal. SF370 was not pathogenic. Phages caused gross genetic differences and increased the gene content of AP1 by 8% as compared to 5448 and SF370. Each of six examined M1 genomes contained two CRISPR-Cas systems. Phage insertion destroyed a type II CRISPR-Cas system in AP1 and other strains of serotypes M1, M3, M6 and M24, but not in M1 strains 5448, SF370, MGAS5005, A20 or M1 476. A resulting impaired defence against invading genetic elements could have led to the wealth of phages in AP1. AP1 lacks genetic features of the MGAS5005-like clonal complex including the streptodornase that drives selection for hypervirulent clones with inactivated CovRS system. Still, inactivating mutations in covS were a common genetic feature of AP1 and the MGAS5005-like isolate 5448AP. Abolished expression of the cysteine proteinase SpeB, due to CovRS inactivation could be a common cause for hypervirulence of the two isolates. Moreover, an additional protein H-coding gene and a mutation in the regulator gene rofA distinguished AP1 form other M1 isolates. In conclusion, hypervirulence of S. pyogenes M1 in mice is not limited to the MGAS5005-like genotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. The burden of sepsis in critically ill human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients--a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, José

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 1996, we have seen dramatic changes in morbi-mortality rates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. If on the one hand, the immunologic preservation-associated with the use of current antiretroviral therapy markedly diminishes the incidence of opportunistic infections, on the other hand it extended life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals similarly to the general population. However, the management of critically ill human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients remains challenging and troublesome for practicing clinician. Sepsis - a complex systemic inflammatory syndrome in response to infection - is the second leading cause of intensive care unit admission in both human immunodeficiency virus-infected and uninfected populations. Recent data have emerged describing a substantial burden of sepsis in the infected population, in addition, to a much poorer prognosis in this group. Many factors contribute to this outcome, including specific etiologies, patterns of inflammation, underlying immune dysregulation related to chronic human immunodeficiency virus infection and delays in prompt diagnosis and treatment. This brief review explores the impact of sepsis in the context of human immunodeficiency virus infection, and proposes future directions for better management and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus-associated sepsis.

  17. The chicken as a natural model for extraintestinal infections caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antão, Esther-Maria; Glodde, Susanne; Li, Ganwu; Sharifi, Reza; Homeier, Timo; Laturnus, Claudia; Diehl, Ines; Bethe, Astrid; Philipp, Hans-C; Preisinger, Rudolf; Wieler, Lothar H; Ewers, Christa

    2008-01-01

    E. coli infections in avian species have become an economic threat to the poultry industry worldwide. Several factors have been associated with the virulence of E. coli in avian hosts, but no specific virulence gene has been identified as being entirely responsible for the pathogenicity of avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). Needless to say, the chicken would serve as the best model organism for unravelling the pathogenic mechanisms of APEC, an extraintestinal pathogen. Five-week-old white leghorn SPF chickens were infected intra-tracheally with a well characterized APEC field strain IMT5155 (O2:K1:H5) using different doses corresponding to the respective models of infection established, that is, the lung colonization model allowing re-isolation of bacteria only from the lung but not from other internal organs, and the systemic infection model. These two models represent the crucial steps in the pathogenesis of APEC infections, including the colonization of the lung epithelium and the spread of bacteria throughout the bloodstream. The read-out system includes a clinical score, pathomorphological changes and bacterial load determination. The lung colonization model has been established and described for the first time in this study, in addition to a comprehensive account of a systemic infection model which enables the study of severe extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) infections. These in vivo models enable the application of various molecular approaches to study host-pathogen interactions more closely. The most important application of such genetic manipulation techniques is the identification of genes required for extraintestinal virulence, as well as host genes involved in immunity in vivo. The knowledge obtained from these studies serves the dual purpose of shedding light on the nature of virulence itself, as well as providing a route for rational attenuation of the pathogen for vaccine construction, a measure by which extraintestinal infections, including

