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Sample records for human immuno-deficiency virus

  1. Focal epithelial hyperplasia in a human immuno-deficiency virus patient treated with laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanakis, Alexandros; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Vecchio, Alessandro Del; Romeo, Umberto

    2014-07-16

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is a rare disease of the oral mucosa; it is mostly found in children or young adults who are immunosuppressed and who live in regions with low socioeconomic status. It is characterized by asymptomatic papules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. Healing can be spontaneous, and treatment is indicated if there are aesthetic or functional complications. Human papillomavirus, especially genotypes 13 and 32, has been associated with FEH and is detected in the majority of lesions. Histopathologically, FEH is characterized by parakeratosis, epithelial hyperplasia, focal acanthosis, and fusion and horizontal outgrowth of epithelial ridges. A 37-year-old male patient was referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences at the Sapienza University of Rome, complaining of numerous exophytic lesions in his mouth. He stated that the lesions were not painful but he had experienced occasional bleeding after incidental masticatory trauma. He had received no previous treatment for the oral lesions. His medical history revealed that he was human immuno-deficiency virus positive and was a smoker with numerous, asymptomatic oral papules clinically and histologically corresponding to FEH. The labial and buccal mucosa were especially affected by lesions. Surgical treatment was performed using a 532-nm potassium titanyl phosphate laser (SmartLite, Deka, Florence, Italy) in continuous mode with a 300 μm fiber and power of 1.4 W (power density 1980.22 W/cm(2)). After anesthesia without vasoconstrictors, the lesions were tractioned with sutures or an Allis clamp and then completely excised. The lesions were preserved in 10% formalin for histological examination, which confirmed the clinical diagnosis of FEH. In this case, the laser allowed excellent control of bleeding, without postoperative sutures, and optimal wound healing.

  2. Constant drug dose in human immuno-deficiency virus-infected patients to induce long-term non-progressor status: bifurcation and controllability approach.

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    Kim, Wonhee; Chung, Han Byul; Chung, Chung Choo

    2013-06-01

    The authors propose a therapy consisting of a constant dosage of reverse transcription inhibitor and protease inhibitor to achieve long-term non-progressor (LTNP) status in human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV) patients. Based on the authors analyses of cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor (CTLp) concentration at several equilibrium points and the bifurcation of these equilibrium points, they find that administration of drugs with an efficacy lower than a certain level induces a higher CTLp concentration. As a result, drug doses of moderate efficacy result in more patients with LTNP status than doses with high efficacy. In analyses of controllability, they show that a treatment of moderate efficacy is more efficient than one of very high efficacy in terms of controlling the immune system. Using simulations, they demonstrate that their proposed method results in LTNP status in HIV patients.

  3. Bacteriological techniques compliment the clinical and cytological diagnosis of tuberculosis in human immuno deficiency virus infected persons

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    Srikantam A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and M. tuberculosis are two intracellular pathogens that interact with each other at both clinical and cellular levels. A known HIV positive case, presentingwith vague pulmonary symptoms followed by bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy, is reported here. The condition was treated as asthma, based on lung symptoms. Cytology revealed acute purulent lymphadenitis. Only Z. N. staining and culture of sputum and lymphnode aspirate could diagnose tuberculosis. Patient responded well to the standard anti tuberculosis treatment.

  4. The role of monocyte-lineage cells in human immuno-deficiency virus persistence: mechanisms and progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Li

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) persistence is a major barrier to the successful treatment and eradication of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In addition to resting CD4+ T cells, a significant long-lived compartment of HIV-1 infection in vivo includes blood monocytes and tissue macrophages. Studying HIV-1 persistence in monocyte-lineage cells is critical because these cells are important HIV-1 target cells in vivo. Monocyte-lineage cells, including monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, play a significant role in HIV-1 infection and transmission. These cells have been implicated as viral reservoirs that facilitate HIV-1 latency and persistence. A better understanding of HIV-1 interactions with monocyte-lineage cells can potentially aid in the development of new approaches for intervention. This minireview highlights the latest advances in understanding the role of monocyte-lineage cells in HIV-1 persistence and emphasizes new insights into the mechanisms underlying viral persistence.

  5. Seroprevalence of hepatitis and human immuno-deficiency virus in multitransfused patients from a pediatric hematology clinic

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    Suar Çakı Kılıç

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Transfusion transmitted hepatitis has been a severe problem in Turkey in pediatric cancer patients and in chronic congenital anemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus infections in these patients in a University Hospital. METHODS: Multi-transfused 66 children (59 acute leukemia, 6 thalassemia major, 1 severe hereditary spherocytosis diagnosed and followed-up between May, 2000 and December, 2006 were evaluated. Screening of all the patients for HbsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, anti-HCV and anti-HIV was performed at presentation and during the last follow-up. Serologic studies of leukemic patients were also repeated at the end of the chemotherapy. Hepatitis B vaccination was administered to unvaccinated patients with anemia. All blood products were provided by Blood Bank of the Center. RESULTS: No patient was found HBsAg, anti-HCV or anti-HIV positive at diagnosis and at the end of the therapy. There was history of hepatitis B vaccination in only 42% of the patients at diagnosis due to administration of this vaccine to newborns since 1998. At the beginning of the study, 45 % (n=27 of the leukemic patients were immune for hepatitis B, but after completion of the intensive chemotherapy seropositivity persisted in only 28.8 % (n=17. CONCLUSION: Transmission of these viruses is no longer a real problem even in multitransfused immunosuppressed children in Pediatric Hematology Units as a result of the improvements in screening of voluntary blood donors, administration of disposable material in clinics and vaccination by hepatitis B.

  6. Impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on salivary flow in patients with human-immuno deficiency virus disease in Southern India

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    S Pavithra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To ascertain and compare between highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and non-HAART patients, the stimulated salivary flow rates and unstimulated salivary flow rates (USFR and SSFR and to correlate the salivary flow rates with immune suppression. Materials and Methods: One hundred human-immuno deficiency virus seropositive patients attending RAGAS-YRG CARE were examined and divided into two groups, a HAART group (patients on combination antiretroviral therapy comprising 50 patients and a non-HAART group comprising 50 patients. The HAART group was followed every 3 months after the baseline visit (0 for a period of 9 months, during which a clinical oral examination and collection of unstimulated and stimulated saliva was done. Their salivary gland function was assessed using a xerostomia inventory during each visit. The study on non-HAART group was cross-sectional. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis were performed with the aid of the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 10.05 software. Results: There was no significant difference in mean SSFR and USFR between the two groups at baseline. In the HAART group, the mean stimulated salivary flow rate increased from baseline to 3 months ( P = 0.02, with the increase being maintained at 6 months and 9 months. When salivary flow rates were correlated with Cluster of Differentiation, CD4 counts, patients in the HAART group with a CD4 ≤ 200 at 6 months visit had a higher mean stimulated salivary flow rate when compared with patients with CD4 ≥ 200 ( P = 0.02. The xerostomia inventory did not reveal any significant difference between the two groups and HAART was not significantly associated with xerostomia. Conclusion: In our study HAART was neither associated with xerostomia nor a reduction in salivary flow rate and immune suppression was not a significant factor for decreasing the salivary flow rate.

  7. Knowledge, attitude, and perception of disease among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome: A study from a tertiary care center in North India

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    Mrinal Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although modification of behavioral practices among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-affected patients is important in decreasing HIV disease transmission, the knowledge, attitude, and perception studies about HIV infection rarely include persons living with HIV/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS. Aims: To assess knowledge, attitude, and perceptions of persons living with HIV/AIDS for the disease and other epidemiological aspects. Materials and Methods: One-hundred and fifty consecutive persons living with HIV/AIDS were enrolled for this questionnaire-based cross-sectional, descriptive study. Results: These 150 patients comprised 93 men and 57 women, aged between 14 and 78 (mean 37.13 years. The majority, 112 (74.67% patients were between 20 and 50 years of age and 116 (77.3% patients were either illiterate or high-school dropouts. Drivers, laborers, and self-employed comprised 69 (74.2% patients among affected males. Only 129 (86% respondents had heard about HIV/AIDS and knew about its heterosexual transmission. Ninety-eight (65.3% respondents were aware of disease transmission from infected blood or needle pricks. Interestingly, 106 (70.7% respondents were aware of the importance of using condom in preventing disease transmission. Television/radio was the most common sources of information for 135 (90% patients. Nearly, 69% respondents disfavored disclosing their disease to friends/colleagues fearing stigmatization. Conclusions: Information, education, and communication activities are imperative to educate persons living with HIV/AIDS about life-long nature of the disease, modes of its transmission, and significance of preventive measures to bridge the gaps in their knowledge. While improvement in individual economic status, education, and health services remains highly desirable, mass media can play a pivotal role in creating awareness among masses.

  8. Electroporation enhances the immunogenicity of human immuno-deficiency virus type 1 DNA vaccines by increasing the expres-sion level in vivo%体内电穿孔对载体表达效率和人类免疫缺陷病毒1型DNA 疫苗免疫反应效果的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘强; 王文波; 黄维金; 邵荣光; 王佑春

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of electroporation on the expression of DNA vaccines in vivo and induced adaptive immune responses .The gene expression in vivo following DNA delivery via electropo-ration was determined by assessing reporter gene products of firefly luciferase by using in vivo imaging de-vice ,which was further dissected as the tissue distribution of gene products ,the peak level and the lasting time of expression when compared to the traditional immunization through muscular injection . The data showed that electroporation did not alter the tissue distribution ,but increased the peak level and lowered the plateau dosage of DNA vaccine .Further experiments with DNA vaccine pDRVI1-HIV expressing env from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CRF07_BC demonstrated that electroporation was able to enhance cellular and humoral immune responses which were gauged by the level of interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT ) responses and HIV-1 specific binding antibody titers , respectively . Altogether ,electroporation in vivo technology is likely to be a useful tool in the administration of DNA vaccines .%本文旨在分析体内电穿孔(EP)技术对 DNA载体 pDRVI1.0表达效率和人类免疫缺陷病毒1型(HIV-1)DNA疫苗免疫反应的辅助效果,为其在DNA疫苗中的应用提供参考数据。通过构建携带荧光素酶基因的pDRVI1.0-Fluc质粒,利用活体成像技术分析EP接种对荧光素酶蛋白的组织分布、表达水平和持续时间的影响;同时,构建携带我国HIV-1 CRF07_BC流行毒株 env基因的DNA疫苗pDRVI1.0-HIV ,利用酶联免疫斑点法(ELISPOT)、酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)和中和抗体法对 EP辅助免疫反应的特点进行分析。结果显示,EP接种后,pDRVI1.0-Fluc质粒未改变组织分布特点,但其体内表达效率显著提高,载体的饱和接种量降低。同时,EP技术提高了pDRVI1.0-HIV疫苗免疫小鼠后

  9. KNOWLEDGE ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE STUDY OF HUMAN IMMUNO DEFICIENCY VIRUS AND AQUIRED IMMUNO DEFICIENCY SYNDROME (HIV/AIDS AMONG RURAL POPULATION OF TAMIL NADU (INDIA

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    Sanjay Kumar Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the knowledge, attitude and practice towards HIV/AIDS in a general population? Objectives: (1 To assess the knowledge about mode of transmission, treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS. (2 To study the socio demographic pattern, myths and misconceptions. Study design: Community based cross sectional study. Setting: Chunampett Village, Tamilnadu. Duration: March to May 2007. Participants: 845 both males and females above the age of 18 years interviewed at home. Results: Population surveyed was 845, comprising of 482 (57.04% males and 363 (42.96% females. Most of them were Hindus (96.10%. Main occupation was agriculture (39.41% among males and house wives (33.73% among females. 40.35% respondents belonged to low socioeconomic status. Illiteracy rate was high especially among females (43%.Source of information about HIV/AIDS was mass media in about 85% of the population. Majority of individuals (58.5% were not aware that the disease was contagious. An overwhelming majority (98.59% were aware about the mode of transmission of HIV/AIDS through sexual route. However about 20% had myths regarding transmission of disease. 65% knew that HIV/AIDS is preventable, yet only 4% used condoms. A vast majority (60-65% were not aware that treatment and PEP were available free of cost in government hospitals. A majority of about 54.22% were of the opinion that the diagnosis of HIV/AIDS should not be kept confidential. Conclusion: The awareness about HIV / AIDS is high among the study population but the implementation of preventive measures is low. The knowledge about availability of prophylactic and therapeutic measures against HIV / AIDS in Govt. hospitals is also low.

  10. Epidemiology of Human Immuno-deficiency Virus and Quality of Life for People Living with HIV/AIDS in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ommari Baaliy Mkangara; Shaofa NIE; Chongjian WANG; Yihua XU; Saumu Tobbi Mweri; Theresia M Kobelo; Mustaafa Bapumiia

    2008-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is increasing in prevalence in China and spread of infection from highly risk populations to the general populations was recognized. Despite the fact, there are still only few scien- tific reviews on quality of life (QOL) for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs). However, many PLWHAs are struggling with social and psychological influences such as substances abuse, cultural beliefs, depression, stigma, poverty, which can affect their QOL. Public unawareness about infection and disease, willingness to seek medical care and motivation to follow therapy are indirectly influ- encing health outcome. In 2003 Chinese government has established the so-called the "Four Frees and One Care" policy. The policy was officially implemented from 2004 in some areas, yet to date it is not implemented nationwide. This paper discussed the epidemiology of HIV, underlying psychoso- cial factors affecting PLWHAs and their impact on QOL. We put forward some recommendations for stakeholders, advocacy groups, non-government organizations and Chinese government.

  11. Molecular and phylogeographic analysis of human immuno-deficiency virus type 1 strains infecting treatment-naive patients from Kigali, Rwanda.

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    John Rusine

    Full Text Available This study aimed at describing the genetic subtype distribution of HIV-1 strains circulating in Kigali and their epidemiological link with the HIV-1 strains from the five countries surrounding Rwanda. One hundred and thirty eight pol (RT and PR sequences from 116 chronically- and 22 recently-infected antiretroviral therapy (ART-naïve patients from Kigali were generated and subjected to HIV drug resistance (HIV-DR, phylogenetic and recombinant analyses in connection with 366 reference pol sequences from Rwanda, Burundi, Kenya, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania and Uganda (Los Alamos database. Among the Rwandan samples, subtype A1 predominated (71.7%, followed by A1/C recombinants (18.1%, subtype C (5.8%, subtype D (2.9%, one A1/D recombinant (0.7% and one unknown subtype (0.7%. Thirteen unique and three multiple A1/C recombinant forms were identified. No evidence for direct transmission events was found within the Rwandan strains. Molecular characteristics of HIV-1 were similar between chronically and recently-infected individuals and were not significantly associated with demographic or social factors. Our report suggests that the HIV-1 epidemic in Kigali is characterized by the emergence of A1/C recombinants and is not phylogenetically connected with the HIV-1 epidemic in the five neighboring countries. The relatively low level of transmitted HIV-DR mutations (2.9% reported here indicates the good performance of the ART programme in Rwanda. However, the importance of promoting couples' counseling, testing and disclosure during HIV prevention strategies is highlighted.

  12. Breastfeeding patterns and its determinants among mothers living with Human Immuno-deficiency Virus -1 in four African countries participating in the ANRS 12174 trial.

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    Somé, Eric N; Engebretsen, Ingunn M S; Nagot, Nicolas; Meda, Nicolas; Lombard, Carl; Vallo, Roselyne; Peries, Marianne; Kankasa, Chipepo; Tumwine, James K; Hofmeyr, G Justus; Singata, Mandisa; Harper, Kim; Van De Perre, Philippe; Tylleskar, Thorkild

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 transmission rates have been reduced over the last decade, an estimated 2 million new infections per year arise, including 220,000 paediatric cases. The main post-natal HIV exposure is through breastfeeding, where both its duration and modality (exclusive or not) are associated with postnatal transmission. The ANRS 12174 trial compared HIV-1 postnatal transmission of 2 prophylaxis drugs for infants during lactation (lamivudine and lopinavir-ritonavir). Our objective has been to examine the feeding practices and the determinants of exclusive/ predominant (EPBF) or any breastfeeding among the participants of this trial in Burkina Faso, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia. Mothers infected with HIV-1 and their uninfected offspring were followed from day 7 after birth for 50 weeks, keeping monthly records of their feeding patterns. Feeding was classified into 3 categories: 1) exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months, only breast-milk being given to infant for 6 months, 2) predominant breastfeeding, breast-milk with liquid-based items being given, and 3) mixed feeding, other non-breast milk or solid food being given in addition to breast milk with or without liquid-based items. The categories were merged into 2 groups: EPBF applying to infants aged feeding applying to infants of any age. The feeding patterns have been given as Kaplan-Meier curves. A flexible parametric multiple regression model was used to identify the determinants of the mothers' feeding behaviour. A total of 1,225 mother-infant pairs provided feeding data from Burkina Faso (N = 204), South Africa (N = 213), Uganda (N = 274) and Zambia (N = 534) between November 2009 and March 2013. The mean maternal age was 27.4 years and the mean BMI was 24.5. 57.7 and 93.9% of mothers initiated breastfeeding within the first hour and first day, respectively. Overall, the median durations of any form of breastfeeding and EPBF were 40.6, and 20.9 weeks, respectively. Babies randomized to the lopinavir/ritonavir group in South Africa tended to do less EPBF than those in the lamivudine group. Overall the group of mothers aged between 25 and 30 years, those married, employed or multiparous tended to stop early EPBF. Mothers living in Uganda or Zambia, those aged between 25 -30 years, better educated (at least secondary school level), employed or having undergone C-section stopped any breastfeeding early. There is a need to improve breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices of children, particularly those exposed to HIV and anti-retrovirals, taking into account context and socio-demographic factors. Clinical trial registration: NCT00640263.

  13. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  14. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus associated central nervous system leiomyosarcoma occurring after renal transplantation: case report and review of the literature; Leiomyosarcome primitif du systeme nerveux central associe au virus d'Epstein-Barr (EBV) et survenu apres transplantation renale: a propos d'un cas et revue de la litterature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahri, A.; Noel, G.; Feuvret, L.; Jauffret, E.; Brun, B.; Mazeron, J.J.; Baillet, F. [Centre des Tumeurs, Groupe Hospitalier Universitaire Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Feuvret, L. [Centre de Protontherapie d' Orsay, 91 (France); Figuerella-Branger, D. [Hopital de la Timone, Service d' Anatomopathologie, 13 - Marseille (France); Goncalves, A. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Service d' Oncologie Medicale, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2003-10-01

    Central nervous system leiomyosarcomas are extremely rare, however, they became more frequent among immuno-deficient patients, either in a patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or after organ transplantation. The data of the literature indicate that the infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays a causal role in the development of these tumours but its precise role in the onco-genesis remains unresolved. We report a new case of EBV associated leiomyosarcoma of the left cavernous sinus occurring after renal transplantation. The epidemiological, clinical, pathological and therapeutic characteristics of these tumours are discussed. (authors)

  16. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS — ONCOGENIC VIRUS

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    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  17. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

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    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  18. Human Viruses and Cancer

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    Abigail Morales-Sánchez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

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    Uma Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients.

  20. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

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    ... their saliva, mucous and feces. Human infections with bird flu viruses can happen when enough virus gets into ... Virus (CVV) for a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (Bird Flu) Virus ” for more information on this process. ...

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection in Cameroon: ... were analyzed using molecular biology techniques that involved RT-PCR, ... There is evidence of genetic diversity of HIV and HCV; virulent hepatitis C virus ...

  2. Ebola virus: bioterrorism for humans

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    Pramodkumar Pyarelal Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease is a severe, often fatal, zoonotic infection caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family (genus Ebolavirus. Ebola virus (EBOV spreads by human to human transmission through contacts with body fluids from infected patients. Initial stages of EBOV are non-specific which makes the differential diagnosis broad. Here in this review article we focused on to show the details of EBOV, from its first case right up to the possible targets to cure this lethal disease. In this study we have shown the statistical survey, epidemiology, disease ontology, different genes coding for different proteins in EBOV and future aspects of it.

  3. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

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    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) . ...

  4. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research: Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting and an opportunity for public comment on...

  5. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research,'' published in the Federal...

  6. Saffold virus infection associated with human myocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Nielsen, Alex Yde; Banner, Jytte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Saffold virus was described in 2007 as one of the first human viruses within the genus cardioviruses. Cardioviruses may cause severe infections of the myocardium in animals, and several studies have associated saffold virus with human disease. As a result, saffold virus has been...... isolated from different anatomical compartments, including the myocardium, but, until now, it has not been possible to demonstrate the accompanying histopathological signs of inflammation. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to examine if saffold virus is capable of causing invasive infection in the human...... myocardium. STUDY DESIGN: Using real-time PCR, we retrospectively examined formalin-fixed paraffin embedded cardiac tissue specimens from 150 deceased individuals diagnosed with myocarditis at autopsy. The results were compared with histological findings. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Saffold virus was detected...

  7. Immunological responses against human papilloma virus and human papilloma virus induced laryngeal cancer.

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    Chitose, Shun-ichi; Sakazaki, T; Ono, T; Kurita, T; Mihashi, H; Nakashima, T

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the local immune status in the larynx in the presence of infection or carcinogenesis associated with human papilloma virus. Cytological samples (for human papilloma virus detection) and laryngeal secretions (for immunoglobulin assessment) were obtained from 31 patients with laryngeal disease, during microscopic laryngeal surgery. On histological examination, 12 patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had laryngeal papilloma and 15 had other benign laryngeal disease. Cytological samples were tested for human papilloma virus DNA using the Hybrid Capture 2 assay. High risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 25 per cent of patients (three of 12) with laryngeal cancer. Low risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected only in three laryngeal papilloma patients. The mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A in human papilloma virus DNA positive patients were more than twice those in human papilloma virus DNA negative patients. A statistically significant difference was observed between the secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations in the two groups. Patients with laryngeal cancer had higher laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type, compared with patients with benign laryngeal disease. The study assessed the mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type in the 12 laryngeal cancer patients, comparing human papilloma virus DNA positive patients (n = 3) and human papilloma virus DNA negative patients (n = 9); the mean concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A tended to be greater in human papilloma virus DNA positive cancer patients, compared with human papilloma virus DNA negative cancer patients. These results suggest that the local laryngeal immune response is activated by infection or carcinogenesis due to human papilloma virus. The findings strongly suggest that secretory IgA has inhibitory activity

  8. Vaccine against human Papilloma Virus

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    Julio Cesar Reina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available At present two prophylactic human papilloma virus (HPV vaccines are commercially available. The Tetravalent vaccine against infection with four VPH types (6, 11, 16, and 18 distributed in the national program in Colombia and the Bivalent vaccine against the VPH types 16 and 18, respectively.  The efficacy and safety of both vaccines has periodically been assessed and they have been declared efficacious and safe by the health authorities of several countries and the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety ( GACVS of the World’s Health Organization (WHO.In its report of March 2014 the GACVS analyzed the evidence of the relationship between the  Human Papillomavirus Vaccine with  >175 million of doses distributed worldwide and autoimmune diseases, particularly Multiple Sclerosis, Aluminum as adjuvant, Vasculitis caused by vaccine DNA fragments and the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome described in Japan.   The Committee ratified the strict vaccine safety control and based on a thorough examination of existing evidence, reaffirmed that the risk-benefit profile remains favorable. The case of the children of Carmen de Bolivar in Colombia has been described by several authors in other countries as "Massive Psychogenic Event", which has absolute no relationship with the vaccine but its high media dissemination resulted into disastrous consequences for the national vaccination program

  9. Transurethral prostatectomy in human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospital with urethral catheter in situ and having failed medical therapy, he opted ... Keywords: Human immunodeficiency virus infected patients, morbidity, risk of transmission, transurethral .... exposure, and the frequency of at risk exposures.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanapathipillai, Rupa; Hickey, Martha; Giles, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    This article aims to review currently available evidence for women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and menopause and to propose clinical management algorithms. Key studies addressing HIV and menopause have been reviewed, specifically age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women, frequency of menopausal symptoms, comorbidities associated with HIV and aging (including cardiovascular disease and bone disease), treatment of menopausal symptoms, and prevention of comorbidities in HIV-infected women. Studies suggest an earlier onset of menopause in HIV-infected women, with increased frequency of symptoms. Cardiovascular disease risk may be increased in this population, with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and chronic inflammation associated with HIV, contributing to increased risk. Chronic inflammation and cART have been independently implicated in bone disease. No published data have assessed the safety and efficacy of hormone therapy in relation to symptoms of menopause, cardiovascular risk, and bone disease among HIV-infected women. Few studies on menopause have been conducted in HIV-infected women compared with HIV-uninfected women. Many questions regarding age of menopause onset, frequency of menopausal symptoms and associated complications such as bone disease and cardiovascular disease, and efficacy of treatment among HIV-infected women remain. The incidence and severity of some of these factors may be increased in the setting of HIV and cART.

  11. Antiviral drugs for viruses other than human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razonable, Raymund R

    2011-10-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M(2) protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M(2) inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects.

  12. Saffold virus infection associated with human myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Nielsen, Alex Yde; Banner, Jytte; Hansen, Jakob; Baandrup, Ulrik; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Saffold virus was described in 2007 as one of the first human viruses within the genus cardioviruses. Cardioviruses may cause severe infections of the myocardium in animals, and several studies have associated saffold virus with human disease. As a result, saffold virus has been isolated from different anatomical compartments, including the myocardium, but, until now, it has not been possible to demonstrate the accompanying histopathological signs of inflammation. The aim of the study was to examine if saffold virus is capable of causing invasive infection in the human myocardium. Using real-time PCR, we retrospectively examined formalin-fixed paraffin embedded cardiac tissue specimens from 150 deceased individuals diagnosed with myocarditis at autopsy. The results were compared with histological findings. Saffold virus was detected in the myocardium, lung tissue and blood of one child and was accompanied by histopathological inflammation in the heart and lungs, which was supportive of a viral infection. These findings suggest that cardioviruses may be associated with myocarditis in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Seasonal and pandemic human influenza viruses attach better to human upper respiratory tract epithelium than avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Debby; den Bakker, Michael A; Leijten, Lonneke M E; Chutinimitkul, Salin; Munster, Vincent J; de Wit, Emmie; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs

    2010-04-01

    Influenza viruses vary markedly in their efficiency of human-to-human transmission. This variation has been speculated to be determined in part by the tropism of influenza virus for the human upper respiratory tract. To study this tropism, we determined the pattern of virus attachment by virus histochemistry of three human and three avian influenza viruses in human nasal septum, conchae, nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, and larynx. We found that the human influenza viruses-two seasonal influenza viruses and pandemic H1N1 virus-attached abundantly to ciliated epithelial cells and goblet cells throughout the upper respiratory tract. In contrast, the avian influenza viruses, including the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, attached only rarely to epithelial cells or goblet cells. Both human and avian viruses attached occasionally to cells of the submucosal glands. The pattern of virus attachment was similar among the different sites of the human upper respiratory tract for each virus tested. We conclude that influenza viruses that are transmitted efficiently among humans attach abundantly to human upper respiratory tract, whereas inefficiently transmitted influenza viruses attach rarely. These results suggest that the ability of an influenza virus to attach to human upper respiratory tract is a critical factor for efficient transmission in the human population.

  14. Validation of virus inactivation by heat treatment in the manufacture of diaspirin crosslinked hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, M; Ebeling, A; Marshall, T; Hauck, W; Sun, C S; White, E; Long, Z

    1992-01-01

    Diaspirin crosslinked hemoglobin (DCLHb), a hemoglobin based oxygen carrying solution prepared from outdated human blood, is subjected to a heat treatment step to inactivate viruses in our manufacturing process. To validate the efficacy of this inactivation, we have simulated the heat treatment procedure at a reduced scale using hemoglobin solution spiked with representative viruses. Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV) were used in this validation. Inoculation with concentrated virus was performed just prior to the heat treatment to determine the effect of that specific process step. Samples were taken before, during, and after heat treatment and assayed for virus titer in an attempt to assess the rate as well as the extent of virus inactivation. CMV was analyzed in a plaque assay using MRC-5 indicator cells. The titer was reduced from 3.3 x 10(6) plaque forming units (PFU) per mL to less than 5 x 10(1) PFU/mL (detection limit) within 30 minutes. DHBV was analyzed by inoculation of serially diluted samples into Pekin ducklings, followed at intervals by screening sera for DHBV DNA by dot blot hybridization. The titer was reduced from 5.0 x 10(6) duck infectious units (DIU) per mL to less than 5 x 10(0) DIU/mL (detection limit) within 1 hour. HIV titers were determined through an ELISA assay for p24 antigen present in peripheral blood lymphocyte cocultivation supernatants. The titer was reduced from 2.0 x 10(4) infectious units (IU) per mL to less than 2 x 10(0) IU/mL (detection limit) within 1 hour. These data indicate that high titers of these blood borne viruses are rapidly inactivated by this heat treatment process.

  15. Human to mosquito transmission of dengue viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B Carrington

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The successful transmission of dengue virus from a human host to a mosquito vector requires a complex set of factors to align. It is becoming increasingly important to improve our understanding of the parameters that shape the human to mosquito component of the transmission cycle so that vaccines and therapeutic anti-virals can be fully evaluated and epidemiological models refined. Here we describe these factors, and discuss the biological and environmental impacts and demographic changes that are influencing these dynamics. Specifically, we examine features of the human infection required for the mosquito to acquire the virus via natural blood feeding, as well as the biological and environmental factors that influence a mosquito’s susceptibility to infection, up to the point that they are capable of transmitting the virus to a new host.

  16. Comparative interactomics for virus-human protein-protein interactions: DNA viruses versus RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmuş, Saliha; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular pathogens and completely depend on their hosts for survival and reproduction. The strategies adopted by viruses to exploit host cell processes and to evade host immune systems during infections may differ largely with the type of the viral genetic material. An improved understanding of these viral infection mechanisms is only possible through a better understanding of the pathogen-host interactions (PHIs) that enable viruses to enter into the host cells and manipulate the cellular mechanisms to their own advantage. Experimentally-verified protein-protein interaction (PPI) data of pathogen-host systems only became available at large scale within the last decade. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the current PHI networks belonging to DNA and RNA viruses and their human host, to get insights into the infection strategies used by these viral groups. We investigated the functional properties of human proteins in the PHI networks, to observe and compare the attack strategies of DNA and RNA viruses. We observed that DNA viruses are able to attack both human cellular and metabolic processes simultaneously during infections. On the other hand, RNA viruses preferentially interact with human proteins functioning in specific cellular processes as well as in intracellular transport and localization within the cell. Observing virus-targeted human proteins, we propose heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins and transporter proteins as potential antiviral therapeutic targets. The observed common and specific infection mechanisms in terms of viral strategies to attack human proteins may provide crucial information for further design of broad and specific next-generation antiviral therapeutics.

  17. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... marker and whether correction of anemia itself results in a better prognosis remain to be determined....

  18. 110 HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) SEROPOSITIVITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -http://www.ajol.info/journals/ajcem ... A seroprevalence study of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in new patients attending the eye .... previous reports that Herpes zoster ophthalmicus in ..... The increase in the number of patients with mild proteinuria after treatment and its implication require ...... bacteriophage.

  19. Recent advances in human viruses imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Paula Ecaterina; Rouillé, Yves; Ruta, Simona; Nichita, Norica; Roseanu, Anca

    2016-06-01

    Microscopy techniques are often exploited by virologists to investigate molecular details of critical steps in viruses' life cycles such as host cell recognition and entry, genome replication, intracellular trafficking, and release of mature virions. Fluorescence microscopy is the most attractive tool employed to detect intracellular localizations of various stages of the viral infection and monitor the pathogen-host interactions associated with them. Super-resolution microscopy techniques have overcome the technical limitations of conventional microscopy and offered new exciting insights into the formation and trafficking of human viruses. In addition, the development of state-of-the art electron microscopy techniques has become particularly important in studying virus morphogenesis by revealing ground-braking ultrastructural details of this process. This review provides recent advances in human viruses imaging in both, in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo, in the animal models recently developed. The newly available imaging technologies bring a major contribution to our understanding of virus pathogenesis and will become an important tool in early diagnosis of viral infection and the development of novel therapeutics to combat the disease.

  20. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  1. Saffold virus, an emerging human cardiovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shawn Zheng Kai; Tan, Mark Zheng Yi; Prabakaran, Mookkan

    2017-01-01

    Saffold virus (SAFV) is an emerging human cardiovirus that has been shown to be ubiquitous. Initial studies of SAFV focused on respiratory and gastrointestinal infection; however, it has also recently been associated with diverse clinical symptoms including the endocrine, cardiovascular, and neurological systems. Given the systemic nature of SAFV, and its high prevalence, understanding its pathogenicity and clinical impact is of utmost importance. This comprehensive review highlights and discusses recent developments in epidemiology, human pathogenicity, animal, and molecular studies related to SAFV. It also provides detailed insights into the neuropathogenicity of SAFV. We argue that human studies have been confounded by coinfections and therefore require support from robust molecular and animal research. Thereby, we aim to provide foresight into further research to better understand this emerging virus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Crosstalk between animal and human influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Although outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild and domestic birds have been posing the threat of a new influenza pandemic for the last decade, the first pandemic of the 21st century came from swine viruses. This fact emphasizes the complexity of influenza viral ecology and the difficulty of predicting influenza viral dynamics. Complete control of influenza viruses seems impossible. However, we must minimize the impact of animal and human influenza outbreaks by learning lessons from past experiences and recognizing the current status. Here, we review the most recent influenza virology data in the veterinary field, including aspects of zoonotic agents and recent studies that assessed the pandemic potential of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. PMID:25387011

  3. Novel human H7N9 influenza virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengmin; Luo, Jing; Wang, Jing; Su, Wen; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Min; Xie, Li; Ding, Hua; Liu, Shelan; Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Yu; Jia, Yaxiong; He, Hongxuan

    2014-06-01

    Outbreaks of H7N9 avian influenza in humans in 5 provinces and 2 municipalities of China have reawakened concern that avian influenza viruses may again cross species barriers to infect the human population and thereby initiate a new influenza pandemic. Evolutionary analysis shows that human H7N9 influenza viruses originated from the H9N2, H7N3 and H11N9 avian viruses, and that it is as a novel reassortment influenza virus. This article reviews current knowledge on 11 subtypes of influenza A virus from human which can cause human infections.

  4. Bilateral optic neuritis in acute human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M; Toft, P.B.; Bernhard, P;

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report a case of acute viral disease accompanied by bilateral optic neuritis with substantial paraclinical evidence that human immunodeficiency virus was the causative agent. METHODS: Clinical and paraclinical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Virus and antibody titers...... as well as reverse lymphocytosis were consistent with acute infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-1. CONCLUSIONS: Human immunodeficiency virus infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute optic neuritis...

  5. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP USER

    DNA:DeoxyriboNucleic Acid, ELAM-1: Endothelial leukocyte adhesion ... Dehydrogenase, HIV: Human immuno deficiency virus, HRP 2: Histidine Rich Protein ... immunofluorescence), methods for the detection of plasmodial antigens in body ...

  6. Replication of biotinylated human immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belshan, Michael; Matthews, John M; Madson, Christian J

    2011-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated recently the adaptation of the Escherichia coli biotin ligase BirA - biotin acceptor sequence (BAS) labeling system to produce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viruses with biotinylated integrase (NLXIN(B)) and matrix (NLXMA(B)) proteins (Belshan et al., 2009). This report describes the construction of an HIV permissive cell line stably expressing BirA (SupT1.BirA). Consistent with the results in the previous report, NLXMA(B) replicated similar to wild-type levels and expressed biotinylated Gag and MA proteins in the SupT1.BirA cells, whereas the replication of NLXIN(B) was reduced severely. Three additional HIV type 2 (HIV-2) viruses were constructed with the BAS inserted into the vpx and vpr accessory genes. Two BAS insertions were made into the C-terminal half of the Vpx, including one internal insertion, and one at the N-terminus of Vpr. All three viruses were replication competent in the SupT1.BirA cells and their target proteins biotinylated efficiently and incorporated into virions. These results demonstrate the potential utility of the biotinylation system to label and capture HIV protein complexes in the context of replicating virus.

  7. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Bility, Moses T.; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system’s contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mous...

  8. Malignant syphilis with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiby Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant syphilis or Lues maligna, commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, has now seen a resurgence with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Immunosuppression and sexual promiscuity set the stage for this deadly association of HIV and Treponema pallidum that can manifest atypically and can prove to cause diagnostic problems. We report one such case in a 30-year-old female who responded favorably to treatment with penicillin.

  9. Ebola Virus: Sensationalism, Science, and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Daniel G; Clougherty, Marguerite M

    2015-10-01

    Outbreaks of the filoviruses, Ebola and Marburg, usually garner immense public attention, often with a sensationalist bent in the lay press, focused on the apparently mysterious origins of the outbreak and the high mortality rates. The scientific community may present a more objective viewpoint, but usually with a rather technical focus on identifying epidemiological risk factors and experimental therapies and vaccines. Often lost in the discussion are the human rights elements that consistently underlie large outbreaks of these dangerous viruses.

  10. Ultrastructure and morphogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, M; Goto, T

    1996-08-01

    The ultrastructure and morphogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were elucidated by observation with several techniques including immunoelectron microscopy and cryo-microscopy. The virus particle consists of an envelope, a core and matrix. The virus particles were observed extracellularly as having one of three profiles: (1) a centric or an eccentric electron-dense core, (2) rod-shaped electron-dense core, and (3) doughnut-shaped. HIV-1 particles in the hydrated state were observed by high resolution electron cryo-microscopy to be globular, and the lipid membrane was clearly resolved as a bilayer. Many projections around the circumference were seen to be knob-like. The shapes and sizes of the projections, especially head parts, were found to vary in each projection. By isolation with Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde, HIV-1 cores were confirmed to consist of p24 protein by immunogold labeling. When the virus enters the cell, two entry modes were found: membrane fusion and endocytosis. No structures resembling virus particles could be seen in the cytoplasm after viral entry. In HIV-1-infected cells, positive reactions by immuno-labeling suggest that HIV-1 Gag may be produced in membrane-bound structures and transported to the cell surface by cytoskeletons. Then a crescent electron-dense layer was first formed underneath the cell membrane. Finally, the virus particle was released from the cell surface. Several cell clones producing defective particles were isolated from MT-4/HIV-1 cells. Among them, doughnut-shaped or teardrop-shaped particles were seen to be produced in the extracellular space. In the doughnut-shaped particles, Gag p17 and p24 proteins faced each other against the inner electron dense ring, suggesting that the inner ring consists of a precursor Gag protein.

  11. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and... Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and......

  12. [Human PAPILLOMA Virus (HPV) vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safra, Tamar

    2007-10-01

    A solid tumor related to viral infection is a rare and challenging condition to the medical community raising the possibility to fight and prevent this cancer by vaccine. Cervical cancer, caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), is a major health problem worldwide. The two HPV vaccines approved lately could lead to more than a 70% reduction in cases of cervical cancer and a similar reduction in deaths from the cancer. Pap smear screening significantly (80%) reduced disease incidence and is still useful and needed. In addition to early detection, vaccination will prevent the development of precancerous and cancerous lesion and reduce morbidity, mortality and psychological and social stress as well as stressful and expensive follow-ups in women with suspicious lesions. The vaccinations described will bring to a significant reduction in genital warts incidence, a serious social and psychological burden to the infected population. Practical social and psychological issues are still to be addressed, some of them are: time and frequency of administration, use of vaccination in men, public acceptance and behavior, appropriate populations to be vaccinated, etc. Most unresolved questions will be answered over time. The new vaccines embody a big promise to humanity, although we still have to overcome the financial burden and possible late side effects of the vaccine.

  13. Detecting emerging transmissibility of avian influenza virus in human households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, M. van; Koopmans, M.; Du Ry van Beest Holle, M.; Meijer, Adam; Klinkenberg, D.; Donnelly, C.A.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in humans underlines the need to track the ability of these viruses to spread among humans. A human-transmissible avian influenza virus is expected to cause clusters of infections in humans living in close contact. Therefore, epidemio

  14. Pathogenic human viruses in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Donaldson, Kim A.; Paul, J.H.; Rose, Joan B.

    2003-01-01

    This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and

  15. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS. NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR VACCINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gaivoronskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems in the modern world is the papilloma virus infection. As is known, this is the most widely spread sexually-transmitted infection. The human papilloma virus is responsible for the occurrence of such a terrible disease as cervical cancer, which ranks third after breast cancer and cancer of the body in the structure of oncological morbidity organs of the reproductive system and mammary glands in women. The other manifestations of the papilloma virus infection are pointed condyloma genital warts, which occur frequently both in men and in women. The only reliable method of the prevention of the papilloma virus infection is immunization. The authors present new data regarding the use of bivalent vaccine, including a new scheme of immunization for girls from nine to fourteen years old. Foreign investigations showed that the double scheme of introduction of the vaccine in young girls is as effective as a triple scheme of introduction in the category of women over 15 years of age.

  16. Human genetic determinants of dengue virus susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lark L; Mertens, Eva; Brehin, Anne-Claire; Fernandez-Garcia, Maria Dolores; Amara, Ali; Després, Philippe; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj

    2009-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an emerging mosquito-borne pathogen that produces significant morbidity worldwide resulting in an estimated 50-100 million infections annually. DENV causes a spectrum of illness ranging from inapparent infection to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever and shock. The varied DENV disease outcome is determined by complex interactions between immunopathologic, viral, and human genetic factors. This review summarizes these interactions with a focus on human genetic determinants of DENV susceptibility, including human leukocyte antigens, blood type, and single nucleotide polymorphisms in immune response genes that have been associated with DENV disease. We also discuss other factors related to DENV outcome including viral genetic determinants, age, ethnicity, and nutritional status as they relate to DENV susceptibility. We emphasize the need for functional genetics studies to complement association-based data and we call for controlled study designs and standard clinical DENV disease definitions that will strengthen conclusions based on human genetic DENV studies.

  17. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H. (Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver (USA)); Murray, R.S. (Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver (USA) Veterans Administration Medical Center, Denver, CO (USA))

    1988-04-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia.

  18. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  19. Prognostic Value Of Immunoglobulin Profile In Human Papilloma Virus Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chattopadhyay S P

    2001-01-01

    Present study aimed at defining the prognostic value of immunoglobulin profile in human papilloma virus infection by assessing and correlating the levels of immunoglobulin with type, number, duration...

  20. Lipid management in human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerson, Merle

    2015-05-01

    The development and use of antiretroviral medications to treat patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has dramatically changed the course of this disease from one that was fatal to a chronic and more manageable condition. Recommendations and guidelines for the general population are presented in this review with suggestions as to how they may be applied to this patient population. Issues for which there is little or no information available are noted to highlight the many gaps in our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of dyslipidemia for patients living with HIV.

  1. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  2. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus infection in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Corinne; D'Angelo, Lawrence J

    2010-08-01

    Despite advances in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment and discovery of effective prevention programs, HIV infection in American youth continues to rise, especially in minority youth. The crisis underscores the lack of access to care and wellness of our adolescent and young adult populations. Primary care practitioners who care for young adults will diagnose and/or encounter HIV-infected patients in their practice. Providers need to become familiar with the basics of HIV prevention and treatment, as well as how adolescence presents unique challenges in HIV care.

  4. Enhancement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity by dendritic cells loaded with Tat-protein transduction domain-fused hepatitis B virus core antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of human immuno-deficiency virus-1-Tat protein has a unique potency to pen-etrate the cellular membranes. To synthesize the sequence of Tat-PTD and hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg), we spliced these sequences and linked a fusion gene into the pMAL-c2x vector. The fusion proteins were purified by affin-ity chromatography and pulsed with bone marrow -derived den-dritic cells (DCs), and the transduction of recombinant pro-tein was detected by immunofluorescence antibody assay.Results showed that recombinant PTD-HBcAg could pen-etrate into DC cytoplasm while recombinant HBcAg was de-tected on the surface of cells. The percentage of DC surface molecules, such as CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibii-ity complex Ⅱ, and production of cytokine (IL-12pT0) induced by recombinant PTD-HBcAg were significantly higher than those induced by recombinant HBcAg or tumor necrosis fac-tor-α. DCs treated with PTD-HBcAg induced T cells to dif-ferentiate into specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and enhanced the CTL killing response. In conclusion, the ex-pressed and purified PTD-HBcAg fusion protein could pen-etrate into cells through the plasma membrane, promote DC maturation, and enhance T cells response to generate HBcAg-specific CTLs efficiently.

  5. 76 FR 72417 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... (PHS) Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV... Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus... Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) through Transplantation of Human Tissue and Organs. The 2011......

  6. Detecting emerging transmissibility of avian influenza virus in human households.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Boven

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in humans underlines the need to track the ability of these viruses to spread among humans. A human-transmissible avian influenza virus is expected to cause clusters of infections in humans living in close contact. Therefore, epidemiological analysis of infection clusters in human households is of key importance. Infection clusters may arise from transmission events from (i the animal reservoir, (ii humans who were infected by animals (primary human-to-human transmission, or (iii humans who were infected by humans (secondary human-to-human transmission. Here we propose a method of analysing household infection data to detect changes in the transmissibility of avian influenza viruses in humans at an early stage. The method is applied to an outbreak of H7N7 avian influenza virus in The Netherlands that was the cause of more than 30 human-to-human transmission events. The analyses indicate that secondary human-to-human transmission is plausible for the Dutch household infection data. Based on the estimates of the within-household transmission parameters, we evaluate the effectiveness of antiviral prophylaxis, and conclude that it is unlikely that all household infections can be prevented with current antiviral drugs. We discuss the applicability of our method for the detection of emerging human-to-human transmission of avian influenza viruses in particular, and for the analysis of within-household infection data in general.

  7. Theories about evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus in primates and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Frederico de Carvalho Dominguez Souza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The human hepatitis B virus causes acute and chronic hepatitis and is considered one of the most serious human health issues by the World Health Organization, causing thousands of deaths per year. There are similar viruses belonging to the Hepadnaviridae family that infect non-human primates and other mammals as well as some birds. The majority of non-human primate virus isolates were phylogenetically close to the human hepatitis B virus, but like the human genotypes, the origins of these viruses remain controversial. However, there is a possibility that human hepatitis B virus originated in primates. Knowing whether these viruses might be common to humans and primates is crucial in order to reduce the risk to humans. Objective: To review the existing knowledge about the evolutionary origins of viruses of the Hepadnaviridae family in primates. Methods: This review was done by reading several articles that provide information about the Hepadnaviridae virus family in non-human primates and humans and the possible origins and evolution of these viruses. Results: The evolutionary origin of viruses of the Hepadnaviridae family in primates has been dated back to several thousand years; however, recent analyses of genomic fossils of avihepadnaviruses integrated into the genomes of several avian species have suggested a much older origin of this genus. Conclusion: Some hypotheses about the evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus have been debated since the '90s. One theory suggested a New World origin because of the phylogenetic co-segregation between some New World human hepatitis B virus genotypes F and H and woolly B virus in basal sister-relationship to the Old monkey human hepatitis World non-human primates and human hepatitis B virus variants. Another theory suggests an Old World origin of human hepatitis B virus, and that it would have been spread following prehistoric human migrations over 100,000 years ago. A third theory

  8. 78 FR 33848 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... No. FDA-2013-D-0589] Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection... guidance for industry entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral Drugs... guidance for industry entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral...

  9. human immunodeficiency virus and the nervous system: an update ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    recognition in. 1981. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrolentivirus causing ... syndrome (AIDS) and eventual death. The origin of HIV in humans lies in its evolution from the simian ... brain barrier (BBB) or the blood CSF.

  10. Prevalence and prognostic significance of infection with TT virus in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, JK; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Sørensen, M;

    2000-01-01

    No clear association between human disease and TT virus (TTV) has been documented. A possible pathogenic role of TTV was investigated in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). TTV serum concentrations were estimated in 185 HIV-infected patients by dilution polymerase chain...

  11. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  12. Modification of AxSYM Human Immunodeficiency Virus Assay to Identify Recent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Korean Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Individuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Jin-Sook; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Sung Soon

    2015-01-01

    To estimate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence using HIV avidity assays in Korea, we established a serological testing method to differentiate recent HIV infections from long-standing ones...

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus-negative plasmablastic lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Xudong; Dong, Meng; Li, Ling; Wang, Xinhua; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Xiaorui; Sun, Zhenchang; Wu, Jingjing; Li, Zhaoming; Chang, Yu; Wang, Yingjun; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Mingzhi; Chen, Qingjiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare subtype of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that predominantly manifests in the oral cavity. Patient concerns: Three cases of HIV-negative PBL were reported. Diagnoses: HIV-negative PBL Interventions: The patient had undergone chemotherapy. Outcomes: Clinical outcomes were very poor in Cases 1 and 3; Case 2, whose diagnosis suggested no bone marrow involvement, is still alive. Lessons subsections: These cases served to broaden the reported clinical spectrum of HIV-negative PBL. Clinicians and pathologists need to be familiar with lymphoma in the identified extra-oral PBL variation and there levant differential diagnosis procedures for this particular disease. PMID:28207555

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, S Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S

    2015-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection.

  15. The Application of Humanized Mouse Models for the Study of Human Exclusive Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Giles, Elizabeth C; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-01-01

    The symbiosis between humans and viruses has allowed human tropic pathogens to evolve intricate means of modulating the human immune response to ensure its survival among the human population. In doing so, these viruses have developed profound mechanisms that mesh closely with our human biology. The establishment of this intimate relationship has created a species-specific barrier to infection, restricting the virus-associated pathologies to humans. This specificity diminishes the utility of traditional animal models. Humanized mice offer a model unique to all other means of study, providing an in vivo platform for the careful examination of human tropic viruses and their interaction with human cells and tissues. These types of animal models have provided a reliable medium for the study of human-virus interactions, a relationship that could otherwise not be investigated without questionable relevance to humans.

  16. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infected pig coughs or sneezes and droplets with influenza virus in them spread through the air. If these ... possibly get infected is to inhale particles containing influenza virus. Scientists aren’t really sure which of these ...

