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Sample records for human immature dcs

  1. Human TSLP-Educated DCs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiongkun Wang; Feiyue Xing

    2008-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), an IL-7-related cytokine, is widely expressed by epithelial cells in many tissues with different biological effects. Human TSLP (hTSLP) has been shown to play an important role in promoting T cell homeostasis, developing nondeletional central tolerance, amplifying epithelium-induced class switching, inducing atopic diseases and maintaining intestinal noninflammatory environment. Among diverse cells responding to hTSLP, dendritic cells (DCs) are the most obviously characterized target cells. In this review, we attempt to outline an effect of the functional versatility of hTSLP-activated DCs (hTSLP-DCs) on T cells.

  2. Inhibitory effect of immature dendritic cells (iDCs phagocytizing apoptotic lymphocytes on LPS-mediated activation of iDCs

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    Yu-xiang WEI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the inhibitory effect of immature dendritic cells(iDCs on LPS-mediated maturation of iDCs phagocytizing allogeneic spleen lymphocytes after being treated bypsoralen plus ultraviolet A(PUVA. Methods Bone marrow-derived DCs were obtained from bone marrow cells of C57BL/6 mice by co-cultivation with recombinant mouse IL-4 and GM-CSF. Spleenlymphocytes(SLP of BALB/c mice were isolated and transformed to PUVA-SLP by treatment with 8-methoxy PUVA irradiation.The bone marrow-derived iDCs of C57BL/6 were co-cultured with PUVA-SLP of BALB/c mice to obtain PUVA¬SLPDCs. After incubation, iDCs and PUVA-SP DCs were induced to maturation by LPS(10ng/ml,24h, and then they were analyzed by flow cytometry.At the same time,the concentrations of the immunoreactive proteins IL-12p70,IL-12p40andIL-10 in cell supernatants were determined by ELISA kits according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Results PUVA-SLP DCs and iDCs were compared in terms of LPS responsiveness.The phenotype of iDCs(CD40,CD80, andCD86 was 50.58%, 66.29%, 71.20%, respectively, showed more rapid changes from immature to mature statein response to LPS stimulation compared with PUVA-SP DCs, the phenotype of which was 21.26%,38.50% and 39.78%, respectively(P0.05.PUVA-SPDCs secreted high levels of IL-10(435.6±13.9, but lowlevels of IL-12(p7018.56±1.3,p4015.22±1.2, as compared with those of iDCs (132.6±2.8, p70192.1±5.9, p40999.8±26.9, P<0.01 after LPS stimulation. Conclusions Although PUVA-SLPDCs do not express as immature phenotype, they can be readily induced to differentiate into mature DCs in the presence of antigen or LPS. It may be suitable to use iDCs clinically in autoimmune diseases and transplantation.

  3. Immature Dengue Virus Is Infectious in Human Immature Dendritic Cells via Interaction with the Receptor Molecule DC-SIGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, Mareike K. S.; Da Silva-Voorham, Júlia M.; Torres Pedraza, Silvia; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dengue Virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. Important target cells during DENV infection are macrophages, monocytes, and immature dendritic cells (imDCs). DENV-infected cells are known to secrete a large number of partially immature and fully immature

  4. Immature human dendritic cells enhance their migration through KCa3.1 channel activation.

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    Crottès, David; Félix, Romain; Meley, Daniel; Chadet, Stéphanie; Herr, Florence; Audiger, Cindy; Soriani, Olivier; Vandier, Christophe; Roger, Sébastien; Angoulvant, Denis; Velge-Roussel, Florence

    2016-04-01

    Migration capacity is essential for dendritic cells (DCs) to present antigen to T cells for the induction of immune response. The DC migration is supposed to be a calcium-dependent process, while not fully understood. Here, we report a role of the KCa3.1/IK1/SK4 channels in the migration capacity of both immature (iDC) and mature (mDC) human CD14(+)-derived DCs. KCa3.1 channels were shown to control the membrane potential of human DC and the Ca(2+) entry, which is directly related to migration capacities. The expression of migration marker such as CCR5 and CCR7 was modified in both types of DCs by TRAM-34 (100nM). But, only the migration of iDC was decreased by use of both TRAM-34 and KCa3.1 siRNA. Confocal analyses showed a close localization of CCR5 with KCa3.1 in the steady state of iDC. Finally, the implication of KCa3.1 seems to be limited to the migration capacities as T cell activation of DCs appeared unchanged. Altogether, these results demonstrated that KCa3.1 channels have a pro-migratory effect on iDC migration. Our findings suggest that KCa3.1 in human iDC play a major role in their migration and constitute an attractive target for the cell therapy optimization.

  5. CD99 isoforms regulate CD1a expression in human monocyte-derived DCs through ATF-2/CREB-1 phosphorylation.

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    Mahiddine, Karim; Mallavialle, Aude; Bziouech, Hanen; Larbret, Frédéric; Bernard, Alain; Bernard, Ghislaine

    2016-06-01

    CD1a expression is considered one of the major characteristics qualifying in vitro human dendritic cells (DCs) during their generation process. Here, we report that CD1A transcription is regulated by a mechanism involving the long and short isoforms of CD99. Using a lentiviral construct encoding for a CD99 short hairpin RNA, we were able to inhibit CD99 expression in human primary DCs. In such cells, CD1a membrane expression increased and CD1A transcripts were much higher in abundance compared to cells expressing CD99 long form (CD99LF). We also show that CD1A transcription is accompanied by a switch in expression from CD99LF to expression at comparable levels of both CD99 isoforms during immature DCs generation in vitro. We demonstrate that CD99LF maintains a lower level of CD1A transcription by up-regulating the phosphorylated form of the ATF-2 transcription factor and that CD99 short form (SF) is required to counteract this regulatory mechanism. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms related to CD99 alternative splicing will be very helpful to better understand the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of CD1a molecules during DCs differentiation and its involvement in the immune response. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Immature dendritic cells generated from cryopreserved human monocytes show impaired ability to respond to LPS and to induce allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation.

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    Guilherme Ferreira Silveira

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells play a key role in the immune system, in the sensing of foreign antigens and triggering of an adaptive immune response. Cryopreservation of human monocytes was investigated to understand its effect on differentiation into immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (imdDCs, the response to inflammatory stimuli and the ability to induce allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation. Cryopreserved (crp-monocytes were able to differentiate into imdDCs, albeit to a lesser extent than freshly (frh-obtained monocytes. Furthermore, crp-imdDCs had lower rates of maturation and cytokine/chemokine secretion in response to LPS than frh-imdDCs. Lower expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (at 24 and 48 h and higher susceptibility to apoptosis in crp-imdDCs than in fresh cells would account for the impaired maturation and cytokine/chemokine secretion observed. A mixed leukocyte reaction showed that lymphocyte proliferation was lower with crp-imdDCs than with frh-imdDCs. These findings suggested that the source of monocytes used to generate human imdDCs could influence the accuracy of results observed in studies of the immune response to pathogens, lymphocyte activation, vaccination and antigen sensing. It is not always possible to work with freshly isolated monocytes but the possible effects of freezing/thawing on the biology and responsiveness of imdDCs should be taken into account.

  7. Combining Exosomes Derived from Immature DCs with Donor Antigen-Specific Treg Cells Induces Tolerance in a Rat Liver Allograft Model

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    Ma, Ben; Yang, Jing-Yue; Song, Wen-jie; Ding, Rui; Zhang, Zhuo-chao; Ji, Hong-chen; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Jian-lin; Yang, Xi-sheng; Tao, Kai-shan; Dou, Ke-feng; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Allograft tolerance is the ultimate goal in the field of transplantation immunology. Immature dendritic cells (imDCs) play an important role in establishing tolerance but have limitations, including potential for maturation, short lifespan in vivo and short storage times in vitro. However, exosomes (generally 30–100 nm) from imDCs (imDex) retain many source cell properties and may overcome these limitations. In previous reports, imDex prolonged the survival time of heart or intestine allografts. However, tolerance or long-term survival was not achieved unless immune suppressants were used. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can protect allografts from immune rejection, and our previous study showed that the effects of imDex were significantly associated with Tregs. Therefore, we incorporated Tregs into the treatment protocol to further reduce or avoid suppressant use. We defined the optimal exosome dose as approximately 20 μg (per treatment before, during and after transplantation) in rat liver transplantation and the antigen-specific role of Tregs in protecting liver allografts. In the co-treatment group, recipients achieved long-term survival, and tolerance was induced. Moreover, imDex amplified Tregs, which required recipient DCs and were enhanced by IL-2. Fortunately, the expanded Tregs retained their regulatory ability and donor-specificity. Thus, imDex and donor-specific Tregs can collaboratively induce graft tolerance. PMID:27640806

  8. Mouse CD8α+ DCs and human BDCA3+ DCs are major producers of IFN-λ in response to poly IC

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    Lauterbach, Henning; Bathke, Barbara; Gilles, Stefanie; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Luber, Christian A.; Fejer, György; Freudenberg, Marina A.; Davey, Gayle M.; Vremec, David; Kallies, Axel; Wu, Li; Shortman, Ken; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; O’Keeffe, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly IC), a double-stranded RNA, is an effective adjuvant in vivo. IFN-λs (also termed IL-28/29) are potent immunomodulatory and antiviral cytokines. We demonstrate that poly IC injection in vivo induces large amounts of IFN-λ, which depended on hematopoietic cells and the presence of TLR3 (Toll-like receptor 3), IRF3 (IFN regulatory factor 3), IRF7, IFN-I receptor, Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FL), and IRF8 but not on MyD88 (myeloid differentiation factor 88), Rig-like helicases, or lymphocytes. Upon poly IC injection in vivo, the IFN-λ production by splenocytes segregated with cells phenotypically resembling CD8α+ conventional dendritic cells (DCs [cDCs]). In vitro experiments revealed that CD8α+ cDCs were the major producers of IFN-λ in response to poly IC, whereas both CD8α+ cDCs and plasmacytoid DCs produced large amounts of IFN-λ in response to HSV-1 or parapoxvirus. The nature of the stimulus and the cytokine milieu determined whether CD8α+ cDCs produced IFN-λ or IL-12p70. Human DCs expressing BDCA3 (CD141), which is considered to be the human counterpart of murine CD8α+ DCs, also produced large amounts of IFN-λ upon poly IC stimulation. Thus, IFN-λ production in response to poly IC is a novel function of mouse CD8α+ cDCs and their human equivalents. PMID:20975040

  9. Mouse CD8alpha+ DCs and human BDCA3+ DCs are major producers of IFN-lambda in response to poly IC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Henning; Bathke, Barbara; Gilles, Stefanie; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Luber, Christian A; Fejer, György; Freudenberg, Marina A; Davey, Gayle M; Vremec, David; Kallies, Axel; Wu, Li; Shortman, Ken; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; O'Keeffe, Meredith; Hochrein, Hubertus

    2010-11-22

    Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly IC), a double-stranded RNA, is an effective adjuvant in vivo. IFN-λs (also termed IL-28/29) are potent immunomodulatory and antiviral cytokines. We demonstrate that poly IC injection in vivo induces large amounts of IFN-λ, which depended on hematopoietic cells and the presence of TLR3 (Toll-like receptor 3), IRF3 (IFN regulatory factor 3), IRF7, IFN-I receptor, Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FL), and IRF8 but not on MyD88 (myeloid differentiation factor 88), Rig-like helicases, or lymphocytes. Upon poly IC injection in vivo, the IFN-λ production by splenocytes segregated with cells phenotypically resembling CD8α(+) conventional dendritic cells (DCs [cDCs]). In vitro experiments revealed that CD8α(+) cDCs were the major producers of IFN-λ in response to poly IC, whereas both CD8α(+) cDCs and plasmacytoid DCs produced large amounts of IFN-λ in response to HSV-1 or parapoxvirus. The nature of the stimulus and the cytokine milieu determined whether CD8α(+) cDCs produced IFN-λ or IL-12p70. Human DCs expressing BDCA3 (CD141), which is considered to be the human counterpart of murine CD8α(+) DCs, also produced large amounts of IFN-λ upon poly IC stimulation. Thus, IFN-λ production in response to poly IC is a novel function of mouse CD8α(+) cDCs and their human equivalents.

  10. Task-concurrent anodal tDCS modulates bilateral plasticity in the human suprahyoid motor cortex

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    Shaofeng eZhao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a non-invasive method to modulate cortical excitability in humans. Here, we examined the effects of anodal tDCS on suprahyoid motor evoked potentials (MEP when applied over the hemisphere with stronger and weaker suprahyoid/submental projections, respectively, while study participants performed a swallowing task. 30 healthy volunteers were invited to two experimental sessions and randomly assigned to one of two different groups. While in the first group stimulation was targeted over the hemisphere with stronger suprahyoid projections, the second group received stimulation over the weaker suprahyoid projections. tDCS was applied either as anodal or sham stimulation in a random cross-over design. Suprahyoid MEPs were assessed immediately before intervention, as well as 5, 30, 60, and 90 min after discontinuation of stimulation from both the stimulated and non-stimulated contralateral hemisphere. We found that anodal tDCS (a-tDCS had long-lasting effects on suprahyoid MEPs on the stimulated side in both groups (tDCS targeting the stronger projections: F(1,14 = 96.2, p < 0.001; tDCS targeting the weaker projections: F(1,14 = 37.45, p < 0.001. While MEPs did not increase when elicited from the non-targeted hemisphere after stimulation of the stronger projections (F(1,14 = 0.69, p = 0.42, we found increased MEPs elicited from the non-targeted hemisphere after stimulating the weaker projections (at time points 30 to 90 min (F(1,14 = 18.26, p = 0.001. We conclude that anodal tDCS has differential effects on suprahyoid MEPs elicited from the targeted and non-targeted hemisphere depending on the site of stimulation. This finding may be important for the application of a-tDCS in patients with dysphagia, for example after stroke.

  11. Lactobacillus crispatus strain SJ-3C-US induces human dendritic cells (DCs) maturation and confers an anti-inflammatory phenotype to DCs.