  18. The Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox gene ATHB12 is involved in symptom development caused by geminivirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungan; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Cheon, Choong-Ill; Kim, Sung-Han; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Im, Kyung-Hwan; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    Geminiviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a number of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Arabidopsis is susceptible to infection with the Curtovirus, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV). Infection of Arabidopsis with BSCTV causes severe symptoms characterized by stunting, leaf curling, and the development of abnormal inflorescence and root structures. BSCTV-induced symptom development requires the virus-encoded C4 protein which is thought to interact with specific plant-host proteins and disrupt signaling pathways important for controlling cell division and development. Very little is known about the specific plant regulatory factors that participate in BSCTV-induced symptom development. This study was conducted to identify specific transcription factors that are induced by BSCTV infection. Arabidopsis plants were inoculated with BSCTV and the induction of specific transcription factors was monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. We found that the ATHB12 and ATHB7 genes, members of the homeodomain-leucine zipper family of transcription factors previously shown to be induced by abscisic acid and water stress, are induced in symptomatic tissues of Arabidopsis inoculated with BSCTV. ATHB12 expression is correlated with an array of morphological abnormalities including leaf curling, stunting, and callus-like structures in infected Arabidopsis. Inoculation of plants with a BSCTV mutant with a defective c4 gene failed to induce ATHB12. Transgenic plants expressing the BSCTV C4 gene exhibited increased ATHB12 expression whereas BSCTV-infected ATHB12 knock-down plants developed milder symptoms and had lower ATHB12 expression compared to the wild-type plants. Reporter gene studies demonstrated that the ATHB12 promoter was responsive to BSCTV infection and the highest expression levels were observed in symptomatic tissues where cell cycle genes also were induced. These results suggest that ATHB7 and ATHB12 may play an

  19. [Antiviral activity of polyprenylphosphates in experimental infection caused by hepatitis C virus in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narovlianskiĭ, A N; Deriabin, P G; Sedov, A M; Sanin, A V; Pronin, A V

    2012-01-01

    Study antiviral effect of sodium polyprenylphosphate (PPP) in experimental infection model caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) in cell culture. Cytopathogenic variant of HCV isolated from blood serum of a chronically infected patient was used. HCV infectious dose was 10.0 TCD50. Highly sensitive to cytopathogenic effect of HCV continuous swine embryo kidney cells (SPEV) as 1 day monolayer grown in 24 well plastic plates on 199 medium with 10% calf serum with addition of L-glutamine and antibiotics (100 U/ml) were used. PPP was used in concentrations that do not have cytotoxic effect (from 60 to 7.5 microg in 50 microl); introduced into SPEV cell cultures immediately after infection, 24 hours before or 24 hours after the infection of cells with HCV. Infectious activity of HCV was evaluated by using Reed-Muench formula based on results of medium samples titration obtained 3 days after the infection of cells. PPP was shown to have antiviral properties when added into the cell cultures immediately after the infection with HCV. Under the effect of PPP HCV titers were established to decrease by 3.0 lg (PPV dose of 60 microg) and by 1.9 lg (PPV dose of 30 microg). Positive effect was also obtained for prophylactic use of PPP. When PPP at a dose of 60 microg was introduced 24 hours before the infection of SPEV with HCV, the titer of the virus decreased by 3.5 lg. Prophylactic administration of low doses of the preparation (7.5 and 15.0 microg) also showed evident antiviral effect (decrease of infectious activity of HCV by 3.2 - 2.3 lg, respectively). PPP at the doses tested has an ability to reduce concentration of HCV in SPEV cell cultures when added immediately after infection or 24 hours before.

  20. Animal-associated opportunistic infections among persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, C A; Angulo, F J; Rooney, J A

    1994-01-01

    A number of animal-associated infections occur in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), including those due to Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptosporidium, Microsporida, Salmonella, Campylo-bacter, Giardia, Rhodococcus equi, Rochalimaea, and Listeria monocytogenes. Most of these infections, with the exception of those due to Rochalimaea, appear to be acquired by the immunosuppressed individual from sources other than exposure to animals. Drs. Glaser and colleagues review our current understanding of the role of exposure to animals, especially pets, in the natural history of these opportunistic infections. They suggest that the risk of zoonotic transmission is small and offer practical suggestions designed to reduce this low risk. They conclude that the benefits of animal companionship outweigh the risks to patients and that prohibition of pet ownership by individuals infected with HIV is not warranted.