  17. Profound CD4+ T lymphocytopenia in human immunodeficiency virus negative individuals, improved with anti-human herpes virus treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Betancourt, María Lilia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytopenia and CD4+ T lymphocytopenia can be associated with many bacterial, fungal, parasite and viral infections. They can also be found in autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, common variable immunodeficiency syndrome, physical, psychological and traumatic stress, malnutrition and immunosuppressive therapy. Besides, they can also be brought into relation, without a known cause, with idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia. Among viral infections, the Retrovirus, specially the human immunodeficiency virus, is the most frequently cause. However, many acute viral infections, including cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus can be associated with transient ymphocytopenia and CD4+ T lymphocytopenia. As is well known, transient ymphocytopenia and CD4+ T lymphocytopenia are temporary and overcome when the disease improves. Nonetheless, severe CD4+ T Lymphocytopenia associated with chronic infections by human herpes virus has not been reported. We describe 6 cases of human immunodeficiency virus negative patients, with chronic cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus infections and profound lymphocytopenia with clinical symptoms of cellular immunodeficiency. These patients improved rapidly with ganciclovir or valganciclovir treatment. We claim here that it is important to consider the chronic human herpes virus infection in the differential diagnosis of profoundly CD4+ T lymphocytopenia etiology, when human mmunodeficiency virus is absent, in order to start effective treatment and to determine, in future studies, the impact of chronic human herpes virus infection in human beings’ health

  18. Herpes viruses and human papilloma virus in nasal polyposis and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Ioannidis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is a multifactorial disease entity with an unclear pathogenesis. Contradictory data exist in the literature on the potential implication of viral elements in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of human herpes viruses (1-6 and Human Papilloma Virus in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls. METHODS: Viral DNA presence was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction application to nasal polyps specimens from 91 chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps patients and nasal turbinate mucosa from 38 healthy controls. RESULTS: Epstein-Barr virus positivity was higher in nasal polyps (24/91; 26.4% versus controls (4/38; 10.5%, but the difference did not reach significance (p = 0.06. Human herpes virus-6 positivity was lower in nasal polyps (13/91; 14.29% versus controls (10/38; 26.32%,p = 0.13. In chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps group, 1 sample was herpes simplex virus-1-positive (1/91; 1.1%, and another was cytomegalovirus-positive (1/91; 1.1%, versus none in controls. No sample was positive for herpes simplex virus-2, varicella-zoster virus, high-risk-human papilloma viruses (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and low-risk-human papilloma viruses (6, 11. CONCLUSION: Differences in Epstein-Barr virus and human herpes virus-6 positivity among patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls are not statistically significant, weakening the likelihood of their implication in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps pathogenesis.

  19. Characterizing human herpes virus 6 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotti, Anthony J; Gulbis, Alison; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Howell, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    Human herpes virus 6 reactivation occurs in approximately 50% of patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplant, however, the significance of human herpes virus 6 reactivation remains uncertain. A retrospective study was conducted analyzing clinical data of patients testing positive for human herpes virus 6 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction following hematopoietic stem cell transplant from 1 January 1998 to 1 October 2011. Data retrieved were used to describe the clinical course and outcome of human herpes virus 6 positive hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Sixty patients were identified who tested positive for human herpes virus 6 by polymerase chain reaction following hematopoietic stem cell transplant. A high proportion of patients were identified in this cohort with acute myeloid leukemia (28.3%), active disease (65%), transplanted with a matched unrelated donor (30%), ≥ 1 antigen mismatched (28.3%) matched unrelated donor, or an umbilical cord graft (25%), and those who received antithymocyte globulin (42.4%). Thirty-eight (63.3%) patients were treated for human herpes virus 6 with foscarnet alone or in combination with intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 18 (30%) did not require treatment survival at Day 100 was 73.3%. This study suggests human herpes virus 6 reactivation occurs shortly after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (median of 25 days (interquartile range, 20-31.75) after hematopoietic stem cell transplant). Many potential risk factors are described in this report. Treatment of human herpes virus 6 predominately consisted of foscarnet with or without intravenous immunoglobulin; however, treatment of human herpes virus 6 was not always warranted. Furthermore, the effect of treatment on patient outcomes is uncertain. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus in institutionalized elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Luiz Gorzoni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: A search in the SciELO and PubMed databases showed few studies on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive individuals in long-term care institutions (LTCIs, thus prompting the present study. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether there were any HIV-positive individuals in LTCIs for the elderly. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in which the Hospital Infection Control Committee (HICC of a 405-bed LTCI was consulted. METHODS: The medical records of 405 individuals interned in the LTCI who had been tested for HIV infection were requested for analysis of the following variables: [1] age and gender; [2] length of stay at LTCI (months; [3] causes and diagnoses on admission to LTCI according to International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition; [4] date of HIV diagnosis; [5] seropositivity for syphilis and hepatitis B and C viruses; [6] medications used at last prescription in medical file; and [7] mean CD4 lymphocyte count based on: total lymphocyte count/6 and total lymphocyte count x 0.8 x 0.2 or 0.3. RESULTS: Four men were HIV-positive, with mean age 71.2 ± 8.6 years, LTCI stay 74.2 ± 38.1 months and length of HIV diagnosis 24.5 ± 17 months (confirmed by HICC standard screening. Three had stroke sequelae; one, dementia syndrome; two, seropositivity for syphilis; two, hepatitis B and one, hepatitis C. The main drugs used were lamivudine, zidovudine, lopinavir, ritonavir, levothyroxine, omeprazole, ranitidine, lactulose and risperidone. The estimated CD4 count was 341 ± 237/mm3. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-positive individuals are present in LTCIs, diagnosable through serological screening and treatable with antiretroviral drugs.

  1. [Latent infection of human herpes virus in hematopoietic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke-Fu; Ma, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Song, Yu-Hua

    2008-12-01

    Up to date, eight types of human herpes viruses have been identified, all of which are ubiquitous, and usually establish latent infection in the host after primary infection. Since most of the herpes viruses are maintained in an asymptomatic form, they are often neglected. However, under some circumstances, these herpes viruses can cause fatal or severe diseases. Furthermore, the association of herpes viruses with hematopoietic malignancies is attracting researchers' attention. With the extensive development of hematopoietic stem cell and organ transplantation, reports regarding transplantation failure and complication caused by infection of human herpes virus has been increasing. Cytokine storm was firstly suggested as the mechanism of graft-versus-host diseases. In recent years, which has also been applied in the pathogenesis research of inflammation, and is supposed to play an important role in severe virus infection. In this paper, through discussing the possible role of latent infection of human herpes virus in the failure or complication of bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in refractory leukemia, the function and significance of latent infection of human herpes virus and the cytokine storm it caused were investigated.

  2. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  3. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus — hepatitis B virus co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azhani Mandiwana

    determine the prevalence of HIV–HBV co-infection amongst HAART eligible adult ... hepatitis B virus (HBV).2,3 Primary modes of the HIV–HBV co- ... due to treatment failure. .... antibody to hepatitis B core (Immunoglobulin [Ig] M, G fractions),.

  4. Cardiovascular implications from untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with access to antiretroviral medications, as the risk for AIDS has fallen and life expectancy improved. Traditional CVD risk...

  5. Knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post-exposure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post-exposure prophylaxis among doctors in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. ... of PEP policy in the hospital. The level of knowledge concerning the high-risk fluid and three drugs used in PEP is high.

  6. Disparities in the Magnitude of Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    human immunodeficiency virus-related opportunistic infections between high and ... estimated 35.3 million people living with HIV (PLHIV), and. 2.3 million new HIV ...... us not erronously conclude that OIs have become a thing of the past.

  7. Using Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) As Surrogate for Human Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    This test is designed to validate virucidal effectiveness claims for a product to be registered as a virucide. It determines the potential of the test agent to disinfect hard surfaces contaminated with human Hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  8. Contemporary North American influenza H7 viruses possess human receptor specificity: Implications for virus transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belser, Jessica A; Blixt, Ola; Chen, Li-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Avian H7 influenza viruses from both the Eurasian and North American lineage have caused outbreaks in poultry since 2002, with confirmed human infection occurring during outbreaks in The Netherlands, British Columbia, and the United Kingdom. The majority of H7 infections have resulted in self......-limiting conjunctivitis, whereas probable human-to-human transmission has been rare. Here, we used glycan microarray technology to determine the receptor-binding preference of Eurasian and North American lineage H7 influenza viruses and their transmissibility in the ferret model. We found that highly pathogenic H7N7...... in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets and was capable of transmission in this species by direct contact. These results indicate that H7 influenza viruses from the North American lineage have acquired sialic acid-binding properties that more closely resemble those of human influenza viruses and have...

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Arikan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in women of child-bearing age continue to increase both internationally and in Canada. The care of HIV-infected pregnant women is complex, and multiple issues must be addressed, including the current and future health of the woman, minimization of the risk of maternal-infant HIV transmission, and maintenance of the well-being of the fetus and neonate. Vertical transmission of HIV can occur in utero, intrapartum and postpartum, but current evidence suggests that the majority of transmission occurs toward end of term, or during labour and delivery. Several maternal and obstetrical factors influence transmission rates, which can be reduced by optimal medical and obstetrical care. Zidovudine therapy has been demonstrated to reduce maternal-infant transmission significantly, but several issues, including the short and long term safety of antiretrovirals and the optimal use of combination antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy, remain to be defined. It is essential that health care workers providing care to these women fully understand the natural history of HIV disease in pregnancy, the factors that affect vertical transmission and the management issues during pregnancy. Close collaboration among a multidisciplinary team of knowledgeable health professionals and, most importantly, the woman herself can improve both maternal and infant outcomes.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus infection, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, H W; Telzak, E E; Sepkowitz, K A; Wormser, G P

    1998-12-01

    The acceptance of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) among patients and health care providers has had a dramatic impact on the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of many opportunistic infections associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Previously intractable opportunistic infections and syndromes are now far less common. In addition, effective antibiotic prophylactic therapies have had a profound impact on the risk of patients developing particular infections and on the incidence of these infections overall. Most notable among these are Pneumocystis carinii, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex, tuberculosis, and toxoplasmosis. Nevertheless, infections continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality among patients who are infected with HIV. The role of HAART in many clinical situations is unquestioned. Compelling data from clinical trials support the use of these therapies during pregnancy to prevent perinatal transmission of HIV. HAART is also recommended for health care workers who have had a "significant" exposure to the blood of an HIV-infected patient. Both of these situations are discussed in detail in this article. In addition, although more controversial, increasing evidence supports the use of HAART during the acute HIV seroconversion syndrome. An "immune reconstitution syndrome" has been newly described for patients in the early phases of treatment with HAART who develop tuberculosis, M avium complex, and cytomegalovirus disease. Accumulating data support the use of hydroxyurea, an agent with a long history in the field of myeloproliferative disorders, for the treatment of HIV. Newer agents, particularly abacavir and adefovir dipivoxil, are available through expanded access protocols, and their roles are being defined and clarified.

  11. The surgeon and human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Jens; Kalangu, Kazadi K N

    2003-08-01

    The moral dilemmas faced by surgeons worldwide who treat patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be viewed against the background of experience in sub-Saharan countries, where the community prevalence is in excess of 25% (90% of hospital inpatients). When seeking consent for an HIV test before surgery, frank communication regarding the surgeons' perspective of risks to themselves and the patient is helpful. When consent for a test must be obtained from a substitute decision-maker, the surgeon should consider if the patient would want the decision-maker to know the result. Understanding the natural history of HIV in the surgical setting can help deal with the uncertainties encountered and should be a research priority for developing countries. International professional organizations are useful platforms for the exchange of ideas when surgeons encounter uncertainty by increasing access to journals and creating opportunities for discussion. Although supervisory bodies in some parts of the world prevent HIV-infected surgeons from putting patients at risk by offering surgery, the withdrawal of their services in developing countries can cause more harm than good. Surgeons in that position may be entitled to offer surgery but only with full disclosure of the risk of HIV infection to the patient. The decision-making process known as "accountability for reasonableness" allows surgeons to determine fairness, legitimacy, and acceptability when making resource allocation decisions involving patients with HIV.

  12. Aging, human immunodeficiency virus, and bone health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim C Mansky

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Kim C ManskyDivision of Orthodontics, Department of Developmental and Surgical Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has had a profound impact on improving the long-term prognosis for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. HAART has been available for close to two decades, and now a significant number of patients with access to HAART are over the age of 50 years. Many clinical studies have indicated that HIV infection, as well as components of HAART, can increase the risk in these individuals to a variety of noninfectious complications, including a risk to bone health. There is a significant need for detailed mechanistic analysis of the aging, HIV-infected population regarding the risk of HIV infection and therapy in order to maintain bone health. Insights from basic mechanistic studies will help to shed light on the role of HIV infection and the components of HAART that impact bone health, and will help in identifying preventative countermeasures, particularly for individuals 50 years of age and older.Keywords: osteopenia, osteomalacia, osteoporosis, bisphosphonates, tenofovir, osteoimmunology

  13. Human papilloma virus (HPV) molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupis, Christos; Vourlidis, Nikolaos

    2011-11-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is becoming a menace worldwide, especially to the developing world, due to its involvement in a variety of malignancies, with cervical cancer being the most important and prevalent. There are many HPV types; HPV 16/18 are the most carcinogenic but few others are also characterized as high-risk (HR). They can cause a variety of low- or high-grade cellular abnormalities, most frequently detected in a routine Pap test. Most infections clear within 2 years, however, a minority persists and potentially could progress to cervical cancer. Molecular tests detecting HPV DNA, RNA or proteins are now being available either commercially or in-house developed. DNA detection is nowadays an established tool for diagnosis and monitoring of HPV-related disease, however, there is lack of a reference method and standardization with reference materials. The various available test formats create confusion on which molecular test to choose and what are its limitations. Therefore, the need for lab accreditation and participation in proficiency testing has to be stressed. Novel HPV biomarkers (RNA, protein etc.) are now intensively examined for their inclusion as adjunct tools. Recently, developed prophylactic vaccines for HPV 16/18 have already proven safe and efficient and raise high expectations for the complete eradication of these types in the future.

  14. Human papilloma virus infection prior to coitarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Daniela; Bernhaus, Astrid; Kottmel, Andrea; Sam, Christine; Koelle, Dieter; Joura, Elmar A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence and the natural course of anogenital human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in girls prior to coitarche attending an outpatient gynecological unit. Specimens were taken from the anogenital region of 114 unselected 4-15 year old girls who were referred consecutively for various gynecological problems. Four girls were excluded because of sexual abuse. Low-risk HPV-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was detected in 4 girls (3.6%) and high-risk HPV DNA in 15 children (13.6%). Two girls testing positive for HPV DNA had clinical apparent warts. After 1 year, 2 children had persistent high-risk HPV DNA, and in 1 case we found a switch from high-risk to low-risk HPV DNA. Subclinical genital low- and high-risk HPV infections are common in girls without any history of sexual abuse or sexual activity. We found persistence of genital HPV infection in children, which could be a reservoir for HPV-associated diseases later in life.

  15. [Microbiological diagnosis of human papilloma virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Lindemann, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Pérez-Gracia, Maria Teresa

    2016-06-25

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the leading cause of sexually transmitted infection worldwide. This virus generally causes benign lesions, such as genital warts, but persistent infection may lead to cervical cancer, anal cancer, vaginal cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer, although less frequently. Cervical cancer is a severe disease with a high mortality in some countries. Screening with cytology has been very successful in the last few years, but nowadays there are numerous studies that confirm that cytology should be replaced with the detection of HPV as a first line test in population based screening. There are several commercially available FDA approved tests for screening of cervical cancer. A new strategy, based on individual detection of the high risk genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, present in 70% of cervical cancer biopsies, has been proposed by some experts, and is going to be implemented in most countries in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasmoblastic lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Emoke; Krenács, L; Bagdi, Eniko; Pávai, Z; Macarie, I; Nagy, Elod-Erno; Demian, Smaranda

    2008-01-01

    Plasmoblastic lymphoma (PBL) is a subtype of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, typically present as extranodal disease associated with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection. PBLs are often the initial manifestation of AIDS. Here we present a case of PBL concerning the oral cavity. A 34-year-old woman presented a tumor in the oral cavity that involved the maxilla and gingiva (confirmed by CT-scan). The gingival biopsy showed a massive infiltration by large lymphoid cells with round, vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli, fine chromatin and an significant amount of basophilic cytoplasm which express CD79a, CD138, cytoplasmic lambda light chain and LCA, without staining for CD20, CD38, CD3 and CTK. Serological analysis confirmed HIV positivity. PBLs lack most B-lineage markers, but many express CD79a in at least some of the cells, therefore generate difficulties in differential diagnosis. Overall assessment and correlation of the histopathological and immunohistochemical features with the clinical findings and serology investigation are the most helpful diagnostic tools and can lead to the final diagnosis.

  17. [Ebola and Marburg viruses: the humans strike back].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazard-Dany, Nathalie; Ottmann Terrangle, Michèle; Volchkov, Viktor

    2006-04-01

    Ebola and Marburg viruses are the causative agents of rapidly progressive hemorrhagic fevers with high mortality rates. Pre- or post-exposure treatments against the diseases are currently not available for human use. In the field, establishment of strict quarantine measures preventing further virus transmission are still the only way to fight the infections. However, our knowledge of Ebola and Marburg viruses has markedly increased as a result of two recent discoveries discussed in this review. Chandran et al. have elucidated the mechanism by which Ebola GP is converted to a fusion-active form. Infectivity of Ebola virus was shown to be dependent on the cleavage of GP by cellular endosomal proteases, cathepsin B and L, thus opening new therapeutic approaches options. As for Jones SM et al., they have successfully vaccinated monkeys with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing Ebola or Marburg virus surface glycoprotein GP, a promising vaccine approach.

  18. Significance of blood analysis in hemophiliacs co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Shen; Qin Huang; Hong-Qing Sun; Reena Ghildyal

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study the effect of hepatitis virus infection on cirrhosis and liver function markers in HIV-infected hemophiliacs.METHODS:We have analyzed the immunological,liver function and cirrhosis markers in a cohort of hemophiliacs co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis viruses.RESULTS:There was no difference in immunological markers among co-infected patients and patients infected with HIV only and those co-infected with one or more hepatitis virus. Although liver function and cirrhosis markers remained within a normal range,there was a worsening trend in all patients co-infected with hepatitis virus C (HCV),which was further exacerbated in the presence of additional infection with hepatitis virus B (HBV).CONCLUSION:Co-infection with HIV,HBV and HCV leads to worsening of hyaluronic acid and liver function markers. Increases in serum hyaluronic acid may be suggestive of a predisposition to liver diseases.

  19. Medical management of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempen John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS pandemic has pervasive effects on culture, economics, policy, and human development. All organs can be affected by complications of HIV/AIDS, including the eye. When sufficient resources are available and widespread antiretroviral resistance does not exist, the four available classes of antiretroviral agents - nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and fusion inhibitors - can be combined to provide highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. For many (not all patients, HAART converts an inexorably fatal disease into a chronic disease with a fairly good prognosis. Use of HAART often induces partial immune recovery, which has predominantly beneficial effects on ocular complications of AIDS. However, HAART-induced immune recovery sometimes results in immune recovery inflammatory syndromes, such as immune recovery uveitis. Use of HAART is the single most useful intervention for most patients with ocular complications of AIDS. However, specific ocular therapy is also critical to avoid blindness in the early months before immune recovery can occur, or if HAART is unavailable. Increasing availability of HAART worldwide shows great promise to alleviate one of the world′s greatest plagues. However, predictable secular trends in the AIDS epidemic make it likely that the number of cases of ocular complications of AIDS will increase substantially before they decrease. Ophthalmologists worldwide should be familiar with the diagnosis and management of cytomegalovirus retinitis - the most common ocular complication of AIDS - and should establish partnerships with physicians who are able to provide HAART. Research is needed to determine the optimal approach for managing cytomegalovirus retinitis in resource-constrained settings.

  20. Drosophila as a genetic model for studying pathogenic human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tamara T; Allen, Amanda L; Bardin, Joseph E; Christian, Megan N; Daimon, Kansei; Dozier, Kelsey D; Hansen, Caom L; Holcomb, Lisa M; Ahlander, Joseph

    2012-02-05

    Viruses are infectious particles whose viability is dependent on the cells of living organisms, such as bacteria, plants, and animals. It is of great interest to discover how viruses function inside host cells in order to develop therapies to treat virally infected organisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for studying the molecular mechanisms of replication, amplification, and cellular consequences of human viruses. In this review, we describe the advantages of using Drosophila as a model system to study human viruses, and highlight how Drosophila has been used to provide unique insight into the gene function of several pathogenic viruses. We also propose possible directions for future research in this area.

  1. Human Immune Responses to Dengue Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    between the PBL of non- inmune donors and dengue virus-infected cells, which results in IFN production. We use dengue virus-infected B lymphoblastoid cell...or, J.J., M.W. Brandriss, and E.E. Walsh. 1985. Protection against 17D yellow fever encephalitis in mice by passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies

  2. Phytocompounds for the control of human enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Doris H

    2014-02-01

    Plant extracts and associated polyphenols are known for their varied health benefits that include antioxidant effects and antimicrobial properties. The increasing consumer demand for cost-effective and natural alternatives to chemically-synthesized antimicrobials and therapeutics that are also sustainable makes the field of phytochemical research rather intriguing and challenging. Human enteric viruses are increasingly recognized worldwide as significant causes of human disease in adults and children, alike. In the absence of available vaccines for the human noroviruses, plant extracts are gaining popularity for the prevention and treatment of viral diseases. Research on plant extracts (particularly polyphenols derived from fruits) for human enteric virus control will be briefly summarized in this article.

  3. Evolutionary origins of human herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, Joel O; Smith, Martin D; Smith, Davey M; Scheffler, Konrad; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L

    2014-09-01

    Herpesviruses have been infecting and codiverging with their vertebrate hosts for hundreds of millions of years. The primate simplex viruses exemplify this pattern of virus-host codivergence, at a minimum, as far back as the most recent common ancestor of New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes. Humans are the only primate species known to be infected with two distinct herpes simplex viruses: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Human herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous, with over two-thirds of the human population infected by at least one virus. Here, we investigated whether the additional human simplex virus is the result of ancient viral lineage duplication or cross-species transmission. We found that standard phylogenetic models of nucleotide substitution are inadequate for distinguishing among these competing hypotheses; the extent of synonymous substitutions causes a substantial underestimation of the lengths of some of the branches in the phylogeny, consistent with observations in other viruses (e.g., avian influenza, Ebola, and coronaviruses). To more accurately estimate ancient viral divergence times, we applied a branch-site random effects likelihood model of molecular evolution that allows the strength of natural selection to vary across both the viral phylogeny and the gene alignment. This selection-informed model favored a scenario in which HSV-1 is the result of ancient codivergence and HSV-2 arose from a cross-species transmission event from the ancestor of modern chimpanzees to an extinct Homo precursor of modern humans, around 1.6 Ma. These results provide a new framework for understanding human herpes simplex virus evolution and demonstrate the importance of using selection-informed models of sequence evolution when investigating viral origin hypotheses.

  4. Human papilloma virus vaccines: Current scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Pandhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genital human papillomavirus (HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection with an estimated worldwide prevalence of 9-13% and approximately 6 million people being infected each year. Mostly acquired during adolescence or young adulthood, HPV presents clinically as anogenital warts and may progress to precancerous lesions and cancers of the cervix, vagina, vulva, penis and anus, and oropharynx. HPV infection is considered to contribute to almost 100% cervical cancers and at least 80% of anal and 40-60% of vulvar, vaginal, and penile cancers. At present, two prophylactic HPV vaccines are commercially available and both are prepared from purified L1 structural proteins. These proteins self-assemble to form virus-like particles that induce a protective immunity. Gardasil® is a quadrivalent vaccine against HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 and is recommended for use in females 9-26 years of age, for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, and vaginal cancers and intraepithelial neoplasia and condyloma acuminata and recently for vaccination in boys and men 9-26 years of age for the prevention of genital warts. Cervarix™ is a bivalent vaccine approved for the prevention of cervical cancer and precancerous lesions caused by HPV 16 and 18, in females 10-25 years. HPV vaccines are safe and efficacious against type-specific HPV-induced anogenital warts, precancerous lesions, and cervical cancer. The vaccines are most effective when given before the onset of sexual activity and provide long-term protection. Effective vaccination coverage in young adolescent females will substantially reduce the incidence of these anogenital malignancy-related morbidity and mortality. There is need to generate India-specific data on HPV epidemiology and HPV vaccination efficacy as well as continue worldwide surveillance and development of newer vaccines.

  5. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B Virus among Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus ... The two groups compared well as regards age, sex, occupation and social class. However, widows has significantly higher prevalence amongst the HIV patients.

  6. Virological factors that increase the transmissibility of emerging human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, Jemma L; Senior, Alistair M; Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Holmes, Edward C

    2016-04-12

    The early detection of pathogens with epidemic potential is of major importance to public health. Most emerging infections result in dead-end "spillover" events in which a pathogen is transmitted from an animal reservoir to a human but is unable to achieve the sustained human-to-human transmission necessary for a full-blown epidemic. It is therefore critical to determine why only some virus infections are efficiently transmitted among humans whereas others are not. We sought to determine which biological features best characterized those viruses that have achieved sustained human transmission. Accordingly, we compiled a database of 203 RNA and DNA human viruses and used an information theoretic approach to assess which of a set of key biological variables were the best predictors of human-to-human transmission. The variables analyzed were as follows: taxonomic classification; genome length, type, and segmentation; the presence or absence of an outer envelope; recombination frequency; duration of infection; host mortality; and whether or not a virus exhibits vector-borne transmission. This comparative analysis revealed multiple strong associations. In particular, we determined that viruses with low host mortality, that establish long-term chronic infections, and that are nonsegmented, nonenveloped, and, most importantly, not transmitted by vectors were more likely to be transmissible among humans. In contrast, variables including genome length, genome type, and recombination frequency had little predictive power. In sum, we have identified multiple biological features that seemingly determine the likelihood of interhuman viral transmissibility, in turn enabling general predictions of whether viruses of a particular type will successfully emerge in human populations.

  7. Distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyö, E M; Morfeldt-Månson, L; Chiodi, F; Lind, B; von Gegerfelt, A; Albert, J; Olausson, E; Asjö, B

    1988-01-01

    According to their capacity to replicate in vitro, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates can be divided into two major groups, rapid/high and slow/low. Rapid/high viruses can easily be transmitted to a variety of cell lines of T-lymphoid (CEM, H9, and Jurkat) and monocytoid (U937) origin. In contrast, slow/low viruses replicate transiently, if at all, in these cell lines. Except for a few isolates, the great majority of slow/low viruses replicate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and Jurkat-tatIII cells constitutively expressing the tatIII gene of HIV-1. The viruses able to replicate efficiently cause syncytium formation and are regularly isolated from immunodeficient patients. Poorly replicating HIV isolates, often obtained from individuals with no or mild disease, show syncytium formation and single-cell killing simultaneously or, with some isolates, cell killing only. Images PMID:2459416

  8. The contrasting phylodynamics of human influenza B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Holmes, Edward C; Joseph, Udayan; Fourment, Mathieu; Su, Yvonne C F; Halpin, Rebecca; Lee, Raphael T C; Deng, Yi-Mo; Gunalan, Vithiagaran; Lin, Xudong; Stockwell, Timothy B; Fedorova, Nadia B; Zhou, Bin; Spirason, Natalie; Kühnert, Denise; Bošková, Veronika; Stadler, Tanja; Costa, Anna-Maria; Dwyer, Dominic E; Huang, Q Sue; Jennings, Lance C; Rawlinson, William; Sullivan, Sheena G; Hurt, Aeron C; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Wentworth, David E; Smith, Gavin J D; Barr, Ian G

    2015-01-16

    A complex interplay of viral, host, and ecological factors shapes the spatio-temporal incidence and evolution of human influenza viruses. Although considerable attention has been paid to influenza A viruses, a lack of equivalent data means that an integrated evolutionary and epidemiological framework has until now not been available for influenza B viruses, despite their significant disease burden. Through the analysis of over 900 full genomes from an epidemiological collection of more than 26,000 strains from Australia and New Zealand, we reveal fundamental differences in the phylodynamics of the two co-circulating lineages of influenza B virus (Victoria and Yamagata), showing that their individual dynamics are determined by a complex relationship between virus transmission, age of infection, and receptor binding preference. In sum, this work identifies new factors that are important determinants of influenza B evolution and epidemiology.

  9. Isolation of a novel swine influenza virus from Oklahoma in 2011 which is distantly related to human influenza C viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D; Webby, Richard J; Simonson, Randy R; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution.

  10. From human behavior to the spread of mobile phone viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu

    Percolation theory was initiated some 50 years ago as a mathematical framework for the study of random physical processes such as the flow of a fluid through a disordered porous medium. It has been proved to be a remarkably rich theory, with applications from thermodynamic phase transitions to complex networks. In this dissertation percolation theory is used to study the diffusion process of mobile phone viruses. Some methodologies widely used in statistical physics are also applied to uncover the underlying statistical laws of human behavior and simulate the spread of mobile phone viruses in a large population. I find that while Bluetooth viruses can reach all susceptible handsets with time, they spread slowly due to human mobility, offering ample opportunities to deploy antiviral software. In contrast, viruses utilizing multimedia messaging services (MMS) could infect all users in hours, but currently a phase transition on the underlying call graph limits them to only a small fraction of the susceptible users. These results explain the lack of a major mobile virus breakout so far and predict that once a mobile operating system's market share reaches the phase transition point, viruses will pose a serious threat to mobile communications. These studies show how the large datasets and tools of statistical physics can be used to study some specific and important problems, such as the spread of mobile phone viruses.

  11. Towards detecting the human immunodeficiency virus using microcantilever sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alodhayb, Abdullah; Brown, Nicole; Saydur Rahman, S. M.; Harrigan, Richard; Beaulieu, L. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Detecting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is difficult because the virus is prone to mutations and is in low concentrations in the body. Inside the HIV virion are two well characterized single stranded (ss) RNA molecules (viral genome) that feature both variable regions and regions that are conserved under virus mutation. In this work, microcantilever sensors have been employed as potential HIV detectors by targeting a conserved sequence of the viral genome by attempting to detect target ssDNA and ssRNA molecules that are significantly longer than the ssDNA molecules functionalized on the cantilever.

  12. Imaging and tracking HIV viruses in human cervical mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukari, Fatima; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Nossal, Ralph; Boukari, Hacène

    2016-09-01

    We describe a systematic approach to image, track, and quantify the movements of HIV viruses embedded in human cervical mucus. The underlying motivation for this study is that, in HIV-infected adults, women account for more than half of all new cases and most of these women acquire the infection through heterosexual contact. The endocervix is believed to be a susceptible site for HIV entry. Cervical mucus, which coats the endocervix, should play a protective role against the viruses. Thus, we developed a methodology to apply time-resolved confocal microscopy to examine the motion of HIV viruses that were added to samples of untreated cervical mucus. From the images, we identified the viruses, tracked them over time, and calculated changes of the statistical mean-squared displacement (MSD) of each virus. Approximately half of tracked viruses appear constrained while the others show mobility with MSDs that are proportional to τα+ν2τ2, over time range τ, depicting a combination of anomalous diffusion (0<α<0.4) and flow-like behavior. The MSD data also reveal plateaus attributable to possible stalling of the viruses. Although a more extensive study is warranted, these results support the assumption of mucus being a barrier against the motion of these viruses.

  13. Heterosexual spread of human immunodeficiency virus in Edinburgh

    OpenAIRE

    France, A J; Skidmore, C A; Robertson, J R; Brettle, R P; Roberts, J J K; Burns, S. M.; Foster, C. A.; Inglis, J. M.; Galloway, W B F; Davidson, S J

    1988-01-01

    Heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was investigated in 123 subjects with no apparent risk factor for infection other than having had heterosexual intercourse with a person who was either infected with HIV or at high risk of being infected with it. Seven subjects were found to be infected with the virus. Risk factors for transmission included being the regular sexual partner of an abuser of intravenous drugs and having a sexual relationship of more than 18 months' ...

  14. Evasion of the human innate immune system by dengue virus

    OpenAIRE

    Pagni, Sarah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus is a worldwide health problem, with billions of people at risk annually. Dengue virus causes a spectrum of diseases, namely dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome with the latter two being linked to death. Understanding how dengue is able to evade the immune system and cause enhanced severity of disease is the main topics of interest in the Fernandez-Sesma laboratory at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Using primary human immune cells, our group investiga...

  15. Postmortem Investigations Following Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Bychkov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS is a global disease and despite intensive research it is one of the main causes of human death. Postmortem studies have proven accurate in determining the various pathologies in these patients. Aims & Objectives: Our aim was to analyze the post mortem results of individuals who died after HIV infection in the same geographical region. We evaluated the most frequent opportunistic diseases and their clinical and morphological outcomes. Methods: We studied case reports and autopsy research data from 32 patients who died after HIV infection in Smolensk, Russian Federation, between 2003 and 2008. All patients had been diagnosed with HIV infection before death, using HIV-specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunoblotting. Autopsy specimens of various organs were examined histologically and microbiologically. Findings: The mean survival period from the moment of detection of seropositivity in all the patients was less than five years. Twelve patients had a parenteral mode of contact, six had been infected by sexual contact, and 14 patients had unknown modes of infection. Most patients (69% had chronic hepatitis C. The main causes of death were various infectious diseases. The most common were generalized miliary tuberculosis and progressive secondary tuberculosis of the lungs. Three (9% patients had tuberculosis of the meninges and five (16% had peritoneal infections, but tuberculous peritonitis had not been diagnosed before death. Six patients had pulmonary tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonia simultaneously. Two (6% patients died from bacterial sepsis as a result of cervical lymphadenitis, and eight (12.5% from abscess-forming pneumonia. The opportunistic infections revealed were Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (eight patients, cytomegaloviral pneumonia (three, bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (one and mucosal candidiasis (three. In three patients, the causes of death were advanced neoplastic processes: two cases

  16. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Ruan, Jishou; Chen, Rui; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chengjie; Kreuze, Jan F; Fei, ZhangJun; Zhu, Xiao; Gao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq) can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  17. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  18. BK virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, J; Muñoz, P; Garcia de Viedma, D; Cabrero, I; Loeches, B; Montilla, P; Gijon, P; Rodriguez-Sanchez, B; Bouza, E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in our hospital. The presence of BKV was analysed in urine and plasma samples from 78 non-selected HIV-infected patients. Clinical data were recorded using a pre-established protocol. We used a nested PCR to amplify a specific region of the BKV T-large antigen. Positive samples were quantified using real-time PCR. Mean CD4 count in HIV-infected patients was 472 cells/mm3 and median HIV viral load was 500 cells/mm3 (74.3% vs 25.7%; p=0.007). Viruria was present in 21.7% of healthy controls (5 out of 23 samples, p=0.02). All viral loads were low (<100 copies/mL), and we could not find any association between BKV infection and renal or neurological manifestations. We provide an update on the prevalence of BKV in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART. BKV viruria was more common in HIV-infected patients; however, no role for BKV has been demonstrated in this population.

  19. Virus rejection with two model human enteric viruses in membrane bioreactor system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR) with gravity drain was tested for virus rejection with two coliphages, T4 and f2, which were used as surrogates for human enteric viruses. Virus rejection was investigated by PVDF and PP membrane modules, with the pore sizes of 0.22 and 0.1 μm, respectively. In tap water system, 2.1 lg rejection of coliphage T4 could be achieved by PVDF membrane compared with complete rejection by PP membrane, while for coliphage f2 with smaller diameter, 0.3―0.5 lg rejection of the influent virus was removed by the two membranes. In domestic wastewater system, cake layer and gel layer on the membrane surface changed the cut-off size of the membrane so that there was no significant difference between PP and PVDF for each coliphage. The removal ratios of coliphage T4 and f2 in the MBR were more than 5.5 and 3.0 lg, respectively. Compared with 5.5 lg removal for virus T4 in the MBR system, only 2.1 lg (96.8%―99.9%) removal rate was observed in the conventional activated sludge system with the influent virus concentration fluctuating from 1830 to 57000 PFU/mL. Only 0.8%―22% virus removal was the effect of adsorption to activated sludge, which showed a decreasing tendency with the retention time, while 75%―98% was the effect of virus inactivation by microbial activity. It indicated that the major mechanism of virus removal was not the transfer of viruses from the water phase to the sludge phase but inactivation in the biological treatment process.

  20. Virus rejection with two model human enteric viruses in membrane bioreactor system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xiang; LIU JunXin

    2007-01-01

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR) with gravity drain was tested for virus rejection with two coliphages, T4 and f2, which were used as surrogates for human enteric viruses. Virus rejection was investigated by PVDF and PP membrane modules, with the pore sizes of 0.22 and 0.1 μm, respectively. In tap water system, 2.1 lg rejection of coliphage T4 could be achieved by PVDF membrane compared with complete rejection by PP membrane, while for coliphage f2 with smaller diameter, 0.3-0.5 lg rejection of the influent virus was removed by the two membranes. In domestic wastewater system, cake layer and gel layer on the membrane surface changed the cut-off size of the membrane so that there was no significant difference between PP and PVDF for each coliphage. The removal ratios of coliphage T4 and f2 in the MBR were more than 5.5 and 3.0 lg, respectively. Compared with 5.5 lg removal for virus T4 in the MBR system, only 2.1 lg (96.8%-99.9%) removal rate was observed in the conventional activated sludge system with the influent virus concentration fluctuating from 1830 to 57000 PFU/mL. Only 0.8 %-22 % virus removal was the effect of adsorption to activated sludge, which showed a decreasing tendency with the retention time, while 75%-98% was the effect of virus inactivation by microbial activity. It indicated that the major mechanism of virus removal was not the transfer of viruses from the water phase to the sludge phase but inactivation in the biological treatment process.

  1. Identification of a natural human serotype 3 parainfluenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiao-Jing

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parainfluenza virus is an important pathogen threatening the health of animals and human, which brings human many kinds of disease, especially lower respiratory tract infection involving infants and young children. In order to control the virus, it is necessary to fully understand the molecular basis resulting in the genetic diversity of the virus. Homologous recombination is one of mechanisms for the rapid change of genetic diversity. However, as a negative-strand virus, it is unknown whether the recombination can naturally take place in human PIV. In this study, we isolated and identified a mosaic serotype 3 human PIV (HPIV3 from in China, and also provided several putative PIV mosaics from previous reports to reveal that the recombination can naturally occur in the virus. In addition, two swine PIV3 isolates transferred from cattle to pigs were found to have mosaic genomes. These results suggest that homologous recombination can promote the genetic diversity and potentially bring some novel biologic characteristics of HPIV.

  2. Zika virus impairs growth in human neurospheres and brain organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Patricia P; Loiola, Erick Correia; Madeiro da Costa, Rodrigo; Higa, Luiza M; Trindade, Pablo; Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Nascimento, Juliana Minardi; Brindeiro, Rodrigo; Tanuri, Amilcar; Rehen, Stevens K

    2016-05-13

    Since the emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV), reports of microcephaly have increased considerably in Brazil; however, causality between the viral epidemic and malformations in fetal brains needs further confirmation. We examined the effects of ZIKV infection in human neural stem cells growing as neurospheres and brain organoids. Using immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy, we showed that ZIKV targets human brain cells, reducing their viability and growth as neurospheres and brain organoids. These results suggest that ZIKV abrogates neurogenesis during human brain development.

  3. Production of Potent Fully Human Polyclonal Antibodies Against Zaire Ebola Virus in Transchromosomal Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    1 Production of potent fully human polyclonal antibodies against Zaire Ebola virus in transchromosomal cattle John M. Dye1, Hua Wu2, Jay...mail: jjiao@sabbiotherapeutics.com Keywords: Ebola virus, virus neutralization assay, human polyclonal antibodies, transchromosomal bovine...recombinant glycoprotein (GP) vaccine consisting of the 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV)-Makona isolate. Serum collected from these hyperimmunized Tc

  4. Association of human immunodeficiency virus-induced immunosuppression with human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, M J; Stanley, M W; Cruikshank, S; Carson, L

    1989-02-01

    Human papillomavirus infection plays an important causal role in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma. The rate of infection with human papillomavirus as well as the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma are increased in immunosuppressed patients. We report a possible association between infection with human immunodeficiency virus and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with human papillomavirus infection.

  5. Recognition determinants of broadly neutralizing human antibodies against dengue viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvinski, Alexander; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Kikuti, Carlos M; Navarro Sanchez, M Erika; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Wongwiwat, Wiyada; Haouz, Ahmed; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Shepard, William E; Desprès, Philippe; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Dussart, Philippe; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin R; Rey, Félix A

    2015-04-02

    Dengue disease is caused by four different flavivirus serotypes, which infect 390 million people yearly with 25% symptomatic cases and for which no licensed vaccine is available. Recent phase III vaccine trials showed partial protection, and in particular no protection for dengue virus serotype 2 (refs 3, 4). Structural studies so far have characterized only epitopes recognized by serotype-specific human antibodies. We recently isolated human antibodies potently neutralizing all four dengue virus serotypes. Here we describe the X-ray structures of four of these broadly neutralizing antibodies in complex with the envelope glycoprotein E from dengue virus serotype 2, revealing that the recognition determinants are at a serotype-invariant site at the E-dimer interface, including the exposed main chain of the E fusion loop and the two conserved glycan chains. This 'E-dimer-dependent epitope' is also the binding site for the viral glycoprotein prM during virus maturation in the secretory pathway of the infected cell, explaining its conservation across serotypes and highlighting an Achilles' heel of the virus with respect to antibody neutralization. These findings will be instrumental for devising novel immunogens to protect simultaneously against all four serotypes of dengue virus.

  6. Antiviral activity of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles against herpes simplex virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Swapnil Gaikwad,1 Avinash Ingle,1 Aniket Gade,1 Mahendra Rai,1 Annarita Falanga,3 Novella Incoronato,2 Luigi Russo,2 Stefania Galdiero,3 Massimilano Galdiero2 1Department of Biotechnology, Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University, Amravati, Maharashtra, India; 2Department of Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, II University of Naples, 3Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples “Federico II”, DFM and Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, Naples, Italy Abstract: The interaction between silver nanoparticles and viruses is attracting great interest due to the potential antiviral activity of these particles, and is the subject of much research effort in the treatment of infectious diseases. In this work, we demonstrate that silver nanoparticles undergo a size-dependent interaction with herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and with human parainfluenza virus type 3. We show that production of silver nanoparticles from different fungi is feasible, and their antiviral activity is dependent on the production system used. Silver nanoparticles are capable of reducing viral infectivity, probably by blocking interaction of the virus with the cell, which might depend on the size and zeta potential of the silver nanoparticles. Smaller-sized nanoparticles were able to inhibit the infectivity of the viruses analyzed. Keywords: silver nanoparticles, antiviral, herpes simplex virus, parainfluenza virus

  7. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A;

    2011-01-01

    that specifically recognize stem-loop motifs in the viral genomes, an assay termed single virion analysis. These studies revealed that >90% of the HIV-2 particles contained viral RNAs and that RNAs derived from different viruses were copackaged frequently. Furthermore, the frequencies of heterozygous particles...... two monomeric RNAs. Additionally, single virion analyses demonstrated a similar RNA distribution in viral particles regardless of whether both viruses had a functional gag or one of the viruses had a nonfunctional gag, providing further support for the trans-packaging hypothesis. Together......Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...

  8. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkuri, Niina; Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-05-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001-2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children.

  9. Sialic acid content in human saliva and anti-influenza activity against human and avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2016-03-01

    It was shown previously that human saliva has higher antiviral activity against human influenza viruses than against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, and that the major anti-influenza activity was associated with sialic-acid-containing molecules. To further characterize the differential susceptibility to saliva among influenza viruses, seasonal influenza A and B virus, pandemic H1N1 virus, and 15 subtypes of avian influenza virus were tested for their susceptibility to human and chicken saliva. Human saliva showed higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) titers against seasonal influenza A virus and the pandemic H1N1 viruses than against influenza B virus and most avian influenza viruses, except for H9N2 and H12N9 avian influenza viruses, which showed high HI and NT titers. To understand the nature of sialic-acid-containing anti-influenza factors in human saliva, α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid was measured in human saliva samples using a lectin binding and dot blot assay. α2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be more abundant than α2,3-linked sialic acid, and a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus bound more efficiently to human saliva than an H5N1 virus in a dot blot analysis. These data indicated that human saliva contains the sialic acid type corresponding to the binding preference of seasonal influenza viruses.

  10. Propagation of respiratory viruses in human airway epithelia reveals persistent virus-specific signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaidi-Laziosi, Manel; Brito, Francisco; Benaoudia, Sacha; Royston, Léna; Cagno, Valeria; Fernandes-Rocha, Mélanie; Piuz, Isabelle; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Huang, Song; Constant, Samuel; Boldi, Marc-Olivier; Kaiser, Laurent; Tapparel, Caroline

    2017-08-07

    Leading etiologies of acute illnesses, respiratory viruses typically cause self-limited diseases, though severe complications can occur in fragile patients. Rhinoviruses, respiratory enteroviruses, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial viruses and coronaviruses are highly prevalent respiratory pathogens, but due to the lack of reliable animal models, their differential pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. To compare infections by respiratory viruses isolated from clinical specimens using reconstituted human airway epithelia. Tissues were infected with rhinoviruses RV-A55, RV-A49, RV-B48, RV-C8 and RV-C15, respiratory enterovirus EV-D68, influenza virus H3N2, respiratory syncytial virus RSV-B and coronavirus HCoV-OC43. Replication kinetics, cell tropism, impact on tissue integrity and cytokine secretion were compared. Virus adaptation and tissue response were assessed through RNA-sequencing. Rhinoviruses, RSV-B and HCoV-OC43 infected ciliated cells and caused no major cell death while H3N2 and EV-D68 induced ciliated cell loss and tissue integrity disruption. H3N2 was also detected in rare goblet and basal cells. All viruses except RV-B48 and HCoV-OC43 altered cilia beating and MCC. H3N2 was the strongest cytokine-inducer and HCoV-OC43 the weakest. Persistent infection was observed in all cases. RNA-sequencing highlighted perturbation of tissue metabolism and induction of a transient but important immune response at 4-days post-infection. No majority mutations emerged in the viral population. Our results highlight the differential in vitro pathogenesis of respiratory viruses during the acute infection-phase and their ability to persist under immune tolerance. These data help to appreciate the range of disease severity observed in vivo and the occurrence of chronic respiratory infections in immunocompromised hosts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Global Mapping of O-Glycosylation of Varicella Zoster Virus, Human Cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nordén, Rickard; Joshi, Hiren J;

    2016-01-01

    of the herpesvirus family: varicella zoster virus, human cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus. We identified a large number of O-glycosites distributed on most envelope proteins in all viruses and further demonstrated conserved patterns of O-glycans on distinct homologous proteins. Because glycosylation is highly...

  12. Current Approaches for Diagnosis of Influenza Virus Infections in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Vikram Vemula

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advancement in vaccine and virus research, influenza continues to be a major public health concern. Each year in the United States of America, influenza viruses are responsible for seasonal epidemics resulting in over 200,000 hospitalizations and 30,000–50,000 deaths. Accurate and early diagnosis of influenza viral infections are critical for rapid initiation of antiviral therapy to reduce influenza related morbidity and mortality both during seasonal epidemics and pandemics. Several different approaches are currently available for diagnosis of influenza infections in humans. These include viral isolation in cell culture, immunofluorescence assays, nucleic acid amplification tests, immunochromatography-based rapid diagnostic tests, etc. Newer diagnostic approaches are being developed to overcome the limitations associated with some of the conventional detection methods. This review discusses diagnostic approaches currently available for detection of influenza viruses in humans.

  13. Epigenetic changes in virus-associated human cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin Pai LI; Yu Wei LEU; Yu Sun CHANG

    2005-01-01

    Epigenetics of human cancer becomes an area of emerging research direction due to a growing understanding of specific epigenetic pathways and rapid development of detection technologies. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation is a prevalent phenonmena in human cancers. Tumor suppressor genes are often hypermethylated due to the increased activity or deregulation of DNMTs. Increasing evidence also reveals that viral genes are one of the key players in regulating DNA methylation. In this review, we will focus on hypermethylation and tumor suppressor gene silencing and the signal pathways that are involved, particularly in cancers closely associated with the hepatitis B virus, simian virus 40 (SV40), and Epstein-Barr virus. In addition, we will discuss current technologies for genome-wide detection of epigenetically regulated targets, which allow for systematic DNA hypermethylation analysis. The study of epigenetic changes should provide a global view of gene profile in cancer, and epigenetic markers could be used for early detection,prognosis, and therapy of cancer.

  14. No evidence of murine leukemia virus-related viruses in live attenuated human vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents. RESULTS: All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV (SA-14-14-2, varicella (Varivax, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II, measles (Attenuvax, rubella (Meruvax-II, rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix, and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans.

  15. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wendy K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Findings Standard (liquid and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk samples from normal lactating Australian women who had no history of breast cancer. High risk human papillomavirus was identified in milk samples of 6 of 40 (15% from normal lactating women - sequencing on four samples showed three were HPV 16 and one was HPV 18. Epstein Barr virus was identified in fourteen samples (33%. Conclusion The presence of high risk HPV and EBV in human milk suggests the possibility of milk transmission of these viruses. However, given the rarity of viral associated malignancies in young people, it is possible but unlikely, that such transmission is associated with breast or other cancers.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and mouse mammary tumour virus as multiple viruses in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy K Glenn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV, high risk human papillomavirus (HPV, and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV co-exist in some breast cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc. RESULTS: EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk - EBV (35%, HPV, 20% and MMTV (32% of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that (i EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer.

  17. Cardiovascular pathology in patients with human immune deficiency virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela-Rodríguez, Germán; Fellow of the American College of Physicians

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection increases both morbidity and mortality by inducing severe immunosupression that generates opportunistic infections. Following use of high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in infected patients, infection-related mortality has decreased and both survival and cardiovascular disease have increased. The etiology of cardiovascular disease could be related to either infection itself, proatherogenic conditions associated with antiretroviral therapy or...

  18. Human parainfluenza virus type 3 in wild nonhuman primates, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michihito; Ishii, Akihiro; Orba, Yasuko; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Moonga, Ladslav; Mweene, Aaron S; Ogawa, Hirohito; Nakamura, Ichiro; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) genome was detected in 4 baboons in Zambia. Antibody for HPIV3 was detected in 13 baboons and 6 vervet monkeys in 2 distinct areas in Zambia. Our findings suggest that wild nonhuman primates are susceptible to HPIV3 infection.

  19. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Humans and Swine, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Annalisa; Gonzales, José Luis; Bonelli, Sara Irene; Valda, Ybar; Pieri, Angela; Segundo, Higinio; Ibañez, Ramón; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Tolari, Francesco; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We determined the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in persons in 2 rural communities in southeastern Bolivia and the presence of HEV in human and swine fecal samples. HEV seroprevalence was 6.3%, and HEV genotype 3 strains with high sequence homology were detected. PMID:21801630

  20. Human skin Langerhans cells are targets of dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, SJL; Grouard-Vogel, G; Mascola, [No Value; Brachtel, E; Putvatana, R; Louder, MK; Filgueira, L; Marovich, MA; Wong, HK; Blauvelt, A; Murphy, GS; Robb, ML; Innes, BL; Birx, DL; Hayes, CG; Frankel, SS

    2000-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV), an arthropod-borne flavivirus, causes a febrile illness for which there is no antiviral treatment and no vaccine(1,2). Macrophages are important in dengue pathogenesis; however, the initial target cell for DV infection remains unknown. As DV is introduced into human skin by mosqui

  1. BST-2 mediated restriction of simian-human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Autumn; Lau, David; Mitchell, Richard S; Hill, M Sarah; Schmitt, Kimberly; Guatelli, John C; Stephens, Edward B

    2010-10-25

    Pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) contain HIV-1 Vpu and SIV Nef, both shown to counteract BST-2 (HM1.24; CD317; tetherin) inhibition of virus release in a species-specific manner. We show that human and pig-tailed BST-2 (ptBST-2) restrict SHIV. We found that sequential "humanization" of the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the pig-tailed BST-2 (ptBST-2) protein resulted in a fluctuation in sensitivity to HIV-1 Vpu. Our results also show that the length of the TMD in human and ptBST-2 proteins is important for BST-2 restriction and susceptibility to Vpu. Taken together, our results emphasize the importance of tertiary structure in BST-2 antagonism and suggests that the HIV-1 Vpu transmembrane domain may have additional functions in vivo unrelated to BST-2 antagonism.