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    Eslami, Solat; Hadjati, Jamshid; Motevaseli, Elahe; Mirzaei, Reza; Farashi Bonab, Samad; Ansaripour, Bita; Khoramizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-08-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus is one of the most predominant species in the healthy vagina microbiota. Nevertheless, the interactions between this commensal bacterium and the immune system are largely unknown. Given the importance of the dendritic cells (DCs) in the regulation of the immunity, this study was performed to elucidate the influence of vaginal isolated L. crispatus SJ-3C-US from healthy Iranian women on DCs, either directly by exposure of DCs to ultraviolet-inactivated (UVI) and heat-killed (HK) L. crispatus SJ-3C-US or indirectly to its cell-free supernatant (CFS), and the outcomes of immune response. In this work we showed that L. crispatus SJ-3C-US induced strong dose-dependent activation of dendritic cells and production of high levels of IL-10, whereas IL-12p70 production was induced at low level in an inverse dose-dependent manner. This stimulation skewed T cells polarization toward CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) Treg cells and production of IL-10 in a dose-dependent manner in mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) test. The mode of bacterial inactivation did not affect the DCs activation pattern, upon encounter with L. crispatus SJ-3C-US. Moreover, while DCs stimulated with CFS showed moderate phenotypic maturation and IL-10 production, it failed to skew T cells polarization toward CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) and production of IL-10. This study showed that L. crispatus SJ-3C-US confers an anti-inflammatory phenotype to DCs through up-regulation of anti-inflammatory/regulatory IL-10 cytokine production and induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) T cells at optimal dosage. Our findings suggest that L. crispatus SJ-3C-US could be a potent candidate as protective probiotic against human immune-mediated pathologies, such as chronic inflammation, vaginitis or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).

  12. ETV6 mutations in early immature human T cell leukemias

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    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Haydu, J. Erika; Rigo, Isaura; Hadler, Michael; Tosello, Valeria; Della Gatta, Giusy; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H.; Luger, Selina M.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Rue, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Early immature T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) account for ∼5–10% of pediatric T-ALLs and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the genetic defects that drive the biology of these tumors remain largely unknown. In this study, analysis of microarray gene expression signatures in adult T-ALL demonstrated a high prevalence of early immature leukemias and revealed a close relationship between these tumors and myeloid leukemias. Many adult immature T-ALLs harbored mutations in myeloid-specific oncogenes and tumor suppressors including IDH1, IDH2, DNMT3A, FLT3, and NRAS. Moreover, we identified ETV6 mutations as a novel genetic lesion uniquely present in immature adult T-ALL. Our results demonstrate that early immature adult T-ALL represents a heterogeneous category of leukemias characterized by the presence of overlapping myeloid and T-ALL characteristics, and highlight the potential role of ETV6 mutations in these tumors. PMID:22162831

  13. Non-meiotic chromosome instability in human immature oocytes.

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    Daina, Gemma; Ramos, Laia; Rius, Mariona; Obradors, Albert; Del Rey, Javier; Giralt, Magda; Campillo, Mercedes; Velilla, Esther; Pujol, Aïda; Martinez-Pasarell, Olga; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-02-01

    Aneuploidy has been a major issue in human gametes and is closely related to fertility problems, as it is known to be present in cleavage stage embryos and gestational losses. Pre-meiotic chromosome abnormalities in women have been previously described. The aim of this study is to assess the whole-chromosome complement in immature oocytes to find those abnormalities caused by mitotic instability. For this purpose, a total of 157 oocytes at the germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, and discarded from IVF cycles, were analysed by CGH. Fifty-six women, between 18 and 45 years old (mean 32.5 years), including 32 IVF patients (25-45 years of age) and 24 IVF oocyte donors (18-33 years of age), were included in the study. A total of 25/157 (15.9%) of the oocytes analysed, obtained from three IVF clinics, contained chromosome abnormalities, including both aneuploidy (24/157) and structural aberrations (9/157). Independently of the maternal age, the incidence of abnormal oocytes which originated before meiosis is 15.9%, and these imbalances were found in 33.9% of the females studied. This work sheds light on the relevance of mitotic instability responsible for the generation of the abnormalities present in human oocytes.

  14. CD1c-related DCs that express CD207/langerin, but are distinguishable from Langerhans cells, are consistently present in human tonsils

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    Anne eDe Monte

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Several subsets of dendritic cells (DCs are present in the oropharyngeal tonsillar tissues and are thought to behave as major actors in development and regulation of immunity by acting as a first line of recognition for airborne and alimentary antigens. We previously discovered in human adult tonsils infected with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV a subset of DCs that expressed langerin/CD207, a lectin usually recognized as a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs. In the present study, we analyzed the content of several child and adult tonsils in order to characterize in more detail the phenotype of these tonsillar CD207-expressing DCs (tCD207 DCs and to compare it with that of other human DC subsets. We showed that all the human tonsils studied (n=12 contained significant proportions of tCD207 DCs among tonsillar cells expressing HLA-DR. Moreover, the presence of tCD207 DCs in tonsils from young children free of EBV infection indicated that these cells could be established early in the tonsil independently of EBV infection. We also showed that tCD207 DCs, that were found mainly located within the tonsillar lymphoid stroma, were distinguishable from LCs by the level of expression of CD1a and EpCAM, and also from human inflammatory DCs (infDCs by the lack of CD1a, CD206 and CD14 expression. Detailed analysis of cell surface DC markers showed that tCD207 DCs were unrelated to CD141+ DCs or macrophages, but defined a subtype of tonsillar DCs closely related to myeloid resident CD1c DCs. Since it was established that blood CD1c myeloid DCs exhibit plasticity and are capable of expressing CD207 notably in the presence of inflammatory cytokines, it is tempting to speculate that CD207+ CD1c+ DCs may play a specific immune role.

  15. CD1c-Related DCs that Express CD207/Langerin, but Are Distinguishable from Langerhans Cells, Are Consistently Present in Human Tonsils.

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    De Monte, Anne; Olivieri, Charles-Vivien; Vitale, Sébastien; Bailleux, Sonanda; Castillo, Laurent; Giordanengo, Valérie; Maryanski, Janet L; Segura, Elodie; Doglio, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Several subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the oropharyngeal tonsillar tissues and are thought to behave as major actors in development and regulation of immunity by acting as a first line of recognition for airborne and alimentary antigens. We previously discovered in human adult tonsils infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a subset of DCs that expressed langerin/CD207, a lectin usually recognized as a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). In the present study, we analyzed the content of several child and adult tonsils in order to characterize in more detail the phenotype of these tonsillar CD207-expressing DCs (tCD207 DCs) and to compare it with that of other human DC subsets. We showed that all the human tonsils studied (n = 12) contained significant proportions of tCD207 DCs among tonsillar cells expressing HLA-DR. Moreover, the presence of tCD207 DCs in tonsils from young children free of EBV infection indicated that these cells could be established early in the tonsil independently of EBV infection. We also showed that tCD207 DCs, that were found mainly located within the tonsillar lymphoid stroma, were distinguishable from LCs by the level of expression of CD1a and EpCAM, and also from human inflammatory DCs by the lack of CD1a, CD206, and CD14 expression. Detailed analysis of cell surface DC markers showed that tCD207 DCs were unrelated to CD141(+) DCs or macrophages, but defined a subtype of tonsillar DCs closely related to myeloid resident CD1c DCs. Since it was established that blood CD1c myeloid DCs exhibit plasticity and are capable of expressing CD207 notably in the presence of inflammatory cytokines, it is tempting to speculate that CD207(+) CD1c(+) DCs may play a specific immune role.

  16. Hard tissue regeneration capacity of apical pulp derived cells (APDCs) from human tooth with immature apex.

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    Abe, Shigehiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Akihiko; Hamada, Keiichi; Amagasa, Teruo

    2008-06-20

    Recent studies indicate that dental pulp is a new source of adult stem cells. The human tooth with an immature apex is a developing organ, and the apical pulp of this tooth may contain a variety of progenitor/stem cells, which participate in root formation. We investigated the hard tissue regeneration potential of apical pulp derived cells (APDCs) from human tooth with an immature apex. APDCs cultured with a mineralization-promoting medium showed alkaline phosphatase activity in porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds. The composites of APDCs and HA were implanted subcutaneously in immunocompromised rats and harvested at 12 weeks after implantation. In histological analysis, the APDCs/HA composites exhibited bone- and dentine-like mineralized tissues in the pore areas of HA. This study suggests that the human tooth with an immature apex is an effective source of cells for hard tissue regeneration.

  17. Human iPSC-Derived Immature Astroglia Promote Oligodendrogenesis by Increasing TIMP-1 Secretion

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    Peng Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, once considered passive support cells, are increasingly appreciated as dynamic regulators of neuronal development and function, in part via secreted factors. The extent to which they similarly regulate oligodendrocytes or proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs is less understood. Here, we generated astrocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-Astros and demonstrated that immature astrocytes, as opposed to mature ones, promote oligodendrogenesis in vitro. In the PVL mouse model of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic encephalopathy, associated with cerebral palsy in humans, transplanted immature hiPSC-Astros promoted myelinogenesis and behavioral outcome. We further identified TIMP-1 as a selectively upregulated component secreted from immature hiPSC-Astros. Accordingly, in the rat PVL model, intranasal administration of conditioned medium from immature hiPSC-Astros promoted oligodendrocyte maturation in a TIMP-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest stage-specific developmental interactions between astroglia and oligodendroglia and have important therapeutic implications for promoting myelinogenesis.

  18. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

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    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  19. Morphometric growth relationships of the immature human mandible and tongue.

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    Hutchinson, Erin F; Kieser, Jules A; Kramer, Beverley

    2014-06-01

    The masticatory apparatus is a highly adaptive musculoskeletal complex comprising several relatively independent structural components, which assist in functions including feeding and breathing. We hypothesized that the tongue is elemental in the maintenance of normal ontogeny of the mandible and in its post-natal growth and development, and tested this using a morphometric approach. We assessed tongue and mandibular measurements in 174 (97 male) human cadavers. Landmark lingual and mandibular data were gathered individuals aged between 20 gestational weeks and 3 yr postnatal. In this analysis, geometric morphometrics assisted in visualizing the morphometrical growth changes in the mandible and tongue. A linear correlation in conjunction with principal component analysis further visualized the growth relationship between these structures. We found that the growth of the tongue and mandible were intrinsically linked in size and shape between 20 gestational weeks and 24 months postnatal. However, the mandible continued to change in shape and size into the 3rd yr of life, whereas the tongue only increased in size over this same period of time. These findings provide valuable insights into the allometric growth relationship between these structures, potentially assisting the clinician in predicting the behaviour of these structures in the assessment of malocclusions.

  20. DCS-SVM: a novel semi-automated method for human brain MR image segmentation.

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    Ahmadvand, Ali; Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Hajiali, Mohammadtaghi

    2016-12-08

    In this paper, a novel method is proposed which appropriately segments magnetic resonance (MR) brain images into three main tissues. This paper proposes an extension of our previous work in which we suggested a combination of multiple classifiers (CMC)-based methods named dynamic classifier selection-dynamic local training local Tanimoto index (DCS-DLTLTI) for MR brain image segmentation into three main cerebral tissues. This idea is used here and a novel method is developed that tries to use more complex and accurate classifiers like support vector machine (SVM) in the ensemble. This work is challenging because the CMC-based methods are time consuming, especially on huge datasets like three-dimensional (3D) brain MR images. Moreover, SVM is a powerful method that is used for modeling datasets with complex feature space, but it also has huge computational cost for big datasets, especially those with strong interclass variability problems and with more than two classes such as 3D brain images; therefore, we cannot use SVM in DCS-DLTLTI. Therefore, we propose a novel approach named "DCS-SVM" to use SVM in DCS-DLTLTI to improve the accuracy of segmentation results. The proposed method is applied on well-known datasets of the Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) and promising results are obtained.

  1. Blood flow measurement of human skeletal muscle during various exercise intensity using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)

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    Murakami, Yuya; Ono, Yumie; Ichinose, Masashi

    2017-02-01

    We studied blood flow dynamics of active skeletal muscle using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), an emerging optical modality that is suitable for noninvasive quantification of microcirculation level in deep tissue. Seven healthy subjects conducted 0.5 Hz dynamic handgrip exercise for 3 minutes at intensities of 10, 20, 30, and 50 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). DCS could detect the time-dependent increase of the blood flow response of the forearm muscle for continuous exercises, and the increase ratios of the mean blood flow through the exercise periods showed good correlation with the exercise intensities. We also compared blood flow responses detected from DCS with two different photon sampling rates and found that an appropriate photon sampling rates should be selected to follow the wide-ranged increase in the muscle blood flow with dynamic exercise. Our results demonstrate the possibility for utilizing DCS in a field of sports medicine to noninvasively evaluate the dynamics of blood flow in the active muscles.

  2. CD1c-related DCs that express CD207/langerin, but are distinguishable from Langerhans cells, are consistently present in human tonsils

    OpenAIRE

    Anne eDe Monte; Charles-Vivien eOLIVIERI; Sebastien eVITALE; Sonanda eBAILLEUX; Laurent eCASTILLO; Valerie eGIORDANENGO; Maryanski, Janet L.; Elodie eSegura; Alain eDOGLIO

    2016-01-01

    Several subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the oropharyngeal tonsillar tissues and are thought to behave as major actors in development and regulation of immunity by acting as a first line of recognition for airborne and alimentary antigens. We previously discovered in human adult tonsils infected with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) a subset of DCs that expressed langerin/CD207, a lectin usually recognized as a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). In the present study, we anal...

  3. CD1c-Related DCs that Express CD207/Langerin, but Are Distinguishable from Langerhans Cells, Are Consistently Present in Human Tonsils

    OpenAIRE

    De Monte, Anne; Olivieri, Charles-Vivien; Vitale, Sébastien; Bailleux, Sonanda; Castillo, Laurent; Giordanengo, Valérie; Maryanski, Janet L.; Segura, Elodie; Doglio, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Several subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the oropharyngeal tonsillar tissues and are thought to behave as major actors in development and regulation of immunity by acting as a first line of recognition for airborne and alimentary antigens. We previously discovered in human adult tonsils infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a subset of DCs that expressed langerin/CD207, a lectin usually recognized as a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). In the present study, we ana...

