WorldWideScience

Sample records for human imprinted 11p15

  1. Parental imprinting of human chromosome region 11p15.3-pter involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and various human neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Hoovers, J. M.; Redeker, E.; Verjaal, M.; Feinberg, A. P.; Little, P.; Boavida, M.; Coad, N.; Steenman, M.; Bliek, J.

    1994-01-01

    Cytogenetic and DNA analyses of patients with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) enabled us to refine the localization of the syndrome at 11p15.3-pter to two distinct regions. One chromosome region (BWSCR1) is near the insulin (INS) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) genes. The other region

  2. Loss of imprinting and loss of heterozygosity on 11p15.5 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainho, C A; Kowalski, L P; Rogatto, S R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IGF2 and H19 are reciprocal imprinted genes with paternal and maternal monoallelic expression, respectively. This is interesting, because IGF2 is known as a growth factor, and H19 encodes a RNA with putative tumor suppressor action. Furthermore, IGF2 and H19 are linked genes located...

  3. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014...... and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment......, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer...

  4. Mouse model for Usher syndrome: linkage mapping suggests homology to Usher type I reported at human chromosome 11p15.

    OpenAIRE

    Heckenlively, J R; Chang, B; Erway, L C; Peng, C; Hawes, N L; Hageman, G S; Roderick, T H

    1995-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of diseases with autosomal recessive inheritance, congenital hearing loss, and the development of retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degeneration characterized by night blindness and visual field loss over several decades. The causes of Usher syndrome are unknown and no animal models have been available for study. Four human gene sites have been reported, suggesting at least four separate forms of Usher syndrome. We report a mouse model of type I Usher syndr...

  5. Fibroadenoma in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 11p15.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takama, Yuichi; Kubota, Akio; Nakayama, Masahiro; Higashimoto, Ken; Jozaki, Kosuke; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2014-12-01

    Herein is described a case of breast fibroadenomas in a 16-year-old girl with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 11p15.5. She was clinically diagnosed with BWS and direct closure was performed for an omphalocele at birth. Subtotal and 90% pancreatectomy were performed for nesidioblastosis at the ages 2 months and 8 years, respectively. Bilateral multiple breast fibroadenomas were noted at the age of 16 and 17 years. In this case, paternal UPD of chromosome 11p15.5 was identified on microsatellite marker analysis. The relevant imprinted chromosomal region in BWS is 11p15.5, and UPD of chromosome 11p15 is a risk factor for BWS-associated tumorigenicity. Chromosome 11p15.5 consists of imprinting domains of IGF2, the expression of which is associated with the tumorigenesis of various breast cancers. This case suggests that fibroadenomas occurred in association with BWS. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Foster parenting, human imprinting and conventional handling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    Foster parenting, human imprinting and conventional handling affects survival and early .... bird may subsequently direct its sexual attention to those humans on whom it was imprinted (Bubier et al., ..... The mind through chicks' eyes: memory,.

  7. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 11p15.5 within the pancreas causes isolated hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Flanagan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLoss of function mutations in the genes encoding the pancreatic β-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channel are identified in approximately 80% of patients with diazoxide-unresponsive hyperinsulinaemic-hypoglycaemia (HH. For a small number of patients HH can occur as part of a multisystem disease such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS. In approximately 20% of patients, BWS results from chromosome 11 paternal uniparental disomy (UPD, which causes dysregulation of imprinted growth regulation genes at 11p15.5. There is a considerable range in the clinical features and phenotypic severity associated with BWS which is likely to be due to somatic mosaicism. The cause of HH in these patients is not known.Research Design and methodsWe undertook microsatellite analysis of 12 markers spanning chromosome 11p in two patients with severe HH and diffuse disease requiring a pancreatectomy. In both patients mutations in the KATP channel genes had not been identified. ResultsWe identified segmental paternal UPD in DNA extracted from pancreatic tissue in both patients. UPD was not observed in DNA extracted from the patient’s leukocytes or buccal samples. In both cases the UPD encompassed the differentially methylated region at chromosome 11p15.5. Despite this neither patient had any further features of BWS.ConclusionsPaternal UPD of the chromosome 11p15.5 differentially methylated region limited to the pancreatic tissue may represent a novel cause of isolated diazoxide unresponsive HH. Loss of heterozygosity studies should therefore be considered in all patients with severe HH who have undergone pancreatic surgery when KATP channel mutation(s have not been identified.

  8. Imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Brian J

    2013-07-01

    Imprinting is a type of learning by which an animal restricts its social preferences to an object after exposure to that object. Filial imprinting occurs shortly after birth or hatching and sexual imprinting, around the onset of sexual maturity; both have sensitive periods. This review is concerned mainly with filial imprinting. Filial imprinting in the domestic chick is an effective experimental system for investigating mechanisms underlying learning and memory. Extensive evidence implicates a restricted part of the chick forebrain, the intermediate and medial mesopallium (IMM), as a memory store for visual imprinting. After imprinting to a visual stimulus, neuronal responsiveness in IMM is specifically biased toward the imprinting stimulus. Both this bias and the strength of imprinting measured behaviorally depend on uninterrupted sleep shortly after training. When learning-related changes in IMM are lateralized they occur predominantly or completely on the left side. Ablation experiments indicate that the left IMM is responsible for long-term storage of information about the imprinting stimulus; the right side is also a store but additionally is necessary for extra storage outside IMM, in a region necessary for flexible use of information acquired through imprinting. Auditory imprinting gives rise to biochemical, neuroanatomical, and electrophysiological changes in the medio-rostral nidopallium/mesopallium, anterior to IMM. Auditory imprinting has not been shown to produce learning-related changes in IMM. Imprinting may be facilitated by predispositions. Similar predispositions for faces and biological motion occur in domestic chicks and human infants. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:375-390. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1231 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The role of imprinted genes in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Miho; Moore, Gudrun E.

    2013-01-01

    Detailed comprehensive molecular analysis using families and multiple matched tissues is essential to determine whether imprinted genes have a functional role in humans. See research article: http://genomebiology.com/2011/12/3/R25

  10. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11p15.5 and relapse in hepatoblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitragar, S; Iyer, V K; Agarwala, S; Gupta, S D; Sharma, A; Wari, M N

    2011-01-01

    IGF2 is a tumor suppressor gene at locus 11p15. Many hepatoblastomas have loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus. Earlier studies have not demonstrated any association between LOH and prognosis. Aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of LOH at 11p15.5 in hepatoblastomas. DNA was isolated from normal liver and tumor tissue in 20 patients with hepatoblastoma. PCR was performed and cases were classified as LOH present, absent or non-informative. Patients' follow-up data was analyzed using Fischer's exact test and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for relapse-free survival (RFS) in relation to LOH. Ethical clearance was obtained from the institutional ethics board. All cases were informative for at least one microsatellite marker used. 4 of the 20 cases (20%) had LOH at 11p15.5. One patient died in the immediate postoperative period. 5 of 19 patients relapsed (26%). Of 4 patients who had LOH, 3 (75%) relapsed, the time to relapse being 7, 7 and 9 months, respectively. Of the 15 cases without LOH, 2 (13.3%) relapsed. 4 patients had mixed epithelial and mesenchymal histology; 3 of them had LOH. The 2 groups with and without LOH were well matched. The RFS for patients with LOH (n=4) was 13% (mean survival time [MST]: 8.7 months; 95CI 6.7-10.7), while the RFS for cases without LOH (n=15) was 75% (MST: 100.7 months; 95CI 74.5-126.8). Mixed epithelial and mesenchymal histology is more frequently associated with LOH on chromosome 11p15.5 than pure epithelial histology. LOH on chromosome 11p15.5 is associated with a significantly increased incidence of relapse and a significantly shorter relapse-free survival in patients with hepatoblastoma. The risk of relapse is higher and the RFS lower both in standard-risk and high-risk patients with hepatoblastoma if they demonstrate the presence of LOH at 11p15.5. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. A new case of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with an 11p15 duplication of paternal origin [46,XY,-21,+der(21), t(11;21)(p15.2;q22.3)pat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska-Walasek, M; Gutkowska, A; Mospinek-Krasnopolska, M; Chrzanowska, K

    1996-01-01

    We present a new case of 11p15 duplication (trisomy 11p15) in a boy (46,XY,-21,+der(21), t(11;21)(p15.2;q22.3)] suffering from Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), whose phenotypically normal father carries a balanced translocation between chromosomes 11 and 21[46,XY, t(11;21)(p15.2;q22.3)]. The paternal grandmother has the same balanced translocation and is also clinically normal. BWS was suspected when the boy was 6 months old because of gigantism, macroglossia, visceromegaly, ear lobe creases and abdominal distention. Apart from the characteristic BWS phenotype, the boy has other features which are almost exclusively observed in 11p trisomy (high forehead with frontal upsweep of hair, wide central nose bridge, slightly beaked nose, chubby cheeks and severe mental retardation). So far, at least eight cases of 11p15 duplication have been described as patients with BWS. In six of these, the duplication was due to inheritance of a translocated or rearranged paternal chromosome. This was also the case in our patient. In the two other previously published cases, the 11p15 duplications were de novo, but in one of these, DNA analysis has subsequently shown that the duplication was of paternal origin. We discuss our observations in relation to the above-mentioned previous cases of 11p15 duplication and the possible role of genomic imprinting in the etiology of BWS.

  12. Frequency of WT1 and 11p15 constitutional aberrations and phenotypic correlation in childhood Wilms tumour patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, H; Kersseboom, R; Alders, M; Pieters, R; Wagner, A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M

    2012-11-01

    In 9-17% of Wilms tumour patients a predisposing syndrome is present, in particular WT1-associated syndromes and overgrowth syndromes. Constitutional WT1 mutations or epigenetic changes on chromosome 11p15 have also been described in Wilms tumour patients without phenotypic abnormalities. Thus, the absence of phenotypic abnormalities does not exclude the presence of a genetic predisposition, suggesting that more Wilms tumour patients may have a constitutional abnormality. Therefore, we investigated the frequency of constitutional aberrations in combination with phenotype. Clinical genetic assessment, as well as molecular analysis of WT1 and locus 11p15 was offered to a single-centre cohort of 109 childhood Wilms tumour patients. Twelve patients (11%) had a WT1 aberration and eight patients (8%) had an 11p15 aberration. Of the 12 patients with a WT1 aberration, four had WAGR syndrome (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary malformations and mental retardation), one had Denys-Drash syndrome, four had genitourinary anomalies without other syndromic features and three had bilateral disease with stromal-predominant histology at young age without congenital anomalies. Of the eight patients with an 11p15 aberration, four had Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), two had minor features of BWS and two had no stigmata of BWS or hemihypertrophy. Constitutional WT1 or 11p15 aberrations are frequent in Wilms tumour patients and careful clinical assessment can identify the majority of these patients. Therefore, we would recommend offering clinical genetic counselling to all Wilms tumour patients, as well as molecular analysis to patients with clinical signs of a syndrome or with features that may indicate a constitutional WT1 or 11p15 aberration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 11p15 duplication and 13q34 deletion with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkiewicz, Dorota; Kugaudo, Monika; Tańska, Anna; Wawrzkiewicz-Witkowska, Angelika; Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Kucharczyk, Marzena; Cieślikowska, Agata; Ciara, Elżbieta; Krajewska-Walasek, Małgorzata

    2015-06-01

    Here we report a patient with 11p15.4p15.5 duplication and 13q34 deletion presenting with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and moderate deficiency of factor VII (FVII). The duplication was initially diagnosed on methylation-sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Array comparative genome hybridization confirmed its presence and indicated a 13q34 distal deletion. The patient's clinical symptoms, including developmental delay and facial dysmorphism, were typical of BWS with paternal 11p15 trisomy. Partial 13q monosomy in this patient is associated with moderate deficiency of FVII and may also overlap with a few symptoms of paternal 11p15 trisomy such as developmental delay and some facial features. To our knowledge this is the first report of 11p15.4p15.5 duplication associated with deletion of 13q34 and FVII deficiency. Moreover, this report emphasizes the importance of detailed clinical as well as molecular examinations in patients with BWS features and developmental delay. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Frequency of WT1 and 11p15 constitutional aberrations and phenotypic correlation in childhood Wilms tumour patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, H.; Kersseboom, R.; Alders, M.; Pieters, R.; Wagner, A.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In 9-17% of Wilms tumour patients a predisposing syndrome is present, in particular WT1-associated syndromes and overgrowth syndromes. Constitutional WT1 mutations or epigenetic changes on chromosome 11p15 have also been described in Wilms tumour patients without phenotypic

  15. GATM, the human ortholog of the mouse imprinted Gatm gene, escapes genomic imprinting in placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Miyamoto

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The GATM gene encodes L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase, which catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine into guanidinoacetate, the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of creatine. Since, deficiencies in creatine synthesis and transport lead to certain forms of mental retardation in human, the human GATM gene appears to be involved in brain development. Recently it has been demonstrated that the mouse Gatm is expressed during development and is imprinted with maternal expression in the placenta and yolk sac, but not in embryonic tissues. We investigated the imprinting status of the human GATM by analyzing its expression in four human placentas. GATM was biallelically expressed, thus suggesting that this gene escapes genomic imprinting in placentas, differently from what has been reported in mouse extra-embryonic tissues.

  16. Imprinted Expression of SNRPN in Human Preimplantation Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Huntriss, John; Daniels, Robert; Bolton, Virginia; Monk, Marilyn

    1998-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are two clinically distinct neurogenetic disorders arising from a loss of expression of imprinted genes within the human chromosome region 15q11-q13. Recent evidence suggests that the SNRPN gene, which is defective in PWS, plays a central role in the imprinting-center regulation of the PWS/AS region. To increase our understanding of the regulation of expression of this imprinted gene, we have developed single-cell-sensitive procedures for...

  17. Foster parenting, human imprinting and conventional handling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the present study indicates that improvements can be made by adopting alternative approaches. Further studies are needed to ascertain how foster parenting and imprinting may be utilized to optimize chick performance, including the long-term consequences of these practices. Keywords: Parental care, Struthio camelus, ...

  18. Loss of heterozygosity at 11p13 and 11p15 in Wilms tumor: a study of 22 cases from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigamani, Elanthenral; Wari, Mohammad Nahidul; Iyer, Venkateswaran K; Agarwala, Sandeep; Sharma, Arundhati; Bakhshi, Sameer; Dinda, Amit

    2013-03-01

    11p13 and 11p15 loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in Wilms tumor (WT), the commonest molecular pathogenetic event in WT, shows variation in different parts of the world. The present study looked for the presence of 11p13 and 11p15 LOH as well as nephrogenic rests in WT occurring in India. Twenty-two cases of WT were subjected to thorough pathological examination for presence of nephrogenic rests. Fresh frozen tissue was evaluated for LOH at 11p13 and 11p15, using PCR for microsatellite markers. Among twenty-two consecutive cases of WT, 20 were unilateral and 2 were bilateral. 6/22 showed LOH at 11p13 (27.7 %) and 1/22 showed LOH at 11p15 (4.54 %). 2/22 cases showed presence of nephrogenic rests. One of the cases with LOH at 11p13 had intralobar nephrogenic rest in the adjacent kidney. One specimen had perilobar nephrogenic rest in the adjacent kidney but did not show LOH for either 11p13 or 11p15 in the tumor. LOH at 11p13 is seen in 27.27 % of WT in India, which is similar to reports in the English language literature. LOH at 11p15 was seen in 4.54 % of WT, which is lower than that reported from Western subjects.

  19. Surface imprinted beads for the recognition of human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Francesca; Piletsky, Sergey; Turner, Anthony P F; Speghini, Adolfo; Bossi, Alessandra

    2007-04-15

    The synthesis of poly-aminophenylboronic acid (ABPA) imprinted beads for the recognition of the protein human serum albumin (HSA) is reported. In order to create homogeneous recognition sites, covalent immobilisation of the template HSA was exploited. The resulting imprinted beads were selective for HSA. The indirect imprinting factor (IF) calculated from supernatant was 1.6 and the direct IF, evaluated from the protein recovered from the beads, was 1.9. The binding capacity was 1.4 mg/g, which is comparable to commercially available affinity materials. The specificity of the HSA recognition was evaluated with competitive experiments, indicating a molar ratio 4.5/1 of competitor was necessary to displace half of the bound HSA. The recognition and binding of the imprinted beads was also tested with a complex sample, human serum and targeted removal of HSA without a loss of the other protein components was demonstrated. The easy preparation protocol of derivatised beads and a good protein recognition properties make the approach an attractive solution to analytical and bio-analytical problems in the field of biotechnology.

  20. Tumor-specific loss of 11p15.5 alleles in del11p13 Wilms tumor and in familial adrenocortical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, I.; Grandjouan, S.; Couillin, P.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have compared constitutional and tumor genotypes in nine cases of hereditary Wilms tumor (WT) and in three unrelated cases of familial adrenocortical carcinoma (ADCC). Since susceptibility to these tumors can be observed in malformation syndromes associated with a constitutional deletion of band 11p13 (WT) and with a constitutional duplication of band 11p15.5 (WT, ADCC), they investigated these two candidate regions by using 11p polymorphic markers. As expected, somatic chromosomal events, resulting in a loss of heterozygosity limited to region 11p15.5, were observed in the tumor of two familial cases of adrenocortical carcinoma. Surprisingly, however, analysis of the WT of two patients with a constitutional deletion of band 11p13, associated with aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation (WAGR syndrome), revealed a loss of heterozygosity limited to region 11p15.5. These data therefore suggest that observation of a specific loss of heterozygosity may not necessarily point to the site of the initial germinal mutation. Together with previous similar observations of a loss of heterozygosity limited to 11p15.5 in breast cancer and in rhabdomyosarcoma, the data suggest that region 11p15.5 may carry a non-tissue-specific gene that could be involved in genetic predisposition, in tumor progression, or in both

  1. Short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs) are excluded from imprinted regions in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greally, John M

    2002-01-08

    To test whether regions undergoing genomic imprinting have unique genomic characteristics, imprinted and nonimprinted human loci were compared for nucleotide and retroelement composition. Maternally and paternally expressed subgroups of imprinted genes were found to differ in terms of guanine and cytosine, CpG, and retroelement content, indicating a segregation into distinct genomic compartments. Imprinted regions have been normally permissive to L1 long interspersed transposable element retroposition during mammalian evolution but universally and significantly lack short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs). The primate-specific Alu SINEs, as well as the more ancient mammalian-wide interspersed repeat SINEs, are found at significantly low densities in imprinted regions. The latter paleogenomic signature indicates that the sequence characteristics of currently imprinted regions existed before the mammalian radiation. Transitions from imprinted to nonimprinted genomic regions in cis are characterized by a sharp inflection in SINE content, demonstrating that this genomic characteristic can help predict the presence and extent of regions undergoing imprinting. During primate evolution, SINE accumulation in imprinted regions occurred at a decreased rate compared with control loci. The constraint on SINE accumulation in imprinted regions may be mediated by an active selection process. This selection could be because of SINEs attracting and spreading methylation, as has been found at other loci. Methylation-induced silencing could lead to deleterious consequences at imprinted loci, where inactivation of one allele is already established, and expression is often essential for embryonic growth and survival.

  2. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family reveals a novel non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation locus on 11p15-tel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Shoaib ur; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Eiberg, Hans

    2011-01-01

    done in all sampled individuals in the family. The nuclear central loop in the five generation family showed homozygosity for a 6-Mb telomeric region on 11p15, whereas all other linkage regions were excluded by calculation of logarithm of odds (LOD) for the SNP microarray data. A maximum LOD score of Z......Autosomal recessive inherited mental retardation is an extremely heterogeneous disease and accounts for approximately 25% of all non-syndromic mental retardation cases. Autozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Pakistani family revealed a novel locus for non-syndromic autosomal recessive...

  3. Hemoglobins, Hemorphins, and 11p15.5 Chromosomal Region in Cancer Biology and İmmunity with Special Emphasis for Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinoz, Meric Adil; Elmaci, Ilhan; Ince, Bahri; Ozpinar, Aysel; Sav, Aydin Murat

    2016-05-01

    In systemic cancers, increased hemolysis leads to extracellular hemoglobin (HB), and experimental studies have shown its provoking role on tumor growth and metastasis. However, investigations have shown that HB chains presented by tumor vascular pericytes or serum protein complexes of HB could also induce antitumor immunity, which may be harnessed to treat refractory cancers and brain tumors. Mounting recent evidence shows that expression of HBs is not restricted to erythrocytes and that HBs exist in the cells of lung and kidney, in macrophages, and in neurons and glia of the central nervous system (CNS). HBs mediate coping with hypoxia and free radical stress in normal and tumor cells, and they are increased in certain tumors including breast, lung, colon, and squamous cell cancers. Recent studies showed HBs in meningioma, in the cyst fluid of craniopharyngioma, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors, and in glioblastoma cell lines. Hemorphins, abundant brain peptides formed via HB-chain cleavage, exert opioid activity and antiproliferative and immunomodifier effects. Hence mutations in HBs may modify brain tumorigenesis via influencing hemorphins and perturbing regulations of immune surveillance and cell growth in the neuroectodermal tissues. The β-globin gene cluster resides in the chromosome region 11p15.5, harboring important immunity genes and IGF2, H19, PHLDA2/TSSC3, TRIM3, and SLC22A18 genes associated with cancers and gliomas. 11p15.5 is a prominent region subject to epigenetic regulation. Thus the β-globin loci may exert haplotypal interactions with these. Some clues support this theory. It is well established that iron load induces liver cancer in thalassemia major; however iron load-independent associations also exist. Enhanced rates of hematologic malignancies are associated with HB Lepore, association of hemoglobin E with cholangiocarcinoma, and enhanced gastric cancer rates in the thalassemia trait. In

  4. Comprehensive analyses of imprinted differentially methylated regions reveal epigenetic and genetic characteristics in hepatoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumbajan, Janette Mareska; Aoki, Shigehisa; Kohashi, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Hata, Kenichiro; Saji, Tsutomu; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Tajiri, Tatsuro; Soejima, Hidenobu; Joh, Keiichiro; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Souzaki, Ryota; Mitsui, Kazumasa; Higashimoto, Ken; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Yatsuki, Hitomi; Nishioka, Kenichi; Harada, Ryoko

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant methylation at imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in human 11p15.5 has been reported in many tumors including hepatoblastoma. However, the methylation status of imprinted DMRs in imprinted loci scattered through the human genome has not been analyzed yet in any tumors. The methylation statuses of 33 imprinted DMRs were analyzed in 12 hepatoblastomas and adjacent normal liver tissue by MALDI-TOF MS and pyrosequencing. Uniparental disomy (UPD) and copy number abnormalities were investigated with DNA polymorphisms. Among 33 DMRs analyzed, 18 showed aberrant methylation in at least 1 tumor. There was large deviation in the incidence of aberrant methylation among the DMRs. KvDMR1 and IGF2-DMR0 were the most frequently hypomethylated DMRs. INPP5Fv2-DMR and RB1-DMR were hypermethylated with high frequencies. Hypomethylation was observed at certain DMRs not only in tumors but also in a small number of adjacent histologically normal liver tissue, whereas hypermethylation was observed only in tumor samples. The methylation levels of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) did not show large differences between tumor tissue and normal liver controls. Chromosomal abnormalities were also found in some tumors. 11p15.5 and 20q13.3 loci showed the frequent occurrence of both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Our analyses revealed tumor-specific aberrant hypermethylation at some imprinted DMRs in 12 hepatoblastomas with additional suggestion for the possibility of hypomethylation prior to tumor development. Some loci showed both genetic and epigenetic alterations with high frequencies. These findings will aid in understanding the development of hepatoblastoma

  5. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Taane G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imprinted genes show expression from one parental allele only and are important for development and behaviour. This extreme mode of allelic imbalance has been described for approximately 56 human genes. Imprinting status is often disrupted in cancer and dysmorphic syndromes. More subtle variation of gene expression, that is not parent-of-origin specific, termed 'allele-specific gene expression' (ASE is more common and may give rise to milder phenotypic differences. Using two allele-specific high-throughput technologies alongside bioinformatics predictions, normal term human placenta was screened to find new imprinted genes and to ascertain the extent of ASE in this tissue. Results Twenty-three family trios of placental cDNA, placental genomic DNA (gDNA and gDNA from both parents were tested for 130 candidate genes with the Sequenom MassArray system. Six genes were found differentially expressed but none imprinted. The Illumina ASE BeadArray platform was then used to test 1536 SNPs in 932 genes. The array was enriched for the human orthologues of 124 mouse candidate genes from bioinformatics predictions and 10 human candidate imprinted genes from EST database mining. After quality control pruning, a total of 261 informative SNPs (214 genes remained for analysis. Imprinting with maternal expression was demonstrated for the lymphocyte imprinted gene ZNF331 in human placenta. Two potential differentially methylated regions (DMRs were found in the vicinity of ZNF331. None of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18%. Conclusions Both Sequenom and Illumina assays were sensitive enough to study imprinting and strong allelic bias. Previous bioinformatics approaches were not predictive of new imprinted genes

  6. Early embryonic failure: Expression and imprinted status of candidate genes on human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, L.S.; Bennett, P.R.; Moore, G.E. [Queen Charlotte`s and Chelsea Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Two cases of maternal uniparental (hetero)disomy for human chromosome 21 (mUPD21) have been identified in a systematic search for UPD in 23 cases of early embryonic failure (EEF). Bi-parental origin of the other chromosome pairs was confirmed using specific VNTR probes or dinucleotide repeat analysis. Both maternally and paternally derived isochromosomes 21q have previously been identified in two individuals with normal phenotypes. Full UPD21 has a different mechanism of origin than uniparental isochromosome 21q and its effect on imprinted genes and phenotypic outcome will therefore not necessarily be the same. EEF associated with mUPD21 suggests that developmentally important genes on HSA 21 may be imprinted such that they are only expressed from either the maternally or paternally derived alleles. We have searched for monoallelic expression of candidate genes on HSA 21 in human pregnancy (CBS, IFNAR, COL6A1) using intragenic DNA polymorphisms. These genes were chosen either because their murine homologues lie in imprinted regions or because they are potentially important in embryogenesis. Once imprinted candidate genes have been identified, their methylation status and expression in normal, early embryonic failure and uniparental disomy 21 pregnancies will be studied. At the same time, a larger number of cases of EEF are being examined to further investigate the incidence of UPD21 in this group.

  7. Disturbed Placental Imprinting in Preeclampsia Leads to Altered Expression of DLX5, a Human-Specific Early Trophoblast Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadora, Julianna; Singh, Manvendra; Herse, Florian; Przybyl, Lukasz; Haase, Nadine; Golic, Michaela; Yung, Hong Wa; Huppertz, Berthold; Cartwright, Judith E; Whitley, Guy; Johnsen, Guro M; Levi, Giovanni; Isbruch, Annette; Schulz, Herbert; Luft, Friedrich C; Müller, Dominik N; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Hurst, Laurence D; Dechend, Ralf; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2017-11-07

    Preeclampsia is a complex and common human-specific pregnancy syndrome associated with placental pathology. The human specificity provides both intellectual and methodological challenges, lacking a robust model system. Given the role of imprinted genes in human placentation and the vulnerability of imprinted genes to loss of imprinting changes, there has been extensive speculation, but no robust evidence, that imprinted genes are involved in preeclampsia. Our study aims to investigate whether disturbed imprinting contributes to preeclampsia. We first aimed to confirm that preeclampsia is a disease of the placenta by generating and analyzing genome-wide molecular data on well-characterized patient material. We performed high-throughput transcriptome analyses of multiple placenta samples from healthy controls and patients with preeclampsia. Next, we identified differentially expressed genes in preeclamptic placentas and intersected them with the list of human imprinted genes. We used bioinformatics/statistical analyses to confirm association between imprinting and preeclampsia and to predict biological processes affected in preeclampsia. Validation included epigenetic and cellular assays. In terms of human specificity, we established an in vitro invasion-differentiation trophoblast model. Our comparative phylogenetic analysis involved single-cell transcriptome data of human, macaque, and mouse preimplantation embryogenesis. We found disturbed placental imprinting in preeclampsia and revealed potential candidates, including GATA3 and DLX5 , with poorly explored imprinted status and no prior association with preeclampsia. As a result of loss of imprinting, DLX5 was upregulated in 69% of preeclamptic placentas. Levels of DLX5 correlated with classic preeclampsia markers. DLX5 is expressed in human but not in murine trophoblast. The DLX5 high phenotype resulted in reduced proliferation, increased metabolism, and endoplasmic reticulum stress-response activation in

  8. Establishment of a Conditionally Immortalized Wilms Tumor Cell Line with a Homozygous WT1 Deletion within a Heterozygous 11p13 Deletion and UPD Limited to 11p15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Brandt

    Full Text Available We describe a stromal predominant Wilms tumor with focal anaplasia and a complex, tumor specific chromosome 11 aberration: a homozygous deletion of the entire WT1 gene within a heterozygous 11p13 deletion and an additional region of uniparental disomy (UPD limited to 11p15.5-p15.2 including the IGF2 gene. The tumor carried a heterozygous p.T41A mutation in CTNNB1. Cells established from the tumor carried the same chromosome 11 aberration, but a different, homozygous p.S45Δ CTNNB1 mutation. Uniparental disomy (UPD 3p21.3pter lead to the homozygous CTNNB1 mutation. The tumor cell line was immortalized using the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT in conjunction with a novel thermolabile mutant (U19dl89-97tsA58 of SV40 large T antigen (LT. This cell line is cytogenetically stable and can be grown indefinitely representing a valuable tool to study the effect of a complete lack of WT1 in tumor cells. The origin/fate of Wilms tumors with WT1 mutations is currently poorly defined. Here we studied the expression of several genes expressed in early kidney development, e.g. FOXD1, PAX3, SIX1, OSR1, OSR2 and MEIS1 and show that these are expressed at similar levels in the parental and the immortalized Wilms10 cells. In addition the limited potential for muscle/ osteogenic/ adipogenic differentiation similar to all other WT1 mutant cell lines is also observed in the Wilms10 tumor cell line and this is retained in the immortalized cells. In summary these Wilms10 cells are a valuable model system for functional studies of WT1 mutant cells.

  9. Establishment of a Conditionally Immortalized Wilms Tumor Cell Line with a Homozygous WT1 Deletion within a Heterozygous 11p13 Deletion and UPD Limited to 11p15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Artur; Löhers, Katharina; Beier, Manfred; Leube, Barbara; de Torres, Carmen; Mora, Jaume; Arora, Parineeta; Jat, Parmjit S.; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    We describe a stromal predominant Wilms tumor with focal anaplasia and a complex, tumor specific chromosome 11 aberration: a homozygous deletion of the entire WT1 gene within a heterozygous 11p13 deletion and an additional region of uniparental disomy (UPD) limited to 11p15.5-p15.2 including the IGF2 gene. The tumor carried a heterozygous p.T41A mutation in CTNNB1. Cells established from the tumor carried the same chromosome 11 aberration, but a different, homozygous p.S45Δ CTNNB1 mutation. Uniparental disomy (UPD) 3p21.3pter lead to the homozygous CTNNB1 mutation. The tumor cell line was immortalized using the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT) in conjunction with a novel thermolabile mutant (U19dl89-97tsA58) of SV40 large T antigen (LT). This cell line is cytogenetically stable and can be grown indefinitely representing a valuable tool to study the effect of a complete lack of WT1 in tumor cells. The origin/fate of Wilms tumors with WT1 mutations is currently poorly defined. Here we studied the expression of several genes expressed in early kidney development, e.g. FOXD1, PAX3, SIX1, OSR1, OSR2 and MEIS1 and show that these are expressed at similar levels in the parental and the immortalized Wilms10 cells. In addition the limited potential for muscle/ osteogenic/ adipogenic differentiation similar to all other WT1 mutant cell lines is also observed in the Wilms10 tumor cell line and this is retained in the immortalized cells. In summary these Wilms10 cells are a valuable model system for functional studies of WT1 mutant cells. PMID:27213811

  10. Genome Imprinting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the cell nucleus (mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes), and. (3) traits governed ... tively good embryonic development but very poor development of membranes and ... Human homologies for the type of situation described above are naturally ..... imprint; (b) New modifications of the paternal genome in germ cells of each ...

  11. Sexual imprinting on facial traits of opposite-sex parents in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowska, Urszula M; Rantala, Markus J

    2012-09-05

    Positive sexual imprinting is a process by which individuals use the phenotype of their opposite-sex parent as a template for acquiring mates. Recent studies in humans have concluded that an imprinting-like mechanism influences human mate choice in facial traits. However, some of the previous studies have had methodological problems or flaws which might have invalidated or led to an overgeneralization of the original interpretation of their results. In this study, 70 heterosexual adults were used to test if their partners resembled facially their opposite-sex parent as the sexual imprinting hypothesis predicts. Judges assessed the subjective facial similarity between each participant's partner and their parent. We found that there was no perceived facial similarity between women's partners and their fathers. However, men tended to pair more often with women that were perceived as resembling the men's own mothers. In contrast to previous studies, the quality of the relationship between participants and their parents did not predict the level of facial resemblance between the participant's spouse and their parent.

  12. Sexual Imprinting on Facial Traits of Opposite-Sex Parents in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula M Marcinkowska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Positive sexual imprinting is a process by which individuals use the phenotype of their opposite-sex parent as a template for acquiring mates. Recent studies in humans have concluded that an imprinting-like mechanism influences human mate choice in facial traits. However, some of the previous studies have had methodological problems or flaws which might have invalidated or led to an overgeneralization of the original interpretation of their results. In this study, 70 heterosexual adults were used to test if their partners resembled facially their opposite-sex parent as the sexual imprinting hypothesis predicts. Judges assessed the subjective facial similarity between each participant's partner and their parent. We found that there was no perceived facial similarity between women's partners and their fathers. However, men tended to pair more often with women that were perceived as resembling the men's own mothers. In contrast to previous studies, the quality of the relationship between participants and their parents did not predict the level of facial resemblance between the participant's spouse and their parent.

  13. Quantitative analysis of DNA methylation at all human imprinted regions reveals preservation of epigenetic stability in adult somatic tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodfine Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes subject to genomic imprinting are mono-allelically expressed in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. Each imprinted locus has at least one differentially methylated region (DMR which has allele specific DNA methylation and contributes to imprinted gene expression. Once DMRs are established, they are potentially able to withstand normal genome reprogramming events that occur during cell differentiation and germ-line DMRs are stably maintained throughout development. These DMRs, in addition to being either maternally or paternally methylated, have differences in whether methylation was acquired in the germ-line or post fertilization and are present in a variety of genomic locations with different Cytosine-phosphate guanine (CpG densities and CTCF binding capacities. We therefore examined the stability of maintenance of DNA methylation imprints and determined the normal baseline DNA methylation levels in several adult tissues for all imprinted genes. In order to do this, we first developed and validated 50 highly specific, quantitative DNA methylation pyrosequencing assays for the known DMRs associated with human imprinted genes. Results Remarkable stability of the DNA methylation imprint was observed in all germ-line DMRs and paternally methylated somatic DMRs (which maintained average methylation levels of between 35% - 65% in all somatic tissues, independent of gene expression. Maternally methylated somatic DMRs were found to have more variation with tissue specific methylation patterns. Most DMRs, however, showed some intra-individual variability for DNA methylation levels in peripheral blood, suggesting that more than one DMR needs to be examined in order to get an overall impression of the epigenetic stability in a tissue. The plasticity of DNA methylation at imprinted genes was examined in a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. All cell lines showed changes in DNA methylation, especially at the paternal germ

  14. Possible involvement of loss of imprinting in immortalization of human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Kotaro; Ohno, Maki; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2011-04-01

    Disruption of the normal pattern of parental origin-specific gene expression is referred to as loss of imprinting (LOI), which is common in various cancers. To investigate a possible role of LOI in the early stage of human cell transformation, we studied LOI in 18 human fibroblast cell lines immortalized spontaneously, by viral oncogenes, by chemical or physical carcinogens, or by infection with a retrovirus vector encoding the human telomerase catalytic subunit, hTERT cDNA. LOI was observed in all the 18 immortal cell lines. The gene most commonly exhibiting LOI was NDN which displayed LOI in 15 of the 18 cell lines (83%). The other genes exhibiting LOI at high frequencies were PEG3 (50%), MAGE-L2 (61%) and ZNF 127 (50%). Expression of NDN that was lost in the immortal cell lines was restored by treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The ratio of histone H3 lysine 9 methylation to histone H3 lysine 4 methylation of the chromatin containing the NDN promoter in the immortal WI-38VA13 cells was greater than that in the parental cells, suggesting chromatin structure-mediated regulation of NDN expression. We previously demonstrated that inactivation of the p16INK4a/pRb pathway is necessary for immortalization of human cells. Human fibroblasts in the pre-crisis phase and cells with an extended lifespan that eventually senesce, both of which have the normal p16INK4a/pRb pathway, did not show LOI at any imprinted gene examined. Although it is not clear if LOI plays a causal role in immortalization of human cells or is merely coincidental, these findings indicate a possible involvement of LOI in immortalization of human cells or a common mechanism involved in both processes.

  15. The genome of a Mongolian individual reveals the genetic imprints of Mongolians on modern human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haihua; Guo, Xiaosen; Zhang, Dong; Narisu, Narisu; Bu, Junjie; Jirimutu, Jirimutu; Liang, Fan; Zhao, Xiang; Xing, Yanping; Wang, Dingzhu; Li, Tongda; Zhang, Yanru; Guan, Baozhu; Yang, Xukui; Yang, Zili; Shuangshan, Shuangshan; Su, Zhe; Wu, Huiguang; Li, Wenjing; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Shilin; Bayinnamula, Bayinnamula; Chang, Yuqi; Gao, Ying; Lan, Tianming; Suyalatu, Suyalatu; Huang, Hui; Su, Yan; Chen, Yujie; Li, Wenqi; Yang, Xu; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Wu, Qizhu; Yin, Ye; Zhou, Huanmin

    2014-11-05

    Mongolians have played a significant role in modern human evolution, especially after the rise of Genghis Khan (1162[?]-1227). Although the social cultural impacts of Genghis Khan and the Mongolian population have been well documented, explorations of their genome structure and genetic imprints on other human populations have been lacking. We here present the genome of a Mongolian male individual. The genome was de novo assembled using a total of 130.8-fold genomic data produced from massively parallel whole-genome sequencing. We identified high-confidence variation sets, including 3.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 756,234 short insertions and deletions. Functional SNP analysis predicted that the individual has a pathogenic risk for carnitine deficiency. We located the patrilineal inheritance of the Mongolian genome to the lineage D3a through Y haplogroup analysis and inferred that the individual has a common patrilineal ancestor with Tibeto-Burman populations and is likely to be the progeny of the earliest settlers in East Asia. We finally investigated the genetic imprints of Mongolians on other human populations using different approaches. We found varying degrees of gene flows between Mongolians and populations living in Europe, South/Central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent. The analyses demonstrate that the genetic impacts of Mongolians likely resulted from the expansion of the Mongolian Empire in the 13th century. The genome will be of great help in further explorations of modern human evolution and genetic causes of diseases/traits specific to Mongolians. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Preparation of a molecularly imprinted sensor based on quartz crystal microbalance for specific recognition of sialic acid in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiuzhen; Xu, Xian-Yan; Chen, Xuncai; Wu, Yiyong; Guo, Huishi

    2018-05-08

    A novel molecularly imprinted quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor was successfully prepared for selective determination of sialic acid (SA) in human urine samples. To obtain the QCM sensor, we first modified the gold surface of the QCM chip by self-assembling of allylmercaptane to introduce polymerizable double bonds on the chip surface. Then, SA molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanofilm was attached to the modified QCM chip surface. For comparison, we have also characterized the nonmodified and improved surfaces of the QCM sensor by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. We then tested the selectivity and detection limit of the imprinted QCM sensor via a series of adsorption experiments. The results show a linear response in the range of 0.025-0.50 μmol L -1 for sialic acid. Moreover, the limit of detection (LOD) of the prepared imprinted QCM sensor was found to be 1.0 nmol L -1 for sialic acid, and high recovery values range from 87.6 to 108.5% with RSD sensor was developed and used to detect sialic acid in human urine samples. Graphical abstract Specific recognition of sialic acid by the MIP-QCM sensor system.

  17. Synthesis, recognition and evaluation of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticle using miniemulsion polymerization for controlled release and analysis of risperidone in human plasma samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadi, Ebadullah; Azodi-Deilami, Saman; Abdouss, Majid; Kordestani, Davood; Rahimi, Alireza; Asadi, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    We prepared high selective imprinted nanoparticle polymers by a miniemulsion polymerization technique, using risperidone as the template, MAA as the functional monomers, and TRIM as the cross-linker in acetonitrile as solvent. The morphology of the nanoparticles determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and drug release, binding properties and dynamic light scattering (DLS) of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were studied. Controlled release of risperidone from nanoparticles was investigated through in 1% wt sodium dodecyl sulfate aqueous solution and by measuring the absorbance by HPLC-UV. The results showed that the imprinted nanoparticles exhibited a higher binding level and slower release rate than non-imprinted nanoparticles, which contributed to interaction of risperidone with imprinted cavities within nanoparticles. Furthermore, the results from HPLC showed good precision (5% for 50.0 µg L -1 ) and recoveries (between 86-91) using MIP from human plasma samples

  18. Hierarchical templating in deposition of semi-covalently imprinted inverse opal polythiophene film for femtomolar determination of human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Marcin; Cieplak, Maciej; Sharma, Piyush Sindhu; Borowicz, Pawel; Noworyta, Krzysztof; Lisowski, Wojciech; D'Souza, Francis; Kuhn, Alexander; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2017-08-15

    Nanostructured artificial receptor materials with unprecedented hierarchical structure for determination of human serum albumin (HSA) are designed and fabricated. For that purpose a new hierarchical template is prepared. This template allowed for simultaneous structural control of the deposited molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film on three length scales. A colloidal crystal templating with optimized electrochemical polymerization of 2,3'-bithiophene enables deposition of an MIP film in the form of an inverse opal. Thickness of the deposited polymer film is precisely controlled with the number of current oscillations during potentiostatic deposition of the imprinted poly(2,3'-bithiophene) film. Prior immobilization of HSA on the colloidal crystal allows formation of molecularly imprinted cavities exclusively on the internal surface of the pores. Furthermore, all binding sites are located on the surface of the imprinted cavities at locations corresponding to positions of functional groups present on the surface of HSA molecules due to prior derivatization of HSA molecules with appropriate functional monomers. This synergistic strategy results in a material with superior recognition performance. Integration of the MIP film as a recognition unit with a sensitive extended-gate field-effect transistor (EG-FET) transducer leads to highly selective HSA determination in the femtomolar concentration range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Methylation and Transcripts Expression at the Imprinted GNAS Locus in Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Grybek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature indicate that genomic imprint marks are disturbed in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs. GNAS is an imprinted locus that produces one biallelic (Gsα and four monoallelic (NESP55, GNAS-AS1, XLsα, and A/B transcripts due to differential methylation of their promoters (DMR. To document imprinting at the GNAS locus in PSCs, we studied GNAS locus DMR methylation and transcript (NESP55, XLsα, and A/B expression in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs derived from two human fibroblasts and their progenies. Results showed that (1 methylation at the GNAS locus DMRs is DMR and cell line specific, (2 changes in allelic transcript expression can be independent of a change in allele-specific DNA methylation, and (3 interestingly, methylation at A/B DMR is correlated with A/B transcript expression. These results indicate that these models are valuable to study the mechanisms controlling GNAS methylation, factors involved in transcript expression, and possibly mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1B.

  20. Epitope imprinted polymer nanoparticles containing fluorescent quantum dots for specific recognition of human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi-Zhi; Li, Dong-Yan; He, Xi-Wen; Li, Wen-You; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Epitope imprinted polymer nanoparticles (EI-NPs) were prepared by one-pot polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide in the presence of CdTe quantum dots and an epitope (consisting of amino acids 598 to 609) of human serum albumin (HSA). The resulting EI-NPs exhibit specific recognition ability and enable direct fluorescence quantification of HSA based on a fluorescence turn-on mode. The polymer was characterized by FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The linear calibration graph was obtained in the range of 0.25–5 μmol · mL −1 with the detection limit of 44.3 nmol · mL −1 . The EI-NPs were successfully applied to the direct fluorometric quantification of HSA in samples of human serum. Overall, this approach provides a promising tool to design functional fluorescent materials with protein recognition capability and specific applications in proteomics. (author)

  1. Molecularly imprinted electrochemical biosensor based on Fe@Au nanoparticles involved in 2-aminoethanethiol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for sensitive determination of cefexime in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Eren, Tanju; Atar, Necip

    2014-10-15

    The molecular imprinting technique depends on the molecular recognition. It is a polymerization method around the target molecule. Hence, this technique creates specific cavities in the cross-linked polymeric matrices. In present study, a sensitive imprinted electrochemical biosensor based on Fe@Au nanoparticles (Fe@AuNPs) involved in 2-aminoethanethiol (2-AET) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNs) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was developed for determination of cefexime (CEF). The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) confirmed the formation of the developed surfaces. CEF imprinted film was constructed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for 9 cycles in the presence of 80 mM pyrrole in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 20mM CEF. The developed electrochemical biosensor was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guideline and found to be linear, sensitive, selective, precise and accurate. The linearity range and the detection limit were obtained as 1.0 × 10(-10)-1.0 × 10(-8)M and 2.2 × 10(-11)M, respectively. The developed CEF imprinted sensor was successfully applied to real samples such as human plasma. In addition, the stability and reproducibility of the prepared molecular imprinted electrode were investigated. The excellent long-term stability and reproducibility of the prepared CEF imprinted electrodes make them attractive in electrochemical sensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Maher, Eamonn R

    2015-01-01

    Congenital imprinting disorders (IDs) are characterised by molecular changes affecting imprinted chromosomal regions and genes, i.e. genes that are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Recent years have seen a great expansion in the range of alterations in regulation, dosage or DNA...... sequence shown to disturb imprinted gene expression, and the correspondingly broad range of resultant clinical syndromes. At the same time, however, it has become clear that this diversity of IDs has common underlying principles, not only in shared molecular mechanisms, but also in interrelated clinical...

  3. 21 CFR 206.10 - Code imprint required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Code imprint required. 206.10 Section 206.10 Food...: GENERAL IMPRINTING OF SOLID ORAL DOSAGE FORM DRUG PRODUCTS FOR HUMAN USE § 206.10 Code imprint required... imprint that, in conjunction with the product's size, shape, and color, permits the unique identification...

  4. Natural breaking of the maternal silence at the mouse and human imprinted Prader-Willi locus: A whisper with functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarazzo, Valery; Muscatelli, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a normal process of epigenetic regulation leading some autosomal genes to be expressed from one parental allele only, the other parental allele being silenced. The reasons why this mechanism has been selected throughout evolution are not clear; however, expression dosage is critical for imprinted genes. There is a paradox between the fact that genomic imprinting is a robust mechanism controlling the expression of specific genes and the fact that this mechanism is based on epigenetic regulation that, per se, should present some flexibility. The robustness has been well studied, revealing the epigenetic modifications at the imprinted locus, but the flexibility has been poorly investigated.   Prader-Willi syndrome is the best-studied disease involving imprinted genes caused by the absence of expression of paternally inherited alleles of genes located in the human 15q11-q13 region. Until now, the silencing of the maternally inherited alleles was like a dogma. Rieusset et al. showed that in absence of the paternal Ndn allele, in Ndn +m/-p mice, the maternal Ndn allele is expressed at an extremely low level with a high degree of non-genetic heterogeneity. In about 50% of these mutant mice, this stochastic expression reduces birth lethality and severity of the breathing deficiency, correlated with a reduction in the loss of serotonergic neurons. Furthermore, using several mouse models, they reveal a competition between non-imprinted Ndn promoters, which results in monoallelic (paternal or maternal) Ndn expression, suggesting that Ndn monoallelic expression occurs in the absence of imprinting regulation. Importantly, specific expression of the maternal NDN allele is also detected in post-mortem brain samples of PWS individuals. Here, similar expression of the Magel2 maternal allele is reported in Magel2 +m/-p mice, suggesting that this loss of imprinting can be extended to other PWS genes. These data reveal an unexpected epigenetic flexibility of PWS

  5. The amino-terminal structure of human fragile X mental retardation protein obtained using precipitant-immobilized imprinted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufeng; Chen, Zhenhang; Fu, Yanjun; He, Qingzhong; Jiang, Lun; Zheng, Jiangge; Gao, Yina; Mei, Pinchao; Chen, Zhongzhou; Ren, Xueqin

    2015-03-01

    Flexibility is an intrinsic property of proteins and essential for their biological functions. However, because of structural flexibility, obtaining high-quality crystals of proteins with heterogeneous conformations remain challenging. Here, we show a novel approach to immobilize traditional precipitants onto molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) to facilitate protein crystallization, especially for flexible proteins. By applying this method, high-quality crystals of the flexible N-terminus of human fragile X mental retardation protein are obtained, whose absence causes the most common inherited mental retardation. A novel KH domain and an intermolecular disulfide bond are discovered, and several types of dimers are found in solution, thus providing insights into the function of this protein. Furthermore, the precipitant-immobilized MIPs (piMIPs) successfully facilitate flexible protein crystal formation for five model proteins with increased diffraction resolution. This highlights the potential of piMIPs for the crystallization of flexible proteins.

  6. The IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR at human chromosome 14q32.2: hierarchical interaction and distinct functional properties as imprinting control centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayo Kagami

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Human chromosome 14q32.2 harbors the germline-derived primary DLK1-MEG3 intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR and the postfertilization-derived secondary MEG3-DMR, together with multiple imprinted genes. Although previous studies in cases with microdeletions and epimutations affecting both DMRs and paternal/maternal uniparental disomy 14-like phenotypes argue for a critical regulatory function of the two DMRs for the 14q32.2 imprinted region, the precise role of the individual DMR remains to be clarified. We studied an infant with upd(14pat body and placental phenotypes and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the IG-DMR alone (patient 1 and a neonate with upd(14pat body, but no placental phenotype and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the MEG3-DMR alone (patient 2. The results generated from the analysis of these two patients imply that the IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR function as imprinting control centers in the placenta and the body, respectively, with a hierarchical interaction for the methylation pattern in the body governed by the IG-DMR. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating an essential long-range imprinting regulatory function for the secondary DMR.

  7. Obesity-related DNA methylation at imprinted genes in human sperm: Results from the TIEGER study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubry, Adelheid; Guo, Lisa; Huang, Zhiqing; Hoyo, Cathrine; Romanus, Stephanie; Price, Thomas; Murphy, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian gametes resets methylation marks that regulate monoallelic expression of imprinted genes. In males, this involves erasure of the maternal methylation marks and establishment of paternal-specific methylation to appropriately guide normal development. The degree to which exogenous factors influence the fidelity of methylation reprogramming is unknown. We previously found an association between paternal obesity and altered DNA methylation in umbilical cord blood, suggesting that the father's endocrine, nutritional, or lifestyle status could potentiate intergenerational heritable epigenetic abnormalities. In these analyses, we examine the relationship between male overweight/obesity and DNA methylation status of imprinted gene regulatory regions in the gametes. Linear regression models were used to compare sperm DNA methylation percentages, quantified by bisulfite pyrosequencing, at 12 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) from 23 overweight/obese and 44 normal weight men. Our study population included 69 volunteers from The Influence of the Environment on Gametic Epigenetic Reprogramming (TIEGER) study, based in NC, USA. After adjusting for age and fertility patient status, semen from overweight or obese men had significantly lower methylation percentages at the MEG3 (β = -1.99; SE = 0.84; p = 0.02), NDN (β = -1.10; SE = 0.47; p = 0.02), SNRPN (β = -0.65; SE = 0.27; p = 0.02), and SGCE/PEG10 (β = -2.5; SE = 1.01; p = 0.01) DMRs. Our data further suggest a slight increase in DNA methylation at the MEG3-IG DMR (β = +1.22; SE = 0.59; p = 0.04) and H19 DMR (β = +1.37; SE = 0.62; p = 0.03) in sperm of overweight/obese men. Our data support that male overweight/obesity status is traceable in the sperm epigenome. Further research is needed to understand the effect of such changes and the point of origin of DNA methylation differences between lean and

  8. Maternal Stress, Preterm Birth, and DNA Methylation at Imprint Regulatory Sequences in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana C. Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In infants exposed to maternal stress in utero, phenotypic plasticity through epigenetic events may mechanistically explain increased risk of preterm birth (PTB, which confers increased risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancers in adulthood. We examined associations between prenatal maternal stress and PTB, evaluating the role of DNA methylation at imprint regulatory regions. We enrolled women from prenatal clinics in Durham, NC. Stress was measured in 537 women at 12 weeks of gestation using the Perceived Stress Scale. DNA methylation at differentially methylated regions (DMRs associated with H19, IGF2, MEG3, MEST, SGCE/PEG10, PEG3, NNAT , and PLAGL1 was measured from peripheral and cord blood using bisulfite pyrosequencing in a sub-sample of 79 mother–-infant pairs. We examined associations between PTB and stress and evaluated differences in DNA methylation at each DMR by stress. Maternal stress was not associated with PTB (OR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.40–-2.40; P = 0.96, after adjustment for maternal body mass index (BMI, income, and raised blood pressure. However, elevated stress was associated with higher infant DNA methylation at the MEST DMR (2.8% difference, P < 0.01 after adjusting for PTB. Maternal stress may be associated with epigenetic changes at MEST , a gene relevant to maternal care and obesity. Reduced prenatal stress may support the epigenomic profile of a healthy infant.

  9. Stability of XIST repression in relation to genomic imprinting following global genome demethylation in a human cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo, E.S.S. de; Vasques, L.R.; Stabellini, R.; Krepischi, A.C.V.; Pereira, L.V.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential in X chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, maintaining repression of XIST in the active X chromosome and monoallelic repression of imprinted genes. Disruption of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the HCT116 cell line (DKO cells) leads to global DNA hypomethylation and biallelic expression of the imprinted gene IGF2 but does not lead to reactivation of XIST expression, suggesting that XIST repression is due to a more stable epigenetic mark than imprinting. To test this hypothesis, we induced acute hypomethylation in HCT116 cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) treatment (HCT116-5-aza-CdR) and compared that to DKO cells, evaluating DNA methylation by microarray and monitoring the expression of XIST and imprinted genes IGF2, H19, and PEG10. Whereas imprinted genes showed biallelic expression in HCT116-5-aza-CdR and DKO cells, the XIST locus was hypomethylated and weakly expressed only under acute hypomethylation conditions, indicating the importance of XIST repression in the active X to cell survival. Given that DNMT3A is the only active DNMT in DKO cells, it may be responsible for ensuring the repression of XIST in those cells. Taken together, our data suggest that XIST repression is more tightly controlled than genomic imprinting and, at least in part, is due to DNMT3A

  10. Stability of XIST repression in relation to genomic imprinting following global genome demethylation in a human cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, E.S.S. de [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vasques, L.R. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Stabellini, R.; Krepischi, A.C.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, L.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-17

    DNA methylation is essential in X chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, maintaining repression of XIST in the active X chromosome and monoallelic repression of imprinted genes. Disruption of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the HCT116 cell line (DKO cells) leads to global DNA hypomethylation and biallelic expression of the imprinted gene IGF2 but does not lead to reactivation of XIST expression, suggesting that XIST repression is due to a more stable epigenetic mark than imprinting. To test this hypothesis, we induced acute hypomethylation in HCT116 cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) treatment (HCT116-5-aza-CdR) and compared that to DKO cells, evaluating DNA methylation by microarray and monitoring the expression of XIST and imprinted genes IGF2, H19, and PEG10. Whereas imprinted genes showed biallelic expression in HCT116-5-aza-CdR and DKO cells, the XIST locus was hypomethylated and weakly expressed only under acute hypomethylation conditions, indicating the importance of XIST repression in the active X to cell survival. Given that DNMT3A is the only active DNMT in DKO cells, it may be responsible for ensuring the repression of XIST in those cells. Taken together, our data suggest that XIST repression is more tightly controlled than genomic imprinting and, at least in part, is due to DNMT3A.

  11. Localising the nitrogen imprint of the Paris food supply: the potential of organic farming and changes in human diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billen, G.; Garnier, J.; Thieu, V.; Silvestre, M.; Barles, S.; Chatzimpiros, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Seine watershed has long been the food-supplying hinterland of Paris, providing most of the animal and vegetal protein consumed in the city. Nowadays, the shift from manure-based to synthetic nitrogen fertilisation, has made possible a strong land specialisation of agriculture in the Seine watershed: it still provides most of the cereal consumed by the Paris agglomeration, but exports 80% of its huge cereal production. On the other hand the meat and milk supply originates mainly from regions in the North and West of France, specialised in animal farming and importing about 30% of their feed from South America. As it works today, this system is responsible for a severe nitrate contamination of surface and groundwater resources. Herein two scenarios of re-localising Paris's food supply are explored, based on organic farming and local provision of animal feed. We show that for the Seine watershed it is technically possible to design an agricultural system able to provide all the plant- and animal-based food required by the population, to deliver sub-root water meeting the drinking water standards and still to export a significant proportion of its production to areas less suitable for cereal cultivation. Decreasing the share of animal products in the human diet has a strong impact on the nitrogen imprint of urban food supply.

  12. Molecularly imprinted polymer cartridges coupled on-line with high performance liquid chromatography for simple and rapid analysis of dextromethorphan in human plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Javanbakht, Mehran; Akbari-Adergani, Behrouz

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a novel method is described for automated determination of dextromethorphan in biological fluids using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) as a sample clean-up technique combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared using methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker, chloroform as porogen and dextromethorphan as template molecule. These imprinted polymers were used as solid-phase extraction sorbent for the extraction of dextromethorphan from human plasma samples. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the MIP cartridges were evaluated. The high selectivity of the sorbent coupled to the high performance liquid chromatographic system permitted a simple and rapid analysis of this drug in plasma samples with limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of 0.12 ng/mL and 0.35 ng/mL, respectively. The MIP selectivity was evaluated by analyzing of the dextromethorphan in presence of several substances with similar molecular structures and properties. Results from the HPLC analyses showed that the recoveries of dextromethorphan using MIP cartridges from human plasma samples in the range of 1-50 ng/mL were higher than 87%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The non-coding RNAs of the H19-IGF2 imprinted loci: a focus on biological roles and therapeutic potential in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matouk, Imad J; Halle, David; Gilon, Michal; Hochberg, Abraham

    2015-04-09

    Since it was first described, the imprinted cluster 11p15.5 has been reported to be deregulated in a variety of pediatric and adult cancers including that of the lung. Both protein coding and non-coding genes functioning as oncogenes or as tumor suppressor genes reside within this cluster. Oncomirs that can function as oncogenes or as tumor suppressors have also been reported. While a complete account of the role played by the 11p15.5 imprinted cluster in lung cancer is beyond the scope of this review, we will focus on the role of the non-coding RNAs processed from the H19-IGF2 loci. A special emphasis will be given to the H19/miR-675 gene locus. Their potential diagnostic and therapeutic use in lung cancer will be described.

  14. Human imprint on archaeological anthroposols: first assessment of combined micromophological, pedological and lipid biomarkers analyses of organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammas, Cécilia; Thuy Nguyen Tu, Thanh; Plessis, Marion; Clotuche, Raphaël; Derenne, Sylvie

    2013-04-01

    Archaeological anthroposol matrix contains significant amounts of fine organic matter (OM), which can give archaeological information. Geoarchaeological studies of OM aim to reveal its origin in order to reconstruct past human activities. Such studies are complex because the nature and the abundance of OM is the result of human activities together with natural processes. Also, MO evolves over time, a process that is not well understood. Combination of complementary approaches may give further insights into human imprint on archaeological anthroposols. For example, micromorphology gives data on in situ activities and pedological processes with the result that components of animal and vegetal origin can be identified but not some amorphous / fibrous material and very fine residues (pedo-sedimentary history and OM preservation. Two tanning pits in urban craft areas were selected for sampling, as they are likely to contain large amounts of organic matter of vegetal and animal origin. The pit of Saint-Denis (SDN, 10 km at the north of Paris, calcareous alluvium, 13th cAD) was a reference tanning pit. The pit of Famars (FAM, near the Belgian border, luvisols, Roman period) was hypothesized to be a part of the tanning process. To assess preservation of organic components and molecules in relation with pedo-sedimentary context and their potential as biomarkers of human activities, methodology combined micromorphology, pedological analysis (C, N, LOI, P total, organic and inorganic phosphorus) and lipid analysis by GC/MS, lipids having a high preservation potential and containing biomarkers indicative of OM origin. Micromorphological study showed a high amount and diversity of organic components in the two pits. At the SDN pit, the interpretation of tanning (liming) was supported by the presence of scarce fragments of lime with calcitic hairs pseudomorphoses. Plant remains and bone fragments were identified, but red fibrous and yellow amorphous material were not. At the FAM

  15. Androgen imprinting of the brain in animal models and humans with intersex disorders: review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabovszky, Zoltan; Hutson, John M

    2002-11-01

    Psychosexual development, gender assignment and surgical treatment in patients with intersex are controversial issues in the medical literature. Some groups are of the opinion that gender identity and sexual orientation are determined prenatally secondary to the fetal hormonal environment causing irreversible development of the nervous system. We reviewed the evidence in animal and human studies to determine the possible role of early postnatal androgen production in gender development. An extensive literature review was performed of data from animal experiments and human studies. RESULTS Many animal studies show that adding or removing hormonal stimulus in early postnatal life can profoundly alter gender behavior of the adult animal. Human case studies show that late intervention is unable to reverse gender orientation from male to female. Most studies have not permitted testing of whether early gender assignment and treatment as female with suppression/ablation of postnatal androgen production leads to improved concordance of the gender identity and sex of rearing. Animal studies support a role for postnatal androgens in brain/behavior development with human studies neither completely supportive nor antagonistic. Therefore, gender assignment in infants with intersex should be made with the possibility in mind that postnatal testicular hormones at ages 1 to 6 months may affect gender identity. A case-control study is required to test the hypothesis that postnatal androgen exposure may convert ambisexual brain functions to committed male behavior patterns.