  2. TUBERCULOSIS IN HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS-EXPOSED OR VIRUS-INFECTED UNITED-STATES CHILDREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GUTMAN, LT; MOYE, J; ZIMMER, B; TIAN, C

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to provide a preliminary assessment of the occurrence of tuberculosis exposure, infection and disease within a national sample of infants and children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exposure or infection, and to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  3. TUBERCULOSIS IN HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS-EXPOSED OR VIRUS-INFECTED UNITED-STATES CHILDREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GUTMAN, LT; MOYE, J; ZIMMER, B; TIAN, C

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to provide a preliminary assessment of the occurrence of tuberculosis exposure, infection and disease within a national sample of infants and children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exposure or infection, and to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  4. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bility, Moses T; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system's contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mouse model engrafted with both human immune and human liver cells is needed to study infection and immunopathogenesis of HBV/HCV infection in vivo. We have recently developed the humanized mouse model with both human immune and human liver cells (AFC8-hu HSC/Hep) to study immunopathogenesis and therapy of HCV infection in vivo. In this review, we summarize the current models of HBV/HCV infection and their limitations in immunopathogenesis. We will then present our recent findings of HCV infection and immunopathogenesis in the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse, which supports HCV infection, human T-cell response and associated liver pathogenesis. Inoculation of humanized mice with primary HCV isolates resulted in long-term HCV infection. HCV infection induced elevated infiltration of human immune cells in the livers of HCV-infected humanized mice. HCV infection also induced HCV-specific T-cell immune response in lymphoid tissues of humanized mice. Additionally, HCV infection induced liver fibrosis in humanized mice. Anti-human alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) staining showed elevated human hepatic stellate cell activation in HCV-infected humanized mice. We discuss the limitation and future improvements of the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse model and its application in evaluating novel therapeutics, as well as studying both HCV and HBV infection, human immune responses, and associated human liver fibrosis and cancer.

  5. Human Herpes Virus-6 and Human Herpes Virus -7 in Pityriasis Rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kıymet Baz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The etiology of pityriasis rosea (PR remains unknown despite numerous investigations. In recent years, human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6 and HHV-7 were accused as causative agents in PR. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible role of HHV-6 and HHV-7 in the pathogenesis of PR. Methods: Twenty three PR patients and 23 healthy blood donors as a control group were included in the study. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR with specific primers for HHV-6 and HHV-7 DNA sequences was performed on the serum samples of 23 active PR patients and controls, and also the lesional skin biopsies from 11 PR patients. Additionally, serum levels of IgM antibodies againts HHV-7 were detected by using indirect immunofluorescence test on the serum samples of all of the study population. Results: No statistically significant differences were detected between PR patients and controls regarding all serum results. Conclusion: These findings do not support a primary etiological role for HHV-6 and HHV-7 in PR as in some previous studies.

  6. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  7. Unique human immune signature of Ebola virus disease in Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruibal, Paula; Oestereich, Lisa; Lüdtke, Anja; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Wozniak, David M; Kerber, Romy; Korva, Miša; Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Mar; Bore, Joseph A; Koundouno, Fara Raymond; Duraffour, Sophie; Weller, Romy; Thorenz, Anja; Cimini, Eleonora; Viola, Domenico; Agrati, Chiara; Repits, Johanna; Afrough, Babak; Cowley, Lauren A; Ngabo, Didier; Hinzmann, Julia; Mertens, Marc; Vitoriano, Inês; Logue, Christopher H; Boettcher, Jan Peter; Pallasch, Elisa; Sachse, Andreas; Bah, Amadou; Nitzsche, Katja; Kuisma, Eeva; Michel, Janine; Holm, Tobias; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; García-Dorival, Isabel; Wölfel, Roman; Stoecker, Kilian; Fleischmann, Erna; Strecker, Thomas; Di Caro, Antonino; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Kurth, Andreas; Meschi, Silvia; Mély, Stephane; Newman, Edmund; Bocquin, Anne; Kis, Zoltan; Kelterbaum, Anne; Molkenthin, Peter; Carletti, Fabrizio; Portmann, Jasmine; Wolff, Svenja; Castilletti, Concetta; Schudt, Gordian; Fizet, Alexandra; Ottowell, Lisa J; Herker, Eva; Jacobs, Thomas; Kretschmer, Birte; Severi, Ettore; Ouedraogo, Nobila; Lago, Mar; Negredo, Anabel; Franco, Leticia; Anda, Pedro; Schmiedel, Stefan; Kreuels, Benno; Wichmann, Dominic; Addo, Marylyn M; Lohse, Ansgar W; De Clerck, Hilde; Nanclares, Carolina; Jonckheere, Sylvie; Van Herp, Michel; Sprecher, Armand; Xiaojiang, Gao; Carrington, Mary; Miranda, Osvaldo; Castro, Carlos M; Gabriel, Martin; Drury, Patrick; Formenty, Pierre; Diallo, Boubacar; Koivogui, Lamine; Magassouba, N'Faly; Carroll, Miles W; Günther, Stephan; Muñoz-Fontela, César

    2016-05-01

    Despite the magnitude of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, there is still a fundamental lack of knowledge about the pathophysiology of EVD. In particular, very little is known about human immune responses to Ebola virus. Here we evaluate the physiology of the human T cell immune response in EVD patients at the time of admission to the Ebola Treatment Center in Guinea, and longitudinally until discharge or death. Through the use of multiparametric flow cytometry established by the European Mobile Laboratory in the field, we identify an immune signature that is unique in EVD fatalities. Fatal EVD was characterized by a high percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells expressing the inhibitory molecules CTLA-4 and PD-1, which correlated with elevated inflammatory markers and high virus load. Conversely, surviving individuals showed significantly lower expression of CTLA-4 and PD-1 as well as lower inflammation, despite comparable overall T cell activation. Concomitant with virus clearance, survivors mounted a robust Ebola-virus-specific T cell response. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of the T cell response is a key component of EVD pathophysiology.

  8. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  9. Virus-neutralizing antibody response of mice to consecutive infection with human and avian influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulíková, J; Stropkovská, A; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Varečková, E

    2015-06-01

    In this work we simulated in a mouse model a naturally occurring situation of humans, who overcame an infection with epidemic strains of influenza A, and were subsequently exposed to avian influenza A viruses (IAV). The antibody response to avian IAV in mice previously infected with human IAV was analyzed. We used two avian IAV (A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) and the attenuated virus rA/Viet Nam/1203-2004 (H5N1)) as well as two human IAV isolates (virus A/Mississippi/1/1985 (H3N2) of medium virulence and A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) of high virulence). Two repeated doses of IAV of H4 or of H5 virus elicited virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice. Exposure of animals previously infected with human IAV (of H3 or H1 subtype) to IAV of H4 subtype led to the production of antibodies neutralizing H4 virus in a level comparable with the level of antibodies against the human IAV used for primary infection. In contrast, no measurable levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies specific to H5 virus were detected in mice infected with H5 virus following a previous infection with human IAV. In both cases the secondary infection with avian IAV led to a significant increase of the titer of VN antibodies specific to the corresponding human virus used for primary infection. Moreover, cross-reactive HA2-specific antibodies were also induced by sequential infection. By virtue of these results we suggest that the differences in the ability of avian IAV to induce specific antibodies inhibiting virus replication after previous infection of mice with human viruses can have an impact on the interspecies transmission and spread of avian IAV in the human population.

  10. Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV-Human Neuron Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Gilden

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV is a highly neurotropic, exclusively human herpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox, wherein VZV replicates in multiple organs, particularly the skin. Widespread infection in vivo is confirmed by the ability of VZV to kill tissue culture cells in vitro derived from any organ. After varicella, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. During latency, virus DNA replication stops, transcription is restricted, and no progeny virions are produced, indicating a unique virus-cell (neuron relationship. VZV reactivation produces zoster (shingles, often complicated by serious neurological and ocular disorders. The molecular trigger(s for reactivation, and thus the identity of a potential target to prevent it, remains unknown due to an incomplete understanding of the VZV-neuron interaction. While no in vitro system has yet recapitulated the findings in latently infected ganglia, recent studies show that VZV infection of human neurons in SCID mice and of human stem cells, including induced human pluripotent stem cells and normal human neural progenitor tissue-like assemblies, can be established in the absence of a cytopathic effect. Usefulness of these systems in discovering the mechanisms underlying reactivation awaits analyses of VZV-infected, highly pure (>90%, terminally differentiated human neurons capable of prolonged survival in vitro.

  11. Do human polyoma viruses and human immunodeficiency virus share common co-receptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borissov, Kalin; Tsekov, Iliya; Gavazova, Rayna; Kalvatchev, Zlatko; Argirova, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Host and/or viral factors involved in human polyomavirus (HPoV) infection in persons living with HIV remain unknown. A hypothesis is outlined suggesting the importance of the co-receptors CCR5, CCR2, and CXCR4 not only for HIV, but also for HPoV. Functionally capable receptors coded by wild-type (wt) genotypes could facilitate internalization of HPoV in the cell resulting in brain and/or kidney infection/s in HIV infected individuals. Forty-nine Bulgarians with HIV, all treated by HAART, without neurological and/or kidney disorders, were tested for JCV and BKV and genotyped for CCR5 (CCR5del32), CCR2 (CCR2-64I), and CXCR4 (SDF1-3'A). In 27/49 (55.1%) individuals a co-infection with HPoV was identified-BKV in 12/49 (24.5%), JCV-in another 12/49 (24.5%), and both viruses-in 3/49 (6.1%). A high frequency of wt CCR5 was found in patients with HPoV (91.7% for BKV and JCV and in 100% with both viruses). V/V of CCR2 was presented in 75% for BKV and JCV and in 66.7% for BKV plus JCV. SDF1-3'G/G predominated in JCV infected patients (75%), while G/A and A/A genotypes were more frequent in patients with BKV (41.7%). Also, 21/22 (95.4%) persons without HPoV infection were heterozygous for SDF1 and CCR2. The number of individuals bearing wt of all co-receptors in the group of persons not infected with HPoV was lower (P = 0.03) than that with polymorphism/s in one or two genes (SDF1 and CCR2) in the same group. The results suggest a probable role of co-receptors used by HIV to facilitate infection with HPoV.

  12. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Lauren L

    2013-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated oral disease among people living with HIV infection includes oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, oral warts, herpes simplex virus ulcers, major aphthous ulcers or ulcers not otherwise specified, HIV salivary gland disease, and atypical gingival and periodontal diseases. Diagnosis of some oral lesions is based on clinical appearance and behavior, whereas others require biopsy, culture, or imaging for definitive diagnosis. Management strategies including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches are discussed in this article. Dentists also need to be cognizant of the potential oral side effects of HIV antiretroviral medications.

  13. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... memoranda entitled ``Revised Recommendations for the Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus...

  14. Discovery of insect and human dengue virus host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, October M; Barrows, Nicholas J; Souza-Neto, Jayme A; Robinson, Timothy J; Hershey, Christine L; Rodgers, Mary A; Ramirez, Jose L; Dimopoulos, George; Yang, Priscilla L; Pearson, James L; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2009-04-23

    Dengue fever is the most frequent arthropod-borne viral disease of humans, with almost half of the world's population at risk of infection. The high prevalence, lack of an effective vaccine, and absence of specific treatment conspire to make dengue fever a global public health threat. Given their compact genomes, dengue viruses (DENV-1-4) and other flaviviruses probably require an extensive number of host factors; however, only a limited number of human, and an even smaller number of insect host factors, have been identified. Here we identify insect host factors required for DENV-2 propagation, by carrying out a genome-wide RNA interference screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells using a well-established 22,632 double-stranded RNA library. This screen identified 116 candidate dengue virus host factors (DVHFs). Although some were previously associated with flaviviruses (for example, V-ATPases and alpha-glucosidases), most of the DVHFs were newly implicated in dengue virus propagation. The dipteran DVHFs had 82 readily recognizable human homologues and, using a targeted short-interfering-RNA screen, we showed that 42 of these are human DVHFs. This indicates notable conservation of required factors between dipteran and human hosts. This work suggests new approaches to control infection in the insect vector and the mammalian host.

  15. Cross talk between animal and human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Although outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild and domestic birds have been posing the threat of a new influenza pandemic for the past decade, the first pandemic of the twenty-first century came from swine viruses. This fact emphasizes the complexity of influenza viral ecology and the difficulty of predicting influenza viral dynamics. Complete control of influenza viruses seems impossible. However, we must minimize the impact of animal and human influenza outbreaks by learning lessons from past experiences and recognizing the current status. Here, we review the most recent influenza virology data in the veterinary field, including aspects of zoonotic agents and recent studies that assess the pandemic potential of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

  16. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition.

  17. Cross-recognition of avian H5N1 influenza virus by human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte populations directed to human influenza A virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.C.M. Kreijtz (Joost); G. de Mutsert (Gerrie); C.A. van Baalen (Carel); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSince the number of human cases of infection with avian H5N1 influenza viruses is ever increasing, a pandemic outbreak caused by these viruses is feared. Therefore, in addition to virus-specific antibodies, there is considerable interest in immune correlates of protection against these v

  18. Shedding new light on viruses: super-resolution microscopy for studying human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Barbara; Heilemann, Mike

    2013-10-01

    For more than 70 years electron microscopy (EM) techniques have played an important role in investigating structures of enveloped viruses. By contrast, use of fluorescence microscopy (FM) methods for this purpose was limited by the fact that the size of virus particles is generally around or below the diffraction limit of light microscopy. Various super-resolution (SR) fluorescence imaging techniques developed over the past two decades bypass the diffraction limit of light microscopy, allowing visualization of subviral details and bridging the gap between conventional FM and EM methods. We summarize here findings on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) obtained using SR-FM techniques. Although the number of published studies is currently limited and some of the pioneering analyses also covered methodological or descriptive aspects, recent publications clearly indicate the potential to approach open questions in HIV-1 replication from a new angle.

  19. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4 sup + T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M. (National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (USA)); June, C.H. (Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4{sup +} T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date.

  20. Virus-Enabled Biosensor for Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Alana F; Edgar, Joshua M; Majumdar, Sudipta; Briggs, Jeffrey S; Patterson, Shae V; Tan, Ming X; Kudlacek, Stephan T; Schneider, Christine A; Weiss, Gregory A; Penner, Reginald M

    2017-01-17

    The label-free detection of human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous buffer is demonstrated using a simple, monolithic, two-electrode electrochemical biosensor. In this device, both millimeter-scale electrodes are coated with a thin layer of a composite containing M13 virus particles and the electronically conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene) or PEDOT. These virus particles, engineered to selectively bind HSA, serve as receptors in this biosensor. The resistance component of the electrical impedance, Zre, measured between these two electrodes provides electrical transduction of HSA binding to the virus-PEDOT film. The analysis of sample volumes as small as 50 μL is made possible using a microfluidic cell. Upon exposure to HSA, virus-PEDOT films show a prompt increase in Zre within 5 s and a stable Zre signal within 15 min. HSA concentrations in the range from 100 nM to 5 μM are detectable. Sensor-to-sensor reproducibility of the HSA measurement is characterized by a coefficient-of-variance (COV) ranging from 2% to 8% across this entire concentration range. In addition, virus-PEDOT sensors successfully detected HSA in synthetic urine solutions.

  1. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U.; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  2. Hepatitis B and C virus co-infections in human immunodeficiency virus positive North Indian patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Swati Gupta; Sarman Singh

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To determine the prevalence of hepatitis B and C virus infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients at a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi,India.METHODS:Serum samples from 451 HIV positive patients were analyzed for HBsAg and HCV antibodies during three years (Jan 2003-Dec 2005). The control group comprised of apparently healthy bone-marrow and renal donors.RESULTS:The study population comprised essentially of heterosexually transmitted HIV infection. The prevalence rate of HBsAg in this population was 5.3% as compared to 1.4% in apparently healthy donors (P < 0.001).Though prevalence of HCV co-infection (2.43%) was lower than HBV in this group of HIV positive patients,the prevalence was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than controls (0.7%). Triple infection of HIV, HBV and HCV was not detected in any patient.CONCLUSION:Our study shows a significantly high prevalence of hepatitis virus infections in HIV infected patients. Hepatitis viruses in HIV may lead to faster progression to liver cirrhosis and a higher risk of antiretroviral therapy induced hepatotoxicity. Therefore,it would be advisable to detect hepatitis virus coinfections in these patients at the earliest.

  3. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2016-12-15

    A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans. Avian influenza viruses, including H5N1 and H7N9, have been associated with severe respiratory disease and fatal outcomes in humans. Although acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and progressive pulmonary endothelial damage

  4. Lentivirus vectors using human and simian immunodeficiency virus elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S M; Renda, M; Nam, N Y; Klimatcheva, E; Zhu, Y; Fisk, J; Halterman, M; Rimel, B J; Federoff, H; Pandya, S; Rosenblatt, J D; Planelles, V

    1999-04-01

    Lentivirus vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) constitute a recent development in the field of gene therapy. A key property of HIV-1-derived vectors is their ability to infect nondividing cells. Although high-titer HIV-1-derived vectors have been produced, concerns regarding safety still exist. Safety concerns arise mainly from the possibility of recombination between transfer and packaging vectors, which may give rise to replication-competent viruses with pathogenic potential. We describe a novel lentivirus vector which is based on HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and which we refer to as HIV/SIVpack/G. In this system, an HIV-1-derived genome is encapsidated by SIVmac core particles. These core particles are pseudotyped with VSV glycoprotein G. Because the nucleotide homology between HIV-1 and SIVmac is low, the likelihood of recombination between vector elements should be reduced. In addition, the packaging construct (SIVpack) for this lentivirus system was derived from SIVmac1A11, a nonvirulent SIV strain. Thus, the potential for pathogenicity with this vector system is minimal. The transduction ability of HIV/SIVpack/G was demonstrated with immortalized human lymphocytes, human primary macrophages, human bone marrow-derived CD34(+) cells, and primary mouse neurons. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first demonstration that the HIV-1-derived genome can be packaged by an SIVmac capsid. We demonstrate that the lentivirus vector described here recapitulates the biological properties of HIV-1-derived vectors, although with increased potential for safety in humans.

  5. Search strategy has influenced the discovery rate of human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Ronald; Johansson, Michael A; Powers, Ann M; Miller, Barry R

    2013-08-20

    A widely held concern is that the pace of infectious disease emergence has been increasing. We have analyzed the rate of discovery of pathogenic viruses, the preeminent source of newly discovered causes of human disease, from 1897 through 2010. The rate was highest during 1950-1969, after which it moderated. This general picture masks two distinct trends: for arthropod-borne viruses, which comprised 39% of pathogenic viruses, the discovery rate peaked at three per year during 1960-1969, but subsequently fell nearly to zero by 1980; however, the rate of discovery of nonarboviruses remained stable at about two per year from 1950 through 2010. The period of highest arbovirus discovery coincided with a comprehensive program supported by The Rockefeller Foundation of isolating viruses from humans, animals, and arthropod vectors at field stations in Latin America, Africa, and India. The productivity of this strategy illustrates the importance of location, approach, long-term commitment, and sponsorship in the discovery of emerging pathogens.

  6. Saffold virus, a novel human Cardiovirus with unknown pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeda, Toshiki; Ohara, Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    Although cardioviruses have been thought to mainly infect rodents, a novel human cardiovirus, designated Saffold virus (SAFV), was identified in 2007. SAFV is grouped with Theiler-like rat virus and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in the species Theilovirus of the genus Cardiovirus of the family Picornaviridae. Eight genotypes of SAFV have now been identified. SAFV has been isolated from nasal and stool specimens from infants presenting with respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms as well as from children with nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis; however, the relationship of SAFV to this symptomatology remains unclear. Of note, the virus has also been isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid specimens of patients with aseptic meningitis. This finding is of interest since TMEV is known to cause a multiple sclerosis-like syndrome in mice. The involvement of SAFV in various diseases (e.g., respiratory illness, gastrointestinal illness, neurological diseases, and type I diabetes) is presently under investigation. In order to clarify the pathogenicity of SAFV, additional epidemiological studies are required. Furthermore, identification of the SAFV cellular receptor will help establish an animal model for SAFV infection and help clarify the pathogenesis of SAFV-related diseases. In addition, investigation of the tissue-specific expression of the receptor may facilitate development of a novel picornavirus vector, which could be a useful tool in gene therapy for humans. The study of viral factors involved in viral pathogenicity using a reverse genetics technique will also be important.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type-2-A milder, kinder virus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannangai, R; David, S; Sridharan, G

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-2 (HIV-2) belongs to the family retroviridae which is phylogenetically clusters with SIV SM from sooty mangabeys. This virus is morphologically similar to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) but has got only a 40% homology at the nucleotide level. There is a distinct geographical distribution of HIV-2 unlike HIV-1. There are currently eight subtypes/groups identified with subtype/group A responsible for the majority of infections. HIV-2 shows a considerable difference in the course of the disease. Clinical, haematological and immunological evaluation of individuals infected with HIV-2 has shown the virus to be less pathogenic than HIV-1 although the exact mechanism underlying this difference is not well defined. Similar to HIV-1, the HIV-2 isolates also showed distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics. The transmission rate for HIV-2 compared to HIV-1 is very low both by heterosexual route and mother to child transmission. The clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency associated with HIV-2 are similar to the ones seen among the HIV-1-infected individuals and they can also progress to AIDS. It is naturally resistant to NNRTI and hence the diagnosis become important as it affects the treatment strategy. Similar to HIV-1, HIV-2 strains of infected individuals also show mutations that can cause drug resistance. The current evidence suggests that there is no protective effective for HIV-2 against HIV-1.

  8. Anti-hepatitis C virus treatment may prevent the progression of liver fibrosis in non-responder human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Sagnelli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate changes in liver histology in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection non-responders to a suboptimal Interferon+Ribavirine regimen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated 49 patients with two sequential liver biopsies: 18 were non-responders to Interferon+Ribavirine treatment (Group hepatitis C virus Rx administered after the 1st liver biopsy who underwent a 2nd liver biopsy after a median period of 3.92 year and 31 were patients who remained untreated for hepatitis C virus disease (Group hepatitis C virus untreated after the 1st liver biopsy because of refusal and underwent a 2nd liver biopsy after a median period of 5.05-years. Most patients in both groups were under highly active antiretroviral therapy. At the time of 1st liver biopsy similar degrees of necro-inflammation, fibrosis and steatosis were observed in both groups. Changes in liver lesions between 1st and 2nd liver biopsys were adjusted for different intervals between liver biopsys by a mathematic formula. RESULTS: Liver fibrosis did not change in 88.9% of patients in Group hepatitis C virus Rx and in 77.4% in Group hepatitis C virus untreated. A marked deterioration in liver fibrosis was observed in 5 (16% patients in Group hepatitis C virus untreated and in none in Group hepatitis C virus treated. Necro-inflammation and steatosis remained substantially unchanged in both groups. CONCLUSION: Liver histology remained substantially unchanged in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus patients non-responder to anti-hepatitis C virus therapy over 4 years observation, suggesting an effective anti-hepatitis C virus early treatment for all hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus coinfected patients who can reasonably tolerate therapy.

  9. Infection of brain-derived cells with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Fuerstenberg, S; Gidlund, M; Asjö, B; Fenyö, E M

    1987-01-01

    A malignant glioma cell line was infected with the human T-lymphotropic virus type IIIB isolate of the human immunodeficiency virus. Infection appeared to be latent rather than productive. Through contact with monocytic or lymphoid cells, the virus present in the glioma cells could be transmitted and gave rise to a fully productive infection. Images PMID:3644020

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Research (AIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-15

    Polonis V, Corts K, Hoc"en-Lewis C, Eddy G. Production of functionally defective HIV-l reverse transcriptase can be initiated by a human peripheral blood... Interamericana , Mexico-Buenos Aires - Madrid. 1989. Ruiz Manuscript 1989 Ruiz NM, Ramirez-Rhonda CH. Tratamiento quirurjico de endocarditis. Chapter in...M.D.; Editorial Interamericana , Mexico-Buenos Aires - Madrid, 1989. Ruiz Manuscript 1989 Rivera G, Ruiz NM. Principios generales en el tratemiento

  11. Zika virus disrupts molecular fingerprinting of human neurospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Patricia P.; Nascimento, Juliana Minardi; de Vasconcelos, Janaina Mota; Madeiro da Costa, Rodrigo; Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Trindade, Pablo; Loiola, Erick Correia; Higa, Luiza M.; Cassoli, Juliana S.; Vitória, Gabriela; Sequeira, Patricia C.; Sochacki, Jaroslaw; Aguiar, Renato S.; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; de Filippis, Ana M. Bispo; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez Júnior, João Lídio; Tanuri, Amilcar; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with microcephaly and other brain abnormalities; however, the molecular consequences of ZIKV to human brain development are still not fully understood. Here we describe alterations in human neurospheres derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells infected with the strain of Zika virus that is circulating in Brazil. Combining proteomics and mRNA transcriptional profiling, over 500 proteins and genes associated with the Brazilian ZIKV infection were found to be differentially expressed. These genes and proteins provide an interactome map, which indicates that ZIKV controls the expression of RNA processing bodies, miRNA biogenesis and splicing factors required for self-replication. It also suggests that impairments in the molecular pathways underpinning cell cycle and neuronal differentiation are caused by ZIKV. These results point to biological mechanisms implicated in brain malformations, which are important to further the understanding of ZIKV infection and can be exploited as therapeutic potential targets to mitigate it. PMID:28112162

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated deep vein thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Kumar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis (DVT has been reported to occur 2-10 times more common in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals than in the general population. We are reporting a case of DVT of right lower limb who was on highly active antiretroviral therapy. The patient did not have any acquired risk factors of DVT. The patient responded well to anticoagulation therapy.

  13. Pediatric Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening in an African District Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    De Baets, A. J.; Edidi, B. S.; Kasali, M. J.; Beelaert, G.; Schrooten, W.; Litzroth, A; Kolsteren, P; Denolf, D.; Fransen, K

    2005-01-01

    In order to evaluate alternative tests and strategies to simplify pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening at the district hospital level, a cross-sectional exploratory study was organized in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Venous and capillary phlebotomies were performed on 941 Congolese children, aged 1 month to 12 years (153 children under 18 months and 788 children more than 18 months old). The HIV prevalence rate was 4.7%. An algorithm for children more than 18 months...

  14. Nonvertical, nonsexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Paula; Pedro, Alinia; Le Bozec, Soazig; Macassa, Eugenia; Salvador, Sergio; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Blanche, Stéphane; Andersson, Sören

    2010-03-01

    In a cohort of 450 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children followed up in Maputo, Mozambique, 22 were born to HIV-uninfected mothers and had no history of sexual abuse. A case record review of these nonvertically, nonsexually infected children as well as a case-control study strongly suggests health care as possible source of infection for many of these children. This facet of the pediatric HIV epidemic should not be overlooked.

  15. A human lung xenograft mouse model of Nipah virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Valbuena

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a member of the genus Henipavirus (family Paramyxoviridae that causes severe and often lethal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans with high mortality rates (up to 92%. NiV can cause Acute Lung Injury (ALI in humans, and human-to-human transmission has been observed in recent outbreaks of NiV. While the exact route of transmission to humans is not known, we have previously shown that NiV can efficiently infect human respiratory epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms of NiV-associated ALI in the human respiratory tract are unknown. Thus, there is an urgent need for models of henipavirus infection of the human respiratory tract to study the pathogenesis and understand the host responses. Here, we describe a novel human lung xenograft model in mice to study the pathogenesis of NiV. Following transplantation, human fetal lung xenografts rapidly graft and develop mature structures of adult lungs including cartilage, vascular vessels, ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium, and primitive "air" spaces filled with mucus and lined by cuboidal to flat epithelium. Following infection, NiV grows to high titers (10(7 TCID50/gram lung tissue as early as 3 days post infection (pi. NiV targets both the endothelium as well as respiratory epithelium in the human lung tissues, and results in syncytia formation. NiV infection in the human lung results in the production of several cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IP-10, eotaxin, G-CSF and GM-CSF on days 5 and 7 pi. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that NiV can replicate to high titers in a novel in vivo model of the human respiratory tract, resulting in a robust inflammatory response, which is known to be associated with ALI. This model will facilitate progress in the fundamental understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis and virus-host interactions; it will also provide biologically relevant models for other respiratory viruses.

  16. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Lima Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, hepatitis B virus (HBV or hepatitis C virus (HCV are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical manifestations and outcomes of leprosy. HTLV-1, HBV and HCV are associated with leprosy in some regions and institutionalization is an important risk factor for these viral coinfections. Some studies show a higher prevalence of viral coinfection in lepromatous cases. Although HBV and HCV coinfection were associated with reversal reaction in one study, there is a lack of information about the consequences of viral coinfections in leprosy. It is not known whether clinical outcomes associated with leprosy, such as development of reactions or relapses could be attributed to a specific viral coinfection. Furthermore, whether the leprosy subtype may influence the progression of the viral coinfection is unknown. All of these important and intriguing questions await prospective studies to definitively establish the actual relationship between these entities.

  17. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Broadly Neutralizing against Influenza B Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasugi, Mayo; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kawashita, Norihito; Du, Anariwa; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Misaki, Ryo; Kuhara, Motoki; Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Nakaya, Takaaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has the ability to evade host immune surveillance through rapid viral genetic drift and reassortment; therefore, it remains a continuous public health threat. The development of vaccines producing broadly reactive antibodies, as well as therapeutic strategies using human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) with global reactivity, has been gathering great interest recently. Here, three hybridoma clones producing HuMAbs against influenza B virus, designated 5A7, 3A2 and 10C4, were prepared using peripheral lymphocytes from vaccinated volunteers, and were investigated for broad cross-reactive neutralizing activity. Of these HuMAbs, 3A2 and 10C4, which recognize the readily mutable 190-helix region near the receptor binding site in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, react only with the Yamagata lineage of influenza B virus. By contrast, HuMAb 5A7 broadly neutralizes influenza B strains that were isolated from 1985 to 2006, belonging to both Yamagata and Victoria lineages. Epitope mapping revealed that 5A7 recognizes 316G, 318C and 321W near the C terminal of HA1, a highly conserved region in influenza B virus. Indeed, no mutations in the amino acid residues of the epitope region were induced, even after the virus was passaged ten times in the presence of HuMAb 5A7. Moreover, 5A7 showed significant therapeutic efficacy in mice, even when it was administered 72 hours post-infection. These results indicate that 5A7 is a promising candidate for developing therapeutics, and provide insight for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza B virus. PMID:23408886

  18. The life-cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T; Nakai, M; Ikuta, K

    1998-01-01

    The life-cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been studied using several techniques including immunoelectron microscopy and cryomicroscopy. The HIV-1 particle consists of an envelope, a core and the region between the core and the envelope (matrix). Virus particles in the extracellular space are observed as having various profiles: a central or an eccentric round electron-dense core, a bar-shaped electron-dense core, and immature doughnut-shaped particle. HIV-1 particles in the hydrated state were observed by high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy to be spherical and the lipid membrane was clearly resolved as a bilayer. Projections around the circumference were seen to be knob-like. The shapes and sizes of the projections, especially the head parts, were found to vary with each projection. HIV-1 cores were isolated with a mixture of Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde, and were confirmed to consist of HIV-1 Gag p24 protein by immunogold labelling. On infection, the HIV-1 virus was found to enter the cell in two ways: membrane fusion and endocytosis. After viral entry, no structures resembling virus particles could be seen in the cytoplasm. In the infected cells, positive reactions by immunolabelling suggest that HIV-1 Gag is produced in membrane-bound structures and transported to the cell surface by the cytoskeletons. A crescent electron-dense layer is then formed underneath the cell membrane. Finally, the virus particle is released from the cell surface and found extracellularly to be a complete virus particle with an electron-dense core. However, several cell clones producing defective mature, doughnut-shaped (immature) or teardrop-shaped particles were found to be produced in the extracellular space. In the doughnut-shaped particles, Gag p17 and p24 proteins exist facing each other against an inner electron-dense ring, suggesting that the inner ring consists of a precursor Gag protein showing a defect at the viral proteinase.

  19. Tacaribe virus but not junin virus infection induces cytokine release from primary human monocytes and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Groseth

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the development of disease during arenavirus infection are poorly understood. However, common to all hemorrhagic fever diseases is the involvement of macrophages as primary target cells, suggesting that the immune response in these cells may be of paramount importance during infection. Thus, in order to identify features of the immune response that contribute to arenavirus pathogenesis, we have examined the growth kinetics and cytokine profiles of two closely related New World arenaviruses, the apathogenic Tacaribe virus (TCRV and the hemorrhagic fever-causing Junin virus (JUNV, in primary human monocytes and macrophages. Both viruses grew robustly in VeroE6 cells; however, TCRV titres were decreased by approximately 10 fold compared to JUNV in both monocytes and macrophages. Infection of both monocytes and macrophages with TCRV also resulted in the release of high levels of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, while levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-12 were not affected. However, we could show that the presence of these cytokines had no direct effect on growth of either TCRV of JUNV in macrophages. Further analysis also showed that while the production of IL-6 and IL-10 are dependent on viral replication, production of TNF-α also occurs after exposure to UV-inactivated TCRV particles and is thus independent of productive virus infection. Surprisingly, JUNV infection did not have an effect on any of the cytokines examined indicating that, in contrast to other viral hemorrhagic fever viruses, macrophage-derived cytokine production is unlikely to play an active role in contributing to the cytokine dysregulation observed in JUNV infected patients. Rather, these results suggest that an early, controlled immune response by infected macrophages may be critical for the successful control of infection of apathogenic viruses and prevention of subsequent disease, including systemic cytokine dysregulation.

  20. Skin Conditions in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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    Yoan Bernárdez Cruz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: patients with human immunodeficiency virus frequently develop skin conditions that affect their quality of life and modify their prognosis. Objective: to describe the most common skin conditions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus. Methods: a case-series study of patients with human immunodeficiency virus was conducted in the province of Cienfuegos. It included all patients diagnosed until February 2008 attending the internal medicine consultation for their follow-up. Forty-seven deceased patients, 12 patients not living in the province and 2 inmates were excluded from the study. Variables analyzed were: age, sex, skin color, self-reported skin conditions and diagnosed skin diseases. Results: Thirty-eight percent of patients were aged 25 to 34 years. Fifty-seven were white-skinned and 75% were male. Approximately half of the patients had AIDS and were under antiretroviral therapy. The skin infection of viral origin most commonly found was herpes simplex (30.0%; of fungal origin, onychomycosis (44 %; and of bacterial origin, folliculitis (43 %. Among papulosquamous disorders, seborrheic dermatitis (74 % predominated and among other skin disorders, lipodystrophy (23.6 %. Xerosis and pruritus shared equal percentage (16.3 %. Conclusions: viral and fungal skin infections predominated. An important number of these skin conditions were diagnosed during the study, particularly in AIDS patients.

  1. A recombinant vaccinia virus expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, H; Schlom, J; Kantor, J

    1991-07-30

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a 180-kDa glycoprotein expressed on most gastrointestinal carcinomas. A 2.4-kb cDNA clone, containing the complete coding sequence, was isolated from a human colon tumor cell library and inserted into a vaccinia virus genome. This newly developed construct was characterized by Southern blotting, DNA hybridization studies, and polymerase chain reaction analysis. The CEA gene was stably integrated into the vaccinia virus thymidine kinase gene. The recombinant was efficiently replicated upon serial passages in cell cultures and in animals. The recombinant virus expresses on the surface of infected cells a protein product recognized by a monoclonal antibody (COL-I) directed against CEA. Immunization of mice with the vaccinia construct elicited a humoral immune response against CEA. Pilot studies also showed that administration of the recombinant CEA vaccinia construct was able to greatly reduce the growth in mice of a syngeneic murine colon adenocarcinoma which had been transduced with the human CEA gene. The use of this new recombinant CEA vaccinia construct may thus provide an approach in the specific active immunotherapy of human GI cancer and other CEA expressing carcinoma types.

  2. Tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzak, E E

    1997-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects one third of the world's population, and tuberculosis remains one of the most common infectious diseases of humans. From a global perspective, tuberculosis may be one of the most common HIV-related opportunistic infections. HIV immunosuppression has had a dramatic influence on the epidemiology, natural history and clinical presentation of tuberculosis. Treatment is highly effective for drug susceptible tuberculosis and has been shown to have a significant impact on resistant, especially multidrug-resistant, tuberculosis if started promptly. Directly observed therapy and rigorous adherence to infection control principles have helped control the tuberculosis epidemic in the United States.

  3. Can Plant Viruses Cross the Kingdom Border and Be Pathogenic to Humans?

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    Fanny Balique

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytoviruses are highly prevalent in plants worldwide, including vegetables and fruits. Humans, and more generally animals, are exposed daily to these viruses, among which several are extremely stable. It is currently accepted that a strict separation exists between plant and vertebrate viruses regarding their host range and pathogenicity, and plant viruses are believed to infect only plants. Accordingly, plant viruses are not considered to present potential pathogenicity to humans and other vertebrates. Notwithstanding these beliefs, there are many examples where phytoviruses circulate and propagate in insect vectors. Several issues are raised here that question if plant viruses might further cross the kingdom barrier to cause diseases in humans. Indeed, there is close relatedness between some plant and animal viruses, and almost identical gene repertoires. Moreover, plant viruses can be detected in non-human mammals and humans samples, and there are evidence of immune responses to plant viruses in invertebrates, non-human vertebrates and humans, and of the entry of plant viruses or their genomes into non-human mammal cells and bodies after experimental exposure. Overall, the question raised here is unresolved, and several data prompt the additional extensive study of the interactions between phytoviruses and non-human mammals and humans, and the potential of these viruses to cause diseases in humans.

  4. Comparison of methods for evaluating the thermal stability of human enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Sabastine E; Gibson, Kristen E

    2015-03-01

    Human enteric viruses have been identified as one of the predominant causative agents of food-borne illnesses in developed countries, and it is estimated that human norovirus accounts for a majority of these illnesses each year. Not all of these viruses can be cultured and hence relatively little is known about their pathogenesis and physicochemical properties. To overcome this, researchers have utilized different virus surrogates for the study of non-cultivable human enteric viruses. In this review, we discuss various methods utilized for the evaluation of the thermal stability of human enteric viruses, compare the results of these methods, and examine how researchers may move toward a single standard approach (i.e., temperatures, virus concentrations, volume/weight of matrices, etc.) for determining thermal inactivation profiles of human enteric viruses and their surrogates. Based on our review, we found that temperature, time of exposure, type of matrix, analysis type, type of heat application, and the concentration and volume of virus used in the experiments were highly variable across virus surrogates even for the same surrogates. Because of these differences-along with the inherent limitations of using surrogate viruses-comparison of these methods and how the results may be extrapolated to human enteric viruses is quite challenging. As a result, we discuss how researchers may move toward a single standard approach for determining thermal inactivation profiles of human enteric viruses and their surrogates.

  5. Viral Causes of Lymphoma: The History of Epstein-Barr Virus and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Esau

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1964, Epstein, Barr, and Achong published a report outlining their discovery of viral particles in lymphoblasts isolated from a patient with Burkitt lymphoma. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV was the first human cancer virus to be described, and its discovery paved the way for further investigations into the oncogenic potential of viruses. In the decades following the discovery of EBV, multinational research efforts led to the discovery of further viral causes of various human cancers. Lymphomas are perhaps the cancer type that is most closely associated with oncogenic viruses: infection with EBV, human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8, and hepatitis C virus have all been associated with lymphomagenesis. Lymphomas have also played an important role in the history of oncoviruses, as both the first human oncovirus (EBV and the first human retrovirus (HTLV-1 were discovered through isolates taken from patients with unique lymphoma syndromes. The history of the discovery of these 2 key oncoviruses is presented here, and their impact on further medical research, using the specific example of HIV research, is briefly discussed.

  6. Viral Causes of Lymphoma: The History of Epstein-Barr Virus and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In 1964, Epstein, Barr, and Achong published a report outlining their discovery of viral particles in lymphoblasts isolated from a patient with Burkitt lymphoma. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was the first human cancer virus to be described, and its discovery paved the way for further investigations into the oncogenic potential of viruses. In the decades following the discovery of EBV, multinational research efforts led to the discovery of further viral causes of various human cancers. Lymphomas are perhaps the cancer type that is most closely associated with oncogenic viruses: infection with EBV, human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8, and hepatitis C virus have all been associated with lymphomagenesis. Lymphomas have also played an important role in the history of oncoviruses, as both the first human oncovirus (EBV) and the first human retrovirus (HTLV-1) were discovered through isolates taken from patients with unique lymphoma syndromes. The history of the discovery of these 2 key oncoviruses is presented here, and their impact on further medical research, using the specific example of HIV research, is briefly discussed.

  7. Dry weather induces outbreaks of human West Nile virus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Belant Jerrold L; Minnis Richard B; Wang Guiming; Wax Charles L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Since its first occurrence in the New York City area during 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) has spread rapidly across North America and has become a major public health concern in North America. By 2002, WNV was reported in 40 states and the District of Columbia with 4,156 human and 14,539 equine cases of infection. Mississippi had the highest human incidence rate of WNV during the 2002 epidemic in the United States. Epidemics of WNV can impose enormous impacts on local econom...

  8. Occurrence of BK Virus and Human Papilloma Virus in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Jarzyński

    2017-09-01

    Developing colorectal cancer can show no symptoms, even for many years. This is why it is so important to become familiar with as many etiological factors as possible. The development of many human neoplasms is often initiated by exposure to infectious agents – such as bacterial or viral infections. Similar to the human papillomavirus, the BK virus was detected in clinical specimens. It seems that HPV and BKV infections can contribute to the neoplastic process, which requires detailed studies on a larger group of patients.

  9. Genetic Reassortment Among the Influenza Viruses (Avian Influenza, Human Influenza and Swine Influenza in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a hazardous virus and harm to respiratory tract. The virus infect birds, pigs, horses, dogs, mammals and humans. Pigs are important hosts in ecology of the influenza virus because they have two receptors, namely NeuAc 2,3Gal and NeuAc 2,6Gal which make the pigs are sensitive to infection of influenza virus from birds and humans and genetic reassortment can be occurred. Classical swine influenza H1N1 viruses had been circulated in pigs in North America and other countries for 80 years. In 1998, triple reassortant H3N2 swine influenza viruses that contains genes of human influenza A virus (H3N2, swine influenza virus (H1N1 and avian influenza are reported as cause an outbreaks in pigs in North America. Furthermore, the circulation of triple reassortant H3N2 swine influenza virus resulting reassortant H1N1 swine influenza and reassortant H1N2 swine influenza viruses cause infection in humans. Humans who were infected by triple reassortant swine influenza A virus (H1N1 usually made direct contact with pigs. Although without any clinical symptoms, pigs that are infected by triple reassortant swine influenza A (H1N1 can transmit infection to the humans around them. In June 2009, WHO declared that pandemic influenza of reassortant H1N1 influenza A virus (novel H1N1 has reached phase 6. In Indonesia until 2009, there were 1005 people were infected by H1N1 influenza A and 5 of them died. Novel H1N1 and H5N1 viruses have been circulated in humans and pigs in Indonesia. H5N1 reassortant and H1N1 viruses or the seasonal flu may could arise because of genetic reassortment between avian influenza and humans influenza viruses that infect pigs together.

  10. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Nandy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles, Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi′s sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis.

  11. Human herpes viruses in burn patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzer, Paul; Guillory, Ashley; Parvizi, Daryousch; Clayton, Robert P; Branski, Ludwik K; Kamolz, Lars-P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Lee, Jong O

    2017-02-01

    The contribution of human herpes viruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) to morbidity and mortality after burns remains controversial. This systematic review was undertaken to assess evidence of herpes virus-related morbidity and mortality in burns. PubMed, Ovid, and Web of Science were searched to identify studies of HSV, CMV, or VZV infections in burn patients. Exclusion criteria included: A level of evidence (LoE) of IV or V; nonhuman in vivo studies; and non-English articles. There was no limitation by publication date. Fifty articles were subjected to full-text analysis. Of these, 18 had LoE between I-III and were included in the final review (2 LoE I, 16 LoE II-III). Eight had a prospective study design, 9 had a retrospective study design, and 1 included both. No direct evidence linked CMV and HSV infection with increased morbidity and mortality in burns. Following burn, CMV reactivation was more common than a primary CMV infection. Active HSV infection impaired wound healing but was not directly correlated to mortality. Infections with VZV are rare after burns but when they occur, VZV infections were associated with severe complications including mortality. The therapeutic effect of antiviral agents administered after burns warrants investigation via prospective randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Fate of human viruses in groundwater recharge systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.

    1980-03-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to determine the ability of a well-managed tertiary effluent-recharge system to return virologically acceptable water to the groundwater aquifer. The study assessed the quality of waters renovated by indigenous recharge operations and investigated a number of virus-soil interrelationships. The elucidation of the interactions led to the establishment of basin operating criteria for optimizing virus removal. Raw influents, chlorinated tertiary effluents, and renovated wastewater from the aquifer directly beneath a uniquely designed recharge test basin were assayed on a weekly basis for the presence of human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria. High concentrations of viruses were routinely isolated from influents but were isolated only on four occasions from tertiary-treated sewage effluents. In spite of the high quality effluent being recharged, viruses were isolated from the groundwater observation well, indicating their ability to penetrate the unsaturated zone. Results of poliovirus seeding experiments carried out in the test basin clearly indicated the need to operate recharge basins at low (e.g. 1 cm/h) infiltration rates in areas having soil types similar to those found at the study site. The method selected for reducing the test basin infiltration rate involved clogging the basin surface with settled organic material from highly turbid effluent. Alternative methods for slowing infiltration rates are discussed in the text.

  13. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

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    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  14. Adhesion of human pathogenic enteric viruses and surrogate viruses to inert and vegetal food surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboosere, Nathalie; Pinon, Anthony; Caudrelier, Yvette; Delobel, Alexandre; Merle, Ghislaine; Perelle, Sylvie; Temmam, Sarah; Loutreul, Julie; Morin, Thierry; Estienney, Marie; Belliot, Gael; Pothier, Pierre; Gantzer, Christophe; Vialette, Michèle

    2012-10-01

    Enteric viruses, particularly human Noroviruses (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV), are key food-borne pathogens. The attachment of these pathogens to foodstuff and food-contact surfaces is an important mechanism in the human contamination process. Studies were done to investigate the nature of the physicochemical forces, such as hydrophobic and electrostatic ones, involved in the interaction virus/matrix but, at this day, only few data are available concerning surface properties of viruses and prediction of the adhesion capacity of one specific virus onto matrices is still very difficult. The purpose of this study was to propose a reference system, including a representative virus surrogate, able to predict as close as possible behaviour of pathogenic viruses in term of adhesion on inert (stainless steel and polypropylene) and food surfaces (lettuce leaves, strawberries and raspberries). The adhesion of human pathogenic enteric viruses, cultivable strain of HAV and non-cultivable strains of human NoV (genogroups I and II), have been quantified and compared to these of human enteric viruses surrogates, included the MNV-1 and three F-specific RNA bacteriophages (MS2, GA and Qβ). A standardized approach was developed to assess and quantify viral adhesion on tested matrices after a contact time with each virus using real-time RT-PCR. Methods used for virus recovery were in accordance with the CEN recommendations, including a bovine Enterovirus type 1 as control to monitor the efficiency of the extraction process and amplification procedure from directly extracted or eluted samples. The adhesion of human pathogenic viruses, ranging from 0.1 to 2%, could be comparable for all matrices studied, except for NoV GII on soft fruits. Adhesion percentages obtained for the studied surrogate virus and phages were shown to be comparable to those of HAV and NoV on inert and lettuce surfaces. The MNV-1 appeared as the best candidate to simulate adhesion phenomena of all human

  15. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  16. Susceptibility of human and avian influenza viruses to human and chicken saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Auewarakul, Prasert; Wiriyarat, Witthawat

    2014-05-01

    Oral cavity can be an entry site of influenza virus and saliva is known to contain innate soluble anti-influenza factors. Influenza strains were shown to vary in their susceptibility to those antiviral factors. Whether the susceptibility to the saliva antiviral factors plays any role in the host species specificity of influenza viruses is not known. In this study, the antiviral activity of human and chicken saliva against human and the H5N1 avian influenza viruses were investigated by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) assays. In comparison to human influenza viruses, H5N1 isolates showed reduced susceptibility to human saliva as measured by HI and NT assays. Interestingly, an H5N1 isolate that bind to both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid showed much higher HI titers with human saliva, suggesting that the susceptibility profile was linked to the receptor-binding preference and the presence of α2,6-linked sialic in human saliva. On the other hand, the H5N1 isolates showed increased HI titers but reduced NT titers to chicken saliva as compared to human influenza isolates. The human salivary antiviral components were characterized by testing the sensitivity to heat, receptor destroying enzyme (RDE), CaCl₂/EDTA dependence, and inhibition by mannan, and shown to be α- and γ-inhibitors. These data suggest that the H5N1 HPAI influenza virus had distinctive susceptibility patterns to human and chicken saliva, which may play some roles in its infectivity and transmissibility in these hosts.

  17. Test and validation of methods to sample and detect human virus from environmental surfaces using norovirus as a model virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, T.; Frandsen, T.; Permin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background: Viruses cause a major proportion of human infections, especially gastroenteritis and respiratory infections in children and adults. Indirect transmission between humans via environmental surfaces may play a role in infections, but methods to investigate this have been sparse. Aim: To ...... lysis, combined with a multiplex qPCR detection assay is an efficient screening tool that merits study of different respiratory and gastrointestinal viruses on environment surfaces.......Background: Viruses cause a major proportion of human infections, especially gastroenteritis and respiratory infections in children and adults. Indirect transmission between humans via environmental surfaces may play a role in infections, but methods to investigate this have been sparse. Aim......: To validate and test efficient and reliable procedures to detect multiple human pathogenic viruses on surfaces. Methods: The study was divided into two parts. In Part A, six combinations of three different swabs (consisting of cotton, foamed cotton, or polyester head) and two different elution methods (direct...