  4. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Human Memory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzen, Laura E.; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Training a person in a new knowledge base or skill set is extremely time consuming and costly, particularly in highly specialized domains such as the military and the intelligence community. Recent research in cognitive neuroscience has suggested that a technique called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has the potential to revolutionize training by enabling learners to acquire new skills faster, more efficiently, and more robustly (Bullard et al., 2011). In this project, we tested the effects of tDCS on two types of memory performance that are critical for learning new skills: associative memory and working memory. Associative memory is memory for the relationship between two items or events. It forms the foundation of all episodic memories, so enhancing associative memory could provide substantial benefits to the speed and robustness of learning new information. We tested the effects of tDCS on associative memory, using a real-world associative memory task: remembering the links between faces and names. Working memory refers to the amount of information that can be held in mind and processed at one time, and it forms the basis for all higher-level cognitive processing. We investigated the degree of transfer between various working memory tasks (the N-back task as a measure of verbal working memory, the rotation-span task as a measure of visuospatial working memory, and Raven's progressive matrices as a measure of fluid intelligence) in order to determine if tDCS-induced facilitation of performance is task-specific or general.

  5. In-vivo Imaging of Magnetic Fields Induced by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in Human Brain using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Mayank V.; Smith, Robert X.; Jann, Kay; Dunn, Walter; Lafon, Belen; Truong, Dennis; Wu, Allan; Parra, Lucas; Bikson, Marom; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging non-invasive neuromodulation technique that applies mA currents at the scalp to modulate cortical excitability. Here, we present a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique, which detects magnetic fields induced by tDCS currents. This technique is based on Ampere’s law and exploits the linear relationship between direct current and induced magnetic fields. Following validation on a phantom with a known path of electric current and induced magnetic field, the proposed MRI technique was applied to a human limb (to demonstrate in-vivo feasibility using simple biological tissue) and human heads (to demonstrate feasibility in standard tDCS applications). The results show that the proposed technique detects tDCS induced magnetic fields as small as a nanotesla at millimeter spatial resolution. Through measurements of magnetic fields linearly proportional to the applied tDCS current, our approach opens a new avenue for direct in-vivo visualization of tDCS target engagement.

  6. Histologic Outcomes of Uninfected Human Immature Teeth Treated with Regenerative Endodontics: 2 Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Ali; Kolahdouzan, Alireza; Hosseini, Farzaneh; Mehrizi, Ehsan A; Verma, Prashant; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of evidence exists showing the possibility of growing vital tissues in the root canal spaces of teeth with necrotic pulps and open apices. However, there is very limited histologic information regarding characteristics of tissues formed in the root canal space of human teeth after regenerative endodontics. The aim of this study was to examine clinically and histologically the outcomes of human immature teeth treated with regenerative endodontics. Two healthy birooted human maxillary first premolar teeth scheduled for extraction were included. Preoperative radiographs confirmed that these teeth had immature apices. Vitality tests showed the presence of vital pulps in these teeth. After receiving consent forms, the teeth were isolated with a rubber dam, and the pulps were completely removed. After the formation of blood clots in the canals, the teeth were covered with mineral trioxide aggregate. Four months later, the teeth were clinically and radiographically evaluated, extracted, and examined histologically. Both patients remained asymptomatic after treatment. Radiographic examination of the teeth showed signs of root development after treatment. Histologic examination of tissues growing into the root canal space of these teeth shows the presence of connective tissue, bone and cementum formation, and thickening of roots. Based on our findings, it appears that when canals of teeth with open apices are treated with regenerative endodontics, tissues of the periodontium grow into the root canals of these teeth. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Oxytocinase-immunohistochemical demonstration in the immature and term human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, C W; Watkins, W B

    1975-10-27

    Oxytocinase (cystine aminopeptidase) was purified from human retroplacental serum by a combination of fractional precipitation, hydroxylapatite chromatography and gel exlusion chromatography on Sephadex G-200. The purified enzyme possessed a specific activity of 980 mIU/mg using L-cystine-di-p-nitroanilide as substrate. This represented a 3200 fold concentration from the starting material in an overall yield of 12%. Antibodies against oxytocinase were raised in rabbits and the gamma-globulins fraction labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate prior to its use in the immunofluorescence histochemical localization of the enzyme in human placental tissue. Oxytocinase was confined to the syncytiotrophoblastic cells of normal term, and immature placentas as well as in placentas from patients suffering from severe toxaemia. Specific immunofluorescence was also present in the outer margins of the chorion and to a lesser extent in the amnion.

  8. A comparison between uni- and bilateral tDCS effects on functional connectivity of the human motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eSehm

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available tDCS over the primary motor cortex (M1 has been shown to induce changes in motor performance and learning. Recent studies indicate that tDCS is capable of modulating widespread neural network properties within the brain. However the temporal evolution of online- and after- effects of tDCS on functional connectivity within and across the stimulated motor cortices (M1 still remain elusive. In the present study, two different tDCS setups were investigated: (i unilateral M1 tDCS (anode over right M1, cathode over the contralateral supraorbital region and (ii bilateral M1 tDCS (anode over right M1, cathode over left M1. In a randomized single-blinded crossover design, 12 healthy subjects underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging at rest (rs-fMRI before, during and after 20 min of either bi-, unilateral or sham M1 tDCS. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis (FC was used to investigate tDCS-induced changes across and within M1. We found that bilateral M1 tDCS induced (a a decrease in interhemispheric FC during stimulation and (b an increase in intracortical FC within right M1 after termination of the intervention. While unilateral M1 tDCS also resulted in similar effects during stimulation, no such changes could be observed after termination of tDCS. Our results provide evidence that depending on the electrode montage, tDCS acts upon a modulation of either intracortical and/or interhemispheric processing of M1.

  9. Analysis of Survivin-Specific T Cells in Breast Cancer Patients Using Human DCs Engineered with Survivin mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Met, Ozcan; Svane, Inge Marie

    2013-01-01

    vaccines, it may be beneficial to analyze preexistent immunity against TAAs in cancer patients because it may be easier to expand a memory pool of T cells compared to generating new immunity. Recent research shows that engineering DCs to synthesize tumor epitopes endogenously by transfecting DCs with m......The observation that dendritic cells (DCs) charged with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is a potent strategy to elicit protective immunity in tumor-bearings hosts has prompted extensive testing of DCs as cellular adjuvant in cancer vaccines. To improve the clinical development of DC-based cancer...

  10. Vitrification affects nuclear maturation and gene expression of immature human oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Shahedi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitrification of oocytes is a fast-freezing technique, which may affect the quality of the human oocyte, and consequently affects the embryo development, pregnancy and birth. The aim of the current study was to investigate the consequence of in-vitro vitrification on maturation status of immature human oocytes, additionally, expression levels of stress, and apoptosis related genes. Materials and Methods: The total of 213 human immature oocytes which routinely discarded from assisted reproduction clinics were collected and divided into two groups including: (I fresh germinal vesicle (GV oocytes (n=106 (matured in-vitro  (fIVM , and  (II GV oocytes (n=107 that initially vitrified, then matured in  in-vitro (vIVM. After 36 hours of incubation, the oocytes were evaluated for nuclear maturation and expression level of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1, stress related genes (Sod1 and Hsp70, and apoptotic related genes (Bax and Bcl-2 by quantitative Real-Time PCR. Results: Oocyte maturation rates were reduced in vIVM compared to fIVM oocytes (P=0.001. The expression of stress (Sod1 and Hsp70, and apoptotic-related genes (Bax and Bcl-2 in vIVM were significantly higher compared to the fIVM group. Additionally, pro-apoptotic gene up-regulated 4.3 times more than anti-apoptotic gene in vIVM oocyte. However, DNMT1 gene expression was reduced in vIVM oocyte (P = 0.047. Conclusions: The low survival rate of vitrified In-vitro matured GV oocytes could definitely be explained by the alterations of their gene expression profile. 

  11. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish mature from immature lymphocyte cells and hence ultimately it may be a useful label-free technique for clinical leukemia diagnosis.

  12. Complement protein C1q induces maturation of human dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosmor, E; Bajtay, Z; Sándor, N;

    2007-01-01

    in the absence of antibodies, we undertook to investigate whether this complement protein has an impact on various functions of human DCs. Maturation of monocyte-derived immature DCs (imMDCs) cultured on immobilized C1q was followed by monitoring expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, MHCII and CCR7. The functional...

  13. The temporal dynamics of differential gene expression in Aspergillus fumigatus interacting with human immature dendritic cells in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morton, Charles O

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most important antigen presenting cells and play a pivotal role in host immunity to infectious agents by acting as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDC) were infected with viable resting conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af293) for 12 hours at an MOI of 5; cells were sampled every three hours. RNA was extracted from both organisms at each time point and hybridised to microarrays. iDC cell death increased at 6 h in the presence of A. fumigatus which coincided with fungal germ tube emergence; >80% of conidia were associated with iDC. Over the time course A. fumigatus differentially regulated 210 genes, FunCat analysis indicated significant up-regulation of genes involved in fermentation, drug transport, pathogenesis and response to oxidative stress. Genes related to cytotoxicity were differentially regulated but the gliotoxin biosynthesis genes were down regulated over the time course, while Aspf1 was up-regulated at 9 h and 12 h. There was an up-regulation of genes in the subtelomeric regions of the genome as the interaction progressed. The genes up-regulated by iDC in the presence of A. fumigatus indicated that they were producing a pro-inflammatory response which was consistent with previous transcriptome studies of iDC interacting with A. fumigatus germ tubes. This study shows that A. fumigatus adapts to phagocytosis by iDCs by utilising genes that allow it to survive the interaction rather than just up-regulation of specific virulence genes.

  14. The temporal dynamics of differential gene expression in Aspergillus fumigatus interacting with human immature dendritic cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles O Morton

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are the most important antigen presenting cells and play a pivotal role in host immunity to infectious agents by acting as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDC were infected with viable resting conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af293 for 12 hours at an MOI of 5; cells were sampled every three hours. RNA was extracted from both organisms at each time point and hybridised to microarrays. iDC cell death increased at 6 h in the presence of A. fumigatus which coincided with fungal germ tube emergence; >80% of conidia were associated with iDC. Over the time course A. fumigatus differentially regulated 210 genes, FunCat analysis indicated significant up-regulation of genes involved in fermentation, drug transport, pathogenesis and response to oxidative stress. Genes related to cytotoxicity were differentially regulated but the gliotoxin biosynthesis genes were down regulated over the time course, while Aspf1 was up-regulated at 9 h and 12 h. There was an up-regulation of genes in the subtelomeric regions of the genome as the interaction progressed. The genes up-regulated by iDC in the presence of A. fumigatus indicated that they were producing a pro-inflammatory response which was consistent with previous transcriptome studies of iDC interacting with A. fumigatus germ tubes. This study shows that A. fumigatus adapts to phagocytosis by iDCs by utilising genes that allow it to survive the interaction rather than just up-regulation of specific virulence genes.

  15. Toward unraveling reading-related modulations of tDCS-induced neuroplasticity in the human visual cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Antal, Andrea; Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Chaieb, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation using weak electrical direct currents has shown to be capable of inducing polarity-dependent diminutions or elevations in motor and visual cortical excitability. The aim of the present study was to test if reading during transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is able to modify stimulation-induced plasticity in the visual cortex. Phosphene thresholds (PTs) in 12 healthy subjects were recorded before and after 10 min of anodal, cathodal, and sham tDCS in combination with rea...

  16. Effects of Vitrification on Outcomes of In VivoMature, In Vitro-Mature and Immature Human Oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-yan Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To observe the effects of vitrification on spindle, zona pellucida, embryonic aneuploidy and DNA injury in in vivo-maruted, in vitro-mature and immature human oocytes. Methods: Between January 2009 and February 2015, 223 immature oocytes from 450 infertile patients, and 31 in vivo-mature oocytes from 3 infertile couples were collected. Of the 223 immature oocytes, 113 were used for in vitro culture before vitrification. Some oocytes were randomly divided into in vivo-mature group (group A, n = 15, in vitro-mature group (group B, n = 88 and immature group (group C, n = 85, and then the oocytes with spindle in these three groups after freezing-thawing were selected to use for Polscope imaging, embryonic aneuploidy screening and embryo development evaluation. Other oocytes were randomly divided into group A (n = 16, group B (n = 25 and group C (n = 25 for detecting DNA injury. Results: After thawing, spindle occurrence rate, spindle Retardance value, and cleavage rate were significantly higher in groups A and B than in group C (all P P > 0.05. Zona pellucida density (ZPD was significantly lower in group A than in groups B and C both before and after vitrification (all P P P > 0.05. Rate of comet cells was significantly lower in group A than in groups B and C (all P P Conclusion: In vivo- and in vitro-mature human oocytes are more suitable to vitrification than immature human oocytes. Spindle Retardance value has more predictive value for embryonic development potential than ZPD and ZPT.

  17. Methods development to evaluate the risk of upgrading to DCS: The human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrom, L.T.; Wilhelmsen, C.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The NRC recognizes that a more complete technical basis for understanding and regulating advanced digital technologies in commercial nuclear power plants is needed. A concern is that the introduction of digital safety systems may have an impact on risk. There is currently no standard methodology for measuring digital system reliability. A tool currently used to evaluate NPP risk in analog systems is the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The use of this tool to evaluate the digital system risk was considered to be a potential methodology for determining the risk. To test this hypothesis, it was decided to perform a limited PRA on a single dominant accident sequence. However, a review of existing human reliability analysis (HRA) methods showed that they were inadequate to analyze systems utilizing digital technology. A four step process was used to adapt existing HRA methodologies to digital environments and to develop new techniques. The HRA methods were then used to analyze an NPP that had undergone a backfit to digital technology in order to determine, as a first step, whether the methods were effective. The very small-break loss of coolant accident sequence was analyzed to determine whether the upgrade to the Eagle-21 process protection system had an effect on risk. The analysis of the very small-break LOCA documented in the Sequoyah PRA was used as the basis of the analysis. The analysis of the results of the HRA showed that the mean human error probabilities for the Eagle-21 PPS were slightly less than those for the analog system it replaced. One important observation from the analysis is that the operators have increased confidence steming from the better level of control provided by the digital system. The analysis of the PRA results, which included the human error component and the Eagle-21 PPS, disclosed that the reactor protection system had a higher failure rate than the analog system, although the difference was not statistically significant.