  16. Humans as Superorganisms: How Microbes, Viruses, Imprinted Genes, and Other Selfish Entities Shape Our Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Peter; Bressan, Paola

    2015-07-01

    Psychologists and psychiatrists tend to be little aware that (a) microbes in our brains and guts are capable of altering our behavior; (b) viral DNA that was incorporated into our DNA millions of years ago is implicated in mental disorders; (c) many of us carry the cells of another human in our brains; and (d) under the regulation of viruslike elements, the paternally inherited and maternally inherited copies of some genes compete for domination in the offspring, on whom they have opposite physical and behavioral effects. This article provides a broad overview, aimed at a wide readership, of the consequences of our coexistence with these selfish entities. The overarching message is that we are not unitary individuals but superorganisms, built out of both human and nonhuman elements; it is their interaction that determines who we are. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres prepared by Pickering emulsion polymerization for selective solid-phase extraction of eight bisphenols from human urine samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jiajia; Li, Yun; Wang, Jincheng; Sun, Xiaoli; Cao, Rong; Sun, Hao; Huang, Chaonan; Chen, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • BPA imprinted polymer microspheres were prepared by Pickering emulsion polymerization. • Regular spherical shape and narrow diameter distribution. • Good specific adsorption capacity for BPA. • Good class-selectivity and clean-up efficiency for bisphenols in human urine under SPE mode. • Good recoveries and sensitivity for bisphenols using the MIPMS-SPE coupled with HPLC-DAD method. - Abstract: The bisphenol A (BPA) imprinted polymer microspheres were prepared by simple Pickering emulsion polymerization. Compared to traditional bulk polymerization, both high yields of polymer and good control of particle sizes were achieved. The characterization results of scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption–desorption measurements showed that the obtained molecularly imprinted polymer microsphere (MIPMS) particles possessed regular spherical shape, narrow diameter distribution (30–60 μm), a specific surface area (S BET ) of 281.26 m 2 g −1 and a total pore volume (V t ) of 0.459 cm 3 g −1 . Good specific adsorption capacity for BPA was obtained in the sorption experiment and good class selectivity for BPA and its seven structural analogs (bisphenol F, bisphenol B, bisphenol E, bisphenol AF, bisphenol S, bisphenol AP and bisphenol Z) was demonstrated by the chromatographic evaluation experiment. The MIPMS as solid-phase extraction (SPE) packing material was then evaluated for extraction and clean-up of these bisphenols (BPs) from human urine samples. An accurate and sensitive analytical method based on the MIPMS-SPE coupled with HPLC-DAD has been successfully established for simultaneous determination of eight BPs from human urine samples with detection limits of 1.2–2.2 ng mL −1 . The recoveries of BPs for urine samples at two spiking levels (100 and 500 ng mL −1 for each BP) were in the range of 81.3–106.7% with RSD values below 8.3%

  18. Molecularly imprinted microspheres synthesized by a simple, fast, and universal suspension polymerization for selective extraction of the topical anesthetic benzocaine in human serum and fish tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Lai, Jia-Ping; Chen, Fang; Zhu, De-Rong

    2015-02-01

    A simple, fast, and universal suspension polymerization method was used to synthesize the molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) for the topical anesthetic benzocaine (BZC). The desired diameter (10-20 μm) and uniform morphology of the MIMs were obtained easily by changing one or more of the synthesis conditions, including type and amount of surfactant, stirring rate, and ratio of organic to water phase. The MIMs obtained were used as a molecular-imprinting solid-phase-extraction (MISPE) material for extraction of BZC in human serum and fish tissues. The MISPE results revealed that the BZC in these biosamples could be enriched effectively after the MISPE operation. The recoveries of BZC on MIMs cartridges were higher than 90% (n = 3). Finally, an MISPE-HPLC method with UV detection was developed for highly selective extraction and fast detection of trace BZC in human serum and fish tissues. The developed method could also be used for the enrichment and detection of BZC in other complex biosamples.

  19. Curcumin Suppresses In Vitro Proliferation and Invasion of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells by Modulating DLK1-DIO3 Imprinted Gene Cluster MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hu; Zheng, Jiajia; Shen, Hongliang; Huang, Yongyi; Liu, Te; Xi, Hao; Chen, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    Curcumin can suppress human prostate cancer (HuPCa) cell proliferation and invasion. However, it is not known whether curcumin can inhibit HuPCa stem cell (HuPCaSC) proliferation and invasion. We used methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium and Transwell assays to examine the proliferation and invasion of the HuPCaSC lines DU145 and 22Rv1 following curcumin or dimethyl sulfoxide (control) treatment. The microRNA (miRNA) expression levels in the DLK1-DIO3 imprinted genomic region in the cells and in tumor tissues from patients with PCa were examined using microarray and quantitative PCR. The median inhibitory concentration of curcumin for HuPCa cells significantly inhibited HuPCaSC proliferation and invasion in vitro. The miR-770-5p and miR-1247 expression levels in the DLK1-DIO3 imprinted gene cluster were significantly different between the curcumin-treated and control HuPCaSCs. Overexpression of these positive miRNAs significantly increased the inhibition rates of miR-770-5p- and miR-1247-transfected HuPCaSCs compared to the control miR-Mut-transfected HuPCaSCs. Lastly, low-tumor grade PCa tissues had higher miR-770-5p and miR-1247 expression levels than high-grade tumor tissues. Curcumin can suppress HuPCaSC proliferation and invasion in vitro by modulating specific miRNAs in the DLK1-DIO3 imprinted gene cluster.

  20. Allelic Dropout During Polymerase Chain Reaction due to G-Quadruplex Structures and DNA Methylation Is Widespread at Imprinted Human Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Stevens

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Loss of one allele during polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of DNA, known as allelic dropout, can be caused by a variety of mechanisms. Allelic dropout during PCR may have profound implications for molecular diagnostic and research procedures that depend on PCR and assume biallelic amplification has occurred. Complete allelic dropout due to the combined effects of cytosine methylation and G-quadruplex formation was previously described for a differentially methylated region of the human imprinted gene, MEST. We now demonstrate that this parent-of-origin specific allelic dropout can potentially occur at several other genomic regions that display genomic imprinting and have propensity for G-quadruplex formation, including AIM1, BLCAP, DNMT1, PLAGL1, KCNQ1, and GRB10. These findings demonstrate that systematic allelic dropout during PCR is a general phenomenon for regions of the genome where differential allelic methylation and G-quadruplex motifs coincide, and suggest that great care must be taken to ensure biallelic amplification is occurring in such situations.

  1. Synthesis of molecular imprinted polymers for selective extraction of domperidone from human serum using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Simin; Rasoul-Amini, Sara; Adib, Noushin; Shekarchi, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    In this study a novel method is described for selective quantization of domperidone in biological matrices applying molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) as a sample clean up procedure using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescence detector. MIPs were synthesized with chloroform as the porogen, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker, methacrylic acid as the monomer, and domperidone as the template molecule. The new imprinted polymer was used as a molecular sorbent for separation of domperidone from serum. Molecular recognition properties, binding capacity and selectivity of MIPs were determined. The results demonstrated exceptional affinity for domperidone in biological fluids. The domperidone analytical method using MIPs was verified according to validation parameters, such as selectivity, linearity (5-80ng/mL, r(2)=0.9977), precision and accuracy (10-40ng/mL, intra-day=1.7-5.1%, inter-day=4.5-5.9%, and accuracy 89.07-98.9%).The limit of detection (LOD) and quantization (LOQ) of domperidone was 0.0279 and 0.092ng/mL, respectively. The simplicity and suitable validation parameters makes this a highly valuable selective bioequivalence method for domperidone analysis in human serum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Allelic Dropout During Polymerase Chain Reaction due to G-Quadruplex Structures and DNA Methylation Is Widespread at Imprinted Human Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Aaron J; Taylor, Millie G; Pearce, Frederick Grant; Kennedy, Martin A

    2017-03-10

    Loss of one allele during polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA, known as allelic dropout, can be caused by a variety of mechanisms. Allelic dropout during PCR may have profound implications for molecular diagnostic and research procedures that depend on PCR and assume biallelic amplification has occurred. Complete allelic dropout due to the combined effects of cytosine methylation and G-quadruplex formation was previously described for a differentially methylated region of the human imprinted gene, MEST We now demonstrate that this parent-of-origin specific allelic dropout can potentially occur at several other genomic regions that display genomic imprinting and have propensity for G-quadruplex formation, including AIM1 , BLCAP , DNMT1 , PLAGL1 , KCNQ1 , and GRB10 These findings demonstrate that systematic allelic dropout during PCR is a general phenomenon for regions of the genome where differential allelic methylation and G-quadruplex motifs coincide, and suggest that great care must be taken to ensure biallelic amplification is occurring in such situations. Copyright © 2017 Stevens et al.

  3. Molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres prepared by Pickering emulsion polymerization for selective solid-phase extraction of eight bisphenols from human urine samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jiajia [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Yun; Wang, Jincheng [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Xiaoli; Cao, Rong [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Hao [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110000 (China); Huang, Chaonan [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Jiping, E-mail: chenjp@dicp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Separation Sciences for Analytical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2015-05-04

    Highlights: • BPA imprinted polymer microspheres were prepared by Pickering emulsion polymerization. • Regular spherical shape and narrow diameter distribution. • Good specific adsorption capacity for BPA. • Good class-selectivity and clean-up efficiency for bisphenols in human urine under SPE mode. • Good recoveries and sensitivity for bisphenols using the MIPMS-SPE coupled with HPLC-DAD method. - Abstract: The bisphenol A (BPA) imprinted polymer microspheres were prepared by simple Pickering emulsion polymerization. Compared to traditional bulk polymerization, both high yields of polymer and good control of particle sizes were achieved. The characterization results of scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption–desorption measurements showed that the obtained molecularly imprinted polymer microsphere (MIPMS) particles possessed regular spherical shape, narrow diameter distribution (30–60 μm), a specific surface area (S{sub BET}) of 281.26 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and a total pore volume (V{sub t}) of 0.459 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. Good specific adsorption capacity for BPA was obtained in the sorption experiment and good class selectivity for BPA and its seven structural analogs (bisphenol F, bisphenol B, bisphenol E, bisphenol AF, bisphenol S, bisphenol AP and bisphenol Z) was demonstrated by the chromatographic evaluation experiment. The MIPMS as solid-phase extraction (SPE) packing material was then evaluated for extraction and clean-up of these bisphenols (BPs) from human urine samples. An accurate and sensitive analytical method based on the MIPMS-SPE coupled with HPLC-DAD has been successfully established for simultaneous determination of eight BPs from human urine samples with detection limits of 1.2–2.2 ng mL{sup −1}. The recoveries of BPs for urine samples at two spiking levels (100 and 500 ng mL{sup −1} for each BP) were in the range of 81.3–106.7% with RSD values below 8.3%.

  4. Molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres prepared by Pickering emulsion polymerization for selective solid-phase extraction of eight bisphenols from human urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiajia; Li, Yun; Wang, Jincheng; Sun, Xiaoli; Cao, Rong; Sun, Hao; Huang, Chaonan; Chen, Jiping

    2015-05-04

    The bisphenol A (BPA) imprinted polymer microspheres were prepared by simple Pickering emulsion polymerization. Compared to traditional bulk polymerization, both high yields of polymer and good control of particle sizes were achieved. The characterization results of scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements showed that the obtained molecularly imprinted polymer microsphere (MIPMS) particles possessed regular spherical shape, narrow diameter distribution (30-60 μm), a specific surface area (S(BET)) of 281.26 m(2) g(-1) and a total pore volume (V(t)) of 0.459 cm(3) g(-1). Good specific adsorption capacity for BPA was obtained in the sorption experiment and good class selectivity for BPA and its seven structural analogs (bisphenol F, bisphenol B, bisphenol E, bisphenol AF, bisphenol S, bisphenol AP and bisphenol Z) was demonstrated by the chromatographic evaluation experiment. The MIPMS as solid-phase extraction (SPE) packing material was then evaluated for extraction and clean-up of these bisphenols (BPs) from human urine samples. An accurate and sensitive analytical method based on the MIPMS-SPE coupled with HPLC-DAD has been successfully established for simultaneous determination of eight BPs from human urine samples with detection limits of 1.2-2.2 ng mL(-1). The recoveries of BPs for urine samples at two spiking levels (100 and 500 ng mL(-1) for each BP) were in the range of 81.3-106.7% with RSD values below 8.3%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Congenital imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Netchine, Irène; Temple, I Karen

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting disorders (IDs) are a group of eight rare but probably underdiagnosed congenital diseases affecting growth, development and metabolism. They are caused by similar molecular changes affecting regulation, dosage or the genomic sequence of imprinted genes. Each ID is characterised...... by specific clinical features, and, as each appeared to be associated with specific imprinting defects, they have been widely regarded as separate entities. However, they share clinical characteristics and can show overlapping molecular alterations. Nevertheless, IDs are usually studied separately despite...... EUCID.net (European network of congenital imprinting disorders) now aims to promote better clinical care and scientific investigation of imprinting disorders by establishing a concerted multidisciplinary alliance of clinicians, researchers, patients and families. By encompassing all IDs and establishing...

  6. [Neurobiology of imprinting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2012-06-01

    Imprinting is an example of learning and memory acquisition in infancy. In the case of precocial birds, such as geese, ducks, and chickens, the baby birds learn the characteristics of the first moving object that they see within a critical period, and they imprint on it and follow it around. We analyzed the neural basis of this behavior in order to understand the neural mechanism of learning and memory in infancy. Information pertaining to a visual imprinting stimulus is recognized and processed in the visual Wulst, a region that corresponds to the mammalian visual cortex. It is then transmitted to the posterior region of the telencephalon, followed by the core region of the hyperpallium densocellulare (HDCo), periventricular region of the hyperpallium densocellulare (HDPe), and finally, the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM), a region similar to the mammalian association cortex. Memory is stored in the IMM. After imprint training, plastic changes are observed in the visual Wulst as well as in the neurons of this circuit. HDCo cells, located at the center of this circuit, express N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors containing the NMDA receptor (NR) 2B subunit; the expression of this receptor increased after the imprint training. Inhibition of this receptor in the cells of the HDCo region leads to failure of imprinting and inactivation of this circuit. Thus, NMDA receptors bearing the NR2B subunit play a critical role in plastic changes in this circuit and in induction of imprinting.

  7. Monodisperse, molecularly imprinted polymers for creatinine by modified precipitation polymerization and their applications to creatinine assays for human serum and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Chitose; Funaya, Noriko; Matsunaga, Hisami; Haginaka, Jun

    2013-11-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for creatinine were prepared by modified precipitation polymerization using methacrylic acid as a functional monomer and divinylbenzene as a crosslinker. The prepared MIPs were monodispersed with a narrow particle size distribution. Binding experiments and Scatchard analyses revealed that two classes of binding sites, high- and low-affinity sites, were formed on the MIPs. The retention and molecular-recognition properties of the MIPs were evaluated by hydrophilic interaction chromatography using a mixture of ammonium acetate buffer and acetonitrile as a mobile phase. With an increase of acetonitrile content, the retention factor of creatinine was increased on the MIP. In addition to shape recognition, hydrophilic interactions seemed to enhance the recognition of creatinine on the MIP. The MIPs' molecular-recognition ability was specific for creatinine; the structurally related compounds such as hydantoin, 1-methylhydantoin, 2-pyrrolidone, N-hydroxysuccinimide and creatine were not recognized. Furthermore, the creatinine concentrations in human serum and urine were successfully determined by direct injection of the deproteinized serum and diluted urine samples onto the MIP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigating the Incorporation of Personality Constructs into IMPRINT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickason, David; Sargent, Bob; Bagnall, Tim

    2009-01-01

    ... in the Army, for use in Navy ship acquisitions. The objective of this study was to determine if it was feasible to incorporate non-cognitive attributes such as stress tolerance into IMPRINT for use as human performance moderators...

  9. Comparative anatomy of chromosomal domains with imprinted and non-imprinted allele-specific DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Anupam; Temkin, Alexis M; Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L; Schork, Nicholas; Do, Catherine; Torkamani, Ali; Tycko, Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated) while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs), each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM.

  10. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  11. Long contiguous stretches of homozygosity spanning shortly the imprinted loci are associated with intellectual disability, autism and/or epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iourov, Ivan Y; Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Korostelev, Sergei A; Zelenova, Maria A; Yurov, Yuri B

    2015-01-01

    Long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) (regions/runs of homozygosity) are repeatedly detected by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chromosomal microarrays. Providing important clues regarding parental relatedness (consanguinity), uniparental disomy, chromosomal recombination or rearrangements, LCSH are rarely considered as a possible epigenetic cause of neurodevelopmental disorders. Additionally, despite being relevant to imprinting, LCSH at imprinted loci have not been truly addressed in terms of pathogenicity. In this study, we examined LCSH in children with unexplained intellectual disability, autism, congenital malformations and/or epilepsy focusing on chromosomal regions which harbor imprinted disease genes. Out of 267 cases, 14 (5.2 %) were found to have LCSH at imprinted loci associated with a clinical outcome. There were 5 cases of LCSH at 15p11.2, 4 cases of LCSH at 7q31.2, 3 cases of LCSH at 11p15.5, and 2 cases of LCSH at 7q21.3. Apart from a case of LCSH at 7q31.33q32.3 (~4 Mb in size), all causative LCSH were 1-1.5 Mb in size. Clinically, these cases were characterized by a weak resemblance to corresponding imprinting diseases (i.e., Silver-Russell, Beckwith-Wiedemann, and Prader-Willi/Angelman syndromes), exhibiting distinctive intellectual disability, autistic behavior, developmental delay, seizures and/or facial dysmorphisms. Parental consanguinity was detected in 8 cases (3 %), and these cases did not exhibit LCSH at imprinted loci. This study demonstrates that shorter LCSH at chromosomes 7q21.3, 7q31.2, 11p15.5, and 15p11.2 occur with a frequency of about 5 % in the children with intellectual disability, autism, congenital malformations and/or epilepsy. Consequently, this type of epigenetic mutations appears to be the most common one among children with neurodevelopmental diseases. Finally, since LCSH less than 2.5-10 Mb in size are generally ignored in diagnostic SNP microarray studies, one can conclude that an important

  12. mRNA levels of imprinted genes in bovine in vivo oocytes, embryos and cross species comparisons in humans, mice and pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-six confirmed imprinted genes in the bovine were quantified in in vivo produced oocytes and embryos. Eighteen were detectable and their transcriptional abundance were categorized into five patterns: largely decreased (MEST and PLAGL1); first decreased and then increased (CDKN1C and IGF2R); p...

  13. Topological imprint for periodic orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín, Jesús San; Moscoso, Ma José; Gómez, A González

    2012-01-01

    The more self-crossing points an orbit has the more complex it is. We introduce the topological imprint to characterize crossing points and focus on the period-doubling cascade. The period-doubling cascade topological imprint determines the topological imprint for orbits in chaotic bands. In addition, there is a closer link between this concept and the braids studied by Lettelier et al (2000 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 33 1809–25). (paper)

  14. Short interspersed element (SINE) depletion and long interspersed element (LINE) abundance are not features universally required for imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Michael; de Burca, Anna; McCole, Ruth B; Chahal, Mandeep; Saadat, Ghazal; Oakey, Rebecca J; Schulz, Reiner

    2011-04-20

    Genomic imprinting is a form of gene dosage regulation in which a gene is expressed from only one of the alleles, in a manner dependent on the parent of origin. The mechanisms governing imprinted gene expression have been investigated in detail and have greatly contributed to our understanding of genome regulation in general. Both DNA sequence features, such as CpG islands, and epigenetic features, such as DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs, play important roles in achieving imprinted expression. However, the relative importance of these factors varies depending on the locus in question. Defining the minimal features that are absolutely required for imprinting would help us to understand how imprinting has evolved mechanistically. Imprinted retrogenes are a subset of imprinted loci that are relatively simple in their genomic organisation, being distinct from large imprinting clusters, and have the potential to be used as tools to address this question. Here, we compare the repeat element content of imprinted retrogene loci with non-imprinted controls that have a similar locus organisation. We observe no significant differences that are conserved between mouse and human, suggesting that the paucity of SINEs and relative abundance of LINEs at imprinted loci reported by others is not a sequence feature universally required for imprinting.

  15. Short interspersed element (SINE depletion and long interspersed element (LINE abundance are not features universally required for imprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cowley

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is a form of gene dosage regulation in which a gene is expressed from only one of the alleles, in a manner dependent on the parent of origin. The mechanisms governing imprinted gene expression have been investigated in detail and have greatly contributed to our understanding of genome regulation in general. Both DNA sequence features, such as CpG islands, and epigenetic features, such as DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs, play important roles in achieving imprinted expression. However, the relative importance of these factors varies depending on the locus in question. Defining the minimal features that are absolutely required for imprinting would help us to understand how imprinting has evolved mechanistically. Imprinted retrogenes are a subset of imprinted loci that are relatively simple in their genomic organisation, being distinct from large imprinting clusters, and have the potential to be used as tools to address this question. Here, we compare the repeat element content of imprinted retrogene loci with non-imprinted controls that have a similar locus organisation. We observe no significant differences that are conserved between mouse and human, suggesting that the paucity of SINEs and relative abundance of LINEs at imprinted loci reported by others is not a sequence feature universally required for imprinting.

  16. Highly selective determination of methylmercury with methylmercury-imprinted polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yongwen [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China)]. E-mail: dtlyw@263.net; Zai Yunhui [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chang Xijun [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Guo Yong [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Meng Shuangming [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Feng Feng [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China)

    2006-08-11

    determination of methylmercury in human hair sample. Determination of methylmercury in certified human hair sample (IAEA-086) and soil certified reference material (CRM 580) demonstrated that the interfering substances in matrix had been almost removed during preconcentration. The methylmercury-imprinted polymers were good enough for methylmercury determination in matrixes containing components with similar chemical property such as Hg(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)

  17. Generation of Five Human Lactoferrin Transgenic Cloned Goats Using Fibroblast Cells and Their Methylation Status of Putative Differential Methylation Regions of IGF2R and H19 Imprinted Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Ziyu; Song, Yang; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising technique to produce transgenic cloned mammalian, including transgenic goats which may produce Human Lactoferrin (hLF). However, success percentage of SCNT is low, because of gestational and neonatal failure of transgenic embryos. According to the studies on cattle and mice, DNA methylation of some imprinted genes, which plays a vital role in the reprogramming of embryo in NT maybe an underlying mechanism. Methodology/Principal Findings Fibroblast cells were derived from the ear of a two-month-old goat. The vector expressing hLF was constructed and transfected into fibroblasts. G418 selection, EGFP expression, PCR, and cell cycle distribution were applied sequentially to select transgenic cells clones. After NT and embryo transfer, five transgenic cloned goats were obtained from 240 cloned transgenic embryos. These transgenic goats were identified by 8 microsatellites genotyping and southern blot. Of the five transgenic goats, 3 were lived after birth, while 2 were dead during gestation. We compared differential methylation regions (DMR) pattern of two paternally imprinted genes (H19 and IGF2R) of the ear tissues from the lived transgenic goats, dead transgenic goats, and control goats from natural reproduction. Hyper-methylation pattern appeared in cloned aborted goats, while methylation status was relatively normal in cloned lived goats compared with normal goats. Conclusions/Significance In this study, we generated five hLF transgenic cloned goats by SCNT. This is the first time the DNA methylation of lived and dead transgenic cloned goats was compared. The results demonstrated that the methylation status of DMRs of H19 and IGF2R were different in lived and dead transgenic goats and therefore this may be potentially used to assess the reprogramming status of transgenic cloned goats. Understanding the pattern of gene imprinting may be useful to improve cloning techniques in future. PMID:24204972

  18. Cultural relativism: maintenance of genomic imprints in pluripotent stem cell culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Maxim Vc; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2015-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in culture have become a widely used model for studying events occurring during mammalian development; they also present an exciting avenue for therapeutics. However, compared to their in vivo counterparts, cultured PSC derivatives have unique properties, and it is well established that their epigenome is sensitive to medium composition. Here we review the specific effects on genomic imprints in various PSC types and culture systems. Imprinted gene regulation is developmentally important, and imprinting defects have been associated with several human diseases. Therefore, imprint abnormalities in PSCs may have considerable consequences for downstream applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative anatomy of chromosomal domains with imprinted and non-imprinted allele-specific DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Paliwal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons, one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs, each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM.

  20. Recent Advances in Imprinting Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soellner, L; Begemann, M; Mackay, D J G

    2017-01-01

    Imprinting disorders (ImpDis) are a group of currently 12 congenital diseases with common underlying (epi)genetic etiologies and overlapping clinical features affecting growth, development and metabolism. In the last years it has emerged that ImpDis are characterized by the same types of mutations...... and epimutations, i.e. uniparental disomies, copy number variations, epimutations, and point mutations. Each ImpDis is associated with a specific imprinted locus, but the same imprinted region can be involved in different ImpDis. Additionally, even the same aberrant methylation patterns are observed in different...

  1. Maternal 5mCpG Imprints at the PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML Differentially Methylated Regions Are Decoupled From Parent-of-Origin Expression Effects in Multiple Human Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela de Sá Machado Araújo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of imprinted genes in mammals is the occurrence of parent-of-origin-dependent asymmetry of DNA cytosine methylation (5mC of alleles at CpG islands (CGIs in their promoter regions. This 5mCpG asymmetry between the parental alleles creates allele-specific imprinted differentially methylated regions (iDMRs. iDMRs are often coupled to the transcriptional repression of the methylated allele and the activation of the unmethylated allele in a tissue-specific, developmental-stage-specific and/or isoform-specific fashion. iDMRs function as regulatory platforms, built through the recruitment of chemical modifications to histones to achieve differential, parent-of-origin-dependent chromatin segmentation states. Here, we used a comparative computational data mining approach to identify 125 novel constitutive candidate iDMRs that integrate the maximal number of allele-specific methylation region records overlapping CGIs in human methylomes. Twenty-nine candidate iDMRs display gametic 5mCpG asymmetry, and another 96 are candidate secondary iDMRs. We established the maternal origin of the 5mCpG imprints of one gametic (PARD6G-AS1 and one secondary (GCSAML iDMRs. We also found a constitutively hemimethylated, nonimprinted domain at the PWWP2AP1 promoter CGI with oocyte-derived methylation asymmetry. Given that the 5mCpG level at the iDMRs is not a sufficient criterion to predict active or silent locus states and that iDMRs can regulate genes from a distance of more than 1 Mb, we used RNA-Seq experiments from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project and public archives to assess the transcriptional expression profiles of SNPs across 4.6 Mb spans around the novel maternal iDMRs. We showed that PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML are expressed biallelically in multiple tissues. We found evidence of tissue-specific monoallelic expression of ZNF124 and OR2L13, located 363 kb upstream and 419 kb downstream, respectively, of the GCSAML iDMR. We hypothesize that the GCSAML

  2. Programmable imprint lithography template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Gregory F [Oakland, CA; Talin, Albert A [Livermore, CA

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  3. Biological imprinting: Some genetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem

    2014-06-21

    Jun 21, 2014 ... Role of chromatin in imprinting . .... flict theory in placental mammals assumes that paternal alleles in pregnancy ... The theory also postulates that maternal alleles, on ..... postulating contributory roles of mitDNA in mediation of.

  4. Simultaneous Detection of Human C-Terminal p53 Isoforms by Single Template Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) Coupled with Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-Based Targeted Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenting; Liu, Liang; Chen, Yun

    2018-03-06

    Abnormal expression of C-terminal p53 isoforms α, β, and γ can cause the development of cancers including breast cancer. To date, much evidence has demonstrated that these isoforms can differentially regulate target genes and modulate their expression. Thus, quantification of individual isoforms may help to link clinical outcome to p53 status and to improve cancer patient treatment. However, there are few studies on accurate determination of p53 isoforms, probably due to sequence homology of these isoforms and also their low abundance. In this study, a targeted proteomics assay combining molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for simultaneous quantification of C-terminal p53 isoforms. Isoform-specific surrogate peptides (i.e., KPLDGEYFTLQIR (peptide-α) for isoform α, KPLDGEYFTLQDQTSFQK (peptide-β) for isoform β, and KPLDGEYFTLQMLLDLR (peptide-γ) for isoform γ) were first selected and used in both MIPs enrichment and mass spectrometric detection. The common sequence KPLDGEYFTLQ of these three surrogate peptides was used as single template in MIPs. In addition to optimization of imprinting conditions and characterization of the prepared MIPs, binding affinity and cross-reactivity of the MIPs for each surrogate peptide were also evaluated. As a result, a LOQ of 5 nM was achieved, which was >15-fold more sensitive than that without MIPs. Finally, the assay was validated and applied to simultaneous quantitative analysis of C-terminal p53 isoforms α, β, and γ in several human breast cell lines (i.e., MCF-10A normal cells, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells, and drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cancer cells). This study is among the first to employ single template MIPs and cross-reactivity phenomenon to select isoform-specific surrogate peptides and enable simultaneous quantification of protein isoforms in LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics.

  5. Endosperm imprinting: a child custody battle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becraft, Philip W

    2012-02-07

    Endosperm gene imprinting has long been speculated to control nutrient allocation to seeds. For the first time, an imprinted gene directly involved in this process has been identified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of imprint training procedure at birth on the reactions of foals at age six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J L; Friend, T H; Collins, M N; Toscano, M J; Sisto-Burt, A; Nevill, C H

    2003-03-01

    While imprint training procedures have been promoted in popular magazines, they have received limited scientific investigation. To determine the effects of a neonatal imprint training procedure on 6-month-old foals and to determine if any one session had a greater effect than others. Foals (n = 131) were divided into the following treatments: no imprint training, imprint training at birth, 12, 24 and 48 h after birth or imprint training only at birth, 12, 24, 48, or 72 h after birth. Foals then received minimal human handling until they were tested at 6 months. During training, time to complete exposure to the stimulus was significant for only 2 of 6 stimuli. Percentage change in baseline heart rate was significant for only 2 of 10 stimuli. These 4 effects were randomly spread across treatments. Neither the number of imprint training sessions (0, 1, or 4) nor the timing of imprint training sessions (none, birth, 12, 24, 48, or 72 h after birth) influenced the foal's behaviour at 6 months of age. In this study, imprint training did not result in better behaved, less reactive foals.

  7. 77 FR 25082 - Picture Permit Imprint Indicia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 111 Picture Permit Imprint Indicia AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION... Service, Domestic Mail Manual (DMM[supreg]) 604.5 to add picture permit imprint indicia standards allowing...: The use of picture permit imprint indicia is designed to improve the effectiveness of a mailpiece by...

  8. Epigenetic status of H19/IGF2 and SNRPN imprinted genes in aborted and successfully derived embryonic stem cell lines in non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Wianny

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The imprinted genes of primate embryonic stem cells (ESCs often show altered DNA methylation. It is unknown whether these alterations emerge while deriving the ESCs. Here we studied the methylation patterns of two differentially methylated regions (DMRs, SNRPN and H19/IGF2 DMRs, during the derivation of monkey ESCs. We show that the SNRPN DMR is characteristically methylated at maternal alleles, whereas the H19/IGF2 DMR is globally highly methylated, with unusual methylation on the maternal alleles. These methylation patterns remain stable from the early stages of ESC derivation to late passages of monkey ESCs and following differentiation. Importantly, the methylation status of H19/IGF2 DMR and the expression levels of IGF2, H19, and DNMT3B mRNAs in early embryo-derived cells were correlated with their capacity to generate genuine ESC lines. Thus, we propose that these markers could be useful to predict the outcomes of establishing an ESC line in primates.

  9. DDC and COBL, flanking the imprinted GRB10 gene on 7p12, are biallelically expressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchins, Megan P; Bentley, Louise; Monk, David; Beechey, Colin; Peters, Jo; Kelsey, Gavin; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Preece, Michael A; Stanier, Philip; Moore, Gudrun E

    2002-12-01

    Maternal duplication of human 7p11.2-p13 has been associated with Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) in two familial cases. GRB10 is the only imprinted gene identified within this region to date. GRB10 demonstrates an intricate tissue- and isoform-specific imprinting profile in humans, with paternal expression in fetal brain and maternal expression of one isoform in skeletal muscle. The mouse homolog is maternally transcribed. The GRB10 protein is a potent growth inhibitor and represents a candidate for SRS, which is characterized by pre- and postnatal growth retardation and a spectrum of additional dysmorphic features. Since imprinted genes tend to be grouped in clusters, we investigated the imprinting status of the dopa-decarboxylase gene (DDC) and the Cordon-bleu gene (COBL) which flank GRB10 within the 7p11.2-p13 SRS duplicated region. Although both genes were found to replicate asynchronously, suggestive of imprinting, SNP expression analyses showed that neither gene was imprinted in multiple human fetal tissues. The mouse homologues, Ddc and Cobl, which map to the homologous imprinted region on proximal Chr 11, were also biallelically expressed in mice with uniparental maternal or paternal inheritance of this region. With the intent of using mouse Grb10 as an imprinted control, biallelic expression was consistently observed in fetal, postnatal, and adult brain of these mice, in contrast to the maternal-specific transcription previously demonstrated in brain in inter-specific F1 progeny. This may be a further example of over-expression of maternally derived transcripts in inter-specific mouse crosses. GRB10 remains the only imprinted gene identified within 7p11.2-p13.

  10. Ultrasound assisted combined molecularly imprinted polymer for selective extraction of nicotinamide in human urine and milk samples: Spectrophotometric determination and optimization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Dashtian, Kheibar

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted dispersive solid phase microextraction followed by UV-vis spectrophotometer (UA-DSPME-UV-vis) was designed for extraction and preconcentration of nicotinamide (vitamin B 3 ) by HKUST-1 metal organic framework (MOF) based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). This new material was characterized by FTIR and FE-SEM techniques. The preliminary Plackett-Burman design was used for screening and subsequently the central composite design justifies significant terms and possible construction of mathematical equation which give the individual and cooperative contribution of variables like HKUST-1-MOF-NA-MIP mass, sonication time, temperature, eluent volume, pH and vortex time. Accordingly the optimum condition was set as: 2.0mg HKUST-1-MOF-NA-MIP, 200μL eluent and 5.0min sonication time in center points other variables were determined as the best conditions to reach the maximum recovery of the analyte. The UA-DSPME-UV-vis method performances like excellent linearity (LR), limits of detection (LOD), limits of quantification of 10-5000μgL -1 with R 2 of 0.99, LOD (1.96ngmL -1 ), LOQ (6.53μgL -1 ), respectively show successful and accurate applicability of the present method for monitoring analytes with within- and between-day precision of 0.96-3.38%. The average absolute recoveries of the nicotinamide extracted from the urine, milk and water samples were 95.85-101.27%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Familiarity interferes with filial imprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanKampen, HS; deVos, GJ

    1996-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate whether and how pre-exposure to an object affects subsequent filial imprinting to that object. In Experiment 1 junglefowl chicks (Gallus gallus spadiceus) were first exposed to either a red object alone (control group), or a red and a yellow object

  12. Imprinted Polymers in Wastewater Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastman, Christopher; Goodrich, Scott; Gartner, Isabelle; Mueller, Anja

    2004-03-31

    In wastewater treatment, a method that specifically recognizes a variety of impurities in a flexible manner would be useful for treatment facilities with varying needs. Current purification techniques (i.e. bacteria, oxidation, reduction, precipitation and filtration) are nonspecific and difficult to control in complex mixtures. Heavy metal removal is particularly important in improving the efficiency of wastewater treatment, as they inhibit or even destroy the bacteria used for filtration. Imprinting polymerization is a technique that allows for the efficient removal of specific compounds and has been used in purification of enantiomers. It has potential to be applied in wastewater systems with the impurities acting as the template for the imprinting polymerization. The polymer with the bound impurities intact can then be removed via precipitation. After removal of the impurity the polymer can be reused. Data for the imprinting polymerization of polyacrylates and polyacrylamides for several metal complexes will be presented. Imprinting polymerization in combination with emulsion polymerization to improve the removal of hydrophobic contaminants will be described. Removal efficiencies will be presented and compared with conventional wastewater treatment methods.

  13. Self-oriented nanoparticles for site-selective immunoglobulin G recognition via epitope imprinting approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çorman, Mehmet Emin; Armutcu, Canan; Uzun, Lokman; Say, Rıdvan; Denizli, Adil

    2014-11-01

    Molecular imprinting is a polymerization technique that provides synthetic analogs for template molecules. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have gained much attention due to their unique properties such as selectivity and specificity for target molecules. In this study, we focused on the development of polymeric materials with molecular recognition ability, so molecular imprinting was combined with miniemulsion polymerization to synthesize self-orienting nanoparticles through the use of an epitope imprinting approach. Thus, L-lysine imprinted nanoparticles (LMIP) were synthesized via miniemulsion polymerization technique. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was then bound to the cavities that specifically formed for L-lysine molecules that are typically found at the C-terminus of the Fc region of antibody molecules. The resulting nanoparticles makes it possible to minimize the nonspecific interaction between monomer and template molecules. In addition, the orientation of the entire IgG molecule was controlled, and random imprinting of the IgG was prevented. The optimum conditions were determined for IgG recognition using the imprinted nanoparticles. The selectivity of the nanoparticles against IgG molecules was also evaluated using albumin and hemoglobin as competitor molecules. In order to show the self-orientation capability of imprinted nanoparticles, human serum albumin (HSA) adsorption onto both the plain nanoparticles and immobilized nanoparticles by anti-human serum albumin antibody (anti-HSA antibody) was also carried out. Due to anti-HSA antibody immobilization on the imprinted nanoparticles, the adsorption capability of nanoparticles against HSA molecules vigorously enhanced. It is proved that the oriented immobilization of antibodies was appropriately succeeded. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The origin of the RB1 imprint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Kanber

    Full Text Available The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to a differentially methylated CpG island in intron 2. This CpG island is part of PPP1R26P1, a truncated retrocopy of PPP1R26, and serves as a promoter for an alternative RB1 transcript. We show here by in silico analyses that the parental PPP1R26 gene is present in the analysed members of Haplorrhini, which comprise Catarrhini (Old World Monkeys, Small apes, Great Apes and Human, Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys and tarsier, and Strepsirrhini (galago. Interestingly, we detected the retrocopy, PPP1R26P1, in all Anthropoidea (Catarrhini and Platyrrhini that we studied but not in tarsier or galago. Additional retrocopies are present in human and chimpanzee on chromosome 22, but their distinct composition indicates that they are the result of independent retrotransposition events. Chimpanzee and marmoset have further retrocopies on chromosome 8 and chromosome 4, respectively. To examine the origin of the RB1 imprint, we compared the methylation patterns of the parental PPP1R26 gene and its retrocopies in different primates (human, chimpanzee, orangutan, rhesus macaque, marmoset and galago. Methylation analysis by deep bisulfite sequencing showed that PPP1R26 is methylated whereas the retrocopy in RB1 intron 2 is differentially methylated in all primates studied. All other retrocopies are fully methylated, except for the additional retrocopy on marmoset chromosome 4, which is also differentially methylated. Using an informative SNP for the methylation analysis in marmoset, we could show that the differential methylation pattern of the retrocopy on chromosome 4 is allele-specific. We conclude that the epigenetic fate of a PPP1R26 retrocopy after integration depends on the DNA sequence and selective forces at the integration site.

  15. Molecular Imprinting of Macromolecules for Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylan, Yeşeren; Yilmaz, Fatma; Özgür, Erdoğan; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yavuz, Handan; Denizli, Adil

    2017-04-19

    Molecular recognition has an important role in numerous living systems. One of the most important molecular recognition methods is molecular imprinting, which allows host compounds to recognize and detect several molecules rapidly, sensitively and selectively. Compared to natural systems, molecular imprinting methods have some important features such as low cost, robustness, high recognition ability and long term durability which allows molecularly imprinted polymers to be used in various biotechnological applications, such as chromatography, drug delivery, nanotechnology, and sensor technology. Sensors are important tools because of their ability to figure out a potentially large number of analytical difficulties in various areas with different macromolecular targets. Proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, antibodies, viruses and cells are defined as macromolecules that have wide range of functions are very important. Thus, macromolecules detection has gained great attention in concerning the improvement in most of the studies. The applications of macromolecule imprinted sensors will have a spacious exploration according to the low cost, high specificity and stability. In this review, macromolecules for molecularly imprinted sensor applications are structured according to the definition of molecular imprinting methods, developments in macromolecular imprinting methods, macromolecular imprinted sensors, and conclusions and future perspectives. This chapter follows the latter strategies and focuses on the applications of macromolecular imprinted sensors. This allows discussion on how sensor strategy is brought to solve the macromolecules imprinting.

  16. Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles for selective recognition and assay of uric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujahid, Adnan; Khan, Aimen Idrees; Afzal, Adeel; Hussain, Tajamal; Raza, Muhammad Hamid; Shah, Asma Tufail; uz Zaman, Waheed

    2015-06-01

    Molecularly imprinted titania nanoparticles are su ccessfully synthesized by sol-gel method for the selective recognition of uric acid. Atomic force microscopy is used to study the morphology of uric acid imprinted titania nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 100-150 nm. Scanning electron microscopy images of thick titania layer indicate the formation of fine network of titania nanoparticles with uniform distribution. Molecular imprinting of uric acid as well as its subsequent washing is confirmed by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy measurements. Uric acid rebinding studies reveal the recognition capability of imprinted particles in the range of 0.01-0.095 mmol, which is applicable in monitoring normal to elevated levels of uric acid in human blood. The optical shift (signal) of imprinted particles is six times higher in comparison with non-imprinted particles for the same concentration of uric acid. Imprinted titania particles have shown substantially reduced binding affinity toward interfering and structurally related substances, e.g. ascorbic acid and guanine. These results suggest the possible application of titania nanoparticles in uric acid recognition and quantification in blood serum.

  17. Recommendations for a nomenclature system for reporting methylation aberrations in imprinted domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monk, David; Morales, Joannella; den Dunnen, Johan T

    2018-01-01

    Disorders we have discussed these issues and designed a nomenclature for naming imprinted DMRs as well as for reporting methylation values. We apply these recommendations for imprinted DMRs that are commonly assayed in clinical laboratories and show how they support standardized database submission....... The recommendations are in line with existing recommendations, most importantly the Human Genome Variation Society nomenclature, and should facilitate accurate reporting and data exchange among laboratories and thereby help to avoid future confusion....

  18. DNA methylation patterns of imprinting centers for H19, SNRPN, and KCNQ1OT1 in single-cell clones of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Huei Peng

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells contain a unique epigenetic signature during in vitro cell culture. H19 and KCNQ1OT1 possessed a substantial degree of hypermethylation status, and variable DNA methylation patterns of SNRPN was observed during in vitro cell culture of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells. Our results urge further understanding of epigenetic status of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells before it is applied in cell replacement therapy.

  19. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Clustering patterns of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proteins reveal imprints of immune evasion on HIV-1 global variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusim, K.; Kesmir, Can; Gaschen, B.

    2002-01-01

    The human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been intensely studied, and hundreds of CTL epitopes have been experimentally defined, published, and compiled in the HIV Molecular Immunology Database. Maps of CTL epitopes on HIV-1 protein sequenc...

  1. Climatic imprints on personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliert, van de Evert

    2017-01-01

    No plant, animal or human is impervious to the problems posed by bitter winters and scorching summers. Two large studies suggest that many Chinese and US inhabitants have adapted their personality to the temperatures at the place where they grew up.

  2. Designing Fingers in Simulation based on Imprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolniakowski, Adam; Krüger, Norbert; Werner, Andrzej

    process of doing so. This method takes root in the idea of using the imprint to produce the finger geometry. We furthermore provide a verification of our newly introduced imprinting method and a comparison to the previously introduced parametrized geometry method. This verification is done through a set...

  3. Imprinting disorders after assisted reproductive technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Pinborg, Anja; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2006-01-01

    To assess the evidence of an increased risk of imprinting diseases in children born after use of assisted reproductive technologies.......To assess the evidence of an increased risk of imprinting diseases in children born after use of assisted reproductive technologies....

  4. Designing Fingers in Simulation based on Imprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuf Schwartz, Lukas Christoffer Malte; Wolniakowski, Adam; Werner, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    process of doing so. This method takes root in the idea of using the imprint to produce the finger geometry. We furthermore provide a verification of our newly introduced imprinting method and a comparison to the previously introduced parametrized geometry method. This verification is done through a set...

  5. Review: Biological imprinting: Some genetic considerations | Saad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as for interpretation of possible mechanisms implicated in its occurrence. Keywords: Genetic imprinting; Mutations; Re-sense mutation; Epigenetic alterations; DNA methylation/demethylation; Parthenogenesis; Position-effect variegation; Post-fertilization genomic imprinting; microRNA; Chromatin modifications; Pyknons ...

  6. Electrochemical sensor based on a carbon nanotube-modified imprinted sol–gel for selective and sensitive determination of β2-agonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Wei; Liu, Ping; Guo, Chunhui; Dong, Chao; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2013-01-01

    We describe a molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor for selective and sensitive determination of β2-agonists. It is making use of a combination of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a molecularly imprinted sol–gel. The SWNTs were introduced in order to enhance electron transport and sensitivity. The imprinted sol–gel film with its specific binding sites acts as a selective recognition element and as a preconcentrator for β 2 -agonists. The morphology of the imprinted film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The optimized sensor displays high sensitivity and excellent selectivity for the β 2 -agonists as shown for their determination in human serum samples. (author)

  7. Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Muhammad; Iqbal, Naseer; Mujahid, Adnan; Afzal, Adeel; Hussain, Tajamal; Sharif, Ahsan; Ahmad, Ejaz; Athar, Muhammad Makshoof

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors. PMID:28348356

  8. Assignment of casein kinase 2 alpha sequences to two different human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Klett, C; Göttert, E

    1992-01-01

    Human casein kinase 2 alpha gene (CK-2-alpha) sequences have been localized within the human genome by in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis using a CK-2 alpha cDNA as a probe. By in situ hybridization, the CK-2 alpha cDNA could be assigned to two different loci, one on 11p15.1-ter...

  9. Molecular imprinting polymer with polyoxometalate/carbon nitride nanotubes for electrochemical recognition of bilirubin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Göde, Ceren; Atar, Necip

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Bilirubin-imprinted sensor is developed for the sensitive detection of bilirubin •The prepared based on nanocomposite were characterized by several methods. •Bilirubin-imprinted sensor offers the important advantages •Bilirubin-imprinted sensor is preferred to the other methods for analysis -- Abstract: In this work, a new molecular imprinted sensor based on polyoxometalate (H 3 PW 12 O 40 , POM) functionalized carbon nitride nanotubes (C 3 N 4 NTs) nanocomposite was prepared for bilirubin (BR) analysis. The structures of prepared surfaces based on the nanocomposite were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX). After that, BR imprinted electrode on H 3 PW 12 O 40 /C 3 N 4 NTs nanocomposite was developed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 100 mM pyrrole containing 25 mM BR. The linearity range and the detection limit of the developed method were calculated as 1.0 × 10 −12 –1.0 × 10 −10 M and 3.0 × 10 −13 M, respectively. In addition, the imprinted sensor was applied to human plasma samples with high recovery and selectivity.

  10. Neural basis of imprinting behavior in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Tomoharu; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Sato, Katsushige; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    Newly hatched chicks memorize the characteristics of the first moving object they encounter, and subsequently show a preference for it. This "imprinting" behavior is an example of infant learning and is elicited by visual and/or auditory cues. Visual information of imprinting stimuli in chicks is first processed in the visual Wulst (VW), a telencephalic area corresponding to the mammalian visual cortex, congregates in the core region of the hyperpallium densocellulare (HDCo) cells, and transmitted to the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM), a region similar to the mammalian association cortex. The imprinting memory is stored in the IMM, and activities of IMM neurons are altered by imprinting. Imprinting also induces functional and structural plastic changes of neurons in the circuit that links the VW and the IMM. Of these neurons, the activity of the HDCo cells is strongly influenced by imprinting. Expression and modulation of NR2B subunit-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the HDCo cells are crucial for plastic changes in this circuit as well as the process of visual imprinting. Thus, elucidation of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the plastic changes that occurred in the HDCo cells may provide useful knowledge about infant learning. © 2012 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2012 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  11. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Synthesis Using RAFT Polymerisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, P.A.G.; Faizatul Shimal Mehamod; Faizatul Shimal Mehamod

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the synthesis and characterisation of caffeine-imprinted polymers are described. The polymers were prepared in monolithic form via both reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerisation and conventional free radical polymerisation, using methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the functional monomer and crosslinking agent, respectively. The potential benefits in applying RAFT polymerisation techniques towards the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are explored and elucidated. The pore structures of the polymers produced were characterised by nitrogen sorption porosimetry and the molecular recognition properties of representative products were evaluated in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) mode. Molecular imprinting effects were confirmed by analysing the relative retentions of analytes on imprinted and non-imprinted HPLC stationary phases. It was found that a caffeine-imprinted polymer synthesised by RAFT polymerisation was superior to a polymer prepared using a conventional synthetic approach; the imprinting factor and column efficiency were found to be higher for the former material. (author)

  12. Recent acquisition of imprinting at the rodent Sfmbt2 locus correlates with insertion of a large block of miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Eu Ddeum

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proximal region of murine Chr 2 has long been known to harbour one or more imprinted genes from classic genetic studies involving reciprocal translocations. No imprinted gene had been identified from this region until our study demonstrated that the PcG gene Sfmbt2 is expressed from the paternally inherited allele in early embryos and extraembryonic tissues. Imprinted genes generally reside in clusters near elements termed Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs, suggesting that Sfmbt2 might represent an anchor for a new imprinted domain. Results We analyzed allelic expression of approximately 20 genes within a 3.9 Mb domain and found that Sfmbt2 and an overlapping non-coding antisense transcript are the only imprinted genes in this region. These transcripts represent a very narrow imprinted gene locus. We also demonstrate that rat Sfmbt2 is imprinted in extraembryonic tissues. An interesting feature of both mouse and rat Sfmbt2 genes is the presence of a large block of miRNAs in intron 10. Other mammals, including the bovine, lack this block of miRNAs. Consistent with this association, we show that human and bovine Sfmbt2 are biallelic. Other evidence indicates that pig Sfmbt2 is also not imprinted. Further strengthening the argument for recent evolution of Sfmbt2 is our demonstration that a more distant muroid rodent, Peromyscus also lacks imprinting and the block of miRNAs. Conclusions These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the block of miRNAs are driving imprinting at this locus. Our results are discussed in the context of ncRNAs at other imprinted loci. Accession numbers for Peromyscus cDNA and intron 10 genomic DNA are [Genbank:HQ416417 and Genbank:HQ416418], respectively.

  13. Microcontact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor for myoglobin detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Bilgen; Uzun, Lokman; Beşirli, Necati; Denizli, Adil

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we prepared surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using the molecular imprinting technique for myoglobin detection in human serum. For this purpose, we synthesized myoglobin imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester) [poly(HEMA-MATrp)] nanofilm on the surface of SPR sensor. We also synthesized non-imprinted poly(HEMA-MATrp) nanofilm without myoglobin for the control experiments. The SPR sensor was characterized with contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. We investigated the effectiveness of the sensor using the SPR system. We evaluated the ability of SPR sensor to sense myoglobin with myoglobin solutions (pH 7.4, phosphate buffer) in different concentration range and in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction. We found that the Langmuir adsorption model was the most suitable for the sensor system. The detection limit was 87.6 ng/mL. In order to show the selectivity of the SPR sensor, we investigated the competitive detection of myoglobin, lysozyme, cytochrome c and bovine serum albumin. The results showed that the SPR sensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for myoglobin. - Highlights: • Micro-contact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor. • Real-time myoglobin detection in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction • Reproducible results for consecutive myoglobin solution supplement • LOD and LOQ values of the SPR sensor were determined to be 26.3 and 87.6 ng/mL. • The SPR sensor has potential for myoglobin sensing during acute MI cases

  14. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  15. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Technology: A Powerful, Generic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Technology: A Powerful, Generic, Facile and Cost Effective Alternative for Enantio-recognition and Separation: A Glance at Advances and Applications. ... Tanzania Journal of Science. Journal Home · ABOUT ...

  16. Cosmological imprints of pre-inflationary particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Itzhaki, Nissan; Kovetz, Ely D., E-mail: anastasia.fialkov@gmail.com, E-mail: nitzhaki@post.tau.ac.il, E-mail: elykovetz@gmail.com [Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv, 69978 (Israel)

    2010-02-01

    We study some of the cosmological imprints of pre-inflationary particles. We show that each such particle provides a seed for a spherically symmetric cosmic defect. The profile of this cosmic defect is fixed and its magnitude is linear in a single parameter that is determined by the mass of the pre-inflationary particle. We study the CMB and peculiar velocity imprints of this cosmic defect and suggest that it could explain some of the large scale cosmological anomalies.

  17. Cosmological imprints of pre-inflationary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Itzhaki, Nissan; Kovetz, Ely D.

    2010-01-01

    We study some of the cosmological imprints of pre-inflationary particles. We show that each such particle provides a seed for a spherically symmetric cosmic defect. The profile of this cosmic defect is fixed and its magnitude is linear in a single parameter that is determined by the mass of the pre-inflationary particle. We study the CMB and peculiar velocity imprints of this cosmic defect and suggest that it could explain some of the large scale cosmological anomalies

  18. Gas Sensors Based on Molecular Imprinting Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Qingju

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size and functional groups. MIT has been successfully applied to analyze; separate and detect macromolecular organic compounds. Furthermore; it has been increasingly applied in assays of biological mac...

  19. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: Present and Future Prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Vasapollo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Imprinting Technology (MIT is a technique to design artificial receptors with a predetermined selectivity and specificity for a given analyte, which can be used as ideal materials in various application fields. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs, the polymeric matrices obtained using the imprinting technology, are robust molecular recognition elements able to mimic natural recognition entities, such as antibodies and biological receptors, useful to separate and analyze complicated samples such as biological fluids and environmental samples. The scope of this review is to provide a general overview on MIPs field discussing first general aspects in MIP preparation and then dealing with various application aspects. This review aims to outline the molecularly imprinted process and present a summary of principal application fields of molecularly imprinted polymers, focusing on chemical sensing, separation science, drug delivery and catalysis. Some significant aspects about preparation and application of the molecular imprinting polymers with examples taken from the recent literature will be discussed. Theoretical and experimental parameters for MIPs design in terms of the interaction between template and polymer functionalities will be considered and synthesis methods for the improvement of MIP recognition properties will also be presented.

  20. An integrated physical map of 210 markers assigned to the short arm of human chromosome 11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redeker, E.; Hoovers, J. M.; Alders, M.; van Moorsel, C. J.; Ivens, A. C.; Gregory, S.; Kalikin, L.; Bliek, J.; de Galan, L.; van den Bogaard, R.; Visser, J.; van der Voort, R.; Feinberg, A. P.; Little, P. F. R.; Westerveld, A.; Mannens, M.

    1994-01-01

    Using a panel of patient cell lines with chromosomal breakpoints, we constructed a physical map for the short arm of human chromosome 11. We focused on 11p15, a chromosome band harboring at least 25 known genes and associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, several childhood tumors, and

  1. Foster parenting, human imprinting and conventional handling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 42, No 2 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. The "silent" imprint of musical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Carina; Liem, Franziskus; Hänggi, Jürgen; Elmer, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2016-02-01

    Playing a musical instrument at a professional level is a complex multimodal task requiring information integration between different brain regions supporting auditory, somatosensory, motor, and cognitive functions. These kinds of task-specific activations are known to have a profound influence on both the functional and structural architecture of the human brain. However, until now, it is widely unknown whether this specific imprint of musical practice can still be detected during rest when no musical instrument is used. Therefore, we applied high-density electroencephalography and evaluated whole-brain functional connectivity as well as small-world topologies (i.e., node degree) during resting state in a sample of 15 professional musicians and 15 nonmusicians. As expected, musicians demonstrate increased intra- and interhemispheric functional connectivity between those brain regions that are typically involved in music perception and production, such as the auditory, the sensorimotor, and prefrontal cortex as well as Broca's area. In addition, mean connectivity within this specific network was positively related to musical skill and the total number of training hours. Thus, we conclude that musical training distinctively shapes intrinsic functional network characteristics in such a manner that its signature can still be detected during a task-free condition. Hum Brain Mapp 37:536-546, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pattern imprinting in CMOS static RAMs from Co-60 irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, J.T.; Zugich, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    Total dose irradiation of various CMOS SRAMs is shown to imprint the pattern stored in the memory during irradiation. This imprinted pattern is the preferred state of the memory at subsequent power-up. Imprinting can occur at dose levels significantly below the failure level of the devices and is consistent with the bias dependent radiation induced threshold shifts of the individual transistors of the memory cells. However, before total imprinting occurs, other unusual imprinting phenomena can occur, such as a reverse imprinting effect seen in SOS memories, which is probably related to the bias dependence of back-channel leakage

  4. Molecular Imprinting Techniques Used for the Preparation of Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem Ertürk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imprinting is the technology of creating artificial recognition sites in polymeric matrices which are complementary to the template in their size, shape and spatial arrangement of the functional groups. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs and their incorporation with various transducer platforms are among the most promising approaches for detection of several analytes. There are a variety of molecular imprinting techniques used for the preparation of biomimetic sensors including bulk imprinting, surface imprinting (soft lithography, template immobilization, grafting, emulsion polymerization and epitope imprinting. This chapter presents an overview of all of these techniques with examples from particular publications.

  5. Creatinine sensor based on a molecularly imprinted polymer-modified hanging mercury drop electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Dhana; Prasad, Bhim Bali; Sharma, Piyush Sindhu

    2006-09-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) have been elucidated to work as artificial receptors. In our present study, a MIP was applied as a molecular recognition element to a chemical sensor. We have constructed a creatinine sensor based on a MIP layer selective for creatinine and its differential pulse, cathodic stripping voltammetric detection (DPCSV) on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The creatinine sensor was fabricated by the drop coating of dimethylformamide (DMF) solution of a creatinine-imprinted polymer onto the surface of HMDE. The modified-HMDE, preanodised in neutral medium at +0.4V versus Ag/AgCl for 120s, exhibited a marked enhancement in DPCSV current in comparison to the less anodised (imprinted polymer-modified electrode did not show linear response to creatinine. The imprinting factor as high as 9.4 implies that the imprinted polymer exclusively acts as a recognition element of creatinine sensor. The proposed procedure can be used to determine creatinine in human blood serum without any preliminary treatment of the sample in an accurate, rapid and simple way.

  6. Development and characterization of an electrochemical sensor for furosemide detection based on electropolymerized molecularly imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kor, Kamalodin; Zarei, Kobra

    2016-01-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor based on a molecularly imprinted polymer, poly(o-phenylenediamine) (PoPD), has been developed for selective and sensitive detection of furosemide. The sensor was prepared by incorporating of furosemide as template molecules during the electropolymerization of o-phenylenediamine on a gold electrode. To develop the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), the template molecules were removed from the modified electrode's surface by washing it with 0.25 mol L(-1) NaOH solution. The imprinted layer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The sensor's preparation conditions including furosemide concentration, the number of CV cycles in the electropolymerization process, extraction solution of the template from the imprinted film, the incubation time and the pH level were optimized. The incubation of the MIP-modified electrode, with respect to furosemide concentration, resulted in a suppression of the K4[Fe(CN)6] oxidation process. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the response of the imprinted sensor was linear in the range of 1.0×10(-7)-7.0×10(-6) mol L(-1) of furosemide. The detection limit was obtained as 7.0×10(-8) mol L(-1) for furosemide by using this sensor. The sensor was successfully used to determine the furosemide amount in the tablet and in human urine samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Imprint cytology: A boon in tissue diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charusheela Rajesh Gore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The technique of imprint cytology has provided great impetus to cytodiagnosis due to its simplicity, cost effectiveness, rapid results. It plays a significant role in the rapid diagnosis of the lesions. Objectives: To analyze the sensitivity and specificity of imprint cytology and thereby to evaluate its diagnostic utility. Materials and Methods: The prospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital. It included 105 cases. Both benign and malignant lesions from different organ systems were included in the study. Various techniques like touch imprints scrape cytology and squash preparations were used according to the nature of tissue sample. The cytodiagnosis was correlated with histopathological (HP diagnosis to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of imprint cytology. Results: Maximum lesions were of central nervous system (25.7% followed by breast, head, and neck. Imprint cytology diagnosis had sensitivity of 95.5% with 100% specificity for detection of benign and malignant lesions. Overall accuracy of detecting type of lesion was 98.1%. Total discordance with HP diagnosis was found in 1.9% of cases. Conclusion: The use of smear technique in intraoperative diagnosis provides a rapid and efficient means of pathological assessment which in experienced hand, is capable of obtaining a high degree of accuracy. Its use is highly recommended routinely.