  18. Humans Have Antibodies against a Plant Virus: Evidence from Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruolan; Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Roberts, Andrew M.; Friedland, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a widespread plant pathogen, is found in tobacco (including cigarettes and smokeless tobacco) as well as in many other plants. Plant viruses do not replicate or cause infection in humans or other mammals. This study was done to determine whether exposure to tobacco products induces an immune response to TMV in humans. Using a sandwich ELISA assay, we detected serum anti-TMV antibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, IgA, and IgM) in all subjects enrolled in the study (20 healthy smokers, 20 smokeless-tobacco users, and 20 non-smokers). Smokers had a higher level of serum anti-TMV IgG antibodies than non-smokers, while the serum level of anti-TMV IgA from smokeless tobacco users was lower than smokers and non-smokers. Using bioinformatics, we also found that the human protein TOMM40L (an outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog – like translocase) contains a strong homology of six contiguous amino acids to the TMV coat protein, and TOMM40L peptide exhibited cross-reactivity with anti-TMV antibodies. People who smoke cigarettes or other tobacco products experience a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Our results showing molecular mimicry between TMV and human TOMM40L raise the question as to whether TMV has a potential role in smokers against Parkinson’s disease development. The potential mechanisms of molecular mimicry between plant viruses and human disease should be further explored. PMID:23573274

  19. Isolation & molecular characterization of human parainfluenza virus in Chennai, India

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    C P Indumathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV accounts for a significant proportion of lower respiratory tract infections in children as well as adults. This study was done to detect the presence of different subtypes of HPIV from patients having influenza like illness (ILI. Methods: Throat and nasal swabs from 232 patients with ILI who were negative for influenza viruses were tested by multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(mRT-PCR for the detection of human parainfluenza virus. All samples were inoculated in rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK2 cell line. Results: Of the 232 samples, 26(11.2% were positive by mRT-PCR and nine (34.6% showed cytopathic effect with syncytium formation for HPIV and all were HPIV-3 serotype, other serotypes like 1,2,4 were negative. The HPIV-3 strains (HN gene were sequenced and analysed. Two novel mutations were identified at amino acid residues 295 and 297. Interpretation & conclusions: The mRT-PCR assay offers a rapid, sensitive and accurate diagnostic method for detection of HPIV which enables early detection and control. In our study there was a predominance of HPIV among 1-5 yr age group and the school going age group was less affected. Further studies need to be done to characterize HPIV isolated from different parts of the country.

  20. Human papilloma viruses (HPV and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human papillomaviruses (HPV may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer.Methods: RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC.Results: Thirty (3.5% low risk and 20 (2.3% high risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA data base. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%, HPV 113 (24%, HPV 16 (10%, HPV 52 (10%. Data from the PCR cohort study, indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens followed by HPV 16 (13%. The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens.Conclusions: There were 4 observations of particular interest: (i confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii a correlation between high risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of

  1. Review of testing for human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, D J; Ziegner, U H; Hooper, D G

    1992-06-01

    The performance of HIV testing requires meticulous attention to preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic variables, especially matters of patient confidentiality. Laboratory directors must pay strict attention to quality control and quality assurance practices. Careful attention to these considerations can produce a screening program in low-prevalence populations that has an extremely low false-positive rate, with a positive predictive value of greater than 99%. Issuing a clear and concise laboratory report to the clinician is important. The Fifth Consensus Conference on Testing for Human Retroviruses of the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors, March 1990, has recommended that ELISA be reported as reactive or nonreactive; IFA as reactive, nonreactive, or nonspecific, and WB as reactive, nonreactive, or indeterminate. It is recommended that the terms positive and negative be reserved for the summary interpretation given at the conclusion of the HIV-1 antibody testing algorithm. The testing algorithm used for HIV antibody screening at Scripps Clinic is shown in Figure 3. Other algorithms for complete testing on a single sample only or on two separate samples are reported. We agree with others that the patient should not be counseled for infection with HIV until a reactive confirmatory test(s) establishes a positive diagnosis. Certain special situations in diagnostic testing deserve comment. Establishing the diagnosis of HIV infection can be difficult in seronegative persons with acute infection. Polymerase chain reaction, viral culture or antigen detection may be useful tests in this situation. However, careful interpretation of test results and close correlation with patient risk factors are important to establish the proper diagnosis. Reports of seronegative persons, some remaining seronegative over a protracted time, have raised concerns over the transfusional risk of HIV infection. Blood donor screening programs are using

  2. Dual infection with dengue virus 3 and human immunodeficiency virus 1 in Havana, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Limonta, Daniel; Bandera, Juan Francisco; Perez, Jorge; Kouri, Gustavo; Guzman, Maria G

    2009-05-01

    Although dengue virus (DEN) endemic regions overlap with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV) high incidence areas, little has been documented on HIV and DEN mixed infection. Here we report DEN/HIV concurrent infections recorded during the DEN-3 epidemic in 2001-2002 in Havana. Serologic-confirmed DEN is described in two HIV-infected subjects with dengue fever symptoms. Although patients had dengue disease, the CD4+ cells remained within normal levels and no accelerated progression of HIV disease was observed. To our knowledge, DEN cases caused by DEN-3 in HIV-infected individuals have not been reported previously. Further research is needed to diagnose this likely underreported mixed viral infection in DEN endemic areas.

  3. Hepatitis B virus exposure in human immunodeficiency virus seropositive Cuban patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licel Rodríguez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the prevalence of serological markers of exposure to Hepatitis B Virus (HBV, 295 subjects were selected at random from the National Registry of human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects. Evidence of exposure to HBV was defined as: testing Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and anti-Hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc positive or anti-HBc positive only. Overall, 133 (45.5% were positive for anti-HBc and 15 (5.1% resulted positive to HBsAg. Significant statistical association was found between male sex and exposure to HBV (p<0.01. Homosexual or bisexual behavior was found to be strongly associated to HBV exposure (p<0.001. In conclusion, the prevalence of HBV serological markers is higher in Cuban HIV positive subjects compared to the Cuban general population.

  4. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice. Notice of Intent to...

  5. Surgical excision for recurrent herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) anogenital infection in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Folasade; Shaver, Aaron; Raffanti, Stephen

    2017-05-15

    Recurrent anogenital herpes simplex virus infections are common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of whom approximately 5% develop resistance to acyclovir. We present a case of a 49-year-old man with HIV who had an 8-year history of recurrent left inguinal herpes simplex virus type 2 ulcerations. He initially responded to oral acyclovir, but developed resistance to acyclovir and eventually foscarnet. The lesion progressed to a large hypertrophic mass that required surgical excision, which led to resolution without recurrences. Our case highlights the importance of surgical excision as a treatment option in refractory herpes simplex virus anogenital infections.

  6. Sustained live poultry market surveillance contributes to early warnings for human infection with avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shisong; Bai, Tian; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Peng, Bo; Liu, Hui; Geng, Yijie; Zhang, Renli; Ma, Hanwu; Zhu, Wenfei; Wang, Dayan; Cheng, Jinquan; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-08-03

    Sporadic human infections with the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A (H5N6) virus have been reported in different provinces in China since April 2014. From June 2015 to January 2016, routine live poultry market (LPM) surveillance was conducted in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province. H5N6 viruses were not detected until November 2015. The H5N6 virus-positive rate increased markedly beginning in December 2015, and viruses were detected in LPMs in all districts of the city. Coincidently, two human cases with histories of poultry exposure developed symptoms and were diagnosed as H5N6-positive in Shenzhen during late December 2015 and early January 2016. Similar viruses were identified in environmental samples collected in the LPMs and the patients. In contrast to previously reported H5N6 viruses, viruses with six internal genes derived from the H9N2 or H7N9 viruses were detected in the present study. The increased H5N6 virus-positive rate in the LPMs and the subsequent human infections demonstrated that sustained LPM surveillance for avian influenza viruses provides an early warning for human infections. Interventions, such as LPM closures, should be immediately implemented to reduce the risk of human infection with the H5N6 virus when the virus is widely detected during LPM surveillance.

  7. Metagenomic analysis of the shrew enteric virome reveals novel viruses related to human stool-associated viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michihito; Orba, Yasuko; Ueno, Keisuke; Ishii, Akihiro; Moonga, Ladslav; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Ito, Kimihito; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2015-02-01

    Shrews are small insectivorous mammals that are distributed worldwide. Similar to rodents, shrews live on the ground and are commonly found near human residences. In this study, we investigated the enteric virome of wild shrews in the genus Crocidura using a sequence-independent viral metagenomics approach. A large portion of the shrew enteric virome was composed of insect viruses, whilst novel viruses including cyclovirus, picornavirus and picorna-like virus were also identified. Several cycloviruses, including variants of human cycloviruses detected in cerebrospinal fluid and stools, were detected in wild shrews at a high prevalence rate. The identified picornavirus was distantly related to human parechovirus, inferring the presence of a new genus in this family. The identified picorna-like viruses were characterized as different species of calhevirus 1, which was discovered previously in human stools. Complete or nearly complete genome sequences of these novel viruses were determined in this study and then were subjected to further genetic characterization. Our study provides an initial view of the diversity and distinctiveness of the shrew enteric virome and highlights unique novel viruses related to human stool-associated viruses.

  8. Humanized Mouse Model of Ebola Virus Disease Mimics the Immune Responses in Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Brian H; Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Khristova, Marina L; Sealy, Tara K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Dodd, Kimberly A; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Sanders, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-03-01

    Animal models recapitulating human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are critical for insights into virus pathogenesis. Ebola virus (EBOV) isolates derived directly from human specimens do not, without adaptation, cause disease in immunocompetent adult rodents. Here, we describe EVD in mice engrafted with human immune cells (hu-BLT). hu-BLT mice developed EVD following wild-type EBOV infection. Infection with high-dose EBOV resulted in rapid, lethal EVD with high viral loads, alterations in key human antiviral immune cytokines and chemokines, and severe histopathologic findings similar to those shown in the limited human postmortem data available. A dose- and donor-dependent clinical course was observed in hu-BLT mice infected with lower doses of either Mayinga (1976) or Makona (2014) isolates derived from human EBOV cases. Engraftment of the human cellular immune system appeared to be essential for the observed virulence, as nonengrafted mice did not support productive EBOV replication or develop lethal disease. hu-BLT mice offer a unique model for investigating the human immune response in EVD and an alternative animal model for EVD pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening.

  9. Hemolytic uremic syndrome as a primary manifestation of acute human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, A M; Ventura, A; Almeida, C; Correia, M; Tavares, V; Mota, M; Seabra, J

    2009-05-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection but it occurs in advanced stages of human immunodeficiency virus disease. As in other forms of hemolytic uremic syndrome plasmapheresis seems to be the treatment of choice. The authors present an unusual case of hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with acute human immunodeficiency virus infection in a 38 year-old black male. The patient was admitted with fever, asthenia, nausea, diarrhea, and reduced urinary output. He was found to have anemia, thrombocytopenia and severe renal failure. Hemolytic uremic syndrome was diagnosed and he was started on plasmapheresis and hemodialysis. Serological tests were consistent with acute human immunodeficiency virus infection: the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for human immunodeficiency virus was weakly positive, Western Blot test was negative and human immunodeficiency virus RNA quantification was positive, with > 1,000,000 copies/microl. After 4 daily treatment sessions, patient's clinical condition improved and hemoglobin, platelets, lactic dehydrogenase and renal function normalized.

  10. Effects of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus antigen insertion in two 3' proximal genome positions of bovine/human parainfluenza virus type 3 on virus replication and immunogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.S. Tang (Roderick); J.H. Schickli (Jeanne); M. MacPhail (Mia); F. Fernandes (Fiona); L. Bicha (Leenas); J. Spaete (Joshua); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R. Spaete (Richard); A.A. Haller (Aurelia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA live attenuated bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), harboring the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) genes of human PIV3, was used as a virus vector to express surface glycoproteins derived from two human pathogens, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and respiratory syncyt

  11. Women's awareness of the human papilloma virus and related health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Aygul; Yılmaz, Cevriye; Yenen, Müfit Cemal; Yavan, Tülay; Kılıç, Ayşe

    2011-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study of women's awareness of the human papilloma virus and related health problems. Cervical cancer is an important cause of mortality, making up approximately 12% of all cancers in women. Awareness on the part of carriers of human papilloma virus is crucial in preventing transmission of the infection and protecting against cervical cancer. The study was performed as a cross-sectional descriptive study. The study consists of 79 human papilloma virus-positive women who had not been diagnosed with cervical cancer and 150 women who had not been diagnosed with human papilloma virus. Data were collected via questionnaires between November 2007 and April 2008. Percentages and chi-square test were used. A significantly higher percentage of women with positive human papilloma virus knew the definition of human papilloma virus, the fact that it is transmitted via sexual contact and that it can lead to cervical cancer than did women with negative human papilloma virus. It was established that approximately half the women with positive human papilloma virus presented at the hospital with a genital wart. None of the women knew that a Pap smear test was a necessary tool in the prevention of cervical cancer. Women with positive human papilloma virus have insufficient knowledge of human papilloma virus, sexually transmitted diseases, the health risks associated with human papilloma virus and the means of preventing these risks. It is therefore necessary to evaluate the education of health workers, and especially of nurses, on human papilloma virus and its prevention. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  13. Differential Mucin Expression by Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus Infection in Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Del Rocío Baños-Lara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucins (MUC constitute an important component of the inflammatory and innate immune response. However, the expression of these molecules by respiratory viral infections is still largely unknown. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV are two close-related paramyxoviruses that can cause severe low respiratory tract disease in infants and young children worldwide. Currently, there is not vaccine available for neither virus. In this work, we explored the differential expression of MUC by RSV and hMPV in human epithelial cells. Our data indicate that the MUC expression by RSV and hMPV differs significantly, as we observed a stronger induction of MUC8, MUC15, MUC20, MUC21, and MUC22 by RSV infection while the expression of MUC1, MUC2, and MUC5B was dominated by the infection with hMPV. These results may contribute to the different immune response induced by these two respiratory viruses.

  14. Repeatedly positive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA polymerase chain reaction in human immunodeficiency virus-exposed seroreverting infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, S S; Tetali, S; Abrams, E J; Paul, M O; Pahwa, S G

    1995-08-01

    Three human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-exposed children who had repeatedly positive DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for HIV in > or = 5 samples before seroreversion to HIV-negative status are reported. The children belong to a cohort of 210 infants who were born to HIV-infected mothers and were tested at intervals of 1 to 3 months by HIV viral culture, PCR, and p24 antigen; only the PCR was positive in > or = 5 samples in the children reported here. Their clinical features were indistinguishable from other seroreverters. All three children had a transient drop in CD4:CD8 ratio to < 1.0. The transiently positive DNA PCR in HIV-exposed infants may indicate either that HIV infection was eliminated by a strong host immune response or that infection was caused by an attenuated/defective strain of virus.

  15. Variation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase within the simian immunodeficiency virus genome of RT-SHIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A Wadford

    Full Text Available RT-SHIV is a chimera of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV containing the reverse transcriptase (RT-encoding region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 within the backbone of SIVmac239. It has been used in a non-human primate model for studies of non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTI and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. We and others have identified several mutations that arise in the "foreign" HIV-1 RT of RT-SHIV during in vivo replication. In this study we catalogued amino acid substitutions in the HIV-1 RT and in regions of the SIV backbone with which RT interacts that emerged 30 weeks post-infection from seven RT-SHIV-infected rhesus macaques. The virus set points varied from relatively high virus load, moderate virus load, to undetectable virus load. The G196R substitution in RT was detected from 6 of 7 animals at week 4 post-infection and remained in virus from 4 of 6 animals at week 30. Virus from four high virus load animals showed several common mutations within RT, including L74V or V75L, G196R, L214F, and K275R. The foreign RT from high virus load isolates exhibited as much variation as that of the highly variable envelope surface glycoprotein, and 10-fold higher than that of the native RT of SIVmac239. Isolates from moderate virus load animals showed much less variation in the foreign RT than the high virus load isolates. No variation was found in SIVmac239 genes known to interact with RT. Our results demonstrate substantial adaptation of the foreign HIV-1 RT in RT-SHIV-infected macaques, which most likely reflects selective pressure upon the foreign RT to attain optimal activity within the context of the chimeric RT-SHIV and the rhesus macaque host.

  16. Trends in contraceptive use among women with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengyang; Peipert, Jeffrey F; Zhao, Qiuhong; Wilson, Tracey E; Weber, Kathleen M; Sanchez-Keeland, Lorraine; DʼSouza, Gypsyamber; Young, Mary; Watts, D Heather; Keller, Marla J; Cohan, Deborah; Massad, L Stewart

    2012-10-01

    To estimate trends in contraceptive use, especially long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) and condoms, among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women. Human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women in a multicenter longitudinal cohort were interviewed semiannually between 1998 and 2010 about sexual behaviors and contraceptive use. Trends in contraceptive use by women aged 18-45 years who were at risk for unintended pregnancy but not trying to conceive were analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Condoms were the dominant form of contraception for HIV-seropositive women and showed little change across time. Less than 15% of these women used no contraception. Between 1998 and 2010, LARC use increased among HIV-seronegative women from 4.8% (6 of 126) to 13.5% (19 of 141, P=.02), but not significantly among seropositive women (0.9% [4 of 438] to 2.8% [6 of 213], P=.09). Use of highly effective contraceptives, including pills, patches, rings, injectable progestin, implants, and intrauterine devices, ranged from 15.2% (53 of 348) in 1998 to 17.4% (37 of 213) in 2010 (P=.55). Human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative but not HIV-seropositive LARC users were less likely than nonusers to use condoms consistently (hazard ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.32-0.81, P=.004 for seronegative women; hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI 0.96-1.23 for seropositive women). Although most HIV-seropositive women use contraception, they rely primarily on condoms and have not experienced the increase in LARC use seen among seronegative women. Strategies to improve simultaneous use of condoms and LARC are needed to minimize risk of unintended pregnancy as well as HIV transmission and acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. II.

  17. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  18. The V protein of canine distemper virus is required for virus replication in human epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Otsuki

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV becomes able to use human receptors through a single amino acid substitution in the H protein. In addition, CDV strains possessing an intact C protein replicate well in human epithelial H358 cells. The present study showed that CDV strain 007Lm, which was isolated from lymph node tissue of a dog with distemper, failed to replicate in H358 cells, although it possessed an intact C protein. Sequence analyses suggested that a cysteine-to-tyrosine substitution at position 267 of the V protein caused this growth defect. Analyses using H358 cells constitutively expressing the CDV V protein showed that the V protein with a cysteine, but not that with a tyrosine, at this position effectively blocked the interferon-stimulated signal transduction pathway, and supported virus replication of 007Lm in H358 cells. Thus, the V protein as well as the C protein appears to be functional and essential for CDV replication in human epithelial cells.

  19. Conflicting selective forces affect T cell receptor contacts in an immunodominant human immunodeficiency virus epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Astrid K N; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Learn, Gerald H

    2006-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are critical for the control of human immunodeficiency virus, but containment of virus replication can be undermined by mutations in CTL epitopes that lead to virus escape. We analyzed the evolution in vivo of an immunodominant, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope and fou...

  20. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 by cdk inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehn-Hall Kylene

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection relies primarily on the administration of anti-retroviral nucleoside analogues, either alone or in combination with HIV-protease inhibitors. Although these drugs have a clinical benefit, continuous therapy with the drugs leads to drug-resistant strains of the virus. Recently, significant progress has been made towards the development of natural and synthetic agents that can directly inhibit HIV-1 replication or its essential enzymes. We previously reported on the pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (PCI r-roscovitine as a potential inhibitor of HIV-1 replication. PCIs are among the most promising novel antiviral agents to emerge over the past few years. Potent activity on viral replication combined with proliferation inhibition without the emergence of resistant viruses, which are normally observed in HAART patients; make PCIs ideal candidates for HIV-1 inhibition. To this end we evaluated twenty four cdk inhibitors for their effect on HIV-1 replication in vitro. Screening of these compounds identified alsterpaullone as the most potent inhibitor of HIV-1 with activity at 150 nM. We found that alsterpaullone effectively inhibits cdk2 activity in HIV-1 infected cells with a low IC50 compared to control uninfected cells. The effects of alsterpaullone were associated with suppression of cdk2 and cyclin expression. Combining both alsterpaullone and r-roscovitine (cyc202 in treatment exhibited even stronger inhibitory activities in HIV-1 infected PBMCs.

  1. [HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) implication in other cancers than gynaecological].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoual, C; Tartour, E; Roussel, H; Bats, A S; Pavie, J; Pernot, S; Weiss, L; Mohamed, A Si; Thariat, J; Hoffmann, C; Péré, H

    2015-08-01

    Worldwide, approximately 5 to 10% of the population is infected by a Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Some of these viruses, with a high oncogenic risk (HPV HR), are responsible for about 5% of cancer. It is now accepted that almost all carcinomas of the cervix and the vulva are due to an HPV HR (HPV16 and 18) infection. However, these viruses are known to be involved in the carcinogenesis of many other cancers (head and neck [SCCHN], penis, anus). For head and neck cancer, HPV infection is considered as a good prognostic factor. The role of HPV HR in anal cancer is also extensively studied in high-risk patient's population. The role of HPV infection in the carcinogenesis of esophageal, bladder, lung, breast or skin cancers is still debated. Given the multiple possible locations of HPV HR infection, the question of optimizing the management of patients with a HPV+ cancer arises in the implementation of a comprehensive clinical and biological monitoring. It is the same in therapeutics with the existence of a preventive vaccination, for example.

  2. A dual drug regimen synergistically blocks human parainfluenza virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Benjamin; Dirr, Larissa; El-Deeb, Ibrahim M.; Altmeyer, Ralf; Guillon, Patrice; von Itzstein, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Human parainfluenza type-3 virus (hPIV-3) is one of the principal aetiological agents of acute respiratory illness in infants worldwide and also shows high disease severity in the elderly and immunocompromised, but neither therapies nor vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection, respectively. Using a multidisciplinary approach we report herein that the approved drug suramin acts as a non-competitive in vitro inhibitor of the hPIV-3 haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Furthermore, the drug inhibits viral replication in mammalian epithelial cells with an IC50 of 30 μM, when applied post-adsorption. Significantly, we show in cell-based drug-combination studies using virus infection blockade assays, that suramin acts synergistically with the anti-influenza virus drug zanamivir. Our data suggests that lower concentrations of both drugs can be used to yield high levels of inhibition. Finally, using NMR spectroscopy and in silico docking simulations we confirmed that suramin binds HN simultaneously with zanamivir. This binding event occurs most likely in the vicinity of the protein primary binding site, resulting in an enhancement of the inhibitory potential of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-based inhibitor. This study offers a potentially exciting avenue for the treatment of parainfluenza infection by a combinatorial repurposing approach of well-established approved drugs.

  3. Management of dyslipidemia in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalit, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are more common in the patient population with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically reduced HIV-associated morbidity and mortality and has transformed HIV disease into a chronic, manageable condition. As a result, non-AIDS-related illnesses, including cardiovascular diseases, are now the leading causes of death in the HIV-infected population. Optimizing fasting lipid parameters plays an important role in reducing cardiovascular risk in this population. This review focuses on the management of dyslipidemia in HIV-infected individuals treated with combination ART.

  4. Neuromyelitis optica in patients with coexisting human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Singh, Parbhdeep; Smith, Robert G

    2013-09-01

    Two patients with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and receiving antiretroviral treatment developed neuromyelitis optica (Devic's disease). One patient tested positive for serum aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G antibodies. Both patients were treated with high dose pulsed intravenous methylprednisolone followed by standard sessions of plasma exchange both at the onset attack and during disease relapses. For maintenance therapy, one patient received rituximab infusions and the second patient received mycophenolate mofetil orally. Despite treatment, both patients are currently wheelchair-bound due to severe paraparesis. Neuromyelitis optica can occur in the course of HIV infection and poses an ongoing therapeutic challenge.

  5. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. [Lopinavir/ritonavir in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez, María Jesús

    2014-11-01

    There are clear sex-related biological differences between men and women. Diseases that affect the two sexes differently are studied separately. However, some diseases affect both men and women, but their incidence or outcome are clearly different. In human immunodeficiency virus infection, the potential differences in the effects of antiretroviral therapy are poorly characterized and few studies have been designed to elucidate these differences. Moreover, women are usually poorly represented in clinical trials of antiretroviral drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiple Pyarthrosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Hemophiliacs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair Ingram

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Classically, a swollen, painful joint in a patient with hemophilia has been considered to be due to a hemarthrosis until otherwise proven, and treated immediately with appropriate coagulation factor replacement. Two cases of human immunodeficiency virus (hiv-infected hemophiliacs presenting with an initial apparent hemarthrosis, complicated subsequently by numerous pyarthroses and sepsis are described. In light of the prevalence of hiv infection in the adult hemophiliac population with arthropathy, a reappraisal of the clinical caveat of immediate infusion without joint aspiration is required.

  8. Inner architecture of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, T; Imura, S; Goto, T; Nakai, M

    1993-07-01

    The cores of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) were observed by negative staining after isolation of the core with Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde. Four kinds of cores were found: asymmetric and symmetric sectoral shapes, a bar shape, and a triangular shape. These results were confirmed by the examination of ultrathin sections of whole virions. In some virions, the connection between the core and the envelope was observed after freeze fracturing. Its structure was considered to be characteristic of an intermediate stage of viral maturation. The HIV-1 core was reacted with anti-HIV-1 p24 mouse monoclonal antibody.

  9. [Detection of human papilloma viruses using in situ hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuljić-Kapulica, N; Radojković, M; Majstorović, J; Matić, V; Krstić, L; Budisin, A; Lepsanović, Z

    1993-01-01

    First experiences in the diagnosis of human papilloma viruses are reported. The method of in situ hybridization was used together with biotin tests for types of HPV: 6/11, 16/18 and 31/33/51. The study was performed on the preparations of of the cervix tissue with displasmic proliferation and laryngeal papilloma tissues. There have been examined 37 specimens: in 6 were found sequence of HPV genoma for types 6/11 and in 1 specimen for types 16/18 and 31/33/51/.

  10. Prognostic Value Of Immunoglobulin Profile In Human Papilloma Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chattopadhyay S P

    2001-01-01

    Present study aimed at defining the prognostic value of immunoglobulin profile in human papilloma virus infection by assessing and correlating the levels of immunoglobulin with type, number, duration and response to therapy in 54 randomly selected cases from age group 8 to 42 years (male â€"35, female â€" 19). Raised IgG levels were seen maximally in all spectrum of warts (59.25%) followed by IgM (40.74%) and IgA (25.92%). It was also...

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus associated plasmablastic lymphoma: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Dinkar; Pandit, Siddharth; Jasphin, Shiny; Shetty, Akhil S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is the third common malignant lesion of the oral region. Plasmablastic lymphomas are rare, aggressive neoplasms occurring mostly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individual which accounts for approximately 2.6% of all NHL. It usually presents as a diffuse growth and with diffuse pattern of histological presentation. It is very difficult to differentiate this lymphoma from other NHL. Immunohistochemical evaluation of various markers is an important criteria of the diagnostic protocol. Here, we describe a case of plasmablastic lymphoma in a 50-year-old female HIV-infected patient. The diagnosis was based on histopathological examination and immunophenotyping. PMID:27795651

  12. Pulmonary disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, J D; Orholm, Marianne; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    Pulmonary disease is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All parts of the hospital system are expected to be involved in the diagnosis and treatment of HIV infected patients in the coming years. Many different processes...... cause pulmonary disease alone or in combination. Bilateral interstitial infiltrates are the most frequent chest x-ray abnormality and are most frequently caused by infection with Pneumocystis carinii. Cytomegalovirus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis and pulmonary Kaposi...

  13. The DNA damage response induced by infection with human cytomegalovirus and other viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaofei, E; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2014-05-23

    Viruses use different strategies to overcome the host defense system. Recent studies have shown that viruses can induce DNA damage response (DDR). Many of these viruses use DDR signaling to benefit their replication, while other viruses block or inactivate DDR signaling. This review focuses on the effects of DDR and DNA repair on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. Here, we review the DDR induced by HCMV infection and its similarities and differences to DDR induced by other viruses. As DDR signaling pathways are critical for the replication of many viruses, blocking these pathways may represent novel therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of certain infectious diseases. Lastly, future perspectives in the field are discussed.

  14. Biliary Secretion of Quasi-Enveloped Human Hepatitis A Virus

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    Asuka Hirai-Yuki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV is an unusual picornavirus that is released from cells cloaked in host-derived membranes. These quasi-enveloped virions (eHAV are the only particle type circulating in blood during infection, whereas only nonenveloped virions are shed in feces. The reason for this is uncertain. Hepatocytes, the only cell type known to support HAV replication in vivo, are highly polarized epithelial cells with basolateral membranes facing onto hepatic (blood sinusoids and apical membranes abutting biliary canaliculi from which bile is secreted to the gut. To assess whether eHAV and nonenveloped virus egress from cells via vectorially distinct pathways, we studied infected polarized cultures of Caco-2 and HepG2-N6 cells. Most (>99% progeny virions were released apically from Caco-2 cells, whereas basolateral (64% versus apical (36% release was more balanced with HepG2-N6 cells. Both apically and basolaterally released virions were predominantly enveloped, with no suggestion of differential vectorial release of eHAV versus naked virions. Basolateral to apical transcytosis of either particle type was minimal (<0.02%/h in HepG2-N6 cells, arguing against this as a mechanism for differences in membrane envelopment of serum versus fecal virus. High concentrations of human bile acids converted eHAV to nonenveloped virions, whereas virus present in bile from HAV-infected Ifnar1−/−Ifngr1−/− and Mavs−/− mice banded over a range of densities extending from that of eHAV to that of nonenveloped virions. We conclude that nonenveloped virions shed in feces are derived from eHAV released across the canalicular membrane and stripped of membranes by the detergent action of bile acids within the proximal biliary canaliculus.

  15. Electrostatic potential of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and rhesus macaque simian immunodeficiency virus capsid proteins

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    Katarzyna eBozek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from a macaque monkey (SIVmac are assumed to have originated from simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from sooty mangabey (SIVsm. Despite their close similarity in genome structure, HIV-2 and SIVmac show different sensitivities to TRIM5α, a host restriction factor against retroviruses. The replication of HIV-2 strains is potently restricted by rhesus (Rh monkey TRIM5α, while that of SIVmac strain 239 (SIVmac239 is not. Viral capsid protein is the determinant of this differential sensitivity to TRIM5α, as the HIV-2 mutant carrying SIVmac239 capsid protein evaded Rh TRIM5α-mediated restriction. However, the molecular determinants of this restriction mechanism are unknown. Electrostatic potential on the protein-binding site is one of the properties regulating protein-protein interactions. In this study, we investigated the electrostatic potential on the interaction surface of capsid protein of HIV-2 strain GH123 and SIVmac239. Although HIV-2 GH123 and SIVmac239 capsid proteins share more than 87% amino acid identity, we observed a large difference between the two molecules with the HIV-2 GH123 molecule having predominantly positive and SIVmac239 predominantly negative electrostatic potential on the surface of the loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5. As L4/5 is one of the major determinants of Rh TRIM5α sensitivity of these viruses, the present results suggest that the binding site of the Rh TRIM5α may show complementarity to the HIV-2 GH123 capsid surface charge distribution.

  16. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses bind differentially to human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Winnie M; Bartee, Eric C; Moreb, Jan S; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H; McFadden, Grant

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes.

  17. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

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    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  18. Human Adaptation of Ebola Virus during the West African Outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowicz, Richard A; McClure, C Patrick; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Sall, Amadou A; Kobinger, Gary; Müller, Marcel A; Holmes, Edward C; Rey, Félix A; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Ball, Jonathan K

    2016-11-03

    The 2013-2016 outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) in West Africa was the largest recorded. It began following the cross-species transmission of EBOV from an animal reservoir, most likely bats, into humans, with phylogenetic analysis revealing the co-circulation of several viral lineages. We hypothesized that this prolonged human circulation led to genomic changes that increased viral transmissibility in humans. We generated a synthetic glycoprotein (GP) construct based on the earliest reported isolate and introduced amino acid substitutions that defined viral lineages. Mutant GPs were used to generate a panel of pseudoviruses, which were used to infect different human and bat cell lines. These data revealed that specific amino acid substitutions in the EBOV GP have increased tropism for human cells, while reducing tropism for bat cells. Such increased infectivity may have enhanced the ability of EBOV to transmit among humans and contributed to the wide geographic distribution of some viral lineages. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Delayed IFN response differentiates replication of West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Yuki; Uchida, Leo; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are important causes of human encephalitis cases, which result in a high mortality ratio and neurological sequelae after recovery. Understanding the mechanism of neuropathogenicity in these viral infections is important for the development of specific antiviral therapy. Here, we focused on human-derived neuronal and glial cells to understand the cellular responses against WNV and JEV infection. It was demonstrated that early IFN-β induction regulated virus replication in glioblastoma tbl98G cells, whereas delayed IFN-β induction resulted in efficient virus replication in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Moreover, the concealing of viral dsRNA in the intracellular membrane resulted in the delayed IFN response in SK-N-SH cells. These results, which showed different IFN responses between human neuronal and glial cells after WNV or JEV infection, are expected to contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for neuropathology in these viral infections.

  20. Endogenous production of infectious Inoue-Melnick virus in a human meningioma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibe, Y; Inoue, Y K; Hollinshead, A C

    1987-11-01

    We investigated continuous production of Inoue-Melnick virus (IMV) in the MG-1 cell line, established from human meningioma. The infectious virus, identified as a type 1 virus, was mostly recovered extracellularly. Assay of MG-1 cells as infective centers indicated that most of the cells were capable of producing infectious virus. By immunofluorescence, more than 90% of the cells were found to have IMV-associated cytoplasmic antigen(s) (IMCA).

  1. Viruses and the human DEAD-box helicase DDX3: inhibition or exploitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Martina

    2011-04-01

    Human DDX3 is a DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp)-box RNA helicase that appears to be a prime target for viral manipulation. While two viruses that manifest major global health threats, HIV and HCV (hepatitis C virus), utilize DDX3 for their replication, other viruses inhibit DDX3's newly identified function in innate antiviral signalling. This review discusses the role of DDX3 in antiviral immunity and its inhibition or exploitation by different viruses.

  2. Viruses and the human DEAD-box helicase DDX3: inhibition or exploitation?

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Human DDX3 is a DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp)-box RNA helicase that appears to be a prime target for viral manipulation. While two viruses that manifest major global health threats, HIV and HCV (hepatitis C virus), utilize DDX3 for their replication, other viruses inhibit DDX3’s newly identified function in innate antiviral signalling. This review discusses the role of DDX3 in antiviral immunity and its inhibition or exploitation by different viruses.

  3. Influenza A Virus with a Human-Like N2 Gene Is Circulating in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Trebbien, Ramona

    2013-01-01

    A novel reassortant influenza A virus, H1avN2hu, has been found in Danish swine. The virus contains an H1 gene similar to the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of H1N1 avian-like swine viruses and an N2 gene most closely related to the neuraminidase (NA) gene of human H3N2 viruses from the mid-1990s....

  4. Human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and epstein barr virus in oral squamous cell carcinoma from eight different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sapkota, Dipak; Ibrahim, Salah O; Larsson, Per-Anders; Sand, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major health problem in many parts of the world, and the major causative agents are thought to be the use of alcohol and tobacco. Oncogenic viruses have also been suggested to be involved in OSCC development. This study investigated the prevalence of human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in 155 OSCC from eight different countries from different ethnic groups, continents and with different socioeconomic backgrounds. 41 A total of OSCCs were diagnosed in the tongue (26%) and 23 in the floor of the mouth (15%); the other 91 OSCCs were diagnosed in other locations (59%). The patients were also investigated regarding the use of alcohol and smoking and smokeless tobacco habits. Tissue samples were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of the OSCC. DNA was extracted and the viral genome was examined by single, nested and semi-nested PCR assays. Sequencing of double-stranded DNA from the PCR product was carried out. Following sequencing of the HPV-, HSV- and EBV-positive PCR products, 100% homology between the sampels was found. Of all the 155 OSCCs examined, 85 (55%) were positive for EBV, 54 (35%) for HPV and 24 (15%) for HSV. The highest prevalence of HPV was seen in Sudan (65%), while HSV (55%) and EBV (80%) were most prevalent in the UK. In 34% (52/155) of all the samples examined, co-infection by two (46/155=30%) or three (6/155=4%) virus specimens was detected. The most frequent double infection was HPV with EBV in 21% (32/155) of all OSCCs. There was a statistically significant higher proportion of samples with HSV (p=0.026) and EBV (p=0.015) in industrialized countries (Sweden, Norway, UK and USA) as compared to developing countries (Sudan, India, Sri Lanka and Yemen). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher co-infection of HSV and EBV in samples from industrialized countries (p=0.00031). No firm conclusions could be drawn regarding the

  5. The absence of the human platelet antigen polymorphism effect on fibrosis progression in human immunodeficiency virus-1/hepatitis C virus coinfected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Picelli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractINTRODUCTION:Hepatic fibrosis progression in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infections has been associated with viral and host factors, including genetic polymorphisms. Human platelet antigen polymorphisms are associated with the rapid development of fibrosis in HCV-monoinfected patients. This study aimed to determine whether such an association exists in human immunodeficiency virus-1/hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients.METHODS:Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid from 36 human immunodeficiency virus-1/hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients was genotyped to determine the presence of human platelet antigens-1, -3, or -5 polymorphisms. Fibrosis progression was evaluated using the Metavir scoring system, and the patients were assigned to two groups, namely, G1 that comprised patients with F1, portal fibrosis without septa, or F2, few septa (n = 23 and G2 that comprised patients with F3, numerous septa, or F4, cirrhosis (n = 13. Fisher's exact test was utilized to determine possible associations between the human platelet antigen polymorphisms and fibrosis progression.RESULTS:There were no deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the human platelet antigen systems evaluated. Statistically significant differences were not observed between G1 and G2 with respect to the distributions of the allelic and genotypic frequencies of the human platelet antigen systems.CONCLUSION:The greater stimulation of hepatic stellate cells by the human immunodeficiency virus and, consequently, the increased expression of transforming growth factor beta can offset the effect of human platelet antigen polymorphism on the progression of fibrosis in patients coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus-1 and the hepatitis C virus.

  6. A human multi-epitope recombinant vaccinia virus as a universal T cell vaccine candidate against influenza virus.

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    Alan G Goodman

    Full Text Available There is a need to develop a universal vaccine against influenza virus infection to avoid developing new formulations of a seasonal vaccine each year. Many of the vaccine strategies for a universal vaccine target strain-conserved influenza virus proteins, such as the matrix, polymerase, and nucleoproteins, rather than the surface hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins. In addition, non-disease-causing viral vectors are a popular choice as a delivery system for the influenza virus antigens. As a proof-of-concept, we have designed a novel influenza virus immunogen based on the NP backbone containing human T cell epitopes for M1, NS1, NP, PB1 and PA proteins (referred as NPmix as well as a construct containing the conserved regions of influenza virus neuraminidase (N-terminal and hemagglutinin (C-terminal (referred as NA-HA. DNA vectors and vaccinia virus recombinants expressing NPmix (WR-NP or both NPmix plus NA-HA (WR-flu in the cytosol were tested in a heterologous DNA-prime/vaccinia virus-boost vaccine regimen in mice. We observed an increase in the number of influenza virus-specific IFNγ-secreting splenocytes, composed of populations marked by CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells producing IFNγ or TNFα. Upon challenge with influenza virus, the vaccinated mice exhibited decreased viral load in the lungs and a delay in mortality. These findings suggest that DNA prime/poxvirus boost with human multi-epitope recombinant influenza virus proteins is a valid approach for a general T-cell vaccine to protect against influenza virus infection.

  7. Evaluation of dengue virus strains for human challenge studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, M P; Lyons, A; Innis, B L; Sun, W; McKinney, D; Chung, R C Y; Eckels, K H; Putnak, R; Kanesa-thasan, N; Scherer, J M; Statler, J; Asher, L V; Thomas, S J; Vaughn, D W

    2014-03-14

    Discordance between the measured levels of dengue virus neutralizing antibody and clinical outcomes in the first-ever efficacy study of a dengue tetravalent vaccine (Lancet, Nov 2012) suggests a need to re-evaluate the process of pre-screening dengue vaccine candidates to better predict clinical benefit prior to large-scale vaccine trials. In the absence of a reliable animal model and established correlates of protection for dengue, a human dengue virus challenge model may provide an approach to down-select vaccine candidates based on their ability to reduce risk of illness following dengue virus challenge. We report here the challenge of flavivirus-naïve adults with cell culture-passaged dengue viruses (DENV) in a controlled setting that resulted in uncomplicated dengue fever (DF). This sets the stage for proof-of-concept efficacy studies that allow the evaluation of dengue vaccine candidates in healthy adult volunteers using qualified DENV challenge strains well before they reach field efficacy trials involving children. Fifteen flavivirus-naïve adult volunteers received 1 of 7 DENV challenge strains (n=12) or placebo (n=3). Of the twelve volunteers who received challenge strains, five (two DENV-1 45AZ5 and three DENV-3 CH53489 cl24/28 recipients) developed DF, prospectively defined as ≥2 typical symptoms, ≥48h of sustained fever (>100.4°F) and concurrent viremia. Based on our study and historical data, we conclude that the DENV-1 and DENV-3 strains can be advanced as human challenge strains. Both of the DENV-2 strains and one DENV-4 strain failed to meet the protocol case definition of DF. The other two DENV-4 strains require additional testing as the illness approximated but did not satisfy the case definition of DF. Three volunteers exhibited effusions (1 pleural/ascites, 2 pericardial) and 1 volunteer exhibited features of dengue (rash, lymphadenopathy, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia), though in the absence of fever and symptoms. The occurrence of

  8. El Bocavirus humano: un nuevo virus respiratorio Human bocavirus: a new respiratory virus

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    Carlos Aguirre Muñoz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Las infecciones respiratorias agudas son una causa muy importante de morbilidad y mortalidad, especialmente en los niños y en los países en desarrollo. Con los métodos de laboratorio actuales, aproximadamente una tercera parte de estas infecciones se queda sin diagnóstico etiológico. Se acepta que los virus juegan un papel cardinal y que más de 200 virus, pertenecientes a seis familias virales están implicados en la génesis de este problema. La familia Parvoviridae se conoce desde mediados del siglo XX. El Parvovirus humano B19, identificado en 1980 y causante de enfermedades febriles y exantemáticas, fue considerado por muchos años como el único miembro de esta familia capaz de afectar a la especie humana. Sin embargo, un grupo de investigadores suecos comandado por Tobías Allander informó en agosto de 2005 el hallazgo de un nuevo Parvovirus, denominado provisionalmente Bocavirus humano, relacionado con infección respiratoria aguda en niños. En este artículo se resumen las características de este nuevo agente, se resalta la importancia de su hallazgo y de la técnica de investigación empleada. Respiratory tract infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, mainly in children and also in developing countries. The aethiology of approximately 30% of these infections remains obscure, using current laboratory methods. It has been accepted that viruses play an important role and more than 200 viruses, belonging to 6 viral families are implied in the pathogenesis of this problem. Parvoviridae family has been known since the middle of the XX century. Human Parvovirus B19 was identified in 1980; it causes rashes and febrile diseases and it was considered for many years as the only member of this family able to affect humans. However, Dr. Tobias Allander and colleagues, at Karolinska Institut, have discovered a previously unknown parvovirus, called Human Bocavirus, that has been found to affect children, causing lower

  9. Dry weather induces outbreaks of human West Nile virus infections

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    Belant Jerrold L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since its first occurrence in the New York City area during 1999, West Nile virus (WNV has spread rapidly across North America and has become a major public health concern in North America. By 2002, WNV was reported in 40 states and the District of Columbia with 4,156 human and 14,539 equine cases of infection. Mississippi had the highest human incidence rate of WNV during the 2002 epidemic in the United States. Epidemics of WNV can impose enormous impacts on local economies. Therefore, it is advantageous to predict human WNV risks for cost-effective controls of the disease and optimal allocations of limited resources. Understanding relationships between precipitation and WNV transmission is crucial for predicting the risk of the human WNV disease outbreaks under predicted global climate change scenarios. Methods We analyzed data on the human WNV incidences in the 82 counties of Mississippi in 2002, using standard morbidity ratio (SMR and Bayesian hierarchical models, to determine relationships between precipitation and human WNV risks. We also entertained spatial autocorrelations of human WNV risks with conditional autocorrelative (CAR models, implemented in WinBUGS 1.4.3. Results We observed an inverse relationship between county-level human WNV incidence risk and total annual rainfall during the previous year. Parameters representing spatial heterogeneity in the risk of human exposure to WNV improved model fit. Annual precipitation of the previous year was a predictor of spatial variation of WNV risk. Conclusions Our results have broad implications for risk assessment of WNV and forecasting WNV outbreaks. Assessing risk of vector-born infectious diseases will require understanding of complex ecological relationships. Based on the climatologically characteristic drought occurrence in the past and on climate model predictions for climate change and potentially greater drought occurrence in the future, we suggest that the

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells: viral shedding and cell contact-mediated infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asin, Susana N; Wildt-Perinic, Dunja; Mason, Sarah I; Howell, Alexandra L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-15

    We examined the mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells to gain a clearer understanding of the events by which HIV-1 infects cells within the female reproductive tract. We demonstrated that these cells can be productively infected by HIV-1 and that infection is associated with viral RNA reverse transcription, DNA transcription, and secretion of infectious virus. Levels of viral DNA and secreted virus decreased gradually after infection. Moreover, virus released by the uterine epithelial cells shortly after infection was able to infect human T cell lines, but virus released later did not. In contrast, human CD4(+) T cell lines were infected after cocultivation with epithelial cells at both early and late stages of infection. These data demonstrated that HIV-1 infects human epithelial cells of upper reproductive tract origin and that productive viral infection of epithelial cells may be an important mechanism of transmission of HIV-1 infection in women.

  11. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

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    Claire M. Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Defective interfering (DI viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8 was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1; it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  12. Zika virus infection in Brazil and human rights obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Debora; Gumieri, Sinara; Bevilacqua, Beatriz Galli; Cook, Rebecca J; Dickens, Bernard M

    2017-01-01

    The February 2016 WHO declaration that congenital Zika virus syndrome constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern reacted to the outbreak of the syndrome in Brazil. Public health emergencies can justify a spectrum of human rights responses, but in Brazil, the emergency exposed prevailing inequities in the national healthcare system. The government's urging to contain the syndrome, which is associated with microcephaly among newborns, is confounded by lack of reproductive health services. Women with low incomes in particular have little access to such health services. The emergency also illuminates the harm of restrictive abortion legislation, and the potential violation of human rights regarding women's health and under the UN Conventions on the Rights of the Child and on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Suggestions have been proposed by which the government can remedy the widespread healthcare inequities among the national population that are instructive for other countries where congenital Zika virus syndrome is prevalent. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  13. The role of giant viruses of amoebas in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Philippe; Aherfi, Sarah; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-06-01

    Since 2003, dozens of giant viruses that infect amoebas (GVA), including mimiviruses and marseilleviruses, have been discovered. These giants appear to be common in our biosphere. From the onset, their presence and possible pathogenic role in humans have been serendipitously observed or investigated using a broad range of technological approaches, including culture, electron microscopy, serology and various techniques based on molecular biology. The link between amoebal mimiviruses and pneumonia has been the most documented, with findings that fulfill several of the criteria considered as proof of viral disease causation. Regarding marseilleviruses, they have been mostly described in asymptomatic persons, and in a lymph node adenitis. The presence and impact of GVA in humans undoubtedly deserve further investigation in medicine.

  14. Phylodynamics and human-mediated dispersal of a zoonotic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbi, Chiraz; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A; Abdelatif, Elbia; Elharrak, Mehdi; Nourlil, Jalal; Jalal, Nourlil; Faouzi, Abdellah; Echevarría, Juan E; Vazquez Morón, Sonia; Rambaut, Andrew; Campiz, Nicholas; Tatem, Andrew J; Holmes, Edward C; Bourhy, Hervé

    2010-10-28

    Understanding the role of humans in the dispersal of predominantly animal pathogens is essential for their control. We used newly developed Bayesian phylogeographic methods to unravel the dynamics and determinants of the spread of dog rabies virus (RABV) in North Africa. Each of the countries studied exhibited largely disconnected spatial dynamics with major geopolitical boundaries acting as barriers to gene flow. Road distances proved to be better predictors of the movement of dog RABV than accessibility or raw geographical distance, with occasional long distance and rapid spread within each of these countries. Using simulations that bridge phylodynamics and spatial epidemiology, we demonstrate that the contemporary viral distribution extends beyond that expected for RABV transmission in African dog populations. These results are strongly supportive of human-mediated dispersal, and demonstrate how an integrated phylogeographic approach will turn viral genetic data into a powerful asset for characterizing, predicting, and potentially controlling the spatial spread of pathogens.

  15. Phylodynamics and human-mediated dispersal of a zoonotic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiraz Talbi

    Full Text Available Understanding the role of humans in the dispersal of predominantly animal pathogens is essential for their control. We used newly developed Bayesian phylogeographic methods to unravel the dynamics and determinants of the spread of dog rabies virus (RABV in North Africa. Each of the countries studied exhibited largely disconnected spatial dynamics with major geopolitical boundaries acting as barriers to gene flow. Road distances proved to be better predictors of the movement of dog RABV than accessibility or raw geographical distance, with occasional long distance and rapid spread within each of these countries. Using simulations that bridge phylodynamics and spatial epidemiology, we demonstrate that the contemporary viral distribution extends beyond that expected for RABV transmission in African dog populations. These results are strongly supportive of human-mediated dispersal, and demonstrate how an integrated phylogeographic approach will turn viral genetic data into a powerful asset for characterizing, predicting, and potentially controlling the spatial spread of pathogens.

  16. Assessment of the efficacy of membrane filtration processes to remove human enteric viruses and the suitability of bacteriophages and a plant virus as surrogates for those viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaki, N; Matsushita, T; Matsui, Y; Murai, K

    2017-02-24

    Here, we evaluated the efficacy of direct microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) to remove three representative human enteric viruses (i.e., adenovirus [AdV] type 40, coxsackievirus [CV] B5, and hepatitis A virus [HAV] IB), and one surrogate of human caliciviruses (i.e., murine norovirus [MNV] type 1). Eight different MF membranes and three different UF membranes were used. We also examined the ability of coagulation pretreatment with high-basicity polyaluminum chloride (PACl) to enhance virus removal by MF. The removal ratios of two bacteriophages (MS2 and φX174) and a plant virus (pepper mild mottle virus; PMMoV) were compared with the removal ratios of the human enteric viruses to assess the suitability of these viruses to be used as surrogates for human enteric viruses. The virus removal ratios obtained with direct MF with membranes with nominal pore sizes of 0.1-0.22 μm differed, depending on the membrane used; adsorptive interactions, particularly hydrophobic interactions between virus particles and the membrane surface, were dominant factors for virus removal. In contrast, direct UF with membranes with nominal molecular weight cutoffs of 1-100 kDa effectively removed viruses through size exclusion, and >4-log10 removal was achieved when a membrane with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 1 kDa was used. At pH 7 and 8, in-line coagulation-MF with nonsulfated high-basicity PACls containing Al30 species had generally a better virus removal (i.e., >4-log10 virus removal) than the other aluminum-based coagulants, except for φX174. For all of the filtration processes, the removal ratios of AdV, CV, HAV, and MNV were comparable and strongly correlated with each other. The removal ratios of MS2 and PMMoV were comparable or smaller than those of the three human enteric viruses and MNV, and were strongly correlated with those of the three human enteric viruses and MNV. The removal ratios obtained with coagulation-MF for φX174 were markedly smaller than

  17. Comparative analysis of avian influenza virus diversity in poultry and humans during a highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N7) virus outbreak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jonges (Marcel); A. Bataille (Arnaud); R. Enserink (Remko); A. Meijer (Adam); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A. Stegeman (Arjan); G. Koch (Guus); M. Koopmans (Matty)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough increasing data have become available that link human adaptation with specific molecular changes in nonhuman influenza viruses, the molecular changes of these viruses during a large highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) outbreak in poultry along with avian-to-human tran

  18. Comparative Analysis of Avian Influenza Virus Diversity in Poultry and Humans during a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A (H7N7) Virus Outbreak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonges, M.; Bataille, A.; Enserink, R.; Meijer, A.; Fouchier, R.A.M.; Stegeman, A.; Koch, G.; Koopmans, M.