  18. Targeting nanosystems to human DCs via Fc receptor as an effective strategy to deliver antigen for immunotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, L.J.; Rueda, F.; Cordobilla, B.; Simon, L.; Hosta, L.; Albericio, F.; Domingo, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are increasingly being explored as cellular vaccines for tumor immunotherapy, since they provide an effective system of antigen presentation both in vitro and in vivo. An additional advantage of this cell type is that it is possible to target specific antigens through the

  19. DCS Budget Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — DCS Budget Tracking System database contains budget information for the Information Technology budget and the 'Other Objects' budget. This data allows for monitoring...

  20. Human cord blood derived immature basophils show dual characteristics, expressing both basophil and eosinophil associated proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Grundström

    Full Text Available Basophils are blood cells of low abundance associated with allergy, inflammation and parasite infections. To study the transcriptome of mature circulating basophils cells were purified from buffy coats by density gradient centrifugations and two-step magnetic cell sorting. However, after extensive analysis the cells were found to be transcriptionally inactive and almost completely lack functional mRNA. In order to obtain transcriptionally active immature basophils for analysis of their transcriptome, umbilical cord blood cells were therefore cultured in the presence of interleukin (IL-3 for 9 days and basophils were enriched by removing non-basophils using magnetic cell sorting. The majority of purified cells demonstrated typical metachromatic staining with Alcian blue dye (95% and expression of surface markers FcεRI and CD203c, indicating a pure population of cells with basophil-like phenotype. mRNA was extracted from these cells and used to construct a cDNA library with approximately 600 000 independent clones. This library served as tool to determine the mRNA frequencies for a number of hematopoietic marker proteins. It was shown that these cells express basophil/mast cell-specific transcripts, i.e. β-tryptase, serglycin and FcεRI α-chain, to a relatively low degree. In contrast, the library contained a high number of several eosinophil-associated transcripts such as: major basic protein (MBP, charcot leyden crystal (CLC, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP, eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO. Out of these transcripts, MBP and EPO were the most frequently observed, representing 8% and 3.2% of the total mRNA pool, respectively. Moreover, in a proteome analysis of cultured basophils we identified MBP and EPO as the two most prominent protein bands, suggesting a good correlation between protein and mRNA analyses of these cells. The mixed phenotype observed for these cells strengthens the conclusion that

  1. Human cord blood derived immature basophils show dual characteristics, expressing both basophil and eosinophil associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundström, Jeanette; Reimer, Jenny M; Magnusson, Sofia E; Nilsson, Gunnar; Wernersson, Sara; Hellman, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Basophils are blood cells of low abundance associated with allergy, inflammation and parasite infections. To study the transcriptome of mature circulating basophils cells were purified from buffy coats by density gradient centrifugations and two-step magnetic cell sorting. However, after extensive analysis the cells were found to be transcriptionally inactive and almost completely lack functional mRNA. In order to obtain transcriptionally active immature basophils for analysis of their transcriptome, umbilical cord blood cells were therefore cultured in the presence of interleukin (IL)-3 for 9 days and basophils were enriched by removing non-basophils using magnetic cell sorting. The majority of purified cells demonstrated typical metachromatic staining with Alcian blue dye (95%) and expression of surface markers FcεRI and CD203c, indicating a pure population of cells with basophil-like phenotype. mRNA was extracted from these cells and used to construct a cDNA library with approximately 600 000 independent clones. This library served as tool to determine the mRNA frequencies for a number of hematopoietic marker proteins. It was shown that these cells express basophil/mast cell-specific transcripts, i.e. β-tryptase, serglycin and FcεRI α-chain, to a relatively low degree. In contrast, the library contained a high number of several eosinophil-associated transcripts such as: major basic protein (MBP), charcot leyden crystal (CLC), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO). Out of these transcripts, MBP and EPO were the most frequently observed, representing 8% and 3.2% of the total mRNA pool, respectively. Moreover, in a proteome analysis of cultured basophils we identified MBP and EPO as the two most prominent protein bands, suggesting a good correlation between protein and mRNA analyses of these cells. The mixed phenotype observed for these cells strengthens the conclusion that eosinophils and

  2. Human cord blood derived immature basophils show dual characteristics, expressing both basophil and eosinophil associated proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanette Grundström; Jenny M Reimer; Sofia E Magnusson; Gunnar Nilsson; Sara Wernersson; Lars Hellman

    2012-01-01

    Basophils are blood cells of low abundance associated with allergy, inflammation and parasite infections. To study the transcriptome of mature circulating basophils cells were purified from buffy coats by density gradient centrifugations and two-step magnetic cell sorting. However, after extensive analysis the cells were found to be transcriptionally inactive and almost completely lack functional mRNA. In order to obtain transcriptionally active immature basophils for analysis of their transc...

  3. Multicenter Systems Analysis of Human Blood Reveals Immature Neutrophils in Males and During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazkova, Jana; Gupta, Sarthak; Liu, Yudong; Gaudilliere, Brice; Ganio, Edward A.; Bolen, Christopher R.; Saar-Dover, Ron; Fragiadakis, Gabriela K.; Angst, Martin S.; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Aghaeepour, Nima; Stevenson, David; Baldwin, Nicole; Anguiano, Esperanza; Chaussabel, Damien; Altman, Matthew C.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Davis, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite clear differences in immune system responses and in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases between males and females, there is little understanding of the processes involved. In this study, we identified a gene signature of immature-like neutrophils, characterized by the overexpression of genes encoding for several granule-containing proteins, which was found at higher levels (up to 3-fold) in young (20–30 y old) but not older (60 to >89 y old) males compared with females. Functional and phenotypic characterization of peripheral blood neutrophils revealed more mature and responsive neutrophils in young females, which also exhibited an elevated capacity in neutrophil extracellular trap formation at baseline and upon microbial or sterile autoimmune stimuli. The expression levels of the immature-like neutrophil signature increased linearly with pregnancy, an immune state of increased susceptibility to certain infections. Using mass cytometry, we also find increased frequencies of immature forms of neutrophils in the blood of women during late pregnancy. Thus, our findings show novel sex differences in innate immunity and identify a common neutrophil signature in males and in pregnant women. PMID:28179497

  4. Altered immune response of immature dendritic cells upon dengue virus infection in the presence of specific antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, Silvia; Flipse, Jacky; Upasani, Vinit C; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) replication is known to prevent maturation of infected DCs thereby impeding the development of adequate immunity. During secondary DENV infection, dengue-specific antibodies can suppress DENV replication in immature DCs (immDCs), however how dengue-antibody complexes (DENV-IC) in

  5. Species difference of CD137 ligand signaling in human and murine monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqiao Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stimulation of CD137 ligand on human monocytes has been shown to induce DC differentiation, and these CD137L-DCs are more potent than classical DCs, in stimulating T cell responses in vitro. To allow an in vivo evaluation of the potency of CD137L-DCs in murine models we aimed at generating murine CD137L-DCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: When stimulated through CD137 ligand murine monocytes responded just as human monocytes with an increased adherence, morphological changes, proliferation and an increase in viable cell numbers. But CD137 ligand signaling did not induce expression of inflammatory cytokines and costimulatory molecules in murine monocytes and these cells had no T cell stimulatory activity. Murine monocytes did not differentiate to inflammatory DCs upon CD137 ligand signaling. Furthermore, while CD137 ligand signaling induces maturation of human immature classical DCs it failed to do so with murine immature classical DCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that both human and murine monocytes become activated by CD137 ligand signaling but only human and not murine monocytes differentiate to inflammatory DCs.

  6. Human Glioma–Initiating Cells Show a Distinct Immature Phenotype Resembling but Not Identical to NG2 Glia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes-Freer, Alonso; Kim, Ella; Bielanska, Joanna; Giese, Alf; Mortensen, Lena Sünke; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J.; Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Glioma-initiating cells (GICs) represent a potential important therapeutic target because they are likely to account for the frequent recurrence of malignant gliomas; however, their identity remains unsolved. Here, we characterized the cellular lineage fingerprint of GICs through a combination of electrophysiology, lineage marker expression, and differentiation assays of 5 human patient-derived primary GIC lines. Most GICs coexpressed nestin, NG2 proteoglycan, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Glioma-initiating cells could be partially differentiated into astrocytic but not oligodendroglial or neural lineages. We also demonstrate that GICs have a characteristic electrophysiologic profile distinct from that of well-characterized tumor bulk cells. Together, our results suggest that GICs represent a unique type of cells reminiscent of an immature phenotype that closely resembles but is not identical to NG2 glia with respect to marker expression and functional membrane properties. PMID:23481707

  7. MDT DCS Electronics System

    CERN Document Server

    Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Gazis, Evangelos; Tsipolitis, Georgios

    This note has the aim to present the Detector Control System for the Monitor- ing of the electronics values of MDT chambers in ATLAS experiment in CERN. This system is decided to be called in short ELTX. The principal task of DCS is to enable and ensure the coherent and safe oper- ation of the detector. The interaction of detector expers, users or shifters to the detector hardware is also done via DCS. This is the responsible system of moni- toring the operational parameters and the overall state of the detector, the alarm generation and handling, the connection of hardware values to databases and the interaction with the DAQ system. Through this thesis, one can see what ELTX system has to offer as a Detector Control System and in detail, what is the hardware to be controlled and monitored. Moreover it is presented the mainstream of central Atlas DCS concerning the active interfaces.ELTX is a system following these standards.

  8. Immature and maturation-resistant human dendritic cells generated from bone marrow require two stimulations to induce T cell anergy in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Berger

    Full Text Available Immature dendritic cells (DC represent potential clinical tools for tolerogenic cellular immunotherapy in both transplantation and autoimmunity. A major drawback in vivo is their potential to mature during infections or inflammation, which would convert their tolerogenicity into immunogenicity. The generation of immature DC from human bone marrow (BM by low doses of GM-CSF (lowGM in the absence of IL-4 under GMP conditions create DC resistant to maturation, detected by surface marker expression and primary stimulation by allogeneic T cells. This resistence could not be observed for BM-derived DC generated with high doses of GM-CSF plus IL-4 (highGM/4, although both DC types induced primary allogeneic T cell anergy in vitro. The estabishment of the anergic state requires two subsequent stimulations by immature DC. Anergy induction was more profound with lowGM-DC due to their maturation resistance. Together, we show the generation of immature, maturation-resistant lowGM-DC for potential clinical use in transplant rejection and propose a two-step-model of T cell anergy induction by immature DC.

  9. Molecular characterization of antigen-peptide pulsed dendritic cells: immature dendritic cells develop a distinct molecular profile when pulsed with antigen peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy X Yang

    Full Text Available As dendritic cells (DCs are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, they are being tested as cancer vaccines for immunotherapy of established cancers. Although numerous studies have characterized DCs by their phenotype and function, few have identified potential molecular markers of antigen presentation prior to vaccination of host. In this study we generated pre-immature DC (piDC, immature DC (iDC, and mature DC (mDC from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC obtained from HLA-A2 healthy donors, and pulsed them with human papillomavirus E7 peptide (p11-20, a class I HLA-A2 binding antigen. We then characterized DCs for cell surface phenotype and gene expression profile by microarray technology. We identified a set of 59 genes that distinguished three differentiation stages of DCs (piDC, iDC and mDC. When piDC, iDC and mDC were pulsed with E7 peptide for 2 hrs, the surface phenotype did not change, however, iDCs rather than mDCs showed transcriptional response by up-regulation of a set of genes. A total of 52 genes were modulated in iDC upon antigen pulsing. Elongation of pulse time for iDCs to 10 and 24 hrs did not significantly bring further changes in gene expression. The E7 peptide up-modulated immune response (KPNA7, IGSF6, NCR3, TREM2, TUBAL3, IL8, NFKBIA, pro-apoptosis (BTG1, SEMA6A, IGFBP3 and SRGN, anti-apoptosis (NFKBIA, DNA repair (MRPS11, RAD21, TXNRD1, and cell adhesion and cell migration genes (EPHA1, PGF, IL8 and CYR61 in iDCs. We confirmed our results by Q-PCR analysis. The E7 peptide but not control peptide (PADRE induced up-regulation of NFKB1A gene only in HLA-A2 positive iDCs and not in HLA-A2 negative iDCs. These results suggest that E7 up-regulation of genes is specific and HLA restricted and that these genes may represent markers of antigen presentation and help rapidly assess the quality of dendritic cells prior to administration to the host.

  10. IL-10 promotes homeostatic proliferation of human CD8(+) memory T cells and, when produced by CD1c(+) DCs, shapes naive CD8(+) T-cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizzoli, Giulia; Larghi, Paola; Paroni, Moira; Crosti, Maria Cristina; Moro, Monica; Neddermann, Petra; Caprioli, Flavio; Pagani, Massimiliano; De Francesco, Raffaele; Abrignani, Sergio; Geginat, Jens

    2016-07-01

    IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that inhibits maturation and cytokine production of dendritic cells (DCs). Although mature DCs have the unique capacity to prime CD8(+) CTL, IL-10 can promote CTL responses. To understand these paradoxic findings, we analyzed the role of IL-10 produced by human APC subsets in T-cell responses. IL-10 production was restricted to CD1c(+) DCs and CD14(+) monocytes. Interestingly, it was differentially regulated, since R848 induced IL-10 in DCs, but inhibited IL-10 in monocytes. Autocrine IL-10 had only a weak inhibitory effect on DC maturation, cytokine production, and CTL priming with high-affinity peptides. Nevertheless, it completely blocked cross-priming and priming with low-affinity peptides of a self/tumor-antigen. IL-10 also inhibited CD1c(+) DC-induced CD4(+) T-cell priming and enhanced Foxp3 induction, but was insufficient to induce T-cell IL-10 production. CD1c(+) DC-derived IL-10 had also no effect on DC-induced secondary expansions of memory CTL. However, IL-15-driven, TCR-independent proliferation of memory CTL was enhanced by IL-10. We conclude that DC-derived IL-10 selects high-affinity CTL upon priming. Moreover, IL-10 preserves established CTL memory by enhancing IL-15-dependent homeostatic proliferation. These combined effects on CTL priming and memory maintenance provide a plausible mechanism how IL-10 promotes CTL responses in humans.