  8. Causal imprinting in causal structure learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Eric G; Ahn, Woo-Kyoung

    2012-11-01

    Suppose one observes a correlation between two events, B and C, and infers that B causes C. Later one discovers that event A explains away the correlation between B and C. Normatively, one should now dismiss or weaken the belief that B causes C. Nonetheless, participants in the current study who observed a positive contingency between B and C followed by evidence that B and C were independent given A, persisted in believing that B causes C. The authors term this difficulty in revising initially learned causal structures "causal imprinting." Throughout four experiments, causal imprinting was obtained using multiple dependent measures and control conditions. A Bayesian analysis showed that causal imprinting may be normative under some conditions, but causal imprinting also occurred in the current study when it was clearly non-normative. It is suggested that causal imprinting occurs due to the influence of prior knowledge on how reasoners interpret later evidence. Consistent with this view, when participants first viewed the evidence showing that B and C are independent given A, later evidence with only B and C did not lead to the belief that B causes C. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer/Metal Organic Framework Based Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhong Guo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes recent advances in the concept of molecular imprinting using metal organic frameworks (MOF for development of chemical sensors. Two main strategies regarding the fabrication, performance and applications of recent sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers associated with MOF are presented: molecularly imprinted MOF films and molecularly imprinted core-shell nanoparticles using MOF as core. The associated transduction modes are also discussed. A brief conclusion and future expectations are described herein.

  10. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Genomic Imprinting: Common Themes in the Regulation of Imprinted Regions in Mammals, Plants, and Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. MacDonald

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is a form of epigenetic inheritance whereby the regulation of a gene or chromosomal region is dependent on the sex of the transmitting parent. During gametogenesis, imprinted regions of DNA are differentially marked in accordance to the sex of the parent, resulting in parent-specific expression. While mice are the primary research model used to study genomic imprinting, imprinted regions have been described in a broad variety of organisms, including other mammals, plants, and insects. Each of these organisms employs multiple, interrelated, epigenetic mechanisms to maintain parent-specific expression. While imprinted genes and imprint control regions are often species and locus-specific, the same suites of epigenetic mechanisms are often used to achieve imprinted expression. This review examines some examples of the epigenetic mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting in mammals, plants, and insects.

  11. Metal films with imprinted nanostructures by template stripping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Pors, Anders; Dreier, Jes

    We present a novel template stripping procedure for fabricating metal films with imprinted nanostructures. The basic idea is to deposit a gold film onto a nano-structured substrate and subsequently strip the film from the substrate surface thereby revealing imprinted nanostructures in the film...... result is a thin gold film with imprinted nano-cavities....

  12. Using IMPRINT to Guide Experimental Design with Simulated Task Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    USING IMPRINT TO GUIDE EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN OF SIMULATED TASK ENVIRONMENTS THESIS Gregory...ENG-MS-15-J-052 USING IMPRINT TO GUIDE EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN WITH SIMULATED TASK ENVIRONMENTS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department...Civilian, USAF June 2015 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENG-MS-15-J-052 USING IMPRINT

  13. Producing superfluid circulation states using phase imprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avinash; Dubessy, Romain; Badr, Thomas; De Rossi, Camilla; de Goër de Herve, Mathieu; Longchambon, Laurent; Perrin, Hélène

    2018-04-01

    We propose a method to prepare states of given quantized circulation in annular Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) confined in a ring trap using the method of phase imprinting without relying on a two-photon angular momentum transfer. The desired phase profile is imprinted on the atomic wave function using a short light pulse with a tailored intensity pattern generated with a spatial light modulator. We demonstrate the realization of "helicoidal" intensity profiles suitable for this purpose. Due to the diffraction limit, the theoretical steplike intensity profile is not achievable in practice. We investigate the effect of imprinting an intensity profile smoothed by a finite optical resolution onto the annular BEC with a numerical simulation of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation. This allows us to optimize the intensity pattern for a given target circulation to compensate for the limited resolution.

  14. Gas Sensors Based on Molecular Imprinting Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Qingju

    2017-07-04

    Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size and functional groups. MIT has been successfully applied to analyze; separate and detect macromolecular organic compounds. Furthermore; it has been increasingly applied in assays of biological macromolecules. Owing to its unique features of structure specificity; predictability; recognition and universal application; there has been exploration of the possible application of MIPs in the field of highly selective gas sensors. In this present study; we outline the recent advances in gas sensors based on MIT; classify and introduce the existing molecularly imprinted gas sensors; summarize their advantages and disadvantages; and analyze further research directions.

  15. Molecularly Imprinted Microrods via Mesophase Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortensia Ilaria Parisi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research work was the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs with a rod-like geometry via “mesophase polymerization”. The ternary lyotropic system consisting of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, water, and decanol was chosen to prepare a hexagonal mesophase to direct the morphology of the synthesized imprinted polymers using theophylline, methacrylic acid, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a drug model template, a functional monomer, and a crosslinker, respectively. The obtained molecularly imprinted microrods (MIMs were assessed by performing binding experiments and in vitro release studies, and the obtained results highlighted good selective recognition abilities and sustained release properties. In conclusion, the adopted synthetic strategy involving a lyotropic mesophase system allows for the preparation of effective MIPs characterized by a rod-like morphology.

  16. Molecularly Imprinted Microrods via Mesophase Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Ortensia Ilaria; Scrivano, Luca; Candamano, Sebastiano; Ruffo, Mariarosa; Vattimo, Anna Francesca; Spanedda, Maria Vittoria; Puoci, Francesco

    2017-12-28

    The aim of the present research work was the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with a rod-like geometry via "mesophase polymerization". The ternary lyotropic system consisting of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), water, and decanol was chosen to prepare a hexagonal mesophase to direct the morphology of the synthesized imprinted polymers using theophylline, methacrylic acid, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a drug model template, a functional monomer, and a crosslinker, respectively. The obtained molecularly imprinted microrods (MIMs) were assessed by performing binding experiments and in vitro release studies, and the obtained results highlighted good selective recognition abilities and sustained release properties. In conclusion, the adopted synthetic strategy involving a lyotropic mesophase system allows for the preparation of effective MIPs characterized by a rod-like morphology.

  17. Combining Pickering Emulsion Polymerization with Molecular Imprinting to Prepare Polymer Microspheres for Selective Solid-Phase Extraction of Malachite Green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixin Liang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Malachite green (MG is currently posing a carcinogenic threat to the safety of human lives; therefore, it is highly desirable to develop an effective method for fast trace detection of MG. Herein, for the first time, this paper presents a systematic study on polymer microspheres, being prepared by combined Pickering emulsion polymerization and molecular imprinting, to detect and purify MG. The microspheres, molecularly imprinted with MG, show enhanced adsorption selectivity to MG, despite a somewhat lowered adsorption capacity, as compared to the counterpart without molecular imprinting. Structural features and adsorption performance of these microspheres are elucidated by different characterizations and kinetic and thermodynamic analyses. The surface of the molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres (M-PMs exhibits regular pores of uniform pore size distribution, endowing M-PMs with impressive adsorption selectivity to MG. In contrast, the microspheres without molecular imprinting show a larger average particle diameter and an uneven porous surface (with roughness and a large pore size, causing a lower adsorption selectivity to MG despite a higher adsorption capacity. Various adsorption conditions are investigated, such as pH and initial concentration of the solution with MG, for optimizing the adsorption performance of M-PMs in selectively tackling MG. The adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics are deeply discussed and analyzed, so as to provide a full picture of the adsorption behaviors of the polymer microspheres with and without the molecular imprinting. Significantly, M-PMs show promising solid-phase extraction column applications for recovering MG in a continuous extraction manner.

  18. Transcription is required to establish maternal imprinting at the Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Y Smith

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS [MIM 17620] and Angelman syndrome (AS [MIM 105830] locus is controlled by a bipartite imprinting center (IC consisting of the PWS-IC and the AS-IC. The most widely accepted model of IC function proposes that the PWS-IC activates gene expression from the paternal allele, while the AS-IC acts to epigenetically inactivate the PWS-IC on the maternal allele, thus silencing the paternally expressed genes. Gene order and imprinting patterns at the PWS/AS locus are well conserved from human to mouse; however, a murine AS-IC has yet to be identified. We investigated a potential regulatory role for transcription from the Snrpn alternative upstream exons in silencing the maternal allele using a murine transgene containing Snrpn and three upstream exons. This transgene displayed appropriate imprinted expression and epigenetic marks, demonstrating the presence of a functional AS-IC. Transcription of the upstream exons from the endogenous locus correlates with imprint establishment in oocytes, and this upstream exon expression pattern was conserved on the transgene. A transgene bearing targeted deletions of each of the three upstream exons exhibited loss of imprinting upon maternal transmission. These results support a model in which transcription from the Snrpn upstream exons directs the maternal imprint at the PWS-IC.

  19. The imprinted brain: how genes set the balance between autism and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    The imprinted brain theory proposes that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) represents a paternal bias in the expression of imprinted genes. This is reflected in a preference for mechanistic cognition and in the corresponding mentalistic deficits symptomatic of ASD. Psychotic spectrum disorder (PSD) would correspondingly result from an imbalance in favor of maternal and/or X-chromosome gene expression. If differences in gene expression were reflected locally in the human brain as mouse models and other evidence suggests they are, ASD would represent not so much an 'extreme male brain' as an extreme paternal one, with PSD correspondingly representing an extreme maternal brain. To the extent that copy number variation resembles imprinting and aneuploidy in nullifying or multiplying the expression of particular genes, it has been found to conform to the diametric model of mental illness peculiar to the imprinted brain theory. The fact that nongenetic factors such as nutrition in pregnancy can mimic and/or interact with imprinted gene expression suggests that the theory might even be able to explain the notable effect of maternal starvation on the risk of PSD - not to mention the 'autism epidemic' of modern affluent societies. Finally, the theory suggests that normality represents balanced cognition, and that genius is an extraordinary extension of cognitive configuration in both mentalistic and mechanistic directions. Were it to be proven correct, the imprinted brain theory would represent one of the biggest single advances in our understanding of the mind and of mental illness that has ever taken place, and would revolutionize psychiatric diagnosis, prevention and treatment - not to mention our understanding of epigenomics.

  20. Catalytic silica particles via template-directed molecular imprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, M.A.; Kust, P.R.; Deng, G.; Schoen, P.E.; Dordick, J.S.; Clark, D.S.; Gaber, B.P.

    2000-02-22

    The surfaces of silica particle were molecularly imprinted with an {alpha}-chymotrypsin transition-state analogue (TSA) by utilizing the technique of template-directed synthesis of mineralized materials. The resulting catalytic particles hydrolyzed amides in an enantioselective manner. A mixture of a nonionic surfactant and the acylated chymotrysin TSA, with the TSA acting as the headgroup at the surfactant-water interface, was used to form a microemulsion for silica particle formation. Incorporation of amine-, dihydroimidazole-, and carboxylate-terminated trialkoxysilanes into the particles during imprinting resulted in enhancement of the rates of amide hydrolysis. Acylated imprint molecules formed more effective imprints in the presence of the functionalized silanes than nonacylated imprint molecules. Particles surface-imprinted with the chymotrypsin TSA were selective for the trypsin substrate, and particles surface-imprinted with the L-isomer of the enzyme TSA were enantioselective for the D-isomer of the substrate.

  1. Soluble Molecularly Imprinted Nanorods for Homogeneous Molecular Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongning Liang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, it is still difficult for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs to achieve homogeneous recognition since they cannot be easily dissolved in organic or aqueous phase. To address this issue, soluble molecularly imprinted nanorods have been synthesized by using soluble polyaniline doped with a functionalized organic protonic acid as the polymer matrix. By employing 1-naphthoic acid as a model, the proposed imprinted nanorods exhibit an excellent solubility and good homogeneous recognition ability. The imprinting factor for the soluble imprinted nanoroads is 6.8. The equilibrium dissociation constant and the apparent maximum number of the proposed imprinted nanorods are 248.5 μM and 22.1 μmol/g, respectively. We believe that such imprinted nanorods may provide an appealing substitute for natural receptors in homogeneous recognition related fields.

  2. Soluble Molecularly Imprinted Nanorods for Homogeneous Molecular Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rongning; Wang, Tiantian; Zhang, Huan; Yao, Ruiqing; Qin, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, it is still difficult for molecularly imprinted polymer (MIPs) to achieve homogeneous recognition since they cannot be easily dissolved in organic or aqueous phase. To address this issue, soluble molecularly imprinted nanorods have been synthesized by using soluble polyaniline doped with a functionalized organic protonic acid as the polymer matrix. By employing 1-naphthoic acid as a model, the proposed imprinted nanorods exhibit an excellent solubility and good homogeneous recognition ability. The imprinting factor for the soluble imprinted nanoroads is 6.8. The equilibrium dissociation constant and the apparent maximum number of the proposed imprinted nanorods are 248.5 μM and 22.1 μmol/g, respectively. We believe that such imprinted nanorods may provide an appealing substitute for natural receptors in homogeneous recognition related fields.

  3. Molecularly imprinted macroporous monoliths for solid-phase extraction: Effect of pore size and column length on recognition properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlakh, E G; Stepanova, M A; Korneeva, Yu M; Tennikova, T B

    2016-09-01

    The series of macroporous monolithic molecularly imprinted monoliths differed by pore size, column length (volume) and amount of template used for imprinting was synthesized using methacrylic acid and glycerol dimethacrylate as co-monomers and antibiotic ciprofloxacin as a template. The prepared monoliths were characterized regarding to their permeability, pore size, porosity, and resistance to the flow of a mobile phase. The surface morphology was also analyzed. The slight dependence of imprinting factor on flow rate, as well as its independence on pore size of macroporous molecularly imprinted monolithic media was observed. The column obtained at different conditions exhibited different affinity of ciprofloxacin to the imprinted sites that was characterized with Kdiss values in the range of 10(-5)-10(-4)M. The solid-phase extraction of ciprofloxacin from such biological liquids as human blood serum, human urine and cow milk serum was performed using the developed monolithic columns. In all cases, the extraction was found to be 95.0-98.6%. Additionally, the comparison of extraction of three fluoroqinolone analogues, e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, from human blood plasma was carried out. Contrary to ciprofloxacin extracted with more than 95%, this parameter did not exceed 40% for its analogues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Imprint of Galactic dynamics on Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A connection between climate and the Solar system's motion perpendicular to the Galactic plane during the last 200 Myr years is studied. An imprint of galactic dynamics is found in a long-term record of the Earth's climate that is consistent with variations in the Solar system oscillation around...

  5. Molecular Imprinting Applications in Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Erkut; Garipcan, Bora; Patra, Hirak K; Uzun, Lokman

    2017-03-28

    Producing molecular imprinting-based materials has received increasing attention due to recognition selectivity, stability, cast effectiveness, and ease of production in various forms for a wide range of applications. The molecular imprinting technique has a variety of applications in the areas of the food industry, environmental monitoring, and medicine for diverse purposes like sample pretreatment, sensing, and separation/purification. A versatile usage, stability and recognition capabilities also make them perfect candidates for use in forensic sciences. Forensic science is a demanding area and there is a growing interest in molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in this field. In this review, recent molecular imprinting applications in the related areas of forensic sciences are discussed while considering the literature of last two decades. Not only direct forensic applications but also studies of possible forensic value were taken into account like illicit drugs, banned sport drugs, effective toxins and chemical warfare agents in a review of over 100 articles. The literature was classified according to targets, material shapes, production strategies, detection method, and instrumentation. We aimed to summarize the current applications of MIPs in forensic science and put forth a projection of their potential uses as promising alternatives for benchmark competitors.

  6. Genomic Imprinting Is Implicated in the Psychology of Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Samuel A; Kotler, Jennifer; Howard, Rhea M; Haig, David; Krasnow, Max M

    2017-10-01

    Why do people sing to babies? Human infants are relatively altricial and need their parents' attention to survive. Infant-directed song may constitute a signal of that attention. In Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a rare disorder of genomic imprinting, genes from chromosome 15q11-q13 that are typically paternally expressed are unexpressed, which results in exaggeration of traits that reduce offspring's investment demands on the mother. PWS may thus be associated with a distinctive musical phenotype. We report unusual responses to music in people with PWS. Subjects with PWS ( N = 39) moved more during music listening, exhibited greater reductions in heart rate in response to music listening, and displayed a specific deficit in pitch-discrimination ability relative to typically developing adults and children ( N = 589). Paternally expressed genes from 15q11-q13, which are unexpressed in PWS, may thus increase demands for music and enhance perceptual sensitivity to music. These results implicate genomic imprinting in the psychology of music, informing theories of music's evolutionary history.

  7. The evolution of imprinting: chromosomal mapping of orthologues of mammalian imprinted domains in monotreme and marsupial mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunham Ian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of genomic imprinting, the parental-origin specific expression of genes, is the subject of much debate. There are several theories to account for how the mechanism evolved including the hypothesis that it was driven by the evolution of X-inactivation, or that it arose from an ancestrally imprinted chromosome. Results Here we demonstrate that mammalian orthologues of imprinted genes are dispersed amongst autosomes in both monotreme and marsupial karyotypes. Conclusion These data, along with the similar distribution seen in birds, suggest that imprinted genes were not located on an ancestrally imprinted chromosome or associated with a sex chromosome. Our results suggest imprinting evolution was a stepwise, adaptive process, with each gene/cluster independently becoming imprinted as the need arose.

  8. Left Hand Thumb Imprint Patterns Among Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Omair; Haroon, Muhammad Zeeshan; Rashid, Muhammad Adnan; Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Khan, Delawar

    2017-01-01

    Finger printing is an absolute method of identification. Recovery of finger prints from a crime scene is an important method of Forensic identification. Human finger prints are detailed, unique, difficult to alter, easily classifiable and durable over life making them stable and long-term tool of human identification. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 95,3rd year MBBS students of Ayub Medical College Abbottabad from December 2014 to August 2015 to establish the frequency of left hand thumb imprints by rolling and plain method. Study shows Loops among most common finger print pattern in 55 (58%) students out of 95, followed by whorls 33 (35%), arches 5 (5%) and composite 2 (2%). It is thus concluded that most common finger print pattern is loops followed by whorls, arches and composite.

  9. A needle extraction utilizing a molecularly imprinted-sol-gel xerogel for on-line microextraction of the lung cancer biomarker bilirubin from plasma and urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Jabbar, Dunia; Colmsjö, Anders; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2014-10-31

    In the present work, a needle trap utilizing a molecularly imprinted sol-gel xerogel was prepared for the on-line microextraction of bilirubin from plasma and urine samples. Each prepared needle could be used for approximately one hundred extractions before it was discarded. Imprinted and non-imprinted sol-gel xerogel were applied for the extraction of bilirubin from plasma and urine samples. The produced molecularly imprinted sol-gel xerogel polymer showed high binding capacity and fast adsorption/desorption kinetics for bilirubin in plasma and urine samples. The adsorption capacity of molecularly imprinted sol-gel xerogel polymer was approximately 60% higher than that of non-imprinted polymer. The effect of the conditioning, washing and elution solvents, pH, extraction time, adsorption capacity and imprinting factor were investigated. The limit of detection and the lower limit of quantification were set to 1.6 and 5nmolL(-1), respectively using plasma or urine samples. The standard calibration curves were obtained within the concentration range of 5-1000nmolL(-1) in both plasma and urine samples. The coefficients of determination values (R(2)) were ≥0.998 for all runs. The extraction recovery was approximately 80% for BR in the human plasma and urine samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Werkgartner's muzzle imprint mark--a literature study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geserick, Gunther; Vendura, Klaus; Wirth, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    Since Werkgartner described and correctly interpreted the muzzle imprint mark around the gunshot entrance wound in 1922, this finding has been generally accepted as a sign of a contact shot. In further studies, it could finally be clarified that the muzzle imprint mark is caused by the expansive power of the powder gases with pressure on and abrasion of the skin at the muzzle (weapon imprint). Its shape depends on the firearm, the ammunition and the anatomical conditions, but does not require a bullet. Examinations under a magnifying glass microscope and histological investigations can complete the macroscopic findings. Occasionally, the muzzle imprint mark requires a certain "drying period" in order to become clearly visible. In rare cases, muzzle imprint marks also form on textiles perforated by the projectile. Characteristically shaped muzzled imprint marks can provide clues to the type of the firearm and its position at the time of discharge.

  11. Potential roles for transposable elements in creating imprinted expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah N; Springer, Nathan M

    2018-04-01

    Changes in gene expression can have profound effects on phenotype. Nature has provided many complex patterns of gene regulation such as imprinting. Imprinted genes exhibit differences in the expression of the maternal and paternal alleles, even though they reside in the same nucleus with access to the same trans-acting factors. Significant attention has been focused on the potential reasons that imprinted expression could be beneficial and stabilized by selection. However, less attention has focused on understanding how imprinted expression might arise or decay. We discuss the evidence for frequent turnover of imprinted expression based on evolutionary analyses in plants and the potential role for transposable elements (TEs) in creating imprinted expression patterns. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Current Progress of Nanomaterials in Molecularly Imprinted Electrochemical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chunju; Yang, Bin; Jiang, Xinxin; Li, Jianping

    2018-01-02

    Nanomaterials have received much attention during the past decade because of their excellent optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. Nanomaterials possess high chemical reactivity, also high surface energy. Thus, provide a stable immobilization platform for biomolecules, while preserving their reactivity. Due to the conductive and catalytic properties, nanomaterials can also enhance the sensitivity of molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensors by amplifying the electrode surface, increasing the electron transfer, and catalyzing the electrochemical reactions. Molecularly imprinted polymers that contain specific molecular recognition sites can be designed for a particular target analyte. Incorporating nanomaterials into molecularly imprinted polymers is important because nanomaterials can improve the response signal, increase the sensitivity, and decrease the detection limit of the sensors. This study describes the classification of nanomaterials in molecularly imprinted polymers, their analytical properties, and their applications in the electrochemical sensors. The progress of the research on nanomaterials in molecularly imprinted polymers and the application of nanomaterials in molecularly imprinted polymers is also reviewed.

  13. Capacitive Biosensors and Molecularly Imprinted Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, Gizem; Mattiasson, Bo

    2017-02-17

    Capacitive biosensors belong to the group of affinity biosensors that operate by registering direct binding between the sensor surface and the target molecule. This type of biosensors measures the changes in dielectric properties and/or thickness of the dielectric layer at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Capacitive biosensors have so far been successfully used for detection of proteins, nucleotides, heavy metals, saccharides, small organic molecules and microbial cells. In recent years, the microcontact imprinting method has been used to create very sensitive and selective biorecognition cavities on surfaces of capacitive electrodes. This chapter summarizes the principle and different applications of capacitive biosensors with an emphasis on microcontact imprinting method with its recent capacitive biosensor applications.

  14. Selection of imprinted nanoparticles by affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, António R; Chianella, Iva; Piletska, Elena; Whitcombe, Michael J; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2009-04-15

    Soluble molecularly imprinted nanoparticles were synthesised via iniferter initiated polymerisation and separated by size via gel permeation chromatography. Subsequent fractionation of these particles by affinity chromatography allowed the separation of high affinity fractions from the mixture of nanoparticles. Fractions selected this way possess affinity similar to that of natural antibodies (K(d) 6.6x10(-8)) M and were also able to discriminate between related functional analogues of the template.

  15. IMPRINT Analysis of an Unmanned Air System Geospatial Information Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunn, Bruce P; Schweitzer, Kristin M; Cahir, John A; Finch, Mary M

    2008-01-01

    ... intelligence, geospatial analysis cell. The Improved Performance Research Integration Tool (IMPRINT) modeling program was used to understand this process and to assess crew workload during several test scenarios...

  16. Synthesis of a Molecularly Imprinted Polymer for Dioxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Brattoli

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A molecularly imprinted polymer for recognising selectively 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD was made by a new non-covalent method employing a“dummy” template. The proposed way represents a simplification of a synthetic schemeproposed by Lübke et al.[1] for covalent imprinting. Comparison of extraction yields of thenovel polymer, a non imprinted polymer and an imprinting polymer, prepared by theoriginal procedure demonstrates the binding capacity of the proposed polymer, which is inprinciple applicable to solid phase extraction (SPE of dioxin.

  17. Role of imprint/exfoliative cytology in ulcerated skin neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Babu, Ravindra; Pai, Dinker; Verma, Surendra Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Imprint cytology is a method of studying cells by taking an imprint from the cut surface of a wedge biopsy specimen or from the resected margins of a surgical specimen. It is rapid, simple and fairly accurate. Exfoliative cytology is an offshoot from the imprint cytology where in cells obtained from the surface of ulcers, either by scrape or brush, are analyzed for the presence of malignant cells. We undertook this study to see the role of imprint/exfoliative cytology in the diagnosis of ulcerated skin neoplasm and to check the adequacy of resected margins intra-operatively. This was a prospective investigative study conducted from September 2003 to July 2005. All patients presenting to surgical clinic with ulcerated skin and soft tissue tumours were included in the study. A wedge biopsy obtained from the ulcer and imprint smears were taken from the cut surface. Exfoliative cytology was analyzed from the surface smears. Wedge biopsy specimen was sent for histopathological (HPE) examination. The cytology and HPE were analyzed by a separate pathologist. Imprint cytology was also used to check the adequacy of resected margins in case of wide excision. This was compared with final HPE. Total of 107 patients was included in the present study and 474 imprint smears were done, with an average of 4.43 slides per lesion. Out of 59 wide excision samples, 132 imprint smears were prepared for assessing resected margins accounting for an average of 2.24 slides per each excised lesion. On combining imprint cytology with exfoliative cytology the overall sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value were 90.38 %, 100 % and 90.38 % respectively. Only one out of 59 cases had a positive resected margin which was not picked by imprint cytology. Imprint cytology can be used for rapid and accurate diagnosis of various skin malignancies. It can also be used to check the adequacy of the resected margin intraoperatively.

  18. Synthesis of L-lysine imprinted cryogels for immunoglobulin G adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çulha, Senem; Armutcu, Canan; Uzun, Lokman; Şenel, Serap, E-mail: senel@hacettepe.edu.tr; Denizli, Adil

    2015-07-01

    L-Lysine imprinted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-N-methacryloyl-L-aspartic acid) [P(HEMA-co-MAAsp)] cryogels were synthesized and characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurements, swelling, and squeezing tests. Specific surface area for imprinted cryogel was 34.2 m{sup 2}/g while the value was 21.3 m{sup 2}/g for non-imprinted cryogel. IgG adsorption from aqueous solution was examined in continuous mode examining the factors effecting adsorption capacity such as pH, concentration, flow rate, temperature, ionic strength, and incubation time. 0.5 M NaCl was used as desorption agent. The IgG adsorption capacity was determined as 55.1 mg/g for 1.0 mg/mL IgG original concentration at 25.0 °C while pH and flow rate were 7.0 and 0.5 mL/min, respectively. When human serum was used as IgG source, the removal of 90.4% of crude IgG was attained for 1/20 diluted plasma sample. The imprinted cryogel was used in ten successive cycles without significant loss in adsorption capacity. The cryogel was determined to be 1.79 times more selective to IgG than albumin and 1.45 times more selective than hemoglobin. The adsorption behavior well suited to Langmuir isotherm and the kinetics followed pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° for this adsorption process were also calculated. - Highlights: • L-Lysine imprinted cryogels through epitope imprinting approach • Optimization of recognition conditions for template (L-lysine) and target (IgG) biomolecules • Efficient reusability (upto 10 cycles) without any significant change in capacity • A great potential for specific and selective IgG purification • Promising, cost-friendly, specific and selective adsorbent • IgG separation/purification from complex feeding solutions like human serum.

  19. Imprinting alterations in sperm may not significantly influence ART outcomes and imprinting patterns in the cord blood of offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Liu, Zichao; Zhang, Ruopeng; Su, Cunmei; Yang, Wenjuan; Yao, Youlin; Zhao, Shuhua

    2017-01-01

    An increase in imprinting disorders in children conceived though assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) has been the subject of several reports. The transmission of imprinting errors from the sperm of infertile fathers is believed to be a possible reason for the increased occurrence of these disorders. However, whether the imprinting alterations in sperm affect ART outcomes and the imprinting of offspring is unclear. In the current study, we analyzed the methylation of H19, SNRPN and KCNQ1OT1 by pyrosequencing sperm samples from 97 infertile patients and 31 proven fertile males as well as cord blood samples from 13 infantswho were conceived by infertile parents through intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and 30 healthy newborns who were conceived naturally. After four cases were excluded owing to the lack of a sequencing signal, the infertile patients were subgrouped into normal (69 cases) and abnormal (24 cases) imprinting groups according to the reference range set by the control group. Between the groups, there were no significant differences in ART outcomes. Significantly different levels of methylation were detected in H19, but none of the imprinted genes were determined to be outside of the methylation reference range set by the values derived from the naturally conceived controls. Three CpG loci were found to be significantly hypomethylated in the maternally imprinted gene KCNQ1OT1 in two patients from the abnormal imprinting group, none of which were caused by sperm imprinting errors. In addition, the paternal H19 gene exhibited discrepant methylation patterns between the sperm controls and the cord blood controls. Our data suggest that increased imprinting errors in the sperm of infertile patients do not have an obvious influence on ART outcomes or the imprinting of offspring.

  20. Imprinting diseases and IVF: Danish National IVF cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Ojvind; Pinborg, Anja; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of imprinting diseases in children born after IVF with the incidence in naturally conceived children.......The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of imprinting diseases in children born after IVF with the incidence in naturally conceived children....

  1. Characterization of Conserved and Nonconserved Imprinted Genes in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic imprinting results in the silencing of a subset of mammalian alleles due to parent-of-origin inheritance. Due to the nature of their expression patterns they play a critical role in placental and early embryonic development. In order to increase our understanding of imprinted genes specifi...

  2. Synthesis of molecular imprinted beta cyclodextrins oligomers in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Donghong; Nielsen, Anne Louise; Bach, Lone

    2003-01-01

    compounds in aqueous solution and, therefore, molecular imprinting of cyclodextrins polymers in aqueous solution is of great interest. In this paper, molecular imprinting of beta cyclodextrins has been performed in water by use of diiodobenzene as template and epichlorohydrin as a crosslinker. Inclusion...

  3. Mycotoxin analysis using imprinted materials technology: Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular imprinting technology is an attractive, cost effective, and robust alternative to address the limitations of highly selective natural receptors, such as antibodies and aptamers. The field of molecular imprinting has seen a recent surge in growth with several commercially available products...

  4. Imprinting can cause a maladaptive preference for infectious conspecifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jessica F; Reynolds, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Recognizing and associating with specific individuals, such as conspecifics or kin, brings many benefits. One mechanism underlying such recognition is imprinting: the long-term memory of cues encountered during development. Typically, juveniles imprint on cues of nearby individuals and may later associate with phenotypes matching their 'recognition template'. However, phenotype matching could lead to maladaptive social decisions if, for instance, individuals imprint on the cues of conspecifics infected with directly transmitted diseases. To investigate the role of imprinting in the sensory ecology of disease transmission, we exposed juvenile guppies,Poecilia reticulata, to the cues of healthy conspecifics, or to those experiencing disease caused by the directly transmitted parasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli In a dichotomous choice test, adult 'disease-imprinted' guppies preferred to associate with the chemical cues of G. turnbulli-infected conspecifics, whereas 'healthy-imprinted' guppies preferred to associate with cues of uninfected conspecifics. These responses were only observed when stimulus fish were in late infection, suggesting imprinted fish responded to cues of disease, but not of infection alone. We discuss how maladaptive imprinting may promote disease transmission in natural populations of a social host. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. DNA replication: stalling a fork for imprinting and switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast has long been known to be directed by a DNA 'imprint'. This imprint has now been firmly characterized as a protected site-specific and strand-specific nick. New work also links the widely conserved Swi1-Swi3 complex to the protection of stalled replication...

  6. Influence of surface-imprinted nanoparticles on trypsin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, António; Poma, Alessandro; Karim, Kal; Moczko, Ewa; Takarada, Jessica; de Vargas-Sansalvador, Isabel Perez; Turner, Nicholas; Piletska, Elena; de Magalhães, Cristiana Schmidt; Glazova, Natalia; Serkova, Anastasia; Omelianova, Aleksandra; Piletsky, Sergey

    2014-09-01

    Here, the modulation of enzyme activity is presented by protein-imprinted nanoparticles produced using a solid-phase approach. Using trypsin as target, binding of the nanoparticles to the enzyme results in its inhibition or in stabilization, depending on the orientation of the immobilized enzyme used during imprinting. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Electropolymerized Molecularly Imprinted Polypyrrole Film for Sensing of Clofibric Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Bianca; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Young; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric quartz crystals and analogous gold substrates were electrochemically coated with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole films for pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) of clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate. Cyclic voltammetry data obtained during polymerization and deposited weight estimations revealed a decrease of the polymerization rate with increasing clofibric acid concentration. XPS measurements indicated that clofibric acid could be removed after imprinting with an aqueo...

  8. Retrotransposon silencing by DNA methylation can drive mammalian genomic imprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Suzuki

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Among mammals, only eutherians and marsupials are viviparous and have genomic imprinting that leads to parent-of-origin-specific differential gene expression. We used comparative analysis to investigate the origin of genomic imprinting in mammals. PEG10 (paternally expressed 10 is a retrotransposon-derived imprinted gene that has an essential role for the formation of the placenta of the mouse. Here, we show that an orthologue of PEG10 exists in another therian mammal, the marsupial tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii, but not in a prototherian mammal, the egg-laying platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, suggesting its close relationship to the origin of placentation in therian mammals. We have discovered a hitherto missing link of the imprinting mechanism between eutherians and marsupials because tammar PEG10 is the first example of a differentially methylated region (DMR associated with genomic imprinting in marsupials. Surprisingly, the marsupial DMR was strictly limited to the 5' region of PEG10, unlike the eutherian DMR, which covers the promoter regions of both PEG10 and the adjacent imprinted gene SGCE. These results not only demonstrate a common origin of the DMR-associated imprinting mechanism in therian mammals but provide the first demonstration that DMR-associated genomic imprinting in eutherians can originate from the repression of exogenous DNA sequences and/or retrotransposons by DNA methylation.

  9. Fluorescense Anisotropy Studies of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yin-Chu; Wang, Zheming; Yan, Mingdi; Prahl, Scott A.

    2005-08-03

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are used as recognition elements in biochemical sensors. In a fluorescence-based MIP sensor system, it is difficult to distinguish the analyte fluorescence from the background fluorescence of the polymer itself. We studied steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of anthracene imprinted in a polymer (polyurethane) matrix. Vertically polarized excitation light was incident on MIP films coated on silicon wafers; vertically and horizontally polarized emission was measured. We compared the fluorescence anisotropy of MIPs with imprinted molecules, MIPs with the imprinted molecules extracted, MIPs with rebound molecules, and nonimprinted control polymers (without binding cavities). It is shown that differences in fluorescence anisotropy between the polymers and imprinted fluorescent molecules may provide a means to discriminate the fluorescence of analyte from that of the background polymer.

  10. Computational Design of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, Sreenath; Piletsky, Sergey A.

    Artificial receptors have been in use for several decades as sensor elements, in affinity separation, and as models for investigation of molecular recognition. Although there have been numerous publications on the use of molecular modeling in characterization of their affinity and selectivity, very few attempts have been made on the application of molecular modeling in computational design of synthetic receptors. This chapter discusses recent successes in the use of computational design for the development of one particular branch of synthetic receptors - molecularly imprinted polymers.

  11. Genomic imprinting of IGF2 in marsupials is methylation dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imumorin Ikhide

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Parent-specific methylation of specific CpG residues is critical to imprinting in eutherian mammals, but its importance to imprinting in marsupials and, thus, the evolutionary origins of the imprinting mechanism have been the subject of controversy. This has been particularly true for the imprinted Insulin-like Growth Factor II (IGF2, a key regulator of embryonic growth in vertebrates and a focal point of the selective forces leading to genomic imprinting. The presence of the essential imprinting effector, DNMT3L, in marsupial genomes and the demonstration of a differentially methylated region (DMR in the retrotransposon-derived imprinted gene, PEG10, in tammar wallaby argue for a role for methylation in imprinting, but several studies have found no evidence of parent-specific methylation at other imprinted loci in marsupials. Results- We performed the most extensive search to date for allele-specific patterns of CpG methylation within CpG isochores or CpG enriched segments across a 22 kilobase region surrounding the IGF2 gene in the South American opossum Monodelphis domestica. We identified a previously unknown 5'-untranslated exon for opossum IGF2, which is flanked by sequences defining a putative neonatal promoter, a DMR and an active Matrix Attachment Region (MAR. Demethylation of this DMR in opossum neonatal fibroblasts results in abherrant biallelic expression of IGF2. Conclusion- The demonstration of a DMR and an active MAR in the 5' flank of opossum IGF2 mirrors the regulatory features of the 5' flank of Igf2 in mice. However, demethylation induced activation of the maternal allele of IGF2 in opossum differs from the demethylation induced repression of the paternal Igf2 allele in mice. While it can now be concluded that parent-specific DNA methylation is an epigentic mark common to Marsupialia and Eutheria, the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional silencing at imprinted loci have clearly evolved along independent

  12. Functional mapping imprinted quantitative trait loci underlying developmental characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gengxin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting, a phenomenon referring to nonequivalent expression of alleles depending on their parental origins, has been widely observed in nature. It has been shown recently that the epigenetic modification of an imprinted gene can be detected through a genetic mapping approach. Such an approach is developed based on traditional quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping focusing on single trait analysis. Recent studies have shown that most imprinted genes in mammals play an important role in controlling embryonic growth and post-natal development. For a developmental character such as growth, current approach is less efficient in dissecting the dynamic genetic effect of imprinted genes during individual ontology. Results Functional mapping has been emerging as a powerful framework for mapping quantitative trait loci underlying complex traits showing developmental characteristics. To understand the genetic architecture of dynamic imprinted traits, we propose a mapping strategy by integrating the functional mapping approach with genomic imprinting. We demonstrate the approach through mapping imprinted QTL controlling growth trajectories in an inbred F2 population. The statistical behavior of the approach is shown through simulation studies, in which the parameters can be estimated with reasonable precision under different simulation scenarios. The utility of the approach is illustrated through real data analysis in an F2 family derived from LG/J and SM/J mouse stains. Three maternally imprinted QTLs are identified as regulating the growth trajectory of mouse body weight. Conclusion The functional iQTL mapping approach developed here provides a quantitative and testable framework for assessing the interplay between imprinted genes and a developmental process, and will have important implications for elucidating the genetic architecture of imprinted traits.

  13. The Drosophila homolog of the mammalian imprint regulator, CTCF, maintains the maternal genomic imprint in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheva Vanya

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CTCF is a versatile zinc finger DNA-binding protein that functions as a highly conserved epigenetic transcriptional regulator. CTCF is known to act as a chromosomal insulator, bind promoter regions, and facilitate long-range chromatin interactions. In mammals, CTCF is active in the regulatory regions of some genes that exhibit genomic imprinting, acting as insulator on only one parental allele to facilitate parent-specific expression. In Drosophila, CTCF acts as a chromatin insulator and is thought to be actively involved in the global organization of the genome. Results To determine whether CTCF regulates imprinting in Drosophila, we generated CTCF mutant alleles and assayed gene expression from the imprinted Dp(1;fLJ9 mini-X chromosome in the presence of reduced CTCF expression. We observed disruption of the maternal imprint when CTCF levels were reduced, but no effect was observed on the paternal imprint. The effect was restricted to maintenance of the imprint and was specific for the Dp(1;fLJ9 mini-X chromosome. Conclusions CTCF in Drosophila functions in maintaining parent-specific expression from an imprinted domain as it does in mammals. We propose that Drosophila CTCF maintains an insulator boundary on the maternal X chromosome, shielding genes from the imprint-induced silencing that occurs on the paternally inherited X chromosome. See commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/104

  14. Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction of glutathione from urine samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Renyuan; Hu, Xiaoling; Guan, Ping; Li, Ji; Zhao, Na; Wang, Qiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) particles for glutathione were synthesized through iniferter-controlled living radical precipitation polymerization (IRPP) under ultraviolet radiation at ambient temperature. Static adsorption, solid-phase extraction, and high-performance liquid chromatography were carried out to evaluate the adsorption properties and selective recognition characteristics of the polymers for glutathione and its structural analogs. The obtained IRPP-MIP particles exhibited a regularly spherical shape, rapid binding kinetics, high imprinting factor, and high selectivity compared with the MIP particles prepared using traditional free-radical precipitation polymerization. The selective separation and enrichment of glutathione from the mixture of glycyl-glycine and glutathione disulfide could be achieved on the IRPP-MIP cartridge. The recoveries of glutathione, glycyl-glycine, and glutathione disulfide were 95.6% ± 3.65%, 29.5% ± 1.26%, and 49.9% ± 1.71%, respectively. The detection limit (S/N = 3) of glutathione was 0.5 mg·L −1 . The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for 10 replicate detections of 50 mg·L −1 of glutathione were 5.76%, and the linear range of the calibration curve was 0.5 mg·L −1 to 200 mg·L −1 under optimized conditions. The proposed approach was successfully applied to determine glutathione in spiked human urine samples with recoveries of 90.24% to 96.20% and RSDs of 0.48% to 5.67%. - Highlights: • Imprinted polymer particles were prepared by IRPP at ambient temperature. • High imprinting factor, high selectivity, and rapid binding kinetics were achieved. • Selective solid-phase extraction of glutathione from human urine samples

  15. Molecular mechanisms of memory in imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonia, Revaz O; McCabe, Brian J

    2015-03-01

    Converging evidence implicates the intermediate and medial mesopallium (IMM) of the domestic chick forebrain in memory for a visual imprinting stimulus. During and after imprinting training, neuronal responsiveness in the IMM to the familiar stimulus exhibits a distinct temporal profile, suggesting several memory phases. We discuss the temporal progression of learning-related biochemical changes in the IMM, relative to the start of this electrophysiological profile. c-fos gene expression increases <15 min after training onset, followed by a learning-related increase in Fos expression, in neurons immunopositive for GABA, taurine and parvalbumin (not calbindin). Approximately simultaneously or shortly after, there are increases in phosphorylation level of glutamate (AMPA) receptor subunits and in releasable neurotransmitter pools of GABA and taurine. Later, the mean area of spine synapse post-synaptic densities, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor number and phosphorylation level of further synaptic proteins are elevated. After ∼ 15 h, learning-related changes in amounts of several synaptic proteins are observed. The results indicate progression from transient/labile to trophic synaptic modification, culminating in stable recognition memory. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIP for Selective Solid Phase Extraction of Celecoxib in Urine Samples Followed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ansari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, for the analysis of human urine samples, a novel method explained for the determination of celecoxib, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The synthesis of the MIP was performed by precipitation polymerization in methacrylic acid (MAA, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA, chloroform, 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN and celecoxib as the functional monomer, cross-linker monomer, solvent, initiator and target drug, respectively. The celecoxib imprinted polymer was utilized as a specific sorbent for the solid phase extraction (SPE of celecoxib from samples. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP performance was compared with the synthesized non-molecularly imprinted polymer (NIP. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG were used for characterizing the synthesized polymers. Moreover, the MISPE procedure parameters such as pH, eluent solvent flow rate, eluent volume and sorbent mass that probably influence the extraction process have been optimized to achieve the highest celecoxib extraction efficiency. The relative standard deviation (RSD %, recovery percent, limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ of this proposed method were 1.12%, 96%, 8 µg L-1 and 26.7 µg L-1, respectively. The proposed MISPE-HPLC-UV method can be used for the separation and enrichment of trace amounts of celecoxib in human urine and biological samples.

  17. Neuronal plasticity and multisensory integration in filial imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Stephen Michael; McCabe, Brian John

    2011-03-10

    Many organisms sample their environment through multiple sensory systems and the integration of multisensory information enhances learning. However, the mechanisms underlying multisensory memory formation and their similarity to unisensory mechanisms remain unclear. Filial imprinting is one example in which experience is multisensory, and the mechanisms of unisensory neuronal plasticity are well established. We investigated the storage of audiovisual information through experience by comparing the activity of neurons in the intermediate and medial mesopallium of imprinted and naïve domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) in response to an audiovisual imprinting stimulus and novel object and their auditory and visual components. We find that imprinting enhanced the mean response magnitude of neurons to unisensory but not multisensory stimuli. Furthermore, imprinting enhanced responses to incongruent audiovisual stimuli comprised of mismatched auditory and visual components. Our results suggest that the effects of imprinting on the unisensory and multisensory responsiveness of IMM neurons differ and that IMM neurons may function to detect unexpected deviations from the audiovisual imprinting stimulus.

  18. Neuronal Plasticity and Multisensory Integration in Filial Imprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Stephen Michael; McCabe, Brian John

    2011-01-01

    Many organisms sample their environment through multiple sensory systems and the integration of multisensory information enhances learning. However, the mechanisms underlying multisensory memory formation and their similarity to unisensory mechanisms remain unclear. Filial imprinting is one example in which experience is multisensory, and the mechanisms of unisensory neuronal plasticity are well established. We investigated the storage of audiovisual information through experience by comparing the activity of neurons in the intermediate and medial mesopallium of imprinted and naïve domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) in response to an audiovisual imprinting stimulus and novel object and their auditory and visual components. We find that imprinting enhanced the mean response magnitude of neurons to unisensory but not multisensory stimuli. Furthermore, imprinting enhanced responses to incongruent audiovisual stimuli comprised of mismatched auditory and visual components. Our results suggest that the effects of imprinting on the unisensory and multisensory responsiveness of IMM neurons differ and that IMM neurons may function to detect unexpected deviations from the audiovisual imprinting stimulus. PMID:21423770

  19. A sol-gel based molecular imprint incorporating carbon dots for fluorometric determination of nicotinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Pengli; Gao, Junfa; Liu, Jianha; Zhao, Mingming; Zhao, Jiahong; Peng, Jun; Zuo, Pengjian; He, Hua

    2016-01-01

    We are introducing functionalized carbon dots (C-dots) coated with a shell of molecularly imprinted sol-gel as a new tool in molecular imprint-based detection. Specifically, an imprint recognizing nicotinic acid (NA) was prepared in two steps. The first involves pyrolytic decomposition of citric acid in the presence of aminopropyltriethoxysilane to yield triethoxysilyl-modified C-dots with a typical size of 2.8 ± 1.1 nm. These are then polycondensed in the presence of tetraethoxysilane and NA at room temperature to give spherical silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) with a typical size of ∼300 nm and containing C-dots and NA in the silica matrix. NA was then removed by extraction. The resulting SiNPs are well permeable to NA, photostable, display strong blue luminescence and can bind NA fairly selectively. The fluorometric detection scheme is based on the finding that increasing concentrations of NA quench the fluorescence of the C-dots in the SiNPs. NA can be determined by this method in the 0.5 to 10.5 μM concentration range, with a 12.6 nM detection limit. The composite was successfully utilized as a fluorescent probe for the determination of NA in spiked human urine samples. The method is believed to have a wider scope in being applicable to other analytes that are capable of quenching the fluorescence of C-dots. (author)

  20. Fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer based on Navicula sp. frustules for optical detection of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Guat Wei; Lim, Jit Kang; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Chan, Derek Juinn Chieh

    2016-03-01

    The direct correlation between disease and lysozyme (LYZ) levels in human body fluids makes the sensitive and convenient detection of LYZ the focus of scientific research. Fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer has emerged as a new alternative for LYZ detection in order to resolve the limitation of immunoassays, which are expensive, unstable, require complex preparation, and are time consuming. In this study, a novel fluorescence molecularly imprinted polymer based on Navicula sp. frustules (FITC-MIP) has been synthesized via post-imprinting treatment for LYZ detection. Navicula sp. frustules were used as supported material because of their unique properties of moderate surface area, reproducibility, and biocompatibility, to address the drawbacks of nanoparticle core material with low adsorption capacity. The FITC acts as recognition signal and optical readout, whereas MIP provides LYZ selectivity. The synthesized FITC-MIP showed a response time as short as 5 min depending on the concentration of LYZ. It is found that the LYZ template can significantly quench the fluorescence intensity of FITC-MIP linearly within a concentration range of 0 to 0.025 mg mL(-1), which is well described by Stern-Volmer equation. The FITC-MIP can selectively and sensitively detect down to 0.0015 mg mL(-1) of LYZ concentration. The excellent sensing performance of FITC-MIP suggests that FITC-MIP is a potential biosensor in clinical diagnosis applications.

  1. Preparation and application of epitope magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers for enrichment of sulfonamide antibiotics in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufeng; Wang, Cheng; Li, Xiangdao; Liu, Lifen

    2017-10-01

    Sulfonamides, which are widely used synthetic antibiotics, are hydrophilic and stable. They can easily migrate into the environment and aquatic animals, and increase the risk of cancer, drug resistance, and allergic symptoms if consumed by humans. Here, we developed an epitope magnetic imprinting approach to enrich multiple sulfonamide antibiotics from a water sample. Epitope magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (EMMIPs) were prepared by free-radical polymerization using vinyl-functioned Fe 3 O 4 as a core, sulfanilamide (SA) as a dummy template, methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker. The performance of the EMMIPs was first evaluated by rebinding SA, and then an adsorption experiment was conducted to assess the extraction of multiple sulfonamide antibiotics containing the SA group. The binding experiments showed that the EMMIPs reached adsorption equilibrium in only 5 min with adsorption of SA at 2040 μg/g, compared with just 462 μg/g for the epitope magnetic non-imprinted polymers. EMMIPs were combined with HPLC for the detection of six sulfonamide antibiotics in surface water samples. The recoveries ranged from 79.3 to 92.4% and the relative standard deviations from 0.9 to 7.3%. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Molecular imprinting-chemiluminescence determination of trimethoprim using trimethoprim-imprinted polymer as recognition material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunhua; Lu, Jiuru; Liu, Mei; Du, Jianxiu

    2005-07-01

    A new molecular imprinting-chemiluminescence method for the determination of trimethoprim was developed, in which trimethoprim-imprinted polymer was used as the molecular recognition material and the CL reaction of trimethoprim with potassium permanganate in acidic medium was used as the detection system. The CL intensity responds linearly to the concentration of trimethoprim within the 5.0 x 10(-8)-5.0 x 10(-6) g mL(-1) range (r= 0.9983) with a detection limit of 2 x 10(-8) g mL(-1). The relative standard deviation for the determination of 1.0 x 10(-7) g mL(-1) trimethoprim solutions is 4.8% (n= 9). The method has been applied to the determination of trimethoprim in pharmaceutical preparations and body fluids, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  3. Targeted deletion of the Nesp55 DMR defines another Gnas imprinting control region and provides a mouse model of autosomal dominant PHP-Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Leopold F; Mrakovcic, Maria; Steinborn, Ralf; Chung, Ung-Il; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-05-18

    Approximately 100 genes undergo genomic imprinting. Mutations in fewer than 10 imprinted genetic loci, including GNAS, are associated with complex human diseases that differ phenotypically based on the parent transmitting the mutation. Besides the ubiquitously expressed Gsalpha, which is of broad biological importance, GNAS gives rise to an antisense transcript and to several Gsalpha variants that are transcribed from the nonmethylated parental allele. We previously identified two almost identical GNAS microdeletions extending from exon NESP55 to antisense (AS) exon 3 (delNESP55/delAS3-4). When inherited maternally, both deletions are associated with erasure of all maternal GNAS methylation imprints and autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib, a disorder characterized by parathyroid hormone-resistant hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. As for other imprinting disorders, the mechanisms resulting in abnormal GNAS methylation are largely unknown, in part because of a paucity of suitable animal models. We now showed in mice that deletion of the region equivalent to delNESP55/delAS3-4 on the paternal allele (DeltaNesp55(p)) leads to healthy animals without Gnas methylation changes. In contrast, mice carrying the deletion on the maternal allele (DeltaNesp55(m)) showed loss of all maternal Gnas methylation imprints, leading in kidney to increased 1A transcription and decreased Gsalpha mRNA levels, and to associated hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Besides representing a murine autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib model and one of only few animal models for imprinted human disorders, our findings suggest that the Nesp55 differentially methylated region is an additional principal imprinting control region, which directs Gnas methylation and thereby affects expression of all maternal Gnas-derived transcripts.

  4. The imprinted SNRPN gene is associated with a polycistronic mRNA and an imprinting control element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, S.; Nicholls, R.D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Seip, J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated protein SmN (SNRPN) gene is located in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) critical region in chromosome 15q11-q13. We have previously shown that it is functionally imprinted in humans, being only expressed from the paternal allele and differentially methylated on parental alleles. Therefore, SNRPN may have a role in PWS, although genetic studies suggest that at least two genes may be necessary for the classical PWS phenotype. We have characterized the SNRPN genomic structure, and shown that it comprises ten exons. Surprisingly, we identified an open reading frame (ORF) in the first three exons, 190-bp 5{prime} to the SmN ORF. Notably, the majority of base substitutions bewteen human and rodents in the upstream ORF occurred in the wobble position of codons, suggesting selection for a protein coding function. This ORF, which we name SNURF (SNRPN upstream reading frame) encodes a putative polypeptide of 71 amino acids. By analogy to prokaryotic operons that encode proteins with related functions, it is possible that SNURF may have a role in pre-mRNA splicing.

  5. Dilatonic imprints on exact gravitational wave signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Fiona; KubizÅák, David; Mann, Robert B.

    2018-05-01

    By employing the moduli space approximation, we analytically calculate the gravitational wave signatures emitted upon the merger of two extremally charged dilatonic black holes. We probe several values of the dilatonic coupling constant a , and find significant departures from the Einstein-Maxwell (a =0 ) counterpart studied in [Phys. Rev. D 96, 061501 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.96.061501]. For (low-energy) string theory black holes (a =1 ) there are no coalescence orbits and only a memory effect is observed, whereas for an intermediate value of the coupling (a =1 /√{3 } ) the late-time merger signature becomes exponentially suppressed, compared to the polynomial decay in the a =0 case without a dilaton. Such an imprint shows a clear difference between the case with and without a scalar field (as, for example, predicted by string theory) in black hole mergers.

  6. Imprinted ZnO nanostructure-based electrochemical sensing of calcitonin: A clinical marker for medullary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, Santanu; Roy, Ekta; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular imprinting-based sensor for medullary thyroid carcinoma marker was developed. • ZnO nanostructure was used as a platform for synthesis of imprinted polymer. • Imprinted polymer was prepared by ARGET–ATRP method. • A novel and biocompatible tyrosine amino acid derivative was used as monomer. • Linear working range is found from 9.99 ng L −1 to 7.919 mg L −1 with LOD 3.09 ng L −1 . - Abstract: The present work describes an exciting method for the selective and sensitive determination of calcitonin in human blood serum samples. Adopting the surface molecular imprinting technique, a calcitonin-imprinted polymer was prepared on the surface of the zinc oxide nanostructure. Firstly, a biocompatible tyrosine derivative as a monomer was grafted onto the surface of zinc oxide nanostructure followed by their polymerization on vinyl functionalized electrode surface by activator regenerated by electron transfer–atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET–ATRP) technique. Such sensor can predict the small change in the concentration of calcitonin in the human body and it may also consider to be as cost-effective, renewable, disposable, and reliable for clinical studies having no such cross-reactivity and matrix effect from real samples. The morphologies and properties of the proposed sensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, difference pulse voltammetry and chronocoulometry. The linear working range was found to be 9.99 ng L −1 to 7.919 mg L −1 and the detection limit as low as 3.09 ± 0.01 ng L −1 (standard deviation for three replicate measurements) (S/N = 3)

  7. Deletions of a differentially methylated CpG island at SNRPN define a putative imprinting control region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutcliffe, J.S.,; Nakao, M.; Beaudet, A.L. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are associated with paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, of gene expression within human chromosome 15q11-q13, and are caused by deletion, uniparental disomy, or other mutations. Four transcripts designated PAR-5, PAR-7, PAR-1 and PAR-4 were isolated and localized to a region within 300 kb telomeric to the gene encoding small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N (SNRPN). Analysis of the transcripts in cultured fibroblasts and lymphoblasts from deletion patients demonstrated that SNRPN, PAR-5 and PAR-1 are expressed exclusively from the paternal chromosome, defining an imprinted domain that spans at least 200 kb. All three imprinted transcripts were absent in cells from three PWS patients (one pair of sibs and one sporadic case) with small deletions that involve a differentially methylated CpG island containing a previously undescribed 5{prime} untranslated exon ({alpha}) of SNRPN. Methylation of the CpG island is specific for the maternal chromosome consistent with paternal expression of the imprinted domain. One deletion, which is benign when maternally transmitted, extends upstream <30 kb from the CpG island, and is associated with altered methylation centromeric to SNRPN, and loss of transcription telomeric to SNRPN, implying the presence of an imprinting control region around the CpG island containing exon {alpha}.

  8. Dimensional characterization of biperiodic imprinted structures using optical scatterometry

    KAUST Repository

    Gereige, Issam; Pietroy, David; Eid, Jessica; Gourgon, Cé cile

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the characterization of biperiodic imprinted structures using a non-destructive optical technique commonly called scatterometry. The nanostructures consist of periodic arrays of square and circular dots which were

  9. Evidence for a Peripheral Olfactory Memory in Imprinted Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Gabrielle A.; Dittman, Andrew H.; Quinn, Thomas P.; Moody, William J., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    The remarkable homing ability of salmon relies on olfactory cues, but its cellular basis is unknown. To test the role of peripheral olfactory receptors in odorant memory retention, we imprinted coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to micromolar concentrations of phenyl ethyl alcohol during parr-smolt transformation. The following year, we measured phenyl ethyl alcohol responses in the peripheral receptor cells using patch clamp. Cells from imprinted fish showed increased sensitivity to phenyl ethyl alcohol compared either to cells from naive fish or to sensitivity to another behaviorally important odorant (L-serine). Field experiments verified an increased behavioral preference for phenyl ethyl alcohol by imprinted salmon as adults. Thus, some component of the imprinted olfactory homestream memory appears to be retained peripherally.

  10. [Evolution of genomic imprinting in mammals: what a zoo!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudhon, Charlotte; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2010-05-01

    Genomic imprinting imposes an obligate mode of biparental reproduction in mammals. This phenomenon results from the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. This specific gene regulation mechanism affects viviparous mammals, especially eutherians, but also marsupials to a lesser extent. Oviparous mammals, or monotremes, do not seem to demonstrate monoparental allele expression. This phylogenic confinement suggests that the evolution of the placenta imposed a selective pressure for the emergence of genomic imprinting. This physiological argument is now complemented by recent genomic evidence facilitated by the sequencing of the platypus genome, a rare modern day case of a monotreme. Analysis of the platypus genome in comparison to eutherian genomes shows a chronological and functional coincidence between the appearance of genomic imprinting and transposable element accumulation. The systematic comparative analyses of genomic sequences in different species is essential for the further understanding of genomic imprinting emergence and divergent evolution along mammalian speciation.

  11. Olefin Metathesis in Peptidomimetics, Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry, and Molecular Imprinting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Low, Tammy K

    2006-01-01

    .... Our research goals consisted of employing olefin metathesis in the synthesis of peptidomimetics, and studying the feasibility of this method in dynamic combinatorial chemistry and molecular imprinting of nerve agents...

  12. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Sik Jang

    Full Text Available Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner.

  13. Dimensional characterization of biperiodic imprinted structures using optical scatterometry

    KAUST Repository

    Gereige, Issam

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report on the characterization of biperiodic imprinted structures using a non-destructive optical technique commonly called scatterometry. The nanostructures consist of periodic arrays of square and circular dots which were imprinted in a thermoplastic polymer by thermal nanoimprint lithography. Optical measurements were performed using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the spectral region of 1.5-4 eV. The geometrical profiles of the imprinted structures were reconstructed using the Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) to model the diffraction phenomena by periodic gratings. The technique was also adapted for large scale evaluation of the imprint process. Uniqueness of the solution was examined by analyzing the diffraction of the structure at different experimental conditions, for instance at various angles of incidence. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Eco RI RFLP in the human IGF II gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocozza, S; Garofalo, S; Robledo, R; Monticelli, A; Conti, A; Chiarotti, L; Frunzio, R; Bruni, C B; Varrone, S

    1988-03-25

    The probe was a 500 bp cDNA containing exons 2-3 and 4 of the human IGF II gene. The clone was isolated by screening a human liver cDNA library with synthetic oligonucleotides. Eco RI digestion of genomic DNA and hybridization with the IGF II probe detects a two allele polymorphism with allelic fragments of 13.5 kb and 10.5 kb. The frequency was studied 38 unrelated Caucasians: Human IGF II gene was localized on the short arm of chromosome 11 (p15) by in situ hybridization. Codominant segregation was observed in 2 Caucasian families (10 individuals).