    2011-01-01

    Although increasing data have become available that link human adaptation with specific molecular changes in nonhuman influenza viruses, the molecular changes of these viruses during a large highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) outbreak in poultry along with avian-to-human transmission hav

  19. Avirulent Avian Influenza Virus as a Vaccine Strain against a Potential Human Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Ayato; Kuboki, Noritaka; Okazaki, Katsunori; Ninomiya, Ai; Tanaka, Hiroko; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Enami, Masayoshi; Tashiro, Masato; Shortridge, Kennedy F.; Kida, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    In the influenza H5N1 virus incident in Hong Kong in 1997, viruses that are closely related to H5N1 viruses initially isolated in a severe outbreak of avian influenza in chickens were isolated from humans, signaling the possibility of an incipient pandemic. However, it was not possible to prepare a vaccine against the virus in the conventional embryonated egg system because of the lethality of the virus for chicken embryos and the high level of biosafety therefore required for vaccine production. Alternative approaches, including an avirulent H5N4 virus isolated from a migratory duck as a surrogate virus, H5N1 virus as a reassortant with avian virus H3N1 and an avirulent recombinant H5N1 virus generated by reverse genetics, have been explored. All vaccines were formalin inactivated. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with each of vaccines elicited the production of hemagglutination-inhibiting and virus-neutralizing antibodies, while intranasal vaccination without adjuvant induced both mucosal and systemic antibody responses that protected the mice from lethal H5N1 virus challenge. Surveillance of birds and animals, particularly aquatic birds, for viruses to provide vaccine strains, especially surrogate viruses, for a future pandemic is stressed. PMID:10482580

  20. Intracellular Immunization of Human Fetal Cord Blood Stem/Progenitor Cells with a Ribozyme Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mang; Leavitt, Mark C.; Maruyama, Midori; Yamada, Osamu; Young, Dennis; Ho, Anthony D.; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1995-01-01

    Successful treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection may ultimately require targeting of hematopoietic stem cells. Here we used retroviral vectors carrying the ribozyme gene to transduce CD34^+ cells from human fetal cord blood. Transduction and ribozyme expression had no apparent adverse effect on cell differentiation and/or proliferation. The macrophage-like cells, differentiated from the stem/progenitor cells in vitro, expressed the ribozyme gene and resisted infection by a macrophage tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1. These results suggest the feasibility of stem cell gene therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

  1. Introductions and evolution of human-origin seasonal influenza a viruses in multinational swine populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Martha I; Wentworth, David E; Culhane, Marie R; Vincent, Amy L; Viboud, Cecile; LaPointe, Matthew P; Lin, Xudong; Holmes, Edward C; Detmer, Susan E

    2014-09-01

    The capacity of influenza A viruses to cross species barriers presents a continual threat to human and animal health. Knowledge of the human-swine interface is particularly important for understanding how viruses with pandemic potential evolve in swine hosts. We sequenced the genomes of 141 influenza viruses collected from North American swine during 2002 to 2011 and identified a swine virus that possessed all eight genome segments of human seasonal A/H3N2 virus origin. A molecular clock analysis indicates that this virus--A/sw/Saskatchewan/02903/2009(H3N2)--has likely circulated undetected in swine for at least 7 years. For historical context, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of an additional 1,404 whole-genome sequences from swine influenza A viruses collected globally during 1931 to 2013. Human-to-swine transmission occurred frequently over this time period, with 20 discrete introductions of human seasonal influenza A viruses showing sustained onward transmission in swine for at least 1 year since 1965. Notably, human-origin hemagglutinin (H1 and H3) and neuraminidase (particularly N2) segments were detected in swine at a much higher rate than the six internal gene segments, suggesting an association between the acquisition of swine-origin internal genes via reassortment and the adaptation of human influenza viruses to new swine hosts. Further understanding of the fitness constraints on the adaptation of human viruses to swine, and vice versa, at a genomic level is central to understanding the complex multihost ecology of influenza and the disease threats that swine and humans pose to each other. The swine origin of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic virus underscored the importance of understanding how influenza A virus evolves in these animals hosts. While the importance of reassortment in generating genetically diverse influenza viruses in swine is well documented, the role of human-to-swine transmission has not been as intensively studied. Through a

  2. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iorio, Alfonso; Marchesini, Emanuela; Awad, Tahany;

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).......Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)....

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus from Lanzhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chuanfeng; Fu, Shengfang; Zhou, Xv; Yu, Li

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complete genome of human respiratory syncytial virus was sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the full-length human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) genome sequence belongs to gene type NA1. We sequenced the genome in order to create the full-length cDNA infectious clone and develop vaccines against HRSV.

  4. Infection of children with avian-human reassortant influenza virus from pigs in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.J. Claas (Eric); Y. Kawaoka (Yoshihiro); J.C. de Jong (Jan); N. Masurel (Nic); R.G. Webster (Robert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractPigs have been proposed to act as the intermediate hosts in the generation of pandemic human influenza strains by reassortment of genes from avian and human influenza virus strains. The circulation of avian-like H1N1 influenza viruses in European pigs since 1979 and the detection of huma

  5. Concomitant Human Infections with 2 Cowpox Virus Strains in Related Cases, France, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducournau, Corinne; Ferrier-Rembert, Audrey; Ferraris, Olivier; Joffre, Aurélie; Favier, Anne-Laure; Flusin, Olivier; Van Cauteren, Dieter; Kecir, Kaci; Auburtin, Brigitte; Védy, Serge; Bessaud, Maël

    2013-01-01

    We investigated 4 related human cases of cowpox virus infection reported in France during 2011. Three patients were infected by the same strain, probably transmitted by imported pet rats, and the fourth patient was infected by another strain. The 2 strains were genetically related to viruses previously isolated from humans with cowpox infection in Europe. PMID:24274113

  6. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  7. Human Infection with Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus - China

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biorisk reduction Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus – China Disease outbreak news 18 January 2017 ... laboratory-confirmed human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus and on 12 January 2017, the Health ...

  8. Round-robin comparison of methods for the detection of human enteric viruses in lettuce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guyader, Francoise S.; Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Haugarreau, Larissa

    2004-01-01

    Five methods that detect human enteric virus contamination in lettuce were compared. To mimic multiple contaminations as observed after sewage contamination, artificial contamination was with human calicivirus and poliovirus and animal calicivirus strains at different concentrations. Nucleic acid...

  9. Human Monoclonal Antibodies as Candidate Therapeutics Against Emerging Viruses and HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongyu Zhu; Ponraj Prabakaran; Weizao Chen; Christopher C.Broder; Rui Gong; Dimiter S.Dimitrov

    2013-01-01

    More than 40 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for a number of disease indications with only one of these (Synagis)-for a viral disease,and not for therapy but for prevention.However,in the last decade novel potent mAbs have been discovered and characterized with potential as therapeutics against viruses of major importance for public health and biosecurity including Hendra virus (HeV),Nipah virus (NiV),severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV),Ebola virus (EBOV),West Nile virus (WNV),influenza virus (IFV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).Here,we review such mAbs with an emphasis on antibodies of human origin,and highlight recent results as well as technologies and mechanisms related to their potential as therapeutics.

  10. Human monoclonal antibodies as candidate therapeutics against emerging viruses and HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongyu; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Chen, Weizao; Broder, Christopher C; Gong, Rui; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2013-04-01

    More than 40 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for a number of disease indications with only one of these (Synagis) - for a viral disease, and not for therapy but for prevention. However, in the last decade novel potent mAbs have been discovered and characterized with potential as therapeutics against viruses of major importance for public health and biosecurity including Hendra virus (HeV), Nipah virus (NiV), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Ebola virus (EBOV), West Nile virus (WNV), influenza virus (IFV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we review such mAbs with an emphasis on antibodies of human origin, and highlight recent results as well as technologies and mechanisms related to their potential as therapeutics.

  11. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Schäfer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV, high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  12. Genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Yin, Yanbo; Sun, Zhongsheng; Gao, Lei; Gao, George F; Liu, Sidang; Sun, Lei; Liu, Wenjun

    2010-11-01

    H1N1 is the main subtype influenza A virus circulating in human and swine population, and has long been a threat to economy and public health. To explore the genetic correlation between current circulating H1N1 swine and human influenza viruses. Three new H1N1 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) were isolated and genomes sequencing were conducted followed by phylogenetic and molecular analysis of all swine and human H1N1 influenza viruses isolated in China in the past five years. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three isolates possessed different characteristics: the genome of A/Swine/Shandong/1112/2008 was closely related to that of classical H1N1 SIV, while A/Swine/Shandong/1123/2008 was a reassortant with NS gene from the human-like H3N2 influenza virus and other genes from the classical H1N1 SIV, and A/Swine/Fujian/0325/2008 fell into a lineage of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses. Genetically, 2009 H1N1 influenza A viruses (2009 H1N1) in China were contiguous to the SIV lineages rather than the seasonal H1N1 human influenza virus's lineage. Furthermore, molecular analysis among human and swine influenza viruses provided more detail information for understanding their genetic correlation. These results suggested that in China in the past five years, the classical, avian-like and human-like H1N1 SIV existed in swine herds and the reassortment between H1N1 swine and H3N2 human influenza viruses was identified. In addition, the present data showed no evidence to support a strong correlation between the 2009 H1N1 and the swine influenza virus circulating in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Serologic evidence of human influenza virus infections in swine populations, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rith, Sareth; Netrabukkana, Punnaporn; Sorn, San; Mumford, Elizabeth; Mey, Channa; Holl, Davun; Goutard, Flavie; Y, Bunthin; Fenwick, Stan; Robertson, Ian; Roger, François; Buchy, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted from 2006 to 2010 and investigated the seroprevalence of influenza A viruses in Cambodian pigs, including human H1N1, H3N2, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A(H1N1)pdm09), and highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza A viruses. A total of 1147 sera obtained from pigs in Cambodia were tested by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays for antibody to human influenza A viruses along with both HI and microneutralization (MN) tests to assess immunological responses to H5N1 virus. The results were compared by year, age, and province. Antibodies against a human influenza A virus were detected in 14·9% of samples. A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were dominant over the study period (23·1%), followed by those to human H1N1 (17·3%) and H3N2 subtypes (9·9%). No pigs were serologically positive for avian H5 influenza viruses. The seroprevalence of human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses peaked in 2008, while that of A(H1N1)pdm09 reached a peak in 2010. No significant differences in seroprevalence to human influenza subtypes were observed in different age groups. Cambodian pigs were exposed to human strains of influenza A viruses either prior to or during this study. The implications of these high prevalence rates imply human-to-swine influenza virus transmission in Cambodia. Although pigs are mostly raised in small non-commercial farms, our preliminary results provide evidence of sustained human influenza virus circulation in pig populations in Cambodia. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 2: evidence for distinct sequence subtypes with differences in virus biology.

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, F; Yue, L; Robertson, D L; Hill, S C; Hui, H.; Biggar, R J; Neequaye, A E; Whelan, T M; Ho, D D; Shaw, G M

    1994-01-01

    The virulence properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) are known to vary significantly and to range from relative attenuation in certain individuals to high-level pathogenicity in others. These differences in clinical manifestations may, at least in part, be determined by genetic differences among infecting virus strains. Evaluation of the full spectrum of HIV-2 genetic diversity is thus a necessary first step towards understanding its molecular epidemiology, natural history ...

  15. Genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 2:evidence for distinct sequence subtypes with differences in virus biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, F; Yue, L; ROBERTSON, DL; Hill, SC; Hui, HX; BIGGAR, RJ; NEEQUAYE, AE; WHELAN, TM; Ho, DD; Shaw, GM; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, BH

    1994-01-01

    The virulence properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) are known to vary significantly and to range from relative attenuation in certain individuals to high level pathogenicity in others. These differences in clinical manifestations may, at least in part, be determined by genetic differences among infecting virus strains. Evaluation of the full spectrum of HIV-2 genetic diversity is thus a necessary first step towards understanding its molecular epidemiology, natural history ...

  16. Virus-Free Human Placental Cell Lines To Study Genetic Functions | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.

  17. High Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Markers in Romanian Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruta Simona

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated the frequency of hepatitis coinfection in Romanian adolescents who were diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection prior to 1995. Methods One hundred sixty-one adolescents (13–18 years of age with symptomatic HIV infection, but without signs of hepatic dysfunction, and 356 age-matched, HIV-uninfected controls underwent laboratory testing for markers of parenterally acquired hepatitis virus infection. Results Seventy-eight percent of HIV-infected adolescents had markers of past or present hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, as compared with 32% of controls (P = .0001. The prevalence of HBV replicative markers was more than 5-fold higher in HIV-infected adolescents as compared with controls: 43.4% vs 7.9% (P = .0001, respectively, for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg; and 11.2% vs 2.2% (P = .0001, respectively, for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg. The prevalence of HBsAg chronic carriers and the presence of HBV replicative markers was significantly higher in patients with immunologically defined AIDS (CD4+ cell counts P = .02 for HBsAg and 22.8% vs 5.7%, (P = .002 for HBV DNA. After 1 year of follow-up, the proportion of those who cleared the HBeAg was considerably lower in severely immunosuppressed coinfected patients: 4.7% vs 37.1% (P = .003. Four additional HIV-infected adolescents became HBsAg-positive over the term of follow-up (incidence rate, 24.9/1000 person-years, despite a record of immunization against hepatitis B. Conclusion A substantial percentage of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected Romanian adolescents have evidence of past or present HBV infection. In HIV-infected adolescents, the degree of immunosuppression is correlated with persistence of HBV replicative markers, even in the absence of clinical or biochemical signs of liver disease.

  18. Functional Evolution of Influenza Virus NS1 Protein in Currently Circulating Human 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amelia M; Nogales, Aitor; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J; DeDiego, Marta L

    2017-09-01

    In 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus emerged in humans, causing a global pandemic. It was previously shown that the NS1 protein from this human 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus was an effective interferon (IFN) antagonist but could not inhibit general host gene expression, unlike other NS1 proteins from seasonal human H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. Here we show that the NS1 protein from currently circulating pH1N1 viruses has evolved to encode 6 amino acid changes (E55K, L90I, I123V, E125D, K131E, and N205S) with respect to the original protein. Notably, these 6 residue changes restore the ability of pH1N1 NS1 to inhibit general host gene expression, mainly by their ability to restore binding to the cellular factor CPSF30. This is the first report describing the ability of the pH1N1 NS1 protein to naturally acquire mutations that restore this function. Importantly, a recombinant pH1N1 virus containing these 6 amino acid changes in the NS1 protein (pH1N1/NSs-6mut) inhibited host IFN and proinflammatory responses to a greater extent than that with the parental virus (pH1N1/NS1-wt), yet virus titers were not significantly increased in cell cultures or in mouse lungs, and the disease was partially attenuated. The pH1N1/NSs-6mut virus grew similarly to pH1N1/NSs-wt in mouse lungs, but infection with pH1N1/NSs-6mut induced lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines, likely due to a general inhibition of gene expression mediated by the mutated NS1 protein. This lower level of inflammation induced by the pH1N1/NSs-6mut virus likely accounts for the attenuated disease phenotype and may represent a host-virus adaptation affecting influenza virus pathogenesis.IMPORTANCE Seasonal influenza A viruses (IAVs) are among the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans. In addition, occasional pandemics are caused when IAVs circulating in other species emerge in the human population. In 2009, a swine-origin H1N1 IAV (pH1N1) was transmitted to humans, infecting people then and up

  19. Replication of swine and human influenza viruses in juvenile and layer turkey hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Yassine, Hadi; Awe, Olusegun O; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2013-04-12

    Since the first reported isolation of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in turkeys in the 1980s, transmission of SIVs to turkeys was frequently documented. Recently, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, that was thought to be of swine origin, was detected in turkeys with a severe drop in egg production. In this study, we assessed the infectivity of different mammalian influenza viruses including swine, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human influenza viruses in both juvenile and layer turkeys. In addition, we investigated the potential influenza virus dissemination in the semen of experimentally infected turkey toms. Results showed that all mammalian origin influenza viruses tested can infect turkeys. SIVs were detected in respiratory and digestive tracts of both juvenile and layer turkeys. Variations in replication efficiencies among SIVs were observed especially in the reproductive tract of layer turkeys. Compared to SIVs, limited replication of seasonal human H1N1 and no detectable replication of recent human-like swine H1N2, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human H3N2 viruses was noticed. All birds seroconverted to all tested viruses regardless of their replication level. In turkey toms, we were able to detect swine H3N2 virus in semen and reproductive tract of infected toms by real-time RT-PCR although virus isolation was not successful. These data suggest that turkey hens could be affected by diverse influenza strains especially SIVs. Moreover, the differences in the replication efficiency we demonstrated among SIVs and between SIV and human influenza viruses in layer turkeys suggest a possible use of turkeys as an animal model to study host tropism and pathogenesis of influenza viruses. Our results also indicate a potential risk of venereal transmission of influenza viruses in turkeys. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania López Rodríguez

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease is related with multiple risk factors. Those patients with human immunodeficiency virus have higher risk of presenting this disease and it is usually more serious in these cases. Objective: To describe the prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV. Methods: Descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study including patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province. The occurrence of the disease was determined after the Periodontics Cuban Standards, and oral hygiene was assessed through the simplified oral hygiene index. Other variables were measured, such as smoking habits, T CD4+ lymphocyte counting and virus load. The independent association of each risk factor with the disease was determined through a logistic regression model. Results: The 56, 5 % of the 154 patients presented Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease; 60 (39.0% gingivitis and 27 (17,5% periodontitis. Gingivitis was associated with poor oral hygiene (OR: 3,71 and periodontitis with smoking habit (OR: 5,20. The severe forms of periodontitis occurred mainly in patients with lymphocyte counting lower than 500 cells/mm3 . Conclusions: The prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province is linked to known risk factors such as smoking habits and oral hygiene.

  1. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  2. MRI in human immunodeficiency virus-associated cerebral vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkefeld, J.; Lanfermann, H. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Enzensberger, W. [Klinik fuer Neurologie, Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Cerebral ischaemia caused by inflammatory vasculopathies has been described as complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Imaging studies have shown ischaemic lesions and changes of the vascular lumen, but did not allow demonstration of abnormalities within the vessel wall itself. Two HIV-infected men presented with symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack. Initial MRI of the first showed no infarct; in the second two small lacunar lesions were detected. In both cases, multiplanar 3-mm slice contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed aneurysmal dilatation, with thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the internal carotid and middle cerebral (MCA) arteries. These findings were interpreted as indicating cerebral vasculitis. In the first patient the vasculopathy progressed to carotid artery occlusion, and he developed an infarct in the MCA territory, but then remained neurologically stable. In the second patient varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection was the probable cause of vasculitis. The clinical deficits and vasculitic MRI changes regressed with antiviral and immunosuppressive therapy. (orig.)

  3. Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in a dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, C; Marianos, D; Ou, C Y; Dumbaugh, R; Witte, J; Berkelman, R; Gooch, B; Myers, G; Luo, C C; Schochetman, G

    1992-05-15

    To determine if patients of a dentist with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) became infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during their dental care and, if so, to identify possible mechanisms of transmission. Retrospective epidemiologic follow-up of the dentist, his office practice, and his former patients. The practice of a dentist with AIDS in Florida. A dentist with AIDS, his health care providers and employees, and former patients of the dentist, including eight HIV-infected patients. Identification of risks for HIV transmission (if present), degree of genetic relatedness of the viruses, and identification of infection control and other office practices. Five of the eight HIV-infected patients had no confirmed exposures to HIV other than the dental practice and were infected with HIV strains that were closely related to those of the dentist. Each of the five had invasive dental procedures, done by the dentist after he was diagnosed with AIDS. Four of these five patients shared visit days (P greater than 0.2). Breaches in infection control and other dental office practices to explain these transmissions could not be identified. Although the specific incident that resulted in HIV transmission to these patients remains uncertain, the epidemiologic evidence supports direct dentist-to-patient transmission rather than a patient-to-patient route.

  4. Gastrointestinal opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Anazi Awadh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI opportunistic infections (OIs are commonly encountered at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disease. In view of the suppressive nature of the virus and the direct contact with the environment, the GI tract is readily accessible and is a common site for clinical expression of HIV. The subject is presented based on information obtained by electronic searches of peer-reviewed articles in medical journals, Cochrane reviews and PubMed sources. The spectrum of GI OIs ranges from oral lesions of Candidiasis, various lesions of viral infections, hepatobiliary lesions, pancreatitis and anorectal lesions. The manifestations of the disease depend on the level of immunosuppression, as determined by the CD4 counts. The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has altered the pattern of presentation, resorting mainly to features of antimicrobial-associated colitis and side effects of antiretroviral drugs. The diagnosis of GI OIs in HIV/ acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients is usually straightforward. However, subtle presentations require that the physicians should have a high index of suspicion when given the setting of HIV infection.

  5. Liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection: Diagnostic methods and clinical impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caterina; Sagnelli; Salvatore; Martini; Mariantonietta; Pisaturo; Giuseppe; Pasquale; Margherita; Macera; Rosa; Zampino; Nicola; Coppola; Evangelista; Sagnelli

    2015-01-01

    Several non-invasive surrogate methods have recently challenged the main role of liver biopsy in assessing liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus(HCV)-monoinfected and human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, applied to avoid the well-known side effects of liver puncture. Serological tests involve the determination of biochemical markers of synthesis or degradation of fibrosis, tests not readily available in clinical practice, or combinations of routine tests used in chronic hepatitis and HIV/HCV coinfection. Several radiologic techniques have also been proposed, some of which commonly used in clinical practice. The studies performed to compare the prognostic value of noninvasive surrogate methods with that of the degree of liver fibrosis assessed on liver tissue have not as yet provided conclusive results. Each surrogate technique has shown some limitations, including the risk of over- or under-estimating the extent of liver fibrosis. The current knowledge on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCVcoinfected patients will be summarized in this review article, which is addressed in particular to physicians involved in this setting in their clinical practice.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus in oral mucosa from human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the detection rate of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is higher in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. In an attempt to contribute to our epidemiological understanding of this coinfection and to investigate the activity of EBV in normal oral mucosa, we performed a cross-sectional study with HIV-positive patients. Methods: oral smears from 145 HIV-positive patients were collected between March 2010 and March 2011. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR and reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR were used to genotype EBV and to detect EBNA-2 expression, respectively. Results: EBV DNA was detected in 48.3% of the study participants, of whom 32.85% were EBV-1 and 45.71% were EBV-2 carriers. Additionally, 14.28% were coinfected with both types. EBNA-2 mRNA was expressed in 45.7% of the EBV -positive samples, including 20.0% with EBV-1 only, 20.0% with EBV-2 only and 1.4% with both genotypes. Immune status affected the overall EBV infection, and EBV-2 positivity was significantly correlated with sexual lifestyle of the participants. EBV co-infection with both viral types was dependent upon HIV viral load and the activity of the EBNA-2 gene. Conclusion: we report a high prevalence of active EBV in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic HIV-seropositive individuals. This study addresses the need for monitoring and treatment of HIV-infected patients with EBV reactivation.

  7. The dynamic DNA methylomes of double-stranded DNA viruses associated with human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Rosales, Cecilia; Lopez-Nieva, Pilar; Graña, Osvaldo; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Espada, Jesus; Melo, Sonia A.; Lujambio, Amaia; Fraga, Mario F.; Pino, Irene; Javierre, Biola; Carmona, Francisco J.; Acquadro, Francesco; Steenbergen, Renske D.M.; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Meijer, Chris J.; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Lloveras, Belen; Capella, Gabriel; Quer, Josep; Buti, Maria; Esteban, Juan-Ignacio; Allende, Helena; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Castellsague, Xavier; Minarovits, Janos; Ponce, Jordi; Capello, Daniela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz; Gomez-Lopez, Gonzalo; Pisano, David G.; Valencia, Alfonso; Piris, Miguel Angel; Bosch, Francesc X.; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Kieff, Elliott; Esteller, Manel

    2009-01-01

    The natural history of cancers associated with virus exposure is intriguing, since only a minority of human tissues infected with these viruses inevitably progress to cancer. However, the molecular reasons why the infection is controlled or instead progresses to subsequent stages of tumorigenesis are largely unknown. In this article, we provide the first complete DNA methylomes of double-stranded DNA viruses associated with human cancer that might provide important clues to help us understand the described process. Using bisulfite genomic sequencing of multiple clones, we have obtained the DNA methylation status of every CpG dinucleotide in the genome of the Human Papilloma Viruses 16 and 18 and Human Hepatitis B Virus, and in all the transcription start sites of the Epstein-Barr Virus. These viruses are associated with infectious diseases (such as hepatitis B and infectious mononucleosis) and the development of human tumors (cervical, hepatic, and nasopharyngeal cancers, and lymphoma), and are responsible for 1 million deaths worldwide every year. The DNA methylomes presented provide evidence of the dynamic nature of the epigenome in contrast to the genome. We observed that the DNA methylome of these viruses evolves from an unmethylated to a highly methylated genome in association with the progression of the disease, from asymptomatic healthy carriers, through chronically infected tissues and pre-malignant lesions, to the full-blown invasive tumor. The observed DNA methylation changes have a major functional impact on the biological behavior of the viruses. PMID:19208682

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus and migrant labor in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochelson, K; Mothibeli, M; Leger, J P

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigate the impact of the migrant labor system on heterosexual relationships on South African mines and assess the implications for the future transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The migrant labor system has created a market for prostitution in mining towns and geographic networks of relationships within and between urban and rural communities. A section of the migrant workforce and a group of women dependent on prostitution for economic support appear especially vulnerable to contracting HIV infection since they are involved in multiple sexual encounters with different, changing partners, usually without condom protection. Furthermore, sexually transmitted disease morbidity is extensive in the general and mineworker populations. Historically, migration facilitated the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and may act similarly for HIV. Problems of combating the HIV epidemic in South Africa are discussed.

  9. [Pulmonary complications in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann V, Pablo; Viviani S, Támara; Peña D, Anamaría

    2007-08-01

    Pulmonary complications in children infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are common and may be the first manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The aim of our study was to review pulmonary diseases and complications in pediatric patients with HIV infection in a large tertiary hospital in Santiago, Chile. We performed a retrospective, descriptive analysis of 17 patients with HIV infection controlled at the Hospital Dr. Sótero del Rio. Respiratory complications/diseases were: overall pneumonia (n: 14), recurrent pneumonia (n: 10), citomegalovirus associated pneumonia (n: 4), Pneumocystis jiroveci associated pneumonia (n: 1) pulmonary tuberculosis (n: 1), lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (n: 3) and chronic pulmonary disease (n: 7). Microorganisms isolated were mostly atypical and frequently associated with severe and chronic pulmonary damage. A high degree of suspicion is required to detect atypical microorganisms promptly, in order to rapidly implement pathogen targeted therapy that could potentially decrease the possibility of sequelae.

  10. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A;

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...... proviruses, one with a wild-type gag/gag-pol and the other with a mutant gag that cannot express functional Gag/Gag-Pol. Viral titers and RNA analyses revealed that mutant viral RNAs can be packaged at efficiencies comparable to that of viral RNA from which wild-type Gag/Gag-Pol is translated. These results...... do not support the cis-packaging hypothesis but instead indicate that trans packaging is the major mechanism of HIV-2 RNA packaging. To further characterize the mechanisms of HIV-2 RNA packaging, we visualized HIV-2 RNA in individual particles by using fluorescent protein-tagged RNA-binding proteins...

  11. Angelica Sinensis May Provide Protection Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad Zarenezhad

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress and disturbed glutathione redox system play an important role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Depletion in intracellular levels of reduced glutathione (GSH contributes to an increment in tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α-stimulated-HIV-1-transcription, activation of HIV-1-replication, sensitivity to TNF-α-induced cell death, and impairment of CD4+ cell function and survival. Therefore, several studies have investigated the effect of GSH-enhancer agents such as N-acetyl cystein in the treatment of patients with HIV infection. With regard to the beneficial effects of Angelica sinensis, a Chinese medicinal herb, on GSH redox system and the pathogenic role of GSH depletion in HIV infection and the immunomodulator effects of active ingredients of this herb, we postulated that Angelica sinensis may be of value in the treatment of HIV-infected patients.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus antibodies and the vaccine problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Weiss, R A

    2014-05-01

    Despite the great advances made in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection with antiretroviral drug treatment, a safe and efficacious HIV vaccine has yet to be developed. Here, we discuss why clinical trials and vaccine development for HIV have so far been disappointing, with an emphasis on the lack of protective antibodies. We review approaches for developing appropriate HIV immunogens and the stimulation of long-lasting B-cell responses with antibody maturation. We conclude that candidate reagents in the pipeline for HIV vaccine development are unlikely to be particularly effective. Although the major funders of HIV vaccine research and development are placing increasing emphasis on clinical product development, a genuine breakthrough in preventing HIV infection through vaccines is more likely to come from novel immunogen research.

  13. [Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against human papilloma virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, A E; Hoffmann, T K; Klussmann, J P; Kaufmann, A M

    2010-08-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) has been identified as the cause of recurrent papillomatosis and of a subgroup of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. A change in prevalence of these lesions, especially for oropharyngeal carcinoma, can be expected as a consequence of the introduction of prophylactic HPV vaccines for young women, targeting the most frequent high- and low-risk HPV subtypes. Vaccination for the major low-risk HPV types has proven to be highly effective against genital warts and activity against papillomatosis can be expected. The possibilities of prophylactic HPV vaccination as well as new developments and the rationale for therapeutic vaccines are discussed on the basis of the current literature.

  14. Emerging bone problems in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondy, Kristin; Tebas, Pablo

    2003-04-01

    Recently, a high incidence of osteopenia and osteoporosis has been observed in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This problem appears to be more frequent in patients receiving potent antiretroviral therapy. Other bone-related complications in HIV-infected individuals, including avascular necrosis of the hip and compression fracture of the lumbar spine, have also been reported. People living with HIV have significant alterations in bone metabolism, regardless of whether they are receiving potent antiretroviral therapy. The underlying mechanisms to account for these observations remain unknown, although studies are underway to examine the relationship between the bone abnormalities and other complications associated with HIV and antiretroviral therapy. HIV-infected patients with osteopenia or osteoporosis should be treated similarly to HIV-seronegative patients with appropriate use of nutritional supplements (calcium and vitamin D) and exercise. Hormone replacement and antiresorptive therapies might be also indicated.

  15. Sexual Assault: A Report on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F. Griffith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this report is to describe an urban county hospital human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection prevention protocol offering prophylactic combination antiretroviral medications to female victims of sexual assault. A retrospective chart review was conducted from June, 2007 through June, 2008 of 151 women who were prescribed antiretroviral prophylaxis by protocol. All women receiving HIV prophylaxis initially screened HIV seronegative. Of the 58 women who reported taking any HIV prophylaxis, 36 (62% were HIV screened at 12 and/or 24 weeks and none had HIV seroconverted. Although the initiation of an HIV post exposure prophylaxis protocol for sexual assault in a county hospital population is feasible, patient follow-up for counseling and HIV serostatus evaluation is an identified barrier

  16. Idiopathic genital ulcers in women infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J; Clark, R A; Watts, D H; Till, M; Arrastia, C; Schuman, P; Cohn, S E; Young, M; Bessen, L; Greenblatt, R; Vogler, M; Swindells, S; Boyer, P

    1996-12-01

    A national survey of investigators caring for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women was undertaken to describe the clinical presentation of idiopathic genital ulcer disease. Patients with negative syphilis and herpes simplex testing and/or negative genital ulcer biopsy were included in this study. Study participants (n = 29) were generally severely immunocompromised (median CD4 cell count was 50/mm3, and 68% had an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining opportunistic process). Thirty-seven percent had coexistent oral ulcers and 19% had their genital ulcer progress to fistula formation (four rectovaginal and one vaginal-perineal). There was generally a favorable response to topical, systemic, and intralesional steroid treatment. This study suggests that idiopathic or probable aphthous genital ulcers in women have similar clinical characteristics to aphthous oroesophageal ulcers. Although infrequent, these genital ulcers can cause severe morbidity. Further research is warranted to better define the pathophysiology and optimal management.

  17. Eosinophilia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Andrew; Serpa, Jose A

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilia is not uncommonly encountered in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), particularly at initiation of care or among those with advanced disease. The clinical manifestation most commonly associated with eosinophilia in this patient population is skin rash. Management of these patients is challenging due to a paucity of data evaluating diagnostic testing and therapeutic strategies. Patients born in or with significant travel to parasite-endemic countries are more likely to have tissue-invasive helminthes, such as Strongyloides or Schistosoma. Patients without such risk factors are unlikely to have parasitic infections and frequently will have self-resolution of eosinophilia. When a detailed history, physical exam, and diagnostic work-up are unrevealing, we sometimes consider empirical therapy with ivermectin. Praziquantel may also be considered for those at risk for schistosomiasis.

  18. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  19. Cardiac Disease Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Leung, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    Over the last 2 decades human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become a chronic disease requiring long-term management. Aging, antiretroviral therapy, chronic inflammation, and several other factors contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients infected with HIV. In low-income and middle-income countries where antiretroviral therapy access is limited, cardiac disease is most commonly related to opportunistic infections and end-stage manifestations of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, including HIV-associated cardiomyopathy, pericarditis, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Cardiovascular screening, prevention, and risk factor management are important factors in the management of patients infected with HIV worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection.

  1. Conjunctival Flora of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients on Antiretroviral Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Kagmeni; Bilong, Yannick; Dohvoma, Andin Viola; Ebana, Steve Robert; Gonsu, Hortance

    2017-01-01

    To determine the conjunctival flora of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART). A total of 104 conjunctival swabs from 104 HIV patients on ART underwent microbiological evaluation to describe the flora. There were 71 (68.26%) women and 33 (31.74%) men. The mean age was 42.9 ± 9.77 (range: 22-70) years. Negative cultures were found in 39 (37.50%) cases. Bacterial growth occurred in 65 (62.50%) cases. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was found in 59 eyes (90.76%), and coagulase-positive in 3 eyes (4.61%). There was a significant correlation between the duration of ART, the degrees of immunosuppression, and bacterial growth. Knowledge of the conjunctival flora in HIV patients may provide a better guideline in the choice of antibiotic for the management of ocular surface infections.

  2. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope confers higher rates of replicative fitness to perinatally transmitted viruses than to nontransmitted viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiaohong; West, John T; Zhang, Hong; Shea, Danielle M; M'soka, Tendai J; Wood, Charles

    2008-12-01

    Selection of a minor viral genotype during perinatal transmission of human Immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been observed, but there is a lack of information on the correlation of the restrictive transmission with biological properties of the virus, such as replicative fitness. Recombinant viruses expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein or the Discosoma sp. red fluorescent (DsRed2) protein carrying the V1 to V5 regions of env from seven mother-infant pairs (MIPs) infected by subtype C HIV-1 were constructed, and competition assays were carried out to compare the fitness between the transmitted and nontransmitted viruses. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the frequency of infected cells, and the replicative fitness was determined based on a calculation that takes into account replication of competing viruses in a single infection versus dual infections. Transmitted viruses from five MIPs with the mothers chronically infected showed a restrictive env genotype, and all the recombinant viruses carrying the infants' Env had higher replicative fitness than those carrying the Env from the mothers. This growth fitness is lineage specific and can be observed only within the same MIP. In contrast, in two MIPs where the mothers had undergone recent acute infection, the viral Env sequences were similar between the mothers and infants and showed no further restriction in quasispecies during perinatal transmission. The recombinant viruses carrying the Env from the infants' viruses also showed replication fitness similar to those carrying the mothers' Env proteins. Our results suggest that newly transmitted viruses from chronically infected mothers have been selected to have higher replicative fitness to favor transmission, and this advantage is conferred by the V1 to V5 region of Env of the transmitted viruses. This finding has important implications for vaccine design or development of strategies to prevent HIV-1 transmission.

  3. Autoimmune hepatitis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Leila; Beattie, Adam; Green, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Chronic liver disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV. However, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in patients with HIV has rarely been reported. Our aim was to evaluate a cohort of patients with HIV and AIH and identify clinical presentations and outcomes. Patient Concerns: Management of autoimmune hepatitis in context of human immunodeficiency virus, long-term outcomes, and safety in setting of underlying immunocompromised state. Diagnoses: Autoimmune Hepatitis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatotoxicity, Liver Injury, Liver Transplantation. Interventions: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients with HIV and AIH based on histological, serologic, biochemical demographic, and clinical data. Outcomes: Five patients were identified with autoimmune hepatitis; 4 of 5 were women, and all were African or African-American. The age at the time of AIH diagnosis was 46.6 ± 13.4 years. All patients acquired HIV sexually and all had CD4 counts >250 cells/uL (456–1011 cells/uL) and undetectable HIV viral loads at the time of AIH diagnosis. One patient presented with acute liver failure necessitating liver transplantation and developed AIH posttransplantation. At the time of diagnosis, the AST were 350 ± 448 U/L, ALT 247 ± 190 U/L, bilirubin 7 ± 12 mg/dL, and alkaline phosphatase 126 ± 53 U/L. All patients had histologic evidence of AIH on liver biopsies. Patients were successfully treated with prednisone and azathioprine, without a decrease in CD4 <250 cells/uL, infectious complications or significant side effects. Lessons: AIH occurs in patients with well-controlled HIV. In our patient cohort, immunosuppressive therapy with prednisone and azathioprine was safe and effective in inducing remission, without significant complications or development of opportunistic infections. PMID:28207511

  4. PD 404,182 Is a Virocidal Small Molecule That Disrupts Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Ana Maria; Chockalingam, Karuppiah; Bobardt, Michael; Simeon, Rudo; Chang, Jinhong

    2012-01-01

    We describe a virucidal small molecule, PD 404,182, that is effective against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The median 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the antiviral effect of PD 404,182 against HCV and HIV in cell culture are 11 and 1 μM, respectively. The antiviral activity of PD 404,182 is due to the physical disruption of virions that is accompanied to various degrees (depending on the virus and exposure temperature/time) by the release of viral nucleic acids into the surrounding medium. PD 404,182 does not directly lyse liposomal membranes even after extended exposure, and it shows no attenuation in antiviral activity when preincubated with liposomes of various lipid compositions, suggesting that the compound inactivates viruses through interaction with a nonlipid structural component of the virus. The virucidal activity of PD 404,182 appears to be virus specific, as little to no viral inactivation was detected with the enveloped Dengue and Sindbis viruses. PD 404,182 effectively inactivates a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 as well as HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and it does not exhibit significant cytotoxicity with multiple human cell lines in vitro (50% cytotoxic concentration, >300 μM). The compound is fully active in cervical fluids, although it exhibits decreased potency in the presence of human serum, retains its full antiviral potency for 8 h when in contact with cells, and is effective against both cell-free and cell-associated HIV. These qualities make PD 404,182 an attractive candidate anti-HIV microbicide for the prevention of HIV transmission through sexual intercourse. PMID:22083468

  5. Entry Properties and Entry Inhibitors of a Human H7N9 Influenza Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Youhui Si; Jianguo Li; Yuqiang Niu; Xiuying Liu; Lili Ren; Li Guo; Min Cheng; Hongli Zhou; Jianwei Wang; Qi Jin; Wei Yang

    2014-01-01

    The recently identified human infections with a novel avian influenza H7N9 virus in China raise important questions regarding possible risk to humans. However, the entry properties and tropism of this H7N9 virus were poorly understood. Moreover, neuraminidase inhibitor resistant H7N9 isolates were recently observed in two patients and correlated with poor clinical outcomes. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the entry properties of H7N9 virus, design and evaluate inhibitors for H7N9 virus e...

  6. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man.

  7. Induction of cytopathogenicity in human glioblastoma cells by chikungunya virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachy Abraham

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an arthritogenic old-world alphavirus, has been implicated in the central nervous system (CNS infection in infants and elderly patients. Astrocytes are the major immune cells of the brain parenchyma that mediate inflammation. In the present study we found that a local isolate of CHIKV infect and activate U-87 MG cells, a glioblastoma cell line of human astrocyte origin. The infection kinetics were similar in infected U-87 MG cells and the human embryo kidney (HEK293 cells as indicated by immunofluorescence and plaque assays, 24h post-infection (p.i.. In infected U-87 MG cells, apoptosis was detectable from 48h p.i. evidenced by DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, nuclear condensation and visible cytopathic effects in a dose and time-dependent manner. XBP1 mRNA splicing and eIF2α phosphorylation studies indicated the occurrence of endoplasmic reticulum stress in infected cells. In U-87 MG cells stably expressing a green fluorescent protein-tagged light chain-3 (GFP-LC3 protein, CHIKV infection showed increased autophagy response. The infection led to an enhanced expression of the mRNA transcripts of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and CXCL9 within 24h p.i. Significant up-regulation of the proteins of RIG-I like receptor (RLR pathway, such as RIG-I and TRAF-6, was observed indicating the activation of the cytoplasmic-cellular innate immune response. The overall results show that the U-87 MG cell line is a potential in vitro model for in depth study of these molecular pathways in response to CHIKV infection. The responses in these cells of CNS origin, which are inherently defective in Type I interferon response, could be analogous to that occurring in infants and very old patients who also have a compromised interferon-response. The results also point to the intriguing possibility of using this virus for studies to develop oncolytic virus therapy approaches

  8. Human viruses and viral indicators in marine water at two recreational beaches in Southern California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, David C; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Gibbons, Christopher D; Griffith, John F; Yu, Qilu; Stewart, Jill R; Sobsey, Mark D

    2014-03-01

    Waterborne enteric viruses may pose disease risks to bather health but occurrence of these viruses has been difficult to characterize at recreational beaches. The aim of this study was to evaluate water for human virus occurrence at two Southern California recreational beaches with a history of beach closures. Human enteric viruses (adenovirus and norovirus) and viral indicators (F+ and somatic coliphages) were measured in water samples over a 4-month period from Avalon Beach, Catalina Island (n = 324) and Doheny Beach, Orange County (n = 112). Human viruses were concentrated from 40 L samples and detected by nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection frequencies at Doheny Beach were 25.5% (adenovirus) and 22.3% (norovirus), and at Avalon Beach were 9.3% (adenovirus) and 0.7% (norovirus). Positive associations between adenoviruses and fecal coliforms were observed at Doheny (p = 0.02) and Avalon (p = 0.01) Beaches. Human viruses were present at both beaches at higher frequencies than previously detected in the region, suggesting that the virus detection methods presented here may better measure potential health risks to bathers. These virus recovery, concentration, and molecular detection methods are advancing practices so that analysis of enteric viruses can become more effective and routine for recreational water quality monitoring.

  9. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, E.; Jong, de M.A.W.P.; Nabatov, A.; Kalay, H.; Kooijk, van Y.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  10. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, E.; Jong, de M.A.W.P.; Nabatov, A.; Kalay, H.; Kooijk, van Y.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  11. Metagenomic analysis of viruses associated with field-grown and retail lettuce identifies human and animal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Tiong Gim; Wengert, Samantha; Rose, Joan B

    2016-04-16

    The emergence of culture- and sequence-independent metagenomic methods has not only provided great insight into the microbial community structure in a wide range of clinical and environmental samples but has also proven to be powerful tools for pathogen detection. Recent studies of the food microbiome have revealed the vast genetic diversity of bacteria associated with fresh produce. However, no work has been done to apply metagenomic methods to tackle viruses associated with fresh produce for addressing food safety. Thus, there is a little knowledge about the presence and diversity of viruses associated with fresh produce from farm-to-fork. To address this knowledge gap, we assessed viruses on commercial romaine and iceberg lettuces in fields and a produce distribution center using a shotgun metagenomic sequencing targeting both RNA and DNA viruses. Commercial lettuce harbors an immense assemblage of viruses that infect a wide range of hosts. As expected, plant pathogenic viruses dominated these communities. Sequences of rotaviruses and picobirnaviruses were also identified in both field-harvest and retail lettuce samples, suggesting an emerging foodborne transmission threat that has yet to be fully recognized. The identification of human and animal viruses in lettuce samples in the field emphasizes the importance of preventing viral contamination on leafy greens starting at the field. Although there are still some inherent experimental and bioinformatics challenges in applying viral metagenomic approaches for food safety testing, this work will facilitate further application of this unprecedented deep sequencing method to food samples.

  12. ABSTRACT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    agricultural extension practitioners should intensify efforts in educating rural farmers ... disease caused by Human immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV), usually found in ... Health experts put Nigeria prevalence rate at 5.4% ranging from a low 1.9% to .... income may increase food and livelihood insecurity and severely undermine ...

  13. The Need for a Regional Security System Multinational Coast Guard Unit in the Eastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    Islands and eight observer states: Aruba, Colombia , Curacao, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Saint Maarten (Kingdom of the Netherlands...former Prime Minister of Barbados, Owen Arthur expressed that the security concerns of the sub-region included Human Immuno- Deficiency Virus /Acquired

  14. 1176-IJBCS-Article-Adeniyi A

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KODJIO NORBERT

    composition, minerals and vitamins. The results obtained from the analysis of the two plants were compared. The results revealed ... There is growing interest in exploiting plants for medicinal ... people living with Human Immuno deficiency. Virus (HIV), and ..... consumed to supplement the scarce or non- available sources of ...

  15. Preferences for antiretroviral therapy services: Qualitative evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AUGUSTINE TANLE

    2015-09-14

    Sep 14, 2015 ... Since the advent of the Human Immuno-Deficiency Virus and ... In a study on 227 persons living with HIV who were receiving ART at the ... Among other things, their study revealed that there was a general inequality in access.

  16. Preferential recognition of avian-like receptors in human influenza A H7N9 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; de Vries, Robert P; Zhu, Xueyong; Nycholat, Corwin M; McBride, Ryan; Yu, Wenli; Paulson, James C; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-12-06

    The 2013 outbreak of avian-origin H7N9 influenza in eastern China has raised concerns about its ability to transmit in the human population. The hemagglutinin glycoprotein of most human H7N9 viruses carries Leu(226), a residue linked to adaptation of H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic viruses to human receptors. However, glycan array analysis of the H7 hemagglutinin reveals negligible binding to humanlike α2-6-linked receptors and strong preference for a subset of avian-like α2-3-linked glycans recognized by all avian H7 viruses. Crystal structures of H7N9 hemagglutinin and six hemagglutinin-glycan complexes have elucidated the structural basis for preferential recognition of avian-like receptors. These findings suggest that the current human H7N9 viruses are poorly adapted for efficient human-to-human transmission.

  17. Recombinant human Fab fragments neutralize human type 1 immunodeficiency virus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbas, C F; Björling, E; Chiodi, F; Dunlop, N; Cababa, D; Jones, T M; Zebedee, S L; Persson, M A; Nara, P L; Norrby, E

    1992-01-01

    A panel of 20 recombinant Fab fragments reactive with the surface glycoprotein gp120 of human type 1 immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) were examined for their ability to neutralize MN and IIIB strains of the virus. Neutralization was determined as the ability of the Fab fragments to inhibit infection as measured in both a p24 ELISA and a syncytium-formation assay. One group of closely sequence-related Fab fragments was found to neutralize virus in both assays with a 50% neutralization titer at approximately 1 micrograms/ml. Another Fab neutralized in the p24 ELISA but not in the syncytium assay. The other Fab fragments showed weak or no neutralizing ability. The results imply that virion aggregation or crosslinking of gp120 molecules on the virion surface is not an absolute requirement for HIV-1 neutralization. Further, all of the Fab fragments were shown to be competitive with soluble CD4 for binding to gp120 and yet few neutralized the virus effectively, implying that the mechanism of neutralization in this case may not involve receptor blocking. The observation of a preponderance of high-affinity Fab fragments with poor or no neutralizing ability could have implications for vaccine strategies. PMID:1384050

  18. A novel mycovirus that is related to the human pathogen hepatitis E virus and rubi-like viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiquan; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Li, Guoqing; Xie, Jun; Peng, Youliang; Yi, Xianhong; Ghabrial, Said A

    2009-02-01

    Previously, we reported that three double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments, designated L-, M-, and S-dsRNAs, were detected in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strain Ep-1PN. Of these, the M-dsRNA segment was derived from the genomic RNA of a potexvirus-like positive-strand RNA virus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum debilitation-associated RNA virus. Here, we present the complete nucleotide sequence of the L-dsRNA, which is 6,043 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of a single open reading frame (nucleotide positions 42 to 5936) that encodes a protein with significant similarity to the replicases of the "alphavirus-like" supergroup of positive-strand RNA viruses. A sequence comparison of the L-dsRNA-encoded putative replicase protein containing conserved methyltransferase, helicase, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase motifs showed that it has significant sequence similarity to the replicase of Hepatitis E virus, a virus infecting humans. Furthermore, we present convincing evidence that the virus-like L-dsRNA could replicate independently with only a slight impact on growth and virulence of its host. Our results suggest that the L-dsRNA from strain Ep-1PN is derived from the genomic RNA of a positive-strand RNA virus, which we named Sclerotinia sclerotiorum RNA virus L (SsRV-L). As far as we know, this is the first report of a positive-strand RNA mycovirus that is related to a human virus. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses of the conserved motifs of the RNA replicase of SsRV-L showed that it clustered with the rubi-like viruses and that it is related to the plant clostero-, beny- and tobamoviruses and to the insect omegatetraviruses. Considering the fact that these related alphavirus-like positive-strand RNA viruses infect a wide variety of organisms, these findings suggest that the ancestral positive-strand RNA viruses might be of ancient origin and/or they might have radiated horizontally among vertebrates, insects, plants, and

  19. Correlates of spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus in a Danish human immunodeficiency virus type 1 cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Weis, Nina; Schønning, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: Around a quarter of individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are spontaneously able to clear the virus. Correlates of spontaneous HCV clearance are not well established and the aim of this study was to characterize factors associated with spontaneous HCV clearance in...... higher clearance rates due to their repeated exposure to low-dose HCV, leading to immune memory. Our data suggest an interaction of hepatitis B virus and HCV that influences the outcome of acute HCV infection....... in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-co-infected cohort. Methods: We analyzed 327 anti-HCV-positive HIV-1-infected patients using multivariate logistic regression. HCV clearance was defined as the presence of anti-HCV with undetectable HCV RNA from at least 2 measurements more than 6 months apart. Results...