  11. Immature CD4+ dendritic cells conditioned with donor kidney antigen prolong renal allograft survival in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tao; XU Lin; LI Heng; HUANG Zheng-yu; ZHANG Sheng-ping; MIAO Bin; NA Ning

    2012-01-01

    Background AIIogeneic transplant rejection is currently a major problem encountered during organ transplantation.The dendritic cell (DC) is the most effective powerful known professional antigen-presenting cell,and recent studies have found that DCs can also induce immune tolerance,and avoid or reduce the degree of transplant rejection.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of transfused immature CD4+ DCs on renal allografts in the rat model.Methods In this study,we induced CD4+ immature DCs from rat bone marrow cells by a cytokine cocktail.The immature CD4+ DCs were identified by morphological analysis and then the suppressive activity of these cells conditioned with donor kidney antigen was evaluated in vitro and in vivo.Results Immature CD4+ DCs conditioned with donor kidney antigen possessed immunosuppressive activity in vitro and they were able to prolong renal transplant survival in an allograft rat model in vivo.Conclusions Our study provides new information on efficacious renal transplantation,which might be useful for understanding the function of immature CD4+ DCs in modulating renal transplant rejection and improving clinical outcome in future studies.

  12. The hematopoietic chemokine CXCL12 promotes integration of human endothelial colony forming cell-derived cells into immature vessel networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, Sarah E; Tsaknakis, Grigorios; Khoo, Cheen P; Athanassopoulos, Thanassi; Camicia, Rosalba; Zhang, Youyi; Grabowska, Rita; Harris, Adrian L; Roubelakis, Maria G; Watt, Suzanne M

    2014-11-15

    Proangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) prime endothelial cells to respond to "hematopoietic" chemokines and cytokines by inducing/upregulating expression of the respective chemokine/cytokine receptors. Coculture of human endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC)-derived cells with human stromal cells in the presence of VEGF and FGF-2 for 14 days resulted in upregulation of the "hematopoietic" chemokine CXCL12 and its CXCR4 receptor by day 3 of coculture. Chronic exposure to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in this vasculo/angiogenesis assay significantly reduced vascular tubule formation, an observation recapitulated by delayed AMD3100 addition. While AMD3100 did not affect ECFC-derived cell proliferation, it did demonstrate a dual action. First, over the later stages of the 14-day cocultures, AMD3100 delayed tubule organization into maturing vessel networks, resulting in enhanced endothelial cell retraction and loss of complexity as defined by live cell imaging. Second, at earlier stages of cocultures, we observed that AMD3100 significantly inhibited the integration of exogenous ECFC-derived cells into established, but immature, vascular networks. Comparative proteome profiler array analyses of ECFC-derived cells treated with AMD3100 identified changes in expression of potential candidate molecules involved in adhesion and/or migration. Blocking antibodies to CD31, but not CD146 or CD166, reduced the ECFC-derived cell integration into these extant vascular networks. Thus, CXCL12 plays a key role not only in endothelial cell sensing and guidance, but also in promoting the integration of ECFC-derived cells into developing vascular networks.

  13. Improving the efficiency of measurement procedures for assessing human exposure in the vicinity of mobile phone (GSM/DCS/UMTS) base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neskovic, N; Koprivica, M; Neskovic, A; Paunovic, G

    2012-04-01

    Standards stipulate 6-min time interval of averaging for measurements of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to assess human exposure to non-ionising radiation. Having in mind the base stations of public land mobile systems, the time interval defined in such a way noticeably limits the number of measuring points in practical applications. In this paper, based on the results of measurements in the vicinity of a multisystem base station (Global System for Mobile Communications [GSM], Digital Communication System [DCS] and Universal Mobile Telecommunications System [UMTS]), it was shown that the measurement process can be significantly accelerated by using shorter time intervals of averaging--15 s, 30 s and 1 min. It was found that measurement results differed from the 6-min root-mean-square mean by 10.5 %, 15.9 and 19 %, respectively, while the uncertainty of the measurements was increased by 3.0 %, 3.8 and 4.4 %, respectively. Shorter time-averaging intervals would reduce the total duration of the exposure assessment survey, while not compromising too much on measurement quality.

  14. In search of better spermatogonial preservation by supplementation of cryopreserved human immature testicular tissue xenografts with N-acetylcysteine and testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan ePoels

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Controlled slow-freezing is the procedure currently applied for immature testicular tissue cryobanking in clinical practice. Vitrification has been proposed as a promising alternative, with a view to better preserving spermatogonial stem cells for future fertility restoration by autografting in young boys suffering from cancer. It appears that besides the potential influence of the cryopreservation technique used, the transplantation procedure itself has a significant impact on spermatogonial loss observed in ITT xenografts. Eighteen immature testicular tissue pieces issuing from 6 patients aged 2-15 years were used. Fragments of fresh tissue (serving as ungrafted controls, frozen-thawed tissue, frozen-thawed tissue supplemented with N-acetylcysteine and frozen-thawed tissue supplemented with testosterone xenografted to nude mice for 5 days were compared. Upon graft removal, histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate spermatogonia, intratubular proliferation and intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. A significant decrease in the integrity of intact seminiferous tubules was found in all three grafted groups. Spermatogonia were observed by immunohistochemistry in all grafted groups, with recovery rates of 67%, 63% and 53% respectively for slow-frozen tissue, slow-frozen tissue supplemented with N-acetylcysteine and slow-frozen tissue supplemented with testosterone. Apoptosis evidenced by active caspase-3 and TUNEL was similar in all grafts. The study is limited by the low availability of immature testicular tissue samples of human origin, and no clear impact of graft supplementation was found. The mouse xenotransplantation model needs to be refined to investigate human spermatogenesis in human immature testicular tissue grafts.

  15. Human pDCs display sex-specific differences in type I interferon subtypes and interferon α/β receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Susanne M; Beisel, Claudia; Sutter, Kathrin; Griesbeck, Morgane; Hildebrandt, Heike; Hagen, Sven H; Dittmer, Ulf; Altfeld, Marcus

    2017-02-01

    The outcomes of many diseases differ between women and men, with women experiencing a higher incidence and more severe pathogenesis of autoimmune and some infectious diseases. It has been suggested that this is partially due to activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), the main producers of interferon (IFN)-α, in response to toll-like receptor (TLR)7 stimulation. We investigated the induction of type I IFN (IFN-I) subtypes upon TLR7 stimulation on isolated pDCs. Our data revealed a sex-specific differential expression of IFN-Is, with pDCs from females showing a significantly higher mRNA expression of all 13 IFN-α subtypes. In addition, pDCs from females had higher levels of IFN-β mRNA after stimulation, indicating that sex differences in IFN-I production by pDCs were mediated by a signaling event upstream of the first loop of IFN-I mRNA transcription. Furthermore, the surface expression levels of the common IFN-α/β receptor subunit 2 were significantly higher on pDCs from females in comparison to males. These data indicate that higher IFN-α production is already established at the mRNA level and propose a contribution of higher IFN-α/β receptor 2 expression on pDCs to the immunological differences in IFN-I production observed between females and males. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The therapeutic effect of recombinant human trefoil factor 3 on hypoxia-induced necrotizing enterocolitis in immature rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing-Hong; Yu, Hong-Gang; Sheng, Zhi-Xiang; Luo, He-Sheng; Yu, Jie-Ping

    2003-11-15

    Trefoil peptides are a new class of regulatory peptides involved in mucosal protection and repair in the gastrointestinal tract. Among them, trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) (intestinal trefoil factor) is known to be cytoprotective in the gut. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of recombinant human trefoil factor 3 (rhTFF3) on hypoxia-induced necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in immature rats. In the present study, thirty-two 1-day-old Wistar rat pups were randomly divided into four groups. Group 1 served as nonhypoxic controls. Group 2 rats were subjected to hypoxia reoxygenation (H/O) and then were returned to their mothers. Groups 3 and 4 rats were subjected to H/O, were returned to their mothers, and were treated with rhTFF3 intraperitoneally (0.5 mg) and subcutaneously (0.2 mg), respectively, for the next 3 days. All animals were killed on day 4, and intestine specimens were obtained to determine the histological changes, tissue level of interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), malondialdehyde (MDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tromboxane B2 (TXB2), and nitric oxide (NO). In addition, the effects of rhTFF3 on abundance of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) were also investigated. In neonatal NEC (group 2), necrosis of villi and crypts and, in some cases, transmural necrosis was observed under light microscopy. Tissue level of interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, malondialdehyde, prostaglandin E2, tromboxane B2, and nitric oxide were significantly higher than group 1. In addition, abundance of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 was markedly increased. In groups 3 and 4, only very slight intestinal injury was observed. The tissue level of interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, malondialdehyde, prostaglandin E2, tromboxane B2, and nitric oxide were significantly decreased in comparison to the group 2. Meanwhile, the abundance of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase

  17. Plasmacytoid DCs regulate recall responses by rapid induction of IL-10 in memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Espen O; Fløisand, Yngvar; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Rollag, Halvor; Farkas, Lorant; Ghanekar, Smita; Brandtzaeg, Per; Jahnsen, Frode L; Olweus, Johanna

    2007-04-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are believed to regulate T cell-mediated immunity primarily by directing differentiation of naive T cells. Here, we show that a large fraction of CD4(+) memory cells produce IL-10 within the first hours after interaction with plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs). In contrast, CD11c(+) DCs induce IFN-gamma and little IL-10. IL-10-secreting T cells isolated after 36 hours of culture with PDCs suppressed antigen-induced T-cell proliferation by an IL-10-dependent mechanism, but were distinct from natural and type 1 regulatory T cells. They proliferated strongly and continued to secrete IL-10 during expansion with PDCs, and after restimulation with immature monocyte-derived DCs or CD11c(+) DCs. The IL-10-producing T cells acquired the ability to secrete high levels of IFN-gamma after isolation and subsequent coculture with PDCs or CD11c(+) DCs. Compared to CD11c(+) DCs, PDCs were superior in their ability to selectively expand T cells that produced cytokines on repeated antigenic challenge. The DC-dependent differences in cytokine profiles were observed with viral recall antigen or staphylococcal enterotoxin B and were independent of extracellular type I interferon or IL-10. Our results show that DCs can regulate memory responses and that PDCs rapidly induce regulatory cytokines in effector T cells that can suppress bystander activity.

  18. Human CD5+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Are Functionally Immature and Their Development from CD34+ Progenitor Cells Is Regulated by Id2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maho Nagasawa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs have emerged as a key cell type involved in surveillance and maintenance of mucosal tissues. Mouse ILCs rely on the transcriptional regulator Inhibitor of DNA-binding protein 2 (Id2 for their development. Here, we show that Id2 also drives development of human ILC because forced expression of Id2 in human thymic progenitors blocked T cell commitment, upregulated CD161 and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF, and maintained CD127 expression, markers that are characteristic for human ILCs. Surprisingly CD5 was also expressed on these in vitro generated ILCs. This was not an in vitro artifact because CD5 was also found on ex vivo isolated ILCs from thymus and from umbilical cord blood. CD5 was also expressed on small proportions of ILC2 and ILC3. CD5+ ILCs were functionally immature, but could further differentiate into mature CD5− cytokine-secreting ILCs. Our data show that Id2 governs human ILC development from thymic progenitor cells toward immature CD5+ ILCs.

  19. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  20. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference of DC-SIGN expression inhibits human immunodeficiency virus transmission from dendritic cells to T cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrighi, JF; Pion, M; Wiznerowicz, M; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Garcia, E; Abraham, S.; Leuba, F; Dutoit, V; Ducrey-Rundquist, O; Kooijk, van Y.; Trono, D; Piguet, V

    2004-01-01

    In the early events of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, immature dendritic cells (DCs) expressing the DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) receptor capture small amounts of HIV-1 on mucosal surfaces and spread viral infection to CD4(+) T

  1. Stimulatory interactions between human coronary smooth muscle cells and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Paccosi

    Full Text Available Despite inflammatory and immune mechanisms participating to atherogenesis and dendritic cells (DCs driving immune and non-immune tissue injury response, the interactions between DCs and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs possibly relevant to vascular pathology including atherogenesis are still unclear. To address this issue, immature DCs (iDCs generated from CD14+ cells isolated from healthy donors were matured either with cytokines (mDCs, or co-cultured (ccDCs with human coronary artery VSMCs (CASMCs using transwell chambers. Co-culture induced DC immunophenotypical and functional maturation similar to cytokines, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and mixed lymphocyte reaction. In turn, factors from mDCs and ccDCs induced CASMC migration. MCP-1 and TNFα, secreted from DCs, and IL-6 and MCP-1, secreted from CASMCs, were primarily involved. mDCs adhesion to CASMCs was enhanced by CASMC pre-treatment with IFNγ and TNFα ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were involved, since the expression of specific mRNAs for these molecules increased and adhesion was inhibited by neutralizing antibodies to the counter-receptors CD11c and CD18. Adhesion was also inhibited by CASMC pre-treatment with the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor atorvastatin and the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, which suggests a further mechanism for the anti-inflammatory action of these drugs. Adhesion of DCs to VSMCs was shown also in vivo in rat carotid 7 to 21 days after crush and incision injury. The findings indicate that DCs and VSMCs can interact with reciprocal stimulation, possibly leading to perpetuate inflammation and vascular wall remodelling, and that the interaction is enhanced by a cytokine-rich inflammatory environment and down-regulated by HMGCoA-reductase inhibitors and PPARγ agonists.

  2. A Novel Molecular and Functional Stemness Signature Assessing Human Cord Blood-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cell Immaturity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriane Guillevic

    Full Text Available Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs, a distinct population of Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs progeny, display phenotypic and functional characteristics of endothelial cells while retaining features of stem/progenitor cells. Cord blood-derived ECFCs (CB-ECFCs have a high clonogenic and proliferative potentials and they can acquire different endothelial phenotypes, this requiring some plasticity. These properties provide angiogenic and vascular repair capabilities to CB-ECFCs for ischemic cell therapies. However, the degree of immaturity retained by EPCs is still confused and poorly defined. Consequently, to better characterize CB-ECFC stemness, we quantified their clonogenic potential and demonstrated that they were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs more efficiently and rapidly than adult endothelial cells. Moreover, we analyzed the transcriptional profile of a broad gene panel known to be related to stem cells. We showed that, unlike mature endothelial cells, CB-ECFCs expressed genes involved in the maintenance of embryonic stem cell properties such as DNMT3B, GDF3 or SOX2. Thus, these results provide further evidence and tools to appreciate EPC-derived cell stemness. Moreover this novel stem cell transcriptional signature of ECFCs could help better characterizing and ranging EPCs according to their immaturity profile.