  15. New molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor for determination of ochratoxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi, E-mail: mehmetyola@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sinop University, Sinop (Turkey); Gupta, Vinod Kumar, E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); Atar, Necip [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Pamukkale University, Denizli (Turkey)

    2016-04-01

    In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was presented for determination of ochrattoxin A (OCH). The developed surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. OCH imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 100 mM phenol as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 25 mM OCH. The linearity range and the detection limit of the method were calculated as 5.0 × 10{sup −11} − 1.5 × 10{sup −9} M and 1.6 × 10{sup −11} M, respectively. The voltammetric sensor was applied to grape juice and wine samples with good selectivity and recovery. The stability of the voltammetric sensor was also reported. - Highlights: • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is developed for the sensitive detection of ochratoxin A • The nanomaterial and ochratoxin A-imprinted surfaces were characterized by several methods • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is sensitive and selective in analysis of food • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is preferred to the other methods.

  16. Sensitive determination of citrinin based on molecular imprinted electrochemical sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atar, Necip [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Pamukkale University, Denizli (Turkey); Yola, Mehmet Lütfi, E-mail: mehmetyola@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sinop University, Sinop (Turkey); Eren, Tanju [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Pamukkale University, Denizli (Turkey)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Citrinin-imprinted electrochemical sensor is developed for the sensitive detection of citrinin. • The nanomaterial and citrinin-imprinted surfaces were characterized by several methods. • Citrinin-imprinted electrochemical sensor is sensitive and selective in analysis of food. • Citrinin-imprinted electrochemical sensor is preferred to the other methods. - Abstract: In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was prepared for the determination of citrinin (CIT). The developed surfaces were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. CIT imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 80.0 mM pyrrole as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 20.0 mM CIT. The linearity range and the detection limit of the developed method were calculated as 1.0 × 10{sup −12}–1.0 × 10{sup −10} M and 2.0 × 10{sup −13} M, respectively. In addition, the voltammetric sensor was applied to rye samples. The stability and selectivity of the voltammetric sensor were also reported.

  17. Sensitive determination of citrinin based on molecular imprinted electrochemical sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atar, Necip; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Eren, Tanju

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Citrinin-imprinted electrochemical sensor is developed for the sensitive detection of citrinin. • The nanomaterial and citrinin-imprinted surfaces were characterized by several methods. • Citrinin-imprinted electrochemical sensor is sensitive and selective in analysis of food. • Citrinin-imprinted electrochemical sensor is preferred to the other methods. - Abstract: In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H_3PW_1_2O_4_0, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was prepared for the determination of citrinin (CIT). The developed surfaces were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. CIT imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 80.0 mM pyrrole as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 20.0 mM CIT. The linearity range and the detection limit of the developed method were calculated as 1.0 × 10"−"1"2–1.0 × 10"−"1"0 M and 2.0 × 10"−"1"3 M, respectively. In addition, the voltammetric sensor was applied to rye samples. The stability and selectivity of the voltammetric sensor were also reported.

  18. New molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor for determination of ochratoxin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Atar, Necip

    2016-01-01

    In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H_3PW_1_2O_4_0, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was presented for determination of ochrattoxin A (OCH). The developed surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. OCH imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 100 mM phenol as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 25 mM OCH. The linearity range and the detection limit of the method were calculated as 5.0 × 10"−"1"1 − 1.5 × 10"−"9 M and 1.6 × 10"−"1"1 M, respectively. The voltammetric sensor was applied to grape juice and wine samples with good selectivity and recovery. The stability of the voltammetric sensor was also reported. - Highlights: • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is developed for the sensitive detection of ochratoxin A • The nanomaterial and ochratoxin A-imprinted surfaces were characterized by several methods • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is sensitive and selective in analysis of food • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is preferred to the other methods

  19. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: Novel Discovery for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanashree, Surve; Priyanka, Mohite; Manisha, Karpe; Vilasrao, Kadam

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are novel carriers synthesized by imprinting of a template over a polymer. This paper presents the recent application of MIP for diagnostic and therapeutic drug delivery. MIP owing to their 3D polymeric structures and due to bond formation with the template serves as a reservoir of active causing stimuli sensitive, enantioselective, targetted and/or controlled release. The review elaborates about key factors for optimization of MIP, controlled release by MIP for various administration routes various forms like patches, contact lenses, nanowires along with illustrations. To overcome the limitation of organic solvent usage causing increased cost, water compatible MIP and use of supercritical fluid technology for molecular imprinting were developed. Novel methods for developing water compatible MIP like pickering emulsion polymerization, co-precipitation method, cyclodextrin imprinting, surface grafting, controlled/living radical chain polymerization methods are described with illustration in this review. Various protein imprinting methods like bulk, epitope and surface imprinting are described along with illustrations. Further, application of MIP in microdevices as biomimetic sensing element for personalized therapy is elaborated. Although development and application of MIP in drug delivery is still at its infancy, constant efforts of researchers will lead to a novel intelligent drug delivery with commercial value. Efforts should be directed in developing solid oral dosage forms consisting of MIP for therapeutic protein and peptide delivery and targeted release of potent drugs addressing life threatening disease like cancer. Amalgamation of bio-engineering and pharmaceutical techniques can make these future prospects into reality.

  20. Design of molecular imprinted polymers compatible with aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piletska, Elena V; Guerreiro, Antonio R; Romero-Guerra, Maria; Chianella, Iva; Turner, Anthony P F; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2008-01-21

    The main problem of poor water compatibility of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was addressed in examples describing design of synthetic receptors with high affinity for drugs of abuse. An extensive potentiometric titration of 10 popular functional monomers and corresponding imprinted and blank polymers was conducted in order to evaluate the subtleties of functional groups ionisation under aqueous conditions. It was found that polymers prepared using 2-trifluoromethacrylic acid (TFMAA) in combination with toluene as porogen possess superior properties which make them suitable for effective template recognition in water. The potential impact of phase separation during polymerisation on formation of high quality imprints has been discussed. Three drugs of abuse such as cocaine, deoxyephedrine and methadone were used as template models in polymer preparation for the practical validation of obtained results. The polymer testing showed that synthesized molecularly imprinted polymers have high affinity and selectivity for corresponding templates in aqueous environment, with imprinting factors of 2.6 for cocaine and 1.4 for methadone and deoxyephedrine. Corresponding blank polymers were unable to differentiate between analytes, suggesting that imprinting phenomenon was responsible for the recognition properties.

  1. Electropolymerized molecularly imprinted polypyrrole film for sensing of clofibric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Bianca; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Young Jun; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-02-26

    Piezoelectric quartz crystals and analogous gold substrates were electrochemically coated with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole films for pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) of clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate. Cyclic voltammetry data obtained during polymerization and deposited weight estimations revealed a decrease of the polymerization rate with increasing clofibric acid concentration. XPS measurements indicated that clofibric acid could be removed after imprinting with an aqueous ethanol solution, which was further optimized by using PAD. Zeta potential and contact angle measurements revealed differences between molecularly imprinted (MIP) and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) layers. Binding experiments with clofibric acid and other substances showed a pronounced selectivity of the MIP for clofibric acid vs. carbamazepine, but the response of MIP and NIP to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was higher than that for clofibric acid. A smooth surface, revealed by AFM measurements, with roughness of 6-8 nm for imprinted and non-imprinted layers, might be a reason for an excessively low density of specific binding sites for clofibric acid. Furthermore, the decreased polymerization rate in the presence of clofibric acid might not result in well-defined polymer structures, which could be the reason for the lower sensitivity.

  2. Electropolymerized Molecularly Imprinted Polypyrrole Film for Sensing of Clofibric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Schweiger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric quartz crystals and analogous gold substrates were electrochemically coated with molecularly imprinted polypyrrole films for pulsed amperometric detection (PAD of clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate. Cyclic voltammetry data obtained during polymerization and deposited weight estimations revealed a decrease of the polymerization rate with increasing clofibric acid concentration. XPS measurements indicated that clofibric acid could be removed after imprinting with an aqueous ethanol solution, which was further optimized by using PAD. Zeta potential and contact angle measurements revealed differences between molecularly imprinted (MIP and non-imprinted polymer (NIP layers. Binding experiments with clofibric acid and other substances showed a pronounced selectivity of the MIP for clofibric acid vs. carbamazepine, but the response of MIP and NIP to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was higher than that for clofibric acid. A smooth surface, revealed by AFM measurements, with roughness of 6–8 nm for imprinted and non-imprinted layers, might be a reason for an excessively low density of specific binding sites for clofibric acid. Furthermore, the decreased polymerization rate in the presence of clofibric acid might not result in well-defined polymer structures, which could be the reason for the lower sensitivity.

  3. Dopamine-imprinted monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşır, Süleyman; Sarı, Duygu; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yılmaz, Fatma; Şarkaya, Koray; Denizli, Adil

    2017-11-01

    A dopamine-imprinted monolithic column was prepared and used in capillary electrochromatography as stationary phase for the first time. Dopamine was selectively separated from aqueous solution containing the competitor molecule norepinephrine, which is similar in size and shape to the template molecule. Morphology of the dopamine-imprinted column was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the organic solvent content of mobile phase, applied pressure and pH of the mobile phase on the recognition of dopamine by the imprinted monolithic column has been evaluated, and the imprinting effect in the dopamine-imprinted monolithic polymer was verified. Developed dopamine-imprinted monolithic column resulted in excellent separation of dopamine from structurally related competitor molecule, norepinephrine. Separation was achieved in a short period of 10 min, with the electrophoretic mobility of 5.81 × 10 -5  m 2 V -1 s -1 at pH 5.0 and 500 mbar pressure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Highly selective solid phase extraction and preconcentration of Azathioprine with nano-sized imprinted polymer based on multivariate optimization and its trace determination in biological and pharmaceutical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Rezayati zad, Zeinab; Taheri, Ali Reza; Rahmatian, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    In this research, for first time selective separation and determination of Azathioprine is demonstrated using molecularly imprinted polymer as the solid-phase extraction adsorbent, measured by spectrophotometry at λ max 286 nm. The selective molecularly imprinted polymer was produced using Azathioprine and methacrylic acid as a template molecule and monomer, respectively. A molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction procedure was performed in column for the analyte from pharmaceutical and serum samples. The synthesized polymers were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). In order to investigate the effect of independent variables on the extraction efficiency, the response surface methodology (RSM) based on Box–Behnken design (BBD) was employed. The analytical parameters such as precision, accuracy and linear working range were also determined in optimal experimental conditions and the proposed method was applied to analysis of Azathioprine. The linear dynamic range and limits of detection were 2.5–0.01 and 0.008 mg L ‐1 respectively. The recoveries for analyte were higher than 95% and relative standard deviation values were found to be in the range of 0.83–4.15%. This method was successfully applied for the determination of Azathioprine in biological and pharmaceutical samples. - Graphical abstract: A new-nano sized imprinted polymer was synthesized and applied as sorbent in SPE in order to selective recognition, preconcentration, and determination of Azathioprine with the response surface methodology based on Box–Behnken design and was successfully investigated for the clean-up of human blood serum and pharmaceutical samples. - Highlights: • The nanosized-imprinted polymer has been synthesized by precipitation polymerization technique. • A molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction procedure was performed for determination of Azathioprine. • The Azathioprine-molecular imprinting

  5. Generation of Five Human Lactoferrin Transgenic Cloned Goats Using Fibroblast Cells and Their Methylation Status of Putative Differential Methylation Regions of IGF2R and H19 Imprinted Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, L.; Wan, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Song, Y.; Wang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Background - Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising technique to produce transgenic cloned mammalian, including transgenic goats which may produce Human Lactoferrin (hLF). However, success percentage of SCNT is low, because of gestational and neonatal failure of transgenic embryos.

  6. Cell and Tissue Imaging with Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Maria; Kunath, Stephanie; Haupt, Karsten; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette

    2017-01-01

    Advanced tools for cell imaging are of particular interest as they can detect, localize and quantify molecular targets like abnormal glycosylation sites that are biomarkers of cancer and infection. Targeting these biomarkers is often challenging due to a lack of receptor materials. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are promising artificial receptors; they can be tailored to bind targets specifically, be labeled easily, and are physically and chemically stable. Herein, we demonstrate the application of MIPs as artificial antibodies for selective labeling and imaging of cellular targets, on the example of hyaluronan and sialylation moieties on fixated human skin cells and tissues. Thus, fluorescently labeled MIP nanoparticles templated with glucuronic acid (MIPGlcA) and N-acetylneuraminic acid (MIPNANA) are respectively applied. Two different fluorescent probes are used: (1) MIPGlcA particles, ~400 nm in size are labeled with the dye rhodamine that target the extracellular hyaluronan on cells and tissue specimens and (2) MIP-coated InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) of two different colors, ~125 nm in size that target the extracellular and intracellular hyaluronan and sialylation sites. Green and red emitting QDs are functionalized with MIPGlcA and MIPNANA respectively, enabling multiplexed cell imaging. This is a general approach that can also be adapted to other target molecules on and in cells.

  7. Prenatal molecular testing for Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Brioude, Frédéric; Russo, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes (BWS/SRS) are two imprinting disorders (IDs) associated with disturbances of the 11p15.5 chromosomal region. In BWS, epimutations and genomic alterations within 11p15.5 are observed in >70% of patients, whereas in SRS they are observed in about 60% ......, the consequences for prenatal genetic testing and counseling and our cumulative experience in dealing with these disorders.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 28 October 2015; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2015.224....

  8. Distinguishing epigenetic marks of developmental and imprinting regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McEwen Kirsten R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The field of epigenetics is developing rapidly, however we are only beginning to comprehend the complexity of its influence on gene regulation. Using genomic imprinting as a model we examine epigenetic profiles associated with different forms of gene regulation. Imprinting refers to the expression of a gene from only one of the chromosome homologues in a parental-origin-specific manner. This is dependent on heritable germline epigenetic control at a cis-acting imprinting control region that influences local epigenetic states. Epigenetic modifications associated with imprinting regulation can be compared to those associated with the more canonical developmental regulation, important for processes such as differentiation and tissue specificity. Here we test the hypothesis that these two mechanisms are associated with different histone modification enrichment patterns. Results Using high-throughput data extraction with subsequent analysis, we have found that particular histone modifications are more likely to be associated with either imprinting repression or developmental repression of imprinted genes. H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 are together enriched at imprinted genes with differentially methylated promoters and do not show a correlation with developmental regulation. H3K27me3 and H3K4me3, however, are more often associated with developmental regulation. We find that imprinted genes are subject to developmental regulation through bivalency with H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 enrichment on the same allele. Furthermore, a specific tri-mark signature comprising H3K4me3, H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 has been identified at all imprinting control regions. Conclusion A large amount of data is produced from whole-genome expression and epigenetic profiling studies of cellular material. We have shown that such publicly available data can be mined and analysed in order to generate novel findings for categories of genes or regulatory elements. Comparing two

  9. The loss of imprinted DNA methylation in mouse blastocysts is inflicted to a similar extent by in vitro follicle culture and ovulation induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz-de-Juano, M D; Billooye, K; Smitz, J; Anckaert, E

    2016-06-01

    Does in vitro follicle culture (IFC) have an effect on maintenance of imprinted DNA methylation in preimplantation mouse embryos? We report similar alterations in the methylation pattern of H19 imprinted maternally expressed transcript (H19), small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (Snrpn) and mesoderm specific transcript (Mest) imprinted genes in mouse blastocysts obtained after ovulation induction and IFC. Furthermore, we observed no differences in the gene expression of maternal effect proteins related with imprinting maintenance between superovulated in vivo grown or IFC oocytes. Assisted reproductive technology is associated with adverse post-natal outcomes such as increased risk of premature birth, altered birthweight, congenital anomalies and genomic imprinting syndromes in human and in animal models. Previous studies have shown that ovulation induction allowed normal imprinting establishment in mouse oocytes, but interfered with imprinting maintenance during preimplantation . Normal imprinting establishment was also observed in mouse oocytes derived from a standardized IFC from the early pre-antral follicle stage. The methylation profiles of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of three key imprinted genes (H19, Snrpn and Mest) were compared at hatched blastocyst stage between embryos obtained from IFC or superovulated oocytes, each subjected to IVF and preimplantation in vitro culture (IVC); in non-manipulated in vivo produced late blastocyst (control) and in in vivo produced 2-cell embryos that were in vitro cultured until the hatched blastocyst stage (to assess the effect of IVC). Two different mice strains (Mus musculus C57BL/6J X CBA/Ca and Mus musculus B6 (CAST7)) were used to discriminate between maternal and paternal alleles of imprinted genes. Additionally, a limiting-dilution bisulfite-sequencing technique was carried out on individual embryos in order to avoid amplification bias. To assess whether IFC and ovulation induction

  10. Parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E Jullien

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals and in plants, parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates embryo growth and might be involved in reproductive isolation between emerging new species. Increased dosage of maternal genomes represses growth while an increased dosage of paternal genomes has the opposite effect. These observations led to the discovery of imprinted genes, which are expressed by a single parental allele. It was further proposed in the frame of the parental conflict theory that parental genome imbalances are directly mirrored by antagonistic regulations of imprinted genes encoding maternal growth inhibitors and paternal growth enhancers. However these hypotheses were never tested directly. Here, we investigated the effect of parental genome imbalance on the expression of Arabidopsis imprinted genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2 and FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA controlled by DNA methylation, and MEDEA (MEA and PHERES1 (PHE1 controlled by histone methylation. Genome dosage imbalance deregulated the expression of FIS2 and PHE1 in an antagonistic manner. In addition increased dosage of inactive alleles caused a loss of imprinting of FIS2 and MEA. Although FIS2 controls histone methylation, which represses MEA and PHE1 expression, the changes of PHE1 and MEA expression could not be fully accounted for by the corresponding fluctuations of FIS2 expression. Our results show that parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting using mechanisms, which are independent from known regulators of imprinting. The complexity of the network of regulations between expressed and silenced alleles of imprinted genes activated in response to parental dosage imbalance does not support simple models derived from the parental conflict hypothesis.

  11. Deregulation of an imprinted gene network in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribarska, Teodora; Goering, Wolfgang; Droop, Johanna; Bastian, Klaus-Marius; Ingenwerth, Marc; Schulz, Wolfgang A

    2014-05-01

    Multiple epigenetic alterations contribute to prostate cancer progression by deregulating gene expression. Epigenetic mechanisms, especially differential DNA methylation at imprinting control regions (termed DMRs), normally ensure the exclusive expression of imprinted genes from one specific parental allele. We therefore wondered to which extent imprinted genes become deregulated in prostate cancer and, if so, whether deregulation is due to altered DNA methylation at DMRs. Therefore, we selected presumptive deregulated imprinted genes from a previously conducted in silico analysis and from the literature and analyzed their expression in prostate cancer tissues by qRT-PCR. We found significantly diminished expression of PLAGL1/ZAC1, MEG3, NDN, CDKN1C, IGF2, and H19, while LIT1 was significantly overexpressed. The PPP1R9A gene, which is imprinted in selected tissues only, was strongly overexpressed, but was expressed biallelically in benign and cancerous prostatic tissues. Expression of many of these genes was strongly correlated, suggesting co-regulation, as in an imprinted gene network (IGN) reported in mice. Deregulation of the network genes also correlated with EZH2 and HOXC6 overexpression. Pyrosequencing analysis of all relevant DMRs revealed generally stable DNA methylation between benign and cancerous prostatic tissues, but frequent hypo- and hyper-methylation was observed at the H19 DMR in both benign and cancerous tissues. Re-expression of the ZAC1 transcription factor induced H19, CDKN1C and IGF2, supporting its function as a nodal regulator of the IGN. Our results indicate that a group of imprinted genes are coordinately deregulated in prostate cancers, independently of DNA methylation changes.

  12. Application of molecularly imprinted and non-imprinted polymers for removal of emerging contaminants in water and wastewater treatment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Audrey; Ormeci, Banu

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have reported trace levels of endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products in surface waters, drinking water, and wastewater effluents. There has also been an increased concern about the ecological and human health impact of these contaminants, and their removal from water and wastewater has become a priority. Traditional treatment processes are limited in their ability to remove emerging contaminants from water, and there is a need for new technologies that are effective and feasible. This paper presents a review on recent research results on molecularly imprinted (MIP) and non-imprinted (NIP) polymers and evaluates their potential as a treatment method for the removal of emerging contaminants from water and wastewater. It also discusses the relative benefits and limitations of using MIP or NIP for water and wastewater treatment. MIP, and in particular NIP, offer promising applications for wastewater treatment, but their toxicity and possible health effects should be carefully studied before they are considered for drinking water treatment. More research is also required to determine how best to incorporate MIP and NIP in treatment plants.

  13. Molecular scale modeling of polymer imprint nanolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandross, Michael; Grest, Gary S

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of two different nanolithographic processes, step-flash imprint lithography (SFIL), and hot embossing. We insert rigid stamps into an entangled bead-spring polymer melt above the glass transition temperature. After equilibration, the polymer is then hardened in one of two ways, depending on the specific process to be modeled. For SFIL, we cross-link the polymer chains by introducing bonds between neighboring beads. To model hot embossing, we instead cool the melt to below the glass transition temperature. We then study the ability of these methods to retain features by removing the stamps, both with a zero-stress removal process in which stamp atoms are instantaneously deleted from the system as well as a more physical process in which the stamp is pulled from the hardened polymer at fixed velocity. We find that it is necessary to coat the stamp with an antifriction coating to achieve clean removal of the stamp. We further find that a high density of cross-links is necessary for good feature retention in the SFIL process. The hot embossing process results in good feature retention at all length scales studied as long as coated, low surface energy stamps are used.

  14. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mckeown, P.C.; Laouielle-Duprat, S.; Prins, J.C.P.; Wolff, de P.; Schmid, M.W.; Donoghue, M.T.; Fort, A.; Duszynska, D.; Comte, A.; Lao, N.T.; Wennblom, T.J.; Smant, G.; Köhler, C.; Grossniklaus, U.; Spillane, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized

  15. Highly Selective Fluorescent Sensing of Proteins Based on a Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Nanosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescent molecularly imprinted nanosensor was obtained by grafting imprinted polymer onto the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and post-imprinting treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. The fluorescence of lysozyme-imprinted polymer (Lys-MIP was quenched more strongly by Lys than that of nonimprinted polymer (NIP, which indicated that the Lys-MIP could recognize Lys. The resulted imprinted material has the ability to selectively sense a target protein, and an imprinting factor of 3.34 was achieved. The Lys-MIP also showed selective detection for Lys among other proteins such as cytochrome C (Cyt C, hemoglobin (HB and bovine serum albumin (BSA due to the imprinted sites in the Lys-MIP. This approach combines the high selectivity of surface molecular imprinting technology and fluorescence, and converts binding events into detectable signals by monitoring fluorescence spectra. Therefore, it will have further applications for Lys sensing.

  16. Molecularly Imprinted Polypyrrole Based Impedimentric Sensor for Theophylline Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratautaite, Vilma; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Haenen, Ken; Nesládek, Milos; Ramanaviciene, Almira; Baleviciute, Ieva; Ramanavicius, Arunas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Sensor based on polypyrrole imprinted by theophylline (MIP) deposited on oxygen terminated boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond was developed. • This structure was applied as impedimetric sensor sensitive for theophylline. • Optimal polymer formation conditions suitable for MIP formation were elaborated. • Some analytical parameters were determined and evaluated. - Abstract: In this study development of impedimetric sensor based on oxygen terminated boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B:NCD:O) modified with theophylline imprinted polypyrrole is described. Hydrogen peroxide induced chemical formation of polypyrrole molecularly imprinted by theophylline was applied for the modification of conducting silicon substrate covered by B:NCD:O film. Non-imprinted polypyrrole layer was formed on similar substrate in order to prove efficiency of imprinted polypyrrole. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was applied for the evaluation of analyte-induced changes in electrochemical capacitance/resistance. The impact of polymerization duration on the capacitance of impedimetric sensor was estimated. A different impedance behavior was observed at different ratio of polymerized monomer and template molecule in the polymerization media. The influence of ethanol as additive to polymerization media on registered changes in capacitance/resistance was evaluated. Degradation of sensor stored in buffer solution was evaluated

  17. Adsorptive molecularly imprinted composite membranes for chiral separation of phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Nasrullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two types of composite imprinted membranes, i.e., composite membrane comprised of D-Phe imprinted beads and D-Phe imprinted membrane or DCM and composite membrane comprised of L-Phe imprinted beads and L-Phe imprinted membranes or LCM, were synthesized by phase inversion technique after a uniform dispersion of beads within the polymeric solutions using simple physico-mechanical process. The assemblies of the prepared DCM, LCM and control membranes were employed in ultrafiltration for chiral separation of D, L-Phenylalanine racemate solution. DCM and LCM showed an improved adsorption capacity (0.334 mg g-1 and 0.365 mg g-1 respectively, and adsorption selectivity (2.72 and 2.98 respectively. However, the percent rejection of the template and counter enantiomer were lower than that of control membranes. Compared to control membrane, the DCM and LCM showed inverse permselectivity. These composite membranes having better adsorption and separation ability for Phenylalanine racemate solution will be suitable in the future for various other applications.

  18. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported. PMID:25196110

  19. [The lymph nodes imprint for the diagnosis of lymphoid neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche-Alvarado, Carolina; Ramos-Peñafiel, Christian Omar; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Romero-Guadarrama, Mónica; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Rozen-Fuller, Etta; Martínez-Tovar, Adolfo; Collazo-Jaloma, Juan; Mendoza-García, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    lymphoma is the most frequent lymphoid neoplasm in our country. Its diagnosis is based on histopathological findings. The lymph node imprint has been used for more than 40 years. The aim was to establish the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of lymph node imprint and estimate the inter-observer rate. we did an observational, retrospective, prolective study, based on the lymph node imprint obtained by excisional biopsies over a period of 6 years. the inclusion criteria was met on 199 samples, 27.1 % were considered as reactive (n = 54), 16.1 % Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 32), 40.2 % (n = 80) non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 16.6 % (n = 33) as metastatic carcinoma. Comparing with the final histopathology report, the sensitivity and specificity of lymph node imprint were 88 % (0.81-0.95) and 64 % (0.55-0.73) respectively, the positive predictive value was 67 % (0.59-0.76) and the negative predictive value was 86 % (0.79-0.94). The interobserver kappa index was 0.467. the lymph node imprint remains as a useful tool for the diagnosis of lymphoid neoplasm. The agreement between observers was acceptable.

  20. Genomic Imprinting Was Evolutionarily Conserved during Wheat Polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanghui; Liu, Zhenshan; Gao, Lulu; Yu, Kuohai; Feng, Man; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu; Xin, Mingming

    2018-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon that causes genes to be differentially expressed depending on their parent of origin. To evaluate the evolutionary conservation of genomic imprinting and the effects of ploidy on this process, we investigated parent-of-origin-specific gene expression patterns in the endosperm of diploid ( Aegilops spp), tetraploid, and hexaploid wheat ( Triticum spp) at various stages of development via high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. We identified 91, 135, and 146 maternally or paternally expressed genes (MEGs or PEGs, respectively) in diploid, tetraploid, and hexaploid wheat, respectively, 52.7% of which exhibited dynamic expression patterns at different developmental stages. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis suggested that MEGs and PEGs were involved in metabolic processes and DNA-dependent transcription, respectively. Nearly half of the imprinted genes exhibited conserved expression patterns during wheat hexaploidization. In addition, 40% of the homoeolog pairs originating from whole-genome duplication were consistently maternally or paternally biased in the different subgenomes of hexaploid wheat. Furthermore, imprinted expression was found for 41.2% and 50.0% of homolog pairs that evolved by tandem duplication after genome duplication in tetraploid and hexaploid wheat, respectively. These results suggest that genomic imprinting was evolutionarily conserved between closely related Triticum and Aegilops species and in the face of polyploid hybridization between species in these genera. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane based imprinted monolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Xiu; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2015-12-18

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic column with high porosity and good permeability. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), naproxon (template), 4-vinylpyridine, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4). The influence of synthesis parameters on the retention factor and imprinting effect, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest imprinting factor on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was 22, about 10 times higher than that prepared in absence of POSS. The comparisons between MIP monoliths synthesized with POSS and without POSS were made in terms of permeability, column efficiency, surface morphology and pore size distribution. In addition, thermodynamic and Van Deemter analysis were used to evaluate the POSS-based MIP monolith. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantum-dots-encoded-microbeads based molecularly imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yixi; Liu, Le; He, Yonghong; He, Qinghua; Ma, Hui

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots encoded microbeads have various advantages such as large surface area, superb optical properties and the ability of multiplexing. Molecularly imprinted polymer that can mimic the natural recognition entities has high affinity and selectivity for the specific analyte. Here, the concept of utilizing the quantum dots encoded microbeads as the supporting material and the polydopamine as the functional monomer to form the core-shell molecular imprinted polymer was proposed for the first time. The resulted imprinted polymer can provide various merits: polymerization can complete in aqueous environment; fabrication procedure is facile and universal; the obvious economic advantage; the thickness of the imprinting layer is highly controllable; polydopamine coating can improve the biocompatibility of the quantum dot encoded microbeads. The rabbit IgG binding and flow cytometer experiment result showed the distinct advantages of this strategy: cost-saving, facile and fast preparation procedure. Most importantly, the ability for the multichannel detection, which makes the imprinted polydopamine modified encoded-beads very attractive in protein pre-concentration, recognition, separation and biosensing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Algieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  4. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for 5-Fluorouracil Release in Biological Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Alhaique

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the possibility of employing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs as a controlled release device for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU in biological fluids, especially gastrointestinal ones, compared to Non Imprinted Polymers (NIPs. MIPs were synthesized using methacrylic acid (MAA as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA as crosslinking agent. The capacity of the polymer to recognize and to bind the template selectively in both organic and aqueous media was evaluated. An in vitro release study was performed both in gastrointestinal and in plasma simulating fluids. The imprinted polymers bound much more 5-Fu than the corresponding non-imprinted ones and showed a controlled/sustained drug release, with MIPs release rate being indeed much more sustained than that obtained from NIPs. These polymers represent a potential valid system for drug delivery and this study indicates that the selective binding characteristic of molecularly imprinted polymers is promising for the preparation of novel controlled release drug dosage form.

  5. Innovative Design and Performance Evaluation of Bionic Imprinting Toothed Wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Tong, Jin; Stephen, Carr

    2018-01-01

    A highly efficient soil-burrowing dung beetle possesses an intricate outer contour curve on its foreleg end-tooth. This study was carried out based on evidence that this special outer contour curve has the potential of reducing soil penetration resistance and could enhance soil-burrowing efficiency. A toothed wheel is a typical agricultural implement for soil imprinting, to increase its working efficiency; the approach of the bionic geometrical structure was utilized to optimize the innovative shape of imprinting toothed wheel. Characteristics in the dung beetle's foreleg end-tooth were extracted and studied by the edge detection technique. Then, this special outer contour curve was modeled by a nine-order polynomial function and used for the innovative design of imprinting the tooth's cutting edge. Both the conventional and bionic teeth were manufactured, and traction tests in a soil bin were conducted. Taking required draft force and volume of imprinted microbasin as the evaluating indexes, operating efficiency and quality of different toothed wheels were compared and investigated. Results indicate that compared with the conventional toothed wheel, a bionic toothed wheel possesses a better forward resistance reduction property against soil and, meanwhile, can enhance the quality of soil imprinting by increasing the volume of the created micro-basin.

  6. Polymer Catalysts Imprinted with Metal Ions as Biomimics of Metalloenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Czulak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the preparation and properties of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs with catalytic centers that mimic the active sites of metalloenzymes. The MIP synthesis was based on suspension polymerization of functional monomers (4-vinylpyridine and acrylonitrile with trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate as a crosslinker in the presence of transition metal ions and 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol as a template. Four metal ions have been chosen for imprinting from among the microelements that are the most essential in the native enzymes: Cu2+, Co2+, Mn2+, and Zn2+. To prepare catalysts, the required loading of metal ions was obtained during sorption process. The catalysts imprinted with Cu2+, Co2+, and Zn2+ were successfully used for hydroquinone oxidation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The Mn2+-imprinted catalyst showed no activity due to the insufficient metal loading. Cu2+ MIP showed the highest efficiency. In case of Cu- and Co-MIP catalysts, their activity was additionally increased by the use of surface imprinting technique.

  7. Molecular imprinting at walls of silica nanotubes for TNT recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chenggen; Liu, Bianhua; Wang, Zhenyang; Gao, Daming; Guan, Guijian; Zhang, Zhongping

    2008-01-15

    This paper reports the molecular imprinting at the walls of highly uniform silica nanotubes for the recognition of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). It has been demonstrated that TNT templates were efficiently imprinted into the matrix of silica through the strong acid-base pairing interaction between TNT and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS). TNT-imprinted silica nanotubes were synthesized by the gelation reaction between APTS and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), selectively occurring at the porous walls of APTS-modified alumina membranes. The removal of the original TNT templates leaves the imprinted cavities with covalently anchored amine groups at the cavity walls. A high density of recognition sites with molecular selectivity to the TNT analyte was created at the wall of silica nanotubes. Furthermore, most of these recognition sites are situated at the inside and outside surfaces of tubular walls and in the proximity of the two surfaces due to the ultrathin wall thickness of only 15 nm, providing a better site accessibility and lower mass-transfer resistance. Therefore, greater capacity and faster kinetics of uptaking target species were achieved. The silica nanotube reported herein is an ideal form of material for imprinting various organic or biological molecules toward applications in chemical/biological sensors and bioassay.

  8. Determination of fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted SPE clean-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new liquid chromatography method to detect fusaric acid in maize is reported based on molecularly imprinted polymer solid phase extraction clean-up (MISPE) using mimic-templated molecularly-imprinted polymers. Picolinic acid was used as a toxin analog for imprinting polymers during a thermolytic s...

  9. Sexual imprinting: what strategies should we expect to see in nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Dalton W; Griffin, Hayes; Gilman, R Tucker

    2013-12-01

    Sexual imprinting occurs when juveniles learn mate preferences by observing the phenotypes of other members of their populations, and it is ubiquitous in nature. Imprinting strategies, that is which individuals and phenotypes are observed and how strong preferences become, vary among species. Imprinting can affect trait evolution and the probability of speciation, and different imprinting strategies are expected to have different effects. However, little is known about how and why different imprinting strategies evolve, or which strategies we should expect to see in nature. We used a mathematical model to study how the evolution of sexual imprinting depends on (1) imprinting costs and (2) the sex-specific fitness effects of the phenotype on which individuals imprint. We found that even small fixed costs prevent the evolution of sexual imprinting, but small relative costs do not. When imprinting does evolve, we identified the conditions under which females should evolve to imprint on their fathers, their mothers, or on other members of their populations. Our results provide testable hypotheses for empirical work and help to explain the conditions under which sexual imprinting might evolve to promote speciation. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form drug...

  11. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  12. Does genomic imprinting play a role in autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camprubí, Cristina; Monk, David

    2011-01-01

    In the 19th century Gregor Mendel defined the laws of genetic inheritance by crossing different types of peas. From these results arose his principle of equivalence: the gene will have the same behaviour whether it is inherited from the mother or the father. Today, several key exceptions to this principle are known, for example sex-linked traits and genes in the mitochondrial genome, whose inheritance patterns are referred to as 'non mendelian'. A third, important exception in mammals is that of genomic imprinting, where transcripts are expressed in a monoallelic fashion from only the maternal or the paternal chromosome. In this chapter, we discuss how parent-of-origin effects and genomic imprinting may play a role in autoimmunity and speculate how imprinted miRNAs may influence the expression of many target autoimmune associated genes.

  13. Recognition of lysozyme using surface imprinted bacterial cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylan, Yeşeren; Tamahkar, Emel; Denizli, Adil

    2017-11-01

    Here, we developed the lysozyme imprinted bacterial cellulose (Lyz-MIP/BC) nanofibers via the surface imprinting strategy that was designed to recognize lysozyme. This study includes the molecular imprinting method onto the surface of bacterial cellulose nanofibers in the presence of lysozyme by metal ion coordination, as well as further characterizations methods FTIR, SEM and contact angle measurements. The maximum lysozyme adsorption capacity of Lyz-MIP/BC nanofibers was found to be 71 mg/g. The Lyz-MIP/BC nanofibers showed high selectivity for lysozyme towards bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c. Overall, the Lyz-MIP/BC nanofibers hold great potential for lysozyme recognition due to the high binding capacity, significant selectivity and excellent reusability.

  14. Inspection of imprint lithography patterns for semiconductor and patterned media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Douglas J.; Haase, Gaddi; Singh, Lovejeet; Curran, David; Schmid, Gerard M.; Luo, Kang; Brooks, Cindy; Selinidis, Kosta; Fretwell, John; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2010-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the requirements of cost-effective device production. This work summarizes the results of defect inspections of semiconductor masks, wafers and hard disks patterned using Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM). Inspections were performed with optical and e-beam based automated inspection tools. For the semiconductor market, a test mask was designed which included dense features (with half pitches ranging between 32 nm and 48 nm) containing an extensive array of programmed defects. For this work, both e-beam inspection and optical inspection were used to detect both random defects and the programmed defects. Analytical SEMs were then used to review the defects detected by the inspection. Defect trends over the course of many wafers were observed with another test mask using a KLA-T 2132 optical inspection tool. The primary source of defects over 2000 imprints were particle related. For the hard drive market, it is important to understand the defectivity of both the template and the imprinted disk. This work presents a methodology for automated pattern inspection and defect classification for imprint-patterned media. Candela CS20 and 6120 tools from KLA-Tencor map the optical properties of the disk surface, producing highresolution grayscale images of surface reflectivity, scattered light, phase shift, etc. Defects that have been identified in this manner are further characterized according to the morphology

  15. Fast screening of ketamine in biological samples based on molecularly imprinted photonic hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Liang; Meng, Pinjia; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Yanji

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel label-free colorimetric chemosensor: with the increase in the concentration of ketamine, the Bragg diffraction peak of MIPHs gradually shifted to the longer wavelength region. Accompanying the peak shift, the color change of MIPHs was also observed obviously: from green to red. Highlights: ► We developed the label-free colorimetric MIPHs for handy and fast screening of ketamine. ► The obvious color change of MIPHs was observed upon ketamine. ► The MIPHs exhibited good sensing abilities in an aqueous environment. ► The sensing mechanisms of the water-compatible MIPHs were investigated. ► The MIPHs were employed to screening ketamine in real biological samples. -- Abstract: A novel label-free colorimetric chemosensor was developed for handy and fast screening of ketamine with high sensitivity and specificity based on molecularly imprinted photonic hydrogels (MIPHs) that combined the colloidal-crystal with molecular imprinting technique. The unique inverse opal arrays with a thin polymer wall in which the imprinted nanocavities of ketamine moleculars distributed allowed high sensitive, quick responsive, specific detection of the target analyte, and good regenerating ability in an aqueous environment. Due to the hierarchical inverse opal structural characteristics, the specific ketamine molecular recognition process can induce obvious swelling of the MIPHs to be directly transferred into visually perceptible optical signal (change in color) which can be detected by the naked eye through Bragg diffractive shifts of ordered macroporous arrays. In order to enhance the recognition ability in aqueous environments, the MIPHs were designed as water-compatible and synthesized in a water–methanol system. The molecular recognition mechanisms were investigated. The proposed MIPHs were successfully employed to screen trace level ketamine in human urine and saliva samples, exhibiting high sensitivity, rapid response, and specificity in the

  16. Fast screening of ketamine in biological samples based on molecularly imprinted photonic hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Liang [Department of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing (China); Meng, Pinjia, E-mail: mengpinjia@163.com [Department of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing (China); Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Yanji [Department of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing (China)

    2013-04-10

    Graphical abstract: A novel label-free colorimetric chemosensor: with the increase in the concentration of ketamine, the Bragg diffraction peak of MIPHs gradually shifted to the longer wavelength region. Accompanying the peak shift, the color change of MIPHs was also observed obviously: from green to red. Highlights: ► We developed the label-free colorimetric MIPHs for handy and fast screening of ketamine. ► The obvious color change of MIPHs was observed upon ketamine. ► The MIPHs exhibited good sensing abilities in an aqueous environment. ► The sensing mechanisms of the water-compatible MIPHs were investigated. ► The MIPHs were employed to screening ketamine in real biological samples. -- Abstract: A novel label-free colorimetric chemosensor was developed for handy and fast screening of ketamine with high sensitivity and specificity based on molecularly imprinted photonic hydrogels (MIPHs) that combined the colloidal-crystal with molecular imprinting technique. The unique inverse opal arrays with a thin polymer wall in which the imprinted nanocavities of ketamine moleculars distributed allowed high sensitive, quick responsive, specific detection of the target analyte, and good regenerating ability in an aqueous environment. Due to the hierarchical inverse opal structural characteristics, the specific ketamine molecular recognition process can induce obvious swelling of the MIPHs to be directly transferred into visually perceptible optical signal (change in color) which can be detected by the naked eye through Bragg diffractive shifts of ordered macroporous arrays. In order to enhance the recognition ability in aqueous environments, the MIPHs were designed as water-compatible and synthesized in a water–methanol system. The molecular recognition mechanisms were investigated. The proposed MIPHs were successfully employed to screen trace level ketamine in human urine and saliva samples, exhibiting high sensitivity, rapid response, and specificity in the

  17. Fiber-optic array using molecularly imprinted microspheres for antibiotic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Sergio; Benito-Peña, Elena; Walt, David R; Moreno-Bondi, María C

    2015-05-01

    In this article we describe a new class of high-density optical microarrays based on molecularly imprinted microsphere sensors that directly incorporate specific recognition capabilities to detect enrofloxacin (ENRO), an antibiotic widely used for both human and veterinary applications. This approach involves the preparation of highly cross-linked polymer microspheres by thermal precipitation-polymerization in the presence and absence of the target analyte ENRO to generate either molecularly imprinted (MIP) or non-imprinted polymer (NIP) microspheres, respectively. Each polymer type of tailor-made microsphere is fluorescently encoded with either coumarin-30 or tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(ii) dichloride [Ru(dip) 3 ]Cl 2 to enable the microspheres to be distinguished. The new MIP-based sensing platform utilizes an optical fiber bundle containing approximately 50 000 individual 3.1 μm diameter fibers that are chemically etched to create microwells in which MIP and NIP microspheres can be deposited and imaged using an epi-fluorescence microscope. The method enables multiplexed detection by independently addressing both types of beads through their separate light channels. The unique response to the presence of ENRO is manifested on the basis of a competitive immunoassay. A red-fluorescent dye-tagged ENRO, labeled with BODIPY® TR Cadaverine, competes with ENRO for specific binding sites. The developed immuno-like assay displayed a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.04 μM (10% binding inhibition) and a dynamic range of 0.29-21.54 μM (20-80% binding inhibition). The selectivity of the assay was evaluated by measuring the cross-reactivity of other fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, danofloxacin, and flumequine) and non-related antibiotics (penicillin G and doxycycline). This work demonstrates, for the first time, the applicability of MIPs, as an alternative to biomolecule receptors, for the development of multiplexed detection fiber

  18. Urine mercury levels correlate with DNA methylation of imprinting gene H19 in the sperm of reproductive-aged men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxu Lu

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is a well-recognized environmental pollutant known by its toxicity of development and neurotoxicity, which results in adverse health outcomes. However, the mechanisms underlying the teratogenic effects of Hg are not well understood. Imprinting genes are emerging regulators for fetal development subjecting to environmental pollutants impacts. In this study, we examined the association between preconceptional Hg exposure and the alteration of DNA methylation of imprinting genes H19, Meg3, and Peg3 in human sperm DNA.A total of 616 men, aged from 22 to 59, were recruited from Reproductive Medicine Clinic of Maternal and Child Care Service Center and the Urologic Surgery Clinic of Shanxi Academy of Medical Sciences during April 2015 and March 2016. Demographic information was collected through questionnaires. Urine was collected and urinary Hg concentrations were measured using a fully-automatic double-channel hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometer. Methylation of imprinting genes H19, Meg3 and Peg3 of sperm DNA from 242 participants were examined by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Spearman's rank and multivariate regression analysis were used for correlation analysis between sperm DNA methylation status of imprinting genes and urinary Hg levels.The median concentration of Hg for 616 participants was 9.14μg/l (IQR: 5.56-12.52 μg/l; ranging 0.16-71.35μg/l. A total of 42.7% of the participants are beyond normal level for non-occupational exposure according to the criterion of Hg poisoning (≥10 μg/L. Spearman's rank analysis indicated a negative correlation between urinary Hg concentrations and average DNA methylation levels of imprinted genes H19 (rs = -0.346, p <0.05, but there was no such a correlation for Peg3 and Meg3. Further, we analyzed the correlation between methylation level at individual CpG site of H19 and urinary Hg level. The results showed a negative correlation between urinary Hg concentrations and three out of

  19. Preparation and recognition of surface molecularly imprinted core-shell microbeads for protein in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yan; Yan Changling; Gao Shuyan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a surface molecular imprinting technique was reported for preparing core-shell microbeads of protein imprinting, and bovine hemoglobin or bovine serum albumin were used as model proteins for studying the imprinted core-shell microbeads. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) was polymerized onto the surface of polystyrene microbead in the presence of the protein templates to create protein-imprinted core-shell microbeads. The various samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The effect of pH on rebinding of the template hemoglobin, the specific binding and selective recognition were studied for the imprinted microbeads. The results show that the bovine hemoglobin-imprinted core-shell microbeads were successfully created. The shell was a sort of imprinted thin films with porous structure and larger surface areas. The imprinted microbeads have good selectivity for templates and high stability. Due to the recognition sites locating at or closing to the surface, these imprinted microbeads have good property of mass-transport. Unfortunately, the imprint technology was not successfully applied to imprinting bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  20. Differential regulation of genomic imprinting by TET proteins in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lizhi; Mao, Shi-Qing; Ray, Chelsea; Zhang, Yu; Bell, Fong T; Ng, Sheau-Fang; Xu, Guo-Liang; Li, Xiajun

    2015-09-01

    TET proteins have been found to play an important role in active demethylation at CpG sites in mammals. There are some reports implicating their functions in removal of DNA methylation imprint at the imprinted regions in the germline. However, it is not well established whether TET proteins can also be involved in demethylation of DNA methylation imprint in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we report that loss of TET proteins caused a significant increase in DNA methylation at the Igf2-H19 imprinted region in ES cells. We also observed a variable increase in DNA methylation at the Peg1 imprinted region in the ES clones devoid of TET proteins, in particular in the differentiated ES cells. By contrast, we did not observe a significant increase of DNA methylation imprint at the Peg3, Snrpn and Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted regions in ES cells lacking TET proteins. Interestingly, loss of TET proteins did not result in a significant increase of DNA methylation imprint at the Igf2-H19 and Peg1 imprinted regions in the embryoid bodies (EB). Therefore, TET proteins seem to be differentially involved in maintaining DNA methylation imprint at a subset of imprinted regions in ES cells and EBs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation and recognition of surface molecularly imprinted core-shell microbeads for protein in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Yan, E-mail: yanlu2001@sohu.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, 46 Jlanshe Road, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Yan Changling; Gao Shuyan [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, 46 Jlanshe Road, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, a surface molecular imprinting technique was reported for preparing core-shell microbeads of protein imprinting, and bovine hemoglobin or bovine serum albumin were used as model proteins for studying the imprinted core-shell microbeads. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) was polymerized onto the surface of polystyrene microbead in the presence of the protein templates to create protein-imprinted core-shell microbeads. The various samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The effect of pH on rebinding of the template hemoglobin, the specific binding and selective recognition were studied for the imprinted microbeads. The results show that the bovine hemoglobin-imprinted core-shell microbeads were successfully created. The shell was a sort of imprinted thin films with porous structure and larger surface areas. The imprinted microbeads have good selectivity for templates and high stability. Due to the recognition sites locating at or closing to the surface, these imprinted microbeads have good property of mass-transport. Unfortunately, the imprint technology was not successfully applied to imprinting bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  2. Paclitaxel molecularly imprinted polymer-PEG-folate nanoparticles for targeting anticancer delivery: Characterization and cellular cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi; Darvishi, Behrad; Ishkuh, Fatemeh Azizi; Shahmoradi, Elnaz; Mohammadi, Ali; Javanbakht, Mehran; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize molecularly imprinted polymer-poly ethylene glycol-folic acid (MIP-PEG-FA) nanoparticles for use as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. MIP nanoparticles were synthesized by a mini-emulsion polymerization technique and then PEG-FA was conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles showed high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, 15.6 ± 0.8 and 100%, respectively. The imprinting efficiency of MIPs was evaluated by binding experiments in human serum. Good selective binding and recognition were found in MIP nanoparticles. In vitro drug release studies showed that MIP-PEG-FA have a controlled release of PTX, because of the presence of imprinted sites in the polymeric structure, which makes it is suitable for sustained drug delivery. The drug release from polymeric nanoparticles was indeed higher at acidic pH. The molecular structure of MIP-PEG-FA was confirmed by Hydrogen-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR), and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) spectroscopy, and their thermal behaviors by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) results showed that nanoparticles have a smooth surface and spherical shape with an average size of 181 nm. MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles showed a greater amount of intracellular uptake in folate receptor-positive cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) in comparison with the non-folate nanoparticles and free PTX, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC_5_0) of 4.9 ± 0.9, 7.4 ± 0.5 and 32.8 ± 3.8 nM, respectively. These results suggest that MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles could be a potentially useful drug carrier for targeting drug delivery to cancer cells. - Highlights: • MIP-PEG-FA was synthesized as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery to cancerous cells. • Nanoparticles

  3. Paclitaxel molecularly imprinted polymer-PEG-folate nanoparticles for targeting anticancer delivery: Characterization and cellular cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Darvishi, Behrad [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ishkuh, Fatemeh Azizi [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahmoradi, Elnaz [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Ali [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Drug and Food Control, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Javanbakht, Mehran [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dinarvand, Rassoul [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh, E-mail: atyabifa@tums.ac.ir [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize molecularly imprinted polymer-poly ethylene glycol-folic acid (MIP-PEG-FA) nanoparticles for use as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. MIP nanoparticles were synthesized by a mini-emulsion polymerization technique and then PEG-FA was conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles showed high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, 15.6 ± 0.8 and 100%, respectively. The imprinting efficiency of MIPs was evaluated by binding experiments in human serum. Good selective binding and recognition were found in MIP nanoparticles. In vitro drug release studies showed that MIP-PEG-FA have a controlled release of PTX, because of the presence of imprinted sites in the polymeric structure, which makes it is suitable for sustained drug delivery. The drug release from polymeric nanoparticles was indeed higher at acidic pH. The molecular structure of MIP-PEG-FA was confirmed by Hydrogen-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR), and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) spectroscopy, and their thermal behaviors by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) results showed that nanoparticles have a smooth surface and spherical shape with an average size of 181 nm. MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles showed a greater amount of intracellular uptake in folate receptor-positive cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) in comparison with the non-folate nanoparticles and free PTX, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of 4.9 ± 0.9, 7.4 ± 0.5 and 32.8 ± 3.8 nM, respectively. These results suggest that MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles could be a potentially useful drug carrier for targeting drug delivery to cancer cells. - Highlights: • MIP-PEG-FA was synthesized as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery to cancerous cells. • Nanoparticles

  4. Pending templates imprinted polymers-hypothesis, synthesis, adsorption, and chromatographic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Luan, Xinjie; Zhao, Meifeng; Liu, Guofeng; Wang, Jian; Qu, Qishu; Hu, Xiaoya

    2013-05-01

    This is the first time when protein-imprinted polymers are prepared with "pending templates." The polymers were synthesized in the presence of a real sample (chicken egg white), rather than any known commercial proteins. Compared with a simultaneously synthesized nonimprinted control polymer, the polymers show higher adsorption capacity for abundant components (as "pending templates") in the original sample. Chromatography experiments indicated that the columns made of the imprinted polymers could retain abundant species (imprinted) and separate them from those not imprinted. Thus, the sample could be split into dimidiate subfractions with reduced complexities. "Pending template imprinting" suggests a new way to investigate molecular imprinting, especially to dissect, simplify, and analyze complicated samples through a series of polymers just imprinted by the samples per se. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Entrepreneurial Founders’ Imprints, Human Capital Sourcing, and Firm Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Brymer, Rhett Andrew

    ) early hiring choices affect new venture performance. This gap is surprising, since hiring soon after a firm founding is especially critical to sustained success. We propose that pipeline hiring – i.e., repeated hiring from various source organizations – might be a strategy considered by startups...

  6. Convergent and divergent evolution of genomic imprinting in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Radhika

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon resulting in parent-of-origin specific monoallelic gene expression. It is postulated to have evolved in placental mammals to modulate intrauterine resource allocation to the offspring. In this study, we determined the imprint status of metatherian orthologues of eutherian imprinted genes. Results L3MBTL and HTR2A were shown to be imprinted in Monodelphis domestica (the gray short-tailed opossum. MEST expressed a monoallelic and a biallelic transcript, as in eutherians. In contrast, IMPACT, COPG2, and PLAGL1 were not imprinted in the opossum. Differentially methylated regions (DMRs involved in regulating imprinting in eutherians were not found at any of the new imprinted loci in the opossum. Interestingly, a novel DMR was identified in intron 11 of the imprinted IGF2R gene, but this was not conserved in eutherians. The promoter regions of the imprinted genes in the opossum were enriched for the activating histone modification H3 Lysine 4 dimethylation. Conclusions The phenomenon of genomic imprinting is conserved in Therians, but the marked difference in the number and location of imprinted genes and DMRs between metatherians and eutherians indicates that imprinting is not fully conserved between the two Therian infra-classes. The identification of a novel DMR at a non-conserved location as well as the first demonstration of histone modifications at imprinted loci in the opossum suggest that genomic imprinting may have evolved in a common ancestor of these two Therian infra-classes with subsequent divergence of regulatory mechanisms in the two lineages.

  7. Preparation and Property Recognition of Nimodipine Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-fei CHEN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the application of molecular imprinting technique in the separation and detection of nimodipine. Methods: Methacrylic acid as functional monomer, pentaerythritol triacrylate as cross-linking agent were used to prepare molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP with the feature of specific recognition performance on imprinting molecule nimodipine under condition of template molecule nimodipine. The preparation conditions, recognition performance of MIP on nimodipine, different proportions of template molecule and functional monomer, the selectivity to other substrate, and the relationship between adsorption quantity (Q and time were observed. Results: MIP was prepared successfully bynimodipine as template and pentaerythritol triacrylate as cross-linking agent, with the feature of specific recognition performance on nimodipine. The static adsorption distribution coefficient (KD was 0.2264. The equation of Q and the concentration of substrate of template MIP was y = -0.21x+0.2204. Combining capacity of template molecule at the same concentration enhanced with the increasing proportion of functional monomer.Conclusion: Nimodipine MIP based on molecular imprinting technique may become a new approach to chiral separation for nimodipine.

  8. 3D Simulation of Nano-Imprint Lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Román Marín, José Manuel; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2010-01-01

    A proof of concept study of the feasibility of fully three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent simulation of nano-imprint lithography of polymer melt, where the polymer is treated as a structured liquid, has been presented. Considering the flow physics of the polymer as a structured liquid, we have...

  9. Imprinted and injection-molded nano-structured optical surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik

    2013-01-01

    . In this paper, nanostructured polymer surfaces suitable for up-scalable polymer replication methods, such as imprinting/embossing and injection-molding, are discussed. The limiting case of injection-moulding compatible designs is investigated. Anti-reflective polymer surfaces are realized by replication...

  10. Roll-to-roll UV imprint lithography for flexible electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maury, P.; Turkenburg, D.H.; Stroeks, N.; Giesen, P.; Barbu, I.; Meinders, E.R.; Bremen, A. van; Iosad, N.; Werf, R. van der; Onvlee, H.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a roll-to-roll UV imprint lithography tool as a way to pattern flexible PET foil with µm-resolution. As a way to overcome dimensional instability of the foil and its effect on overlay, a self-align approach was investigated, that permits to make several layers in a single lithography

  11. Pyrogallol-imprinted polymers with methyl methacrylate via precipitation polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehamod, Faizatul Shimal; Othman, Nor Amira; Bulat, Ku Halim Ku; Suah, Faiz Bukhari Mohd

    2018-06-01

    Molecular simulation techniques are important to study the understanding of chemical and physical properties of any material. Computational modeling is considered as time reducer in finding the best recipes for Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers (MIPs). In this study, Pyrogallol-imprinted polymers (PIP) and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) were synthesized via precipitation polymerization using Pyrogallol (Py), methyl methacrylate (MMA), divinylbenzene (DVB) as template, functional monomer and cross-linker, respectively. The recipe was according to the results from computational techniques. The synthesized PIP and NIPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). Studies on adsorption isotherm showed that PIP and NIPs follow Scatchard isotherm models. Sorption kinetic study found that PIP and NIPs follow pseudo-second order which indicates the rate-limiting step is the surface adsorption. The imprinting factor of PIP was determined by selectivity study and showed the value of k >1, which proved that PIP was selective toward Pyrogallol compared to NIP.

  12. Imprinting: When Early Life Memories Make Food Smell Bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayes, Diego; Alkema, Mark J

    2016-05-09

    A recent study has found that pathogen exposure early in the life of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans leads to a long-lasting aversion that requires distinct sets of neurons for the formation and retrieval of the imprinted memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prenatal imprinting by environmental toxicants: really an important issue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Ernst v. Mühlendahl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal imprinting of sexual behaviour and of other traits by environmental toxicants has been one important topic in the ongoing discussions in environmental medicine. This review of the literature shows that, so far, concrete data are sparse and, in part, contradictory.

  14. Generic nano-imprint process for fabrication of nanowire arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierret, A.; Hocevar, M.; Diedenhofen, S.L.; Algra, R.E.; Vlieg, E.; Timmering, E.C.; Verschuuren, M.A.; Immink, W.G.G.; Verheijen, M.A.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    A generic process has been developed to grow nearly defect-free arrays of (heterostructured) InP and GaP nanowires. Soft nano-imprint lithography has been used to pattern gold particle arrays on full 2inch substrates. After lift-off organic residues remain on the surface, which induce the growth of

  15. Surface engineering: molecularly imprinted affinity membranes by photograft polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuschewski, Heike; Sergeyeva, Tatiana A.; Bendig, Juergen; Piletsky, Sergey A.; Ulbricht, Matthies; Schedler, Uwe

    2001-02-01

    Commercial polymer microfiltration membranes were surface-modified with a graft copolymer of a functional monomer and a crosslinker in the presence of a template (triazine-herbicide). As result, membranes covered with a thin layer of imprinted polymer (MIP) selective to the template were obtained. The influence of the polymerization conditions on membrane recognition properties was studied by membranes

  16. Chemical point detection using differential fluorescence from molecularly imprinted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Anderson, John E.; Nelson, Jean; Tepper, Gary C.

    2004-12-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most attractive approaches for chemical sensing due to the abundant light produced by most fluorophores, resulting in excellent detection sensitivity. However, the broad and overlapping emission spectra of target and background species have made it difficult to perform species identification in a field instrument because of the need to perform spectral decomposition and analysis. This paper describes a new chemical sensing strategy based on differential fluorescence measurements from molecularly imprinted polymers, which eliminates the need to perform any spectral analysis. Species identification is accomplished by measuring the differential light output from a pair of polymers-one imprinted to a target species and the other identical, but not imprinted. The imprinted polymer selectively concentrates the target molecule and controls the energy (wavelength) of the emitted fluorescence signal and the differential output eliminates common mode signals associated with non-specific background interference. Because no spectral analysis is required, the sensors can be made extremely small and require very little power. Preliminary performance parameters from a prototype sensor are presented and discussed.

  17. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED ELECTROPOLYMERIZED CARBON ELECTRODES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) selective for fluorescein, rhodamine or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were electropolymerized onto graphite electrodes using an aqueous solution equimolar in resorsinol/ortho-phenylenediamine and in the presence of the template mole...