  20. Capsid proteins from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac can coassemble into mature cores of infectious viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo; Pathak, Vinay K; Peng, Weiqun; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2008-09-01

    We have recently shown that the Gag polyproteins from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 can coassemble and functionally complement each other. During virion maturation, the Gag polyproteins undergo proteolytic cleavage to release mature proteins including capsid (CA), which refolds and forms the outer shell of a cone-shaped mature core. Less than one-half of the CA proteins present within the HIV-1 virion are required to form the mature core. Therefore, it is unclear whether the mature core in virions containing both HIV-1 and HIV-2 Gag consists of CA proteins from a single virus or from both viruses. To determine whether CA proteins from two different viruses can coassemble into mature cores of infectious viruses, we exploited the specificity of the tripartite motif 5alpha protein from the rhesus monkey (rhTRIM5alpha) for cores containing HIV-1 CA (hCA) but not the simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(mac) CA protein (sCA). If hCA and sCA cannot coassemble into the same core when equal amounts of sCA and hCA are coexpressed, the infectivities of such virus preparations in cells should be inhibited less than twofold by rhTRIM5alpha. However, if hCA and sCA can coassemble into the same core structure to form a mixed core, rhTRIM5alpha would be able to recognize such cores and significantly restrict virus infectivity. We examined the restriction phenotypes of viruses containing both hCA and sCA. Our results indicate that hCA and sCA can coassemble into the same mature core to produce infectious virus. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of functional coassembly of heterologous CA protein into the retroviral core.

  1. Susceptibility of human lymphoid tissue cultured ex vivo to xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Curriu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was generated after a recombination event between two endogenous murine leukemia viruses during the production of a prostate cancer cell line. Although the associations of the XMRV infection with human diseases appear unlikely, the XMRV is a retrovirus of undefined pathogenic potential, able to replicate in human cells in vitro. Since recent studies using animal models for infection have yielded conflicting results, we set out an ex vivo model for XMRV infection of human tonsillar tissue to determine whether XMRV produced by 22Rv1 cells is able to replicate in human lymphoid organs. Tonsil blocks were infected and infection kinetics and its pathogenic effects were monitored RESULTS: XMRV, though restricted by APOBEC, enters and integrates into the tissue cells. The infection did not result in changes of T or B-cells, immune activation, nor inflammatory chemokines. Infectious viruses could be recovered from supernatants of infected tonsils by reinfecting DERSE XMRV indicator cell line, although these supernatants could not establish a new infection in fresh tonsil culture, indicating that in our model, the viral replication is controlled by innate antiviral restriction factors. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the replication-competent retrovirus XMRV, present in a high number of laboratories, is able to infect human lymphoid tissue and produce infectious viruses, even though they were unable to establish a new infection in fresh tonsillar tissue. Hereby, laboratories working with cell lines producing XMRV should have knowledge and understanding of the potential biological biohazardous risks of this virus.

  2. High Permissivity of Human HepG2 Hepatoma Cells for Influenza Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Ollier, Laurence; Caramella, Anne; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    Human HepG2 hepatoma cells are highly permissive for influenza virus type A and type B, even without the addition of trypsin, and they exhibit a marked cytopathic effect. This property greatly facilitates the primary isolation of influenza viruses. Virus replication was significantly reduced by the plasmin(ogen)-specific inhibitor tranexamic acid, and this suggests a potential role played by the plasminogen/tissue plasminogen activator complex at the surface of HepG2 cells. This might represe...

  3. Identification of linear human B-cell epitopes of tick-borne encephalitis virus

    OpenAIRE

    Kuivanen, Suvi; Hepojoki, Jussi; Vene, Sirkka; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Background Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a central nervous system infection transmitted to humans by ticks. The causative agent, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), belongs to the genus Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae), which includes globally important arthropod-borne viruses, such as dengue, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and West Nile viruses. Flaviviruses are highly cross-reactive in serological tests that are currently based on viral envelope proteins. The envelope (E) protein ...

  4. Subcellular localization of the Vif protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalves, J.; Jallepalli, P; Gabuzda, D H

    1994-01-01

    The Vif (viral infectivity factor) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been shown to dramatically enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 virus particles during virus production. The subcellular localization of Vif was examined to elucidate cellular pathways which may be important for Vif function. Indirect immunofluorescence staining of Vif demonstrated a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution and showed that most Vif was not associated with the Golgi complex, a proposed site of lo...

  5. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura might be an early hematologic manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-03-01

    Little research focuses on the association between immune thrombocytopenic purpura and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Taiwan. This study investigated whether immune thrombocytopenic purpura might be an early hematologic manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection in Taiwan. We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study using data of individuals enrolled in Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5472 subjects aged 1-84 years with a new diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the purpura group since 1998-2010 and 21,887 sex-matched and age-matched, randomly selected subjects without immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the non-purpura group. The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection at the end of 2011 was measured in both groups. We used the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model to measure the hazard ratio and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the association between immune thrombocytopenic purpura and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The overall incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection was 6.47-fold higher in the purpura group than that in the non-purpura group (3.78 vs. 0.58 per 10,000 person-years, 95 % CI 5.83-7.18). After controlling for potential confounding factors, the adjusted HR of human immunodeficiency virus infection was 6.3 (95 % CI 2.58-15.4) for the purpura group, as compared with the non-purpura group. We conclude that individuals with immune thrombocytopenic purpura are 6.47-fold more likely to have human immunodeficiency virus infection than those without immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We suggest not all patients, but only those who have risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus infection should receive testing for undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection when they develop immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

  6. Nonstructural Protein L* Species Specificity Supports a Mouse Origin for Vilyuisk Human Encephalitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drappier, Melissa; Opperdoes, Fred R; Michiels, Thomas

    2017-07-15

    Vilyuisk human encephalitis virus (VHEV) is a picornavirus related to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). VHEV was isolated from human material passaged in mice. Whether this VHEV is of human or mouse origin is therefore unclear. We took advantage of the species-specific activity of the nonstructural L* protein of theiloviruses to track the origin of TMEV isolates. TMEV L* inhibits RNase L, the effector enzyme of the interferon pathway. By using coimmunoprecipitation and functional RNase L assays, the species specificity of RNase L antagonism was tested for L* from mouse (DA) and rat (RTV-1) TMEV strains as well as for VHEV. Coimmunoprecipitation and functional assay data confirmed the species specificity of L* activity and showed that L* from rat strain RTV-1 inhibited rat but not mouse or human RNase L. Next, we showed that the VHEV L* protein was phylogenetically related to L* of mouse viruses and that it failed to inhibit human RNase L but readily antagonized mouse RNase L, unambiguously showing the mouse origin of VHEV.IMPORTANCE Defining the natural host of a virus can be a thorny issue, especially when the virus was isolated only once or when the isolation story is complex. The species Theilovirus includes Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), infecting mice and rats, and Saffold virus (SAFV), infecting humans. One TMEV strain, Vilyuisk human encephalitis virus (VHEV), however, was isolated from mice that were inoculated with cerebrospinal fluid of a patient presenting with chronic encephalitis. It is therefore unclear whether VHEV was derived from the human sample or from the inoculated mouse. The L* protein encoded by TMEV inhibits RNase L, a cellular enzyme involved in innate immunity, in a species-specific manner. Using binding and functional assays, we show that this species specificity even allows discrimination between TMEV strains of mouse and of rat origins. The VHEV L* protein clearly inhibited mouse but not human RNase L

  7. Several Human Liver Cell Expressed Apolipoproteins Complement HCV Virus Production with Varying Efficacy Conferring Differential Specific Infectivity to Released Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Hueging

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (ApoE, an exchangeable apolipoprotein, is necessary for production of infectious Hepatitis C virus (HCV particles. However, ApoE is not the only liver-expressed apolipoprotein and the role of other apolipoproteins for production of infectious HCV progeny is incompletely defined. Therefore, we quantified mRNA expression of human apolipoproteins in primary human hepatocytes. Subsequently, cDNAs encoding apolipoproteins were expressed in 293T/miR-122 cells to explore if they complement HCV virus production in cells that are non-permissive due to limiting endogenous levels of human apolipoproteins. Primary human hepatocytes expressed high mRNA levels of ApoA1, A2, C1, C3, E, and H. ApoA4, A5, B, D, F, J, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6, M, and O were expressed at intermediate levels, and C2, C4, and L5 were not detected. All members of the ApoA and ApoC family of lipoproteins complemented HCV virus production in HCV transfected 293T/miR-122 cells, albeit with significantly lower efficacy compared with ApoE. In contrast, ApoD expression did not support production of infectious HCV. Specific infectivity of released particles complemented with ApoA family members was significantly lower compared with ApoE. Moreover, the ratio of extracellular to intracellular infectious virus was significantly higher for ApoE compared to ApoA2 and ApoC3. Since apolipoproteins complementing HCV virus production share amphipathic alpha helices as common structural features we altered the two alpha helices of ApoC1. Helix breaking mutations in both ApoC1 helices impaired virus assembly highlighting a critical role of alpha helices in apolipoproteins supporting HCV assembly. In summary, various liver expressed apolipoproteins with amphipathic alpha helices complement HCV virus production in human non liver cells. Differences in the efficiency of virus assembly, the specific infectivity of released particles, and the ratio between extracellular and intracellular

  8. [Should the human smallpox virus (variola) be destroyed?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryland, Morten

    2004-10-21

    Smallpox, caused by variola virus, was a terror for civilizations around the world for more than 3000 years. Although the disease is eradicated, hundreds of variola virus isolates are kept in two WHO-collaborating facilities, one in USA and one in Russia. In spite of several agreements on destruction, it is now doubtful that these virus isolates will be destroyed. Variola virus may exist in other places and may be used as a biological weapon in war or for terror. Further research on variola virus is thus essential in order to achieve a better understanding of the pathogenicity of the virus and to develop new anti-variola virus vaccines and antiviral drugs.

  9. Materno-Fetal Transmission of Human Immune Deficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Schäfer

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Mother-to-child transmission of human immune deficiency virus (HIV is a multifactorial event highly associated with advanced maternal HIV disease and obstetric incidents taking place during parturition. Thus, various approaches to prevention may be beneficial. Although the time and the route of materno-fetal HIV transmission are still not sufficiently clear, much speaks in favor of a late HIV transmission, most probably taking place during parturition or the phase before the delivery. The fetus is remarkably protected by the placenta and the intact fetal membranes against many viral infections during gestation. These conditions change at parturition and the chance for a transition of HIV-infected carrier cells or virus into the fetal compartment increases. Proinflammatory cytokines secreted at the materno-fetal interface accumulate in amniotic fluid and may chemoattract and stimulate potentially HIV-infected immunocytes. After rupture of membranes, maternal cells of the decidua are directly exposed to the amniotic fluid. Aside from the contamination of the fetal skin at vaginal delivery as a debatable route of infection, blood-to-blood contacts and the fetal swallowing of contaminated amniotic fluid may be the major path of fetal HIV infection. For the fetal prophylaxis of an intrauterine infection, the application of zidovudine is recommended. However, cesarian section before the onset of labor leads also to a diminution of the transmission rate. As the transmission seems to have both systemic and local causes, it makes sense to combine different intervention strategies. Whether a combination of zidovudine and elective cesarean section can lower the transmission risk further has to be evaluated.

  10. Changing patterns of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Francoise

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the evolution of the pathogenic concepts associated with the infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, with emphasis to the pathology of the nervous system. Although the first description of damage to the nervous system in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS only appeared in 1982, the dramatic diffusion of the epidemic worldwide, as well as the invariably rapidly fatal outcome of the disease before the introduction of efficient treatment, generated from the beginning an enormous amount of research and re-thinking on a number of pathogenetic concepts. Less than 25 years after the first autopsy series on AIDS patients were published and the virus responsible for AIDS was identified, satisfactory definition and classification of a number of neuropathological complications of HIV infection have been established. This has led to the establishment of accurate clinical and biological diagnosis of the main neurological complications of the disease, which remain a major cause of disability and death in patients. Clinical and experimental studies have provided essential insight into the pathogenesis of CNS lesions and the natural history of the disorder. The relatively recent introduction of effective antiretroviral therapy in 1995-6 dramatically improved the course of prognosis of HIV disease. However, there remain a number of unsolved pathogenetic issues, the most puzzling of which remains the precise mechanism of neuronal damage underlying the specific HIV-related cognitive disorder (HIV-dementia. In addition, although antiretroviral therapy has changed the course of neurological complications, new issues have emerged, such as the lack of improvement or even paradoxical deterioration of the neurological status in treated patients. Interpretation of these complications remains largely speculative, partly because of the small number of neuropathological studies related to the beneficial consequence of this

  11. Viral Interactions in Human Lymphoid Tissue: Human Herpesvirus 7 Suppresses the Replication of CCR5-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 via CD4 Modulation▿

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affect...

  12. Rapid quantitative PCR assays for the simultaneous detection of herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human herpesvirus 6 DNA in blood and other clinical specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelmann, I.; Petzold, D. R.; Kosinska, A.; Hepkema, B. G.; Schulz, T. F.; Heim, A.

    Rapid diagnosis of human herpesvirus primary infections or reactivations is facilitated by quantitative PCRs. Quantitative PCR assays with a standard thermal cycling profile permitting simultaneous detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV),

  13. Complete genome analysis of hepatitis B virus in human immunodeficiency virus infected and uninfected South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gededzha, Maemu P; Muzeze, Muxe; Burnett, Rosemary J; Amponsah-Dacosta, Edina; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Selabe, Selokela G

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are highly endemic in South Africa. Data on the complete genome sequences of HBV in HIV-positive patients in South Africa are scanty. This study characterized the complete HBV genome isolated from both HIV-positive and negative patients at the Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital (DGMAH), Pretoria. Serum samples from nine (five HIV-positive and four HIV-negative) patients attending the DGMAH from 2007 to 2011 were serologically tested, amplified, and sequenced for complete genome. Phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA6.0. Mutations were analyzed by comparing the sequences with genotype-matched GenBank references. Eight patients were HBsAg positive, with only one from the HIV positive group being negative. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequences classified them into five genotypes; A1 (n = 4), A2 (n = 1), C1 (n = 2), D1 (n = 1), and D3 (n = 1). Deletions up to 35 nucleotides in length were identified in this study. No drug resistance mutations were identified in the P ORF, while the L217R mutation was identified in one subgenotype A2 sequence. The double (A1762T/G1764A) and triple (T1753C/A1762T/G1764A) mutations in the Basal core promoter were identified in four and two sequences, respectively. In the core region, mutation G1888A was identified in four of the subgenotype A1 sequences. In conclusion, this study has added to the limited South African data on HBV genotypes and mutations in HBV/HIV co-infected and HBV mono-infected patients, based on complete HBV genome analysis. Subgenotype A1 was predominant, and no drug-resistant mutants were detected in the study. J. Med. Virol. 88:1560-1566, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in the Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Keyvani, Hossein; Esghaei, Maryam; Zare-Karizi, Shohreh; Dermenaki-Farahani, Sahar-Sadat; Hesami-Zadeh, Khashayar; Fakhim, Shahin

    2016-11-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new form of chronic HCV infection described by the presence of the genomic HCV-RNA in liver biopsy and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples, and undetectable levels or absence of HCV-RNA and in the absence or presence of anti HCV antibodies in the plasma specimens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of occult HCV infection (OCI) among Iranian subjects infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using RT-nested PCR. From March 2014 until April 2015, 109 Iranian patients with established HIV infection were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. After extraction of viral RNA from the plasma and PBMC samples, HCV-RNA status was examined by RT-nested PCR using primers from the 5'-NTR. HCV genotyping was conducted using RFLP analysis. For the confirmation of HCV genotyping by RFLP method, the PCR products were sequenced. Of the 109 patients, 50 were positive for antibodies against HCV. The HCV-RNA was detected in PBMC specimens in 6 (10.2%) out of the total 59 patients negative for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA and also from 4 (8.0%) out of the total 50 patients positive for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA. HCV genotyping analysis showed that 6 (60.0%) patients were infected with HCV subtype 3a, 3 (30.0%) were infected with HCV subtype 1a and 1 (10.0%) patient was infected with HCV subtype 1b. This study revealed the incidence of OCI (9.2%) in HIV-infected Iranian patients. Hence, designing prospective studies focusing on the detection of OCI in these patients would provide more information. J. Med. Virol. 88:1960-1966, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Saffold virus, a human Theiler's-like cardiovirus, is ubiquitous and causes infection early in life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zoll

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The family Picornaviridae contains well-known human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and parechovirus. In addition, this family contains a number of viruses that infect animals, including members of the genus Cardiovirus such as Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV and Theiler's murine encephalomyelits virus (TMEV. The latter are important murine pathogens that cause myocarditis, type 1 diabetes and chronic inflammation in the brains, mimicking multiple sclerosis. Recently, a new picornavirus was isolated from humans, named Saffold virus (SAFV. The virus is genetically related to Theiler's virus and classified as a new species in the genus Cardiovirus, which until the discovery of SAFV did not contain human viruses. By analogy with the rodent cardioviruses, SAFV may be a relevant new human pathogen. Thus far, SAFVs have sporadically been detected by molecular techniques in respiratory and fecal specimens, but the epidemiology and clinical significance remained unclear. Here we describe the first cultivated SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3 isolate, its growth characteristics, full-length sequence, and epidemiology. Unlike the previously isolated SAFV-1 and -2 viruses, SAFV-3 showed efficient growth in several cell lines with a clear cytopathic effect. The latter allowed us to conduct a large-scale serological survey by a virus-neutralization assay. This survey showed that infection by SAFV-3 occurs early in life (>75% positive at 24 months and that the seroprevalence reaches >90% in older children and adults. Neutralizing antibodies were found in serum samples collected in several countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia. In conclusion, this study describes the first cultivated SAFV-3 isolate, its full-length sequence, and epidemiology. SAFV-3 is a highly common and widespread human virus causing infection in early childhood. This finding has important implications for understanding the impact of these ubiquitous viruses and their possible

  16. Saffold virus, a human Theiler's-like cardiovirus, is ubiquitous and causes infection early in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Jan; Erkens Hulshof, Sandra; Lanke, Kjerstin; Verduyn Lunel, Frans; Melchers, Willem J G; Schoondermark-van de Ven, Esther; Roivainen, Merja; Galama, Jochem M D; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2009-05-01

    The family Picornaviridae contains well-known human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and parechovirus). In addition, this family contains a number of viruses that infect animals, including members of the genus Cardiovirus such as Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and Theiler's murine encephalomyelits virus (TMEV). The latter are important murine pathogens that cause myocarditis, type 1 diabetes and chronic inflammation in the brains, mimicking multiple sclerosis. Recently, a new picornavirus was isolated from humans, named Saffold virus (SAFV). The virus is genetically related to Theiler's virus and classified as a new species in the genus Cardiovirus, which until the discovery of SAFV did not contain human viruses. By analogy with the rodent cardioviruses, SAFV may be a relevant new human pathogen. Thus far, SAFVs have sporadically been detected by molecular techniques in respiratory and fecal specimens, but the epidemiology and clinical significance remained unclear. Here we describe the first cultivated SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3) isolate, its growth characteristics, full-length sequence, and epidemiology. Unlike the previously isolated SAFV-1 and -2 viruses, SAFV-3 showed efficient growth in several cell lines with a clear cytopathic effect. The latter allowed us to conduct a large-scale serological survey by a virus-neutralization assay. This survey showed that infection by SAFV-3 occurs early in life (>75% positive at 24 months) and that the seroprevalence reaches >90% in older children and adults. Neutralizing antibodies were found in serum samples collected in several countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia. In conclusion, this study describes the first cultivated SAFV-3 isolate, its full-length sequence, and epidemiology. SAFV-3 is a highly common and widespread human virus causing infection in early childhood. This finding has important implications for understanding the impact of these ubiquitous viruses and their possible role in acute

  17. Saffold virus, a human Theiler's-like cardiovirus, is ubiquitous and causes infection early in life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zoll

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The family Picornaviridae contains well-known human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and parechovirus. In addition, this family contains a number of viruses that infect animals, including members of the genus Cardiovirus such as Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV and Theiler's murine encephalomyelits virus (TMEV. The latter are important murine pathogens that cause myocarditis, type 1 diabetes and chronic inflammation in the brains, mimicking multiple sclerosis. Recently, a new picornavirus was isolated from humans, named Saffold virus (SAFV. The virus is genetically related to Theiler's virus and classified as a new species in the genus Cardiovirus, which until the discovery of SAFV did not contain human viruses. By analogy with the rodent cardioviruses, SAFV may be a relevant new human pathogen. Thus far, SAFVs have sporadically been detected by molecular techniques in respiratory and fecal specimens, but the epidemiology and clinical significance remained unclear. Here we describe the first cultivated SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3 isolate, its growth characteristics, full-length sequence, and epidemiology. Unlike the previously isolated SAFV-1 and -2 viruses, SAFV-3 showed efficient growth in several cell lines with a clear cytopathic effect. The latter allowed us to conduct a large-scale serological survey by a virus-neutralization assay. This survey showed that infection by SAFV-3 occurs early in life (>75% positive at 24 months and that the seroprevalence reaches >90% in older children and adults. Neutralizing antibodies were found in serum samples collected in several countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia. In conclusion, this study describes the first cultivated SAFV-3 isolate, its full-length sequence, and epidemiology. SAFV-3 is a highly common and widespread human virus causing infection in early childhood. This finding has important implications for understanding the impact of these ubiquitous viruses and their possible

  18. A Review of the Antiviral Susceptibility of Human and Avian Influenza Viruses over the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yuan Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antivirals play an important role in the prevention and treatment of influenza infections, particularly in high-risk or severely ill patients. Two classes of influenza antivirals have been available in many countries over the last decade (2004–2013, the adamantanes and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs. During this period, widespread adamantane resistance has developed in circulating influenza viruses rendering these drugs useless, resulting in the reliance on the most widely available NAI, oseltamivir. However, the emergence of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal A(H1N1 viruses in 2008 demonstrated that NAI-resistant viruses could also emerge and spread globally in a similar manner to that seen for adamantane-resistant viruses. Previously, it was believed that NAI-resistant viruses had compromised replication and/or transmission. Fortunately, in 2013, the majority of circulating human influenza viruses remain sensitive to all of the NAIs, but significant work by our laboratory and others is now underway to understand what enables NAI-resistant viruses to retain the capacity to replicate and transmit. In this review, we describe how the susceptibility of circulating human and avian influenza viruses has changed over the last ten years and describe some research studies that aim to understand how NAI-resistant human and avian influenza viruses may emerge in the future.

  19. Identification of Influenza A/H7N9 Virus Infection-Related Human Genes Based on Shortest Paths in a Virus-Human Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recently emerging Influenza A/H7N9 virus is reported to be able to infect humans and cause mortality. However, viral and host factors associated with the infection are poorly understood. It is suggested by the “guilt by association” rule that interacting proteins share the same or similar functions and hence may be involved in the same pathway. In this study, we developed a computational method to identify Influenza A/H7N9 virus infection-related human genes based on this rule from the shortest paths in a virus-human protein interaction network. Finally, we screened out the most significant 20 human genes, which could be the potential infection related genes, providing guidelines for further experimental validation. Analysis of the 20 genes showed that they were enriched in protein binding, saccharide or polysaccharide metabolism related pathways and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. We also compared the results with those from human rhinovirus (HRV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV by the same method. It was indicated that saccharide or polysaccharide metabolism related pathways might be especially associated with the H7N9 infection. These results could shed some light on the understanding of the virus infection mechanism, providing basis for future experimental biology studies and for the development of effective strategies for H7N9 clinical therapies.

  20. Virus-like particle-based human vaccines: quality assessment based on structural and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinjian; Li, Shaowei; Yu, Hai; Xia, Ningshao; Modis, Yorgo

    2013-11-01

    Human vaccines against three viruses use recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) as the antigen: hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis E virus. VLPs are excellent prophylactic vaccine antigens because they are self-assembling bionanoparticles (20 to 60 nm in diameter) that expose multiple epitopes on their surface and faithfully mimic the native virions. Here we summarize the long journey of these vaccines from bench to patients. The physical properties and structural features of each recombinant VLP vaccine are described. With the recent licensure of Hecolin against hepatitis E virus adding a third disease indication to prophylactic VLP-based vaccines, we review how the crucial quality attributes of VLP-based human vaccines against all three disease indications were assessed, controlled, and improved during bioprocessing through an array of structural and functional analyses.

  1. H7N9 avian influenza A virus and the perpetual challenge of potential human pandemicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Fauci, Anthony S

    2013-07-09

    ABSTRACT The ongoing H7N9 influenza epizootic in China once again presents us questions about the origin of pandemics and how to recognize them in early stages of development. Over the past ~135 years, H7 influenza viruses have neither caused pandemics nor been recognized as having undergone human adaptation. Yet several unusual properties of these viruses, including their poultry epizootic potential, mammalian adaptation, and atypical clinical syndromes in rarely infected humans, suggest that they may be different from other avian influenza viruses, thus questioning any assurance that the likelihood of human adaptation is low. At the same time, the H7N9 epizootic provides an opportunity to learn more about the mammalian/human adaptational capabilities of avian influenza viruses and challenges us to integrate virologic and public health research and surveillance at the animal-human interface.

  2. Infection and pathogenesis of canine, equine, and human influenza viruses in canine tracheas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gaelle; Marshall, John F; Morrell, Joanna; Robb, David; McCauley, John W; Perez, Daniel R; Parrish, Colin R; Murcia, Pablo R

    2014-08-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) can jump species barriers and occasionally cause epidemics, epizootics, pandemics, and panzootics. Characterizing the infection dynamics at the target tissues of natural hosts is central to understanding the mechanisms that control host range, tropism, and virulence. Canine influenza virus (CIV; H3N8) originated after the transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) into dogs. Thus, comparing CIV and EIV isolates provides an opportunity to study the determinants of influenza virus emergence. Here we characterize the replication of canine, equine, and human IAVs in the trachea of the dog, a species to which humans are heavily exposed. We define a phenotype of infection for CIV, which is characterized by high levels of virus replication and extensive tissue damage. CIV was compared to evolutionarily distinct EIVs, and the early EIV isolates showed an impaired ability to infect dog tracheas, while EIVs that circulated near the time of CIV emergence exhibited a CIV-like infection phenotype. Inoculating dog tracheas with various human IAVs (hIAVs) showed that they infected the tracheal epithelium with various efficiencies depending on the virus tested. Finally, we show that reassortant viruses carrying gene segments of CIV and hIAV are viable and that addition of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of CIV to the 2009 human pandemic virus results in a virus that replicates at high levels and causes significant lesions. This provides important insights into the role of evolution on viral emergence and on the role of HA and NA as determinants of pathogenicity. Influenza A viruses (IAVs) have entered new host species in recent history, sometimes with devastating consequences. Canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N8 originated from a direct transfer of an equine influenza virus (EIV) in the early 2000s. We studied the infection patterns of IAVs that circulate in dogs or to which dogs are commonly exposed and showed that CIV emergence was likely

  3. Ultrastructural localization of human papilloma virus by nonradioactive in situ hybridization on tissue of human cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Rafferty, P A; Warhol, M J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A nonradioactive in situ hybridization was developed to localize human papilloma virus (HPV) at the ultrastructural level. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Cervical biopsies from human uterine cervices clinically suspicious of condyloma were embedded in Lowicryl K4M at low temperature...... confirmed the specificity of the HPV positive signals. CONCLUSIONS: This study helps define the subcellular compartmentalization of HPV DNA in infected human cells....

  4. Virus-Bacteria Interactions: An Emerging Topic in Human Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almand, Erin A; Moore, Matthew D; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2017-03-21

    Bacteria and viruses often occupy the same niches, however, interest in their potential collaboration in promoting wellness or disease states has only recently gained traction. While the interaction of some bacteria and viruses is well characterized (e.g., influenza virus), researchers are typically more interested in the location of the infection than the manner of cooperation. There are two overarching types of bacterial-virus disease causing interactions: direct interactions that in some way aid the viruses, and indirect interactions aiding bacteria. The virus-promoting direct interactions occur when the virus exploits a bacterial component to facilitate penetration into the host cell. Conversely, indirect interactions result in increased bacterial pathogenesis as a consequence of viral infection. Enteric viruses mainly utilize the direct pathway, while respiratory viruses largely affect bacteria in an indirect fashion. This review focuses on some key examples of how virus-bacteria interactions impact the infection process across the two organ systems, and provides evidence supporting this as an emerging theme in infectious disease.

  5. Surfactant enhanced disinfection of the human norovirus surrogate, tulane virus with organic acids and surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human infection with foodborne viruses can occur following consumption of contaminated food, person-to-person body contact, or release of aerosols. Combinatorial treatments of surfactants and organic acids may have synergistic or additive mechanisms to inactivate foodborne viruses and prevent outbr...

  6. Bicyclams, selective antagonists of the human chemokine receptor CXCR4, potently inhibit feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Clercq, E. de; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Balzarini, J.; Bridger, G.J.; Henson, G.; Schols, D.

    1999-01-01

    Bicyclams are low-molecular-weight anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents that have been shown to act as potent and selective CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that bicyclams are potent inhibitors of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication when evalua

  7. Chikungunya Virus in Febrile Humans and Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes, Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarroa-Toledo, Nohemi; Blitvich, Bradley J; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa C; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G; Baak-Baak, Carlos M; Torres-Chablé, Oswaldo M; Hamid, Md-Nafiz; Friedberg, Iddo; González-Martinez, Pedro; Alonzo-Salomon, Gabriela; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy P; Rivero-Cárdenas, Nubia; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe C; Farfan-Ale, Jose A; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E; Machain-Williams, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was isolated from 12 febrile humans in Yucatan, Mexico, in 2015. One patient was co-infected with dengue virus type 1. Two additional CHIKV isolates were obtained from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes collected in the homes of patients. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the CHIKV isolates belong to the Asian lineage.

  8. Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus

    OpenAIRE

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Midlej, Victor; Pereira da Silva, Ana Paula; Silva da Costa, Leandro; Benchimol, Marlene; Galina, Antonio; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus correspondence: Corresponding author. Fax: +55 21 22708647. (El-Bacha, Tatiana) (El-Bacha, Tatiana) Laboratorio de Bioquimica de Virus, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - RJ-Brasil--> , Av. Bauhinia n? 400 ? CCS Bloco H 2? andar--> , sala 22. Ilha do Governador--> ...

  9. Chikungunya Virus in Febrile Humans and Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarroa-Toledo, Nohemi; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa C.; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G.; Baak-Baak, Carlos M.; Torres-Chablé, Oswaldo M.; Hamid, Md-Nafiz; Friedberg, Iddo; González-Martinez, Pedro; Alonzo-Salomon, Gabriela; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy P.; Rivero-Cárdenas, Nubia; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe C.; Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was isolated from 12 febrile humans in Yucatan, Mexico, in 2015. One patient was co-infected with dengue virus type 1. Two additional CHIKV isolates were obtained from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes collected in the homes of patients. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the CHIKV isolates belong to the Asian lineage. PMID:27347760

  10. Evolutionary trajectory of the VP1 gene of human enterovirus 71 genogroup B and C viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.G. van der Sanden (Sabine); H.G.A.M. van der Avoort (Harrie); P. Lemey (Philippe); G. Uslu (Gökhan); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractFrom 1963 to 1986, human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) infections in the Netherlands were successively caused by viruses of subgenogroups B0, B1 and B2. A genogroup shift occurred in 1987, after which viruses of subgenogroups C1 and C2 were detected exclusively. This is in line with HEV71 typin

  11. Saffold virus, a human Theiler's-like cardiovirus, is ubiquitous and causes infection early in life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoll, J.; Erkens Hulshof, S.; Lanke, K.H.W.; Verduyn Lunel, F.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Schoondermark-van de Ven, E.M.E.; Roivainen, M.; Galama, J.M.D.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The family Picornaviridae contains well-known human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and parechovirus). In addition, this family contains a number of viruses that infect animals, including members of the genus Cardiovirus such as Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and

  12. Groundwater sampling methods using glass wool filtration to trace human enteric viruses in Madison, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses have been detected in the Madison, Wisconsin deep municipal well system. Earlier projects by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) have used glass wool filters to sample groundwater for these viruses directly from the deep municipal wells. Polymerase chain...

  13. Human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in the etiology of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Hørding, U; Nielsen, H W;

    1994-01-01

    sequences of two viruses with known transforming abilities, human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used. In none of the 19 successfully amplified samples were DNA sequences of HPV type 16 or type 18 detected. In six cases a faint trace...

  14. Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus

    OpenAIRE

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Midlej, Victor; Silva, Ana Paula Pereira da; COSTA,LEANDRO SILVA DA; Benchimol, Marlene; Galina, Antonio; POIAN,ANDREA T. DA

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus correspondence: Corresponding author. Fax: +55 21 22708647. (El-Bacha, Tatiana) (El-Bacha, Tatiana) Laboratorio de Bioquimica de Virus, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - RJ-Brasil--> , Av. Bauhinia n? 400 ? CCS Bloco H 2? andar--> , sala 22. Ilha do Governador--> ...

  15. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus in ticks collected from humans, South Korea, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seok-Min; Lee, Wook-Gyo; Ryou, Jungsang; Yang, Sung-Chan; Park, Sun-Whan; Roh, Jong Yeol; Lee, Ye-Ji; Park, Chan; Han, Myung Guk

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the infection rate for severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) among ticks collected from humans during May-October 2013 in South Korea. Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks have been considered the SFTSV vector. However, we detected the virus in H. longicornis, Amblyomma testudinarium, and Ixodes nipponensis ticks, indicating additional potential SFTSV vectors.

  16. Absence of human metapneumovirus co-infection in cases of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J B M; Bos, A P; Lutter, R; Rossen, J W A; Schuurman, R

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that co-infection of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in severe respiratory syncytial (RSV) virus bronchiolitis is very common. To evaluate the epidemiology of hMPV co-infection in children with severe lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV virus. This was an observational

  17. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma.

  18. Economic impact of routine opt-out antenatal human immune deficiency virus screening: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, Everistus; Haigh, Carol; Duncan, Fiona; Fatoye, Francis

    2017-03-02

    To evaluate the economic impact of routine testing of human immune deficiency virus in antenatal settings. Many children are being infected with human immune deficiency virus through mother-to-child transmission of the virus. Most of these infections are preventable if the mothers' human immune deficiency virus status is identified in a timely manner and appropriate interventions put in place. Routine human immune deficiency virus testing is widely acclaimed as a strategy for universal access to human immune deficiency virus testing and is being adopted by developed and developing poor income countries without recourse to the economic impact. A systematic review of published articles. Extensive electronic searches for relevant journal articles published from 1998-2015 when countries began to implement routine antenatal HIV testing on their own were conducted in the following databases: Science Direct, MEDLINE, SCOPUS, JSTOR, CINAHL and PubMed with search terms as listed in Box 2. Manual searches were also performed to complement the electronic identification of high-quality materials. There were no geographical restrictions, but language was limited to English. Fifty-five articles were retrieved; however, ten were eligible and included in the review. The findings showed that many programmes involving routine human immune deficiency virus testing for pregnant women compared to the alternatives were cost-effective and cost saving. Data from the reviewed studies showed cost savings between $5,761.20-$3.69 million per case of previously undiagnosed maternal human immune deficiency virus-positive infection prevented. Overall, cost-effectiveness was strongly associated with the prevalence rate of human immune deficiency virus in the various settings. Routine human immune deficiency virus testing is both cost-effective and cost saving compared to the alternatives. However, there are wide variations in the methodological approaches to the studies. Adopting standard

  19. Optimization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins with V1/V2 deleted, using virus evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bontjer, I.; Land, A.; Eggink, D.; Verkade, E.; Tuin, K.; Baldwin, C.; Pollakis, G.; Paxton, W.A.; Braakman, L.J.; Berkhout, B.; Sanders, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex is the principal focus of neutralizing antibody-based vaccines. The functional Env complex is a trimer consisting of six individual subunits: three gp120 molecules and three gp41 molecules. The individual subunits have prove

  20. The equine herpes virus 4 thymidine kinase is a better suicide gene than the human herpes virus 1 thymidine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubière, L; Tiraby, M; Cazaux, C; Brisson, E; Grisoni, M; Zhao-Emonet, J; Tiraby, G; Klatzmann, D

    1999-09-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase suicide gene (HSV1tk) together with ganciclovir (GCV) have been successfully used for in vivo treatment of various experimental tumors, and many clinical trials using this system have been launched. With the aim to improve this therapeutic system, we compared the potential efficacy of different herpes virus derived thymidine kinases (HSV1, varicella-zoster virus, equine herpes virus type-4 and Epstein-Barr virus) as suicide genes in association with the nucleoside analogs acyclovir, ganciclovir and bromovinyldeoxyur- idine. Using various murine and human cell lines expressing these viral tk, we show that HSV1- and EHV4tk are the more efficient suicide genes for the different nucleoside analogs tested. Moreover, EHV4tk expressing murine and human cells were three- to 12-fold more sensitive to GCV than HSV1tk expressing cells. This was correlated with the presence of five-fold higher amounts of the toxic triphosphated-GCV in EHV4- versus HSV1tk expressing cells. Altogether, these experiments underline the potential advantages of the EHV4tk as a suicide gene.

  1. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M;

    1991-01-01

    . This inhibition was found in infection of both lymphocytic cells and monocytoid cells. Viruses tested included six HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates propagated in different cells, as well as infectious plasma from AIDS patients. The antiviral effect of anti-Tn MAbs occurred by specific binding of the MAb to the virus......The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells...

  2. High permissivity of human HepG2 hepatoma cells for influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollier, Laurence; Caramella, Anne; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2004-12-01

    Human HepG2 hepatoma cells are highly permissive for influenza virus type A and type B, even without the addition of trypsin, and they exhibit a marked cytopathic effect. This property greatly facilitates the primary isolation of influenza viruses. Virus replication was significantly reduced by the plasmin(ogen)-specific inhibitor tranexamic acid, and this suggests a potential role played by the plasminogen/tissue plasminogen activator complex at the surface of HepG2 cells. This might represent a new approach for study of the interrelations of this complex with influenza viruses.

  3. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  4. Wipes coated with a singlet-oxygen-producing photosensitizer are effective against human influenza virus but not against norovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaelen, Katharina; Bouwknegt, Martijn; Rutjes, Saskia; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Duizer, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Transmission of enteric and respiratory viruses, including human norovirus (hNoV) and human influenza virus, may involve surfaces. In food preparation and health care settings, surfaces are cleaned with wipes; however, wiping may not efficiently reduce contamination or may even spread viruses,

  5. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis A virus infection in non-human primates in Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G. Nath

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated 37 serum samples of non-human primates in Assam State Zoo and the Department of Forest and Environment, Govt. of Assam for seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection during the period from December, 2007 to November, 2009. Four serum samples were also collected from animal keepers of the zoo to investigate transmission of the disease to the attendants working with these primates. Competitive ELISA was performed using hepatitis A virus ELISA kit (Wanti Hep. AV to detect hepatitis A virus antibody in serum samples. Ten (27.21% of the non-human primate samples and three (75% human samples had detectable anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies. Living status of the non-human primates (Free living was a high potential risk for hepatitis A virus infection. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection had significant difference between free living non-human primates and captive non-human primates (P less than 0.05. No significant difference (p=0.86 was seen between male and female non-human primates

  6. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis A virus infection in non-human primates in Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G. Nath

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated 37 serum samples of non-human primates in Assam State Zoo and the Department of Forest and Environment, Govt. of Assam for seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection during the period from December, 2007 to November, 2009. Four serum samples were also collected from animal keepers of the zoo to investigate transmission of the disease to the attendants working with these primates. Competitive ELISA was performed using hepatitis A virus ELISA kit (Wanti Hep. AV to detect hepatitis A virus antibody in serum samples. Ten (27.21% of the non-human primate samples and three (75% human samples had detectable anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies. Living status of the non-human primates (Free living was a high potential risk for hepatitis A virus infection. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection had significant difference between free living non-human primates and captive non-human primates (P less than 0.05. No significant difference (p=0.86 was seen between male and female non-human primates

  7. Human Alveolar Macrophages May Not Be Susceptible to Direct Infection by a Human Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettensohn, David B; Frampton, Mark W; Nichols, Joan E; Roberts, Norbert J

    2016-12-01

    The current studies were undertaken to determine the susceptibility of human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to influenza A virus (IAV) infection in comparison with autologous peripheral blood-derived monocytes-macrophages (PBMs). AMs and PBMs were exposed to IAV in vitro and examined for their ability to bind and internalize IAV, and synthesize viral proteins and RNA. PBMs but not AMs demonstrated binding and internalization of the virus, synthesizing viral proteins and RNA. Exposure of AMs in the presence of a sialidase inhibitor or anti-IAV antibody resulted in viral protein synthesis by the cells. Exposure of AMs to fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled IAV in the presence of anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody also resulted in viral protein synthesis. Thus, human AMs are apparently not susceptible to direct infection by a human IAV but are likely to be infected indirectly in the setting of exposure in the presence of antibody that binds the challenging strain of IAV. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Tolerance and Pharmacokinetic Interactions of Rifabutin and Clarithromycin in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Volunteers†

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, Richard; Bethel, James; Power, Maureen; Landry, Bernard; Banach, Mary; Mole, Larry; Standiford, Harold C.; Follansbee, Stephen; Kumar, Princy; Raasch, Ralph; Cohn, David; Mushatt, David; Drusano, George

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated the tolerance and potential pharmacokinetic interactions between clarithromycin (500 mg every 12 h) and rifabutin (300 mg daily) in clinically stable human immunodeficiency virus-infected volunteers with CD4 counts of

  9. Correlation of in vivo neuroimaging abnormalities with postmortem human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis and dendritic loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Sarah L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Fennema-Notestine, Christine;

    2004-01-01

    previous studies have linked brain viral levels to these alterations, other neuropathological mechanisms might also contribute to them. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between findings on premortem magnetic resonance images and postmortem neuropathologic evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV...

  10. Oncogenic impact of human papilloma virus in head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heffernan, C B

    2012-02-01

    There is considerable debate within the literature about the significance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and its potential influence on the prevention, diagnosis, grading, treatment and prognosis of these cancers. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have traditionally been cited as the main risk factors for head and neck cancers. However, human papilloma virus, normally associated with cervical and other genital carcinomas, has emerged as a possible key aetiological factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, especially oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers pose a significant financial burden on health resources and are increasing in incidence. The recent introduction of vaccines targeted against human papilloma virus types 16 and 18, to prevent cervical cancer, has highlighted the need for ongoing research into the importance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  11. Serodiagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the established role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in gastritis and duodenal ulcer in general, conflicting results have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The seroprevalence during early HIV...

  12. Association between human immunodeficiency virus infection and arterial stiffness in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuilder, Justin S.; Idris, Nikmah S.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Bots, Michiel L.; Cheung, Michael M H; Burgner, David; Kurniati, Nia; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M

    2017-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and adverse cardiovascular outcome in adults. Early recognition of changes in vascular properties might prove essential in cardiovascular prevention in HIV-infected patients. We investigated the

  13. Candida nivariensis isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuningsih, Retno; SahBandar, Ivo N.; Theelen, Bart; Hagen, Ferry; Poot, Ge; Meis, Jacques F.; Rozalyani, Anna; Sjam, Ridhawati; Widodo, Djoko; Djauzi, Samsuridjal; Boekhout, Teun

    2008-01-01

    Candida nivariensis was isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who suffered from oropharyngeal candidiasis and was identified with molecular tools. Our isolate demonstrated low MICs to amphotericin B, flucytosine, posaconazole, caspofungin, and isavueonazole and wa

  14. [Discrimination and homophobia associated to the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Núñez, Emanuel; Alcalde-Rabanal, Jacqueline Elizabeth; Ruiz-Larios, José Arturo; Sucilla-Pérez, Héctor; García-Cerde, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    To describe a political mapping on discrimination and homophobia associated to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the context of public institutions in Mexico. The political mapping was conducted in six Mexican states. Stakeholders who were involved in HIV actions from public and private sectors were included. Semistructured interviews were applied to explore homophobia and discrimination associated with HIV. Information was systematized using the Policy Maker software, which is a good support for analyzing health policies. Discriminatory and homophobic practices in the public domain occurred, damaging people´s integrity via insults, derision and hate crimes. Most stakeholders expressed a supportive position to prevent discrimination and homophobia and some of them had great influence on policy-making decisions. It was found that state policy frameworks are less specific in addressing these issues. Homophobia and discrimination associated to HIV are still considered problematic in Mexico. Homophobia is a very sensitive issue that requires further attention. Also, an actual execution of governmental authority requires greater enforcement of laws against discrimination and homophobia.

  15. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer – Assessment of Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K.; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case–control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is “specificity.” HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers. PMID:27747193

  16. INFECTION WITH HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS IN CERVICAL NEOPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Crauciuc

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish if the infection with human papilloma virus (HPV presents a potential irreversible evolution towards malignancy. Materials and methods. The study was made on a number of 1885 patients that were suspected to have cervical neoplasia, which were monitored between 2001-2010 in „Elena-Doamna” Clinical Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Ia�i, the Military Hospital Gala�i, the County Hospital Gala�i and the Emergency Hospital Buzau. Results and discussions. The study proved that the risk of contacting a genital infection with HPV and cervical cancer is influenced by the sexual activity, the risk of getting infected with HPV during a person’ s lifetime is at least 50% for those sexually active. Conclusions. The patients benefited from colposcopy and biopsy only if the repeated cytology suggested more severe changes. The conservative conduct is represented by a repeated cytology when the patients are admitted into the lot (the initial cytology is performed before this moment

  17. Occurrence of human respiratory syncytial virus in summer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobugawa, Y; Takeuchi, T; Hibino, A; Hassan, M R; Yagami, R; Kondo, H; Odagiri, T; Saito, R

    2017-01-01

    In temperate zones, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) outbreaks typically occur in cold weather, i.e. in late autumn and winter. However, recent outbreaks in Japan have tended to start during summer and autumn. This study examined associations of meteorological conditions with the numbers of HRSV cases reported in summer in Japan. Using data from the HRSV national surveillance system and national meteorological data for summer during the period 2007-2014, we utilized negative binomial logistic regression analysis to identify associations between meteorological conditions and reported cases of HRSV. HRSV cases increased when summer temperatures rose and when relative humidity increased. Consideration of the interaction term temperature × relative humidity enabled us to show synergistic effects of high temperature with HRSV occurrence. In particular, HRSV cases synergistically increased when relative humidity increased while the temperature was ⩾28·2 °C. Seasonal-trend decomposition analysis using the HRSV national surveillance data divided by 11 climate divisions showed that summer HRSV cases occurred in South Japan (Okinawa Island), Kyushu, and Nankai climate divisions, which are located in southwest Japan. Higher temperature and higher relative humidity were necessary conditions for HRSV occurrence in summer in Japan. Paediatricians in temperate zones should be mindful of possible HRSV cases in summer, when suitable conditions are present.

  18. National Surveillance of Occupational Exposure to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Ricketts

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In September 1985, a prospective study was initiated to monitor the occurrence of occupational exposures to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected blood and body fluids in Canada. This program was coordinated by the Federal Centre for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS (now the Division of HIV/AIDS Epidemiology at the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control. The objective was to determine the risk to workers of acquiring HIV infection as a result of exposure to HIV-infected blood and other body fluids. To be eligible, a worker must have sustained a documented parenteral, mucous membrane or skin contact exposure to blood or body fluids from an HIV-infected person. A baseline specimen was collected within a week of the exposure and then at six weeks, 12 weeks, six months and 12 months. Information concerning the type of exposure, precautions used and post exposure treatment was submitted to the Federal Centre for AIDS on standard data collection forms. All information was anonymous, identified only by a code number. Guidelines for counselling an exposed employee were provided with enrollment material. As of July 29, 1991, 414 employees have been included in the study. Two hundred and thirty-seven of the 414 exposures (57% were needlestick injuries of which 167 (70% were sustained by nurses. Other exposures consisted of open wound contamination, eye splashes, scalpel wounds and skin contact with blood and body fluids. To date, there have been no seroconversions among workers enrolled in the surveillance program.

  19. Tuberculous meningitis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Sinha, Manish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. HIV-infected patients have a high incidence of tuberculous meningitis as well. The exact incidence and prevalence of tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected patients are not known. HIV infection does not significantly alter the clinical manifestations, laboratory, radiographic findings, or the response to therapy. Still, some differences have been noted. For example, the histopathological examination of exudates in HIV-infected patients shows fewer lymphocytes, epithelioid cells, and Langhan's type of giant cells. Larger numbers of acid-fast bacilli may be seen in the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. The chest radiograph is abnormal in up to 46% of patients with tuberculous meningitis. Tuberculous meningitis is likely to present with cerebral infarcts and mass lesions. Cryptococcal meningitis is important in differential diagnosis. The recommended duration of treatment in HIV-infected patients is 9-12 months. The benefit of adjunctive corticosteroids is uncertain. Antiretroviral therapy and antituberculosis treatment should be initiated at the same time, regardless of CD4 cell counts. Tuberculous meningitis may be a manifestation of paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Some studies have demonstrated a significant impact of HIV co-infection on mortality from tuberculous meningitis. HIV-infected patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have significantly higher mortality. The best way to prevent HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis is to diagnose and isolate infectious cases of tuberculosis promptly and administer appropriate treatment.

  20. Systemic fungal infections in patients with human inmunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cerdeira, C; Arenas, R; Moreno-Coutiño, G; Vásquez, E; Fernández, R; Chang, P

    2014-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. In immunocompromised patients, primary pulmonary infection can spread to the skin and meninges. Clinical manifestations appear in patients with a CD4(+) lymphocyte count of less than 150 cells/μL. Coccidioidomycosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii. It can present as diffuse pulmonary disease or as a disseminated form primarily affecting the central nervous system, the bones, and the skin. Cryptococcosis is caused by Cryptococcus neoformans (var. neoformans and var. grubii) and Cryptococcus gattii, which are members of the Cryptococcus species complex and have 5 serotypes: A, B, C, D, and AD. It is a common opportunistic infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, even those receiving antiretroviral therapy. Histopathologic examination and culture of samples from any suspicious lesions are essential for the correct diagnosis of systemic fungal infections in patients with HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  2. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  3. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atessa Pakfetrat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center.     Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration.   Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%. The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+.   Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. 

  4. Prognostic Value Of Immunoglobulin Profile In Human Papilloma Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay S P

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study aimed at defining the prognostic value of immunoglobulin profile in human papilloma virus infection by assessing and correlating the levels of immunoglobulin with type, number, duration and response to therapy in 54 randomly selected cases from age group 8 to 42 years (male â€"35, female â€" 19. Raised IgG levels were seen maximally in all spectrum of warts (59.25% followed by IgM (40.74% and IgA (25.92%. It was also seen that 82% of cases with elevated IgM and IgA were free from lesions with no recurrence at 6 months follow up with any form of treatment (electrodessication, 25% podophyllin, 50% trichloroacetic acid,50% 5-fluorouracil. On the contrary, patients with elevated IgG level showed poor response (64% and partial response (16% with recurrence of 38% at the end of 6 months. Cure rate was 54% with combined elevation of IgG, IgA and IgM with recurrence rate of 24%.

  5. Advances in human papilloma virus vaccines: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Tomar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women and third leading cause of cancer death. Approximately 500,000 women worldwide develop new cases of cervical cancer annually, with 80% of these new cases occurring in developing countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV infection is the main factor associated with the development of cervical cancer. The currently available HPV vaccines, gardasil and cervarix, can prevent infection by certain HPV types, but not all. At present, research efforts are being devoted to developing broader spectrum preventative vaccines, as well as therapeutic vaccines. To confer additional therapeutic activities, chimeric vaccines have been developed. Multivalent vaccine technologies employ strategies for addressing a broader spectrum of HPV types or for combining HPV with other pathogens. Edible vaccines are also disclosed. For needleless immunization, jet gun, gene gun and microneedles have been developed. Biodegradable and mucoadhesive polymer-based vaccine formulations have been developed to deliver vaccines through the mucosa and enhance immunogenicity. Various viral vectors of recombinant HPV DNA vaccine are disclosed. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 37-43

  6. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  7. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atessa Pakfetrat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center.     Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration.   Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%. The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+.   Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia.