  3. Slit2N/Robo1 inhibit HIV-gp120-induced migration and podosome formation in immature dendritic cells by sequestering LSP1 and WASp.

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    Anil Prasad

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated transmission and dissemination of sexually-acquired human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 in the host involves the migration of immature dendritic cells (iDCs. iDCs migrate in response to the HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120, and inhibiting such migration may limit the mucosal transmission of HIV-1. In this study, we elucidated the mechanism of HIV-1-gp120-induced transendothelial migration of iDCs. We found that gp120 enhanced the binding of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp and the Actin-Related Protein 2/3 (Arp2/3 complex with β-actin, an interaction essential for the proper formation of podosomes, specialized adhesion structures required for the migration of iDCs through different tissues. We further identified Leukocyte-Specific Protein 1 (LSP1 as a novel component of the WASp-Arp2/3-β-actin complex. Pretreating iDCs with an active fragment of the secretory glycoprotein Slit2 (Slit2N inhibited HIV-1-gp120-mediated migration and podosome formation, by inducing the cognate receptor Roundabout 1 (Robo1 to bind to and sequester WASp and LSP1 from β-actin. Slit2N treatment also inhibited Src signaling and the activation of several downstream molecules, including Rac1, Pyk2, paxillin, and CDC42, a major regulator of podosome formation. Taken together, our results support a novel mechanism by which Slit2/Robo1 may inhibit the HIV-1-gp120-induced migration of iDCs, thereby restricting dissemination of HIV-1 from mucosal surfaces in the host.

  4. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1+ DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1+ DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells. PMID:26966045

  5. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1(+) DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1(+) DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Involvement of the mannose receptor in the uptake of Der p 1, a major mite allergen, by human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslée, Gaëtan; Charbonnier, Anne-Sophie; Hammad, Hamida; Angyalosi, Gerhild; Tillie-Leblond, Isabelle; Mantovani, Alberto; Tonnel, André-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2002-11-01

    Immature dendritic cells (DCs) take up antigens in peripheral tissues and, after antigen processing, mature to efficiently stimulate T cells in secondary lymph nodes. In allergic airway diseases DCs have been shown to be involved in the induction and maintenance of a T(H)2-type profile. The present study was undertaken to determine pathways of Der p 1 (a house dust mite allergen) uptake by human DCs and to compare Der p 1 uptake between DCs from patients with house dust mite allergy and DCs from healthy donors. Monocyte-derived DCs (MD-DCs) were obtained from patients with house dust mite allergy (n = 13) and healthy donors (n = 11). Der p 1 was labeled with rhodamine. Der p 1 uptake by MD-DCs was analyzed by means of flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Rhodamine- labeled Der p 1 was demonstrated to be taken up by MD-DCs in a dose-, time-, and temperature- dependent manner. The involvement of the mannose receptor (MR) in the Der p 1 uptake was demonstrated by using (1) inhibitors of the MR- mediated endocytosis (mannan and blocking anti-MR mAb), which inhibited the Der p 1 uptake from 40 % to 50 %, and (2) confocal microscopy showing the colocalization of rhodamine-labeled Der p 1 with FITC-dextran. Interestingly, compared with DCs from healthy donors, DCs from allergic patients expressed more MR and were more efficient in Der p 1 uptake. These results suggest that the MR could play a key role in the Der p 1 allergen uptake by DCs and in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases in dust mite -sensitive patients.

  7. Decline in Proliferation and Immature Neuron Markers in the Human Subependymal Zone during Aging: Relationship to EGF- and FGF-related Transcripts

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    Christin Weissleder

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblasts exist within the human subependymal zone (SEZ; however, it is debated to what extent neurogenesis changes during normal aging. It is also unknown how precursor proliferation may correlate with the generation of neuronal and glial cells or how expression of growth factors and receptors may change throughout the adult lifespan. We provided evidence of dividing cells in the human SEZ in conjunction with a dramatic age-related decline (n=50; 21-103 years of mRNAs indicative of proliferating cells (Ki67 and immature neurons (doublecortin. Microglia mRNA (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 increased during aging, whereas transcript levels of stem/precursor cells (glial fibrillary acidic protein delta and achaete-scute homolog 1, astrocytes (vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein and oligodendrocytes (oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 remained stable. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 mRNAs increased throughout adulthood, while transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα, EGF, Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 4 (ErbB4 and FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1 mRNAs were unchanged across adulthood. Cell proliferation mRNA positively correlated with FGFR1 transcripts. Immature neuron and oligodendrocyte expression positively correlated with TGFα and ErbB4 mRNAs, whilst astrocyte transcripts positively correlated with EGF, FGF2 and FGFR1 mRNAs. Microglia mRNA positively correlated with EGF and FGF2 expression. Our findings indicate that neurogenesis in the human SEZ continues well into adulthood, although proliferation and neuronal differentiation may decline across adulthood. We suggest that mRNA expression of EGF- and FGF-related family members do not become limited during aging and may modulate neuronal and glial fate determination in the SEZ throughout human life.

  8. Comparative study of clinical grade human tolerogenic dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Cáceres E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of tolerogenic DCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for transplantation and autoimmune disorders. Immunomodulatory DCs are primarily generated from monocytes (MDDCs for in vitro experiments following protocols that fail to fulfil the strict regulatory rules of clinically applicable products. Here, we compared the efficacy of three different tolerance-inducing agents, dexamethasone, rapamycin and vitamin D3, on DC biology using GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice or clinical grade reagents with the aim of defining their use for human cell therapy. Methods Tolerogenic MDDCs were generated by adding tolerogenic agents prior to the induction of maturation using TNF-α, IL-β and PGE2. We evaluated the effects of each agent on viability, efficiency of differentiation, phenotype, cytokine secretion and stability, the stimulatory capacity of tol-DCs and the T-cell profiles induced. Results Differences relevant to therapeutic applicability were observed with the cellular products that were obtained. VitD3-induced tol-DCs exhibited a slightly reduced viability and yield compared to Dexa-and Rapa-tol-DCs. Phenotypically, while Dexa-and VitD3-tol-DCs were similar to immature DCs, Rapa-tol-DCs were not distinguishable from mature DCs. In addition, only Dexa-and moderately VitD3-tol-DCs exhibited IL-10 production. Interestingly, in all cases, the cytokine secretion profiles of tol-DCs were not modified by a subsequent TLR stimulation with LPS, indicating that all products had stable phenotypes. Functionally, clearly reduced alloantigen T cell proliferation was induced by tol-DCs obtained using any of these agent. Also, total interferon-gamma (IFN-γ secretion by T cells stimulated with allogeneic tol-DCs was reduced in all three cases, but only T cells co-cultured with Rapa-tol-DCs showed impaired intracellular IFN-γ production. In addition, Rapa-DCs promoted CD4+ CD127 low/negative CD25high and Foxp3+ T cells. Conclusions Our

  9. β2-Agonist clenbuterol hinders human monocyte differentiation into dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Luciana; Cuzziol, Noemi; Del Pinto, Tamara; Sanchez, Massimo; Maccari, Sonia; Massimi, Alessia; Pietraforte, Donatella; Viora, Marina

    2015-12-10

    Clenbuterol (CLB) is a beta2-adrenergic agonist commonly used in asthma therapy, but is also a non-steroidal anabolic drug often abused in sport doping practices. Here we evaluated the in vitro impact of CLB on the physiology and function of human monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), instrumental in the development of immune responses. We demonstrate that CLB inhibits the differentiation of monocytes into DCs and this effect is specific and dependent on β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation. We found that CLB treatment reduced the percentage of CD1a(+) immature DCs, while increasing the frequency of monocytes retaining CD14 surface expression. Moreover, CLB inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) enhanced IL-(interleukin)-10 and IL-6 production. In contrast, CLB did not modulate the phenotypic and functional properties of monocytes and DCs, such as the surface expression of HLA-DR, CD83, CD80 and CD86 molecules, cytokine production, immunostimulatory activity and phagocytic activity. Moreover, we found that CLB did not modulate the activation of NF-kB in DCs. Moreover, we found that the differentiation of monocytes into DCs was associated with a significant decrease of β2-ARs mRNA expression. These results provide new insights on the effect of CLB on monocyte differentiation into DCs. Considering the frequent illegal use of CLB in doping, our work suggests that this drug is potentially harmful to immune responses decreasing the supply of DCs, thus subverting immune surveillance.

  10. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P.; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J.; Edwards, Dylan J.; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M.; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R. Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A.; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S. Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar–motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar–thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions. PMID:25406224

  11. Experimental Study on Induction of Tolerance to Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis by Immature Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of immature dendritic cells (iDCs) on experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG), iDCs were generated in low dose of GM-CSF, and then they were pulsed with acetylcholine receptor (AchR) and transferred to allogeneic rats. After 3 weeks, all rats were immunized with AchR and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and observed for the corresponding indices of MG for 7 weeks. Our results showed that compared with mature DCs (mDCs) generated at high dose of GM-CSF plus additional stimulation by lipopolysaccharide, iDCs expressed significantly lower levels of MHC-Ⅱ , CD80 and CD86, and their ability to uptake FITC-Dextran was stronger but the ability of stimulating proliferation of allogeneic T cells were weaker. Like controls,after immunization, all rats transferred with iDCs, mDCs and AchR-pulsed mDCs showed typical symptoms in 4 to 7 weeks. The amplitude of electromyogram wave dropped obviously, the level of serum AchRab increased and neuromuscular junction showed typical damage of MG. In contrast, no conspicuous changes were noted in rats transferred with AchR-pulsed iDCs. The results suggest that iDCs could be generated by inducing bone marrow precursors in low dose of GM-CSF, AchRpulsed iDCs could induce tolerance of EAMG. The dysfunction of DCs may play an important role in the initiation and maintenance of normal immune response in MG.

  12. Immature dengue virus: a veiled pathogen?

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    Izabela A Rodenhuis-Zybert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells infected with dengue virus release a high proportion of immature prM-containing virions. In accordance, substantial levels of prM antibodies are found in sera of infected humans. Furthermore, it has been recently described that the rates of prM antibody responses are significantly higher in patients with secondary infection compared to those with primary infection. This suggests that immature dengue virus may play a role in disease pathogenesis. Interestingly, however, numerous functional studies have revealed that immature particles lack the ability to infect cells. In this report, we show that fully immature dengue particles become highly infectious upon interaction with prM antibodies. We demonstrate that prM antibodies facilitate efficient binding and cell entry of immature particles into Fc-receptor-expressing cells. In addition, enzymatic activity of furin is critical to render the internalized immature virus infectious. Together, these data suggest that during a secondary infection or primary infection of infants born to dengue-immune mothers, immature particles have the potential to be highly infectious and hence may contribute to the development of severe disease.

  13. The potential role of granulosa cells in the maturation rate of immature human oocytes and embryo development: A co-culture study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Bahia Namavar; Mosallanezhad, Zahra; Matloob, Najmeh; Davari, Maryam; Ghobadifar, Mohamed Amin

    2015-09-01

    In order to increase the number of mature oocytes usable for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), we aimed to investigate the effect of co-culturing granulosa cells (GCs) on human oocyte maturation in vitro, the fertilization rate, and embryo development. A total of 133 immature oocytes were retrieved and were randomly divided into two groups; oocytes that were cultured with GCs (group A) and oocytes that were cultured without GCs (group B). After in vitro maturation, only oocytes that displayed metaphase II (MII) underwent the ICSI procedure. The maturation and fertilization rates were analyzed, as well as the frequency of embryo development. The mean age of the patients, their basal levels of follicle-stimulating hormone, and the number of oocytes recovered from the patients were all comparable between the two study groups. The number of oocytes that reached MII (mature oocytes) was 59 out of 70 (84.28%) in group A, compared to 41 out of 63 (65.07%) in group B (p=0.011). No significant difference between fertilization rates was found between the two study groups (p=0.702). The embryo development rate was higher in group A (33/59, 75%) than in group B (12/41, 42.85%; p=0.006). The proportion of highest-quality embryos and the blastocyst formation rate were significantly lower in group B than in group A (p=0.003 and p<0.001, respectively). The findings of the current study demonstrate that culturing immature human oocytes with GCs prior to ICSI improves the maturation rate and the likelihood of embryo development.

  14. Size and placement of developing anterior teeth in immature Neanderthal mandibles from Dederiyeh Cave, Syria: implications for emergence of the modern human chin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukase, Hitoshi; Kondo, Osamu; Ishida, Hajime

    2015-03-01

    Evolutionary and functional significance of the human chin has long been explored from various perspectives including masticatory biomechanics, speech, and anterior tooth size. Recent ontogenetic studies have indicated that the spatial position of internally forming anterior teeth partially constrains adult mandibular symphyseal morphology. The present study therefore preliminarily examined the size and placement of developing anterior teeth in immature Neanderthal mandibles of Dederiyeh 1 and 2, compared with similarly-aged modern humans (N = 16) and chimpanzees (N = 7) whose incisors are comparatively small and large among extant hominids, respectively. The Dederiyeh 1 mandible is described as slightly presenting a mental trigone and attendant mental fossa, whereas Dederiyeh 2 completely lacks such chin-associated configurations. Results showed that, despite symphyseal size being within the modern human range, both Dederiyeh mandibles accommodated overall larger anterior dentition and displayed a remarkably wide bicanine space compared to those of modern humans. Dederiyeh 2 had comparatively thicker deciduous incisor roots and more enlarged permanent incisor crypts than Dederiyeh 1, but both Dederiyeh individuals exhibited a total dental size mostly intermediate between modern humans and chimpanzees. These findings potentially imply that the large deciduous/permanent incisors collectively distended the labial alveolar bone, obscuring an incipient mental trigone. It is therefore hypothesized that the appearance of chin-associated features, particularly of the mental trigone and fossa, can be accounted for partly by developmental relationships between the sizes of the available mandibular space and anterior teeth. This hypothesis must be, however, further addressed with more referential samples in future studies.