  18. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovicka, J.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2013-01-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called "colloid antibodies", were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating

  19. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  20. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers as Extracting Media for the Chromatographic Determination of Antibiotics in Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Bitas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Milk-producing animals are typically kept stationary in overcrowded large-scale farms and in most cases under unsanitary conditions, which promotes the development of infections. In order to maintain sufficient health status among the herd or promote growth and increase production, farmers administer preventative antibiotic doses to the animals through their feed. However, many antibiotics used in cattle farms are intended for the treatment of bacterial infections in humans. This results in the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria which pose a great risk for public health. Additionally, antibiotic residues are found in milk and dairy products, with potential toxic effects for the consumers. Hence the need of antibiotic residues monitoring in milk arises. Analytical methods were developed for the determination of antibiotics in milk, with key priority given to the analyte extraction and preconcentration step. Extraction can benefit from the production of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs that can be applied as sorbents for the extraction of specific antibiotics. This review focuses on the principals of molecular imprinting technology and synthesis methods of MIPs, as well as the application of MIPs and MIPs composites for the chromatographic determination of various antibiotic categories in milk found in the recent literature.

  1. Development of molecularly imprinted polymers to block quorum sensing and inhibit bacterial biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Luyao; Feng, Shaolong; de la Fuente-Nunez, Cesar; Hancock, Robert E W; Lu, Xiaonan

    2018-05-16

    Bacterial biofilms are responsible for most clinical infections and show increased antimicrobial resistance. In this study, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were developed to specifically capture prototypical quorum sensing autoinducers [i.e., N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12AHL)], interrupt quorum sensing, and subsequently inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human nosocomial pathogen. The synthesis of MIPs was optimized by considering the amount and type of the functional monomers itaconic acid (IA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). IA-based MIPs showed high adsorption affinity towards 3-oxo-C12AHL with an imprinting factor of 1.68. Compared to IA-based MIPs, the adsorption capacity of HEMA-based MIPs was improved 5-fold. HEMA-based MIPs significantly reduced biofilm formation (by ~65%), while biofilm suppression by IA-based MIPs was neutralized due to increased bacterial attachment. The developed MIPs represent promising alternative biofilm intervention agents that can be applied to surfaces relevant to clinical settings and food processing equipment.

  2. Sexual imprinting on continuous variation: do female zebra finches prefer or avoid unfamiliar sons of their foster parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schielzeth, H; Burger, C; Bolund, E; Forstmeier, W

    2008-09-01

    Sexual imprinting on discrete variation that serves the identification of species, morphs or sexes is well documented. By contrast, sexual imprinting on continuous variation leading to individual differences in mating preferences within a single species, morph and sex has been studied only once (in humans). We measured female preferences in a captive population of wild-type zebra finches. Individual cross-fostering ensured that all subjects grew up with unrelated foster parents and nest mates. Females from two cohorts (N = 113) were given a simultaneous choice between (two or four) unfamiliar males, one of which was a genetic son of their foster parents (SFP). We found no significant overall preference for the SFP (combined effect size d = 0.14 +/- 0.15). Additionally, we tested if foster parent traits could potentially explain between-female variation in preferences. However, neither the effectiveness of cooperation between the parents nor male contribution to parental care affected female preferences for the son of the foster father. We conclude that at least in zebra finches sexual imprinting is not a major source of between-individual variation in mating preferences.

  3. Assisted Reproduction Causes Reduced Fetal Growth Associated with Downregulation of Paternally Expressed Imprinted Genes That Enhance Fetal Growth in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Chen, Shuqiang; Tang, Na; Xiao, Xifeng; Huang, Jianlei; Jiang, Feng; Huang, Xiuying; Sun, Fangzhen; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-02-01

    Alteration of intrauterine growth trajectory is linked to metabolic diseases in adulthood. In mammalian and, specifically, human species, pregnancies through assisted reproductive technology (ART) are associated with changes in intrauterine growth trajectory. However, it is still unclear how ART alters intrauterine growth trajectory, especially reduced fetal growth in early to midgestation. In this study, using a mouse model, it was found that ART procedures reduce fetal and placental growth at Embryonic Day 10.5. Furthermore, ART leads to decreased methylation levels at H19, KvDMR1, and Snrpn imprinting control regions in the placentae, instead of fetuses. Furthermore, in the placenta, ART downregulated a majority of parentally expressed imprinted genes, which enhance fetal growth, whereas it upregulated a majority of maternally expressed genes which repress fetal growth. Additionally, the expression of genes that regulate placental development was also affected by ART. ART also downregulated a majority of placental nutrient transporters. Disruption of genomic imprinting and abnormal expression of developmentally and functionally relevant genes in placenta may influence the placental development and function, which affect fetal growth and reprogramming. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  4. A sensitive fluorescent nanosensor for chloramphenicol based on molecularly imprinted polymer-capped CdTe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadi, Mohammad; Jalili, Roghayeh; Manzoori, Jamshid L

    2016-05-01

    A novel fluorescent nanosensor using molecularly imprinted silica nanospheres embedded CdTe quantum dots (CdTe@SiO2 @MIP) was developed for detection and quantification of chloramphenicol (CAP). The imprinted sensor was prepared by synthesis of molecularly imprinting polymer (MIP) on the hydrophilic CdTe quantum dots via reverse microemulsion method using small amounts of solvents. The resulting CdTe@SiO2 @MIP nanoparticles were characterized by fluorescence, UV-vis absorption and FT-IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. They preserved 48% of fluorescence quantum yield of the parent quantum dots. CAP remarkably quenched the fluorescence of prepared CdTe@SiO2 @MIP, probably via electron transfer mechanism. Under the optimal conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of CdTe@SiO2 @MIP decreased with increasing CAP by a Stern-Volmer type equation in the concentration range of 40-500 µg L(-1). The corresponding detection limit was 5.0 µg L(-1). The intra-day and inter-day values for the precision of the proposed method were all <4%. The developed sensor had a good selectivity and was applied to determine CAP in spiked human and bovine serum and milk samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Mammalian-specific genomic functions: Newly acquired traits generated by genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mammals, including human beings, have evolved a unique viviparous reproductive system and a highly developed central nervous system. How did these unique characteristics emerge in mammalian evolution, and what kinds of changes did occur in the mammalian genomes as evolution proceeded? A key conceptual term in approaching these issues is "mammalian-specific genomic functions", a concept covering both mammalian-specific epigenetics and genetics. Genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes are reviewed as the representative, mammalian-specific genomic functions that are essential not only for the current mammalian developmental system, but also mammalian evolution itself. First, the essential roles of genomic imprinting in mammalian development, especially related to viviparous reproduction via placental function, as well as the emergence of genomic imprinting in mammalian evolution, are discussed. Second, we introduce the novel concept of "mammalian-specific traits generated by mammalian-specific genes from LTR retrotransposons", based on the finding that LTR retrotransposons served as a critical driving force in the mammalian evolution via generating mammalian-specific genes.

  6. Transgenerational effects of the endocrine disruptor vinclozolin on the methylation pattern of imprinted genes in the mouse sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouder, Christelle; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2010-02-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), among which is the antiandrogen vinclozolin (VCZ), have been reported to affect the male reproductive system. In this study, VCZ was administered to pregnant mice at the time of embryo sex determination, and its possible effects on the differentially methylated domains (DMDs) of two paternally (H19 and Gtl2) and three maternally (Peg1, Snrpn, and Peg3) imprinted genes were tested in the male offspring. The CpGs methylation status within the five gene DMDs was analyzed in the sperm, tail, liver, and skeletal muscle DNAs by pyrosequencing. In the sperm of controls, the percentages of methylated CpGs were close to the theoretical values of 100 and 0% in paternally or maternally imprinted genes respectively. VCZ decreased the percentages of methylated CpGs of H19 and Gtl2 (respective values 83.1 and 91.5%) and increased those of Peg1, Snrpn, and Peg3 (respective values 11.3, 18.3, and 11.2%). The effects of VCZ were transgenerational, but they disappeared gradually from F1 to F3. The mean sperm concentration of the VCZ-administered female offspring was only 56% of that of the controls in the F1 offspring, and it was back to normal values in the F2 and F3 offspring. In the somatic cells of controls, the percentages of methylated CpGs were close to the theoretical value of 50% and, surprisingly, VCZ altered the methylation of Peg3. We propose that the deleterious effects of VCZ on the male reproductive system are mediated by imprinting defects in the sperm. The reported effects of EDCs on human male spermatogenesis might be mediated by analogous imprinting alterations.

  7. Rational preparation of dibenzothiophene-imprinted polymers by surface imprinting technique combined with atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Wenming; Liu, Lukuan; Zhou, Zhiping; Liu, Hong; Xie, Binze; Xu, Wanzhen

    2013-01-01

    A computational simulation method is introduced to simulate the dibenzothiophene-monomer pre-assembly system of molecular imprinted polymers. The interaction type and intensity between dibenzothiophene and monomer are discussed from the binding energy and spatial position distribution. The simulation and analysis results indicate that the amount of the function monomer is not the more the better in preparing molecular imprinted polymers. Based on the above results, a novel dibenzothiophene-imprinted polymers with the favorable specific adsorption effect was prepared by surface imprinting technique combined with atom transfer radical polymerization. This combined technologies are used for preparing a desulfurization adsorbent for the first time. Various measures were selected to characterize the structure and morphology of the prepared adsorbent. The characterization results show that the adsorbent has suitable features for further adsorption process. A series of static adsorption experiments were conducted to analyze its adsorption performance. The adsorption process follows Elovich model by the kinetic analysis and Sips equation by the isothermal analysis. The approach we described will provide another opportunity in the deep desulfurization field.

  8. Influence of Exogenous Factors on Genomic Imprinting. 2. Effect of Bad Habits of Parents on Genomic Imprinting of the Descendants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents research data, which suggest that alcohol abuse and smoking of parents have an adverse effect on fetal development and the health of the child. These factors disrupt the processes of DNA methylation of imprinted genes, causing an increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation, and of pathological abnormalities in fetal neurogenesis.

  9. Polarization imprint effects on the photovoltaic effect in Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhengwei; Tian, Junjiang; Fan, Zhen; Lu, Zengxing; Zhang, Luyong; Zheng, Dongfeng; Wang, Yadong; Chen, Deyang; Qin, Minghui; Zeng, Min; Lu, Xubing; Gao, Xingsen; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2018-04-01

    The polarization imprint along with the photovoltaic (PV) effect has been studied in Pt/Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3/SrRuO3 ferroelectric capacitors. It is shown that the positive DC poling induces the imprint with a downward direction whereas the negative DC poling suppresses the imprint (i.e., rejuvenation). In the polarization up state, the imprinted capacitor exhibits degraded PV properties compared with the rejuvenated one. This may be because the imprint reduces the number of upward domains, thus lowering the driving force for the PV effect. In the polarization down state, however, the rejuvenated capacitor enters the imprinted state spontaneously. This rejuvenation-to-imprint transition can be further aggravated by applying positive voltages and ultraviolet illumination. It is proposed that the domain pinning/depinning, which are associated with the oxygen vacancies and trapped electrons modulated by polarization, voltage, and illumination, may be responsible for the polarization imprint and rejuvenation. Our study therefore sheds light on the correlation between the polarization imprint and the PV effect in the ferroelectrics and also provides some viable suggestions to address the imprint-induced degradation of PV performance.

  10. Transgenerational hormonal imprinting caused by vitamin A and vitamin D treatment of newborn rats. Alterations in the biogenic amine contents of the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, Kornélia; Gyenge, Melinda; Hantos, Mónika; Csaba, György

    2009-10-01

    Biogenic amines (norepinephrine, dopamine, homovanillic acid, serotonin and 5-hyroxyindole acetic acid) were measured by HPLC method in adult F1 generation rats' brain regions (brainstem, hypothalamus, hippocampus, striatum and frontal cortex), whose mothers (P generation) were treated with vitamin A or vitamin D neonatally (hormonal imprinting). Many significant differences were found, related to the maternally untreated controls. In the earlier studied P generation females, vitamin A consistently influenced the serotonerg system (5HIAA), while vitamin D the dopaminerg system (DA or HVA). Vitamin A imprinting always resulted in reduced, while that by vitamin D always in increased tissue levels. In the present case (directly untreated F1 generation) the transgenerational effect was not unidirectional, however biogenic amine tissue levels were strongly disturbed and brain-area dependent. The results call attention to the transgenerational effect of hormonal imprinting in the case of receptor level acting vitamins which are frequently used in the most imprinting-sensitive period (perinatally) of human life and suggests that caution is warranted.

  11. Fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer thin films for specific protein detection prepared with dansyl ethylenediamine-conjugated O-acryloyl L-hydroxyproline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuki; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Ohmori, Kohei; Sunayama, Hirobumi; Ooya, Tooru; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-10-15

    Protein-imprinted polymers, capable of specific transduction of protein binding events into fluorescent signal change, were designed and synthesized by using dansyl ethylenediamine-conjugated O-acryloyl L-hydroxyproline (Hyp-En-Dans). Human serum albumin (HSA) was used as a model target protein and HSA-imprinted polymers (HSA-IP) were prepared on glass substrates. Specific fluorescence change was observed for HSA binding on the imprinted polymer thin film, whereas a weaker response was observed for other proteins, including bovine serum albumin, chymotrypsin, lysozyme, and avidin. The binding specificity was found to derive from the rigid structure of the hydrogen-bondable pyrrolidine moiety. Compared with SPR measurements, the non-specific binding caused by the polymer matrix and/or randomly located fluorescent monomer residues that did not compose specific binding sites did not contribute to the observed fluorescence change. These results revealed that the proposed protein-imprinting technique using Hyp-En-Dans could provide a highly selective protein-sensing platform, in which only specific binding events would be detected by fluorescent measurements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modified Au nanoparticles-imprinted sol-gel, multiwall carbon nanotubes pencil graphite electrode used as a sensor for ranitidine determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, B; Lotfi-Forushani, H; Ensafi, A A

    2014-04-01

    A new, simple, and disposable molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor for the determination of ranitidine was developed on pencil graphite electrode (PGE) via cyclic voltammetry (CV). The PGEs were coated with MWCNTs containing the carboxylic functional group (f-MWCNTs), imprinted with sol-gel and Au nanoparticle (AuNPs) layers (AuNP/MIP-sol-gel/f-MWCNT/PGE), respectively, to enhance the electrode's electrical transmission and sensitivity. The thin film of molecularly imprinted sol-gel polymers with specific binding sites for ranitidine was cast on modified PGE by electrochemical deposition. The AuNP/MIP-sol-gel/f-MWCNT/PGE thus developed was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and CV. The interaction between the imprinted sensor and the target molecule was also observed on the electrode by measuring the current response of 5.0mMK3[Fe(CN)6] solution as an electrochemical probe. The pick currents of ranitidine increased linearly with concentration in the ranges of 0.05 to 2.0μM, with a detection limit of (S/N=3) 0.02μM. Finally, the modified electrode was successfully employed to determine ranitidine in human urine samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Desorption of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from imprinted particles: An impact of cross-linker structure on binding capacity and selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klejn, Dorota; Luliński, Piotr; Maciejewska, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.maciejewska@wum.edu.pl

    2015-11-01

    Here, seven cross-linkers (six polar diacrylates or dimethacrylates of different lengths between double bonds, and one aromatic-divinylbenzene) were used to examine the impact of the cross-linker on binding capacity and selectivity of 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) imprinted material. DIM participates in the suppression of viability of human ovarian and human breast cancer cell lines, but has low bioavailability. The investigations of novel imprinted polymer matrices for improvement of DIM release could allow to utilize not only a potency of DIM but also similar alkaloids, which are the important compounds with pharmacological activity. The bulk, thermal radical copolymerization of the cross-linkers in the presence of 3,3′-diindolylmethane (the template) and allylamine (the functional monomer) in dimethyl sulfoxide or in carbon tetrachloride (porogens) was carried out. The binding capacities of imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were compared, and two polymers (these were prepared using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linkers) with the highest selectivity and binding capacity were selected to desorption test. The desorption profile of polymer prepared using polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker revealed sustained release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane, and this system was selected for further optimization of the cross-linker amounts. The morphology and structure of the selected particles were analyzed using SEM micrographs, {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy, and BET measurements. The desorption of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from poly(allylamine-co-polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate) particles was in accordance with pseudo-second-order kinetics and the simplified Higuchi model indicated the diffusion controlled release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane. - Graphical abstract: Sustained release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from cavity in imprinted poly(allylamine-co-polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate

  14. Desorption of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from imprinted particles: An impact of cross-linker structure on binding capacity and selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klejn, Dorota; Luliński, Piotr; Maciejewska, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Here, seven cross-linkers (six polar diacrylates or dimethacrylates of different lengths between double bonds, and one aromatic-divinylbenzene) were used to examine the impact of the cross-linker on binding capacity and selectivity of 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) imprinted material. DIM participates in the suppression of viability of human ovarian and human breast cancer cell lines, but has low bioavailability. The investigations of novel imprinted polymer matrices for improvement of DIM release could allow to utilize not only a potency of DIM but also similar alkaloids, which are the important compounds with pharmacological activity. The bulk, thermal radical copolymerization of the cross-linkers in the presence of 3,3′-diindolylmethane (the template) and allylamine (the functional monomer) in dimethyl sulfoxide or in carbon tetrachloride (porogens) was carried out. The binding capacities of imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were compared, and two polymers (these were prepared using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linkers) with the highest selectivity and binding capacity were selected to desorption test. The desorption profile of polymer prepared using polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker revealed sustained release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane, and this system was selected for further optimization of the cross-linker amounts. The morphology and structure of the selected particles were analyzed using SEM micrographs, 13 C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy, and BET measurements. The desorption of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from poly(allylamine-co-polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate) particles was in accordance with pseudo-second-order kinetics and the simplified Higuchi model indicated the diffusion controlled release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane. - Graphical abstract: Sustained release of 3,3′-diindolylmethane from cavity in imprinted poly(allylamine-co-polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate). - Highlights:

  15. Characterization of the imprinting and expression patterns of ZAG2 in maize endosperm and embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoxian Liu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ZAG2 has been identified as a maternally expressed imprinted gene in maize endosperm. Our study revealed that paternally inherited ZAG2 alleles were imprinted in maize endosperm and embryo at 14 days after pollination (DAP, and consistently imprinted in endosperm at 10, 12, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, and 28 DAP in reciprocal crosses between B73 and Mo17. ZAG2 alleles were also imprinted in reciprocal crosses between Zheng 58 and Chang 7-2 and between Huang C and 178. ZAG2 alleles exhibited differential imprinting in hybrids of 178 × Huang C and B73 × Mo17, while in other hybrids ZAG2 alleles exhibited binary imprinting. The tissue-specific expression pattern of ZAG2 showed that ZAG2 was expressed at a high level in immature ears, suggesting that ZAG2 plays important roles in not only kernel but ear development.

  16. Magnetization dynamics of imprinted non-collinear spin textures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streubel, Robert, E-mail: r.streubel@ifw-dresden.de; Kopte, Martin; Makarov, Denys, E-mail: d.makarov@ifw-dresden.de [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Fischer, Peter [Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Schmidt, Oliver G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Chemnitz University of Technology, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-09-14

    We study the magnetization dynamics of non-collinear spin textures realized via imprint of the magnetic vortex state in soft permalloy into magnetically hard out-of-plane magnetized Co/Pd nanopatterned heterostructures. Tuning the interlayer exchange coupling between soft- and hard-magnetic subsystems provides means to tailor the magnetic state in the Co/Pd stack from being vortex- to donut-like with different core sizes. While the imprinted vortex spin texture leads to the dynamics similar to the one observed for vortices in permalloy disks, the donut-like state causes the appearance of two gyrofrequencies characteristic of the early and later stages of the magnetization dynamics. The dynamics are described using the Thiele equation supported by the full scale micromagnetic simulations by taking into account an enlarged core size of the donut states compared to magnetic vortices.

  17. Ducklings imprint on the relational concept of "same or different".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Antone; Kacelnik, Alex

    2016-07-15

    The ability to identify and retain logical relations between stimuli and apply them to novel stimuli is known as relational concept learning. This has been demonstrated in a few animal species after extensive reinforcement training, and it reveals the brain's ability to deal with abstract properties. Here we describe relational concept learning in newborn ducklings without reinforced training. Newly hatched domesticated mallards that were briefly exposed to a pair of objects that were either the same or different in shape or color later preferred to follow pairs of new objects exhibiting the imprinted relation. Thus, even in a seemingly rigid and very rapid form of learning such as filial imprinting, the brain operates with abstract conceptual reasoning, a faculty often assumed to be reserved to highly intelligent organisms. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Process and device for forming imprints on ceramic tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the present invention is a process and a device for making imprints on ceramic tubes and these ceramic tubes with imprints. It is known that in uranium enrichment processes by gaseous diffusion, microporous tubes are used to made the diffuser units used for the application of this isotope enrichment process. It is known that these microporous tubes are generally made in two stages. In a first stage, a macroporous ceramic tube called a ''support'' is made. In a second stage, an internal microporous deposit is made which makes it possible to obtain a tube called a ''barrier'' finally having the required porosity to apply the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. The present invention involves the first stage of the manufacturing process of the barriers and, more precisely, a step in the manufacturing process of the supports that makes it possible to improve the efficiency of these barriers

  19. Imprint reduction in rotating heavy ions beam energy deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Piriz, A.R., E-mail: Roberto.Piriz@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N.A., E-mail: n.tahir@gsi.de [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical target by a rotating heavy ions beam is contemplated in certain inertial fusion schemes or in heavy density matter experiments. Because the beam has its proper temporal profile, the energy deposition is asymmetric and leaves an imprint which can have important consequences for the rest of the process. In this paper, the Fourier components of the deposited ion density are computed exactly in terms of the beam temporal profile and its rotation frequency Ω. We show that for any beam profile of duration T, there exist an infinite number of values of ΩT canceling exactly any given harmonic. For the particular case of a parabolic profile, we find possible to cancel exactly the first harmonic and nearly cancel every other odd harmonics. In such case, the imprint amplitude is divided by 4 without any increase of Ω.

  20. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan Xianwen; Geng Zhirong; Zhao Yao; Wang Zhilin; Zhu Junjie [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, MOE Key Lab of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)], E-mail: wangzl@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: jjzhu@nju.edu.cn

    2009-04-22

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  1. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Xianwen; Geng Zhirong; Zhao Yao; Wang Zhilin; Zhu Junjie

    2009-01-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  2. Biotin-specific synthetic receptors prepared using molecular imprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piletska, Elena; Piletsky, Sergey; Karim, Kal; Terpetschnig, Ewald; Turner, Anthony

    2004-02-16

    The composition of new molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) specific for biotin was optimised using molecular modelling software. Three functional monomers: methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylic acid (TFAA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPSA), which demonstrated the highest binding scores with biotin, were tested on their ability to generate specific binding sites. The imprinted polymers were photografted to the surface of polystyrene microspheres in water. The affinity of the synthetic 'receptor' sites was evaluated in binding experiments using horseradish peroxidase-labelled biotin. Good correlation was found between the modelling results and the performance of the materials in the template re-binding study. The dissociation constants for all MIPs were 1.4-16.8 nM, which is sufficient for most analytical applications where biotin is used as a label.

  3. Biotin-specific synthetic receptors prepared using molecular imprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piletska, Elena; Piletsky, Sergey; Karim, Kal; Terpetschnig, Ewald; Turner, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    The composition of new molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) specific for biotin was optimised using molecular modelling software. Three functional monomers: methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylic acid (TFAA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPSA), which demonstrated the highest binding scores with biotin, were tested on their ability to generate specific binding sites. The imprinted polymers were photografted to the surface of polystyrene microspheres in water. The affinity of the synthetic 'receptor' sites was evaluated in binding experiments using horseradish peroxidase-labelled biotin. Good correlation was found between the modelling results and the performance of the materials in the template re-binding study. The dissociation constants for all MIPs were 1.4-16.8 nM, which is sufficient for most analytical applications where biotin is used as a label

  4. Virtual Screening of Receptor Sites for Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Ferdia; Cela-Pérez, María Concepción; Karim, Kal; Piletsky, Sergey; López-Vilariño, José Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) are highly advantageous in the field of analytical chemistry. However, interference from secondary molecules can also impede capture of a target by a MIP receptor. This greatly complicates the design process and often requires extensive laboratory screening which is time consuming, costly, and creates substantial waste products. Herein, is presented a new technique for screening of "virtually imprinted receptors" for rebinding of the molecular template as well as secondary structures, correlating the virtual predictions with experimentally acquired data in three case studies. This novel technique is particularly applicable to the evaluation and prediction of MIP receptor specificity and efficiency in complex aqueous systems. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Experimental demonstration of laser imprint reduction using underdense foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, B.; Casner, A.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Michel, D. T.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V.; Riazuelo, G.; Borisenko, N.; Orekhov, A.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Grech, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the detrimental effect of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability on the target performance is a critical challenge. In this purpose, the use of targets coated with low density foams is a promising approach to reduce the laser imprint. This article presents results of ablative RT instability growth measurements, performed on the OMEGA laser facility in direct-drive for plastic foils coated with underdense foams. The laser beam smoothing is explained by the parametric instabilities developing in the foam and reducing the laser imprint on the plastic (CH) foil. The initial perturbation pre-imposed by the means of a specific phase plate was shown to be smoothed using different foam characteristics. Numerical simulations of the laser beam smoothing in the foam and of the RT growth are performed with a suite of paraxial electromagnetic and radiation hydrodynamic codes. They confirmed the foam smoothing effect in the experimental conditions.

  6. Composite vascular repair grafts via micro-imprinting and electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yuanyuan-liu@shu.edu.cn; Hu, Qingxi, E-mail: huqingxi@shu.edu.cn [Rapid Manufacturing Engineering Center, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Intelligent Manufacturing and Robotics, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xiang, Ke, E-mail: xiangke@shu.edu.cn; Chen, Haiping, E-mail: 519673062@qq.com; Li, Yu, E-mail: liyu@hpu.edu.cn [Rapid Manufacturing Engineering Center, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Composite vascular grafts formed by micro-imprinting and electrospinning exhibited improved mechanical properties relative to those formed by electrospinning alone. The three-layered composite grafts mimic the three-layered structure of natural blood vessels. The middle layer is made by micro-imprinting poly-p-dioxanone (PPDO), while the inner and outer layers are electrospun mixtures of chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol. The graft morphology is characterized with scanning electron microscopy. For constant graft thicknesses, the PPDO increases the mechanical strength. Cells cultivated on the vascular grafts adhere and proliferate better because of the natural, biological chitosan in the inner and outer layers. Overall, the composite scaffolds could be good candidates for blood vessel repair.

  7. Consequences of Morphology on Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-Ligand Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika M. Rosengren

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP morphology and template-rebinding over a series of warfarin-imprinted methacrylic acid co(ethylene dimethacrylate polymers has been explored. Detailed investigations of the nature of template recognition revealed that an optimal template binding was obtained with polymers possessing a narrow population of pores (~3–4 nm in the mesopore size range. Importantly, the warfarin-polymer rebinding analyses suggest strategies for regulating ligand binding capacity and specificity through variation of the degree of cross-linking, where polymers prepared with a lower degree of cross-linking afford higher capacity though non-specific in character. In contrast, the co-existence of specific and non-specific binding was found in conjunction with higher degrees of cross-linking and resultant meso- and macropore size distributions.

  8. Imprint reduction in rotating heavy ions beam energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bret, A.; Piriz, A.R.; Tahir, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical target by a rotating heavy ions beam is contemplated in certain inertial fusion schemes or in heavy density matter experiments. Because the beam has its proper temporal profile, the energy deposition is asymmetric and leaves an imprint which can have important consequences for the rest of the process. In this paper, the Fourier components of the deposited ion density are computed exactly in terms of the beam temporal profile and its rotation frequency Ω. We show that for any beam profile of duration T, there exist an infinite number of values of ΩT canceling exactly any given harmonic. For the particular case of a parabolic profile, we find possible to cancel exactly the first harmonic and nearly cancel every other odd harmonics. In such case, the imprint amplitude is divided by 4 without any increase of Ω

  9. Experimental demonstration of laser imprint reduction using underdense foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, B.; Casner, A. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); CELIA, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, F-33400 Talence (France); Olazabal-Loumé, M. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablières, F-33114 Le Barp (France); CELIA, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, F-33400 Talence (France); Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [CELIA, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, F-33400 Talence (France); Michel, D. T.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Riazuelo, G. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Borisenko, N.; Orekhov, A. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, 53 Leninskii Prospect, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan); Grech, M. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2016-04-15

    Reducing the detrimental effect of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability on the target performance is a critical challenge. In this purpose, the use of targets coated with low density foams is a promising approach to reduce the laser imprint. This article presents results of ablative RT instability growth measurements, performed on the OMEGA laser facility in direct-drive for plastic foils coated with underdense foams. The laser beam smoothing is explained by the parametric instabilities developing in the foam and reducing the laser imprint on the plastic (CH) foil. The initial perturbation pre-imposed by the means of a specific phase plate was shown to be smoothed using different foam characteristics. Numerical simulations of the laser beam smoothing in the foam and of the RT growth are performed with a suite of paraxial electromagnetic and radiation hydrodynamic codes. They confirmed the foam smoothing effect in the experimental conditions.

  10. Tissue-specific and minor inter-individual variation in imprinting of IGF2R is a common feature of Bos taurus Concepti and not correlated with fetal weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Bebbere

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R is essential for prenatal growth regulation and shows gene dosage effects on fetal weight that can be affected by in-vitro embryo culture. Imprinted maternal expression of murine Igf2r is well documented for all fetal tissues excluding brain, but polymorphic imprinting and biallelic expression were reported for IGF2R in human. These differences have been attributed to evolutionary changes correlated with specific reproductive strategies. However, data from species suitable for testing this hypothesis are lacking. The domestic cow (Bos taurus carries a single conceptus with a similar gestation length as human. We identified 12 heterozygous concepti informative for imprinting studies among 68 Bos taurus fetuses at Day 80 of gestation (28% term and found predominantly maternal IGF2R expression in all fetal tissues but brain, which escapes imprinting. Inter-individual variation in allelic expression bias, i.e. expression of the repressed paternal allele relative to the maternal allele, ranged from 4.6-8.9% in heart, 4.3-10.2% in kidney, 6.1-11.2% in liver, 4.6-15.8% in lung and 3.2-12.2% in skeletal muscle. Allelic bias for mesodermal tissues (heart, skeletal muscle differed significantly (P<0.05 from endodermal tissues (liver, lung. The placenta showed partial imprinting with allelic bias of 22.9-34.7% and differed significantly (P<0.001 from all other tissues. Four informative fetuses were generated by in-vitro fertilization (IVF with embryo culture and two individuals displayed fetal overgrowth. However, there was no evidence for changes in imprinting or DNA methylation after IVF, or correlations between allelic bias and fetal weight. In conclusion, imprinting of Bos taurus IGF2R is similar to mouse except in placenta, which could indicate an effect of reproductive strategy. Common minor inter-individual variation in allelic bias and absence of imprinting abnormalities in IVF fetuses suggest

  11. Preliminary evidence of a neurophysiological basis for individual discrimination in filial imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Stephen Michael

    2011-12-01

    Filial imprinting involves a predisposition for biologically important stimuli and a learning process directing preferences towards a particular stimulus. Learning underlies discrimination between imprinted and unfamiliar individuals and depends upon the IMM (intermediate and medial mesopallium). Here, IMM neurons responded differentially to familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics following socialization and the neurophysiological effects of social experience differed between hemispheres. Such findings may provide a neurophysiological basis for individual discrimination in imprinting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)-Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for Chemical Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0536 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)- Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for...ARL-RP-0536 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)- Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for Chemical...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)-Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for Chemical Detection 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  13. Nano- and Micro-sized Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Particles on Solid Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kamra, Tripta

    2015-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are artificial receptors made by imprinting template molecules in a polymer matrix followed by their removal through washing to obtain a specific and selective template cavities. This property of the MIPs have made them a very efficient material for diverse applications such as chromatography, purification, drug sensing, etc. Recently, zero-dimensional polymer materials, in the present case molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIP nanoparticles), ...

  14. Tunable and stable in time ferroelectric imprint through polarization coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Anirban; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a method to tune a ferroelectric imprint, which is stable in time, based on the coupling between the non-switchable polarization of ZnO and switchable polarization of PbZrxTi(1−x)O3. SrRuO3/PbZrxTi(1−x)O3/ZnO/SrRuO3 heterostructures were grown with different ZnO thicknesses. It

  15. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Beads-Synthesis, Evaluation and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Tongchang

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are artificial receptors designed for the selective recognition of template molecules. These polymers have been applied in analytical separations, as chemical sensors and in drug delivery system due to their low cost and high stability. In recent years MIP beads, especially those with good selectivity in aqueous solution, have become attractive as they can be potentially used as selective adsorbents for the solid phase extraction (SPE) and chromatographic...

  16. PEG-Stabilized Core–Shell Surface-Imprinted Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Moczko, Ewa; Guerreiro, Antonio; Piletska, Elena; Piletsky, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a simple technique to produce target-specific molecularly imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (MIP NPs) and their surface modification in order to prevent the aggregation process that is ever-present in most nanomaterial suspensions/dispersions. Specifically, we studied the influence of surface modification of MIP NPs with polymerizable poly(ethylene glycol) on their degree of stability in water, in phosphate buffer, and in the presence of serum proteins. Grafting a polymer shel...

  17. Global imprint of historical connectivity on freshwater fish biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, M. S.; Oberdorff, Thierry; Hugueny, Bernard; Leprieur, F.; Jézéquel, Céline; Cornu, Jean-François; Brosse, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Tedesco, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The relative importance of contemporary and historical processes is central for understanding biodiversity patterns. While several studies show that past conditions can partly explain the current biodiversity patterns, the role of history remains elusive. We reconstructed palaeo-drainage basins under lower sea level conditions (Last Glacial Maximum) to test whether the historical connectivity between basins left an imprint on the global patterns of freshwater fish biodiversity. After controll...

  18. Phytosterol Recognition via Rationally Designed Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan J. Schwarz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs prepared via a semi-covalent imprinting strategy using stigmasteryl methacrylate as a polymerisable template have been evaluated by static binding methods for their ability to selectively capture other valuable phytosterol targets, including campesterol and brassicasterol. Design criteria based on molecular modelling procedures and interaction energy calculations were employed to aid the selection of the co-monomer type, as well as the choice of co-monomer:template ratios for the formation of the pre-polymerisation complex. These novel hybrid semi-covalently imprinted polymers employed N,N′-dimethylacryl-amide (N,N′-DMAAM as the functional co-monomer and displayed specific binding capacities in the range 5.2–5.9 mg sterol/g MIP resin. Their binding attributes and selectivities towards phytosterol compounds were significantly different to the corresponding MIPs prepared via non-covalent procedures or when compared to non-imprinted polymers. Cross-reactivity studies using stigmasterol, ergosterol, cholesterol, campesterol, and brassicasterol as single analytes revealed the importance of the A-ring C-3-β-hydroxyl group and the orientational preferences of the D-ring alkyl chain structures in their interaction in the templated cavity with the N,N′-dimethylamide functional groups of the MIP. Finally, to obtain useful quantities of both campersterol and brassicasterol for these investigations, improved synthetic routes have been developed to permit the conversion of the more abundant, lower cost stigmasterol via a reactive aldehyde intermediate to these other sterols.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Nonylphenol Magnetic Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F. Y.; Ba, S. P.; Tang, Y. B.; Wang, X. G.

    2015-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is a toxic xenobiotic compound classified as an endocrine disrupter, which can interface with the hormonal system of numerous organisms, and then cause a series of pathological changes. It is of great significance to remove nonyl phenol from the environment. In this paper, an effective method for the preparation of molecularly imprinted nanoparticles was reported. Firstly, Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ at the rate SiO/sub 2/ magnetic carrier material modified by trimethoxysilane was achieved through three-step reaction. After that, the selective magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent for NP (Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ at the rate SiO/sub 2/-MIP) was synthesized by surface molecular imprinting technique, using NP as template, 4-vinyl pyridine(4-Vpy) as functional monomers, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross linker and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. The morphous, composition, structure and performance of polymer adsorbent was characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD, EDS, VSM and nitrogen adsorption-desorption techniques. The results indicated that the polymer adsorbent was successfully prepared. The size of the polymer particle was about 50 nm, the aperture on the surface was 3.71 nm, the BET specific surface area was 61.80 m/sup 2/g and the Langmuir specific surface area was 101.24 m/sup 2/g. The selective adsorption rate for NP of 0.5 mmol/L attained value of 86.5%, and for NP with low concentration (less than 2.0 mg/L), the selective adsorption rate reached more than 90%. The synthesized magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer had higher selective recognition ability towards the template molecule nonylphenol. It has good magnetism and can be rapidly separated after being employed by using adscititious magnetic field. It has potential application value in treatment and enrichment of nonylphenol. (author)

  20. Imprints of spinning particles on primordial cosmological perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciolini, Gabriele; Kehagias, Alex; Riotto, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    If there exist higher-spin particles during inflation which are light compared to the Hubble rate, they may leave distinct statistical anisotropic imprints on the correlators involving scalar and graviton fluctuations. We characterise such signatures using the dS/CFT3 correspondence and the operator product expansion techniques. In particular, we obtain generic results for the case of partially massless higher-spin states.

  1. Mom's shadow: structure-from-motion in newly hatched chicks as revealed by an imprinting procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalzoni, Elena; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2009-03-01

    The ability to recognize three-dimensional objects from two-dimensional (2-D) displays was investigated in domestic chicks, focusing on the role of the object's motion. In Experiment 1 newly hatched chicks, imprinted on a three-dimensional (3-D) object, were allowed to choose between the shadows of the familiar object and of an object never seen before. In Experiments 2 and 3 random-dot displays were used to produce the perception of a solid shape only when set in motion. Overall, the results showed that domestic chicks were able to recognize familiar shapes from 2-D motion stimuli. It is likely that similar general mechanisms underlying the perception of structure-from-motion and the extraction of 3-D information are shared by humans and animals. The present data shows that they occur similarly in birds as known for mammals, two separate vertebrate classes; this possibly indicates a common phylogenetic origin of these processes.

  2. Highly selective solid phase extraction and preconcentration of Azathioprine with nano-sized imprinted polymer based on multivariate optimization and its trace determination in biological and pharmaceutical samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny, E-mail: ss-hosseiny@cc.sbu.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., P.O. Box 19839-4716, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezayati zad, Zeinab [Faculty of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., P.O. Box 19839-4716, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri, Ali Reza; Rahmatian, Nasrin [Islamic Azad University, Ilam Branch, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    In this research, for first time selective separation and determination of Azathioprine is demonstrated using molecularly imprinted polymer as the solid-phase extraction adsorbent, measured by spectrophotometry at λ{sub max} 286 nm. The selective molecularly imprinted polymer was produced using Azathioprine and methacrylic acid as a template molecule and monomer, respectively. A molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction procedure was performed in column for the analyte from pharmaceutical and serum samples. The synthesized polymers were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). In order to investigate the effect of independent variables on the extraction efficiency, the response surface methodology (RSM) based on Box–Behnken design (BBD) was employed. The analytical parameters such as precision, accuracy and linear working range were also determined in optimal experimental conditions and the proposed method was applied to analysis of Azathioprine. The linear dynamic range and limits of detection were 2.5–0.01 and 0.008 mg L{sup ‐1} respectively. The recoveries for analyte were higher than 95% and relative standard deviation values were found to be in the range of 0.83–4.15%. This method was successfully applied for the determination of Azathioprine in biological and pharmaceutical samples. - Graphical abstract: A new-nano sized imprinted polymer was synthesized and applied as sorbent in SPE in order to selective recognition, preconcentration, and determination of Azathioprine with the response surface methodology based on Box–Behnken design and was successfully investigated for the clean-up of human blood serum and pharmaceutical samples. - Highlights: • The nanosized-imprinted polymer has been synthesized by precipitation polymerization technique. • A molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction procedure was performed for determination of Azathioprine. • The Azathioprine

  3. Cholesterol-imprinted macroporous monoliths: Preparation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Mariia А; Kinziabulatova, Lilia R; Nikitina, Anna A; Korzhikova-Vlakh, Evgenia G; Tennikova, Tatiana B

    2017-11-01

    The development of sorbents for selective binding of cholesterol, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, has a great importance for analytical science and medicine. In this work, two series of macroporous cholesterol-imprinted monolithic sorbents differing in the composition of functional monomers (methacrylic acid, butyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate), amount of a template (4, 6 and 8 mol%) used for molecular imprinting, as well as mean pore size were synthesized by in situ free-radical process in stainless steel housing of 50 mm × 4.6 mm i.d. All prepared materials were characterized regarding to their hydrodynamic permeability and porous properties, as well as examined by BET and SEM methods. Imprinting factors, apparent dynamic dissociation constants, the maximum binding capacity, the number of theoretical plates and the height equivalent to a theoretical palate of MIP monoliths at different mobile phase flow rates were determined. The separation of a mixture of structural analogues, namely, cholesterol and prednisolone, was demonstrated. Additionally, the possibility of using the developed monoliths for cholesterol solid-phase extraction from simulated biological solution was shown. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Imprint lithography: lab curiosity or the real NGL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Douglas J.; Dauksher, William J.; Mancini, David P.; Nordquist, Kevin J.; Bailey, Todd C.; Johnson, Stephen C.; Stacey, Nicholas A.; Ekerdt, John G.; Willson, C. Grant; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Schumaker, Norman E.

    2003-06-01

    The escalating cost for Next Generation Lithography (NGL) tools is driven in part by the need for complex sources and optics. The cost for a single NGL tool could exceed $50M in the next few years, a prohibitive number for many companies. As a result, several researchers are looking at low cost alternative methods for printing sub-100 nm features. In the mid-1990s, several resarech groups started investigating different methods for imprinting small features. Many of these methods, although very effective at printing small features across an entire wafer, are limited in their ability to do precise overlay. In 1999, Willson and Sreenivasan discovered that imprinting could be done at low pressures and at room temperatures by using low viscosity UV curable monomers. The technology is typically referred to as Step and Flash Imprint Lithography. The use of a quartz template enabled the photocuring process to occur and also opened up the potential for optical alignment of teh wafer and template. This paper traces the development of nanoimprint lithography and addresses the issues that must be solved if this type of technology is to be applied to high-density silicon integrated circuitry.

  5. Detour behaviour, imprinting and visual lateralization in the domestic chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallortigara, G; Regolin, L; Pagni, P

    1999-01-01

    Detour behaviour was studied in chicks faced with a vertical-bar barrier behind where an imprinting object (a red ball) was located. Right-eyed chicks took less time to detour the barrier than left-eyed chicks, and binocular chicks showed a bias to detour the barrier on the left side, thus maintaining visual contact with the imprinting object using the lateral field of the right eye, while circling around the barrier. In males, the asymmetries were consistent all along the first two weeks of life, whereas in females they disappeared on days 8 and 11. When tested with a slightly novel version of the original imprinting object (i.e., a ball of a different color), binocular chicks showed a bias to detour the barrier on the right side, thus showing preferential use of the left eye. The same bias occurred when unfamiliar conspecifics were used as goal-objects. Results suggest that cerebral lateralization in birds can directly affect visually-guided motor responses through selective use of the lateral field of vision of the eye contralateral to the hemisphere which has to be put in charge of control of overt behaviour. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  6. Sexual imprinting on ecologically divergent traits leads to sexual isolation in sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Genevieve M; Head, Megan L; Boughman, Janette W

    2011-09-07

    During sexual imprinting, offspring learn parental phenotypes and then select mates who are similar to their parents. Imprinting has been thought to contribute to the process of speciation in only a few rare cases; this is despite imprinting's potential to generate assortative mating and solve the problem of recombination in ecological speciation. If offspring imprint on parental traits under divergent selection, these traits will then be involved in both adaptation and mate preference. Such 'magic traits' easily generate sexual isolation and facilitate speciation. In this study, we show that imprinting occurs in two ecologically divergent stickleback species (benthics and limnetics: Gasterosteus spp.). Cross-fostered females preferred mates of their foster father's species. Furthermore, imprinting is essential for sexual isolation between species; isolation was reduced when females were raised without fathers. Daughters imprinted on father odour and colour during a critical period early in development. These traits have diverged between the species owing to differences in ecology. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that imprinting links ecological adaptation to sexual isolation between species. Our results suggest that imprinting may facilitate the evolution of sexual isolation during ecological speciation, may be especially important in cases of rapid diversification, and thus play an integral role in the generation of biodiversity.

  7. Angular dependence of imprinting levels in laser-target interactions on planar CH foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Goncharov, V.N.; Boehly, T.R.; Delettrez, J.A.; Li, D.Y.; Marozas, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    Imprinting of laser-beam modulations at various angles of incidence is measured for the first time in planar CH foils. The imprinted target modulations were seeded by special probe beams at a spatial wavelength of 60 μm and subsequently amplified by five drive beams. The measured imprint efficiency decreases by a factor of 3 as the angle of incidence of the probe beam is increased from 20 deg. to 60 deg., as predicted by theoretical modeling. The imprinting is very sensitive to the relative arrival time of the probe and drive beams

  8. Enhanced Absorption in Organic Thin-Films from Imprinted Concave Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jaroslaw; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a rapid, replicable method for imprinting concave nanostructures to be used as functional light-trapping nanostructures in organic thin-films is presented. Porous anodic alumina templates were fabricated both by anodization of thick Al foils and by anodization of submicrometer thin Al...... patterns and used for imprinting of spin coated photoresist on glass substrates. We have investigated semi-periodic and aperiodic imprinted large concave patterns fabricated from rigid masters after anodization of Al in H3PO4. We show that metal covered imprinted concaves show enhancement in absorption...

  9. Imprinting of Phenylalanine ethyl ester in cyclodextrin polymers in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detcheva, Anna Hr.; Yu, Donghong; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen

    During the last decades there has been a wide interest of developing molecularly imprinted polymers, which selectively can recognize small molecules. Cyclodextrins offer relatively strong binding site of a wide range of small molecules in water and molecular imprinted polymers of these have...... previously been produced with some success. Nevertheless most molecules of interest for molecular imprinting are too samll to accommodate more than one cyclodextrin per molecule and thus limited selectivity may be expected. In order to improve the selectivity of cyclodextrin based molecular imprinted polymer...

  10. Role of imprint cytology in intra operative diagnosis of thyroid lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anila, K R; Krishna, G

    2014-07-01

    Intra-operative imprint cytology is an important diagnostic modality in the diagnosis of thyroid lesions. A correct intra-operative diagnosis helps eliminate the need for second surgery. To study diagnostic accuracy of imprint cytology and to compare the imprint cytology results with that of the corresponding paraffin section diagnosis in thyroidectomy cases. This is a prospective study of 84 patients who have undergone thyroidectomies over a period of one year at the Department of Surgery, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. The intraoperative imprint cytology smears were stained by Papanicolaou method. The imprint cytology interpretation was later compared with the paraffin section diagnosis. Of the 84 patients using haematoxylin and eosin stained histopathology sections as the gold standard, the diagnostic sensitivity of imprint cytology was 75% and specificity was 100%. Positive predictive value was 100%. Negative predictive value was 98.74%. Imprint cytology has high sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing lesions of the thyroid. The problems faced were in diagnosing follicular carcinomas and differentiating low grade lymphoma from lymphocytic thyroiditis. Imprint cytology is a simple, reliable diagnostic technique. It has high sensitivity and specificity in intra-operative diagnosis of lesions of thyroid. In spite of the advent of newer diagnostic modalities like frozen sections, imprint cytology still holds its unique position in the current perspective.

  11. [The peculiar morphological features of the imprints of straight and wavy head hair dirtied with blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, E N; Nagornov, M N; Prokhorenko, A S

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the specific morphological features of the imprints of blood-soaked straight and wavy head hair. The contact imprints of straight and wavy head hair dirtied with blood were obtained experimentally. The imprints of straight hair were shown to exhibit the elements in the form of the rectilinear and bow-shaped slightly bent stripes. The imprints of wavy hair were shaped as the arches, waves, circles, and a large number of various small elements, such as dashes and commas.

  12. Evaluation of accuracy of intra operative imprint cytology for detection of breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, Z.; Shahbaz, A.; Qureshi, A.; Aziz, N.; Niazi, S.; Qureshi, S.; Bukhari, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of imprint cytology as an intraoperative diagnostic procedure for breast lesions with histopathological correlation. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study on 40 cases of breast lesions comprising of inflammatory, benign and malignant lesions including their margins etc. It was conducted at King Edward Medical University, Lahore in collaboration with all Surgical Departments of Mayo Hospital. Relevant clinical data was recorded in a proforma. Both touch and scrape imprints were prepared from all the lesions and stained with May-Grunwaled Giemsa and Haematoxylin and Eosin stains. The imprints were subsequently compared with histopathology sections. Results: When we used atypical cases as negative both touch and scrape imprints gave sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy at 100%. However when we used cases with atypia as positive, sensitivity and negative predictive value were 100% with both touch and scrape imprints. Specificity, positive predictive value and accuracy were 71%, 86%, 85.5% respectively with touch imprints and 78%, 89%, 89% respectively with scrape imprints. No diagnostic difference was noted between the results of both stains. All the imprints were well correlated with histopathological diagnosis. Conclusion: Imprint cytology is an accurate and simple intraoperative method for diagnosing breast lesions. It can provide the surgeons with information regarding immediate clinical and surgical interventions. (author)

  13. Selective enrichment and separation of phosphotyrosine peptides by thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoqing; Xia, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Novel thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers were successfully prepared using the epitope imprinting approach in the presence of the mimic template phenylphosphonic acid, the functional monomer vinylphosphonic acid-Ti(4+) , the temperature-sensitive monomer N-isopropylacrylamide and the crosslinker N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide. The ratio of the template/thermosensitive monomers/crosslinker was optimized, and when the ratio was 2:2:1, the prepared thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers had the highest imprinting factor. The synthetic thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to reveal the combination and elution processes of the template. Then, the adsorption capacity and thermosensitivity was measured. When the temperature was 28°C, the imprinting factor was the highest. The selectivity and adsorption capacity of the thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers for phosphotyrosine peptides from a mixture of three tailor-made peptides were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that the thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers have good selectivity for phosphotyrosine peptides. Finally, the imprinted hydrogels were applied to specifically adsorb phosphotyrosine peptides from a sample mixture containing phosphotyrosine and a tryptic digest of β-casein, which demonstrated high selectivity. After four rebinding cycles, 78.9% adsorption efficiency was still retained. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. From 3D to 2D: a review of the molecular imprinting of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nicholas W; Jeans, Christopher W; Brain, Keith R; Allender, Christopher J; Hlady, Vladimir; Britt, David W

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a generic technology that allows for the introduction of sites of specific molecular affinity into otherwise homogeneous polymeric matrices. Commonly this technique has been shown to be effective when targeting small molecules of molecular weight proteins has proven difficult. A number of key inherent problems in protein imprinting have been identified, including permanent entrapment, poor mass transfer, denaturation, and heterogeneity in binding pocket affinity, which have been addressed using a variety of approaches. This review focuses on protein imprinting in its various forms, ranging from conventional bulk techniques to novel thin film and monolayer surface imprinting approaches.

  15. Maternally expressed gene 3, an imprinted noncoding RNA gene, is associated with meningioma pathogenesis and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Gejman, Roger; Mahta, Ali; Zhong, Ying; Rice, Kimberley A; Zhou, Yunli; Cheunsuchon, Pornsuk; Louis, David N; Klibanski, Anne

    2010-03-15

    Meningiomas are common tumors, representing 15% to 25% of all central nervous system tumors. NF2 gene inactivation on chromosome 22 has been shown as an early event in tumorigenesis; however, few factors underlying tumor growth and progression have been identified. The chromosomal abnormalities of 14q32 are often associated with meningioma pathogenesis and progression; therefore, it has been proposed that an as yet unidentified tumor suppressor is present at this locus. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) is an imprinted gene located at 14q32 which encodes a noncoding RNA with an antiproliferative function. We found that MEG3 mRNA is highly expressed in normal arachnoidal cells. However, MEG3 is not expressed in the majority of human meningiomas or the human meningioma cell lines IOMM-Lee and CH157-MN. There is a strong association between loss of MEG3 expression and tumor grade. Allelic loss at the MEG3 locus is also observed in meningiomas, with increasing prevalence in higher grade tumors. In addition, there is an increase in CpG methylation within the promoter and the imprinting control region of MEG3 gene in meningiomas. Functionally, MEG3 suppresses DNA synthesis in both IOMM-Lee and CH157-MN cells by approximately 60% in bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Colony-forming efficiency assays show that MEG3 inhibits colony formation in CH157-MN cells by approximately 80%. Furthermore, MEG3 stimulates p53-mediated transactivation in these cell lines. Therefore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that MEG3, which encodes a noncoding RNA, may be a tumor suppressor gene at chromosome 14q32 involved in meningioma progression via a novel mechanism.

  16. Climato-economic imprints on Chinese collectivism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Vliert, E; Yang, Huadong; Wang, Y; Ren, X

    A still unsolved question is why humans create collectivism. New theory proposes that poorer populations coping with more demanding winters or summers become more collectivist. Preliminary support comes from a province-level analysis of survey data from 1662 native residents of 15 Chinese provinces.

  17. Climato-economic imprints on Chinese collectivism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vliert, E.; Yang, H.; Wang, Y.; Ren, X.

    2013-01-01

    A still unsolved question is why humans create collectivism. A new theory proposes that poorer populations coping with more demanding winters or summers become more collectivist. Preliminary support comes from a province-level analysis of survey data from 1,662 native residents of 15 Chinese

  18. Predicting the performance of molecularly imprinted polymers: Selective extraction of caffeine by molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, Keith [School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Magner, Edmond [Materials and Surface Science Institute, Chemical and Environmental Sciences Department, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Regan, Fiona [School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)]. E-mail: fiona.regan@dcu.ie

    2006-04-27

    A rational design approach was taken to the planning and synthesis of a molecularly imprinted polymer capable of extracting caffeine (the template molecule) from a standard solution of caffeine and further from a food sample containing caffeine. Data from NMR titration experiments in conjunction with a molecular modelling approach was used in predicting the relative ratios of template to functional monomer and furthermore determined both the choice of solvent (porogen) and the amount used for the study. In addition the molecular modelling program yielded information regarding the thermodynamic stability of the pre-polymerisation complex. Post-polymerisation analysis of the polymer itself by analysis of the pore size distribution by BET yielded significant information regarding the nature of the size and distribution of the pores within the polymer matrix. Here is proposed a stepwise procedure for the development and testing of a molecularly imprinted polymer using a well-studied compound-caffeine as a model system. It is shown that both the physical characteristics of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) and the analysis of the pre-polymerisation complex can yield vital information, which can predict how well a given MIP will perform.

  19. Predicting the performance of molecularly imprinted polymers: Selective extraction of caffeine by molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrington, Keith; Magner, Edmond; Regan, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    A rational design approach was taken to the planning and synthesis of a molecularly imprinted polymer capable of extracting caffeine (the template molecule) from a standard solution of caffeine and further from a food sample containing caffeine. Data from NMR titration experiments in conjunction with a molecular modelling approach was used in predicting the relative ratios of template to functional monomer and furthermore determined both the choice of solvent (porogen) and the amount used for the study. In addition the molecular modelling program yielded information regarding the thermodynamic stability of the pre-polymerisation complex. Post-polymerisation analysis of the polymer itself by analysis of the pore size distribution by BET yielded significant information regarding the nature of the size and distribution of the pores within the polymer matrix. Here is proposed a stepwise procedure for the development and testing of a molecularly imprinted polymer using a well-studied compound-caffeine as a model system. It is shown that both the physical characteristics of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) and the analysis of the pre-polymerisation complex can yield vital information, which can predict how well a given MIP will perform

  20. A sol-gel derived pH-responsive bovine serum albumin molecularly imprinted poly(ionic liquids) on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mingming; Pi, Jiangyan; Wang, Xiaojie; Huang, Rong; Du, Yamei; Yu, Xiaoyang; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan; Shea, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    .52 mg g"−"1), excellent imprinting effect (imprinting factor of up to 5.84), strong selectivity (selectivity factor of 2.61 and 5.63 for human serum albumin and bovine hemoglobin, respectively), and good reusability. - Graphical abstract: A pH-responsive bovine serum albumin molecularly imprinted poly(ionic liquids) was prepared on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes via a sol-gel route. The specific binding from shape selectivity was significantly strengthened by controlling the non-specific binding by adjusting the incubation pH value to 9.9. The use of ionic liquids as stabilizers, functional monomers and sol-gel catalysts was found to be a promising strategy for the preparation of water compatible molecularly imprinted polymers for protein molecules. - Highlights: • An alkyl-functionalized ionic liquid was used as monomer, stabilizer and catalyst to prepare MIPs. • The MWCNTs@BSA-MIPIL was prepared via a multi-step sol-gel route. • The imprinting conditions were optimized by investigating molecular interactions between templates and monomers. • The MWCNTs@BSA-MIPIL was found to be pH-responsive. • The MWCNTs@BSA-MIPIL demonstrated high adsorption capacity, good imprinting effect and strong shape selectivity to BSA.

  1. A sol-gel derived pH-responsive bovine serum albumin molecularly imprinted poly(ionic liquids) on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Mingming, E-mail: liumm@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Arable Land Conservation (Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtse River), Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Pi, Jiangyan; Wang, Xiaojie; Huang, Rong; Du, Yamei; Yu, Xiaoyang; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan [Key Laboratory of Arable Land Conservation (Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtse River), Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Shea, Kenneth J., E-mail: kjshea@uci.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2016-08-17

    capacity (55.52 mg g{sup −1}), excellent imprinting effect (imprinting factor of up to 5.84), strong selectivity (selectivity factor of 2.61 and 5.63 for human serum albumin and bovine hemoglobin, respectively), and good reusability. - Graphical abstract: A pH-responsive bovine serum albumin molecularly imprinted poly(ionic liquids) was prepared on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes via a sol-gel route. The specific binding from shape selectivity was significantly strengthened by controlling the non-specific binding by adjusting the incubation pH value to 9.9. The use of ionic liquids as stabilizers, functional monomers and sol-gel catalysts was found to be a promising strategy for the preparation of water compatible molecularly imprinted polymers for protein molecules. - Highlights: • An alkyl-functionalized ionic liquid was used as monomer, stabilizer and catalyst to prepare MIPs. • The MWCNTs@BSA-MIPIL was prepared via a multi-step sol-gel route. • The imprinting conditions were optimized by investigating molecular interactions between templates and monomers. • The MWCNTs@BSA-MIPIL was found to be pH-responsive. • The MWCNTs@BSA-MIPIL demonstrated high adsorption capacity, good imprinting effect and strong shape selectivity to BSA.