  8. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakfetrat, Atessa; Falaki, Farnaz; Delavarian, Zahra; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Sanatkhani, Majid; Zabihi Marani, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration. Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%). The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+. Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. PMID:25745611

  9. [Changes in vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus infection Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez P, Ana; Alvarez P, Ana M; Wu H, Elba; Peña D, Anamaría; Vizueta R, Eloísa

    2007-10-01

    The identification of various risk factors of vertical human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission resulted in the development of strategies whose aim was to decrease the mother's viral load, to reduce her child's exposure to it during delivery, and to avoid the subsequent viral exposure due to breastfeeding. The administration of antiretroviral treatment during pregnancy, delivery and to the neonate (PACTG 076) proved to be useful. At a first stage, zidovudine was used. A triple combination therapy was then administered. Initially, the viral transmission in mothers who were enrolled in protocols for vertically transmitted HIV prophylaxis was reduced to 9.5%, whereas the last measurement carried out between 1998 and 2005, the initial figure was brought down to 2%. Nevertheless, the delivery of infected children whose mother's HIV status was unknown is still considered likely to happen. The main step to be taken to reduce HIV infection among children is to perform universal HIV tests during pregnancy, so that HIV positive pregnant patients conveniently receive proper prophylaxis. We look forward to achieving this by following the new prevention guidelines of vertically-transmitted HIV infection, developed by the Comisión Nacional del SIDA of the Chilean Health Ministry.

  10. Effects of human respiratory syncytial virus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus 3 and influenza virus on CD4+ T cell activation by dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Le Nouën

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, and to a lesser extent human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, re-infect symptomatically throughout life without antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete immunity. One causative factor is thought to be viral interference with dendritic cell (DC-mediated stimulation of CD4+ T cells. METHODOLOGY, PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We infected human monocyte-derived DC with purified HRSV, HMPV, HPIV3, or influenza A virus (IAV and compared their ability to induce activation and proliferation of autologous CD4+ T cells in vitro. IAV was included because symptomatic re-infection without antigenic change is less frequent, suggesting that immune protection is more complete and durable. We examined virus-specific memory responses and superantigen-induced responses by multiparameter flow cytometry. Live virus was more stimulatory than inactivated virus in inducing DC-mediated proliferation of virus-specific memory CD4+ T cells, suggesting a lack of strong suppression by live virus. There were trends of increasing proliferation in the order: HMPVviruses are similar in their ability to induce DC to activate CD4+ T cells. Thus, the results do not support the common model in which viral suppression of CD4+ T cell activation and

  11. Positive Selection Analysis of VP1 Genes of Worldwide Human Enterovirus 71 Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-feng SHI; Zhong ZHANG; Ai-she DUN; Yan-zhou ZHANG; Guang-fu YU; Dong-ming ZHUANG; Chao-dong ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 viruses have been long circulating throughout the world. In this study, we performed a positive selection analysis of the VP1 genes of capsid proteins from Enterovirus 71 viruses. Our results showed that although most sites were under negative or neutral evolution, four positions of the VP1 genes were under positive selection pressure. This might account for the spread and frequent outbreaks of the viruses and the enhanced neurovirulence. In particular, position 98 might be involved in neutralizing antibodies, modulating the virus-receptor interaction and enhancing the virulence of the viruses. Moreover, both positions 145 and 241 might correlate to determine the receptor specificity. However, these positions did not display much difference in amino acid polymorphism. In addition, no position in the VP1 genes of viruses isolated from China was under positive selection.

  12. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  13. Role of human papilloma virus in oral leukoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuja Bhargava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Controversy surrounds regarding the role of human papillomavirus (HPV in oral precancerous and cancerous lesions in India where smokeless, tobacco consumption is rampant. Aims: The present study was carried out with an aim to investigate the presence and type of HPV infection in oropharyngeal leukoplakia and to determine the association of HPV positivity with various patient and lesion characteristics. Settings and Design: Prospective case series. Materials and Methods: A total of fifty confirmed cases of oral leukoplakia (OL, aged 18–55 years were enrolled in the study. Specimens were obtained from the site of lesion. All the specimens were subjected to histopathological analysis and HPV-16, 18 detection was done using real-time polymerase chain reaction technique. Results: Mean age of patients was 34.00 ± 8.85. Majority were males (62%, from middle social class (78% and were educated up to graduation or above (54%. All the patients had one or more adverse habits (betel, chewing tobacco, smoking and alcohol with mean duration of disease was 3.53 ± 3.05 years. Five patients (10% had diabetes. Burning sensation (86% and trismus (36% were the reported complaints. Maximum were Stage II (50%, sized 2–4 cm2 (60%, homogenous (70%. Floor of mouth and tongue were most commonly involved sites (50%. Majority had mild dysplasia (58%. Acanthosis (66%, hyperplasia (62%, koliocytosis (40%, and keratosis (98% were quite common. HPV (16/18 could not be detected in any specimen. Conclusions: The present study highlighted the fact that association of HPV with oral leukoplakia seems to be overestimated and needs to be reexamined with consensus Human papilloma virus (HPV primers to detect HPV types with more valid empirical relationships.

  14. BENIGN EPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA ASSOCIATED WITH BETA-HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Molochkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study an association between acrochordon and human papilloma virus (HPV using quantitative analysis of viral desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA; to detect different phenotypes of beta-HPV. Materials and methods: We examined 52  patients (22 immuno-suppressed patients and 30 immunocompetent subjects in the Dermatovenereology and Dermato-Oncology Department and Chronic Dialysis and Kidney Transplantation Department of the Moscow Regional Research and Clinical Institute (MONIKI. Control group included 49 healthy donors. Burr biopsy samples (micro-samples of acrochordon and intact skin (apper arm were collected in sterile conditions. After sample procession and DNA isolation using DNK-sorb-C kit (Central Research Institute for Epidemiology – CRIE, polymerase chain reaction for HPV was performed with real-time fluorescent hybridization detection. For DNA amplification and detection we used RotorGene 3000 analyzer (Corbett Research, Australia. In the beta-HPV assay, recombinant plasmids were used as positive controls and control human beta-globin gene fragments (CRIE. 4 oligo-nucleotide systems (group-specific primers and probes were used for the detection of beta-HPV DNA. Results: Preliminary data indicated that acrochordons of open and covered skin regions were common in renal transplant recipients. Beta-HPV DNA was more frequent in acrochordons and intact skin (64% and 54% of renal transplant recipients compared to healthy donors (47%. 57% of renal transplant recipients demonstrated mixed infection in acrochordons. Conclusion: HPV DNA was frequently detected in acrochordons and intact skin of renal transplant recipients. In immunocompetent patients prevalence of HPV DNA in acrochordons was significantly higher compared to intact skin.

  15. Transcriptomic profiles of human foreskin fibroblast cells in response to orf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daxiang; Long, Mingjian; Xiao, Bin; Xiong, Yufeng; Chen, Huiqin; Chen, Yu; Kuang, Zhenzhan; Li, Ming; Wu, Yingsong; Rock, Daniel L; Gong, Daoyuan; Wang, Yong; He, Haijian; Liu, Fang; Luo, Shuhong; Hao, Wenbo

    2017-08-29

    Orf virus has been utilized as a safe and efficient viral vector against not only diverse infectious diseases, but also against tumors. However, the nature of the genes triggered by the vector in human cells is poorly characterized. Using RNA sequencing technology, we compared specific changes in the transcriptomic profiles in human foreskin fibroblast cells following infection by the orf virus. The results indicated that orf virus upregulates or downregulates expression of a variety of genes, including genes involved in antiviral immune response, apoptosis, cell cycle and a series of signaling pathways, such as the IFN and p53-signaling pathways. The orf virus stimulates or inhibits immune gene expression such as chemokines, chemokine receptors, cytokines, cytokine receptors, and molecules involved in antigen uptake and processing after infection. Expression of pro-apoptotic genes increased at 8 hours post-infection. The p53 signaling pathway was activated to induce apoptosis at the same time. However, the cell cycle program was promoted after infection, which may be due to the immunomodulatory genes of the orf virus. This presents the first description of transcription profile changes in human foreskin fibroblast cells after orf virus infection and provides an in-depth analysis of the interaction between the host and orf virus. These data offer new insights into the understanding of the mechanisms of infection by orf virus and identify potential targets for future studies.

  16. Reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus with circulating human and avian influenza viruses: public health risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stincarelli, Maria; Arvia, Rosaria; De Marco, Maria Alessandra; Clausi, Valeria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Cotti, Claudia; Delogu, Mauro; Donatelli, Isabella; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Exploring the reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A/H1N1pdm09) influenza virus with other circulating human or avian influenza viruses is the main concern related to the generation of more virulent or new variants having implications for public health. After different coinfection experiments in human A549 cells, by using the A/H1N1pdm09 virus plus one of human seasonal influenza viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtype or one of H11, H10, H9, H7 and H1 avian influenza viruses, several reassortant viruses were obtained. Among these, the HA of H1N1 was the main segment of human seasonal influenza virus reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Conversely, HA and each of the three polymerase segments, alone or in combination, of the avian influenza viruses mainly reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Of note, A/H1N1pdm09 viruses that reassorted with HA of H1N1 seasonal human or H11N6 avian viruses or carried different combination of avian origin polymerase segments, exerted a higher replication effectiveness than that of the parental viruses. These results confirm that reassortment of the A/H1N1pdm09 with circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses should not be misjudged in the prediction of the next pandemic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sindbis Virus Infection in Resident Birds, Migratory Birds, and Humans, Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Kurkela, Satu; Rätti, Osmo; Huhtamo, Eili; Uzcátegui, Nathalie Y.; Nuorti, J. Pekka; Laakkonen, Juha; Manni, Tytti; Helle, Pekka; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2008-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV), a mosquito-borne virus that causes rash and arthritis, has been causing outbreaks in humans every seventh year in northern Europe. To gain a better understanding of SINV epidemiology in Finland, we searched for SINV antibodies in 621 resident grouse, whose population declines have coincided with human SINV outbreaks, and in 836 migratory birds. We used hemagglutination-inhibition and neutralization tests for the bird samples and enzyme immunoassays and hemagglutination-i...

  18. Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis in a child with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Katelyn R; Gonzalez Santiago, Tania M; Tollefson, Megha M

    2013-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EDV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by susceptibility to human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. An acquired form of EDV has been described in the setting of immunosuppression, including in patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We present the case of an HIV-positive, adopted Haitian boy who presented with EDV. Few cases of chidren with HIV and acquired EDV have been reported and are likely underrecognized.

  19. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients Diagnosed with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS in Cienfuegos

    OpenAIRE

    Nivia Gontán Quintana; Alain Soto Ugalde; Elena Idaisy Otero Salabarría

    2013-01-01

    Background: human immunodeficiency virus increases patients´ susceptibility to infections. Consequently, a high incidence of periodontal diseases is observed among them. It is often associated with other lesions of the oral mucous. Objective: to determine the evolution of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease in patients diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS.Methods: a case series study involving HIV-positive patients who attended the Stomatology consultation in Cienfuegos was c...

  20. Maternal Syphilis: An Independent Risk Factor for Mother to Infant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinikar, Aarti; Gupte, Nikhil; Bhat, Jayalakshmi; Bharadwaj, Renu; Kulkarni, Vandana; Bhosale, Ramesh; McIntire, Katherine N; Mave, Vidya; Suryavanshi, Nishi; Patil, Sandesh; Bollinger, Robert; Gupta, Amita

    2017-06-01

    Syphilis is associated with increased human immunodeficiency virus acquisition and sexual transmission; we examined impact on human immunodeficiency virus mother-to-child transmission among mother-infant pairs enrolled in the India Six-Week Extended-Dose Nevirapine study. Maternal syphilis, diagnosed serologically using Venereal Disease Research Laboratory titer plus Treponema Pallidum Hemagglutination Assay, was associated with 2.5-fold greater risk.

  1. Does human bocavirus infection depend on helper viruses? A challenging case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockmann Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case of severe diarrhoea associated with synergistic human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV and human herpes virus type 6 (HHV6 is reported. The case supports the hypotheses that HBoV infection under clinical conditions may depend on helper viruses, or that HBoV replicates by a mechanism that is atypical for parvoviruses, or that HBoV infection can be specifically treated with cidofovir.

  2. Hepatitis C virus core protein induces neuroimmune activation and potentiates Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpun Vivithanaporn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV genomes and proteins are present in human brain tissues although the impact of HIV/HCV co-infection on neuropathogenesis remains unclear. Herein, we investigate HCV infectivity and effects on neuronal survival and neuroinflammation in conjunction with HIV infection. METHODOLOGY: Human microglia, astrocyte and neuron cultures were infected with cell culture-derived HCV or exposed to HCV core protein with or without HIV-1 infection or HIV-1 Viral Protein R (Vpr exposure. Host immune gene expression and cell viability were measured. Patch-clamp studies of human neurons were performed in the presence or absence of HCV core protein. Neurobehavioral performance and neuropathology were examined in HIV-1 Vpr-transgenic mice in which stereotaxic intrastriatal implants of HCV core protein were performed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HCV-encoded RNA as well as HCV core and non-structural 3 (NS3 proteins were detectable in human microglia and astrocytes infected with HCV. HCV core protein exposure induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in microglia (p<0.05 but not in astrocytes while increased chemokine (e.g. CXCL10 and interleukin-8 expression was observed in both microglia and astrocytes (p<0.05. HCV core protein modulated neuronal membrane currents and reduced both β-III-tubulin and lipidated LC3-II expression (p<0.05. Neurons exposed to supernatants from HCV core-activated microglia exhibited reduced β-III-tubulin expression (p<0.05. HCV core protein neurotoxicity and interleukin-6 induction were potentiated by HIV-1 Vpr protein (p<0.05. HIV-1 Vpr transgenic mice implanted with HCV core protein showed gliosis, reduced neuronal counts together with diminished LC3 immunoreactivity. HCV core-implanted animals displayed neurobehavioral deficits at days 7 and 14 post-implantation (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: HCV core protein exposure caused neuronal injury

  3. Low prevalence of DNA virus in the human endometrium og endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv; Knudsen, Ulla Breth; Munk, Torben

    2010-01-01

    biopsies and subjected to highly sensitive PCR tests detecting human papillomavirus (HPV) types, the herpes family viruses HSV-1 and -2, CMV, and EBV, and the polyomaviruses SV40, JCV, BKV, KIV, WUV, and MCV. The prevalence of pathogenic DNA viruses in the human endometrium was generally low (0......The chronic female disease endometriosis causes debilitating pain and lowered fertility. The aetiology is unknown, but indications of an infectious agent are present. This study investigates the possible involvement of a pathogenic virus in endometriosis patients and controls. DNA was purified from......–10%). The virus prevalence was found to vary slightly when comparing the endometrium of healthy women and women with endometriosis. However, these were not significant differences, and no viruses were identified in endometriotic lesions. These results do not point towards any evidence that endometriosis is caused...

  4. Factors in enhancing blood safety by nucleic acid technology testing for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatakrishna Shyamala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades through an awareness of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI, a majority of countries have mandated serology based blood screening assays for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Hepatitis C virus (HCV, and Hepatitis B virus (HBV. However, despite improved serology assays, the transfusion transmission of HIV, HCV, and HBV continues, primarily due to release of serology negative units that are infectious because of the window period (WP and occult HBV infections (OBI. Effective mode of nucleic acid technology (NAT testing of the viruses can be used to minimize the risk of TTIs. This review compiles the examples of NAT testing failures for all three viruses; analyzes the causes for failure, and the suggestions from retrospective studies to minimize such failures. The results suggest the safest path to be individual donation testing (ID format for highest sensitivity, and detection of multiple regions for rapidly mutating and recombining viruses. The role of blood screening in the context of the donation and transfusion practices in India, the donor population, and the epidemiology is also discussed. World wide, as the public awareness of TTIs increases, as the recipient rights for safe blood are legally upheld, as the possibility to manage diseases such as hepatitis through expensive and prolonged treatment becomes accessible, and the societal responsibility to shoulder the health costs as in the case for HIV becomes routine, there is much to gain by preventing infections than treating diseases.

  5. A new model for simulating evolution of human influenza virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Understanding the evolution of influenza A virus, which poses a global challenge to public health, is of special significance for its control and prevention. Although the genome structure of the virus is seemingly simple, their evolutionary patterns and molecular mechanisms are difficult to reveal.

  6. Detection and Genetic Characterization of Rabies Virus from Human Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Saliva and blood were collected from two patients who had not received post exposure prophylaxis in the cities of Wenzhou and Xinning respectively. Both patients were confirmed as positive for rabies by detection of rabies virus specific nucleoprotein antibodies in the sera by Western Blot. However, rabies virus specific RNA was only identified in the saliva collected from the patient in Wenzhou. Furthermore, the isolate Zhejiang Wz0 (H) was obtained by inoculating one-day-old suckling mice. Both nucleoprotein (N) and glycoprotein (G) genes from the isolate were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolate belonged to classic rabies virus, and shared a higher homology with the street viruses from dogs in the main endemic areas in China and the street virus from dogs in Indonesia than with other known strains. Further comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences between the isolate and the vaccine strains used in China showed that the virus had a higher level of homology with the vaccine strain CTN than with the other vaccine strains (3aG, PV, PM and ERA). In particular, amino acid residues substitutions located in antigenic site Ⅲ in the G protein, which could react with the neutralizing antibodies, were observed. These results suggested that the virus belonged to the classic rabies virus, and both N and G genes diverged from the current vaccine strains used in China at either the nucleotide or the amino acid level.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated polymorphic lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, Roland G; Chadburn, Amy; Gundappa, Girija; Cesarman, Ethel; Said, Jonathan W; Knowles, Daniel M

    2003-03-01

    The majority of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are clinically aggressive monoclonal B-cell Burkitt's lymphomas, large cell lymphomas, or immunoblastic lymphomas. In contrast, the lymphoid proliferations arising in solid organ transplant recipients, collectively referred to as posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PT-LPDs), represent a clinically and histopathologically heterogeneous group of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell proliferations of variable clonal composition. During a retrospective histopathologic review of lymphoid proliferations associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection we identified 10 cases that morphologically resemble the polymorphic PT-LPDs. They arose in lymph nodes (five), lungs (two), and the parotid gland, perineum, and skin (one each). They exhibit a diffuse growth pattern and are composed of a polymorphic lymphoid cell population exhibiting a variable degree of plasmacytic differentiation, cytologic atypia, and numbers of atypical immunoblasts. A clonal B-cell population was detected by immunoglobulin heavy and light chain gene rearrangement and/or EBV terminal repeat analysis in 8 of the 10 (80%) cases by Southern blotting. The nongermline hybridizing bands were usually faint, however, suggesting that the clonal B-cell population represented only a subpopulation within the polymorphic lesion. Strong clonal rearrangement bands were present in one case in which there was clear morphologic evidence of transformation to diffuse large cell lymphoma. This case exhibited C-MYC, BCL-6, and p53 gene mutations. One other case exhibited a p53 gene mutation. The remaining eight cases lacked C-MYC, BCL-6, RAS, and p53 gene alterations. Clonal EBV infection was detected in 4 of the 10 (40%) lesions. Like EBV-containing PT-LPDs, all four EBV-positive HIV-associated polymorphic lesions were associated with type A EBV. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus was detectable in two cases by polymerase chain

  8. Human cytotoxic T lymphocytes directed to seasonal influenza A viruses cross-react with the newly emerging H7N9 virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. van de Sandt (Carolien); J.H.C.M. Kreijtz (Joost); G. de Mutsert (Gerrie); M.M. Geelhoed-Mieras (Martina); M.L.B. Hillaire (Marine); S.E. Vogelzang-van Trierum (Stella ); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIn February 2013, zoonotic transmission of a novel influenza A virus of the H7N9 subtype was reported in China. Although at present no sustained human-to-human transmission has been reported, a pandemic outbreak of this H7N9 virus is feared. Since neutralizing antibodies to the hemagglut

  9. Genomic Signatures for Avian H7N9 Viruses Adapting to Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Wu Chen

    Full Text Available An avian influenza A H7N9 virus emerged in March 2013 and caused a remarkable number of human fatalities. Genome variability in these viruses may provide insights into host adaptability. We scanned over 140 genomes of the H7N9 viruses isolated from humans and identified 104 positions that exhibited seven or more amino acid substitutions. Approximately half of these substitutions were identified in the influenza ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex. Although PB2 627K of the avian virus promotes replication in humans, 45 of the 147 investigated PB2 sequences retained the E signature at this position, which is an avian characteristic. We discovered 10 PB2 substitutions that covaried with K627E. An RNP activity assay showed that Q591K, D701N, and M535L restored the polymerase activity in human cells when 627K transformed to an avian-like E. Genomic analysis of the human-isolated avian influenza virus is crucial in assessing genome variability, because relationships between position-specific variations can be observed and explored. In this study, we observed alternative positions that can potentially compensate for PB2 627K, a well-known marker for cross-species infection. An RNP assay suggested Q591K, D701N, and M535L as potential markers for an H7N9 virus capable of infecting humans.

  10. [The Emergence of Ebola virus in humans: a long process not yet fully understood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Éric Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Since 1976 Ebola virus regularly has caused small deadly outbreaks in Central Africa, usually controlled in a few months. For the first time, an Ebola epidemic of exceptional magnitude dramatically engulfed several countries in West Africa since December 2013. Major failures of implementing measures to prevent human-to-human transmissions are the main cause of this large-scale Ebola outbreak. After about one-week incubation period, the Ebola virus disease is characterized by a sudden onset of high fever leading to multiple hemorrhages and to widespread organ failure. Several bat species constitute the main reservoirs of Ebola viruses. Human contamination would occur either directly from bats, widely consumed by the local populations, or through animal species susceptible to Ebola infection, such as chimpanzees and gorillas. Alongside this "natural cycle", an "epidemic cycle" involving domestic animals living in villages such as dogs or pigs, is seriously suggested. Thus, according to the diversity of concerned animals and their clinical infectionform, modalities of human contamination can be multiple and are still largely unknown. In this context, all efforts that could be made to unravel the mystery of the Ebola virus emergence in humans and clarify modalities of the virus transmission, would allow for predicting or for anticipating the future occurrence of epidemics. This review aims to provide an exhaustive inventory of the Ebola ecology to highlight events governing the virus transmission to humans that still remain unsolved.

  11. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: from Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezra David Mirvish

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis (RDA. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Patrick S. Moore, Yuan Chang, and colleagues developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS, an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV from Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC. Here we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV.

  12. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Langlois, A.J.; Lyerly, H.K.; Carson, H.; Krohn, K.; Ranki, A.; Gallo, R.C.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Putney, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120.

  13. Differential transcriptional responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infection in bat and human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölzer, Martin; Krähling, Verena; Amman, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa resulted in over 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths, underlining the need for a better understanding of the biology of this highly pathogenic virus to develop specific counter strategies. Two filoviruses, the Ebola and Marburg viruses, result...... expressed genes, activity motifs and pathways in human and bat cells infected with the Ebola and Marburg viruses, and we demonstrate that the replication of filoviruses is more rapid in human cells than in bat cells. We also found that the most strongly regulated genes upon filovirus infection are chemokine...

  14. Removal of pathogenic human viruses by insoluble pyridinium-type resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, N; Yamazaki, K; Otake, T; Oishi, I; Minekawa, Y

    1990-12-01

    Cross-linked poly(N-benzyl-4-vinylpyridinium bromide) (BVP resin) was found to be very efficient in removing pathogenic human viruses from aqueous solution. In batch removal experiments using 50 g/l of BVP resin at 35 degrees C, the level of infectivity in suspensions of enterovirus, herpes simplex virus, poliovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus was reduced 1000-100,000 fold during a 2 h period. Those of coxsackievirus and echovirus were reduced 60-600 fold during 1 h contact. The haemagglutination titres of solutions of human rotavirus, influenza virus, human adenovirus, and Japanese encephalitis virus were reduced 16-256 fold during 30 min of contact. In removal experiments by a continuous flow column method for poliovirus, enterovirus, and coxsackievirus with initial infectivities of less than 10(5)/ml, the infectivity of these viruses was no longer detectable in the effluent solution. For poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and echovirus with initial infectivities higher than 10(6), 99.8-99.9998% of the input viruses was removed as indicated by the reduction of infectivity.

  15. A Novel H1N2 Influenza Virus Related to the Classical and Human Influenza Viruses from Pigs in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yafen; Wu, Xiaowei; Wang, Nianchen; Ouyang, Guowen; Qu, Nannan; Cui, Jin; Qi, Yan; Liao, Ming; Jiao, Peirong

    2016-01-01

    Southern China has long been considered to be an epicenter of pandemic influenza viruses. The special environment, breeding mode, and lifestyle in southern China provides more chances for wild aquatic birds, domestic poultry, pigs, and humans to be in contact. This creates the opportunity for interspecies transmission and generation of new influenza viruses. In this study, we reported a novel reassortant H1N2 influenza virus from pigs in southern China. According to the phylogenetic trees and homology of the nucleotide sequence, the virus was confirmed to be a novel triple-reassortant H1N2 virus containing genes from classical swine (PB2, PB1, HA, NP, and NS genes), triple-reassortant swine (PA and M genes), and recent human (NA gene) lineages. It indicated that the novel reassortment virus among human and swine influenza viruses occurred in pigs in southern China. The isolation of the novel reassortant H1N2 influenza viruses provides further evidence that pigs are "mixing vessels," and swine influenza virus surveillance in southern China will provide important information about genetic evaluation and antigenic variation of swine influenza virus to formulate the prevention and control measures for the viruses.

  16. Prevalence of human papilloma virus in marginal periodontium and its association with periodontitis: A cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Anila Jacob; Presanthila Janam; Janki Mohan Babu Vijayamma

    2014-01-01

    Context: Bacterial pathogens in dental plaque are necessary for the development of periodontitis but this etiology alone does not explain all its clinicopathologic features. Researchers have proven the role of certain viruses like herpes virus in periodontal disease which implies that other viral agents like human papilloma virus may also be involved. Aims: This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the proportion of patients with human papilloma virus (HPV-16) in marginal periodon...

  17. Human papilloma virus dermatosis in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: A 14-year retrospective study in 965 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuno-Gonzalez, Almudena; Losa Garcia, Juan Emilio; López Estebaranz, José Luis; Martin-Rios, María Dolores

    2017-05-10

    The incidence of the human papilloma virus (HPV) has not dropped in HIV-positive patients despite the discovery of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our goal is to assess the prevalence of HPV in HIV patients and its relationship with the epidemiological and virological characteristics of HIV patients. Retrospective cohort of 965 patients diagnosed with HIV from 1998 to 2012. We analyzed patients' demographic factors and factors related to the HPV. Of the 965 patients examined, 333 consulted a dermatologist. Of these, 52 patients had genital warts (15.6%), 43 had common warts (12.9%) and 8% had both conditions. In total, 28.5% of patients had a skin lesion caused by HPV. This is the first longitudinal observational study carried out on HIV-positive patients in the era of ART in which HPV infection is the most common skin pathology. We observed a similar trend in countries with access to ART. This study spreads awareness on the importance of preventing HPV and the difficulty of treating it in HIV-positive patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Dengue virus-specific, human CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T-cell clones: multiple patterns of virus cross-reactivity recognized by NS3-specific T-cell clones.

    OpenAIRE

    Kurane, I; Brinton, M.A.; Samson, A L; Ennis, F A

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen dengue virus-specific, cytotoxic CD4+ CD8- T-cell clones were established from a donor who was infected with dengue virus type 3. These clones were examined for virus specificity and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) restriction in cytotoxic assays. Six patterns of virus specificities were determined. Two serotype-specific clones recognized only dengue virus type 3. Two dengue virus subcomplex-specific clones recognized dengue virus types 2, 3, and 4, and one subcomplex-specific clone re...

  19. Expression of the Surface Glycoproteins of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 by Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3, a Novel Attenuated Virus Vaccine Vector

    OpenAIRE

    Haller, Aurelia A.; Miller, Tessa; Mitiku, Misrach; Coelingh, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (bPIV3) is being evaluated as an intranasal vaccine for protection against human PIV3 (hPIV3). In young infants, the bPIV3 vaccine appears to be infectious, attenuated, immunogenic, and genetically stable, which are desirable characteristics for an RNA virus vector. To test the potential of the bPIV3 vaccine strain as a vector, an infectious DNA clone of bPIV3 was assembled and recombinant bPIV3 (r-bPIV3) was rescued. r-bPIV3 displayed a temperature-sensitive...

  20. A systems approach to understanding human rhinovirus and influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taek-Kyun; Bheda-Malge, Anjali; Lin, Yakang; Sreekrishna, Koti; Adams, Rachel; Robinson, Michael K; Bascom, Charles C; Tiesman, Jay P; Isfort, Robert J; Gelinas, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinovirus and influenza virus infections of the upper airway lead to colds and the flu and can trigger exacerbations of lower airway diseases including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets are still needed to differentiate between the cold and the flu, since the clinical course of influenza can be severe while that of rhinovirus is usually more mild. In our investigation of influenza and rhinovirus infection of human respiratory epithelial cells, we used a systems approach to identify the temporally changing patterns of host gene expression from these viruses. After infection of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) with rhinovirus, influenza virus or co-infection with both viruses, we studied the time-course of host gene expression changes over three days. We modeled host responses to these viral infections with time and documented the qualitative and quantitative differences in innate immune activation and regulation.

  1. Weighing serological evidence of human exposure to animal influenza viruses - a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Reina Saapke; Freidl, Gudrun Stephanie; de Bruin, Erwin; Koopmans, Marion

    2016-11-03

    Assessing influenza A virus strains circulating in animals and their potential to cross the species barrier and cause human infections is important to improve human influenza surveillance and preparedness. We reviewed studies describing serological evidence of human exposure to animal influenza viruses. Comparing serological data is difficult due to a lack of standardisation in study designs and in laboratory methods used in published reports. Therefore, we designed a scoring system to assess and weigh specificity of obtained serology results in the selected articles. Many studies report reliable evidence of antibodies to swine influenza viruses among persons occupationally exposed to pigs. Most avian influenza studies target H5, H7 and H9 subtypes and most serological evidence of human exposure to avian influenza viruses is reported for these subtypes. Avian influenza studies receiving a low grade in this review often reported higher seroprevalences in humans compared with studies with a high grade. Official surveillance systems mainly focus on avian H5 and H7 viruses. Swine influenza viruses and avian subtypes other than H5 and H7 (emphasising H9) should be additionally included in official surveillance systems. Surveillance efforts should also be directed towards understudied geographical areas, such as Africa and South America. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  2. The Interplay of Dengue Virus Morphological Diversity and Human Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Shee-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects ∼400 million people annually, and there is no available vaccine or therapeutics. It is not clear why candidate vaccines provide only modest protection. In addition to the presence of four different dengue serotypes, there is also structural heterogeneity in DENV infectious particles, even within a strain. This severely complicates the development of vaccines and therapeutics. The currently known different morphologies of DENV are: immature, partially mature, compact mature, and expanded mature forms of the virus. In this review I describe these forms of the virus, their infectivity, and how antibodies could recognize these morphologies. I also discuss possible vaccine and antibody therapeutic formulations to protect against all morphologies.

  3. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjaerg, L L; Hansen, J E; Dalbøge, H;

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1, human protein interaction database at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, William; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E; Katz, Kenneth S; Maglott, Donna R; Pruitt, Kim D; Ptak, Roger G

    2009-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Protein Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/HIVInteractions, was created to catalog all interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins published in the peer-reviewed literature. The database serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. To facilitate this discovery approach, the following information for each HIV-1 human protein interaction is provided and can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, Entrez Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. Currently, 2589 unique HIV-1 to human protein interactions and 5135 brief descriptions of the interactions, with a total of 14,312 PMID references to the original articles reporting the interactions, are stored in this growing database. In addition, all protein-protein interactions documented in the database are integrated into Entrez Gene records and listed in the 'HIV-1 protein interactions' section of Entrez Gene reports. The database is also tightly linked to other databases through Entrez Gene, enabling users to search for an abundance of information related to HIV pathogenesis and replication.

  5. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  6. Serological report of pandemic and seasonal human influenza virus infection in dogs in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Zhao, Fu-Rong; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Wei, Ping; Chang, Hui-Yun

    2014-11-01

    From January to July 2012, we looked for evidence of subclinical A (H1N1) pdm09 and seasonal human influenza viruses infections in healthy dogs in China. Sera from a total of 1920 dogs were collected from Guangdong, Guangxi, Fujian and Jiangxi provinces. We also examined archived sera from 66 dogs and cats that were collected during 2008 from these provinces. Using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization (MN) assays, we found that only the dogs sampled in 2012 had elevated antibodies (≥ 1:32) against A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and seasonal human influenza viruses: Of the 1920 dog sera, 20.5 % (n = 393) had elevated antibodies against influenza A(H1N1) pdm09 by the HI assay, 1.1 % (n = 22), and 4.7 % (n = 91) of the 1920 dogs sera had elevated antibodies against human seasonal H1N1 influenza virus and human seasonal H3N2 influenza virus by the HI assay. Compared with dogs that were raised on farms, dogs that were raised as pets were more likely to have elevated antibodies against A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal human influenza viruses. Seropositivity was highest among pet dogs, which likely had more diverse and frequent exposures to humans than farm dogs. These findings will help us better understand which influenza A viruses are present in dogs and will contribute to the prevention and control of influenza A virus. Moreover, further in-depth study is necessary for us to understand what roles dogs play in the ecology of influenza A.

  7. Measuring domestic violence in human immunodeficiency virus-positive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrikar, Seema; Verma, Ak; Bhatti, Vk; Shatabdi, S

    2012-04-01

    Violence affects the lives of millions of women worldwide, in all socioeconomic classes. Violence and the fear of violence are emerging as important risk factor contributing to the vulnerability to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection for women. The objective of the present cross sectional study is to compare the experiences of domestic violence between HIV-positive and HIV-negative married women seeking treatment in a tertiary care hospital. The study is conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Pune on a randomly selected 150 married women (75 HIV-positive and 75 HIV-negative). Informed consent was obtained from all the women and also a trained counsellor was present during the process of data collection. The data was collected by interview method by taking precautions as laid down in the World Health Organization's ethical and safety recommendations for research on domestic violence and using modified conflict tactics scale (CTS). The definition of violence followed is as per the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993. The percentage of women reporting domestic violence is 44.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 36.84-52.68). The proportion of physical, emotional and sexual violence reported is 38% (95% CI = 30.49-45.96), 24% (95% CI = 17.67-31.31), and 14.7% (95% CI = 9.66-21.02), respectively. The odds of reporting violence of all forms is significantly higher among HIV-positive women than among HIV-negative women (Pviolence. The findings suggest high proportion of HIV-positive women report violence then HIV-negative women which must be addressed through multilevel prevention approaches.

  8. Current human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and its response in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Lai-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The first patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was identified in 1985; since then, as of October 31, 2010, a total accumulative number of 370 000 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS have been reported. The estimated number of patients living with HIV (PLHIV) in China was 740 000 in 2009. Although China is still a low-HIV prevalence region (rate of 0.057%), the epidemic has spread more widely from the high-risk groups to the general population. This paper covers five topics of importance, i.e., current trends of the HIV epidemic; HIV-1 subtype diversity; emergence of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR); the country's response to the disease; and future challenges and additional actions needed. This paper emphasizes sexual transmission as the predominant route of transmission and it being spread more frequently among men who have sex with men; the epidemic being concentrated over particular areas in China. We also discuss the fact that diverse HIV-1 subtypes have been found throughout the entire country and that recombinant subtypes became predominant. We also explore other topics such as the possibility of HIVDR, including primary and secondary resistance, with the use of free highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART); the integrated strategy of HIVDR surveillance and individual clinical HIVDR testing as a new attempt in China. For many years both policy-makers and professionals (including non-governmental organizations) have expressed strong commitment to prevention, control, and care of HIV/sexual transmission infection (STI), promoted the research and conducted different actions to slow the rising trend of the HIV epidemics. Although China is facing many challenges, its citizens need to be persistent on continuing the campaign of the State Council titled "Information of Strengthening Work on Prevention and Control of AIDS".

  9. Human papilloma virus infection in female kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Ghazizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of genital human papilloma virus (HPV infection and cervical intra-epithelial lesions in transplanted patients. Cervical Papanicolaou (Pap smear/HPV test and colposcopic examinations were performed in 58 patients who were candidates for renal transplant surgery; these tests were repeated one year later. Their age range was 26-53 years (mean, 37.2 years. Hypertension was the most common cause of renal insufficiency (34.4%, while in 41.4% of the patients, the causative pathology was unknown. In 24.1% of the patients, there was no history of dialysis, i.e. they had pre-emptive transplantation. The mean duration of marriage (years since first intercourse was 16.2 years (range, 1-35. Coitus interruptus was the most common contraceptive method used (37.9%, followed by tubal ligation and condom (10.3% and 6.9%, respectively. All patients had negative Pap tests and normal gynecologic exam before undergoing transplantation. The Pap test remained normal after transplant surgery, although the HPV test became positive in four patients (6.9%. There were five cases of white epithelium on colposcopy, but biopsy showed normal metaplasia. Two cases of extensive anogenital warts were treated by CO 2 laser, and one patient had recurrent warts, which responded well to second laser surgery. None of the study patients had squamous intra-epithelial lesions (SIL or vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasia. Our study suggests that screening with HPV and Pap test should be performed before transplant surgery and should be repeated at regular intervals in order to avoid irreversible situations such as high-grade SILs, which are difficult to treat. Avoiding high-risk sexual relations in this group of patients is highly recommended.

  10. Human papilloma virus (HPV) modulation of the HNSCC epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Josena K; Worsham, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the human papilloma virus (HPV), in addition to tobacco and alcohol, is considered another independent risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous head and neck cancer (OPSCC), where the prevalence of HPV-16 increases to 50-90 % for the oropharynx. Also, incidence and mortality in head and neck SCC (HNSCC) continue to be higher in African Americans (AA) than in Caucasian Americans (CA). A recent study found that poorer survival outcomes for AA versus CA with oropharyngeal tumors were attributable to racial differences in the prevalence of HPV positive (+) tumors; HPV negative (-) AA and CA patients had similar outcomes (Settle et al., Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 2:776-781, 2009). Evidence indicates that a HPV+ diagnosis has significant prognostic implications; these patients have at least half the risk of death when compared with the HPV- patient, due in part to a better response to chemoradiotherapy (Fakhry et al., J Natl Cancer Inst 100:261-269, 2008).Epigenetic events of promoter hypermethylation are emerging as promising molecular strategies for cancer detection, representing tumor-specific markers occurring early in tumor progression. HPV infection is now recognized to play a role in the pathogenesis of OPSCC, where HPV+ and HPV- patients appear to be clinically and biologically distinct with reported genome-wide hypomethylation and promoter hypermethylation in HPV+ HNSCC tumors. A recent study from our group applying pathway analysis to investigate the biological role of the differentially methylated genes in HPV+ and HPV- HNSCC reported 8 signal transduction pathways germane to HNSCC (Worsham et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 149:409-416, 2013).

  11. Metabolic syndrome in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Bajaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives : To assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients. Prevalence of MetS was compared in patients who were not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART to patients who were on HAART. Materials and Methods: Seventy HIV positive cases were studied. Pregnant and lactating women, patients on drugs other than HAART known to cause metabolic abnormalities and those having diabetes or hypertension were excluded. Cases were evaluated for MetS by using National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel-III. Results: 47 cases were on HAART and 23 cases were not on HAART. Fasting Blood Glucose ≥100 mg/dl was present in 28.6% cases, out of whom 27.7% were on HAART and 30.4% were not on HAART (P = 0.8089. 12.9% cases had BP ≥130/≥85 mm Hg, out of whom 14.9% were on HAART and 8.7% were not on HAART (P = 0.4666. 42.9% cases had TG ≥150 mg/dl, out of whom 44.7% were on HAART and 39.1% were not on HAART (P = 0.6894. HDL cholesterol was low (males <40 mg/dl, females <50 mg/dl in 50% cases, out of whom 55.3% were on HAART and 39.1% were not on HAART (P = 0.2035. Conclusions: Prevalence of MetS was 20%. Majority of patients had only one component of MetS (32.9%. Low HDL was present in 50%, followed by raised triglycerides in 42.9%. Waist circumference was not increased in any of the patients. There was no statistically significant difference between those on HAART and those not on HAART in distribution of risk factors and individual components of MetS.

  12. Declined Neural Efficiency in Cognitively Stable Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Thomas; Yakupov, Renat; Nakama, Helenna; Crocket, Grace; Cole, Michael; Watters, Michael; Ricardo-Dukelow, Mary Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether brain activation changes in clinically and neurocognitively normal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and in HIV-seronegative control (SN) participants over a 1-year period. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in 32 SN and 31 HIV patients (all with stable combination antiretroviral treatment) at baseline and after 1 year. Each participant performed a set of visual attention tasks with increasing attentional load (from tracking two, three, or four balls). All HIV and SN participants had normal neuropsychological function at both examinations. Results Over 1 year, HIV patients showed no change in their neurocognitive status or in task performance during fMRI. However, HIV patients showed significant 1-year increases in fMRI signals in the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices for the more difficult tasks, whereas SN control participants showed only decreases in brain activation in these regions. This resulted in significant interactions between HIV status and time of study in left insula, left parietal, left temporal, and several frontal regions (left and right middle frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate). Interpretation Because fMRI task performance remained unchanged in both groups, the HIV patients appeared to maintain performance by increasing usage of the attention network, whereas the control participants reduced usage of the attention network after 1 year. These findings suggest improved efficiency or a practice effect in the SN participants but declined efficiency of the neural substrate in HIV patients, possibly because of ongoing brain injury associated with the HIV infection, despite their apparent stable clinical course. PMID:19334060

  13. REVIEW OF CONTROL OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dami, N; Shehu, N Y; Dami, S; Iroezindu, M O

    2015-01-01

    The global scourge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is inundating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in particular Nigeria which is home to 10% of the world's HIV-infected persons. The target of the millennium development goal 6 is to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. HIV control in Nigeria was initially shrouded in denial and apathy. Subsequently, a more pragmatic approach was launched during the tenure of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Several policies were formulated. The national prevalence of HIV witnessed some progressive decline and is currently 4.1%. There is now improvement in both HIV awareness and counselling and testing. Greater access to antiretroviral therapy and other support services have also been witnessed with over 300,000 persons currently on drugs. Notable achievements have been recorded in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTC). However, with increased access to antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drug resistance has become inevitable. Acquired drug resistance is high-82% and transmitted drug resistance ranges between 0.7 and 4.5%. The achievements were largely facilitated by international partnerships which have become more streamlined in recent years. A sustained shift to indigenously sourced financial and manpower resource has become imperative. It is also important to integrate HIV facilities with other existing health care facilities for sustainability and cost-effectiveness. In an attempt to strengthen the national response, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched the President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. It is hoped that this well-articulated policy would be well implemented to significantly reverse the epidemic.

  14. The citrus flavanone naringenin impairs dengue virus replication in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frabasile, Sandra; Koishi, Andrea Cristine; Kuczera, Diogo; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Verri, Waldiceu Aparecido; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia Nunes; Bordignon, Juliano

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most significant health problems in tropical and sub-tropical regions throughout the world. Nearly 390 million cases are reported each year. Although a vaccine was recently approved in certain countries, an anti-dengue virus drug is still needed. Fruits and vegetables may be sources of compounds with medicinal properties, such as flavonoids. This study demonstrates the anti-dengue virus activity of the citrus flavanone naringenin, a class of flavonoid. Naringenin prevented infection with four dengue virus serotypes in Huh7.5 cells. Additionally, experiments employing subgenomic RepDV-1 and RepDV-3 replicon systems confirmed the ability of naringenin to inhibit dengue virus replication. Antiviral activity was observed even when naringenin was used to treat Huh7.5 cells 24 h after dengue virus exposure. Finally, naringenin anti-dengue virus activity was demonstrated in primary human monocytes infected with dengue virus sertoype-4, supporting the potential use of naringenin to control dengue virus replication. In conclusion, naringenin is a suitable candidate molecule for the development of specific dengue virus treatments. PMID:28157234

  15. Assessment of sewer source contamination of drinking water wells using tracers and human enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Randall J; Borchardt, Mark A; Richards, Kevin D; Spencer, Susan K

    2010-10-15

    This study investigated the source, transport, and occurrence of human enteric viruses in municipal well water, focusing on sanitary sewer sources. A total of 33 wells from 14 communities were sampled once for wastewater tracers and viruses. Wastewater tracers were detected in four of these wells, and five wells were virus- positive by qRT-PCR. These results, along with exclusion of wells with surface water sources, were used to select three wells for additional investigation. Viruses and wastewater tracers were found in the groundwater at all sites. Some wastewater tracers, such as ionic detergents, flame retardants, and cholesterol, were considered unambiguous evidence of wastewater. Sampling at any given time may not show concurrent virus and tracer presence; however, given sufficient sampling over time, a relation between wastewater tracers and virus occurrence was identified. Presence of infectious viruses at the wellhead demonstrates that high-capacity pumping induced sufficiently short travel times for the transport of infectious viruses. Therefore, drinking-water wells are vulnerable to contaminants that travel along fast groundwater flowpaths even if they contribute a small amount of virus-laden water to the well. These results suggest that vulnerability assessments require characterization of "low yield-fast transport" in addition to traditional "high yield-slow transport", pathways.

  16. Interactions of human immunodeficiency virus-1 proteins with neurons : possible role in the development of human immunodeficiency virus-1-associated dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bovenkamp, M; Nottet, HSLM; Pereira, CF

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia is a severe neurological complication of HIV-1 infection that affects 15-20% of the patients in the late stages of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV-1-associated dementia is most probably a consequence of HIV-1 infection of the brain r

  17. Human and bovine viruses in the Milwaukee River watershed: hydrologically relevant representation and relations with environmental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, S R; Borchardt, M A; Spencer, S K; Hughes, P E; Baldwin, A K

    2014-08-15

    To examine the occurrence, hydrologic variability, and seasonal variability of human and bovine viruses in surface water, three stream locations were monitored in the Milwaukee River watershed in Wisconsin, USA, from February 2007 through June 2008. Monitoring sites included an urban subwatershed, a rural subwatershed, and the Milwaukee River at the mouth. To collect samples that characterize variability throughout changing hydrologic periods, a process control system was developed for unattended, large-volume (56-2800 L) filtration over extended durations. This system provided flow-weighted mean concentrations during runoff and extended (24-h) low-flow periods. Human viruses and bovine viruses were detected by real-time qPCR in 49% and 41% of samples (n=63), respectively. All human viruses analyzed were detected at least once including adenovirus (40% of samples), GI norovirus (10%), enterovirus (8%), rotavirus (6%), GII norovirus (1.6%) and hepatitis A virus (1.6%). Three of seven bovine viruses analyzed were detected including bovine polyomavirus (32%), bovine rotavirus (19%), and bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 (5%). Human viruses were present in 63% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt, and 20% of low-flow samples. Maximum human virus concentrations exceeded 300 genomic copies/L. Bovine viruses were present in 46% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt and 14% of low-flow samples. The maximum bovine virus concentration was 11 genomic copies/L. Statistical modeling indicated that stream flow, precipitation, and season explained the variability of human viruses in the watershed, and hydrologic condition (runoff event or low-flow) and season explained the variability of the sum of human and bovine viruses; however, no model was identified that could explain the variability of bovine viruses alone. Understanding the factors that affect virus fate and transport in rivers will aid watershed management for minimizing

  18. Human and bovine viruses in the Milwaukee River Watershed: hydrologically relevant representation and relations with environmental variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Steven R.; Borchardt, M. A.; Spencer, S. K.; Hughes, Peter E.; Baldwin, Austin K.

    2014-01-01

    To examine the occurrence, hydrologic variability, and seasonal variability of human and bovine viruses in surface water, three stream locations were monitored in the Milwaukee River watershed in Wisconsin, USA, from February 2007 through June 2008. Monitoring sites included an urban subwatershed, a rural subwatershed, and the Milwaukee River at the mouth. To collect samples that characterize variability throughout changing hydrologic periods, a process control system was developed for unattended, large-volume (56–2800 L) filtration over extended durations. This system provided flow-weighted mean concentrations during runoff and extended (24-h) low-flow periods. Human viruses and bovine viruses were detected by real-time qPCR in 49% and 41% of samples (n = 63), respectively. All human viruses analyzed were detected at least once including adenovirus (40% of samples), GI norovirus (10%), enterovirus (8%), rotavirus (6%), GII norovirus (1.6%) and hepatitis A virus (1.6%). Three of seven bovine viruses analyzed were detected including bovine polyomavirus (32%), bovine rotavirus (19%), and bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 (5%). Human viruses were present in 63% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt, and 20% of low-flow samples. Maximum human virus concentrations exceeded 300 genomic copies/L. Bovine viruses were present in 46% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt and 14% of low-flow samples. The maximum bovine virus concentration was 11 genomic copies/L. Statistical modeling indicated that stream flow, precipitation, and season explained the variability of human viruses in the watershed, and hydrologic condition (runoff event or low-flow) and season explained the variability of the sum of human and bovine viruses; however, no model was identified that could explain the variability of bovine viruses alone. Understanding the factors that affect virus fate and transport in rivers will aid watershed management for minimizing

  19. Genome evolution of novel influenza A (H1N1)viruses in humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOU Zheng; HU SongNian; LI TianXian

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic situation of A H1N1 flu arose in North America in April 2009,which rapidly expanded to three continents of Europe,Asia and Africa,with the risk ranking up to 5.Until May 13th,the flu virus of A H1N1 had spread into 33 countries and regions,with a laboratory confirmed case number of 5728,including 61 deaths.Based on IRV and EpiFluDB database,425 parts of A H1N1 flu virus sequence were achieved,followed by sequenced comparison and evolution analysis.The results showed that the current predominant A H1N1 flu virus was a kind of triple reassortment A flu virus:(i) HA,NA,MP,NP and NS originated from swine influenza virus;PB2 and PA originated from bird influenza virus;PB1 originated from human influenza virus.(ii) The origin of swine influenza virus could be subdivided as follows:HA,NP and NS originated from classic swine influenza virus of H1N1 subtype;NA and MP originated from bird origin swine influenza virus of H1N1 subtype.(iii) A H1N1 flu virus experienced no significant mutation during the epidemic spread,accompanied with no reassortment of the virus genome.In the paper,the region of the representative strains for sequence analysis (A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) and A/Mexico/4486/2009 (H1N1)) included USA and Mexico and was relatively wide,which suggested that the analysis results were convincing.