  15. HIF2A and IGF2 Expression Correlates in Human Neuroblastoma Cells and Normal Immature Sympathetic Neuroblasts

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    Sofie Mohlin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During normal sympathetic nervous system (SNS development, cells of the ganglionic lineage can malignantly transform and develop into the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs mediate cellular responses during normal development and are central in the adaptation to oxygen shortage. HIFs are also implicated in the progression of several cancer forms, and high HIF-2α expression correlates with disseminated disease and poor outcome in neuroblastoma. During normal SNS development, HIF2A is transiently expressed in neuroblasts and chromaffin cells. SNS cells can, during development, be distinguished by distinct gene expression patterns, and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2 is a marker of sympathetic chromaffin cells, whereas sympathetic neuroblasts lack IGF2 expression. Despite the neuronal derivation of neuroblastomas, we show that neuroblastoma cell lines and specimens express IGF2 and that expression of HIF2A and IGF2 correlates, with the strongest correlation in high-stage tumors. In neuroblastoma, both IGF2 and HIF2A are hypoxia-driven and knocking down IGF2 at hypoxia resulted in downregulated HIF2A levels. HIF-2α and IGF2 were strongly expressed in subsets of immature neuroblastoma cells, suggesting that these two genes could be co-expressed also at early stages of SNS development. We show that IGF2 is indeed expressed in sympathetic chain ganglia at embryonic week 6.5, a developmental stage when HIF-2α is present. These findings provide a rationale for the unexpected IGF2 expression in neuroblastomas and might suggest that IGF2 and HIF2A positive neuroblastoma cells are arrested at an embryonic differentiation stage corresponding to the stage when sympathetic chain ganglia begins to coalesce.

  16. IL-27 in human secondary lymphoid organs attracts myeloid dendritic cells and impairs HLA class I-restricted antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Fabio; Di Carlo, Emma; Ferrone, Soldano; Petretto, Andrea; Pistoia, Vito; Airoldi, Irma

    2014-03-15

    Different cytokines play crucial roles in inflammation and in polarizing immune responses, including IL-27 that exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. Although the activity of IL-27 is well characterized in murine immune cells, only limited information is available regarding the natural cellular sources of IL-27 in humans and its effects on human immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional APCs that in the immature state are positioned throughout peripheral tissues by acting as sentinels, sensing the presence of Ags. Activated DCs migrate into the lymph nodes and direct Ag-specific T cell responses, thus acting as key players in both adaptive and innate immunity. In this study we asked whether IL-27 is produced by human secondary lymphoid organs and what is its functional role on human DCs. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that 1) in lymph nodes, macrophages are the major source for IL-27; 2) immature and mature human DCs express functional IL-27R; 3) IL-27 exerts immunosuppressive activity by crippling the Ag processing machinery in immature DCs under steady-state conditions and after pulsing with a viral Ag; and 4) IL-27 is chemotactic for human DCs. Our findings highlight novel mechanisms underlying the immunosuppressive activity of IL-27, suggesting that this cytokine may function as a homeostatic cytokine in secondary lymphoid organs by limiting duration and/or intensity of ongoing adaptive immune responses. The results presented in this study pave the way to future studies aimed at investigating whether dysregulation of IL-27 expression and function may be involved in pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

  17. 锌影响镉对人未成熟树突状细胞毒性作用%Effects of zinc on the cytotoxicity of human immature dendritic cells treated in vitro with cadmium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文; 林忠宁; 林育纯; 陈慧峰; 罗洁; 李晓杰; 林丽娜; 胡耀明; 张树江; 陈雯

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨锌对镉诱导的人未成熟树突状细胞(iDC)毒性的影响。方法 分离人周围血单核细胞(PBMC)并诱导为iDC后,分组给予生理氯化钠溶液(对照组)、氯化镉(CdCl2组)、硫酸锌(ZnSO4组)、锌预处理后加氯化镉(Zn+Cd组)、锌离子特异性螯合剂(TPEN)预处理后加氯化镉(TPEN+Cd组)处理。噻唑蓝(MTT)颜色反应法检测细胞活力;单细胞凝胶电泳(SCGE)检测DNA链断裂损伤;吖啶橙(AO)与碘化丙啶(PI)核双染观察细胞凋亡并通过流式细胞仪检测凋亡细胞中染色体断裂的亚二倍体(SubGl)。结果 CdCl2组iDC活力抑制率随CdCl2呈剂量依赖性显著增高(P<0.05);与ZnSO4组或CdCl2组相比,Zn+Cd组和TPEN+Cd组细胞活力抑制率明显升高(P<0.05);相同CdCl2剂量(20μmol/L)时,Zn+Cd组和TPEN+Cd组细胞的彗星尾长和尾矩明显增大(P<O.05);各处理组出现凋亡细胞核染色和SubG1阳性细胞比例明显增加。结论 镉化合物暴露导致iDC活力降低,其诱导的细胞毒性明显高于锌;细胞内锌稳态干预可增加镉介导的iDC内DNA损伤相关的毒作用敏感性。%Objective To explore the impacts of zinc compounds on the cytotoxicity of human immature dendritic cells (iDC) administrated by cadmium in vitro. Methods iDCs were derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The iDC cel-lular models were conducted by different groups treated with normal saline (negative control) , cadmium chloride ( CdCl2 ) , zinc sulfate ( ZnSO4 ) , ZnSO4 pretreatment for 12 h ( Zn + Cd) or zinc chelator pretreatment for 4 h (TPEN + Cd) followed by CdCl2 administration, respectively. MTT assay was used to test the cell viability. Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) was used to detect the DNA strand breaks with alkaline comet assay. Cell apoptosis analysis of nuclear morphology was performed through double-dying with acridine orange ( AO) and propidine iodide ( PI) , while Flow cytometry was used for the

  18. Early transplantation of human immature dental pulp stem cells from baby teeth to golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD dogs: Local or systemic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brolio Marina P

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD dogs represent the best available animal model for therapeutic trials aiming at the future treatment of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. We have obtained a rare litter of six GRMD dogs (3 males and 3 females born from an affected male and a carrier female which were submitted to a therapeutic trial with adult human stem cells to investigate their capacity to engraft into dogs muscles by local as compared to systemic injection without any immunosuppression. Methods Human Immature Dental Pulp Stem Cells (hIDPSC were transplanted into 4 littermate dogs aged 28 to 40 days by either arterial or muscular injections. Two non-injected dogs were kept as controls. Clinical translation effects were analyzed since immune reactions by blood exams and physical scores capacity of each dog. Samples from biopsies were checked by immunohistochemistry (dystrophin markers and FISH for human probes. Results and Discussion We analyzed the cells' ability in respect to migrate, engraftment, and myogenic potential, and the expression of human dystrophin in affected muscles. Additionally, the efficiency of single and consecutive early transplantation was compared. Chimeric muscle fibers were detected by immunofluorescence and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH using human antibodies and X and Y DNA probes. No signs of immune rejection were observed and these results suggested that hIDPSC cell transplantation may be done without immunosuppression. We showed that hIDPSC presented significant engraftment in GRMD dog muscles, although human dystrophin expression was modest and limited to several muscle fibers. Better clinical condition was also observed in the dog, which received monthly arterial injections and is still clinically stable at 25 months of age. Conclusion Our data suggested that systemic multiple deliveries seemed more effective than local injections. These findings open important

  19. Frontal tDCS modulates orbitofrontal reality filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, A L; David, A W; Bikson, M; Schnider, A

    2014-04-18

    Orbitofrontal reality filtering denotes a memory control mechanism necessary to keep thought and behavior in phase with reality. Its failure induces reality confusion as evident in confabulation and disorientation. In the present study, we explored the influence of orbitofrontal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on reality filtering. Twenty healthy human subjects made a reality filtering task, while receiving cathodal, anodal, or sham stimulation over the frontal pole in three sessions separated by at least 1week. Computational models predicted that this montage can produce polarity-specific current flow across the posterior medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). In agreement with our hypothesis, we found that cathodal tDCS over the frontal pole specifically impaired reality filtering in comparison to anodal and sham stimulation. This study shows that reality filtering, an orbitofrontal function, can be modulated with tDCS.

  20. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) - application in neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Il; Foerster, Águida; Nitsche, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation is a versatile tool to modulate psychological processes via alterations of brain activity, and excitability. It is applied to explore the physiological basis of cognition and behavior, as well as to reduce clinical symptoms in neurological and psychiatric diseases. Neuromodulatory brain stimulation via transcranial direct currents (tDCS) has gained increased attention recently. In this review we will describe physiological mechanisms of action of tDCS, and summarize its application to modulate psychological processes in healthy humans and neuropsychiatric diseases. Furthermore, beyond giving an overview of the state of the art of tDCS, including limitations, we will outline future directions of research in this relatively young scientific field.

  1. The Influence of Ouabain on Human Dendritic Cells Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although known as a Na,K-ATPase inhibitor, several other cellular and systemic actions have been ascribed to the steroid Ouabain (Oua. Particularly in the immune system, our group showed that Ouabain acts on decreasing lymphocyte proliferation, synergizing with glucocorticoids in spontaneous thymocyte apoptosis, and also lessening CD14 expression and blocking CD16 upregulation on human monocytes. However, Ouabain effects on dendritic cells (DCs were not explored so far. Considering the peculiar plasticity and the importance of DCs in immune responses, the aim of our study was to investigate DC maturation under Ouabain influence. To generate immature DCs, human monocytes were cultured with IL-4 and GM-CSF (5 days. To investigate Ouabain role on DC activation, DCs were stimulated with TNF-α for 48 h in the presence or absence of Ouabain. TNF-induced CD83 expression and IL-12 production were abolished in DCs incubated with 100 nM Ouabain, though DC functional capacity concerning lymphocyte activation remained unaltered. Nevertheless, TNF-α-induced antigen capture downregulation, another maturation marker, occurred even in the presence of Ouabain. Besides, Ouabain increased HLA-DR and CD86 expression, whereas CD80 expression was maintained. Collectively, our results suggest that DCs respond to Ouabain maturating into a distinct category, possibly contributing to the balance between immunity and tolerance.

  2. Development of a new protocol for 2-day generation of mature dendritic cells from human monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Obermaier Bianca; Dauer Marc; Herten Jan; Schad Katharina; Endres Stefan; Eigler Andreas

    2003-01-01

    We developed a new 2-day protocol for the generation of dendritic cells (DCs) from human monocytes in vitro. First, we demonstrated that 24 hours of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4 are sufficient to generate immature DCs capable of antigen uptake. We then compared two different strategies for DC maturation: proinflammatory mediators were either added together with GM-CSF and IL-4 from the beginning of cell culture or added after 24 hours of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4. After 48 hours of...

  3. Stage 3 immature human natural killer cells found in secondary lymphoid tissue constitutively and selectively express the TH17 cytokine interleukin-22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tiffany; Becknell, Brian; McClory, Susan; Briercheck, Edward; Freud, Aharon G.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Nuovo, Gerard; Yu, Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    Considerable functional heterogeneity within human natural killer (NK) cells has been revealed through the characterization of distinct NK-cell subsets. Accordingly, a small subset of CD56+NKp44+NK cells, termed NK-22 cells, was recently described within secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT) as IL-22− when resting, with a minor fraction of this population becoming IL-22+ when activated. Here we discover that the vast majority of stage 3 immature NK (iNK) cells in SLT constitutively and selectively express IL-22, a TH17 cytokine important for mucosal immunity, whereas earlier and later stages of NK developmental intermediates do not express IL-22. These iNK cells have a surface phenotype of CD34−CD117+CD161+CD94−, largely lack expression of NKp44 and CD56, and do not produce IFN-γ or possess cytolytic activity. In summary, stage 3 iNK cells are highly enriched for IL-22 and IL-26 messenger RNA, and IL-22 protein production, but do not express IL-17A or IL-17F. PMID:19244159

  4. Involvement of Ovarian Estradiol Biosynthesis and Pituitary FSH Expression in the Mechanism of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Stimulation of Uterine Growth in Immature Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Rafert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work, we showed that human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG alone is able to stimulate uterine ponderal growth in immature female rats. In the present paper, we provide new information indicating that a single 100 ng hCG injection increased ovarian androgen availability and aromatase activity. These changes are consistent with an increase in ovarian estradiol secretion. Ovarian activin βA and activin βB subunit RNAs expression were also increased following hCG injection. Most interestingly, this treatment also led to an increase in FSHβ subunit mRNA expression in the pituitary, which might be due to hCG-stimulated ovarian activin secretion. We have not been able so far to follow the kinetics of the plasma concentrations of activin and FSH in hCG-treated animals compared to control animals. This has to be explored in the future to provide a more complete assessment of our model.

  5. Influence of low dose irradiation on differentiation, maturation and T-cell activation of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahns, Jutta [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Anderegg, Ulf; Saalbach, Anja [Department for Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Rosin, Britt; Patties, Ina; Glasow, Annegret [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute for Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Scholz, Markus [Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Leipzig, Haertelstr. 16-18, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Hildebrandt, Guido, E-mail: Guido.Hildebrandt@uni-rostock.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Rostock, Suedring 75, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-05-10

    Ionizing irradiation could act directly on immune cells and may induce bystander effects mediated by soluble factors that are released by the irradiated cells. This is the first study analyzing both the direct effect of low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on the maturation and cytokine release of human dendritic cells (DCs) and the functional consequences for co-cultured T-cells. We showed that irradiation of DC-precursors in vitro does not influence surface marker expression or cytokine profile of immature DCs nor of mature DCs after LPS treatment. There was no difference of single dose irradiation versus fractionated irradiation protocols on the behavior of the mature DCs. Further, the low dose irradiation did not change the capacity of the DCs to stimulate T-cell proliferation. But the irradiation of the co-culture of DCs and T-cells revealed significantly lower proliferation of T-cells with higher doses. Summarizing the data from approx. 50 DC preparations there is no significant effect of low dose ionizing irradiation on the cytokine profile, surface marker expression and maturation of DCs in vitro although functional consequences cannot be excluded.