  2. Real-time prostate-specific antigen detection with prostate-specific antigen imprinted capacitive biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertürk, Gizem [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Hedström, Martin [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); CapSenze HB, Medicon Village, SE-223 63 Lund (Sweden); Tümer, M. Aşkın [Department of Biology, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Mattiasson, Bo, E-mail: Bo.Mattiasson@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); CapSenze HB, Medicon Village, SE-223 63 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-09-03

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a valuable biomarker for early detection of prostate cancer, the third most common cancer in men. Ultrasensitive detection of PSA is crucial to screen the prostate cancer in an early stage and to detect the recurrence of the disease after treatment. In this report, microcontact-PSA imprinted (PSA-MIP) capacitive biosensor chip was developed for real-time, highly sensitive and selective detection of PSA. PSA-MIP electrodes were prepared in the presence of methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker via UV polymerization. Immobilized Anti-PSA antibodies on electrodes (Anti-PSA) for capacitance measurements were also prepared to compare the detection performances of both methods. The electrodes were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) and real-time PSA detection was performed with standard PSA solutions in the concentration range of 10 fg mL{sup −1}–100 ng mL{sup −1}. The detection limits were found as 8.0 × 10{sup −5} ng mL{sup −1} (16 × 10{sup −17} M) and 6.0 × 10{sup −4} ng mL{sup −1} (12 × 10{sup −16} M) for PSA-MIP and Anti-PSA electrodes, respectively. Selectivity studies were performed against HSA and IgG and selectivity coefficients were calculated. PSA detection was also carried out from diluted human serum samples and finally, reproducibility of the electrodes was tested. The results are promising and show that when the sensitivity of the capacitive system is combined with the selectivity and reproducibility of the microcontact-imprinting procedure, the resulting system might be used successfully for real-time detection of various analytes even in very low concentrations. - Highlights: • Microcontact imprinting method was used for preparing the sensor chip for capacitive biosensing. • High sensitivity was obtained. • Good selectivity was

  3. Real-time prostate-specific antigen detection with prostate-specific antigen imprinted capacitive biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertürk, Gizem; Hedström, Martin; Tümer, M. Aşkın; Denizli, Adil; Mattiasson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a valuable biomarker for early detection of prostate cancer, the third most common cancer in men. Ultrasensitive detection of PSA is crucial to screen the prostate cancer in an early stage and to detect the recurrence of the disease after treatment. In this report, microcontact-PSA imprinted (PSA-MIP) capacitive biosensor chip was developed for real-time, highly sensitive and selective detection of PSA. PSA-MIP electrodes were prepared in the presence of methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker via UV polymerization. Immobilized Anti-PSA antibodies on electrodes (Anti-PSA) for capacitance measurements were also prepared to compare the detection performances of both methods. The electrodes were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) and real-time PSA detection was performed with standard PSA solutions in the concentration range of 10 fg mL"−"1–100 ng mL"−"1. The detection limits were found as 8.0 × 10"−"5 ng mL"−"1 (16 × 10"−"1"7 M) and 6.0 × 10"−"4 ng mL"−"1 (12 × 10"−"1"6 M) for PSA-MIP and Anti-PSA electrodes, respectively. Selectivity studies were performed against HSA and IgG and selectivity coefficients were calculated. PSA detection was also carried out from diluted human serum samples and finally, reproducibility of the electrodes was tested. The results are promising and show that when the sensitivity of the capacitive system is combined with the selectivity and reproducibility of the microcontact-imprinting procedure, the resulting system might be used successfully for real-time detection of various analytes even in very low concentrations. - Highlights: • Microcontact imprinting method was used for preparing the sensor chip for capacitive biosensing. • High sensitivity was obtained. • Good selectivity was demonstrated. • Stability of

  4. Conservation of Repeats at the Mammalian KCNQ1OT1-CDKN1C Region Suggests a Role in Genomic Imprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos De Donato

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available KCNQ1OT1 is located in the region with the highest number of genes showing genomic imprinting, but the mechanisms controlling the genes under its influence have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we conducted a comparative analysis of the KCNQ1/KCNQ1OT1-CDKN1C region to study its conservation across the best assembled eutherian mammalian genomes sequenced to date and analyzed potential elements that may be implicated in the control of genomic imprinting in this region. The genomic features in these regions from human, mouse, cattle, and dog show a higher number of genes and CpG islands (detected using cpgplot from EMBOSS, but lower number of repetitive elements (including short interspersed nuclear elements and long interspersed nuclear elements, compared with their whole chromosomes (detected by RepeatMasker. The KCNQ1OT1-CDKN1C region contains the highest number of conserved noncoding sequences (CNS among mammals, where we found 16 regions containing about 38 different highly conserved repetitive elements (using mVista, such as LINE1 elements: L1M4, L1MB7, HAL1, L1M4a, L1Med, and an LTR element: MLT1H. From these elements, we found 74 CNS showing high sequence identity (>70% between human, cattle, and mouse, from which we identified 13 motifs (using Multiple Em for Motif Elicitation/Motif Alignment and Search Tool with a significant probability of occurrence, 3 of which were the most frequent and were used to find transcription factor–binding sites. We detected several transcription factors (using JASPAR suite from the families SOX, FOX, and GATA. A phylogenetic analysis of these CNS from human, marmoset, mouse, rat, cattle, dog, horse, and elephant shows branches with high levels of support and very similar phylogenetic relationships among these groups, confirming previous reports. Our results suggest that functional DNA elements identified by comparative genomics in a region densely populated with imprinted mammalian genes may be

  5. Fabrication of Surface Protein-Imprinted Nanoparticles Using a Metal Chelating Monomer via Aqueous Precipitation Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Sun, Yan; Yang, Chongchong; Yan, Xianming; Guo, Hao; Fu, Guoqi

    2015-12-16

    Molecular imprinting is a promising way for constructing artificial protein recognition materials, but it has been challenged by difficulties such as restricted biomacromolecule transfer in the cross-linked polymer networks, and reduced template-monomer interactions that are due to the required aqueous media. Herein, we propose a strategy for imprinting of histidine (His)-exposed proteins by combining previous approaches such as surface imprinting over nanostructures, utilization of metal coordination interactions, and adoption of aqueous precipitation polymerization capable of forming reversible physical crosslinks. With lysozyme as a model template bearing His residues, imprinted polymer nanoshells were grafted over vinyl-modified nanoparticles by aqueous precipitation copolymerization of a Cu(2+) chelating monomer with a temperature-responsive monomer carried out at 37 °C, above the volume phase-transition temperature (VPTT) of the final copolymer. The imprinted nanoshells showed significant temperature sensitivity and the template removal could be facilitated by swelling of the imprinted layers at 4 °C, below the VPTT. The resultant core-shell imprinted nanoparticles exhibited strikingly high rebinding selectivity against a variety of nontemplate proteins. An imprinting factor up to 22.7 was achieved, which is among the best values reported for protein imprinting, and a rather high specific binding capacity of 67.3 mg/g was obtained. Moreover, this approach was successfully extended to preliminary imprinting of hemoglobin, another protein with accessible His. Therefore, it may be a versatile method for fabrication of high-performance surface-imprinted nanoparticles toward His-exposed proteins.

  6. Histopathology-like categories based on endometrial imprint cytology in dysfunctional uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxi, Seema N; Panchal, Nirav S

    2015-01-01

    Cytology of the endometrium is an underused technique in diagnostic pathology. It has been used in the past for endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma. Only few studies have used cytology in the diagnosis of dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB). Endometrial imprint cytology has been rarely used except for application of immunocytochemistry in diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma. The present study was conducted to evaluate whether it is possible to assign histopathology-like diagnosis by imprint cytology and also to evaluate its usefulness in the assessment of patients of dysfunctional uterine bleeding of low clinical suspicion. Imprint smears were made from 93 curettage materials during a study of DUB. Blinded analysis of imprint smears was performed by using McKenzie's criteria and some criteria devised for the requirements of this study. Results of cytology were correlated with histopathology. Statistical analysis was carried out by GraphpadInStat Demo. Majority of the patterns classifiable in histopathology could also be classified in this study on imprint cytology. The overall sensitivity and specificity of cytology in the detection of endometrial patterns in DUB patients were 91.23% and 83.87%, respectively, although the sensitivities and specificities differ according to the phase of endometrium. Histopathology-like categories can be assigned on imprint smears in the diagnosis of DUB. Endometrial imprint cytology can be helpful in centers where histopathology laboratories are not available and even in well-established institutes. It is possible to improve the sensitivity and specificity with better imprinting techniques.

  7. Characterization of Conserved and Non-conserved Imprinted Genes in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to increase our understanding of the role of imprinted genes in swine reproduction we used two complementary approaches, analysis of imprinting by pyrosequencing, and expression profiling of parthenogenetic fetuses, to carry out a comprehensive analysis of this gene family in swine. Using A...

  8. Double-layer imprint lithography on wafers and foils from the submicrometer to the millimeter scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.F.; Yakimets, I.; Peter, M.; Meinders, E.R.; Huskens, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal imprint technique, double-layer nanoimprint lithography (dlNIL), is introduced, allowing complete filling of features in the dimensional range of submicrometer to millimeter. The imprinting and filling quality of dlNIL was studied on Si substrates as a model system and

  9. Dispersive solid-phase imprinting of proteins for the production of plastic antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashley, Jon; Feng, Xiaotong; Halder, Arnab

    2018-01-01

    We describe a novel dispersive solid-phase imprinting technique for the production of nano-sized molecularly imprinted polymers (nanoMIPs) as plastic antibodies. The template was immobilized on in-house synthesized magnetic microspheres instead of conventional glass beads. As a result, high...

  10. Protein imprinting and recognition via forming nanofilms on microbeads surfaces in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yan; Yan Changling; Wang Xuejing; Wang Gongke

    2009-01-01

    In this paler, we present a technique of forming nanofilms of poly-3-aminophenylboronic acid (pAPBA) on the surfaces of polystyrene (PS) microbeads for proteins (papain and trypsin) in aqueous. Papain was chosen as a model to study the feasibility of the technique and trypsin as an extension. Obtained core-shell microbeads were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and BET methods. The results show that pAPBA formed nanofilms (60-100 nm in thickness) on the surfaces of PS microbeads. The specific surface area of the papain-imprinted beads was about 180 m 2 g -1 and its pore size was 31 nm. These imprinted microbeads exhibit high recognition specificity and fast mass transfer kinetics. The specificity of these imprinted beads mainly originates from the spatial effect of imprinted sites. Because the protein-imprinted sites were located at, or close to, the surface, the imprinted beads have good site accessibility toward the template molecules. The facility of the imprinting protocol and the high recognition properties of imprinted microbeads make the approach an attractive solution to problems in the field of biotechnology.

  11. Multi-level single mode 2D polymer waveguide optical interconnects using nano-imprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.U.; Justice, J.; Petäjä, J.; Korhonen, T.; Boersma, A.; Wiegersma, S.; Karppinen, M.; Corbett, B.

    2015-01-01

    Single and multi-layer passive optical interconnects using single mode polymer waveguides are demonstrated using UV nano-imprint lithography. The fabrication tolerances associated with imprint lithography are investigated and we show a way to experimentally quantify a small variation in index

  12. Elevated expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor facilitates visual imprinting in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiko; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Suzuki, Shingo; Nakamori, Tomoharu; Sugiyama, Hayato; Kanamatsu, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2012-12-01

    With the aim of elucidating the neural mechanisms of early learning, we studied the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in visual imprinting in birds. The telencephalic neural circuit connecting the visual Wulst and intermediate medial mesopallium is critical for imprinting, and the core region of the hyperpallium densocellulare (HDCo), situated at the center of this circuit, has a key role in regulating the activity of the circuit. We found that the number of BDNF mRNA-positive cells in the HDCo was elevated during the critical period, particularly at its onset, on the day of hatching (P0). After imprinting training on P1, BDNF mRNA-positive cells in the HDCo increased in number, and tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkB was observed. BDNF infusion into the HDCo at P1 induced imprinting, even with a weak training protocol that does not normally induce imprinting. In contrast, K252a, an antagonist of Trk, inhibited imprinting. Injection of BDNF at P7, after the critical period, did not elicit imprinting. These results suggest that BDNF promotes the induction of imprinting through TrkB exclusively during the critical period. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Magnetic-graphene based molecularly imprinted polymer nanocomposite for the recognition of bovine hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junxia; Wang, Yuzhi; Liu, Yanjin; Zhang, Cenjin; Zhou, Yigang

    2015-11-01

    The protein imprinted technique combining surface imprinting and nanomaterials has been an attractive strategy for recognition and rapid separation of proteins. In this work, magnetic-graphene (MG) was chosen as the supporting substrate for the magnetic nanomaterials, which served to absorb the targeting imprinting molecules, bovine hemoglobin (BHb). Acryl amide (AAm) with a high affinity to BHb and N,N'- methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) were selected as the functional monomer and cross-linking agent, respectively. After in-situ polymerization, the proposed magnetic-graphene based molecularly imprinted polymer (MG-MIP) was obtained with a further extraction step of imprinted BHb. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), raman spectroscopy(RS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were employed to characterize the resulted MG-MIP. The maximum adsorption capability (Qmax) was determined by Langmuir Isotherm Plots and was 186.73 mg/g for imprinted nanomaterials (MIP) with an imprinting factor of 1.96. The selectivity of MG-MIP was investigated by using several proteins that are different in molecular mass and isoelectric points as the reference. The results showed that the shape memory effect of imprinted cavities, the size of proteins and the charge effect of proteins were the major factors for the selective recognition. The proposed method was also employed to specifically capture BHb from a binary protein mixture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimal synthesis of a Ni(II)-dimethylglyoxime ion-imprinted polymer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Ni(II)-dimethylglyoxime ion-imprinted polymer {Ni(II)-DMG IIP} was optimised by the uniform design experimental ... The bonds formed between the template and the functional monomers in ion- imprinted polymerisation reactions are weaker, non-covalent. (Arshady and Mosbach, 1981; ..... where the polymer did not form.

  15. Polycarbonate as an Elasto-Plastic Material Model for Simulation of the Microstructure Hot Imprint Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokas Šakalys

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermal imprint process of polymer micro-patterning is widely applied in areas such as manufacturing of optical parts, solar energy, bio-mechanical devices and chemical chips. Polycarbonate (PC, as an amorphous polymer, is often used in thermoforming processes because of its good replication characteristics. In order to obtain replicas of the best quality, the imprint parameters (e.g., pressure, temperature, time, etc. must be determined. Therefore finite element model of the hot imprint process of lamellar periodical microstructure into PC has been created using COMSOL Multiphysics. The mathematical model of the hot imprint process includes three steps: heating, imprinting and demolding. The material properties of amorphous PC strongly depend on the imprint temperature and loading pressure. Polycarbonate was modelled as an elasto-plastic material, since it was analyzed below the glass transition temperature. The hot imprint model was solved using the heat transfer and the solid stress-strain application modes with thermal contact problem between the mold and polycarbonate. It was used for the evaluation of temperature and stress distributions in the polycarbonate during the hot imprint process. The quality of the replica, by means of lands filling ratio, was determined as well.

  16. Smart coumarin-tagged imprinted polymers for the rapid detection of tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Judith V; Mirata, Fosca; Pérollier, Celine; Arotcarena, Michel; Bayoudh, Sami; Resmini, Marina

    2016-03-01

    A signalling molecularly imprinted polymer was synthesised for easy detection of tamoxifen and its metabolites. 6-Vinylcoumarin-4-carboxylic acid (VCC) was synthesised from 4-bromophenol to give a fluorescent monomer, designed to switch off upon binding of tamoxifen. Clomiphene, a chlorinated analogue, was used as the template for the imprinting, and its ability to quench the coumarin fluorescence when used in a 1:1 ratio was demonstrated. Tamoxifen and 4-hydroxytamoxifen were also shown to quench coumarin fluorescence. Imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were synthesised using VCC, methacrylic acid as a backbone monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker, and were ground and sieved to particle sizes ranging between 45 and 25 μm. Rebinding experiments demonstrate that the imprinted polymer shows very strong affinity for both clomiphene and tamoxifen, while the non-imprinted polymer shows negligible rebinding. The fluorescence of the imprinted polymer is quenched by clomiphene, tamoxifen and 4-hydroxytamoxifen. The switch off in fluorescence of the imprinted polymer under these conditions could also be detected under a UV lamp with the naked eye, making this matrix suitable for applications when coupled with a sample preparation system.

  17. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uygun, Murat; Feyzioğlu, Esra; Özçalışkan, Emir; Caka, Müşerref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO 3 solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m 2 /g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities

  18. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygun, Murat; Feyzioğlu, Esra; Özçalışkan, Emir; Caka, Müşerref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO3 solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m2/g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities.

  19. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uygun, Murat, E-mail: muygun@adu.edu.tr [Adnan Menderes University, Kocarl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Vocational and Training School (Turkey); Feyzioglu, Esra; Oezcal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Emir; Caka, Mueserref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgoel, Sinan [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey)

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO{sub 3} solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m{sup 2}/g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities.

  20. Genomic Imprinting and the Expression of Affect in Angelman Syndrome: What's in the Smile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chris; Horsler, Kate; Berg, Katy; Bellamy, Gail; Dick, Katie; Griffiths, Emily

    2007-01-01

    Background: Kinship theory (or the genomic conflict hypothesis) proposes that the phenotypic effects of genomic imprinting arise from conflict between paternally and maternally inherited alleles. A prediction arising for social behaviour from this theory is that imbalance in this conflict resulting from a deletion of a maternally imprinted gene,…

  1. Characterization of molecularly imprinted polymers using a new polar solvent titration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Di; Zhang, Yagang; Geer, Michael F; Shimizu, Ken D

    2014-07-01

    A new method of characterizing molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed and tested, which provides a more accurate means of identifying and measuring the molecular imprinting effect. In the new polar solvent titration method, a series of imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were prepared in solutions containing increasing concentrations of a polar solvent. The polar solvent additives systematically disrupted the templation and monomer aggregation processes in the prepolymerization solutions, and the extent of disruption was captured by the polymerization process. The changes in binding capacity within each series of polymers were measured, providing a quantitative assessment of the templation and monomer aggregation processes in the imprinted and non-imprinted polymers. The new method was tested using three different diphenyl phosphate imprinted polymers made using three different urea functional monomers. Each monomer had varying efficiencies of templation and monomer aggregation. The new MIP characterization method was found to have several advantages. To independently verify the new characterization method, the MIPs were also characterized using traditional binding isotherm analyses. The two methods appeared to give consistent conclusions. First, the polar solvent titration method is less susceptible to false positives in identifying the imprinting effect. Second, the method is able to differentiate and quantify changes in binding capacity, as measured at a fixed guest and polymer concentration, arising from templation or monomer aggregation processes in the prepolymerization solution. Third, the method was also easy to carry out, taking advantage of the ease of preparing MIPs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Charged hydrogels for post-loading, release, and molecular imprinting of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillemans, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304835137

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a technique to create template-shaped cavities in polymer matrices with memory of the template molecules, to be used in molecular recognition. Molecular imprinting of low molecular weight compounds is a well established technique used to create high affinity materials. On the

  3. Optimal synthesis of a Ni(II)-dimethylglyoxime ion-imprinted polymer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Ni(II)-dimethylglyoxime ion-imprinted polymer {Ni(II)-DMG IIP} was optimised by the uniform design experimental method and used to adsorb Ni(II) ions from water, soil and mine tailing samples. This aimed to improve the performance of this ion-imprinted polymer in trapping Ni(II) ions from soil and mine tailing samples ...

  4. Genomic imprinting status of IGF-II and H19 in placentas of fetal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    velop metabolic syndrome later in life, manifesting as obe- ... Venous blood samples were collected from both the parents .... and five families of the group B2 were informative for H19. .... that may have impacts on the imprinting status of imprinted genes ... This work was supported by a grant from National Natural Science.

  5. Sb(III)-Imprinted Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Sorbent Prepared by Hydrothermal-Assisted Surface Imprinting Technique for Selective Adsorption of Sb(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Hong-Bo

    2018-03-01

    Sb(III)-imprinted organic-inorganic hybrid sorbent was prepared by hydrothermal-assisted surface imprinting technique and was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled to an energy dispersive spectrometer and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms. Hydrothermal-assisted process can improve the selectivity of the Sb(III)-imprinted hybrid sorbent for Sb(III) due to stable control of temperature and pressure. The Sb(III)-imprinted hybrid sorbent IIS indicated higher selectivity for Sb(III), had high static adsorption capacity of 37.3 mg g-1 for Sb(III), displayed stable adsorption capacity in pH range from 4 to 8, reached an rapid adsorption equilibrium within 30 min. According to the correlation coefficient ( r 2 > 0.99), the experimental data fitted better the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir equilibrium isotherm.

  6. ZFP57 maintains the parent-of-origin-specific expression of the imprinted genes and differentially affects non-imprinted targets in mouse embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riso, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Marco; Kukreja, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    ZFP57 is necessary for maintaining repressive epigenetic modifications at Imprinting control regions (ICRs). In mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), ZFP57 binds ICRs (ICRBS) and many other loci (non-ICRBS). To address the role of ZFP57 on all its target sites, we performed high-throughput and multi......-locus analyses of inbred and hybrid mouse ESC lines carrying different gene knockouts. By using an allele-specific RNA-seq approach, we demonstrate that ZFP57 loss results in derepression of the imprinted allele of multiple genes in the imprinted clusters. We also find marked epigenetic differences between ICRBS...... the imprinted expression over long distances. At non-ICRBS, ZFP57 inactivation results in acquisition of epigenetic features that are characteristic of poised enhancers, suggesting that another function of ZFP57 in early embryogenesis is to repress cis-acting regulatory elements whose activity is not yet...

  7. Selectivity enhancement of phosphate based functional polymeric gels towards Uranium(VI) using ion imprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappa, Sankararao; Agarwal, Chhavi; Pandey, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    The imprinting of gel containing polymer chains of ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate (EGMP) for U(VI) ions were carried out. The U(VI) imprinting has been carried out in pure EGMP and in EGMP: poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) = 1:9 composition. Complexation of the monomer with template (U(VI)) followed by polymerization have been used to imprint the U(VI) onto the polymer chains. The comparison of uptake studies of U(VI) and Pu(IV) at 3 M HNO 3 shows increased selectivity of U(VI) relative to Pu(IV) for both the gel compositions. The less uptake of U(VI) for imprinted EGMP:PEGMA gel relative to pure imprinted EGMP gel at tracer level can be possibly due to the requirement of two EGMP units in the vicinity for U(VI) complexation. (author)

  8. Muzzle imprint mark: a patterned injury which may be constituted of intradermal blood extravasations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pircher, R; Bielefeld, L; Geisenberger, D; Große Perdekamp, M; Pollak, S; Thierauf-Emberger, A

    2014-11-01

    The muzzle imprint mark in contact shots is usually regarded as a patterned pressure abrasion depicting the barrel end as well as adjacent constructional components of the weapon. Due to parching after exposure to air, the affected skin assumes a brown color, especially along the contours of the impacting structures. Apart from this well-known type of epidermal damage, the imprint mark may also be formed by intradermal hemorrhages. In some cases, these intracutaneous bleedings manifest themselves as circular, curved or straight reddish lines mirroring the surface relief of the weapon's muzzle end. To estimate the frequency of skin hematomas in muzzle imprints, 35 consecutive contact shots to the head (temple, forehead, submental and occipital region) were evaluated. In 3 cases, the muzzle imprint mark exclusively consisted of intracutaneous bruises surrounding the bullet entrance hole. In 14 cases, the muzzle imprint was composed of both excoriations and intradermal hematomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of oxytetracycline imprinted magnetic polymer for application in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sneha; Rajput, Yudhishthir Singh; Singh, Gulab; Sharma, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic imprinted polymer was prepared by polymerization of methacrylate and ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate in the presence of oxytetracycline on the surface of iron magnetite. Selectivity of prepared polymer was calculated from ratio of partition coefficient of oxytetracycline for imprinted and non- imprinted polymer in water, acetonitrile, methanol and at different pH in aqueous buffer. pH of solvent exhibited pronounced effect on selectivity. Selectivity at pH 7.0, 6.0 and 5.0 was 36.0, 2.25 and 1.61 fold higher than at pH 4.0. Imprinted polymer was not selective for oxytetracycline in methanol. However, selectivity in water and acetonitrile was 19.42 and 2.86, respectively. Oxytetracycline did bind to imprinted polymer in water or aqueous buffer (pH 7.0) and could be eluted with methanol. Prepared polymer extracted 75-80 % oxytetracycline from water, honey and egg white.

  10. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Considerations on the Specific Sorption and Molecular Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejun Tong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a work aiming at thermodynamically and kinetically interpreting the specific sorption and recognition by a molecularly imprinted polymer. Using Boc-L-Phe-OH as a template, the imprinted material was prepared. The result indicates that the prepared polymer can well discriminate the imprint species from its analogue (Boc-D-Phe-OH, so as to adsorb more for the former but less for the latter. Kinetic analysis indicates that this specific sorption, in nature, can be a result of a preferential promotion. The imprint within the polymer causes a larger adsorption rate for the template than for the analogue. Thermodynamic study also implies that the molecular induction from the specific imprint to the template is larger than to the analogue, which thus makes the polymer capable of preferentially alluring the template to bind.

  11. A molecularly imprinted dual-emission carbon dot-quantum dot mesoporous hybrid for ratiometric determination of anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadi, Mohammad; Jalili, Roghayeh

    2018-02-01

    We report on a ratiometric fluorescent sensor based on dual-emission molecularly imprinted mesoporous silica embedded with carbon dots and CdTe quantum dots (mMIP@CDs/QDs) for celecoxib (CLX) as target molecule. The fluorescence of the embedded CDs is insensitive to the analyte while the green emissive QDs are selectively quenched by it. This effect is much stronger for the MIP than for the non-imprinted polymer, which indicates a good recognition ability of the mesoporous MIP. The hybrid sensor also exhibited good selectivity to CLX over other substances. The ratio of the intensity at two wavelengths (F550/F440) proportionally decreased with the increasing of CLX concentration in the range of 0.08-0.90 μM. A detection limit as low as 57 nM was achieved. Experimental results testified that this sensor was highly sensitive and selective for the detection of CLX in human serum samples.

  12. The Surface Imprinted Polystyrene Beads Prepared via Emulsion Templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Xiang CHENG; Guang Ling PEI; Ling Gang ZENG; Li Yong ZHANG; Chao LIU

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the surface imprinted cross-linked polystyrene beads were prepared via suspension polymerization with styrene (St), divinylbezene (DVB), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA1788), the mixture of Span 85 and xylene or the mixture of Span 85 and paraffin as monomer, cross-linking agent, dispersion stabilizer and templates, respectively. The results indicate that there are dense cavities on the surface of beads, and the diameter and density of cavity are related with the composition and amount of emulsion template. The forming mechanism of cavity from thermodynamics and dynamics was proposed.

  13. Introducing MINA--The Molecularly Imprinted Nanoparticle Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutov, Roman V; Guerreiro, Antonio; Moczko, Ewa; de Vargas-Sansalvador, Isabel Perez; Chianella, Iva; Whitcombe, Michael J; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2014-03-26

    A new ELISA- (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay)-like assay is demonstrated in which no elements of biological origin are used for molecular recognition or signaling. Composite imprinted nanoparticles that contain a catalytic core and which are synthesized by using a solid-phase approach can simultaneously act as recognition/signaling elements, and be used with minimal modifications to standard assay protocols. This assay provides a new route towards replacement of unstable biomolecules in immunoassays. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Memory, imprinting, and the brain: an inquiry into mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horn, Gabriel

    1985-01-01

    ... process, and advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which information is stored in the brain are recent and have been made on a limited front. The purpose of writing this book is to say something about these advances. The book is not, nor is it intended to be, a general review of this field, but gives an account of work in which I have been involved, over the past two decades or so, on habituation and imprinting. During that time modest success has been achieved in analysing habituation- a common change...

  15. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Chitosan-Glutaraldehyde for Monosodium Glutamate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyasuryani, Ani; Haryanto, Edi; Sulistyarti, Hermin; Rumhayati, Barlah

    2018-01-01

    Chitosan has been used as a functional monomer in the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) for monosodium glutamate (MSG). MIP is made from a mixture of 5 g chitosan, 50 mg glutaraldehyde and 2 g MSG, MIP is formed as flakes and beads. MIPs are identified by the FTIR spectrum, SEM image and their adsorption capabilities. MIP flakes and beads have no structural differences if they are based on FTIR or SEM spectra, but MIP adsorption capacity of beads higher than flakes. Adsorption capacity of MIP flakes is 548 mg/g and MIP beads 627 mg/g.

  16. Imprints of Nuclear Symmetry Energy on Properties of Neutron Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Gearheart, Michael; Hooker, Joshua; Krastev, Plamen G; Lin Weikang; Newton, William G; Wen Dehua; Xu Chang; Ko Cheming; Xu Jun

    2011-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in constraining the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy using terrestrial nuclear laboratory data. Around and below the nuclear matter saturation density, the experimental constraints start to merge in a relatively narrow region. At supra-saturation densities, there are, however, still large uncertainties. After summarizing the latest experimental constraints on the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy, we highlight a few recent studies examining imprints of nuclear symmetry energy on the binding energy, energy release during hadron-quark phase transitions as well as the ω-mode frequency and damping time of gravitational wave emission of neutron stars.

  17. Molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor based on nickel nanoparticle-modified electrodes for phenobarbital determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hui Cheng; Huang, Xue Yi; Lei, Fu Hou; Tan, Xue Cai; Wei, Yi Chun; Li, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Uniform Ni nanoparticles were synthesized. • A Ni nanoparticle-modified imprinted sensor was developed to detect phenobarbital. • The modified sensor exhibited high sensitivity for phenobarbital. • The electrochemical properties of the modified sensor were investigated. • The prepared sensor was applied to detect phenobarbital in fish samples. - Abstract: Uniform nickel nanoparticles were applied to improve the sensitivity of sensors for phenobarbital (PB) determination. A Ni nanoparticle-modified imprinted electrochemical sensor was developed by thermal polymerization with the use of methacrylic acid as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol maleic rosinate acrylate as the crosslinking agent. The chemical structures and morphologies of the imprinted films were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The success of the fabrication of Ni nanoparticles, as well as the Ni nanoparticle-modified imprinted electrochemical sensor, was confirmed by the analytical results. The electrochemical properties of the modified molecularly imprinted and non-imprinted polymer sensors were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and chronoamperometry. Results showed that the electrochemical properties of the molecularly imprinted sensor were remarkably different from those of the non-imprinted sensor. Linear responses of the imprinted sensor to PB were observed for concentrations ranging from 1.4 × 10 −7 mol L −1 to 1.3 × 10 −4 mol L −1 (r 2 = 0.9976), with a detection limit of 8.2 × 10 −9 mol L −1 (S/N = 3). The imprinted electrochemical sensor was used to determine PB in actual fish samples, in which average recoveries between 95.60% and 104.67% were achieved. The developed Ni nanoparticle-modified electrochemical sensor exhibited high sensitivity, high selectivity, and good recovery

  18. Molecular imprinted polypyrrole modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of tobramycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Özaltın, Nuran; Atar, Necip; Üstündağ, Zafer; Uzun, Lokman

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Atomic force microscopic images of (A) bare GCE and (B) TOB imprinted PPy/GCE surface. - Highlights: • Glassy carbon electrode based on molecularly imprinted polypyrrole was prepared. • The developed surfaces were characterized by AFM, FTIR, EIS and CV. • The developed nanosensor was applied to egg and milk samples. - Abstract: Over the past two decades, molecular imprinted polymers have attracted a broad interest from scientists in sensor development. In the preparation of molecular imprinted polymers the desired molecule (template) induces the creation of specific recognition sites in the polymer. In this study, the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) based on molecularly imprinted polypyrrole (PPy) was fabricated for the determination of tobramycin (TOB). The developed electrode was prepared by incorporation of a template molecule (TOB) during the electropolymerization of pyrrole on GCE in aqueous solution using cyclic voltammetry (CV) method. The performance of the imprinted and non-imprinted electrodes was evaluated by square wave voltammetry (SWV). The effect of pH, monomer and template concentrations, electropolymerization cycles on the performance of the imprinted and non-imprinted electrodes was investigated and optimized. The non-modified and TOB-imprinted surfaces were characterized by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and CV. The linearity range of TOB was 5.0 × 10 −10 –1.0 × 10 −8 M with the detection limit of 1.4 × 10 −10 M. The developed nanosensor was applied successfully for the determination of TOB in egg and milk

  19. MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION FOR TRACE ANALYSIS OF DIAZINON IN DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rahiminejad ، S. J. Shahtaheri ، M. R. Ganjali ، A. Rahimi Forushani ، F. Golbabaei

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Amongst organophosphate pesticides, the one most widely used and common environmental contaminant is diazinon; thus methods for its trace analysis in environmental samples must be developed. Use of diazinon imprinted polymers such as sorbents in solid phase extraction, is a prominent and novel application area of molecular imprinted polymers. For diazinon extraction, high performance liquid chromatography analysis was demonstrated in this study. During optimization of the molecular imprinted solid phase extraction procedure for efficient solid phase extraction of diazinon, Plackett-Burman design was conducted. Eight experimental factors with critical influence on molecular imprinted solid phase extraction performance were selected, and 12 different experimental runs based on Plackett-Burman design were carried out. The applicability of diazinon imprinted polymers as the sorbent in solid phase extraction, presented obtained good recoveries of diazinon from LC-grade water. An increase in pH caused an increase in the recovery on molecular imprinted solid phase extraction. From these results, the optimal molecular imprinted solid phase extraction procedure was as follows: solid phase extraction packing with 100 mg diazinon imprinted polymers; conditioning with 5 mL of methanol and 6 mL of LC-grade water; sample loading containing diazinon (pH=10; washing with 1 mL of LC-grade water, 1 mL LC- grade water containing 30% acetonitrile and 0.5 mL of acetonitrile, respectively; eluting with 1 mL of methanol containing 2% acetic acid. The percentage recoveries obtained by the optimized molecular imprinted solid phase extraction were more than 90% with drinking water spiked at different trace levels of diazinon. Generally speaking, the molecular imprinted solid phase extraction procedure and subsequent high performance liquid chromatography analysis can be a relatively fast and proper approach for qualitative and quantitative analysis of diazinon in

  20. Molecularly Imprinted Sol-Gel-Based QCM Sensor Arrays for the Detection and Recognition of Volatile Aldehydes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjun Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The detection and recognition of metabolically derived aldehydes, which have been identified as important products of oxidative stress and biomarkers of cancers; are considered as an effective approach for early cancer detection as well as health status monitoring. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor arrays based on molecularly imprinted sol-gel (MISG materials were developed in this work for highly sensitive detection and highly selective recognition of typical aldehyde vapors including hexanal (HAL; nonanal (NAL and bezaldehyde (BAL. The MISGs were prepared by a sol-gel procedure using two matrix precursors: tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS and tetrabutoxytitanium (TBOT. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APT; diethylaminopropyltrimethoxysilane (EAP and trimethoxy-phenylsilane (TMP were added as functional monomers to adjust the imprinting effect of the matrix. Hexanoic acid (HA; nonanoic acid (NA and benzoic acid (BA were used as psuedotemplates in view of their analogous structure to the target molecules as well as the strong hydrogen-bonding interaction with the matrix. Totally 13 types of MISGs with different components were prepared and coated on QCM electrodes by spin coating. Their sensing characters towards the three aldehyde vapors with different concentrations were investigated qualitatively. The results demonstrated that the response of individual sensors to each target strongly depended on the matrix precursors; functional monomers and template molecules. An optimization of the 13 MISG materials was carried out based on statistical analysis such as principle component analysis (PCA; multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA. The optimized sensor array consisting of five channels showed a high discrimination ability on the aldehyde vapors; which was confirmed by quantitative comparison with a randomly selected array. It was suggested that both the molecularly imprinting (MIP effect and the matrix

  1. Improvement of imprinting effect of ionic liquid molecularly imprinted polymers by use of a molecular crowding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Man; Yang, Jian; Sun, Ya Kun; Bai, Xi; Wu, Tao; Liu, Zhao Sheng; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to improve the imprinting effect of ionic liquid molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) by use of a molecular crowding agent. The ionic liquid 1-vinyl-3-ethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([VEIm][BF 4 ]) was used as the functional monomer and aesculetin was used as the template molecule in a crowding environment, which was made up of a tetrahydrofuran solution of polystyrene. The ionic liquid MIPs that were prepared in the crowding environment displayed an enhanced imprinting effect. NMR peak shifts of active hydrogen of aesculetin suggested that interaction between the functional monomer and the template could be increased by the use of a crowding agent in the self-assembly process. The retention and selectivity of aesculetin were affected greatly by high molecular crowding, the amount of high molecular weight crowding agent, and the ratio of [VEIm][BF 4 ] to aesculetin. The optimal MIPs were used as solid-phase extraction sorbents to extract aesculetin from Cichorium glandulosum. A calibration curve was obtained with aesculetin concentrations from 0.0005 to 0.05 mg mL -1 (correlation coefficient R 2 of 0.9999, y = 1519x + 0.0923). The limit of quantification was 0.12 μg mL -1 , and the limit of detection was 0.05 μg mL -1 . The absolute recovery of aesculetin was (80 ± 2)% (n = 3), and the purity of aesculetin was (92 ± 0.5)% (n = 5). As a conclusion, molecular crowding is an effective approach to obtain ionic liquid MIPs with high selectivity even in a polar solvent environment.

  2. Effects of Assisted Reproduction Technology on Placental Imprinted Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Yukiko; Aoki, Chizu; Tamaki-Ishihara, Yuko; Fukuda, Yusuke; Kitamura, Mamoru; Matsue, Yoichi; So, Akiko; Morita, Mineto

    2010-01-01

    We used placental tissue to compare the imprinted gene expression of IGF2, H19, KCNQ1OT1, and CDKN1C of singletons conceived via assisted reproduction technology (ART) with that of spontaneously conceived (SC) singletons. Of 989 singletons examined (ART n = 65; SC n = 924), neonatal weight was significantly lower (P < .001) in the ART group than in the SC group, but placental weight showed no significant difference. Gene expression analyzed by real-time PCR was similar for both groups with appropriate-for-date (AFD) birth weight. H19 expression was suppressed in fetal growth retardation (FGR) cases in the ART and SC groups compared with AFD cases (P < .02 and P < .05, resp.). In contrast, CDKN1C expression was suppressed in FGR cases in the ART group (P < .01), while KCNQ1OT1 expression was hyperexpressed in FGR cases in the SC group (P < .05). As imprinted gene expression patterns differed between the ART and SC groups, we speculate that ART modifies epigenetic status even though the possibilities always exist. PMID:20706653

  3. New molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor for determination of ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Atar, Necip

    2016-04-01

    In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H3PW12O40, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was presented for determination of ochrattoxin A (OCH). The developed surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. OCH imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 100mM phenol as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH6.0) containing 25 mM OCH. The linearity range and the detection limit of the method were calculated as 5.0 × 10(-11) - 1.5 × 10(-9)M and 1.6 × 10(-11) M, respectively. The voltammetric sensor was applied to grape juice and wine samples with good selectivity and recovery. The stability of the voltammetric sensor was also reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular Imprinting Technology in Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Emir Diltemiz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs as artificial antibodies have received considerable scientific attention in the past years in the field of (biosensors since they have unique features that distinguish them from natural antibodies such as robustness, multiple binding sites, low cost, facile preparation and high stability under extreme operation conditions (higher pH and temperature values, etc.. On the other hand, the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM is an analytical tool based on the measurement of small mass changes on the sensor surface. QCM sensors are practical and convenient monitoring tools because of their specificity, sensitivity, high accuracy, stability and reproducibility. QCM devices are highly suitable for converting the recognition process achieved using MIP-based memories into a sensor signal. Therefore, the combination of a QCM and MIPs as synthetic receptors enhances the sensitivity through MIP process-based multiplexed binding sites using size, 3D-shape and chemical function having molecular memories of the prepared sensor system toward the target compound to be detected. This review aims to highlight and summarize the recent progress and studies in the field of (biosensor systems based on QCMs combined with molecular imprinting technology.

  5. Molecular Imprinting Technology in Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emir Diltemiz, Sibel; Keçili, Rüstem; Ersöz, Arzu; Say, Rıdvan

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as artificial antibodies have received considerable scientific attention in the past years in the field of (bio)sensors since they have unique features that distinguish them from natural antibodies such as robustness, multiple binding sites, low cost, facile preparation and high stability under extreme operation conditions (higher pH and temperature values, etc.). On the other hand, the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) is an analytical tool based on the measurement of small mass changes on the sensor surface. QCM sensors are practical and convenient monitoring tools because of their specificity, sensitivity, high accuracy, stability and reproducibility. QCM devices are highly suitable for converting the recognition process achieved using MIP-based memories into a sensor signal. Therefore, the combination of a QCM and MIPs as synthetic receptors enhances the sensitivity through MIP process-based multiplexed binding sites using size, 3D-shape and chemical function having molecular memories of the prepared sensor system toward the target compound to be detected. This review aims to highlight and summarize the recent progress and studies in the field of (bio)sensor systems based on QCMs combined with molecular imprinting technology. PMID:28245588

  6. Molecularly imprinted hydrogels as functional active packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Peña, Elena; González-Vallejo, Victoria; Rico-Yuste, Alberto; Barbosa-Pereira, Letricia; Cruz, José Manuel; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of novel molecularly imprinted hydrogels (MIHs) for the natural antioxidant ferulic acid (FA), and their application as packaging materials to prevent lipid oxidation of butter. A library of MIHs was synthesized using a synthetic surrogate of FA, 3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)propionic acid (HFA), as template molecule, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as cross-linker, and 1-allylpiperazine (1-ALPP) or 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), in combination with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) as functional monomers, at different molar concentrations. The DMAEMA/HEMA-based MIHs showed the greatest FA loading capacity, while the 1-ALLP/HEMA-based polymers exhibited the highest imprinting effect. During cold storage, FA-loaded MIHs protected butter from oxidation and led to TBARs values that were approximately half those of butter stored without protection and 25% less than those recorded for butter covered with hydrogels without FA, potentially extending the shelf life of butter. Active packaging is a new field of application for MIHs with great potential in the food industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Extraction of tributyltin by magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Shanshan; Pan, Daodong; Hu, Futao; Gan, Ning; Li, Yi; Cao, Yuting; Wu, Dazhen; Yang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    We have prepared core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for recognition and extraction of tributyl tin (TBT). The use of particles strongly improves the imprinting effect and leads to fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacities. The functional monomer acrylamide was grafted to the surface of Fe 3 O 4 nanospheres in two steps, and MIP layers were then formed on the surface by creating a MIP layer on the surface consisting of poly(ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) with a TBT template. The particles were characterized in terms of morphological, magnetic, adsorption, and recognition properties. We then have developed a method for the extraction of TBT from spiked mussel (Mytilidae), and its determination by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method has a limit of detection of 1.0 ng g −1 (n = 5) of TBT, with a linear response between 5.0 and 1,000 ng g −1 . The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace TBT in marine food samples with recoveries in the range of 78.3–95.6 %. (author)

  8. Detection of Waterborne Viruses Using High Affinity Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Zeynep; Gittens, Micah; Guerreiro, Antonio; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Walker, Jimmy; Piletsky, Sergey; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2015-07-07

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are artificial receptor ligands which can recognize and specifically bind to a target molecule. They are more resistant to chemical and biological damage and inactivation than antibodies. Therefore, target specific-MIP nanoparticles are aimed to develop and implemented to biosensors for the detection of biological toxic agents such as viruses, bacteria, and fungi toxins that cause many diseases and death due to the environmental contamination. For the first time, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) targeting the bacteriophage MS2 as the template was investigated using a novel solid-phase synthesis method to obtain the artificial affinity ligand for the detection and removal of waterborne viruses through optical-based sensors. A high affinity between the artificial ligand and the target was found, and a regenerative MIP-based virus detection assay was successfully developed using a new surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-biosensor which provides an alternative technology for the specific detection and removal of waterborne viruses that lead to high disease and death rates all over the world.

  9. Sensitive determination of citrinin based on molecular imprinted electrochemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Necip; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Eren, Tanju

    2016-01-01

    In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H3PW12O40, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was prepared for the determination of citrinin (CIT). The developed surfaces were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. CIT imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 80.0 mM pyrrole as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 20.0 mM CIT. The linearity range and the detection limit of the developed method were calculated as 1.0 × 10-12-1.0 × 10-10 M and 2.0 × 10-13 M, respectively. In addition, the voltammetric sensor was applied to rye samples. The stability and selectivity of the voltammetric sensor were also reported.

  10. Preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers simazine as material potentiometric sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bow Yohandri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imprinting technology is a promising technique for creating recognition elements for selected compounds and has been successfully applied for synthesis of environmental pollutants such as simazine. Simazine is a pesticide ingredient that is commonly used in agriculture, which has devastating effects on the environment if used excessively. Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP provides cavities to form a particular space generated by removing the template when the polymer has formed. In this study, MIP using simazine as template had been made by the cooling-heating method and used as a material potentiometric sensor for detecting simazine. A template (simazine was incorporated into a pre-polymerization solution that contains a methacrylic acid as functional monomer, an ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross linker, and benzoyl peroxide as initiator. Characterization was performed by scanning electron microscope (SEM and fourier transforms infra-red (FTIR. The FTIR spectra of the MIP showed that the peaks of amine group decrease significantly, indicating that the simazine concentration decreases drastically. Characterization by SEM images showing the broadest pore size distribution with the highest number of pores in the MIP prepared under the heating time of 150 min. The MIPs therefore could be applied as a simazine sensor.

  11. Large area nanoimprint by substrate conformal imprint lithography (SCIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuuren, Marc A.; Megens, Mischa; Ni, Yongfeng; van Sprang, Hans; Polman, Albert

    2017-06-01

    Releasing the potential of advanced material properties by controlled structuring materials on sub-100-nm length scales for applications such as integrated circuits, nano-photonics, (bio-)sensors, lasers, optical security, etc. requires new technology to fabricate nano-patterns on large areas (from cm2 to 200 mm up to display sizes) in a cost-effective manner. Conventional high-end optical lithography such as stepper/scanners is highly capital intensive and not flexible towards substrate types. Nanoimprint has had the potential for over 20 years to bring a cost-effective, flexible method for large area nano-patterning. Over the last 3-4 years, nanoimprint has made great progress towards volume production. The main accelerator has been the switch from rigid- to wafer-scale soft stamps and tool improvements for step and repeat patterning. In this paper, we discuss substrate conformal imprint lithography (SCIL), which combines nanometer resolution, low patterns distortion, and overlay alignment, traditionally reserved for rigid stamps, with the flexibility and robustness of soft stamps. This was made possible by a combination of a new soft stamp material, an inorganic resist, combined with an innovative imprint method. Finally, a volume production solution will be presented, which can pattern up to 60 wafers per hour.

  12. Duplex-imprinted nano well arrays for promising nanoparticle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangping; Manz, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    A large area nano-duplex-imprint technique is presented in this contribution using natural cicada wings as stamps. The glassy wings of the cicada, which are abundant in nature, exhibit strikingly interesting nanopillar structures over their membrane. This technique, with excellent performance despite the nonplanar surface of the wings, combines both top-down and bottom-up nanofabrication techniques. It transitions micro-nanofabrication from a cleanroom environment to the bench. Two different materials, dicing tape with an acrylic layer and a UV optical adhesive, are used to make replications at the same time, thus achieving duplex imprinting. The promise of a large volume of commercial manufacturing of these nanostructure elements can be envisaged through this contribution to speeding up the fabrication process and achieving a higher throughput. The contact angle of the replicated nanowell arrays before and after oxygen plasma was measured. Gold nanoparticles (50 nm) were used to test how the nanoparticles behaved on the untreated and plasma-treated replica surface. The experiments show that promising nanoparticle self-assembly can be obtained.

  13. Intergenerational impact of paternal lifetime exposures to both folic acid deficiency and supplementation on reproductive outcomes and imprinted gene methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Lundi; Chan, Donovan; Aarabi, Mahmoud; Landry, Mylène; Behan, Nathalie A; MacFarlane, Amanda J; Trasler, Jacquetta

    2017-07-01

    methylation at a global level and at the differentially methylated regions of imprinted genes (H19, Imprinted Maternally Expressed Transcript (Non-Protein Coding)-H19, Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Polypeptide N-Snrpn, KCNQ1 Opposite Strand/Antisense Transcript 1 (Non-Protein Coding)-Kcnq1ot1, Paternally Expressed Gene 1-Peg1 and Paternally Expressed Gene 3-Peg3) was assessed by luminometric methylation analysis and bisulfite pyrosequencing, respectively, in F1 sperm, F2 E18.5 placenta and F2 E18.5 brain cortex. F1 males exhibited lower sperm counts following lifetime exposure to both folic acid deficiency and the highest dose of folic acid supplementation (20FS), (both P methylation across imprinted gene H19, P methylation across the imprinted genes Snrpn and Peg3 in F2 E18.5 placenta, ≥50% of individual sites tested in Peg1 and/or Peg3 were affected in the 7FD and 10FS groups. Inter-individual alterations in Peg1 methylation were found in F2 E18.5 day 10FS group brain cortex (P methylation in sperm. This study was supported by a grant to J.M.T. from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR #89944). The authors declare they have no conflicts of interest. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Preparation of Molecularly Imprinted Composite Membranes for Inducing Bergenin Crystallization in Supercritical CO2 and Adsorption Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wencheng; Wang, Ruixia; Cui, Yanfang; Hong, Lile; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Xingyuan

    2012-01-01

    The process of molecular imprinting is composed of three steps: covalent conjugate or noncovalent adduct between a functional monomer and a template molecule, which is the preorganization step; polymerization of this monomer-template conjugate (or adduct) and removal of the template from the polymer. In the above procedures, the molecular memory is strongly dependent on the formation and status of the template-monomer preorganization conjugate (or adduct). Therefore, to study these conjugates/adducts in detail is crucially important for understanding the imprinting mechanism and designing efficient molecular imprinting systems. On the other hand, one of the most important and facile ways to realize the molecular imprinting is using the molecularly imprinted membranes (MIMs), which were first introduced by Piletsky et al. In MIMs systems, the combination of the imprinting technique can provide membranes with specific selectivity for the separation of targeted organic compounds and thus make the MIMs possess the advantages of both molecular imprinting and membrane technology

  15. Preparation of Molecularly Imprinted Composite Membranes for Inducing Bergenin Crystallization in Supercritical CO{sub 2} and Adsorption Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wencheng; Wang, Ruixia; Cui, Yanfang; Hong, Lile [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei (China); Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Xingyuan [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2012-02-15

    The process of molecular imprinting is composed of three steps: covalent conjugate or noncovalent adduct between a functional monomer and a template molecule, which is the preorganization step; polymerization of this monomer-template conjugate (or adduct) and removal of the template from the polymer. In the above procedures, the molecular memory is strongly dependent on the formation and status of the template-monomer preorganization conjugate (or adduct). Therefore, to study these conjugates/adducts in detail is crucially important for understanding the imprinting mechanism and designing efficient molecular imprinting systems. On the other hand, one of the most important and facile ways to realize the molecular imprinting is using the molecularly imprinted membranes (MIMs), which were first introduced by Piletsky et al. In MIMs systems, the combination of the imprinting technique can provide membranes with specific selectivity for the separation of targeted organic compounds and thus make the MIMs possess the advantages of both molecular imprinting and membrane technology.

  16. Interfacial pattern changes of imprinted multilayered material in milli- and microscales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura, Kazuhiro; Tokumaru, Kazuki; Tsumori, Fujio

    2018-06-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a technique that transfers a mold pattern of nanometer order to the surface of a resist material by heating and pressing. NIL is an excellent technology in terms of high productivity, accuracy, and resolution. Recently, NIL has been applied to the processing of different multilayered materials, in which it is possible to process multiple materials simultaneously. In this processing of multilayered materials, it is possible to form an interfacial pattern between the upper layer and the lower layer simultaneously with patterning on the mold surface. This interface pattern can be controlled by the deformation characteristics, initial thickness, and so forth. In this research, we compared the interfacial pattern changes of imprinted multilayered materials in milli- and microscales. For multilayered imprint using multiple materials, it is important to know the flow of the resist and its dependence on the scale. If there is similarity in the relationship produced by the scale on the imprinted samples, a process design with a number of feedbacks could be realized. It also becomes easier to treat structures in the millimeter scale for the experiment. In this study, we employed micropowder imprint (µPI) for multilayered material imprint. A compound sheet of alumina powder and polymer binder was used for imprint. Two similar experiments in different scales, micro- and millimeter scales, were carried out. Results indicate that the interfacial patterns of micro- and millimeter-scale-imprinted samples are similar.

  17. The evolution of the DLK1-DIO3 imprinted domain in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Edwards

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive, domain-wide comparative analysis of genomic imprinting between mammals that imprint and those that do not can provide valuable information about how and why imprinting evolved. The imprinting status, DNA methylation, and genomic landscape of the Dlk1-Dio3 cluster were determined in eutherian, metatherian, and prototherian mammals including tammar wallaby and platypus. Imprinting across the whole domain evolved after the divergence of eutherian from marsupial mammals and in eutherians is under strong purifying selection. The marsupial locus at 1.6 megabases, is double that of eutherians due to the accumulation of LINE repeats. Comparative sequence analysis of the domain in seven vertebrates determined evolutionary conserved regions common to particular sub-groups and to all vertebrates. The emergence of Dlk1-Dio3 imprinting in eutherians has occurred on the maternally inherited chromosome and is associated with region-specific resistance to expansion by repetitive elements and the local introduction of noncoding transcripts including microRNAs and C/D small nucleolar RNAs. A recent mammal-specific retrotransposition event led to the formation of a completely new gene only in the eutherian domain, which may have driven imprinting at the cluster.

  18. Synthesis and Theoretical Study of Molecularly Imprinted Nanospheres for Recognition of Tocopherols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chartchalerm Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imprinting is a technology that facilitates the production of artificial receptors toward compounds of interest. The molecularly imprinted polymers act as artificial antibodies, artificial receptors, or artificial enzymes with the added benefit over their biological counterparts of being highly durable. In this study, we prepared molecularly imprinted polymers for the purpose of binding specifically to tocopherol (vitamin E and its derivative, tocopherol acetate. Binding of the imprinted polymers to the template was found to be two times greater than that of the control, non-imprinted polymers, when using only 10 mg of polymers. Optimization of the rebinding solvent indicated that ethanol-water at a molar ratio of 6:4 (v/v was the best solvent system as it enhanced the rebinding performance of the imprinted polymers toward both tocopherol and tocopherol acetate with a binding capacity of approximately 2 mg/g of polymer. Furthermore, imprinted nanospheres against tocopherol was successfully prepared by precipitation polymerization with ethanol-water at a molar ratio of 8:2 (v/v as the optimal rebinding solvent. Computer simulation was also performed to provide mechanistic insights on the binding mode of template-monomer complexes. Such polymers show high potential for industrial and medical applications, particularly for selective separation of tocopherol and derivatives.

  19. Synthesis of molecular imprinting polymers for extraction of gallic acid from urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawani, Showkat Ahmad; Sen, Tham Soon; Ibrahim, Mohammad Nasir Mohammad

    2018-02-21

    The molecularly imprinted polymers for gallic acid were synthesized by precipitation polymerization. During the process of synthesis a non-covalent approach was used for the interaction of template and monomer. In the polymerization process, gallic acid was used as a template, acrylic acid as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile as an initiator and acetonitrile as a solvent. The synthesized imprinted and non-imprinted polymer particles were characterized by using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The rebinding efficiency of synthesized polymer particles was evaluated by batch binding assay. The highly selective imprinted polymer for gallic acid was MIPI1 with a composition (molar ratio) of 1:4:20, template: monomer: cross-linker, respectively. The MIPI1 showed highest binding efficiency (79.50%) as compared to other imprinted and non-imprinted polymers. The highly selective imprinted polymers have successfully extracted about 80% of gallic acid from spiked urine sample.

  20. Effect of template on chiral separation of phenylalanine using molecularly imprinted membrane in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, N.U.

    2014-01-01

    Wet phase inversion method was used to prepare L-Phenylalanine (L-Phe) and D-Phenylalanine (D-Phe) imprinted poly ((acrylonitrile)-co-(acrylic acid)) membranes for chiral separation. Ultrafiltration experiments were conducted to evaluate the chiral separation ability of the prepared membrane towards racemate aqueous solution of Phenylalanine. The continuous permselectivity was observed by novel membrane. The chiral resolution ability of L-Phe imprinted membrane was much better than that of D-Phe. It was observed that both membranes simultaneously, selectively reject, selectively adsorbed and selectively permeate solute. The achieved adsorption selectivities of L-Phe imprinted membrane (AlphaAds)L and D-Phe imprinted membrane (AlphaAds)D were 2.6 and 2.40 respectively. Permselectivity of L-Phe imprinted membrane (AlphaPerm)L was 2.56 while D-Phe imprinted membrane permselectivity (AlphaPerm)D was 2.03. The rejection selectivities of L-Phe and D-Phe imprinted membranes were (AlphaRej)L=0.32 and (AlphaRej)D =0.28 respectively. (author)

  1. Sexual dimorphism in parental imprint ontogeny and contribution to embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourc'his, Déborah; Proudhon, Charlotte

    2008-01-30

    Genomic imprinting refers to the functional non-equivalence of parental genomes in mammals that results from the parent-of-origin allelic expression of a subset of genes. Parent-specific expression is dependent on the germ line acquisition of DNA methylation marks at imprinting control regions (ICRs), coordinated by the DNA-methyltransferase homolog DNMT3L. We discuss here how the gender-specific stages of DNMT3L expression may have influenced the various sexually dimorphic aspects of genomic imprinting: (1) the differential developmental timing of methylation establishment at paternally and maternally imprinted genes in each parental germ line, (2) the differential dependence on DNMT3L of parental methylation imprint establishment, (3) the unequal duration of paternal versus maternal methylation imprints during germ cell development, (4) the biased distribution of methylation-dependent ICRs towards the maternal genome, (5) the different genomic organization of paternal versus maternal ICRs, and finally (6) the overwhelming contribution of maternal germ line imprints to development compared to their paternal counterparts.

  2. Imprinted Genes and the Environment: Links to the Toxic Metals Arsenic, Cadmium and Lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Smeester

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR, some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology.

  3. Imprinting modulates processing of visual information in the visual wulst of chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchimura Motoaki

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imprinting behavior is one form of learning and memory in precocial birds. With the aim of elucidating of the neural basis for visual imprinting, we focused on visual information processing. Results A lesion in the visual wulst, which is similar functionally to the mammalian visual cortex, caused anterograde amnesia in visual imprinting behavior. Since the color of an object was one of the important cues for imprinting, we investigated color information processing in the visual wulst. Intrinsic optical signals from the visual wulst were detected in the early posthatch period and the peak regions of responses to red, green, and blue were spatially organized from the caudal to the nasal regions in dark-reared chicks. This spatial representation of color recognition showed plastic changes, and the response pattern along the antero-posterior axis of the visual wulst altered according to the color the chick was imprinted to. Conclusion These results indicate that the thalamofugal pathway is critical for learning the imprinting stimulus and that the visual wulst shows learning-related plasticity and may relay processed visual information to indicate the color of the imprint stimulus to the memory storage region, e.g., the intermediate medial mesopallium.

  4. Imprinted Genes and the Environment: Links to the Toxic Metals Arsenic, Cadmium and Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeester, Lisa; Yosim, Andrew E.; Nye, Monica D.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology. PMID:24921406

  5. Imprinted genes and the environment: links to the toxic metals arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeester, Lisa; Yosim, Andrew E; Nye, Monica D; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K; Fry, Rebecca C

    2014-06-11

    Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology.