  20. Caveolin-1 influences human influenza A virus (H1N1 multiplication in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemgård Gun-Viol

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The threat of recurring influenza pandemics caused by new viral strains and the occurrence of escape mutants necessitate the search for potent therapeutic targets. The dependence of viruses on cellular factors provides a weak-spot in the viral multiplication strategy and a means to interfere with viral multiplication. Results Using a motif-based search strategy for antiviral targets we identified caveolin-1 (Cav-1 as a putative cellular interaction partner of human influenza A viruses, including the pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1 strains of swine origin circulating from spring 2009 on. The influence of Cav-1 on human influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1 virus replication was determined in inhibition and competition experiments. RNAi-mediated Cav-1 knock-down as well as transfection of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant results in a decrease in virus titre in infected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK, a cell line commonly used in basic influenza research as well as in virus vaccine production. To understand the molecular basis of the phenomenon we focussed on the putative caveolin-1 binding domain (CBD located in the lumenal, juxtamembranal portion of the M2 matrix protein which has been identified in the motif-based search. Pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that caveolin-1 binds to M2. The data suggest, that Cav-1 modulates influenza virus A replication presumably based on M2/Cav-1 interaction. Conclusion As Cav-1 is involved in the human influenza A virus life cycle, the multifunctional protein and its interaction with M2 protein of human influenza A viruses represent a promising starting point for the search for antiviral agents.

  1. Molecular characterization of H1N1 influenza A viruses from human cases in North America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; WANG ChengMin; DONG GuoYing; LUO Jing; ZHAO BaoHua; HE HongXuan

    2009-01-01

    Subtypes of H1N1 influenza virus can be found in humans in North America,while they are also associated with the infection of swine.Characterization of the genotypes of viral strains in human populations is important to understand the source and distribution of viral strains.Genomic and protein sequences of 10 isolates of the 2009 outbreak of influenza A (H1N1) virus in North America were obtained from GenBank database.To characterize the genotypes of these viruses,phylogenetic trees of genes PB2,PB1,PA,HA,NP,NA,NS and M were constructed by Phylip3.67 program and N-Linked glycosylation sites of HA,NA,PB2,NS1 and M2 proteins were analyzed online by NetNGIyc1.0 program.Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these isolates are virtually identical but may be recombinant viruses because their genomic fragments come from different viruses.The isolates also contain a characteristic lowly pathogenic amino acid motif at their HA cleavage sites (IPSIQSR↓GL),and an E residue at position 627 of the PB2 protein which shows its high affinity to humans.The homologous model of M proteins showed that the viruses had obtained the ability of anti-amantadine due to the mutation at the drug-sensitive site,while sequence analysis of NA proteins indicated that the viruses are still susceptible to the neuraminidase inhibitor drug (i.e.oseltamivir and zanamivir) because no mutations have been observed.Our results strongly suggested that the viruses responsible for the 2009 outbreaks of influenza A (H1N1) virus have the ability to cross species barriers to infect human and mammalian animals based on molecular analysis.These findings may further facilitate the therapy and prevention of possible transmission from North America to other countries.

  2. Recovery of Epstein--Barr virus from nonproducer neonatal human lymphoid cell transformants. [X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.; Miller, G.

    1979-06-01

    Lymphoid cell lines (LCL) were established by infection of two batches of human umbilical cord lymphocytes with low multiplicities of the B95-8 strain of Epstein--Barr virus. Three of the 17 lines released minute mounts of transforming virus. The rest did not, nor did they make capsid antigen. However virus could be regularly recovered by lethal x-irradiation of transformed cells followed by cocultivation with primary human umbilical cord leukocytes. By this technique transforming activity could be identified in 15 of the 17 lines. These data indicate that these nonproducer human neonatal cell transformants established by EBV infection in vitro possess sufficient genetic information to code for production of biologically active mature virions. X rays alone failed to cause a detectable increase in the number of cells with capsid antigen or to enhance extracellular virus production. EBV-positive human serum blocked rescue if it was added during the first 2 to 4 hr after cocultivation, but not thereafter. Transforming virus could be recovered from x-rayed cells which were immediately thereafter lysed by freezing and thawing. These results suggest that recovery of virus following x-ray and cocultivation is not due to activation of the intracellular virus genome. Rather, it is likely that the method detects small numbers of virions which are cell associated. While transforming virus could regularly be rescued from lymphoblastoid cell lines resulting from in vitro transformation, attempts to rescue virus from Raji or EBV-converted BJAB cells were unsuccessful. This discrepancy suggests differences in genome complexity or in genome-cell interactions in different types of EBV-transformed cells.

  3. Avian influenza viruses that cause highly virulent infections in humans exhibit distinct replicative properties in contrast to human H1N1 viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Philippe F.; de La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Paradis, Éric; Mendoza, Emelissa; Coombs, Kevin M.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Avian influenza viruses present an emerging epidemiological concern as some strains of H5N1 avian influenza can cause severe infections in humans with lethality rates of up to 60%. These have been in circulation since 1997 and recently a novel H7N9-subtyped virus has been causing epizootics in China with lethality rates around 20%. To better understand the replication kinetics of these viruses, we combined several extensive viral kinetics experiments with mathematical modelling of in vitro infections in human A549 cells. We extracted fundamental replication parameters revealing that, while both the H5N1 and H7N9 viruses replicate faster and to higher titers than two low-pathogenicity H1N1 strains, they accomplish this via different mechanisms. While the H7N9 virions exhibit a faster rate of infection, the H5N1 virions are produced at a higher rate. Of the two H1N1 strains studied, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain exhibits the longest eclipse phase, possibly indicative of a less effective neuraminidase activity, but causes infection more rapidly than the seasonal strain. This explains, in part, the pandemic strain’s generally slower growth kinetics and permissiveness to accept mutations causing neuraminidase inhibitor resistance without significant loss in fitness. Our results highlight differential growth properties of H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses.

  4. Myxoma and Vaccinia Viruses Bind Differentially to Human Leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Winnie M.; Bartee, Eric C.; Moreb, Jan S.; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H.; McFadden, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and ...

  5. [Polymorphism of current human influenza A and B virus population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinbaum, E B; Litvinova, O M; Bannikov, A I; Konovalenko, I B; Chernookaia, N Iu; Iukhnova, L G; Kiselev, O I

    1994-01-01

    During the past years, the etiological situation has been significantly complicated. It is characterized by simultaneous circulation of A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and influenza B viruses and by the isolation of reassortant strains and viruses, which are atypical in relation to the process of their natural variability. The antigenic properties of epidemic strains and unusual isolates were investigated. The marked heterogeneity of the A(H3N2) influenza viruses was demonstrated. It was determined by the circulation of several antigenic variants during the epidemic. Two separate antigenic lineage of the influenza B viruses--b/Victoria/2/87 and B/Yamagata/16/88--cocirculated in our country in 1991. Since 1986, all the influenza A(H1N1) viruses have been considered to be varieties of the reference strain A/Taiwan/1/86. A direct correlation was found between some atypical viruses and the vaccine strains previously used.

  6. Prediction of biological functions on glycosylation site migrations in human influenza H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shisheng; Wang, Qinzhe; Zhao, Fei; Chen, Wentian; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Protein glycosylation alteration is typically employed by various viruses for escaping immune pressures from their hosts. Our previous work had shown that not only the increase of glycosylation sites (glycosites) numbers, but also glycosite migration might be involved in the evolution of human seasonal influenza H1N1 viruses. More importantly, glycosite migration was likely a more effectively alteration way for the host adaption of human influenza H1N1 viruses. In this study, we provided more bioinformatics and statistic evidences for further predicting the significant biological functions of glycosite migration in the host adaptation of human influenza H1N1 viruses, by employing homology modeling and in silico protein glycosylation of representative HA and NA proteins as well as amino acid variability analysis at antigenic sites of HA and NA. The results showed that glycosite migrations in human influenza viruses have at least five possible functions: to more effectively mask the antigenic sites, to more effectively protect the enzymatic cleavage sites of neuraminidase (NA), to stabilize the polymeric structures, to regulate the receptor binding and catalytic activities and to balance the binding activity of hemagglutinin (HA) with the release activity of NA. The information here can provide some constructive suggestions for the function research related to protein glycosylation of influenza viruses, although these predictions still need to be supported by experimental data.

  7. Human Gut-On-A-Chip Supports Polarized Infection of Coxsackie B1 Virus In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papafragkou, Efstathia; Weaver, James C.; Ferrante, Thomas C.; Bahinski, Anthony; Elkins, Christopher A.; Kulka, Michael; Ingber, Donald E.

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of enterovirus infection is difficult in animals because they express different virus receptors than humans, and static cell culture systems do not reproduce the physical complexity of the human intestinal epithelium. Here, using coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) as a prototype enterovirus strain, we demonstrate that human enterovirus infection, replication and infectious virus production can be analyzed in vitro in a human Gut-on-a-Chip microfluidic device that supports culture of highly differentiated human villus intestinal epithelium under conditions of fluid flow and peristalsis-like motions. When CVB1 was introduced into the epithelium-lined intestinal lumen of the device, virions entered the epithelium, replicated inside the cells producing detectable cytopathic effects (CPEs), and both infectious virions and inflammatory cytokines were released in a polarized manner from the cell apex, as they could be detected in the effluent from the epithelial microchannel. When the virus was introduced via a basal route of infection (by inoculating virus into fluid flowing through a parallel lower ‘vascular’ channel separated from the epithelial channel by a porous membrane), significantly lower viral titers, decreased CPEs, and delayed caspase-3 activation were observed; however, cytokines continued to be secreted apically. The presence of continuous fluid flow through the epithelial lumen also resulted in production of a gradient of CPEs consistent with the flow direction. Thus, the human Gut-on-a-Chip may provide a suitable in vitro model for enteric virus infection and for investigating mechanisms of enterovirus pathogenesis. PMID:28146569

  8. Human Gut-On-A-Chip Supports Polarized Infection of Coxsackie B1 Virus In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villenave, Remi; Wales, Samantha Q; Hamkins-Indik, Tiama; Papafragkou, Efstathia; Weaver, James C; Ferrante, Thomas C; Bahinski, Anthony; Elkins, Christopher A; Kulka, Michael; Ingber, Donald E

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of enterovirus infection is difficult in animals because they express different virus receptors than humans, and static cell culture systems do not reproduce the physical complexity of the human intestinal epithelium. Here, using coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) as a prototype enterovirus strain, we demonstrate that human enterovirus infection, replication and infectious virus production can be analyzed in vitro in a human Gut-on-a-Chip microfluidic device that supports culture of highly differentiated human villus intestinal epithelium under conditions of fluid flow and peristalsis-like motions. When CVB1 was introduced into the epithelium-lined intestinal lumen of the device, virions entered the epithelium, replicated inside the cells producing detectable cytopathic effects (CPEs), and both infectious virions and inflammatory cytokines were released in a polarized manner from the cell apex, as they could be detected in the effluent from the epithelial microchannel. When the virus was introduced via a basal route of infection (by inoculating virus into fluid flowing through a parallel lower 'vascular' channel separated from the epithelial channel by a porous membrane), significantly lower viral titers, decreased CPEs, and delayed caspase-3 activation were observed; however, cytokines continued to be secreted apically. The presence of continuous fluid flow through the epithelial lumen also resulted in production of a gradient of CPEs consistent with the flow direction. Thus, the human Gut-on-a-Chip may provide a suitable in vitro model for enteric virus infection and for investigating mechanisms of enterovirus pathogenesis.

  9. Rome Consensus Conference - statement; human papilloma virus diseases in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Andrea; Mirone, Vincenzo; Gentile, Vincenzo; Bartoletti, Riccardo; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Foresta, Carlo; Mariani, Luciano; Mazzoli, Sandra; Parisi, Saverio G; Perino, Antonio; Picardo, Mauro; Zotti, Carla Maria

    2013-02-07

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a very resistant, ubiquitous virus that can survive in the environment without a host. The decision to analyse HPV-related diseases in males was due to the broad dissemination of the virus, and, above all, by the need to stress the importance of primary and secondary prevention measures (currently available for women exclusively). The objective of the Consensus Conference was to make evidence-based recommendations that were designed to facilitate the adoption of a standard approach in clinical practice in Italy. The Sponsoring Panel put a series of questions to the members of the Scientific Committee who prepared a summary of the currently available information, relevant for each question, after the review and grading of the existing scientific literature. The summaries were presented to a Jury, also called multidisciplinary Consensus Panel, who drafted a series of recommendations. The prevalence of HPV in males ranges between 1.3-72.9%;. The prevalence curve in males is much higher than that in females and does not tend to decline with age. Women appear to have a higher probability of acquiring HPV genotypes associated with a high oncogenic risk, whereas in males the probability of acquiring low- or high-risk genotypes is similar. The HPV-related diseases that affect males are anogenital warts and cancers of the penis, anus and oropharynx. The quadrivalent vaccine against HPV has proved to be effective in preventing external genital lesions in males aged 16-26 years in 90.4%; (95%; CI: 69.2-98.1) of cases. It has also proved to be effective in preventing precancerous anal lesions in 77.5%; (95%; CI: 39.6-93.3) of cases in a per-protocol analysis and in 91.7%; (95%; CI: 44.6-99.8) of cases in a post-hoc analysis. Early ecological studies demonstrate reduction of genital warts in vaccinated females and some herd immunity in males when vaccine coverage is high, although males who have sex with males gained no benefit at all. Males with

  10. Knowledge and attitudes about Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in rural Uganda (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    about Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in rural Uganda NKONWA INNOCENT H 1,2,3* , MICHAEL J...Human Papilloma virus (HPV) strains 16 and 18. While cervical cancer is widely understood as a fatal disease, knowledge and awareness of cervical...capture assay of self – collected virginal swabs in rural Uganda for detection of human papilloma virus . J Infect Disease, 1999 1999.180; p. 1316.1319. 19

  11. Human Ebola virus infection results in substantial immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Anita K; Akondy, Rama S; Davis, Carl W; Ellebedy, Ali H; Mehta, Aneesh K; Kraft, Colleen S; Lyon, G Marshall; Ribner, Bruce S; Varkey, Jay; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, Shelley; Ströher, Ute; Damon, Inger; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-04-14

    Four Ebola patients received care at Emory University Hospital, presenting a unique opportunity to examine the cellular immune responses during acute Ebola virus infection. We found striking activation of both B and T cells in all four patients. Plasmablast frequencies were 10-50% of B cells, compared with less than 1% in healthy individuals. Many of these proliferating plasmablasts were IgG-positive, and this finding coincided with the presence of Ebola virus-specific IgG in the serum. Activated CD4 T cells ranged from 5 to 30%, compared with 1-2% in healthy controls. The most pronounced responses were seen in CD8 T cells, with over 50% of the CD8 T cells expressing markers of activation and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that all four patients developed robust immune responses during the acute phase of Ebola virus infection, a finding that would not have been predicted based on our current assumptions about the highly immunosuppressive nature of Ebola virus. Also, quite surprisingly, we found sustained immune activation after the virus was cleared from the plasma, observed most strikingly in the persistence of activated CD8 T cells, even 1 mo after the patients' discharge from the hospital. These results suggest continued antigen stimulation after resolution of the disease. From these convalescent time points, we identified CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses to several Ebola virus proteins, most notably the viral nucleoprotein. Knowledge of the viral proteins targeted by T cells during natural infection should be useful in designing vaccines against Ebola virus.

  12. Detection of novel sequences related to african Swine Fever virus in human serum and sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Joy; Zhao, Guoyan; Presti, Rachel M; Holtz, Lori R; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Droit, Lindsay; Villasana, Zoilmar; Todd, Collin; Pipas, James M; Calgua, Byron; Girones, Rosina; Wang, David; Virgin, Herbert W

    2009-12-01

    The family Asfarviridae contains only a single virus species, African swine fever virus (ASFV). ASFV is a viral agent with significant economic impact due to its devastating effects on populations of domesticated pigs during outbreaks but has not been reported to infect humans. We report here the discovery of novel viral sequences in human serum and sewage which are clearly related to the asfarvirus family but highly divergent from ASFV. Detection of these sequences suggests that greater genetic diversity may exist among asfarviruses than previously thought and raises the possibility that human infection by asfarviruses may occur.

  13. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that lead to ...

  14. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palella, T D; Silverman, L J; Schroll, C T; Homa, F L; Levine, M; Kelley, W N

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  15. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  16. MAVS-dependent host species range and pathogenicity of human hepatitis A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai-Yuki, Asuka; Hensley, Lucinda; McGivern, David R; González-López, Olga; Das, Anshuman; Feng, Hui; Sun, Lu; Wilson, Justin E; Hu, Fengyu; Feng, Zongdi; Lovell, William; Misumi, Ichiro; Ting, Jenny P-Y; Montgomery, Stephanie; Cullen, John; Whitmire, Jason K; Lemon, Stanley M

    2016-09-30

    Hepatotropic viruses are important causes of human disease, but the intrahepatic immune response to hepatitis viruses is poorly understood because of a lack of tractable small- animal models. We describe a murine model of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection that recapitulates critical features of type A hepatitis in humans. We demonstrate that the capacity of HAV to evade MAVS-mediated type I interferon responses defines its host species range. HAV-induced liver injury was associated with interferon-independent intrinsic hepatocellular apoptosis and hepatic inflammation that unexpectedly resulted from MAVS and IRF3/7 signaling. This murine model thus reveals a previously undefined link between innate immune responses to virus infection and acute liver injury, providing a new paradigm for viral pathogenesis in the liver. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Mx1 gene protects mice against the highly lethal human H5N1 influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Rachelle; Staeheli, Peter; Kochs, Georg; Yen, Hui-Ling; Franks, John; Rehg, Jerold E; Webster, Robert G; Hoffmann, Erich

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the importance of the host Mx1 gene in protection against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Mice expressing the Mx1 gene survived infection with the lethal human H5N1 isolate A/Vietnam/1203/04 and with reassortants combining its genes with those of the non-lethal virus A/chicken/Vietnam/C58/04, while all Mx1-/- mice succumbed. Mx1-expressing mice showed lower organ virus titers, fewer lesions, and less pulmonary inflammation. Our data support the hypothesis that Mx1 expression protects mice against the high pathogenicity of H5N1 virus through inhibition of viral polymerase activity ultimately resulting in reduced viral growth and spread. Drugs that mimic this mechanism may be protective in humans.

  18. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Haugaard, S B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with high doses (2-6 mg day(-1)) of human growth hormone (hGH) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) has been shown to increase concentrations of total insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) more than twofold greater than ...

  19. Avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in humans: epidemiology, evolution, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Matloob

    2014-12-01

    New human influenza A virus strains regularly emerge causing seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Lately, several zoonotic avian influenza A strains have been reported to directly infect humans. In early 2013, a novel avian influenza A virus (H7N9) strain was discovered in China to cause severe respiratory disease in humans. Since then, over 450 human cases of H7N9 infection have been discovered and 165 of them have died. Multiple epidemiological, phylogenetic, in vivo, and in vitro studies have been done to determine the origin and pathogenesis of novel H7N9 strain. This article reviews the literature related to the epidemiology, evolution, and pathogenesis of the H7N9 strain since its discovery in February 2013 till August 2014. The data available so far indicate that H7N9 was originated by a two-step reassortment process in birds and transmitted to humans through direct contact with live-bird markets. H7N9 is a low-pathogenic avian virus and contains several molecular signatures for adaptation in mammals. The severity of the respiratory disease caused by novel H7N9 virus in humans can be partly attributed to the age, sex, and underlying medical conditions of the patients. A universal influenza vaccine is not available, though several strain-specific H7N9 candidate vaccine viruses have been developed. Further, novel H7N9 virus is resistant to antiviral drug amantadine and some H7N9 isolates have acquired the resistance to neuraminidase-inhibitors. Therefore, constant surveillance and prompt control measures combined with novel research approaches to develop alternative and effective anti-influenza strategies are needed to overcome influenza A virus.

  20. Characterization of human antiviral adaptive immune responses during hepatotropic virus infection in HLA-transgenic human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billerbeck, Eva; Horwitz, Joshua A; Labitt, Rachael N; Donovan, Bridget M; Vega, Kevin; Budell, William C; Koo, Gloria C; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Humanized mice have emerged as a promising model to study human immunity in vivo. Although they are susceptible to many pathogens exhibiting an almost exclusive human tropism, human immune responses to infection remain functionally impaired. It has recently been demonstrated that the expression of HLA molecules improves human immunity to lymphotropic virus infections in humanized mice. However, little is known about the extent of functional human immune responses in nonlymphoid tissues, such as in the liver, and the role of HLA expression in this context. Therefore, we analyzed human antiviral immunity in humanized mice during a hepatotropic adenovirus infection. We compared immune responses of conventional humanized NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient (NSG) mice to those of a novel NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient strain transgenic for both HLA-A*0201 and a chimeric HLA-DR*0101 molecule. Using a firefly luciferase-expressing adenovirus and in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we demonstrate a human T cell-dependent partial clearance of adenovirus-infected cells from the liver of HLA-transgenic humanized mice. This correlated with liver infiltration and activation of T cells, as well as the detection of Ag-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. When infected with a hepatitis C virus NS3-expressing adenovirus, HLA-transgenic humanized mice mounted an HLA-A*0201-restricted hepatitis C virus NS3-specific CD8(+) T cell response. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the generation of partial functional antiviral immune responses against a hepatotropic pathogen in humanized HLA-transgenic mice. The adenovirus reporter system used in our study may serve as simple in vivo method to evaluate future strategies for improving human intrahepatic immune responses in humanized mice.

  1. Potent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus by MDL 101028, a novel sulphonic acid polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D L; Brennan, T M; Bridges, C G; Mullins, M J; Tyms, A S; Jackson, R; Cardin, A D

    1995-10-01

    MDL 101028, a novel biphenyl disulphonic acid urea co-polymer was designed and synthesised as a heparin mimetic. This low molecular weight polymer showed potent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a number of host-cell/virus systems, including primary clinical isolates of the virus cultured in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). When compared with the heterogeneous polysulphated molecules, heparin and dextran sulphate, this chemically defined compound showed equivalent antiviral activity with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) in the range 0.27-3.0 micrograms/ml in the host-cell/virus systems tested. MDL 101028 also inhibited the replication of HIV type 2 and the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), as well as HIV-1 variants resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Virus growth was blocked when exposure of T-lymphocytes to MDL 101028 was restricted to the virus absorption stage, or even in whole blood conditions. MDL 101028 did not irreversibly inactivate virions, and in contrast to heparin, did not inhibit the attachment of radiolabelled HIV-1 to CD4+ T-cells. MDL 101028 blocked HIV-induced cell-to-cell fusion and this activity appears to explain the mechanism of its antiviral action. The antiviral evaluation of discrete oligomer molecules of MDL 101028 showed that a polymer chain length of six repeating units had optimal potency. The lack of anticoagulant properties and significant antiviral activity in whole blood may allow the development of MDL 101028 as a treatment of HIV infections.

  2. The epidemiology and spread of drug resistant human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Significant changes in the circulation of antiviral-resistant influenza viruses have occurred over the last decade. The emergence and continued circulation of adamantane-resistant A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses mean that the adamantanes are no longer recommended for use. Resistance to the newer class of drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors, is typically associated with poorer viral replication and transmission. But 'permissive' mutations, that compensated for impairment of viral function in A(H1N1) viruses during 2007/2008, enabled them to acquire the H275Y NA resistance mutation without fitness loss, resulting in their rapid global spread. Permissive mutations now appear to be present in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses thereby increasing the risk that oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses may also spread globally, a concerning scenario given that oseltamivir is the most widely used influenza antiviral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pleiotropic expression of Epstein--Barr virus DNA in human epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    We have attempted to establish a system that can be used to study the association of Epstein--Barr virus (EBV) with epithelial cells. Attempts were made to transfect human carcinoma cells with EBV DNA. Successful transfection was confirmed by the expression of EBV-specific early antigen (EA), virus capsid antigen, and the presence of virus DNA. The transfecting preparation contained a mixture of EBV and cellular DNA extracted from two producer cell lines, P3HR-1 and AG-876. Our data suggest t...

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease and the Emergence of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Rødtness

    in the virus life cycle has made it a major target for drug development and active site competitive inhibitors have been successful in the battle against HIV. Unfortunately, the massive drug pressure along with high-level replication and lack of proofreading by the viral reverse transcriptase have resulted......Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PR) is responsible for cleaving ten different sites in the viral Gag and Gag-pol polyproteins, thereby releasing the structural proteins and enzymes necessary for the maturation and infectivity of the HIV-1 virus. The vital role of HIV-1 PR...

  5. Suppression of chikungunya virus replication and differential innate responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells during co-infection with dengue virus

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Aguilar Briseño, José A; Upasani, Vinit; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Smit, Jolanda M.; Izabela A. Rodenhuis-Zybert

    2017-01-01

    Dengue and chikungunya are viral diseases transmitted to humans by infected Aedes spp. mosquitoes. With an estimated 390 million infected people per year dengue virus (DENV) currently causes the most prevalent arboviral disease. During the last decade chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has caused large outbreaks and has expanded its territory causing millions of cases in Asia, Africa and America. The viruses share a common mosquito vector and during the acute phase cause similar flu-like symptoms that...

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 long terminal repeat: analysis of regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Arya, S. K.; Gallo, R C

    1988-01-01

    The long terminal repeats (LTRs) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and a related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) contain cis-acting positive regulatory elements upstream and the major transactivator gene (tat) response element and a possible negative regulatory element downstream of the transcriptional initiation site. The tat response element of HIV-2 and of SIVmac was more complex than that of HIV-1. Two structurally similar subelements within the HIV-2 tat response ...

  7. Newcastle Disease Virus: Potential Therapeutic Application for Human and Canine Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Sánchez; Rosana Pelayo; Luis Alberto Medina; Eduardo Vadillo; Rogelio Sánchez; Luis Núñez; Gabriela Cesarman-Maus; Rosa Elena Sarmiento-Silva

    2015-01-01

    Research on oncolytic viruses has mostly been directed towards the treatment of solid tumors, which has yielded limited information regarding their activity in hematological cancer. It has also been directed towards the treatment of humans, yet veterinary medicine may also benefit. Several strains of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) have been used as oncolytics in vitro and in a number of in vivo experiments. We studied the cytolytic effect of NDV-MLS, a low virulence attenuated lentogenic s...

  8. Survey of human virus occurrence in wastewater-recharged groundwater on Long Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.; Baranosky, L.J.; Beckwith, C.A.; Dahl, M.C.; Delihas, N.C.

    1978-07-01

    Treated wastewater effluents and groundwater observation wells from three sewage recharge installations located on Long Island were assayed on a monthly basis for indigenous human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria for a period of 1 year. Viruses were detected in groundwater at sites where recharge basins were located less than 35 feet (ca. 10.6 m) above the aquifer. Results from one of the sites indicated the horizontal transfer of viable viruses through the groundwater aquifer.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion presenting with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan Derek J; Nicolson Andrew; Miller Alastair RO; Beeching Nick J; Beadsworth Mike BJ

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is associated with a range of neurological conditions. Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare presentation; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is the commonest form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has occasionally been reported in acute Immunodeficiency Virus infection but little data exists on frequency, management and outcome. Case presentation We describe an episode of Gui...

  10. Human Papilloma Virus and oral cancer: Narrative review of the literature.

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandra Fernández; Maureen Marshall; Alfredo Esguep

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection is now more common sexually transmitted diseases, with an incidence of 5.5 million worldwide, with 85% of the carrier of this virus adult population. Their oncogenic potential and increased oral lesions associated with oral HPV infection have led us to make a narrative of the literature on the role of HPV in oral cancer, especially types 16 and 18. Here we refer to the possible routes of infection, oncogenic mechanisms, both benign and potent...

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Diarrhea: Still an Issue in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dikman, Andrew E.; Schonfeld, Emily; Srisarajivakul, Nalinee C.; Poles, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Over half of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) experience diarrhea that contributes negatively to quality of life and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Opportunistic infectious agents that cause diarrhea in patients with HIV span the array of protozoa, fungi, viruses, and bacteria. With global use of ART, the incidence of diarrhea because of opportunistic infections has decreased; however, the incidence of noninfectious diarrhea has increased. The etiology of noninfect...

  12. Purinergic receptor functionality is necessary for infection of human hepatocytes by hepatitis delta virus and hepatitis B virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Taylor

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis delta virus (HDV are major sources of acute and chronic hepatitis. HDV requires the envelope proteins of HBV for the processes of assembly and infection of new cells. Both viruses are able to infect hepatocytes though previous studies have failed to determine the mechanism of entry into such cells. This study began with evidence that suramin, a symmetrical hexasulfated napthylurea, could block HDV entry into primary human hepatocytes (PHH and was then extrapolated to incorporate findings of others that suramin is one of many compounds that can block activation of purinergic receptors. Thus other inhibitors, pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonate (PPADS and brilliant blue G (BBG, both structurally unrelated to suramin, were tested and found to inhibit HDV and HBV infections of PHH. BBG, unlike suramin and PPADS, is known to be more specific for just one purinergic receptor, P2X7. These studies provide the first evidence that purinergic receptor functionality is necessary for virus entry. Furthermore, since P2X7 activation is known to be a major component of inflammatory responses, it is proposed that HDV and HBV attachment to susceptible cells, might also contribute to inflammation in the liver, that is, hepatitis.

  13. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Hansen, J-ES; Dalbøge, H;

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...... hybridization. It was not possible to detect any viral antigen production in the cultures, and attempts to recover virus by highly sensitive coculture techniques were unsuccessful, indicating that the infection was latent. The PCR technique provides a simple approach to the study of viral infection in cases...

  14. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjaerg, L L; Hansen, J E; Dalbøge, H

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...... hybridization. It was not possible to detect any viral antigen production in the cultures, and attempts to recover virus by highly sensitive coculture techniques were unsuccessful, indicating that the infection was latent. The PCR technique provides a simple approach to the study of viral infection in cases...

  15. Dengue Virus Type 2: Protein Binding and Active Replication in Human Central Nervous System Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Isabel Salazar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS, characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa. Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1 that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2 that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2.

  16. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Prime and Intramuscular Protein Boost Provides Protection against Intrarectal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge in Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Tian, Baoping; Cleveland, Brad; Guo, Wenjin; Polacino, Patricia; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2015-12-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition occurs predominantly through mucosal transmission. We hypothesized that greater mucosal immune responses and protective efficacy against mucosal HIV-1 infection may be achieved by prime-boost immunization at mucosal sites. We used a macaque model to determine the safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of orally delivered, replication-competent but attenuated recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing full-length HIV-1 SF162 envelope (Env) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag-Pol proteins. We examined the dose and route that are suitable for oral immunization with recombinant vaccinia viruses. We showed that sublingual inoculation of two vaccinia virus-naive pigtailed macaques with 5 × 10(8) PFU of recombinant vaccinia viruses was safe. However, sublingual inoculation with a higher dose or tonsillar inoculation resulted in secondary oral lesions, indicating the need to optimize the dose and route for oral immunization with replication-competent vaccinia virus vectors. Oral priming alone elicited antibody responses to vaccinia virus and to the SF162 Env protein. Intramuscular immunization with the SF162 gp120 protein at either 20 or 21 weeks postpriming resulted in a significant boost in antibody responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. Furthermore, we showed that immune responses induced by recombinant vaccinia virus priming and intramuscular protein boosting provided protection against intrarectal challenge with the simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162-P4.

  17. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  18. Dengue virus: A global human threat: Review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Alalowi, Munther; Al Ageel Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an acute viral illness caused by RNA virus of the family Flaviviridae and spread by Aedes mosquitoes. Presenting features may range from asymptomatic fever to dreaded complications such as hemorrhagic fever and shock. A cute-onset high fever, muscle and joint pain, myalgia, cutaneous rash, hemorrhagic episodes, and circulatory shock are the commonly seen symptoms. Oral manifestations are rare in dengue infection; however, some cases may have oral features as the only presenting manifestation. Early and accurate diagnosis is critical to reduce mortality. Although dengue virus infections are usually self-limiting, dengue infection has come up as a public health challenge in the tropical and subtropical nations. This article provide a detailed overview on dengue virus infections, varied clinical manifestations, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and prevention and treatment. PMID:27011925

  19. Fcgamma receptor-mediated suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Bercoff, Danielle; David, Annie; Sudry, Hugues; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Pancino, Gianfranco

    2003-04-01

    Permissiveness of monocytes and macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is modulated by various stimuli. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) through the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (FcgammaR) inhibits HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Viral p24 production was decreased by 1.5 to 3 log units in MDM infected with both R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains upon stimulation by immobilized IgG but not upon stimulation by soluble IgG or by F(ab')(2) IgG fragments. Although MDM activation by immobilized IgG induced high levels of macrophage-derived chemokine secretion as well as a sustained down-regulation of CD4 and a transient decrease in CCR5 expression, these factors did not appear to play a major role in the suppression of HIV-1 replication. Single-cycle infection of FcgammaR-stimulated MDM with HIV-1 virions pseudotyped with either HIV-1 R5 or vesicular stomatitis virus G envelopes was inhibited, suggesting a postentry restriction of viral replication. PCR analyses of HIV-1 DNA intermediate replication forms suggested that reverse transcription is not affected by stimulation with immobilized human IgG, at least during the first replication cycle. The accumulation of PCR products corresponding to nuclear unintegrated two-long-terminal-repeat circles and the relative decrease of integrated HIV-1 DNA signals suggest an inhibition of proviral integration. Our data, showing that FcgammaR-mediated activation of MDM is a potent mechanism of HIV-1 suppression, raise the possibility that FcgammaR cross-linking by immune complexes may contribute to the control of viral replication in macrophages.

  20. Post-pandemic seroprevalence of human influenza viruses in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Ali, Ahmed; Daniels, Joshua B; Lee, Chang-Won

    2016-12-30

    The continuous exposure of cats to diverse influenza viruses raises the concern of a potential role of cats in the epidemiology of these viruses. Our previous seroprevalence study of domestic cat sera collected during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic wave (September 2009-September 2010) revealed a high prevalence of pandemic H1N1, as well as seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 human flu virus infection (22.5%, 33.0%, and 43.5%, respectively). In this study, we extended the serosurvey of influenza viruses in cat sera collected post-pandemic (June 2011-August 2012). A total of 432 cat sera were tested using the hemagglutination inhibition assay. The results showed an increase in pandemic H1N1 prevalence (33.6%) and a significant reduction in both seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 prevalence (10.9% and 17.6%, respectively) compared to our previous survey conducted during the pandemic wave. The pandemic H1N1 prevalence in cats showed an irregular seasonality pattern in the post-pandemic phase. Pandemic H1N1 reactivity was more frequent among female cats than male cats. In contrast to our earlier finding, no significant association between clinical respiratory disease and influenza virus infection was observed. Our study highlights a high susceptibility among cats to human influenza virus infection that is correlated with influenza prevalence in the human population.

  1. Features of Circulating Parainfluenza Virus Required for Growth in Human Airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Palermo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory paramyxoviruses, including the highly prevalent human parainfluenza viruses, cause the majority of childhood croup, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia, yet there are currently no vaccines or effective treatments. Paramyxovirus research has relied on the study of laboratory-adapted strains of virus in immortalized cultured cell lines. We show that findings made in such systems about the receptor interaction and viral fusion requirements for entry and fitness—mediated by the receptor binding protein and the fusion protein—can be drastically different from the requirements for infection in vivo. Here we carried out whole-genome sequencing and genomic analysis of circulating human parainfluenza virus field strains to define functional and structural properties of proteins of circulating strains and to identify the genetic basis for properties that confer fitness in the field. The analysis of clinical strains suggests that the receptor binding-fusion molecule pairs of circulating viruses maintain a balance of properties that result in an inverse correlation between fusion in cultured cells and growth in vivo. Future analysis of entry mechanisms and inhibitory strategies for paramyxoviruses will benefit from considering the properties of viruses that are fit to infect humans, since a focus on viruses that have adapted to laboratory work provides a distinctly different picture of the requirements for the entry step of infection.

  2. Demographic and ecological risk factors for human influenza A virus infections in rural Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Elisabeth Dowling; Agustian, Dwi; Kartasasmita, Cissy; Uyeki, Timothy M; Simões, Eric A F

    2017-09-01

    Indonesia has the world's highest reported mortality for human infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) virus. Indonesia is an agriculturally driven country where human-animal mixing is common and provides a unique environment for zoonotic influenza A virus transmission. To identify potential demographic and ecological risk factors for human infection with seasonal influenza A viruses in rural Indonesia, a population-based study was conducted in Cileunyi and Soreang subdistricts near Bandung in western Java from 2008 to 2011. Passive influenza surveillance with RT-PCR confirmation of influenza A viral RNA in respiratory specimens was utilized for case ascertainment. A population census and mapping were utilized for population data collection. The presence of influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections in a household was modeled using Generalized Estimating Equations. Each additional child aged influenza A virus infections in rural Indonesian households with young children and poultry. © 2017 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Individual donor-nucleic acid testing for human immunodeficiency virus-1, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus and its role in blood safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs are one of the biggest threats to blood transfusion safety. Nucleic acid testing (NAT in blood donor screening has been implemented in many countries to reduce the risk of TTIs. NAT shortens this window period, thereby offering blood centers a much higher sensitivity for detecting viral infections. Aims: The objective was to assess the role of individual donor-NAT (ID-NAT for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1, hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV and its role in blood safety. Materials and Methods: A total of 32978 donations were tested for all three viruses using enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (Vironostika ® HIV Ag-Ab, Hepanostika ® HCV ultra and hepatitis B surface antigen ultra by Biomerieux and ID-NAT using Procleix Ultrio plus ® Assay (Novartis Diagnostic, USA. All initial NAT reactive samples and serology nonreactive were retested in triplicate and NAT discriminatory assay for HIV-1, HCV and HBV were performed. Results: Of the 32978 samples, 43 (0.13% were found to be ID-NAT reactive but seronegative. Out of 43, one for HIV-1, 13 for HCV and 27 for HBV were reactive by discriminatory assays. There were two samples that were reactive for both HCV-HBV and counted as HCV-HBV co-infection NAT yield. The prevalence of these viruses in our sample, tested by ID-NAT is 0.06%, 0.71%, and 0.63% for HIV-1, HCV and HBV respectively. The combined NAT yield among blood donors was 1 in 753. Conclusion: ID-NAT testing for HIV-1, HCV and HBV can tremendously improve the efficacy of screening for protecting blood recipient from TTIs. It enables detection of these viruses that were undetected by serological test and thus helped in providing safe blood to the patients.

  4. Association of interferon lambda-1 with herpes simplex viruses-1 and -2, Epstein-Barr virus, and human cytomegalovirus in chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzammil; Jayanthi, D; Faizuddin, Mohamed; Noor Ahamadi, H M

    2017-05-01

    Periodontal tissues facilitate the homing of herpes viruses that elicit the immune-inflammatory response releasing the interferons (IFN). IFN lambda-1 (λ1) can suppress the replication of viruses, and induces the antiviral mechanism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between IFN-λ1 and periodontal herpes viruses in the immunoregulation of chronic periodontal disease. The cross-sectional study design included 30 chronic periodontitis patients with a mean age of 42.30 ± 8.63 years. Gingival crevicular fluid collected was assessed for IFN-λ1 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and four herpes viruses were detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction technique. IFN-λ1 levels were compared between virus-positive and -negative patients for individual and total viruses. Fifty per cent (n = 15) of patients were positive for the four herpes viruses together; 50% (n = 15), 30% (n = 9), 26.7% (n = 8), and 40% (n = 12) were positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1, Epstein-Barr virus, HSV-2, and human cytomegalovirus, respectively. The mean concentrations of IFN-λ1 in virus-positive patients (14.38 ± 13.95) were lower than those of virus-negative patients (228.26 ± 215.35). INF-λ1 levels in individual virus groups were also lower in virus-positive patients compared to virus-negative patients, with P < 0.001. These results suggest that IFN-λ1 could have antiviral and therapeutic value against the viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Comparative performances of serologic and molecular assays for detecting human T lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Rodrigues Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study evaluated several techniques currently available (commercial kits and in-house assays for diagnosing human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 in two groups of patients enrolled at HIV/AIDS specialized care services in São Paulo: Group 1 (G1, n = 1608, 1237 male/371 female, median age 44.3 years old, majority using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; G2, n = 1383, 930 male/453 female, median age of 35.6 years old, majority HAART naïve. Enzyme immunoassays [(EIA Murex and Gold ELISA] were employed for human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 screening; Western blotting (WB, INNO-LIA (LIA, real-time PCR pol (qPCR, and nested-PCR-RFLP (tax were used to confirm infection. Samples were considered human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 positive when there was reactivity using at least one of the four confirmatory assays. By serological screening, 127/2991 samples were positive or borderline, and human T lymphotropic virus infection was confirmed in 108 samples (three EIA-borderline: 56 human T lymphotropic virus type 1 [G1 (27 + G2 (29]; 45 human T lymphotropic virus type 2 [G1 (21 + G2 (24]; one human T lymphotropic virus type 1 + human T lymphotropic virus type 2 (G2; six human T lymphotropic virus [G1 (2 + G2 (4]. Although there were differences in group characteristics, human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 prevalence was similar [3.1% (G1 and 4.2% (G2, p = 0.113]. The overall sensitivities of LIA, WB, qPCR, and PCR-RFLP were 97.2%, 82.4%, 68.9%, and 68.4%, respectively, with some differences among groups, likely due to the stage of human T lymphotropic virus infection and/or HAART duration. Indeterminate immunoblotting results were detected in G2, possibly due to the seroconversion period. Negative results in molecular assays could be explained by the use of HAART, the occurrence of defective provirus and/or the low circulating proviral load. In conclusion, when determining the human T

  6. Novel avian influenza A (H7N9 virus induces impaired interferon responses in human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veera Arilahti

    Full Text Available In March 2013 a new avian influenza A(H7N9 virus emerged in China and infected humans with a case fatality rate of over 30%. Like the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, H7N9 virus is causing severe respiratory distress syndrome in most patients. Based on genetic analysis this avian influenza A virus shows to some extent adaptation to mammalian host. In the present study, we analyzed the activation of innate immune responses by this novel H7N9 influenza A virus and compared these responses to those induced by the avian H5N1 and seasonal H3N2 viruses in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We observed that in H7N9 virus-infected cells, interferon (IFN responses were weak although the virus replicated as well as the H5N1 and H3N2 viruses in moDCs. H7N9 virus-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines remained at a significantly lower level as compared to H5N1 virus-induced "cytokine storm" seen in human moDCs. However, the H7N9 virus was extremely sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-β in pretreated cells. Our data indicates that different highly pathogenic avian viruses may show considerable differences in their ability to induce host antiviral responses in human primary cell models such as moDCs. The unexpected appearance of the novel H7N9 virus clearly emphasizes the importance of the global influenza surveillance system. It is, however, equally important to systematically characterize in normal human cells the replication capacity of the new viruses and their ability to induce and respond to natural antiviral substances such as IFNs.

  7. Resource Manual for Handling Body Fluids in the School Setting To Prevent the Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    Guidelines to prevent the transmission of blood-borne diseases, especially those caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), in the school setting are provided in this resource manual for school staff. Sections include information on the reasons for the development of this manual; a summary of the means of HIV…

  8. Suppression of chikungunya virus replication and differential innate responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells during co-infection with dengue virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Mariana Ruiz; Briseno, Jose A. Aguilar; Upasani, Vinit; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Smit, Jolanda M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.

    2017-01-01

    Dengue and chikungunya are viral diseases transmitted to humans by infected Aedes spp. mosquitoes. With an estimated 390 million infected people per year dengue virus (DENV) currently causes the most prevalent arboviral disease. During the last decade chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has caused large

  9. Virological response and resistance mutations to NS3/4A inhibitors in hepatitis C virus-human immunodeficiency virus coinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Naqvi, Alissa; Giordanengo, Valérie; Dunais, Brigitte; de Salvador-Guillouet, Francine; Perbost, Isabelle; Durant, Jacques; Pugliese, Pascal; Joulié, Aline; Roger, Pierre Marie; Rosenthal, Eric

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate virological response to telaprevir or boceprevir in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin and resistance mutations to NS3/4A inhibitors in hepatitis C virus-human immunodeficiency virus (HCV-HIV) coinfected patients in a real life setting.

  10. Immune responses to recombinant hepatitis B virus vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients with different CD4~+ T-lymphocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡琳

    2014-01-01

    Objective.To compare the difference of immune responses to hepatitis B virus(HBV)vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)-1-infected patients with different CD4+T-lymphocyte counts.Methods HIV-1 infected patients who visited clinic at the Public Health Clinical Center of Chengdu were enrolled and divided in-+

  11. Absolute level of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) DNA in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection is not predictive of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van Baarle (Debbie); K.C. Wolthers (Katja); E. Hovenkamp (Egbert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); F. Miedema (Frank); M.H.J. van Oers (Marinus); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo study whether Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) load can be used to predict the occurrence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (AIDS-NHL), we determined EBV load longitudinally for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. EBV load in periphe

  12. Absolute level of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection is not predictive of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Baarle, Debbie; Wolthers, Katja C; Hovenkamp, Egbert; Niesters, Hubert G M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Miedema, Frank; Van Oers, Marinus H J

    2002-01-01

    To study whether Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) load can be used to predict the occurrence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (AIDS-NHL), we determined EBV load longitudinally for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. EBV load in peripheral blood mo

  13. Suppression of chikungunya virus replication and differential innate responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells during co-infection with dengue virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Aguilar Briseño, José A; Upasani, Vinit; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2017-01-01

    Dengue and chikungunya are viral diseases transmitted to humans by infected Aedes spp. mosquitoes. With an estimated 390 million infected people per year dengue virus (DENV) currently causes the most prevalent arboviral disease. During the last decade chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has caused large outbr

  14. Resource Manual for Handling Body Fluids in the School Setting To Prevent Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    This Maryland resource manual provides local education agencies with guidelines on how to handle body fluids to prevent the transmission of diseases, especially Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), in the school setting. The first section summarizes the reasons for development of the manual. The second section summarizes…

  15. Resource Manual for Handling Body Fluids in the School Setting To Prevent the Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    Guidelines to prevent the transmission of blood-borne diseases, especially those caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), in the school setting are provided in this resource manual for school staff. Sections include information on the reasons for the development of this manual; a summary of the means of HIV…

  16. Serro 2 Virus Highlights the Fundamental Genomic and Biological Features of a Natural Vaccinia Virus Infecting Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Emerson, Ginny L.; Sammons, Scott; Frace, Michael; Govil, Dhwani; Fernandes Mota, Bruno Eduardo; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; de Assis, Felipe Lopes; Olsen-Rasmussen, Melissa; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Li, Yu; Carroll, Darin; Guimarães da Fonseca, Flavio; Kroon, Erna; Damon, Inger K.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has been implicated in infections of dairy cattle and humans, and outbreaks have substantially impacted local economies and public health in Brazil. During a 2005 outbreak, a VACV strain designated Serro 2 virus (S2V) was collected from a 30-year old male milker. Our aim was to phenotypically and genetically characterize this VACV Brazilian isolate. S2V produced small round plaques without associated comets when grown in BSC40 cells. Furthermore, S2V was less virulent than the prototype strain VACV-Western Reserve (WR) in a murine model of intradermal infection, producing a tiny lesion with virtually no surrounding inflammation. The genome of S2V was sequenced by primer walking. The coding region spans 184,572 bp and contains 211 predicted genes. Mutations in envelope genes specifically associated with small plaque phenotypes were not found in S2V; however, other alterations in amino acid sequences within these genes were identified. In addition, some immunomodulatory genes were truncated in S2V. Phylogenetic analysis using immune regulatory-related genes, besides the hemagglutinin gene, segregated the Brazilian viruses into two clusters, grouping the S2V into Brazilian VACV group 1. S2V is the first naturally-circulating human-associated VACV, with a low passage history, to be extensively genetically and phenotypically characterized. PMID:27973399

  17. Structure and Genome Release Mechanism of the Human Cardiovirus Saffold Virus 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullapudi, Edukondalu; Nováček, Jiří; Pálková, Lenka; Kulich, Pavel; Lindberg, A Michael; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Plevka, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    In order to initiate an infection, viruses need to deliver their genomes into cells. This involves uncoating the genome and transporting it to the cytoplasm. The process of genome delivery is not well understood for nonenveloped viruses. We address this gap in our current knowledge by studying the uncoating of the nonenveloped human cardiovirus Saffold virus 3 (SAFV-3) of the family Picornaviridae SAFVs cause diseases ranging from gastrointestinal disorders to meningitis. We present a structure of a native SAFV-3 virion determined to 2.5 Å by X-ray crystallography and an 11-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of an "altered" particle that is primed for genome release. The altered particles are expanded relative to the native virus and contain pores in the capsid that might serve as channels for the release of VP4 subunits, N termini of VP1, and the RNA genome. Unlike in the related enteroviruses, pores in SAFV-3 are located roughly between the icosahedral 3- and 5-fold axes at an interface formed by two VP1 and one VP3 subunit. Furthermore, in native conditions many cardioviruses contain a disulfide bond formed by cysteines that are separated by just one residue. The disulfide bond is located in a surface loop of VP3. We determined the structure of the SAFV-3 virion in which the disulfide bonds are reduced. Disruption of the bond had minimal effect on the structure of the loop, but it increased the stability and decreased the infectivity of the virus. Therefore, compounds specifically disrupting or binding to the disulfide bond might limit SAFV infection. A capsid assembled from viral proteins protects the virus genome during transmission from one cell to another. However, when a virus enters a cell the virus genome has to be released from the capsid in order to initiate infection. This process is not well understood for nonenveloped viruses. We address this gap in our current knowledge by studying the genome release of Human Saffold virus 3

  18. A genetically humanized mouse model for hepatitis C virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorner, M.; Horwitz, J.A.; Robbins, J.B.; Barry, W.T.; Feng, Q.; Mu, K.; Jones, C.T.; Schoggins, J.W.; Catanese, M.T.; Burton, D.R.; Law, M.; Rice, C.M.; Ploss, A.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major medical problem. Antiviral treatment is only partially effective and a vaccine does not exist. Development of more effective therapies has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Although xenotransplantation of immunodeficient mice with hum

  19. Cocaine: A Catalyst for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet K Dhillon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug use has been recognized as a major risk factor for AIDS from the outset of the epidemic. Cocaine, one of the most widely abused drugs in the United States can both impair the functions of macrophages & CD4+ lymphocytes and also activate HIV-1 expression in these cells. Cocaine is a multifactorial agent that acts globally to impair the functioning of brain resident cells through multiple pathways. The drug not only promotes virus replication in macrophages, microglia and astrocytes, but can also upregulate CCR5 coreceptor, and reciprocally inhibit its ligands, thereby increasing virus infectivity. Cocaine is known to modulate astroglial function and activation. Cocaine causes a myriad of toxic responses in the neurons: a it synergizes with viral proteins, Tat and gp120 resulting in exacerbated neuronal apoptosis, b it causes calcium mobilization and, c generation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, cocaine also exerts potent effects on microvascular permeability, thereby impacting the influx of virus-infected inflammatory cells in brain parenchyma. By amplifying the various arms of the toxic responses that characterize HIV-associated dementia (HAD, cocaine skews the balance in favor of the virus leading to accelerated progression and severity of dementia.

  20. Alteration in pancreatic islet function in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind the defects in insulin production and secretion associated with antihuman immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapy and the development of HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) are discussed in this article. Data suggesting insulin resistance on the beta cell an...