  6. Thermometric sensing of nitrofurantoin by noncovalently imprinted polymers containing two complementary functional monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athikomrattanakul, Umporn; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Scheller, Frieder W

    2011-10-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for nitrofurantoin (NFT) recognition addressing in parallel of two complementary functional groups were created using a noncovalent imprinting approach. Specific tailor-made functional monomers were synthesized: a diaminopyridine derivative as the receptor for the imide residue and three (thio)urea derivatives for the interaction with the nitro group of NFT. A significantly improved binding of NFT to the new MIPs was revealed from the imprinting factor, efficiency of binding, affinity constants and maximum binding number as compared to previously reported MIPs, which addressed either the imide or the nitro residue. Substances possessing only one functionality (either the imide group or nitro group) showed significantly weaker binding to the new imprinted polymers than NFT. However, the compounds lacking both functionalities binds extremely weak to all imprinted polymers. The new imprinted polymers were applied in a flow-through thermistor in organic solvent for the first time. The MIP-thermistor allows the detection of NFT down to a concentration of 5 μM in acetonitrile + 0.2% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The imprinting factor of 3.91 at 0.1 mM of NFT as obtained by thermistor measurements is well comparable to the value obtained by batch binding experiments. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. DNA sequence polymorphisms within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha (Gsα-encoding (GNAS genomic imprinting domain are associated with performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes which are epigenetically regulated via genomic imprinting can be potential targets for artificial selection during animal breeding. Indeed, imprinted loci have been shown to underlie some important quantitative traits in domestic mammals, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In this candidate gene study, we have identified novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS domain on bovine chromosome 13 and genetic merit for a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian sires. The mammalian GNAS domain consists of a number of reciprocally-imprinted, alternatively-spliced genes which can play a major role in growth, development and disease in mice and humans. Based on the current annotation of the bovine GNAS domain, four of the SNPs analysed (rs43101491, rs43101493, rs43101485 and rs43101486 were located upstream of the GNAS gene, while one SNP (rs41694646 was located in the second intron of the GNAS gene. The final SNP (rs41694656 was located in the first exon of transcripts encoding the putative bovine neuroendocrine-specific protein NESP55, resulting in an aspartic acid-to-asparagine amino acid substitution at amino acid position 192. Results SNP genotype-phenotype association analyses indicate that the single intronic GNAS SNP (rs41694646 is associated (P ≤ 0.05 with a range of performance traits including milk yield, milk protein yield, the content of fat and protein in milk, culled cow carcass weight and progeny carcass conformation, measures of animal body size, direct calving difficulty (i.e. difficulty in calving due to the size of the calf and gestation length. Association (P ≤ 0.01 with direct calving difficulty (i.e. due to calf size and maternal calving difficulty (i.e. due to the maternal pelvic width size was also observed at the rs

  8. Does imprint cytology improve the accuracy of transrectal prostate needle biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Hamide; Bulut, Burak Besir; Bahar, Abdulkadir Yasir; Bahar, Mustafa Remzi; Seringec, Nurten; Resim, Sefa; Çıralık, Harun

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of imprint cytology of core needle biopsy specimens in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Between December 24, 2011 and May 9, 2013, patients with an abnormal DRE and/or serum PSA level of >2.5 ng/mL underwent transrectal prostate needle biopsy. Samples with positive imprint cytology but negative initial histologic exam underwent repeat sectioning and histological examination. 1,262 transrectal prostate needle biopsy specimens were evaluated from 100 patients. Malignant imprint cytology was found in 236 specimens (18.7%), 197 (15.6%) of which were confirmed by histologic examination, giving an initial 3.1% (n = 39) rate of discrepant results by imprint cytology. Upon repeat sectioning and histologic examination of these 39 biopsy samples, 14 (1.1% of the original specimens) were then diagnosed as malignant, 3 (0.2%) as atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP), and 5 (0.4%) as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). Overall, 964 (76.4%) specimens were negative for malignancy by imprint cytology. Seven (0.6%) specimens were benign by cytology but malignant cells were found on histological evaluation. On imprint cytology examination, nonmalignant but abnormal findings were seen in 62 specimens (4.9%). These were all due to benign processes. After reexamination, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, false-positive rate, false-negative rate of imprint preparations were 98.1, 96.9, 98.4, 92.8, 99.3, 1.6, 3.1%, respectively. Imprint cytology is valuable tool for evaluating TRUS-guided core needle biopsy specimens from the prostate. Use of imprint cytology in combination with histopathology increases diagnostic accuracy when compared with histopathologic assessment alone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Imprint cytology on microcalcifications excised by Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy: A rapid preliminary diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drouveli Theodora

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate imprint cytology in the context of specimens with microcalcifications derived from Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy (VABB. Patients and methods A total of 93 women with microcalcifications BI-RADS 3 and 4 underwent VABB and imprint samples were examined. VABB was performed on Fischer's table using 11-gauge Mammotome vacuum probes. A mammogram of the cores after the procedure confirmed the excision of microcalcifications. For the application of imprint cytology, the cores with microcalcifications confirmed by mammogram were gently rolled against glass microscope slides and thus imprint smears were made. For rapid preliminary diagnosis Diff-Quick stain, modified Papanicolaou stain and May Grunwald Giemsa were used. Afterwards, the core was dipped into a CytoRich Red Collection fluid for a few seconds in order to obtain samples with the use of the specimen wash. After the completion of cytological procedures, the core was prepared for routine histological study. The pathologist was blind to the preliminary cytological results. The cytological and pathological diagnoses were comparatively evaluated. Results According to the pathological examination, 73 lesions were benign, 15 lesions were carcinomas (12 ductal carcinomas in situ, 3 invasive ductal carcinomas, and 5 lesions were precursor: 3 cases of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH and 2 cases of lobular neoplasia (LN. The observed sensitivity and specificity of the cytological imprints for cancer were 100% (one-sided, 97.5% CI: 78.2%–100%. Only one case of ADH could be detected by imprint cytology. Neither of the two LN cases was detected by the imprints. The imprints were uninformative in 11 out of 93 cases (11.8%. There was no uninformative case among women with malignancy. Conclusion Imprint cytology provides a rapid, accurate preliminary diagnosis in a few minutes. This method might contribute to the diagnosis of early breast cancer and possibly attenuates

  10. Imprint switch mutations at Rasgrf1 support conflict hypothesis of imprinting and define a growth control mechanism upstream of IGF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Nadia M.; Park, Yoon Jung; Shirali, Aditya S.; Cleland, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Rasgrf1 is imprinted and expressed preferentially from the paternal allele in neonatal mouse brain. At weaning, expression becomes biallelic. Using a mouse model, we assayed the effects of perturbing imprinted Rasgrf1 expression in mice with the following imprinted expression patterns: monoallelic paternal (wild type), monoallelic maternal (maternal only), biallelic (both alleles transcribed), and null (neither allele transcribed). All genotypes exhibit biallelic expression around weaning. Consequences of this transient imprinting perturbation are manifested as overall size differences that correspond to the amount of neonatal Rasgrf1 expressed and are persistent, extending into adulthood. Biallelic mice are the largest and overexpress Rasgrf1 relative to wild-type mice, null mice are the smallest and underexpress Rasgrf1 as neonates, and the two monoallelically expressing genotypes are intermediate and indistinguishable from one another, in both size and Rasgrf1 expression level. Importantly, these data support one of the key underlying assumptions of the “conflict hypothesis” that describes the evolution of genomic imprinting in mammals and supposes that equivalent amounts of imprinted gene expression produce equivalent phenotypes, regardless of which parental allele is transcribed. Concordant with the difference in overall body size, we identify differences in IGF-1 levels, both in serum protein and as liver transcript, and identify additional differential expression of components upstream of IGF-1 release in the GH/IGF-1 axis. These data suggest that imprinted Rasgrf1 expression affects GH/IGF-1 axis function, and that the consequences of Rasgrf1 inputs to this axis persist beyond the time period when expression is restricted via epigenetic mechanisms, suggesting that proper neonatal Rasgrf1 expression levels are critical for development. PMID:19513790

  11. Chromosomal mutations and chromosome loss measured in a new human-hamster hybrid cell line, ALC: studies with colcemid, ultraviolet irradiation, and 137Cs gamma-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, S. M.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Small mutations, megabase deletions, and aneuploidy are involved in carcinogenesis and genetic defects, so it is important to be able to quantify these mutations and understand mechanisms of their creation. We have previously quantified a spectrum of mutations, including megabase deletions, in human chromosome 11, the sole human chromosome in a hamster-human hybrid cell line AL. S1- mutants have lost expression of a human cell surface antigen, S1, which is encoded by the M1C1 gene at 11p13 so that mutants can be detected via a complement-mediated cytotoxicity assay in which S1+ cells are killed and S1- cells survive. But loss of genes located on the tip of the short arm of 11 (11p15.5) is lethal to the AL hybrid, so that mutants that have lost the entire chromosome 11 die and escape detection. To circumvent this, we fused AL with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a new hybrid, ALC, in which the requirement for maintaining 11p15.5 is relieved, allowing us to detect mutations events involving loss of 11p15.5. We evaluated the usefulness of this hybrid by conducting mutagenesis studies with colcemid, 137Cs gamma-radiation and UV 254 nm light. Colcemid induced 1000 more S1- mutants per unit dose in ALC than in AL; the increase for UV 254 nm light was only two-fold; and the increase for 137Cs gamma-rays was 12-fold. The increase in S1- mutant fraction in ALC cells treated with colcemid and 137Cs gamma-rays were largely due to chromosome loss and 11p deletions often containing a breakpoint within the centromeric region.

  12. An optical sensor for the determination of digoxin in serum samples based on a molecularly imprinted polymer membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paniagua Gonzalez, Gema; Fernandez Hernando, Pilar; Durand Alegria, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and testing of a molecularly imprinted polymer membrane for digoxin analysis. Digoxin-specific bulk polymer was obtained by the UV initiated co-polymerisation of methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in acetonitrile as porogen. After extracting the template analyte, the ground polymer particles were mixed with plasticizer polyvinyl chloride to form a MIP membrane. A reference polymer membrane was prepared from the same mixture of monomers but with no template. The resultant membrane morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The imprinted membrane was tested as the recognition element in a digoxin-sensitive fluorescence sensor; sensor response was measured using standard solutions of digoxin at concentrations of up to 4 x 10 -3 mg L -1 . The detection limit was 3.17 x 10 -5 mg L -1 . Within- and between-day relative standard deviations RSD (n = 5) were in the range 4.5-5.5% and 5.5-6.5% respectively for 0 and 1 x 10 -3 mg L -1 digoxin concentrations. A selectivity study showed that compounds of similar structure to digoxin did not significantly interfere with detection for interferent concentrations at 10, 30 and 100 times higher than the digoxin concentration. This simply manufactured MIP membrane showed good recognition characteristics, a high affinity for digoxin, and provided satisfactory results in analyses of this analyte in human serum.

  13. Surface plasmon resonance sensor for femtomolar detection of testosterone with water-compatible macroporous molecularly imprinted film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingwen; Jing, Lijing; Zhang, Jinling; Ren, Yamin; Wang, Yang; Wang, Yi; Wei, Tianxin; Liedberg, Bo

    2014-10-15

    A novel water-compatible macroporous molecularly imprinted film (MIF) has been developed for rapid, sensitive, and label-free detection of small molecule testosterone in urine. The MIF was synthesized by photo copolymerization of monomers (methacrylic acid [MAA] and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate [HEMA]), cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, EGDMA), and polystyrene nanoparticles (PS NPs) in combination with template testosterone molecules. The PS NPs and template molecules were subsequently removed to form an MIF with macroporous structures and the specific recognition sites of testosterone. Incubation of artificial urine and human urine on the MIF and the non-imprinted film (NIF), respectively, indicated undetectable nonspecific adsorption. Accordingly, the MIF was applied on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for the detection of testosterone in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and artificial urine with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 10(-15)g/ml. To the best of our knowledge, the LOD is considered as one of the lowest among the SPR sensors for the detection of small molecules. The control experiments performed with analogue molecules such as progesterone and estradiol demonstrated the good selectivity of this MIF for sensing testosterone. Furthermore, this MIF-based SPR sensor shows high stability and reproducibility over 8months of storage at room temperature, which is more robust than protein-based biosensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Specific recognition and fluorescent determination of aspirin by using core-shell CdTe quantum dot-imprinted polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xiao; Zhou, Zhiping; Hao, Tongfan; Lu, Kai; Dai, Jiangdong; Xu, Yeqing; Li, Hongji; Zheng, Xudong; Gao, Lin; Wang, Jixiang; Yan, Yongsheng; Zhu, Yanzhuo

    2015-01-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was deposited on the surface of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) to act as a recognition element for aspirin. The MIP was synthesized from 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as the functional monomer, aspirin as the template, and tetraethoxysilane as the cross-linker via a sol–gel process that leads to surface imprinting. It is shown that the fraction of QDs and the polymerization process affect size and morphology of the MIP-coated QDs. The optical stability, effects of pH, detection time and selective determination of aspirin were optimized. The fluorescence intensity of the particles (photoexcited at 400 nm and measured at 628 nm) decreases linearly with increasing concentration of aspirin in the 2.0–50 μmol L −1 range. The limit of detection (at an S/N of 3) is 0.25 μmol L −1 . The method was successfully applied to the determination of aspirin in human urine and saliva. (author)

  15. An optical sensor for the determination of digoxin in serum samples based on a molecularly imprinted polymer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paniagua Gonzalez, Gema [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez Hernando, Pilar, E-mail: pfhernando@ccia.uned.es [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Durand Alegria, J. S. [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-04-13

    This paper reports the synthesis and testing of a molecularly imprinted polymer membrane for digoxin analysis. Digoxin-specific bulk polymer was obtained by the UV initiated co-polymerisation of methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in acetonitrile as porogen. After extracting the template analyte, the ground polymer particles were mixed with plasticizer polyvinyl chloride to form a MIP membrane. A reference polymer membrane was prepared from the same mixture of monomers but with no template. The resultant membrane morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The imprinted membrane was tested as the recognition element in a digoxin-sensitive fluorescence sensor; sensor response was measured using standard solutions of digoxin at concentrations of up to 4 x 10{sup -3} mg L{sup -1}. The detection limit was 3.17 x 10{sup -5} mg L{sup -1}. Within- and between-day relative standard deviations RSD (n = 5) were in the range 4.5-5.5% and 5.5-6.5% respectively for 0 and 1 x 10{sup -3} mg L{sup -1} digoxin concentrations. A selectivity study showed that compounds of similar structure to digoxin did not significantly interfere with detection for interferent concentrations at 10, 30 and 100 times higher than the digoxin concentration. This simply manufactured MIP membrane showed good recognition characteristics, a high affinity for digoxin, and provided satisfactory results in analyses of this analyte in human serum.

  16. Critical comparison of the on-line and off-line molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction of patulin coupled with liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotská, Ivona; Holznerová, Anežka; Solich, Petr; Šatínský, Dalibor

    2017-12-01

    Reaching trace amounts of mycotoxin contamination requires sensitive and selective analytical tools for their determination. Improving the selectivity of sample pretreatment steps covering new and modern extraction techniques is one way to achieve it. Molecularly imprinted polymers as selective sorbent for extraction undoubtedly meet these criteria. The presented work is focused on the hyphenation of on-line molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction with a chromatography system using a column-switching approach. Making a critical comparison with a simultaneously developed off-line extraction procedure, evaluation of pros and cons of each method, and determining the reliability of both methods on a real sample analysis were carried out. Both high-performance liquid chromatography methods, using off-line extraction on molecularly imprinted polymer and an on-line column-switching approach, were validated, and the validation results were compared against each other. Although automation leads to significant time savings, fewer human errors, and required no handling of toxic solvents, it reached worse detection limits (15 versus 6 μg/L), worse recovery values (68.3-123.5 versus 81.2-109.9%), and worse efficiency throughout the entire clean-up process in comparison with the off-line extraction method. The difficulties encountered, the compromises made during the optimization of on-line coupling and their critical evaluation are presented in detail. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Molecularly Imprinted Core-Shell CdSe@SiO2/CDs as a Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for 4-Nitrophenol Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyue; Gao, Zhao; Yu, Yanjun; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2018-01-01

    4-Nitrophenol (4-NP) is a priority pollutant in water and is both carcinogenic and genotoxic to humans and wildlife even at very low concentrations. Thus, we herein fabricated a novel molecularly imprinted core-shell nanohybrid as a ratiometric fluorescent sensor for the highly sensitive and selective detection of 4-NP. This sensor was functioned by the transfer of fluorescence resonance energy between photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) and 4-NP. This sensor was synthesized by linking organosilane-functionalized CDs to silica-coated CdSe quantum dots (CdSe@SiO2) via Si-O bonds. The nanohybrids were further modified by anchoring a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer on the ratiometric fluorescent sensor through a facile sol-gel polymerization method. The morphology, chemical structure, and optical properties of the resulting molecularly imprinted dual-emission fluorescent probe were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic analysis. The probe was then applied in the detection of 4-NP and exhibited good linearity between 0.051 and 13.7 μg/mL, in addition to a low detection limit of 0.026 μg/mL. Furthermore, the simplicity, reliability, high selectivity, and high sensitivity of the developed sensor demonstrate that the combination of MIPs and ratiometric fluorescence allows the preparation of excellent fluorescent sensors for the detection of trace or ultra-trace analytes.

  18. An Assay Study of Molecular Recognition of Amino Acids in Water: Covalent Imprinting of Cysteine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burri, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Yu, Donghong

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthetic N-(9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SH)-OH) receptor was pre- pared by co-polymerizing (9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-S-(1-propene-2-thiol)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SCH2CHCH2)-OH) and a non-imprinted polymer prepared from 1-propene-1-thiol photo-chemically 15 h...... at room temperature and additional 3 h thermally at 80℃. Subsequently, disulfides were reduced with lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) from imprinted polymers. The imprinted polymers selectively recognized Fmoc-Cys(SH)-OH with high binding constants in aqueous and protic solvents by thiol...

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymers for sample preparation and biosensing in food analysis: Progress and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashley, Jon; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Kant, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are biomimetics which can selectively bind to analytes of interest. One of the most interesting areas where MIPs have shown the biggest potential is food analysis. MIPs have found use as sorbents in sample preparation attributed to the high selectivity and high...... the imprinting methods which are applicable for imprinting food templates, summarize the recent progress in using MIPs for preparing and analysing food samples, and discuss the current limitations in the commercialisation of MIPs technology. Finally, future perspectives will be given....

  20. S-Layer Based Bio-Imprinting - Synthetic S-Layer Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-09

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0161 S-Layer Based Bio- Imprinting - Synthetic S-Layer Polymers Dietmar Pum ZENTRUM FUER NANOBIOTECHNOLOGIE Final Report 07/09...COVERED (From - To)      01-06-2012 to 31-05-2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE S-Layer Based Bio- Imprinting - Synthetic S-Layer Polymers 5a.  CONTRACT...technology for the fabrication of nano patterned thin film imprints by using functional S-layer protein arrays as templates. The unique feature of

  1. A quick responding quartz crystal microbalance sensor array based on molecular imprinted polyacrylic acids coating for selective identification of aldehydes in body odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sunil K; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2015-03-01

    In present work, a novel quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor array has been developed for prompt identification of primary aldehydes in human body odor. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are prepared using the polyacrylic acid (PAA) polymer matrix and three organic acids (propenoic acid, hexanoic acid and octanoic acid) as template molecules, and utilized as QCM surface coating layer. The performance of MIP films is characterized by 4-element QCM sensor array (three coated with MIP layers and one with pure PAA for reference) dynamic and static responses to target aldehydes: hexanal, heptanal, and nonanal in single, binary, and tertiary mixtures at distinct concentrations. The target aldehydes were selected subsequent to characterization of body odor samples with solid phase-micro extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometer (SPME-GC-MS). The hexanoic acid and octanoic acid imprinted PAA exhibit fast response, and better sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility than the propenoic acid, and non-imprinted PAA in array. The response time and recovery time for hexanoic acid imprinted PAA are obtained as 5 s and 12 s respectively to typical concentrations of binary and tertiary mixtures of aldehydes using the static response. Dynamic sensor array response matrix has been processed with principal component analysis (PCA) for visual, and support vector machine (SVM) classifier for quantitative identification of target odors. Aldehyde odors were identified successfully in principal component (PC) space. SVM classifier results maximum recognition rate 79% for three classes of binary odors and 83% including single, binary, and tertiary odor classes in 3-fold cross validation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. DNA sequence polymorphisms in a panel of eight candidate bovine imprinted genes and their association with performance traits in Irish Holstein-Friesian cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies in mice and humans have shown that imprinted genes, whereby expression from one of the two parentally inherited alleles is attenuated or completely silenced, have a major effect on mammalian growth, metabolism and physiology. More recently, investigations in livestock species indicate that genes subject to this type of epigenetic regulation contribute to, or are associated with, several performance traits, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In the present study, a candidate gene approach was adopted to assess 17 validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their association with a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Irish Holstein-Friesian artificial insemination sires. These SNPs are located proximal to, or within, the bovine orthologs of eight genes (CALCR, GRB10, PEG3, PHLDA2, RASGRF1, TSPAN32, ZIM2 and ZNF215) that have been shown to be imprinted in cattle or in at least one other mammalian species (i.e. human/mouse/pig/sheep). Results Heterozygosities for all SNPs analysed ranged from 0.09 to 0.46 and significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions (P ≤ 0.01) were observed at four loci. Phenotypic associations (P ≤ 0.05) were observed between nine SNPs proximal to, or within, six of the eight analysed genes and a number of performance traits evaluated, including milk protein percentage, somatic cell count, culled cow and progeny carcass weight, angularity, body conditioning score, progeny carcass conformation, body depth, rump angle, rump width, animal stature, calving difficulty, gestation length and calf perinatal mortality. Notably, SNPs within the imprinted paternally expressed gene 3 (PEG3) gene cluster were associated (P ≤ 0.05) with calving, calf performance and fertility traits, while a single SNP in the zinc finger protein 215 gene (ZNF215) was associated with milk protein percentage (P ≤ 0.05), progeny carcass weight (P ≤ 0.05), culled cow carcass weight (P ≤ 0.01), angularity (P

  3. DNA sequence polymorphisms in a panel of eight candidate bovine imprinted genes and their association with performance traits in Irish Holstein-Friesian cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in mice and humans have shown that imprinted genes, whereby expression from one of the two parentally inherited alleles is attenuated or completely silenced, have a major effect on mammalian growth, metabolism and physiology. More recently, investigations in livestock species indicate that genes subject to this type of epigenetic regulation contribute to, or are associated with, several performance traits, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In the present study, a candidate gene approach was adopted to assess 17 validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and their association with a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Irish Holstein-Friesian artificial insemination sires. These SNPs are located proximal to, or within, the bovine orthologs of eight genes (CALCR, GRB10, PEG3, PHLDA2, RASGRF1, TSPAN32, ZIM2 and ZNF215 that have been shown to be imprinted in cattle or in at least one other mammalian species (i.e. human/mouse/pig/sheep. Results Heterozygosities for all SNPs analysed ranged from 0.09 to 0.46 and significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions (P ≤ 0.01 were observed at four loci. Phenotypic associations (P ≤ 0.05 were observed between nine SNPs proximal to, or within, six of the eight analysed genes and a number of performance traits evaluated, including milk protein percentage, somatic cell count, culled cow and progeny carcass weight, angularity, body conditioning score, progeny carcass conformation, body depth, rump angle, rump width, animal stature, calving difficulty, gestation length and calf perinatal mortality. Notably, SNPs within the imprinted paternally expressed gene 3 (PEG3 gene cluster were associated (P ≤ 0.05 with calving, calf performance and fertility traits, while a single SNP in the zinc finger protein 215 gene (ZNF215 was associated with milk protein percentage (P ≤ 0.05, progeny carcass weight (P ≤ 0.05, culled cow carcass weight (P ≤ 0

  4. Gene dosage effects of the imprinted delta-like homologue 1 (dlk1/pref1 in development: implications for the evolution of imprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simao Teixeira da Rocha

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is a normal process that causes genes to be expressed according to parental origin. The selective advantage conferred by imprinting is not understood but is hypothesised to act on dosage-critical genes. Here, we report a unique model in which the consequences of a single, double, and triple dosage of the imprinted Dlk1/Pref1, normally repressed on the maternally inherited chromosome, can be assessed in the growing embryo. BAC-transgenic mice were generated that over-express Dlk1 from endogenous regulators at all sites of embryonic activity. Triple dosage causes lethality associated with major organ abnormalities. Embryos expressing a double dose of Dlk1, recapitulating loss of imprinting, are growth enhanced but fail to thrive in early life, despite the early growth advantage. Thus, any benefit conferred by increased embryonic size is offset by postnatal lethality. We propose a negative correlation between gene dosage and survival that fixes an upper limit on growth promotion by Dlk1, and we hypothesize that trade-off between growth and lethality might have driven imprinting at this locus.

  5. Synthesis of molecularly imprinted dye-silica nanocomposites with high selectivity and sensitivity: Fluorescent imprinted sensor for rapid and efficient detection of τ-fluvalinate in vodka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyun; Wang, Jixiang; Cheng, Rujia; Sun, Lin; Dai, Xiaohui; Yan, Yongsheng

    2018-04-01

    An imprinted fluorescent sensor was fabricated based on SiO 2 nanoparticles encapsulated with a molecularly imprinted polymer containing allyl fluorescein. High fluorine cypermethirin as template molecules, methyl methacrylate as functional monomer, and allyl fluorescein as optical materials synthesized a core-shell fluorescent molecular imprinted sensor, which showed a high and rapid sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of τ-fluvalinate. The sensor presented appreciable sensitivity with a limit of 13.251 nM, rapid detection that reached to equilibrium within 3 min, great linear relationship in the relevant concentration range from 0 to 150 nM, and excellent selectivity over structural analogues. In addition, the fluorescent sensor demonstrated desirable regeneration ability (eight cycling operations). The molecularly imprinted polymers ensured specificity, while the fluorescent dyes provided the stabile sensitivity. Finally, an effective application of the sensor was implemented by the detection of τ-fluvalinate in real samples from vodka. The molecularly imprinted fluorescent sensor showed a promising potential in environmental monitoring and food safety. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Generic nano-imprint process for fabrication of nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierret, Aurelie; Hocevar, Moira; Algra, Rienk E; Timmering, Eugene C; Verschuuren, Marc A; Immink, George W G; Verheijen, Marcel A; Bakkers, Erik P A M [Philips Research Laboratories Eindhoven, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Diedenhofen, Silke L [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics c/o Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Vlieg, E, E-mail: e.p.a.m.bakkers@tue.nl [IMM, Solid State Chemistry, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-10

    A generic process has been developed to grow nearly defect-free arrays of (heterostructured) InP and GaP nanowires. Soft nano-imprint lithography has been used to pattern gold particle arrays on full 2 inch substrates. After lift-off organic residues remain on the surface, which induce the growth of additional undesired nanowires. We show that cleaning of the samples before growth with piranha solution in combination with a thermal anneal at 550 deg. C for InP and 700 deg. C for GaP results in uniform nanowire arrays with 1% variation in nanowire length, and without undesired extra nanowires. Our chemical cleaning procedure is applicable to other lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography, and therefore represents a generic process.

  7. Synthesis of Plaster for moulers's elaboration of imprint denture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamiane, M; Rabahi, N; Saidi, M; Salhi, M

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was the synthesis of plaster from local raw materials to be used in denture mouler's. The plaster type α and β was synthesis by hydrothermal and dry method from gypsum (CaSO4. 2H2O) of the west Algerian. After crushing and mineralogical analysis, gypsum has undergone through cooking in an oven at a temperature (T = 200 ° C), for a time t = 4 hours. The synthesis and characterization of the product has involved several ways investigated as diffraction RX, X-ray fluorescence, time taken, electron microscope (MEB), hardness, SSB, compressive and bending strength and Ph. A digester horizontal type Toni - technical laboratory was used for the synthesis of plasterα. The results are conformable with the standard and plaster synthesized can be a basic material in the manufacture of moulers imprint denture.

  8. Synthesis of Plaster for moulers's elaboration of imprint denture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiane, M.; Rabahi, N.; Saidi, M.; Salhi, M.

    2012-02-01

    Our goal was the synthesis of plaster from local raw materials to be used in denture mouler's. The plaster type α and β was synthesis by hydrothermal and dry method from gypsum (CaSO4. 2H2O) of the west Algerian. After crushing and mineralogical analysis, gypsum has undergone through cooking in an oven at a temperature (T = 200 ° C), for a time t = 4 hours. The synthesis and characterization of the product has involved several ways investigated as diffraction RX, X-ray fluorescence, time taken, electron microscope (MEB), hardness, SSB, compressive and bending strength and Ph. A digester horizontal type Toni - technical laboratory was used for the synthesis of plasterα. The results are conformable with the standard and plaster synthesized can be a basic material in the manufacture of moulers imprint denture.

  9. The effect of dopants on laser imprint mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lee; Gardner, John H.; Bodner, Stephen E.; Colombant, Denis; Dahlburg, Jill

    1999-11-01

    An intact implosion of a pellet for direct-drive ICF requires that the perturbations imprinted by the laser be kept below some threshold. We report on simulations of targets that incorporate very small concentrations of a high-Z dopant in the ablator, to increase the electron density in the ablating plasma, causing the laser to be absorbed far enough from the solid ablator to achieve a substantial degree of thermal smoothing. These calculations were performed using NRL's FAST radiation hydrodynamics code(J.H. Gardner, A.J. Schmitt, et al., Phys. Plasmas) 5, 1935 (1998), incorporating the flux-corrected transport algorithm and opacities generated by an STA code, with non-LTE radiation transport based on the Busquet method.

  10. Synthesis of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer for Sterol Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuangsawad Ratanaporn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imprinted polymer (MIP was prepared by bulk polymerization in acetone using acrylamide as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a crosslinker, stigmasterol as a template and benzoyl peroxide as an initiator. The obtained MIPs were characterized using a scanning electron microscope and a fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. Performance in sterol adsorption of MIPs prepared under various conditions was investigated using a model solution of phytosterols in heptane, comparing with a nonimprinted polymer (NIP. Statistical analysis revealed that the amounts of crosslinker and template strongly affected the performance of MIP while the amount of solvent slightly affected the performance of MIP. MIP synthesized under the optimal condition had adsorption capacity of 1.28 mgsterols/gads which were 1.13 times of NIP.

  11. Selectivity of β-Sitosterol Imprinted Polymers as Adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauziah, St.; Hariani Soekamto, Nunuk; Taba, Paulina; Bachri Amran, Muh

    2018-03-01

    Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) are smart materials that have been used as adsorbents in separation processes of compounds because they have a memorial effect to a certain compound. In this research, MIP synthesized was used as adsorbent for β-sitosterol. The objective of the research was to know the selectivity of MIP in adsorbing β-sitosterol. The concentrations of β-sitosterol after adsorption and desorption were analyzed by a UV-Vis spectrophotometer and the selectivity test was analyzed by HPLC. Result showed that the MIP had high adsorption ability ( qe ). The recovery of β-sitosterol from MIP for the adsorption-desorption process was 68.48%. The MIP was very selective to β-sitosterol compared to cholesterol because it can adsorb β-sitosterol as many as 100%, whereas the adsorption of cholesterol was only 30.27 %.

  12. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  13. Transferring the Selectivity of a Natural Antibody into a Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirhagl, Romana

    2017-01-01

    Natural antibodies are widely used for their unprecedented reproducibility and the remarkable selectivity for a wide range of analytes. However, biodegradability and the need to work in biocompatible environments limit their applications. Molecularly imprinted polymers are a robust alternative.

  14. Stop grating for perfect replication of micro Fresnel lens by thermal imprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yulong; Lin, Jie; Jin, Peng; Tan, Jiubin; Davies, Graham; Prewett, Philip D

    2012-01-01

    A stop grating concept is proposed to improve polymer filling in the thermal imprinting of a micro Fresnel lens structure. The stop grating consists of line and space structures outside the Fresnel lens pattern zone area. The experimental results have proved that the stop grating can help to achieve the complete filling of a mold, at the same time acting as a stop to prevent possible damage to the mold surface relief structures during imprinting press. A computer simulation was carried out to identify the phenomena of micro-holes at the edge of imprinted pattern. By removing the cavity between the pattern area and stop grating, perfect imprinting results have been achieved. (paper)

  15. Macroscopic Ensembles of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes in Bubble Imprints Studied by Polarized Raman Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Ushiba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in bubble imprints through polarized Raman microscopy. A hemispherical bubble containing SWCNTs is pressed against a glass substrate, resulting in an imprint of the bubble membrane with a coffee ring on the substrate. We find that macroscopic ensembles of aligned SWCNTs are obtained in the imprints, in which there are three patterns of orientations: (i azimuthal alignment on the coffee ring, (ii radial alignment at the edge of the membrane, and (iii random orientation at the center of the membrane. We also find that the alignment of SWCNTs in the imprints can be manipulated by spinning bubbles. The orientation of SWCNTs on the coffee ring is directed radially, which is orthogonal to the case of unspun bubbles. This approach enables one to align SWCNTs in large quantities and in a short time, potentially opening up a wide range of CNT-based electronic and optical applications.

  16. Laser imprint and implications for direct drive ignition with the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, S.V.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Remington, B.A.; Rothenberg, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    For direct drive ICF, nonuniformities in laser illumination can seed ripples at the ablation front in a process called imprint. Such nonuniformities will grow during the capsule implosion and can penetrate the capsule shell impede ignition, or degrade burn. We have simulated imprint for a number of experiments on tile Nova laser. Results are in generally good agreement with experimental data. We leave also simulated imprint upon National Ignition Facility (NIF) direct drive ignition capsules. Imprint modulation amplitude comparable to the intrinsic surface finish of ∼40 nm is predicted for a laser bandwidth of 0.5 THz. Ablation front modulations experience growth factors up to several thousand, carrying modulation well into the nonlinear regime. Saturation modeling predicts that the shell should remain intact at the time of peak velocity, but penetration at earlier times appears more marginal

  17. The effect of increased irradiation uniformity on imprinting by 351-nm laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehly, T.R.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Bradley, D.K.; Verdon, C.P.; Kalantar, D.

    1997-01-01

    The acceleration-driven growth of perturbations initially seeded (or imprinted) by irradiation nonuniformities is a major concern for direct-drive ICF. We report on experiments where unperturbed, CH 2 targets were irradiated with 3-ns square pulses at 2x10 14 W/cm 2 using five overlapped UV beams. The uniformity of these beams was varied and subsequent unstable growth of irradiation imprinting was observed using time-gated x-radiography. We demonstrate that increased irradiation uniformity reduces imprinting, and we show the beneficial effects of distributed polarization rotators a new beam-smoothing device. In addition, we discuss experiments using a ' perturbing beam' to study the time dependence of imprinting. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. An engineered cell-imprinted substrate directs osteogenic differentiation in stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamguyan, Khorshid; Katbab, Ali Asghar; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2018-01-01

    A cell-imprinted poly(dimethylsiloxane)/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite substrate was fabricated to engage topographical, mechanical, and chemical signals to stimulate and boost stem cell osteogenic differentiation. The physicochemical properties of the fabricated substrates, with nanoscale resolution...

  19. Ultrafast direct imprinting of nanostructures in metals by pulsed laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Bo; Keimel, Chris; Chou, Stephen Y

    2010-01-01

    We report a method of one-step direct patterning of metallic nanostructures. In the method, termed laser assisted direct imprinting (LADI), the surface of a metal film on a substrate is melted by a single excimer laser pulse and subsequently imprinted within ∼100 ns using a transparent quartz mold, while the substrate is kept at a low temperature and in a solid phase. Using LADI, we imprinted gratings with ∼100 nm linewidth, 100 nm depth, and 200 nm pitch, as well as isolated mesas of ∼20 μm size, in Al, Au, Cu and Ni thin films. We found that the quartz mold was able to imprint metals even at temperatures higher than its melting point. The technique could be extended to other metals regardless of their ductility and hardness, and would find applications in photonic and plasmonic device production.

  20. Planar self-aligned imprint lithography for coplanar plasmonic nanostructures fabrication

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Weiwei; Lin, Liang; Xu, Yelong; Guo, Xu; Liu, Xiaoping; Ge, Haixiong; Lu, Minghui; Cui, Bo; Chen, Yanfeng

    2014-01-01

    manufacturing remains a challenge due to the high cost of achieving mechanical alignment precision. Although self-aligned imprint lithography was developed to avoid the need of alignment for the vertical layered structures, it has limited usage

  1. Use of computational modeling in preparation and evaluation of surface imprinted xerogels for binding tetracycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, Samantha J.; Nguyen, Eric; Baria, Maximillian P.; Mojica, Elmer-Rico E.

    2015-01-01

    Linear alkyl alkoxysilanes (methoxy and ethoxy-based) of varying length were used in preparing tetracycline surface imprinted silica xerogels by the sol–gel process. The resulting xerogels were characterized in terms of binding tetracycline (TC) by using tritium-labeled TC. Results showed preferential binding in the ethoxysilane based xerogels in comparison to methoxysilane based xerogels. A computational approach using the interaction energy (IE) between TC and each alkyl alkoxysilane was deduced as a rational way of predicting the formulation that would provide the best analytical performance for a given molecularly imprinted xerogel (MIX). Hartree-Fock calculations revealed an increase in IE as the length of the carbon chain increases until an optimum value at C6 in both alkoxysilanes. This is consistent with the experimental results wherein the C6 xerogel formulation has the highest imprinting factor. These results show the potential of using computational modeling as a rational way of preparing surface imprinted materials. (author)

  2. Using SNP markers to estimate additive, dominance and imprinting genetic variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, M S; Bastiaansen, J W M; Janss, Luc

    The contributions of additive, dominance and imprinting effects to the variance of number of teats (NT) were evaluated in two purebred pig populations using SNP markers. Three different random regression models were evaluated, accounting for the mean and: 1) additive effects (MA), 2) additive...... and dominance effects (MAD) and 3) additive, dominance and imprinting effects (MADI). Additive heritability estimates were 0.30, 0.28 and 0.27-0.28 in both lines using MA, MAD and MADI, respectively. Dominance heritability ranged from 0.06 to 0.08 using MAD and MADI. Imprinting heritability ranged from 0.......01 to 0.02. Dominance effects make an important contribution to the genetic variation of NT in the two lines evaluated. Imprinting effects appeared less important for NT than additive and dominance effects. The SNP random regression model presented and evaluated in this study is a feasible approach...

  3. Synthesis and application of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers in sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuyao; Xu, Jianqiao; Zheng, Jiating; Zhu, Fang; Xie, Lijun; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2018-04-12

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have superior advantages in sample pretreatment because of their high selectivity for target analytes and the fast and easy isolation from samples. To meet the demand of both good magnetic property and good extraction performance, MMIPs with various structures, from traditional core-shell structures to novel composite structures with a larger specific surface area and more accessible binding sites, are fabricated by different preparation technologies. Moreover, as the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layers determine the affinity, selectivity, and saturated adsorption amount of MMIPs, the development and innovation of the MIP layer are attracting attention and are reviewed here. Many studies that used MMIPs as sorbents in dispersive solid-phase extraction of complex samples, including environmental, food, and biofluid samples, are summarized. Graphical abstract The application of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in the sample preparation procedure improves the analytical performances for complex samples. MITs molecular imprinting technologies.

  4. Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories induced by total dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Qi-Wen; Yu Xue-Feng; Cui Jiang-Wei; Guo Qi; Ren Di-Yuan; Cong Zhong-Chao; Zhou Hang

    2014-01-01

    Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories (SRAMs) during total dose irradiation is investigated in detail. As the dose accumulates, the data pattern of memory cells loading during irradiation is gradually imprinted on their background data pattern. We build a relationship between the memory cell's static noise margin (SNM) and the background data, and study the influence of irradiation on the probability density function of ΔSNM, which is the difference between two data sides' SNMs, to discuss the reason for pattern imprinting. Finally, we demonstrate that, for micron and deep sub-micron devices, the mechanism of pattern imprinting is the bias-dependent threshold shift of the transistor, but for a deep sub-micron device the shift results from charge trapping in the shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide rather than from the gate oxide of the micron-device. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  5. Recognition of conformational changes in beta-lactoglobulin by molecularly imprinted thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nicholas W; Liu, Xiao; Piletsky, Sergey A; Hlady, Vladimir; Britt, David W

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenesis in protein conformational diseases is initiated by changes in protein secondary structure. This molecular restructuring presents an opportunity for novel shape-based detection approaches, as protein molecular weight and chemistry are otherwise unaltered. Here we apply molecular imprinting to discriminate between distinct conformations of the model protein beta-lactoglobulin (BLG). Thermal- and fluoro-alcohol-induced BLG isoforms were imprinted in thin films of 3-aminophenylboronic acid on quartz crystal microbalance chips. Enhanced rebinding of the template isoform was observed in all cases when compared to the binding of nontemplate isoforms over the concentration range of 1-100 microg mL(-1). Furthermore, it was observed that the greater the changes in the secondary structure of the template protein the lower the binding of native BLG challenges to the imprint, suggesting a strong steric influence in the recognition system. This feasibility study is a first demonstration of molecular imprints for recognition of distinct conformations of the same protein.

  6. Piezoelectric sensors based on molecular imprinted polymers for detection of low molecular mass analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludağ, Yildiz; Piletsky, Sergey A; Turner, Anthony P F; Cooper, Matthew A

    2007-11-01

    Biomimetic recognition elements employed for the detection of analytes are commonly based on proteinaceous affibodies, immunoglobulins, single-chain and single-domain antibody fragments or aptamers. The alternative supra-molecular approach using a molecularly imprinted polymer now has proven utility in numerous applications ranging from liquid chromatography to bioassays. Despite inherent advantages compared with biochemical/biological recognition (which include robustness, storage endurance and lower costs) there are few contributions that describe quantitative analytical applications of molecularly imprinted polymers for relevant small molecular mass compounds in real-world samples. There is, however, significant literature describing the use of low-power, portable piezoelectric transducers to detect analytes in environmental monitoring and other application areas. Here we review the combination of molecularly imprinted polymers as recognition elements with piezoelectric biosensors for quantitative detection of small molecules. Analytes are classified by type and sample matrix presentation and various molecularly imprinted polymer synthetic fabrication strategies are also reviewed.

  7. Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction in the analysis of agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ling-Xiao; Fang, Rou; Chen, Guan-Hua

    2013-08-01

    The molecular imprinting technique is a highly predeterminative recognition technology. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) can be applied to the cleanup and preconcentration of analytes as the selective adsorbent of solid-phase extraction (SPE). In recent years, a new type of SPE has formed, molecularly imprinted polymer solid-phase extraction (MISPE), and has been widely applied to the extraction of agrochemicals. In this review, the mechanism of the molecular imprinting technique and the methodology of MIP preparations are explained. The extraction modes of MISPE, including offline and online, are discussed, and the applications of MISPE in the analysis of agrochemicals such as herbicides, fungicides and insecticides are summarized. It is concluded that MISPE is a powerful tool to selectively isolate agrochemicals from real samples with higher extraction and cleanup efficiency than commercial SPE and that it has great potential for broad applications.

  8. Planar self-aligned imprint lithography for coplanar plasmonic nanostructures fabrication

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Weiwei

    2014-03-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a cost-efficient nanopatterning technology because of its promising advantages of high throughput and high resolution. However, accurate multilevel overlay capability of NIL required for integrated circuit manufacturing remains a challenge due to the high cost of achieving mechanical alignment precision. Although self-aligned imprint lithography was developed to avoid the need of alignment for the vertical layered structures, it has limited usage in the manufacture of the coplanar structures, such as integrated plasmonic devices. In this paper, we develop a new process of planar self-alignment imprint lithography (P-SAIL) to fabricate the metallic and dielectric structures on the same plane. P-SAIL transfers the multilevel imprint processes to a single-imprint process which offers higher efficiency and less cost than existing manufacturing methods. Such concept is demonstrated in an example of fabricating planar plasmonic structures consisting of different materials. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  9. Expression and imprinting of DIO3 and DIO3OS genes in Holstein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2016-10-18

    Oct 18, 2016 ... expressed from the paternal allele, while the DIO3OS transcript is ..... interactions, or via transcriptional occlusion mechanisms (e.g. Kanduri ... The IG-DMR is associated with proper imprinting of linked genes on the maternal.

  10. Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories induced by total dose irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi-Wen; Yu, Xue-Feng; Cui, Jiang-Wei; Guo, Qi; Ren, Di-Yuan; Cong, Zhong-Chao; Zhou, Hang

    2014-10-01

    Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories (SRAMs) during total dose irradiation is investigated in detail. As the dose accumulates, the data pattern of memory cells loading during irradiation is gradually imprinted on their background data pattern. We build a relationship between the memory cell's static noise margin (SNM) and the background data, and study the influence of irradiation on the probability density function of ΔSNM, which is the difference between two data sides' SNMs, to discuss the reason for pattern imprinting. Finally, we demonstrate that, for micron and deep sub-micron devices, the mechanism of pattern imprinting is the bias-dependent threshold shift of the transistor, but for a deep sub-micron device the shift results from charge trapping in the shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide rather than from the gate oxide of the micron-device.

  11. From 3D to 2D: A Review of the Molecular Imprinting of Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Nicholas W.; Jeans, Christopher W.; Brain, Keith R.; Allender, Christopher J.; Hlady, Vladimir; Britt, David W.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a generic technology that allows for the introduction of sites of specific molecular affinity into otherwise homogeneous polymeric matrices. Commonly this technique has been shown to be effective when targeting small molecules of molecular weight

  12. Highly selective BSA imprinted polyacrylamide hydrogels facilitated by a metal-coding MIP approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharif, H F; Yapati, H; Kalluru, S; Reddy, S M

    2015-12-01

    We report the fabrication of metal-coded molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) using hydrogel-based protein imprinting techniques. A Co(II) complex was prepared using (E)-2-((2 hydrazide-(4-vinylbenzyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol; along with iron(III) chloroprotoporphyrin (Hemin), vinylferrocene (VFc), zinc(II) protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and protoporphyrin (PP), these complexes were introduced into the MIPs as co-monomers for metal-coding of non-metalloprotein imprints. Results indicate a 66% enhancement for bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein binding capacities (Q, mg/g) via metal-ion/ligand exchange properties within the metal-coded MIPs. Specifically, Co(II)-complex-based MIPs exhibited 92 ± 1% specific binding with Q values of 5.7 ± 0.45 mg BSA/g polymer and imprinting factors (IF) of 14.8 ± 1.9 (MIP/non-imprinted (NIP) control). The selectivity of our Co(II)-coded BSA MIPs were also tested using bovine haemoglobin (BHb), lysozyme (Lyz), and trypsin (Tryp). By evaluating imprinting factors (K), each of the latter proteins was found to have lower affinities in comparison to cognate BSA template. The hydrogels were further characterised by thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to assess optimum polymer composition. The development of hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymer (HydroMIPs) technology for the memory imprinting of proteins and for protein biosensor development presents many possibilities, including uses in bio-sample clean-up or selective extraction, replacement of biological antibodies in immunoassays and biosensors for medicine and the environment. Biosensors for proteins and viruses are currently expensive to develop because they require the use of expensive antibodies. Because of their biomimicry capabilities (and their potential to act as synthetic antibodies), HydroMIPs potentially offer a route to the development of new low-cost biosensors. Herein, a metal ion-mediated imprinting approach was employed to metal-code our

  13. Magnetic deep eutectic solvents molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective recognition and separation of protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanjin; Wang, Yuzhi; Dai, Qingzhou; Zhou, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    A novel and facile magnetic deep eutectic solvents (DES) molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the selective recognition and separation of Bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was prepared. The new-type DES was adopted as the functional monomer which would bring molecular imprinted technology to a new direction. The amounts of DES were optimized. The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs were characterized with fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), elemental analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results suggested that the imprinted polymers were successfully formed and possessed a charming magnetism. The maximum adsorption capability (Q_m_a_x) and dissociation constant (K_L) were analyzed by Langmuir isotherms (R"2 = 0.9983) and the value were estimated to be 175.44 mg/g and 0.035 mg/mL for the imprinted particles. And the imprinted particles showed a high imprinting factor of 4.77. In addition, the magnetic DES-MIPs presented outstanding recognition specificity and selectivity so that it can be utilized to separate template protein from the mixture of proteins and real samples. Last but not least, the combination of deep eutectic solvents and molecular imprinted technology in this paper provides a new perspective for the recognition and separation of proteins. - Highlights: • Combined green deep eutectic solvents (DES) and molecular imprinted technology in recognition and separation of proteins. • DES was adopted as a new-type functional monomer. • The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs can separate proteins rapidly by an external magnetic field. • Adsorption and selectivity properties were discussed.

  14. Cellulose acetate-based molecularly imprinted polymeric membrane for separation of vanillin and o-vanillin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang,Chunjing; Zhong,Shian; Yang,Zhengpeng

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose acetate-based molecularly imprinted polymeric membranes were prepared using vanillin as template molecule. The microscopic structure of the resultant polymeric membranes was characterized by SEM and FTIR spectroscopy, and the selective binding properties and separation capacity of the membranes for vanillin and o-vanillin were tested with binding experiments and separate experiments, respectively. The results showed that the vanillin-imprinted polymeric membranes displayed higher bi...

  15. Magnetic deep eutectic solvents molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective recognition and separation of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanjin [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Wang, Yuzhi, E-mail: wyzss@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Dai, Qingzhou [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Zhou, Yigang [Department of Microbiology, College of Basic Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2016-09-14

    A novel and facile magnetic deep eutectic solvents (DES) molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the selective recognition and separation of Bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was prepared. The new-type DES was adopted as the functional monomer which would bring molecular imprinted technology to a new direction. The amounts of DES were optimized. The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs were characterized with fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), elemental analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results suggested that the imprinted polymers were successfully formed and possessed a charming magnetism. The maximum adsorption capability (Q{sub max}) and dissociation constant (K{sub L}) were analyzed by Langmuir isotherms (R{sup 2} = 0.9983) and the value were estimated to be 175.44 mg/g and 0.035 mg/mL for the imprinted particles. And the imprinted particles showed a high imprinting factor of 4.77. In addition, the magnetic DES-MIPs presented outstanding recognition specificity and selectivity so that it can be utilized to separate template protein from the mixture of proteins and real samples. Last but not least, the combination of deep eutectic solvents and molecular imprinted technology in this paper provides a new perspective for the recognition and separation of proteins. - Highlights: • Combined green deep eutectic solvents (DES) and molecular imprinted technology in recognition and separation of proteins. • DES was adopted as a new-type functional monomer. • The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs can separate proteins rapidly by an external magnetic field. • Adsorption and selectivity properties were discussed.

  16. Verification of epigenetic inheritance in a unicellular model system: multigenerational effects of hormonal imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kőhidai, László; Lajkó, Eszter; Pállinger, Eva; Csaba, György

    2012-10-01

    The unicellular Tetrahymena has receptors for hormones of higher vertebrates, produces these hormones, and their signal pathways are similar. The first encounter with a hormone in higher dose provokes the phenomenon of hormonal imprinting, by which the reaction of the cell is quantitatively modified. This modification is transmitted to the progeny generations. The duration of the single imprinter effect of two representative signal molecules, insulin and 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine), in two concentrations (10(-6) and 10(-15) M) were studied. The effects of imprinting were followed in 5 physiological indices: (i) insulin binding, (ii) 5-HT synthesis, (iii) swimming behaviour, (iv) cell growth and (v) chemotaxis in progeny generations 500 and 1000. The result of each index was different from the non-imprinted control functions, growth rate, swimming behaviour and chemotactic activity to insulin being enhanced, while others, e.g. synthesis and chemotactic responsiveness of 5-HT and the binding of insulin were reduced. This means that a function-specific heritable epigenetic change during imprinting occurs, and generally a single encounter with a femtomolar hormone concentration is enough for provoking durable and heritable imprinting in Tetrahymena. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of epigenetic effects at a unicellular level and call attention to the possibility that the character of unicellular organisms has changed through to the present day due to an enormous amount of non-physiological imprinter substances in their environment. The results - together with results obtained earlier in mammals - point to the validity of epigenetic imprinting effects throughout the animal world.

  17. Surface imprinting on nano-TiO{sub 2} as sacrificial material for the preparation of hollow chlorogenic acid imprinted polymer and its recognition behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hui, E-mail: lihuijsdx@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jishou University, Hunan 416000, Jishou (China); Key Laboratory of Plant Resource Conservation and Utilization, Jishou University, Hunan 416000, Jishou (China); Li Gui [Key Laboratory of Plant Resource Conservation and Utilization, Jishou University, Hunan 416000, Jishou (China); Li Zhiping; Lu Cuimei; Li Yanan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jishou University, Hunan 416000, Jishou (China); Tan Xianzhou [Key Laboratory of Plant Resource Conservation and Utilization, Jishou University, Hunan 416000, Jishou (China)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Used surface imprinting technique with nano-TiO{sub 2} as sacrificial support material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved adsorption capability of the H-MIP1 compared with the previous work. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent mass transfer dynamics for the H-MIP1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated adsorption thermodynamic of the H-MIP1. - Abstract: Surface imprinting chlorogenic acid (CGA) on nano-TiO{sub 2} particles as sacrificial support material was successfully performed by using 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) as functional monomer to obtain a hollow CGA-imprinted polymer (H-MIP1). Fourier transmission infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized for structurally characterizing the polymers obtained and adsorption dynamics and thermodynamic behavior investigated according to different models. Binding selectivity, adsorption capacity and the reusability for this H-MIP1 were also evaluated. This hollow CGA imprinted polymer shows rapid binding dynamics and higher binding capability toward the template molecules. The pseudo first-order kinetic model was shown best to describe the binding process of CGA on the H-MIP1 and Langmuir isotherm model best to fit the experimental adsorption isotherm data. Through adsorption isotherms at different temperatures, thermodynamic parameter values were obtained. Selectivity coefficients for the H-MIP1 toward the template were 2.209, 3.213, 1.746 and 2.353 relative to CA, VA, PCA and GA, respectively. This H-MIP1 was also indicated with a good imprint effect and a high capability to capture CGA from methanol extract of Eucommia ulmoides (E. ulmoides) leaves. Additionally, a good reusability for this imprinted polymer was exhibited during repeated adsorption-desorption use.

  18. Fabrication and nano-imprintabilities of Zr-, Pd- and Cu-based glassy alloy thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Kana; Saidoh, Noriko; Nishiyama, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Akihisa

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of investigating nano-imprintability of glassy alloys in a film form, Zr 49 Al 11 Ni 8 Cu 32 , Pd 39 Cu 29 Ni 13 P 19 and Cu 38 Zr 47 Al 9 Ag 6 glassy alloy thin films were fabricated on Si substrate by a magnetron sputtering method. These films exhibit a very smooth surface, a distinct glass transition phenomenon and a large supercooled liquid region of about 80 K, which are suitable for imprinting materials. Moreover, thermal nano-imprintability of these obtained films is demonstrated by using a dot array mold with a dot diameter of 90 nm. Surface observations revealed that periodic nano-hole arrays with a hole diameter of 90 nm were successfully imprinted on the surface of these films. Among them, Pd-based glassy alloy thin film indicated more precise pattern imprintability, namely, flatter residual surface plane and sharper hole edge. It is said that these glassy alloy thin films, especially Pd-based glassy alloy thin film, are one of the promising materials for fabricating micro-machines and nano-devices by thermal imprinting.

  19. Identification and resolution of artifacts in the interpretation of imprinted gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudhon, Charlotte; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2010-12-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to genes that are epigenetically programmed in the germline to express exclusively or preferentially one allele in a parent-of-origin manner. Expression-based genome-wide screening for the identification of imprinted genes has failed to uncover a significant number of new imprinted genes, probably because of the high tissue- and developmental-stage specificity of imprinted gene expression. A very large number of technical and biological artifacts can also lead to the erroneous evidence of imprinted gene expression. In this article, we focus on three common sources of potential confounding effects: (i) random monoallelic expression in monoclonal cell populations, (ii) genetically determined monoallelic expression and (iii) contamination or infiltration of embryonic tissues with maternal material. This last situation specifically applies to genes that occur as maternally expressed in the placenta. Beside the use of reciprocal crosses that are instrumental to confirm the parental specificity of expression, we provide additional methods for the detection and elimination of these situations that can be misinterpreted as cases of imprinted expression.

  20. Biomimetic Silica Nanoparticles Prepared by a Combination of Solid-Phase Imprinting and Ostwald Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piletska, Elena; Yawer, Heersh; Canfarotta, Francesco; Moczko, Ewa; Smolinska-Kempisty, Katarzyna; Piletsky, Stanislav S; Guerreiro, Antonio; Whitcombe, Michael J; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2017-09-14

    Herein we describe the preparation of molecularly imprinted silica nanoparticles by Ostwald ripening in the presence of molecular templates immobilised on glass beads (the solid-phase). To achieve this, a seed material (12 nm diameter silica nanoparticles) was incubated in phosphate buffer in the presence of the solid-phase. Phosphate ions act as a catalyst in the ripening process which is driven by differences in surface energy between particles of different size, leading to the preferential growth of larger particles. Material deposited in the vicinity of template molecules results in the formation of sol-gel molecular imprints after around 2 hours. Selective washing and elution allows the higher affinity nanoparticles to be isolated. Unlike other strategies commonly used to prepare imprinted silica nanoparticles this approach is extremely simple in nature and can be performed under physiological conditions, making it suitable for imprinting whole proteins and other biomacromolecules in their native conformations. We have demonstrated the generic nature of this method by preparing imprinted silica nanoparticles against targets of varying molecular mass (melamine, vancomycin and trypsin). Binding to the imprinted particles was demonstrated in an immunoassay (ELISA) format in buffer and complex media (milk or blood plasma) with sub-nM detection ability.

  1. Genomic imprinting, growth control and the allocation of nutritional resources: consequences for postnatal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Marika; da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C

    2007-02-01

    Genes subject to genomic imprinting are predominantly expressed from one of the two parental chromosomes, are often clustered in the genome, and their activity and repression are epigenetically regulated. The role of imprinted genes in growth control has been apparent since the discovery of imprinting in the early 1980s. Drawing from studies in the mouse, we propose three distinct classes of imprinted genes - those expressed, imprinted and acting predominantly within the placenta, those with no associated foetal growth effects that act postnatally to regulate metabolic processes, and those expressed in the embryo and placenta that programme the development of organs participating in metabolic processes. Members of this latter class may interact in functional networks regulating the interaction between the mother and the foetus, affecting generalized foetal well-being, growth and organ development; they may also coordinately regulate the development of particular organ systems. The mono-allelic behaviour and sensitivity to changes in regional epigenetic states renders imprinted genes adaptable and vulnerable; in all cases, their perturbed dosage can compromise prenatal and/or postnatal control of nutritional resources. This finding has implications for understanding the relationships between prenatal events and diseases later in life.

  2. Selective solid-phase extraction of Hg(II) using silica gel surface - imprinting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, H.; Geng, T.; Hu, L.

    2008-01-01

    A new ion-imprinted amino-functionalized silica gel sorbent was synthesized by surface-imprinting technique for preconcentration and separation of Hg(II) prior to its determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Compared to the traditional solid sorbents and non-imprinted polymer particles, the ion-imprinted polymers (IIPs) have higher adsorption capacity and selectivity for Hg(II). The maximum static adsorption capacity of the imprinted and non-imprinted sorbent for Hg(II) was 29.89 mg g -1 and 11.21 mg g -1 , respectively. The highest selectivity coefficient for Hg(II) in the presence of Zn(II) exceeded 230. The detection limit (3σ) of the method was 0.25 μg L -1 . The relative standard deviation of the method was 2.5% for eight replicate determinations of 10 μg of Hg 2+ in 200 mL-in-volume water sample. The procedure was validated by performing the analysis of the certified river sediment sample (GBW 08603, China) using the standard addition method. The developed method was also successfully applied to the determination of trace mercury in Chinese traditional medicine and water samples with satisfactory results. (authors)

  3. 3D Laser Imprint Using a Smoother Ray-Traced Power Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andrew J.

    2017-10-01

    Imprinting of laser nonuniformities in directly-driven icf targets is a challenging problem to accurately simulate with large radiation-hydro codes. One of the most challenging aspects is the proper construction of the complex and rapidly changing laser interference structure driving the imprint using the reduced laser propagation models (usually ray-tracing) found in these codes. We have upgraded the modelling capability in our massively-parallel fastrad3d code by adding a more realistic EM-wave interference structure. This interference model adds an axial laser speckle to the previous transverse-only laser structure, and can be impressed on our improved smoothed 3D raytrace package. This latter package, which connects rays to form bundles and performs power deposition calculations on the bundles, is intended to decrease ray-trace noise (which can mask or add to imprint) while using fewer rays. We apply this improved model to 3D simulations of recent imprint experiments performed on the Omega-EP laser and the Nike laser that examined the reduction of imprinting due to very thin high-Z target coatings. We report on the conditions in which this new model makes a significant impact on the development of laser imprint. Supported by US DoE/NNSA.

  4. Schedules of electric shock presentation in the behavioral control of imprinted ducklings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, J E

    1972-09-01

    The behavioral effects of various schedules of electric shock presentation were investigated during and after the imprinting of Peking ducklings to moving stimuli. The behavior of following a moving imprinted stimulus was differentially controlled by a multiple schedule of punishment and avoidance that respectively suppressed and maintained following behavior. Pole-pecking, reinforced by presentations of the imprinted stimulus, was suppressed by response-produced shock (punishment); various schedules of response-independent shock and delayed punishment had an overall minimal effect. The delivery of response-independent shock in the presence of one of two stimuli, both during and after imprinting, resulted in a marked reduction in choice of the stimulus paired with shock. The experiments provide no support for a differentiation of imprinting from learning on the basis of the behavioral effects of aversive stimuli. Instead, as is the case with other organisms, the schedule under which shock is delivered to imprinted ducklings appears to be an important determinant of the temporal patterning of subsequent behavior.

  5. Modeling genetic imprinting effects of DNA sequences with multilocus polymorphism data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staud Roland

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs represent the most widespread type of DNA sequence variation in the human genome and they have recently emerged as valuable genetic markers for revealing the genetic architecture of complex traits in terms of nucleotide combination and sequence. Here, we extend an algorithmic model for the haplotype analysis of SNPs to estimate the effects of genetic imprinting expressed at the DNA sequence level. The model provides a general procedure for identifying the number and types of optimal DNA sequence variants that are expressed differently due to their parental origin. The model is used to analyze a genetic data set collected from a pain genetics project. We find that DNA haplotype GAC from three SNPs, OPRKG36T (with two alleles G and T, OPRKA843G (with alleles A and G, and OPRKC846T (with alleles C and T, at the kappa-opioid receptor, triggers a significant effect on pain sensitivity, but with expression significantly depending on the parent from which it is inherited (p = 0.008. With a tremendous advance in SNP identification and automated screening, the model founded on haplotype discovery and statistical inference may provide a useful tool for genetic analysis of any quantitative trait with complex inheritance.

  6. Passive control of quorum sensing: prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piletska, Elena V; Stavroulakis, Georgios; Larcombe, Lee D; Whitcombe, Michael J; Sharma, Anant; Primrose, Sandy; Robinson, Gary K; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2011-04-11

    Here we present the first molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) that is able to attenuate the biofilm formation of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa through specific sequestration of its signal molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C(12)-AHL). The MIP was rationally designed using computational modeling, and its capacity and specificity and that of a corresponding blank polymer toward signal molecule of P. aeruginosa (3-oxo-C(12)-AHL) and its analogue were tested. The biofilm formation in the presence of polymers and without polymers was studied using scanning confocal laser microscopy. Staining with crystal violet dye was used for the quantification of the biofilm formation. A significant reduction of the biofilm growth was observed in the presence of MIP (>80%), which was superior to that of the resin prepared without template, which showed a reduction of 40% in comparison with biofilm, which was grown without polymer addition. It was shown that 3-oxo-C(12)-AHL-specific MIP prevented the development of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes (in this case, biofilm formation) from being up-regulated. The developed MIP could be considered as a new tool for the elimination of life-threatening infections in a multitude of practical applications; it could, for example, be grafted on the surface of medical devices such as catheters and lenses, be a component of paints, or be used as a wound adsorbent.

  7. Molecularly imprinted polymer based electrochemical detection of L-cysteine at carbon paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswini, K K; Vinu Mohan, A M; Biju, V M

    2014-04-01

    A methacrylic acid (MAA) based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) was developed for electrochemical detection of L-cysteine (Cys). Characterisation of MIP was done with FTIR and the modified electrode with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). CV, DPV and impedance analysis demonstrated that the modified electrode is responsive towards the target molecule. The optimum percentage composition of MIP for MIP/CPE and the effect of pH towards the electrode response for Cys were studied. The detection of Cys in the range of 2×10(-8) to 18×10(-8)M at MIP/CPE was monitored by DPV with a limit of detection of 9.6nM and R(2) of 0.9974. Also, various physiological interferents such as ascorbic acid, L-tryptophan, D-glucose, D-cysteine and L-cysteine were found to have little effect on DPV response at MIP/CPE. The utility of the electrode was proved by the effective detection of Cys from tap water and human blood plasma samples with reproducible results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Impaired imprinted X chromosome inactivation is responsible for the skewed sex ratio following in vitro fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kun; An, Lei; Miao, Kai; Ren, Likun; Hou, Zhuocheng; Tao, Li; Zhang, Zhenni; Wang, Xiaodong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Jinghao; Wang, Zhuqing; Xi, Guangyin; Gao, Shuai; Sui, Linlin; Zhu, De-Sheng; Wang, Shumin; Wu, Zhonghong; Bach, Ingolf; Chen, Dong-bao; Tian, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic epigenetic reprogramming occurs during normal embryonic development at the preimplantation stage. Erroneous epigenetic modifications due to environmental perturbations such as manipulation and culture of embryos during in vitro fertilization (IVF) are linked to various short- or long-term consequences. Among these, the skewed sex ratio, an indicator of reproductive hazards, was reported in bovine and porcine embryos and even human IVF newborns. However, since the first case of sex skewing reported in 1991, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We reported herein that sex ratio is skewed in mouse IVF offspring, and this was a result of female-biased peri-implantation developmental defects that were originated from impaired imprinted X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) through reduced ring finger protein 12 (Rnf12)/X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) expression. Compensation of impaired iXCI by overexpression of Rnf12 to up-regulate Xist significantly rescued female-biased developmental defects and corrected sex ratio in IVF offspring. Moreover, supplementation of an epigenetic modulator retinoic acid in embryo culture medium up-regulated Rnf12/Xist expression, improved iXCI, and successfully redeemed the skewed sex ratio to nearly 50% in mouse IVF offspring. Thus, our data show that iXCI is one of the major epigenetic barriers for the developmental competence of female embryos during preimplantation stage, and targeting erroneous epigenetic modifications may provide a potential approach for preventing IVF-associated complications. PMID:26951653

  9. Glucose metabolism, islet architecture, and genetic homogeneity in imprinting of [Ca2+](i and insulin rhythms in mouse islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig S Nunemaker

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We reported previously that islets isolated from individual, outbred Swiss-Webster mice displayed oscillations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i that varied little between islets of a single mouse but considerably between mice, a phenomenon we termed "islet imprinting." We have now confirmed and extended these findings in several respects. First, imprinting occurs in both inbred (C57BL/6J as well as outbred mouse strains (Swiss-Webster; CD1. Second, imprinting was observed in NAD(PH oscillations, indicating a metabolic component. Further, short-term exposure to a glucose-free solution, which transiently silenced [Ca2+](i oscillations, reset the oscillatory patterns to a higher frequency. This suggests a key role for glucose metabolism in maintaining imprinting, as transiently suppressing the oscillations with diazoxide, a K(ATP-channel opener that blocks [Ca2+](i influx downstream of glucose metabolism, did not change the imprinted patterns. Third, imprinting was not as readily observed at the level of single beta cells, as the [Ca2+](i oscillations of single cells isolated from imprinted islets exhibited highly variable, and typically slower [Ca2+](i oscillations. Lastly, to test whether the imprinted [Ca2+](i patterns were of functional significance, a novel microchip platform was used to monitor insulin release from multiple islets in real time. Insulin release patterns correlated closely with [Ca2+](i oscillations and showed significant mouse-to-mouse differences, indicating imprinting. These results indicate that islet imprinting is a general feature of islets and is likely to be of physiological significance. While islet imprinting did not depend on the genetic background of the mice, glucose metabolism and intact islet architecture may be important for the imprinting phenomenon.

  10. Microcystin-LR detection in water by the Fabry-Pérot interferometer using an optical fibre coated with a sol-gel imprinted sensing membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, Raquel B; Silva, S O; Noronha, J P; Frazão, O; Jorge, P; Aguilar, G; Marques, P V S; Sales, M G F

    2011-05-15

    Cyanobacteria deteriorate the water quality and are responsible for emerging outbreaks and epidemics causing harmful diseases in Humans and animals because of their toxins. Microcystin-LR (MCT) is one of the most relevant cyanotoxin, being the most widely studied hepatotoxin. For safety purposes, the World Health Organization recommends a maximum value of 1 μg L(-1) of MCT in drinking water. Therefore, there is a great demand for remote and real-time sensing techniques to detect and quantify MCT. In this work a Fabry-Pérot sensing probe based on an optical fibre tip coated with a MCT selective thin film is presented. The membranes were developed by imprinting MCT in a sol-gel matrix that was applied over the tip of the fibre by dip coating. The imprinting effect was obtained by curing the sol-gel membrane, prepared with (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS), diphenyl-dimethoxysilane (DPDMS), tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), in the presence of MCT. The imprinting effect was tested by preparing a similar membrane without template. In general, the fibre Fabry-Pérot with a Molecular Imprinted Polymer (MIP) sensor showed low thermal effect, thus avoiding the need of temperature control in field applications. It presented a linear response to MCT concentration within 0.3-1.4 μg L(-1) with a sensitivity of -12.4±0.7 nm L μg(-1). The corresponding Non-Imprinted Polymer (NIP) displayed linear behaviour for the same MCT concentration range, but with much less sensitivity, of -5.9±0.2 nm L μg(-1). The method shows excellent selectivity for MCT against other species co-existing with the analyte in environmental waters. It was successfully applied to the determination of MCT in contaminated samples. The main advantages of the proposed optical sensor include high sensitivity and specificity, low-cost, robustness, easy preparation and preservation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A sensing approach for dopamine determination by boronic acid-functionalized molecularly imprinted graphene quantum dots composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xi; Gao, Xuexia; Song, Fengyan; Wang, Chunpeng; Chu, Fuxiang; Wu, Shishan

    2017-11-01

    A novel fluorescence sensor was developed for dopamine (DA) determination based on molecularly imprinted graphene quantum dots and poly(indolylboronic acid) composite (MIPs@ PIn-BAc/GQDs). When the DA is added to the system, it leads to an aggregation and fluorescence quenching of the MIPs@ PIn-BAc/GQDs because of the covalent binding between the catechol group of DA and boronic acid. Such fluorescence behaviors are used for well testing DA in a range from 5 × 10-9 to 1.2 × 10-6 M with the detection limit of 2.5 × 10-9 M. Furthermore, the prepared sensors could well against the interferences from various biomolecules and be successfully used for the assay of DA in human biological samples, exhibiting excellent specificity. It is believed that the prepared MIPs@ PIn-BAc/GQDs hold great promise as a practical platform that can monitor DA level change.

  12. The parental non-equivalence of imprinting control regions during mammalian development and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Schulz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, imprinted gene expression results from the sex-specific methylation of imprinted control regions (ICRs in the parental germlines. Imprinting is linked to therian reproduction, that is, the placenta and imprinting emerged at roughly the same time and potentially co-evolved. We assessed the transcriptome-wide and ontology effect of maternally versus paternally methylated ICRs at the developmental stage of setting of the chorioallantoic placenta in the mouse (8.5dpc, using two models of imprinting deficiency including completely imprint-free embryos. Paternal and maternal imprints have a similar quantitative impact on the embryonic transcriptome. However, transcriptional effects of maternal ICRs are qualitatively focused on the fetal-maternal interface, while paternal ICRs weakly affect non-convergent biological processes, with little consequence for viability at 8.5dpc. Moreover, genes regulated by maternal ICRs indirectly influence genes regulated by paternal ICRs, while the reverse is not observed. The functional dominance of maternal imprints over early embryonic development is potentially linked to selection pressures favoring methylation-dependent control of maternal over paternal ICRs. We previously hypothesized that the different methylation histories of ICRs in the maternal versus the paternal germlines may have put paternal ICRs under higher mutational pressure to lose CpGs by deamination. Using comparative genomics of 17 extant mammalian species, we show here that, while ICRs in general have been constrained to maintain more CpGs than non-imprinted sequences, the rate of CpG loss at paternal ICRs has indeed been higher than at maternal ICRs during evolution. In fact, maternal ICRs, which have the characteristics of CpG-rich promoters, have gained CpGs compared to non-imprinted CpG-rich promoters. Thus, the numerical and, during early embryonic development, functional dominance of maternal ICRs can be explained as the

  13. The parental non-equivalence of imprinting control regions during mammalian development and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Reiner; Proudhon, Charlotte; Bestor, Timothy H; Woodfine, Kathryn; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Lin, Shau-Ping; Prissette, Marine; Oakey, Rebecca J; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2010-11-18

    In mammals, imprinted gene expression results from the sex-specific methylation of imprinted control regions (ICRs) in the parental germlines. Imprinting is linked to therian reproduction, that is, the placenta and imprinting emerged at roughly the same time and potentially co-evolved. We assessed the transcriptome-wide and ontology effect of maternally versus paternally methylated ICRs at the developmental stage of setting of the chorioallantoic placenta in the mouse (8.5dpc), using two models of imprinting deficiency including completely imprint-free embryos. Paternal and maternal imprints have a similar quantitative impact on the embryonic transcriptome. However, transcriptional effects of maternal ICRs are qualitatively focused on the fetal-maternal interface, while paternal ICRs weakly affect non-convergent biological processes, with little consequence for viability at 8.5dpc. Moreover, genes regulated by maternal ICRs indirectly influence genes regulated by paternal ICRs, while the reverse is not observed. The functional dominance of maternal imprints over early embryonic development is potentially linked to selection pressures favoring methylation-dependent control of maternal over paternal ICRs. We previously hypothesized that the different methylation histories of ICRs in the maternal versus the paternal germlines may have put paternal ICRs under higher mutational pressure to lose CpGs by deamination. Using comparative genomics of 17 extant mammalian species, we show here that, while ICRs in general have been constrained to maintain more CpGs than non-imprinted sequences, the rate of CpG loss at paternal ICRs has indeed been higher than at maternal ICRs during evolution. In fact, maternal ICRs, which have the characteristics of CpG-rich promoters, have gained CpGs compared to non-imprinted CpG-rich promoters. Thus, the numerical and, during early embryonic development, functional dominance of maternal ICRs can be explained as the consequence of two

  14. Experimental evaluation of imprinting and the role innate preference plays in habitat selection in a coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Danielle L; Jones, Geoffrey P; Munday, Philip L; Planes, Serge; Pratchett, Morgan S; Thorrold, Simon R

    2014-01-01

    When facing decisions about where to live, juveniles have a strong tendency to choose habitats similar to where their parents successfully bred. Developing larval fishes can imprint on the chemical cues from their natal habitat. However, to demonstrate that imprinting is ecologically important, it must be shown that settlers respond and distinguish among different imprinted cues, and use imprinting for decisions in natural environments. In addition, the potential role innate preferences play compared to imprinted choices also needs to be examined. As environmental variability increases due to anthropogenic causes these two recognition mechanisms, innate and imprinting, could provide conflicting information. Here we used laboratory rearing and chemical choice experiments to test imprinting in larval anemonefish (Amphiprion percula). Individuals exposed to a variety of benthic habitat or novel olfactory cues as larvae either developed a preference for (spent >50% of their time in the cue) or increased their attraction to (increased preference but did not spend >50% of their time in the cue) the cue when re-exposed as settlers. Results indicate not only the capacity for imprinting but also the ability to adjust innate preferences after early exposure to a chemical cue. To test ecological relevance in the natural system, recruits were collected from anemones and related to their parents, using genetic parentage analysis, providing information on the natal anemone species and the species chosen at settlement. Results demonstrated that recruits did not preferentially return to their natal species, conflicting with laboratory results indicating the importance imprinting might have in habitat recognition.

  15. Imprinting, latchment and displacement: a mini review of early instinctual behaviour in newborn infants influencing breastfeeding success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Elsie J; Mobbs, George A; Mobbs, Anthony E D

    2016-01-01

    Instinctive behaviours have evolved favouring the mother-infant dyad based on fundamental processes of neurological development, including oral tactile imprinting and latchment. Latchment is the first stage of emotional development based on the successful achievement of biological imprinting. The mechanisms underpinning imprinting are identified and the evolutionary benefits discussed. It is proposed that the oral tactile imprint to the breast is a keystone for optimal latchment and breastfeeding, promoting evolutionary success. ©2015 The Authors. Acta Paediatrica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  16. Towards bilirubin imprinted poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate) for the specific binding of α-bilirubin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syu, M.-J.; Deng, J.-H.; Nian, Y.-M.

    2004-01-01

    With α-bilirubin as a molecular template, polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) was carried out with the aid of the initiator 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) and the cross-linking agent ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EGDMA). Bulk polymerization was successfully carried out so that poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate) (poly(MAA-EGDMA)) imprinted with α-bilirubin was first developed. UV irradiation polymerization and heated polymerization methods were compared. Effect of different ratios of monomer to EGDMA during the polymerization was also discussed. Proper solvent for better desorption of α-bilirubin from the imprinted poly(MAA-EGDMA) was investigated. In addition, SEM photos were provided for observing the differences between the surfaces of the imprinted poly(MAA-EGDMA) before and after extraction. The corresponding binding results of α-bilirubin imprinted poly(MAA-EGDMA) and non-imprinted poly(MAA-EGDMA) both after extraction were compared. How the pH values during extraction stage affected the binding capacities of the imprinted polymer as well as non-imprinted polymer were also discussed. Similar study and comparison were made for different binding pH values. Different compounds of similar molecular weight were used to show the specific binding of the imprinted polymer for bilirubin. The results further confirmed the successful binding as well as specificity of the imprinted poly(MAA-EGDMA) for α-bilirubin

  17. Molecularly imprinted polymer beads for nicotine recognition prepared by RAFT precipitation polymerization: a step forward towards multifunctionalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Tongchang; Jørgensen, Lars; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm

    2014-01-01

    A nicotine imprinted polymer was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer. The resulting molecularly imprinted polymers were monodispersed beads with an average diameter of 1.55 mm. The molecular...... selectivity of the imprinted polymer beads was evaluated by studying the uptake of nicotine and its structural analogs by the polymer beads. Equilibrium binding results indicate that the amount of nicotine bound to the imprinted polymer beads is significantly higher than that bound to the nonimprinted polymer...

  18. Controlled Vectorial Electron Transfer and Photoelectrochemical Applications of Layered Relay/Photosensitizer-Imprinted Au Nanoparticle Architectures on Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Tzuriel S; Tel-Vered, Ran; Willner, Itamar

    2016-03-23

    Two configurations of molecularly imprinted bis-aniline-bridged Au nanoparticles (NPs) for the specific binding of the electron acceptor N,N'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (MV(2+) ) and for the photosensitizer Zn(II)-protoporphyrin IX (Zn(II)-PP-IX) are assembled on electrodes, and the photoelectrochemical features of the two configurations are discussed. Configuration I includes the MV(2+) -imprinted Au NPs matrix as a base layer, on which the Zn(II)-PP-IX-imprinted Au NPs layer is deposited, while configuration II consists of a bilayer corresponding to the reversed imprinting order. Irradiation of the two electrodes in the presence of a benzoquinone/benzohydroquinone redox probe yields photocurrents of unique features: (i) Whereas configuration I yields an anodic photocurrent, the photocurrent generated by configuration II is cathodic. (ii) The photocurrents obtained upon irradiation of the imprinted electrodes are substantially higher as compared to the nonimprinted surfaces. The high photocurrents generated by the imprinted Au NPs-modified electrodes are attributed to the effective loading of the imprinted matrices with the MV(2+) and Zn(II)-PP-IX units and to the effective charge separation proceeding in the systems. The directional anodic/cathodic photocurrents are rationalized in terms of vectorial electron transfer processes dictated by the imprinting order and by the redox potentials of the photosensitizer/electron acceptor units associated with the imprinted sites in the two configurations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Synthesis of thermo-responsive bovine hemoglobin imprinted nanoparticles by combining ionic liquid immobilization with aqueous precipitation polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongmei; Yang, Chongchong; Sun, Yan; Qiu, Fengtao; Xiang, Yang; Fu, Guoqi

    2018-02-01

    Surface molecular imprinting over functionalized nanoparticles has proved to be an effective approach for construction of artificial nanomaterials for protein recognition. Herein, we report a strategy for synthesis of core-shell protein-imprinted nanoparticles by the functionalization of nano-cores with ionic liquids followed by aqueous precipitation polymerization to build thermo-responsive imprinted polymer nano-shells. The immobilized ionic liquids can form multiple interactions with the protein template. The polymerization process can produce thermo-reversible physical crosslinks, which are advantageous to enhancing imprinting and facilitating template removal. With bovine hemoglobin as a model template, the imprinted nanoparticles showed temperature-sensitivity in both dispersion behaviors and rebinding capacities. Compared with the ionic-liquid-modified core nanoparticles, the imprinted particles exhibited greatly increased selectivity and two orders of magnitude higher binding affinity for the template protein. The imprinted nanoparticles achieved relatively high imprinting factor up to 5.0 and specific rebinding capacity of 67.7 mg/g, respectively. These nanoparticles also demonstrated rapid rebinding kinetics and good reproducibility after five cycles of adsorption-regeneration. Therefore, the presented approach may be viable for the fabrication of high-performance protein-imprinted nanoparticles with temperature sensitivity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Maternally Expressed Gene 3, an imprinted non-coding RNA gene, is associated with meningioma pathogenesis and progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Gejman, Roger; Mahta, Ali; Zhong, Ying; Rice, Kimberley A.; Zhou, Yunli; Cheunsuchon, Pornsuk; Louis, David N.; Klibanski, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Meningiomas are common tumors, representing 15-25% of all central nervous system tumors. NF2 gene inactivation on chromosome 22 has been shown as an early event in tumorigenesis; however, few factors underlying tumor growth and progression have been identified. Chromosomal abnormalities of 14q32 are often associated with meningioma pathogenesis and progression; therefore it has been proposed that an as yet unidentified tumor suppressor is present at this locus. MEG3 is an imprinted gene located at 14q32 that encodes a non-coding RNA with an anti-proliferative function. We found that MEG3 mRNA is highly expressed in normal arachnoidal cells. However, MEG3 is not expressed in the majority of human meningiomas or the human meningioma cell lines IOMM-Lee and CH157-MN. There is a strong association between loss of MEG3 expression and tumor grade. Allelic loss at the MEG3 locus is also observed in meningiomas, with increasing prevalence in higher grade tumors. In addition, there is an increase in CpG methylation within the promoter and the imprinting control region of MEG3 gene in meningiomas. Functionally, MEG3 suppresses DNA synthesis in both IOMM-Lee and CH157-MN cells by approximately 60% in BrdU incorporation assays. Colony-forming efficiency assays show that MEG3 inhibits colony formation in CH157-MN cells by approximately 80%. Furthermore, MEG3 stimulates p53-mediated transactivation in these cell lines. Therefore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that MEG3, which encodes a non-coding RNA, may be a tumor suppressor gene at chromosome 14q32 involved in meningioma progression via a novel mechanism. PMID:20179190

  1. Three-phase molecularly imprinted sol-gel based hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for enrichment and selective determination of a tentative lung cancer biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Javanbakht, Mehran; Karimi, Mohammad; Akbari-Adergani, Behrouz; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2015-07-15

    In the present study, the modification of a polysulfone hollow fiber membrane with in situ molecularly imprinted sol-gel process (as a novel and one-step method) was prepared and investigated. 3-(propylmethacrylate)trimethoxysilane (3PMTMOS) as an inorganic precursor was used for preparation of molecularly imprinted sol-gel. The modified molecularly imprinted sol-gel hollow fiber membrane (MSHM) was used for the liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) of hippuric acid (HA) in human plasma and urine samples. MSHM as a selective, robust, and durable tool was used for at least 50 extractions without significant decrease in the extraction efficiency. The non-molecularly imprinted sol-gel hollow fiber membrane (NSHM) as blank hollow fiber membrane was prepared by the same process, only without HA. To achieve the best condition, influential parameters on the extraction efficiency were thoroughly investigated. The capability of this robust, green, and simple method for extraction of HA was successfully accomplished with LC/MS/MS. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) in human plasma and urine samples were 0.3 and 1.0nmolL(-1), respectively. The standard calibration curves were obtained within the concentration range 1-2000nmolL(-1) for HA in human plasma and urine. The coefficients of determination (r(2)) were ≥0.998. The obtained data exhibited recoveries were higher than 89% for the extraction of HA in human plasma and urine samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of nicotine based on molecularly imprinted TiO{sub 2}-modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.-T.; Chen, P.-Y.; Chen, J.-G.; Suryanarayanan, Vembu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Ho, K.-C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kcho@ntu.edu.tw

    2009-02-02

    Amperometric detection of nicotine (NIC) was carried out on a titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2})/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-modified electrode by a molecular imprinting technique. In order to improve the conductivity of the substrate, PEDOT was coated onto the sintered electrode by in situ electrochemical polymerization of the monomer. The sensing potential of the NIC-imprinted TiO{sub 2} electrode (ITO/TiO{sub 2}[NIC]/PEDOT) in a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 7.4) containing 0.1 M KCl was determined to be 0.88 V (vs. Ag/AgCl/saturated KCl). The linear detection range for NIC oxidation on the so-called ITO/TiO{sub 2}[NIC]/PEDOT electrode was 0-5 mM, with a sensitivity and limit of detection of 31.35 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and 4.9 {mu}M, respectively. When comparing with the performance of the non-imprinted one, the sensitivity ratio was about 1.24. The sensitivity enhancement was attributed to the increase in the electroactive area of the imprinted electrode. The at-rest stability of the ITO/TiO{sub 2}[NIC]/PEDOT electrode was tested over a period of 3 days. The current response remained about 85% of its initial value at the end of 2 days. The ITO/TiO{sub 2}[NIC]/PEDOT electrode showed reasonably good selectivity in distinguishing NIC from its major interferent, (-)-cotinine (COT). Moreover, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was employed to elucidate the surface morphology of the imprinted and non-imprinted electrodes using Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-}/Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4-} as a redox probe on a platinum tip. The imprinted electrode was further characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)

  3. Improvement of the homogeneity of protein-imprinted polymer films by orientated immobilization of the template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lijian; Zheng Jingjing; Fang Guijie; Xie Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► MPH was genetically modified at its C-terminal with (Gly-Ser) 5 –Cys. ► MPH-L was immobilized with fixed orientation via disulfide chemistry. ► The immobilized MPH-L retained the activity of MPH. ► MPH-L formed a homogeneous template. ► Homogeneous MIP film was obtained with orientated immobilization of the template. - Abstract: A method for preparing homogeneous protein-imprinted polymer films with orientated immobilization of template is described. The template methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH) was modified with a peptide linker (Gly-Ser) 5 –Cys and was immobilized on a cover glass with a fixed orientation via the linker. The activity of the fusion enzyme (MPH-L) was evaluated by determining the product's absorbance at 405 nm (A 405 ). Both the free and the immobilized MPH-L showed higher retention of the bioactivity than the wide type enzyme (MPH-W) as revealed by the A 405 values for MPH-L free /MPH-W free (1.159/1.111) and for MPH-L immobilized /MPH-W immobilized (0.348/0.118). The immobilized MPH-L also formed a more homogeneous template stamp compared to the immobilized MPH-W. The molecularly imprinted polymer films prepared with the immobilized MPH-L exhibited high homogeneity with low Std. Deviations of 80 and 200 from the CL intensity mean volumes which were observed for batch-prepared films and an individual film, respectively. MPH-L-imprinted polymer film also had a larger template binding capacity indicated by higher CL intensity mean volume of 3900 INT over 2500 INT for MPH-W-imprinted films. The imprinted film prepared with the orientated immobilization of template showed an imprinting factor of 1.7, while the controls did not show an imprinting effect.

  4. Highly sensitive and selective hyphenated technique (molecularly imprinted polymer solid-phase microextraction-molecularly imprinted polymer sensor) for ultra trace analysis of aspartic acid enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bhim Bali; Srivastava, Amrita; Tiwari, Mahavir Prasad

    2013-03-29

    The present work is related to combination of molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction and complementary molecularly imprinted polymer-sensor. The molecularly imprinted polymer grafted on titanium dioxide modified silica fiber was used for microextraction, while the same polymer immobilized on multiwalled carbon nanotubes/titanium dioxide modified pencil graphite electrode served as a detection tool. In both cases, the surface initiated polymerization was found to be advantageous to obtain a nanometer thin imprinted film. The modified silica fiber exhibited high adsorption capacity and enantioselective diffusion of aspartic acid isomers into respective molecular cavities. This combination enabled double preconcentrations of d- and l-aspartic acid that helped sensing both isomers in real samples, without any cross-selectivity and matrix complications. Taking into account 6×10(4)-fold dilution of serum and 2×10(3)-fold dilution of cerebrospinal fluid required by the proposed method, the limit of detection for l-aspartic acid is 0.031ngmL(-1). Also, taking into account 50-fold dilution required by the proposed method, the limit of detection for d-aspartic acid is 0.031ngmL(-1) in cerebrospinal fluid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Induction of anchorage-independent growth of human embryonic fibroblasts with a deletion in the short arm of chromosome 11 by human papillomavirus type 16 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, H.L.; Raadsheer, E.; Rood, I.; Mehendale, S.; Slater, R.M.; van der Noordaa, J.; Ter Schegget, J.

    1988-01-01

    Human embryonic fibroblasts with a large deletion (11p11.11p15.1) in the short arm of one chromosome 11 (del-11 cells) appeared to be susceptible to transformation by early human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA, whereas diploid human embryonic fibroblasts were not. This difference in susceptibility might be explained by the absence of a tumor suppressor gene located within the deleted part on the short arm of chromosome 11. The presence of abundant viral early-gene transcripts in transformed cells suggests that transformation was induced by an elevated level of an HPV-16 early-gene product(s). The low transcriptional activity of HPV-16 in diploid cells may indicate that cellular genes affect viral transcription. Interruption of the HPV-16 E2 early open reading frame is probably required for high-level HPV-16 early-gene expression driven from the homologous enhancer-promoter region

  6. Towards Phosphate Detection in Hydroponics Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Christopher S; Coldrick, Zachary; Tate, Daniel J; Donoghue, Jack Marsden; Grieve, Bruce

    2018-02-10

    An interdigitated electrode sensor was designed and microfabricated for measuring the changes in the capacitance of three phosphate selective molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) formulations, in order to provide hydroponics users with a portable nutrient sensing tool. The MIPs investigated were synthesised using different combinations of the functional monomers methacrylic acid (MAA) and N -allylthiourea, against the template molecules diphenyl phosphate, triethyl phosphate, and trimethyl phosphate. A cross-interference study between phosphate, nitrate, and sulfate was carried out for the MIP materials using an inductance, capacitance, and resistance (LCR) meter. Capacitance measurements were taken by applying an alternating current (AC) with a potential difference of 1 V root mean square (RMS) at a frequency of 1 kHz. The cross-interference study demonstrated a strong binding preference to phosphate over the other nutrient salts tested for each formulation. The size of template molecule and length of the functional monomer side groups also determined that a short chain functional monomer in combination with a template containing large R-groups produced the optimal binding site conditions when synthesising a phosphate selective MIP.

  7. Solid-phase synthesis of molecularly imprinted nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfarotta, Francesco; Poma, Alessandro; Guerreiro, Antonio; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are synthetic materials, generally based on acrylic or methacrylic monomers, that are polymerized in the presence of a specific target molecule called the 'template' and capable of rebinding selectively to this target molecule. They have the potential to be low-cost and robust alternatives to biomolecules such as antibodies and receptors. When prepared by traditional synthetic methods (i.e., with free template in solution), their usefulness has been limited by high binding site heterogeneity, the presence of residual template and the fact that the production methods are complex and difficult to standardize. To overcome some of these limitations, we developed a method for the synthesis of MIP nanoparticles (nanoMIPs) using an innovative solid-phase approach, which relies on the covalent immobilization of the template molecules onto the surface of a solid support (glass beads). The obtained nanoMIPs are virtually free of template and demonstrate high affinity for the target molecule (e.g., melamine and trypsin in our published work). Because of an affinity separation step performed on the solid phase after polymerization, poor binders and unproductive polymer are removed, so the final product has more uniform binding characteristics. The overall protocol, starting from the immobilization of the template onto the solid phase and including the purification and characterization of the nanoparticles, takes up to 1 week.

  8. PEG-stabilized core-shell surface-imprinted nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Ewa; Guerreiro, Antonio; Piletska, Elena; Piletsky, Sergey

    2013-08-06

    Here we present a simple technique to produce target-specific molecularly imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (MIP NPs) and their surface modification in order to prevent the aggregation process that is ever-present in most nanomaterial suspensions/dispersions. Specifically, we studied the influence of surface modification of MIP NPs with polymerizable poly(ethylene glycol) on their degree of stability in water, in phosphate buffer, and in the presence of serum proteins. Grafting a polymer shell on the surface of nanoparticles decreases the surface energy, enhances the polarity, and as a result improves the dispersibility, storage, and colloidal stability as compared to those of core (unmodified) particles. Because of the unique solid-phase approach used for synthesis, the binding sites of MIP NPs are protected during grafting, and the recognition properties of nanoparticles are not affected. These results are significant for developing nanomaterials with selective molecular recognition, increased biocompatibility, and stability in solution. Materials synthesized this way have the potential to be used in a variety of technological fields, including in vivo applications such as drug delivery and imaging.

  9. PEG-Stabilized Core–Shell Surface-Imprinted Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Ewa; Guerreiro, Antonio; Piletska, Elena; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a simple technique to produce target-specific molecularly imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (MIP NPs) and their surface modification in order to prevent the aggregation process that is ever-present in most nanomaterial suspensions/dispersions. Specifically, we studied the influence of surface modification of MIP NPs with polymerizable poly(ethylene glycol) on their degree of stability in water, in phosphate buffer, and in the presence of serum proteins. Grafting a polymer shell on the surface of nanoparticles decreases the surface energy, enhances the polarity, and as a result improves the dispersibility, storage, and colloidal stability as compared to those of core (unmodified) particles. Because of the unique solid-phase approach used for synthesis, the binding sites of MIP NPs are protected during grafting, and the recognition properties of nanoparticles are not affected. These results are significant for developing nanomaterials with selective molecular recognition, increased biocompatibility, and stability in solution. Materials synthesized this way have the potential to be used in a variety of technological fields, including in vivo applications such as drug delivery and imaging. PMID:23855734

  10. Global imprint of historical connectivity on freshwater fish biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Murilo S; Oberdorff, Thierry; Hugueny, Bernard; Leprieur, Fabien; Jézéquel, Céline; Cornu, Jean-François; Brosse, Sébastien; Grenouillet, Gael; Tedesco, Pablo A

    2014-09-01

    The relative importance of contemporary and historical processes is central for understanding biodiversity patterns. While several studies show that past conditions can partly explain the current biodiversity patterns, the role of history remains elusive. We reconstructed palaeo-drainage basins under lower sea level conditions (Last Glacial Maximum) to test whether the historical connectivity between basins left an imprint on the global patterns of freshwater fish biodiversity. After controlling for contemporary and past environmental conditions, we found that palaeo-connected basins displayed greater species richness but lower levels of endemism and beta diversity than did palaeo-disconnected basins. Palaeo-connected basins exhibited shallower distance decay of compositional similarity, suggesting that palaeo-river connections favoured the exchange of fish species. Finally, we found that a longer period of palaeo-connection resulted in lower levels of beta diversity. These findings reveal the first unambiguous results of the role played by history in explaining the global contemporary patterns of biodiversity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  11. Nano-imprint gold grating as refractive index sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Sudha; Mohapatra, Saswat; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Large scale of fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures has been a challenging task due to time consuming process and requirement of expensive nanofabrication tools such as electron beam lithography system, focused ion beam system, and extreme UV photolithography system. Here, we present a cost-effective fabrication technique so called soft nanoimprinting to fabricate nanostructures on the larger sample area. In our fabrication process, a commercially available optical DVD disc was used as a template which was imprinted on a polymer glass substrate to prepare 1D polymer nano-grating. A homemade nanoimprinting setup was used in this fabrication process. Further, a label-free refractive index sensor was developed by utilizing the properties of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a gold coated 1D polymer nano-grating. Refractive index sensing was tested by exposing different solutions of glycerol-water mixture on the surface of gold nano-grating. The calculated bulk refractive index sensitivity was found to be 751nm/RIU. We believed that our proposed SPR sensor could be a promising candidate for developing low-cost refractive index sensor with high sensitivity on a large scale.

  12. Oriented immobilized anti-hIgG via F(c) fragment-imprinted PHEMA cryogel for IgG purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereli, Nilay; Ertürk, Gizem; Tümer, M Aşkin; Say, Ridvan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-05-01

    Antibodies are used in many applications, especially as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Among the various techniques used for the purification of antibodies, immunoaffinity chromatography is by far the most common. For this purpose, oriented immobilization of antibodies is an important step for the efficiency of purification step. In this study, F(c) fragment-imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) cryogel (MIP) was prepared for the oriented immobilization of anti-hIgG for IgG purification from human plasma. Non-imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) cryogel (NIP) was also prepared for random immobilization of anti-hIgG to compare the adsorption capacities of oriented (MIP/anti-hIgG) and random (NIP/anti-hIgG) cryogel columns. The amount of immobilized anti-hIgG was 19.8 mg/g for the NIP column and 23.7 mg/g for the MIP column. Although the amount of immobilized anti-hIgG was almost the same for the NIP and MIP columns, IgG adsorption capacity was found to be three times higher than the NIP/anti-hIgG column (29.7 mg/g) for the MIP/anti-hIgG column (86.9 mg/g). Higher IgG adsorption capacity was observed from human plasma (up to 106.4 mg/g) with the MIP/anti-hIgG cryogel column. Adsorbed IgG was eluted using 1.0 M NaCl with a purity of 96.7%. The results obtained here are very encouraging and showed the usability of MIP/anti-hIgG cryogel prepared via imprinting of Fc fragments as an alternative to conventional immunoaffinity techniques for IgG purification. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Imprinted genes and transpositions: epigenomic targets for low dose radiation effects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirtle, Randy L.

    2012-01-01

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A vy ) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure ( vy locus in a sex-specific manner (p=0.004). Average DNA methylation was significantly increased in male offspring exposed to doses between 0.7 cGy and 7.6 cGy with maximum effects at 1.4 cGy and 3.0 cGy (p<0.01). Offspring coat color was concomitantly shifted towards pseudoagouti (p<0.01). Maternal dietary antioxidant supplementation mitigated both the DNA methylation changes and coat color shift in the irradiated offspring (p<0.05). Thus, LDIR exposure during gestation elicits epigenetic alterations that lead to positive adaptive phenotypic changes that are negated with antioxidants, indicating they are mediated in part by oxidative stress. These findings provide evidence that in the isogenic Avy mouse model epigenetic alterations resulting from LDIR play a role in radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in animals and humans needs to be defined

  14. Biopolymeric receptor for peptide recognition by molecular imprinting approach—Synthesis, characterization and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Lav Kumar; Singh, Monika; Singh, Meenakshi

    2014-01-01

    The present work is focused on the development of a biocompatible zwitterionic hydrogel for various applications in analytical chemistry. Biopolymer chitosan was derivatized to obtain a series of zwitterionic hydrogel samples. Free amino groups hanging on the biopolymeric chain were reacted with γ-butyrolactone to quaternize the N-centers of polymeric chain. N,N-methylene-bis-acrylamide acts as a crosslinker via Michael-type addition in the subsequent step and facilitated gelation of betainized chitosan. These biopolymeric hydrogel samples were fully characterized by FTIR, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR spectra, SEM and XRD. Hydrogels were further characterized for their swelling behavior at varying parameters. The extent of swelling was perceived to be dictated by solvent composition such as pH, ionic strength and temperature. This valuable polymeric format is herein chosen to design an artificial receptor for dipeptide ‘carnosine’, which has adequate societal significance to be analytically determined, by molecular imprinting. Electrostatic interactions along with complementary H-bonding and other hydrophobic interactions inducing additional synergetic effect between the template (carnosine) and the imprinted polymer led to the formation of imprinted sites. The MIP was able to selectively and specifically take up carnosine from aqueous solution quantitatively. Thus prepared MIPs were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, SEM providing evidence for the quality and quantity of imprinted gels. The binding studies showed that the MIP illustrated good recognition for carnosine as compared to non-imprinted polymers (NIPs). Detection limit was estimated as 3.3 μg mL −1 . Meanwhile, selectivity experiments demonstrated that imprinted gel had a high affinity to carnosine in the presence of close structural analogues (interferrants). - Highlights: • Development of a biocompatible zwitterionic hydrogel • A series of chitosan-derived zwitterionic hydrogel samples • Polymeric

  15. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKeown, Peter C

    2011-08-12

    Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs) displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination). We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag) which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i) their size and (ii) which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1 seeds was

  16. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennblom Trevor J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination. We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i their size and (ii which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1

  17. ADSORPTION PROCESS OF MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED SILICA FOR EXTRACTION OF LACTOSE FROM MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Balieiro

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, about 25-30% of the population has some degree of intolerance to lactose, a disorder associated with the inability of the body to digest lactose due to a disability or absence of the enzyme lactase. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of adsorption of lactose from fresh milk using a fixed bed column of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP. The polymeric material was characterized using Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis, thermal analysis (e.g., differential scanning calorimetric (DSC and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, and the method of Braunauer, Emmet and Teller (BET. The adsorption column dynamics and performance were studied by the breakthrough curves using a 24-1 fractional factorial design. The chemical and structural characterization of the pure matrix and imprinted polymers confirmed the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP imprinted with lactose. The highest capacity was 62.21 mgg-1, obtained at 307.1 K and a flow rate of 12.5 mL.min-1, with central point conditions, 320.1 K and 9 mL.min-1, with an average value of 50.9 mg.g-1. The results indicate that the molecularly imprinted polymer is efficient.

  18. Elucidation of Type of Molecular Interactions for the Imprinting of Shikimic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beng, Y.C.; Nor Azah Yusof

    2016-01-01

    During the preparation of shikimic acid imprinted polymer, the effect of rebinding solution water content on the rebinding performance of shikimic acid (SA) imprinted polymer was studied. Result showed that the highest affinity toward SA was in a 100 % aqueous rebinding solution, suggesting that the interactions occurred between SA and the polymer were ionic and/ or hydrophobic in nature. Further study on the effect of rebinding solution pH to the SA imprinted polymer rebinding performance showed that the performance of the SA imprinted polymer depended on the rebinding solution pH and the highest affinity occurred at pH 4.0; this confirmed that ionic interaction played an important role in the rebinding of SA. Taking into account the deductions made from the combined results of the rebinding solution water content and effect of pH, together with observation of the red shift in the SA spectral during ultraviolet-visible spectroscopic titration experiments, suggest that the specificity shown by SA imprinted polymer in the aqueous solution was due to both ionic and π-π hydrophobic interactions. (author)

  19. Simulations of laser imprint for Nova experiments and for ignition capsules. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, S.V.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Key, M.H.; Remington, B.A.; Rothenberg, J.L.; Wolfrum, E.; Verdon, C.P.; Knauer, J.P.

    1996-12-01

    In direct drive ICF, nonuniformities in laser illumination seed ripples at the ablation front in a process called ''imprint''. These nonuniformities grow during the capsule implosion and, if initially large enough, can penetrate the capsule shell, impede ignition, or degrade burn. Imprint has been simulated for recent experiments performed on the Nova laser at LLNL examining a variety of beam smoothing conditions. Most used laser intensities similar to the early part of an ignition capsule pulse shape, 1 ≅ 10 13 W/cm 2 . The simulations matched most of the measurements of imprint modulation. The effect of imprint upon National Ignition Facility (NIF) direct drive ignition capsules has also been simulated. Imprint is predicted to give modulation comparable to an intrinsic surface finish of ∼10 nm RMS. Modulation growth was examined using the Haan [Phys. Rev. A 39, 5812 (1989)] model, with linear growth factors as a function of spherical harmonic mode number obtained from an analytic dispersion relation. Ablation front amplitudes are predicted to become substantially nonlinear, so that saturation corrections are large. Direct numerical simulations of two-dimensional multimode growth were also performed. The capsule shell is predicted to remain intact, which gives a basis for believing that ignition can be achieved. 27 refs., 10 figs

  20. Fabrication of an organic field effect transistor using nano imprinting of Ag inks and semiconducting polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, PingAn; Li, Kun; O'Neill, William; Chen, Weilin; Peng, Li; Chu, Daping

    2010-01-01

    A simple and cheap procedure for flexible electronics fabrication was demonstrated by imprinting metallic nanoparticles (NPs) on flexible substrates. Silver NPs with an average diameter of 10 nm were prepared via an improved chemical approach and Ag Np ink was produced in α-terpineol with a concentration up to 15%. Silver micro/nanostructures with a dimension varying from nanometres to microns were produced on a flexible substrate (polyimide) by imprinting the as-prepared silver ink. The fine fluidic properties of an Ag NP/α-terpineol solution and low melting temperatures of silver nanoparticles render a low pressure and low temperature procedure, which is well suited for flexible electronics fabrication. The effects of sintering and mechanical bending on the conductivity of imprinted silver contacts were also investigated. Large area organic field effect transistors (OFET) on flexible substrates were fabricated using an imprinted silver electrode and semiconducting polymer. The OFET with silver electrodes imprinted from our prepared oleic acid stabilized Ag nanoparticle ink show an ideal ohmic contact; therefore, the OFET exhibit high performance (I on /I off ratio: 1 × 10 3 ; mobility: 0.071 cm 2 V −1 s −1 ).

  1. Vitamin-caused faulty perinatal hormonal imprinting and its consequences in adult age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, G

    2017-09-01

    Lipid-soluble vitamins (vitamins A, D, E, and K) are actually hormones (exohormones), as they can be directly bound by hormone receptors or are in connection with molecules, which influence hormone receptors. Vitamin D is a transition between endo- and exohormones and the possibility of similar situation in case of other lipid-soluble hormones is discussed. The perinatal exposition with these "vitamins" can cause faulty perinatal hormonal imprinting with similar consequences as the faulty imprinting by the synthetic endohormones, members of the same hormone family or industrial, communal, or medical endocrine disruptors. The faulty imprinting leads to late (lifelong) consequences with altered hormone binding by receptors, altered sexuality, brain function, immunity, bone development, and fractures, etc. In addition, as hormonal imprinting is an epigenetic process, the effect of a single exposure by fat-soluble vitamins is inherited to the progeny generations. As vitamins are handled differently from hormones; however, perinatal treatments take place frequently and sometimes it is forced, the negative late effect of faulty perinatal vitamin-caused hormonal imprinting must be considered.

  2. Molecularly imprinted poly (methacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) composite membranes for recognition of curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ping; Hu Wenming; Su Weike

    2008-01-01

    In this study, molecularly imprinted poly (methacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) composite membranes with different ratio of methacrylamide (MAM) versus methacrylic acid (MAA) were prepared via UV initiated photo-copolymerization on the commercial filter paper. Curcumin was chosen as the template molecule. Infra-red (IR) spectroscopy was used to study the binding mechanism between the imprinted sites and the templates. The morphology of the resultant membranes was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Static equilibrium binding and recognition properties of the imprinted composite membranes to curcumin (cur-I) and its analogues demethoxycurcumin (cur-II) or bisdemethoxycurcumin (cur-III) were tested. The results showed that curcumin-imprinted membranes had the best recognition ability to curcumin compared to its analogues. From the results, the biggest selectivity factor of α cur-I/cur-II and α cur-I/cur-III were 1.50 and 5.94, and they were obtained from the composite membranes in which MAM/MAA were 1:4 and 0:1, respectively. The results of this study implied that the molecularly imprinted composite membranes could be used as separation membranes for curcumin enrichment

  3. Naproxen-imprinted xerogels in the micro- and nanospherical formsby emulsion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Mariana; Azenha, Manuel; Pereira, Carlos; Silva, A Fernando

    2015-11-27

    Naproxen-imprinted xerogels in the microspherical and nanospherical forms were prepared by W/O emulsion and microemulsion, respectively. The work evolved from a sol–gel mixture previously reported for bulk synthesis. It was relatively simple to convert the original sol–gel mixture to one amenable to emulsion technique. The microspheres thus produced presented mean diameter of 3.7 μm, surface area ranging 220–340 m2/g, selectivity factor 4.3 (against ibuprofen) and imprinting factor 61. A superior capacity (9.4 μmol/g) was found, when comparing with imprints obtained from similar pre-gelification mixtures. However, slow mass transfer kinetics was deduced from column efficiency results. Concerning the nanospherical format, which constituted the first example of the production of molecularly imprinted xerogels in that format by microemulsion technique, adapting the sol–gel mixture was troublesome. In the end, nanoparticles with diameter in the order of 10 nm were finally obtained, exhibiting good indications of an efficient molecular imprinting process. Future refinements are necessary to solve serious aggregation issues, before moving to more accurate characterization of the binding characteristics or to real applications of the nanospheres.

  4. Translational control of auditory imprinting and structural plasticity by eIF2α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Gervasio; Johnson, Jennifer Leigh; Dominguez, Elena; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Pena, Jose L

    2016-01-01

    The formation of imprinted memories during a critical period is crucial for vital behaviors, including filial attachment. Yet, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Using a combination of behavior, pharmacology, in vivo surface sensing of translation (SUnSET) and DiOlistic labeling we found that, translational control by the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) bidirectionally regulates auditory but not visual imprinting and related changes in structural plasticity in chickens. Increasing phosphorylation of eIF2α (p-eIF2α) reduces translation rates and spine plasticity, and selectively impairs auditory imprinting. By contrast, inhibition of an eIF2α kinase or blocking the translational program controlled by p-eIF2α enhances auditory imprinting. Importantly, these manipulations are able to reopen the critical period. Thus, we have identified a translational control mechanism that selectively underlies auditory imprinting. Restoring translational control of eIF2α holds the promise to rejuvenate adult brain plasticity and restore learning and memory in a variety of cognitive disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17197.001 PMID:28009255

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Molecular Imprinting Polymer Microspheres of Piperine: Extraction of Piperine from Spiked Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Marcella Roland

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP microspheres for Piperine were synthesized by precipitation polymerization with a noncovalent approach. In this research Piperine was used as a template, acrylic acid as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker, and 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN as an initiator and acetonitrile as a solvent. The imprinted and nonimprinted polymer particles were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The synthesized polymer particles were further evaluated for their rebinding efficiency by batch binding assay. The highly selected imprinted polymer for Piperine was MIP 3 with a composition (molar ratio of 0.5 : 3 : 8, template : monomer : cross-linker, respectively. The MIP 3 exhibits highest binding capacity (84.94% as compared to other imprinted and nonimprinted polymers. The extraction efficiency of highly selected imprinted polymer of Piperine from spiked urine was above 80%.

  6. Molecular imprinting of enzymes with water-insoluble ligands for nonaqueous biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Joseph O; Mozhaev, Vadim V; Dordick, Jonathan S; Clark, Douglas S; Khmelnitsky, Yuri L

    2002-05-15

    Attaining higher levels of catalytic activity of enzymes in organic solvents is one of the major challenges in nonaqueous enzymology. One of the most successful strategies for enhancing enzyme activity in organic solvents involves tuning the enzyme active site by molecular imprinting with substrates or their analogues. Unfortunately, numerous imprinters of potential importance are poorly soluble in water, which significantly limits the utility of this method. In the present study, we have developed strategies that overcome this limitation of the molecular-imprinting technique and that thus expand its applicability beyond water-soluble ligands. The solubility problem can be addressed either by converting the ligands into a water-soluble form or by adding relatively high concentrations of organic cosolvents, such as tert-butyl alcohol and 1,4-dioxane, to increase their solubility in the lyophilization medium. We have succeeded in applying both of these strategies to produce imprinted thermolysin, subtilisin, and lipase TL possessing up to 26-fold higher catalytic activity in the acylation of paclitaxel and 17beta-estradiol compared to nonimprinted enzymes. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time that molecular imprinting and salt activation, applied in combination, produce a strong additive activation effect (up to 110-fold), suggesting different mechanisms of action involved in these enzyme activation techniques.

  7. Microcontact Imprinted Plasmonic Nanosensors: Powerful Tools in the Detection of Salmonella paratyphi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işık Perçin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification of pathogenic microorganisms by traditional methods is slow and cumbersome. Therefore, the focus today is on developing new and quicker analytical methods. In this study, a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR sensor with a microcontact imprinted sensor chip was developed for detecting Salmonella paratyphi. For this purpose, the stamps of the target microorganism were prepared and then, microcontact S. paratyphi-imprinted SPR chips were prepared with the functional monomer N-methacryloyl-L-histidine methyl ester (MAH. Characterization studies of the SPR chips were carried out with ellipsometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The real-time Salmonella paratyphi detection was performed within the range of 2.5 × 106–15 × 106 CFU/mL. Selectivity of the prepared sensors was examined by using competing bacterial strains such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The imprinting efficiency of the prepared sensor system was determined by evaluating the responses of the SPR chips prepared with both molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs. Real sample experiments were performed with apple juice. The recognition of Salmonella paratyphi was achieved using these SPR sensor with a detection limit of 1.4 × 106 CFU/mL. In conclusion, SPR sensor has the potential to serve as an excellent candidate for monitoring Salmonella paratyphi in food supplies or contaminated water and clearly makes it possible to develop rapid and appropriate control strategies.

  8. Loss of Gnas imprinting differentially affects REM/NREM sleep and cognition in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Lassi

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that imprinted genes are important in the regulation of sleep. However, the fundamental question of whether genomic imprinting has a role in sleep has remained elusive up to now. In this work we show that REM and NREM sleep states are differentially modulated by the maternally expressed imprinted gene Gnas. In particular, in mice with loss of imprinting of Gnas, NREM and complex cognitive processes are enhanced while REM and REM-linked behaviors are inhibited. This is the first demonstration that a specific overexpression of an imprinted gene affects sleep states and related complex behavioral traits. Furthermore, in parallel to the Gnas overexpression, we have observed an overexpression of Ucp1 in interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT and a significant increase in thermoregulation that may account for the REM/NREM sleep phenotypes. We conclude that there must be significant evolutionary advantages in the monoallelic expression of Gnas for REM sleep and for the consolidation of REM-dependent memories. Conversely, biallelic expression of Gnas reinforces slow wave activity in NREM sleep, and this results in a reduction of uncertainty in temporal decision-making processes.

  9. High resolution beam profiling of X-ray free electron laser radiation by polymer imprint development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, Benedikt; Döring, Florian; Ribič, Primož R; Gauthier, David; Principi, Emiliano; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Zangrando, Marco; Vila-Comamala, Joan; De Ninno, Giovanni; David, Christian

    2017-11-27

    High resolution metrology of beam profiles is presently a major challenge at X-ray free electron lasers. We demonstrate a characterization method based on beam imprints in poly (methyl methacrylate). By immersing the imprints formed at 47.8 eV into organic solvents, the regions exposed to the beam are removed similar to resist development in grayscale lithography. This allows for extending the sensitivity of the method by more than an order of magnitude compared to the established analysis of imprints created solely by ablation. Applying the Beer-Lambert law for absorption, the intensity distribution in a micron-sized focus can be reconstructed from one single shot with a high dynamic range, exceeding 10 3 . The procedure described here allows for beam characterization at free electron lasers revealing even faint beam tails, which are not accessible when using ablation imprint methods. We demonstrate the greatly extended dynamic range on developed imprints taken in focus of conventional Fresnel zone plates and spiral zone plates producing beams with a topological charge.

  10. Electrochemical sensor based on magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles modified magnetic electrode for determination of Hb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Binghua; Ni, Xinjiong; Cao, Yuhua; Cao, Guangqun

    2017-05-15

    A fast and selective electrochemical sensor for determination of hemoglobin (Hb) was developed based on magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles modified on the magnetic glassy carbon electrode. The nanoparticles Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 with a magnetic core and a molecularly imprinted shell had regular structures and good monodispersity. Hb could be determined directly by electrochemical oxidization with the modified electrode. A magnetic field increased electrochemical response to Hb by two times. Imprinting Hb on the surface of Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 shortened the response time within 7min. Under optimum conditions, the imprinting factor toward the non-imprinted sensor was 2.8, and the separation factor of Hb to horseradish peroxidase was 2.6. The oxidation peak current had a linear relationship with Hb concentration ranged from 0.005mg/ml to 0.1mg/ml with a detection limit (S/N =3) of 0.0010mg/ml. The sensors were successfully applied to analysis of Hb in whole blood samples with recoveries between 95.7% and 105%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and application of molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective extraction of organophosphorus pesticides from vegetable oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanouar, Sara; Combès, Audrey; Mezzache, Sakina; Pichon, Valérie

    2017-09-01

    The increasing use of pesticides in agriculture causes environmental issues and possible serious health risks to humans and animals. Their determination at trace concentrations in vegetable oils constitutes a significant analytical challenge. Therefore, their analysis often requires both an extraction and a purification step prior to separation with liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) detection. This work aimed at developing sorbents that are able to selectively extract from vegetable oil samples several organophosphorus (OPs) pesticides presenting a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Therefore, different conditions were screened to prepare molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) by a non-covalent approach. The selectivity of the resulting polymers was evaluated by studying the OPs retention in pure media on both MIPs and non-imprinted polymers (NIP) used as control. The most promising MIP sorbent was obtained using monocrotophos (MCP) as the template, methacrylic acid (MAA) as the monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker with a molar ratio of 1/4/20 respectively. The repeatability of the extraction procedure and of the synthesis procedure was demonstrated in pure media. The capacity of this MIP was 1mg/g for malathion. This MIP was also able to selectively extract three OPs from almond oil by applying the optimized SPE procedure. Recoveries were between 73 and 99% with SD values between 4 and 6% in this oil sample. The calculated LOQs (between 0.3 and 2μg/kg) in almond seeds with a SD between 0.1 and 0.4μg/kg were lower than the Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) established for the corresponding compounds in almond seed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Solid phase extraction using molecular imprinting polymers (MISPE for the determination of estrogens in surface water by HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane do Nascimento Bianchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens are emerging pollutants and traditional sewage treatments unable to remove them. They are harmful to human health and to the environment. It is therefore important to evaluate the presence and concentration of estrogens in water bodies and environmental matrices. This work presents the development and application of a methodology for the determination of E1, E3, EE2 and E2 in surface waters using solid phase extraction with molecular imprinting polymers (MISPE followed by identification and quantification by HPLC-DAD. Acetonitrile and water deionized acidified with phosphoric acid pH 3 (1:1, v/v, a flow rate of 1.0 ml min-1, at 40°C and an injection volume of 5 µL. The method was validated according to the protocol ICH Q2R. Reproducibility and repeatability tests resulted in a smaller variation coefficient of 10%; the calibration curves in the concentration ranged from 1 to 20 mg L-1, with return linearity values greater than 0.99. The limits of detection and quantification were less than 1 mg L-1 and the method was satisfactory for specificity and selectivity tests using caffeine, which is often found in water bodies receiving effluent, and DES, an estrogen used in the treatment of prostate cancer. Selected samples underwent clean-up and pre-concentration treatments using solid phase extraction with commercial phase (C18 and molecularly imprinted polymers (MISPE. The analysis of MISPE extracts indicate that it is possible to obtain results with greater sensitivity and precision for analyses of complex environmental matrices, demonstrating that the developed method can be applied in complex environmental matrices.

  13. Reactive Imprint Lithography: Combined Topographical Patterning and Chemical Surface Functionalization of Polystyrene-block-poly(tert-butyl acrylate) Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvigneau, Joost; Cornelissen, Stijn; Bardajı´Valls, Nuria; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2009-01-01

    Here, reactive imprint lithography (RIL) is introduced as a new, one-step lithographic tool for the fabrication of large-area topographically patterned, chemically activated polymer platforms. Films of polystyrene-block-poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PS-b-PtBA) are imprinted with PDMS master stamps at

  14. Nanosecond Characterization of Regional Domain Imprint from Fast Domain Switching Currents in Pb(Zr,Ti)O_3 Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun Jiang; An-Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The traditional imprint characterization of ferroelectric thin films estimates imprint time dependence of the mean coercive voltage of all domains from a polarization-voltage hysteresis loop, which shows a semilogarithmic time dependence above an initial imprint time of τ_0 > 1 μs at room temperature. Below τ_0, the imprint effect is believed to be weak. In consideration of region-by-region domain reversal under a rising pulsed voltage with ordered coercive voltages increasing from zero up to the maximum applied voltage during capacitor charging time, we can estimate the imprinted coercive voltage of each domain from domain switching current transient separately with imprint time as short as 20 ns. In disagreement with the previous observations, all imprinted coercive voltages for the domains in Pt/Pb(Zr_0_._4Ti_0_._6)O_3/Pt thin-film capacitors show step-like increases at two characteristic times of 300 ns and 0.27s. The imprint effect is surprisingly strong enough even at shortened time down to 20 ns without any evidence of weakening. (paper)

  15. Contractile response of bovine lateral saphenous vein to ergotamine tartrate exposed to different concentrations of molecularly imprinted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergot alkaloids, in their active isomeric form, affect animal health and performance and adsorbents are used to mitigate toxicities by reducing bioavailability. Adsorbents with high specificity (molecularly imprinted: MIP and non-imprinted: NIP polymers) adsorb ergot alkaloids in vitro, but require ...

  16. Tet-mediated imprinting erasure in H19 locus following reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selective methylation of CpG islands at imprinting control regions (ICR) determines the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. The imprinting marks are protected from global demethylation taking place during pre-implantation development before being reset in primordial germ cells. However, it...

  17. A molecular imprinted SPR biosensor for sensitive determination of citrinin in red yeast rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Necip; Eren, Tanju; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi

    2015-10-01

    A novel and sensitive molecular imprinted surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was developed for selective determination of citrinin (CIT) in red yeast rice. Firstly, the gold surface of SPR chip was modified with allyl mercaptane. Then, CIT-imprinted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methacryloylamidoglutamic acid) (p(HEMA-MAGA)) film was generated on the gold surface modified with allyl mercaptane. The unmodified and imprinted surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. The linearity range and the detection limit were obtained as 0.005-1.0 ng/mL and 0.0017 ng/mL, respectively. The SPR biosensor was applied to determination of CIT in red yeast rice sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of the expression of putatively imprinted genes in bovine peri-implantation embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille Yde; Alexopoulos, N.I.; Cooney, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The application of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) has been shown to induce changes in the methylation of the embryonic genome, leading to aberrant gene expression, including that of imprinted genes. Aberrant methylation and gene expression has been linked to the large offspring syndrome...... (LOS) in bovine embryos resulting in increased embryonic morbidity and mortality. In the bovine, limited numbers of imprinted genes have been studied and studies have primarily been restricted to pre-implantation stages. This study reports original data on the expression pattern of 8 putatively...... imprinted genes (Ata3, Dlk1, Gnas, Grb10, Magel2, Mest-1, Ndn and Sgce) in bovine peri-implantation embryos. Two embryonic developmental stages were examined, Day 14 and Day 21. The gene expression pattern of single embryos was recorded for in vivo, in vitro produced (IVP) and parthenogenetic embryos...

  19. Determination of stamp deformation during imprinting on semi-spherical surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kafka, Jan; Matschuk, Maria; Pranov, Henrik

    of sol-gel was applied onto spherical injection mold inserts and subsequently imprinted using a flexible stamp. A hard curing step transformed the sol-gel into a quartz-like and durable material. As an example, we present theory and results regarding the imprint of pillar nanostructures on semi......-spherical mold surfaces. Imprints were realized on three different radii of circumferenceof the spherical mold: R = 0.5 mm, R = 1.0 mm, and R = 2 mm. After hard-curing of theimprinted sol-gel, the inserts were used for cold-mold as well as vario-therm injection molding.The polymer replicas and the inserts were...

  20. Detection of creatinine enriched on a surface imprinted polystyrene film using FT-ATR-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, K

    2006-01-01

    The surface of polystyrene (PS) was chemically modified by coating a thin layer of polyaniline (PANI) by oxidizing aniline using ammonium persulfate. Affinity sites for creatinine, a clinically relevant molecule, were created in the coated layer by adding creatinine as print molecules during the oxidation. The imprinted layer adsorbed creatinine was compared to non-imprinted surface reflecting the creation of creatinine-specific sites on the surface. The equilibrium was attained rapidly, indicating that a material of this kind is suitable for sensing applications. The adsorbed creatinine on the surface was detected using the technique of Fourier transform attenuated total internal reflection infra red spectroscopy (FT-ATR-IR). The results show that molecularly imprinted surface can enrich molecules of interest and the enriched molecules can be detected using FT-IR.