  6. Nrf2-dependent repression of interleukin-12 expression in human dendritic cells exposed to inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Génard, Romain; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic, a well-known Nrf2 inducer, exerts immunosuppressive properties. In this context, we recently reported that the differentiation of human blood monocytes into immature dendritic cells (DCs), in the presence of low and noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenic, represses the ability of DCs to release key cytokines in response to different stimulating agents. Particularly, arsenic inhibits the expression of human interleukin-12 (IL-12, also named IL-12p70), a major proinflammatory cytokine that controls the differentiation of Th1 lymphocytes. In the present study, we determined if Nrf2 could contribute to these arsenic immunotoxic effects. To this goal, human monocyte-derived DCs were first differentiated in the absence of metalloid and then pretreated with arsenic just before DC stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Under these experimental conditions, arsenic rapidly and stably activates Nrf2 and increases the expression of Nrf2 target genes. It also significantly inhibits IL-12 expression in activated DCs, at both mRNA and protein levels. Particularly, arsenic reduces mRNA levels of IL12A and IL12B genes which encodes the p35 and p40 subunits of IL-12p70, respectively. tert-Butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a reference Nrf2 inducer, mimics arsenic effects and potently inhibits IL-12 expression. Genetic inhibition of Nrf2 expression markedly prevents the repression of both IL12 mRNA and IL-12 protein levels triggered by arsenic and tBHQ in human LPS-stimulated DCs. In addition, arsenic significantly reduces IL-12 mRNA levels in LPS-activated bone marrow-derived DCs from Nrf2+/+ mice but not in DCs from Nrf2-/- mice. Finally, we show that, besides IL-12, arsenic significantly reduces the expression of IL-23, another heterodimer containing the p40 subunit. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that arsenic represses IL-12 expression in human-activated DCs by specifically stimulating Nrf2 activity.

  7. Class 3 semaphorins induce F-actin reorganization in human dendritic cells: Role in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Sabrina; Wong, Bin Sheng; Latinovic, Olga; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Stamatos, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Class 3 semaphorins (Semas) are soluble proteins that are well recognized for their role in guiding axonal migration during neuronal development. In the immune system, Sema3A has been shown to influence murine dendritic cell (DC) migration by signaling through a neuropilin (NRP)-1/plexin-A1 coreceptor axis. Potential roles for class 3 Semas in human DCs have yet to be described. We tested the hypothesis that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, each with a unique NRP-1 and/or NRP-2 binding specificity, influence human DC migration. In this report, we find that although NRP-1 and NRP-2 are expressed in human immature DCs (imDCs), NRP-2 expression increases as cells mature further, whereas expression of NRP-1 declines dramatically. Elevated levels of RNA encoding plexin-A1 and -A3 are present in both imDCs and mature DC (mDCs), supporting the relevance of Sema/NRP/plexin signaling pathways in these cells. Sema3A, -3C, and -3F bind to human DCs, with Sema3F binding predominantly through NRP-2. The binding of these Semas leads to reorganization of actin filaments at the plasma membrane and increased transwell migration in the absence or presence of chemokine CCL19. Microfluidic chamber assays failed to demonstrate consistent changes in speed of Sema3C-treated DCs, suggesting increased cell deformability as a possible explanation for enhanced transwell migration. Although monocytes express RNA encoding Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, only RNA encoding Sema3C increases robustly during DC differentiation. These data suggest that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, likely with coreceptors NRP-1, NRP-2, and plexin-A1 and/or -A3, promote migration and possibly other activities of human DCs during innate and adaptive immune responses.

  8. Immature Dengue Virus : A Veiled Pathogen?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Da Silva-Voorham, Júlia; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Lei, Huan-Yao; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Cells infected with dengue virus release a high proportion of immature prM-containing virions. In accordance, substantial levels of prM antibodies are found in sera of infected humans. Furthermore, it has been recently described that the rates of prM antibody responses are significantly higher in pa

  9. Isolation and characterization of dendritic cells from normal human esophageal mucosa%食管黏膜树突状细胞表型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王存良; 宁寒冰; 王艳红; 张连峰; 李继昌

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究食管黏膜树突状细胞(DCs)表型特点.方法:内镜下收集健康人食管黏膜标本,Ficoll-Hypacque密度梯度离心法分离食管黏膜标本中的单个核细胞,采用磁珠分选技术分离DCs,流式细胞仪分析食管黏膜DCs表型.结果:健康人食管黏膜含3类单个核细胞:HLA-DRhtgh/CD13low,HLA-DRmed/CD13+和HLA-DR-/CD13+; HLA-DRhigh/CD13low细胞表达不同DCs亚群表面标志,是食管黏膜DCs;健康人食管黏膜DCsCD80、CD83、CD86表达水平低,是不成熟DCs.结论:成功分离了食管黏膜DCs,证实HLA-DRhigh/CD13low细胞是食管黏膜DCs.%AIM: To investigate the characteristics of dendritic cells (DCs) from normal human esophageal mucosa. METHODS: We collected normal esophageal mucosa samples from healthy individuals using endoscope and isolated mononuclear cells from the samples using Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation. DCs were further separated by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) to analyze DCs subsets by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Three mononuclear cell populations were detected in normal human esophageal mucosa: HLA-DRhigh/CD13low, HLA-DRmad/CD13 + and HLA-DR-/CD13+. HLA-DRhigh/CD13low cells expressed the DCs-associated molecules and were referred to as esophageal mucosal DCs. The DCs were immature since they expressed low levels of CD80, CD83 and CD86. CONCLUSION; HLA-DRhigh/CD13low cells isolated from the normal human esophageal mucosa were proved to be DCs. DCs can be successfully isolated from esophageal mucosa.

  10. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment of an Immature Necrotic Molar with Arrested Root Development by Using Recombinant Human Platelet-derived Growth Factor: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhujiang, Annie; Kim, Sahng G

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic treatment has provided a treatment option that aims to allow root maturation. The present report describes the regenerative endodontic treatment of a necrotic, immature molar by using recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB) and shows the continued root maturation in the tooth with arrested root development. A regenerative endodontic procedure that used a growth factor was performed for a necrotic molar with arrested root formation in a 20-year-old patient. Thorough disinfection by using mechanical instrumentation and copious irrigation of antimicrobial agents as well as intracanal medication with calcium hydroxide was performed throughout the first 2 appointments. At the third appointment, the root canals were irrigated with an antimicrobial solution and 17% EDTA, and bleeding was evoked by passing sterile paper points beyond the apex in each canal. Small pieces of a collagen membrane saturated with rhPDGF-BB solution from GEM 21S were packed into each canal. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed, and Cavit and composite resin were used to restore the tooth. Complete root maturation and resolution of a periapical radiolucency were observed at the 15-month follow-up. The present report presents a regenerative endodontic procedure that uses rhPDGF-BB for a necrotic molar with arrested root development. The finding of continued root development in the present case suggests that regenerative endodontic treatment may be able to resume the root maturation process in teeth with arrested root formation. Further clinical studies are required to investigate the efficacy of rhPDGF-BB in regenerative endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The application of tDCS in psychiatric disorders: a brain imaging view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Baeken

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a non-invasive, non-convulsive technique for modulating brain function. In contrast to other non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, where costs, clinical applicability, and availability limit their large-scale use in clinical practices, the low-cost, portable, and easy-to-use tDCS devices may overcome these restrictions. Objective: Despite numerous clinical applications in large numbers of patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, it is not quite clear how tDCS influences the mentally affected human brain. In order to decipher potential neural mechanisms of action of tDCS in patients with psychiatric conditions, we focused on the combination of tDCS with neuroimaging techniques. Design: We propose a contemporary overview on the currently available neurophysiological and neuroimaging data where tDCS has been used as a research or treatment tool in patients with psychiatric disorders. Results: Over a reasonably short period of time, tDCS has been broadly used as a research tool to examine neuronal processes in the healthy brain. tDCS has also commonly been applied as a treatment application in a variety of mental disorders, with to date no straightforward clinical outcome and not always accompanied by brain imaging techniques. Conclusion: tDCS, as do other neuromodulation devices, clearly affects the underlying neuronal processes. However, research on these mechanisms in psychiatric patients is rather limited. A better comprehension of how tDCS modulates brain function will help us to define optimal parameters of stimulation in each indication and may result in the detection of biomarkers in favor of clinical response.

  12. Role of C/EBPβ-LAP and C/EBPβ-LIP in early adipogenic differentiation of human white adipose-derived progenitors and at later stages in immature adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Stefan; Mitterberger, Maria C; Mattesich, Monika; Zwerschke, Werner

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of the major isoforms of CCAAT enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ), C/EBPβ-LAP and C/EBPβ-LIP, in adipogenesis of human white adipose-derived stromal/progenitor cells (ASC). C/EBPβ gene expression was transiently induced early in adipogenesis. At later stages, in immature adipocytes, the C/EBPβ mRNA and protein levels declined. The C/EBPβ-LIP protein steady-state level decreased considerably stronger than the C/EBPβ-LAP level and the C/EBPβ-LIP half-life was significantly shorter than the C/EBPβ-LAP half-life. The turn-over of both C/EBPβ-isoforms was regulated by ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent degradation. These data suggest that the protein stability of the C/EBPβ-isoforms is differentially regulated in the course of adipogenesis and in immature adipocytes. Constitutive overexpression of C/EBPβ-LIP had antiadipogenic activity in human ASC. C/EBPβ-LAP, which promotes adipogenesis in mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by directly activating expression of the adipogenic keyregulator PPARγ2, induced the expression of PPARγ2 and of the adipocyte differentiation gene product FABP4 in confluent ASC in the absence of adipogenic hormones. At later stages after hormone cocktail-induced adipogenesis, in immature adipocytes, constitutive overexpression of C/EBPβ-LAP led to reduced expression of PPARγ2 and FABP4, C/EBPα expression was downregulated and the expression of the adipocyte differentiation gene products adiponectin and leptin was impaired. These findings suggest that constitutive overexpression of C/EBPβ-LAP induces adipogenesis in human ASC and negatively regulates the expression of adipogenic regulators and certain adipocyte differentiation gene products in immature adipocytes. We conclude the regulation of both C/EBPβ gene expression and C/EBPβ-LIP and C/EBPβ-LAP protein turn-over plays an important role for the expression of adipogenic regulators and/or adipocyte differentiation genes in early adipogenic differentiation of

  13. Cord blood mesenchymal stem cells propel human dendritic cells to an intermediate maturation state and boost interleukin-12 production by mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berk, Lieke C J; Roelofs, Helene; Huijs, Tonnie; Siebers-Vermeulen, Kim G C; Raymakers, Reinier A; Kögler, Gesine; Figdor, Carl G; Torensma, Ruurd

    2009-12-01

    Pathogen-derived entities force the tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) towards a mature state, followed by migration to the draining lymph node to present antigens to T cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modulate the differentiation, maturation and function of DCs. In umbilical cord blood an immature MSC population was identified. Remarkably, these immature stem cells modulated DCs in a different way. Marker expression was unchanged during the differentiation of monocytes towards immature DCs (iDCs) when cocultured with cord blood MSC [unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs)]. The maturation to mature DCs (mDCs) was enhanced when DCs were co-cultured with USSC, as evidenced by the up-regulation of costimulatory molecules. Endocytosis of dextran by iDCs was hampered in the presence of USSCs, which is indicative for the maturation of iDCs. Despite this maturation, the migration of iDCs cocultured with USSCs appeared to be identical to iDCs cultured alone. However, USSCs increased the migration of mDCs towards CCL21 and boosted interleukin-12 production. So, USSCs mature iDCs, thereby redirecting the antigen-uptake phenotype towards a mature phenotype. Furthermore, DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or USSCs reflects two distinct pathways because migration was unaffected when iDCs were matured by coculture with USSCs, while it was strongly enhanced in the presence of LPS. DCs are able to discriminate the different MSC subtypes, resulting in diverse differentiation programmes.

  14. DCS emulator development for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Y. [Hitachi Canada Ltd., Power and Industry Div., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Ishii, K.; Chiba, D. [Hitachi Ltd., Information and Control Systems Div., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    Continual training of operators is one of the principal means by which Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operational efficiency can be improved. Since this training cannot take place in the actual NPP, NPP simulator applications must be used instead. While digitalization scope of Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems has been expanded to the entire plant by using Distributed Control System (DCS) implementation, Hitachi has implemented DCS emulator on a general purpose Personal Computer (PC) and applied it to simulator applications. This paper reviews such DCS emulator development for NPP by Hitachi. (author)

  15. Development of a new protocol for 2-day generation of mature dendritic cells from human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermaier, Bianca; Dauer, Marc; Herten, Jan; Schad, Katharina; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    We developed a new 2-day protocol for the generation of dendritic cells (DCs) from human monocytes in vitro. First, we demonstrated that 24 hours of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4 are sufficient to generate immature DCs capable of antigen uptake. We then compared two different strategies for DC maturation: proinflammatory mediators were either added together with GM-CSF and IL-4 from the beginning of cell culture or added after 24 hours of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4. After 48 hours of total culture period, expression of activation markers was more pronounced in cells generated by the 2-step differentiation and activation method. Our new protocol for 2-day DC differentiation reduces labor, cost and time and also reliably renders high numbers of mature and viable DCs.

  16. Development of a new protocol for 2-day generation of mature dendritic cells from human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obermaier Bianca

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a new 2-day protocol for the generation of dendritic cells (DCs from human monocytes in vitro. First, we demonstrated that 24 hours of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4 are sufficient to generate immature DCs capable of antigen uptake. We then compared two different strategies for DC maturation: proinflammatory mediators were either added together with GM-CSF and IL-4 from the beginning of cell culture or added after 24 hours of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4. After 48 hours of total culture period, expression of activation markers was more pronounced in cells generated by the 2-step differentiation and activation method. Our new protocol for 2-day DC differentiation reduces labor, cost and time and also reliably renders high numbers of mature and viable DCs.

  17. Sodium butyrate enhances the IDO expression in immature dendritic cells to induce T cells anergy in vitro%丁酸钠增强未成熟树突状细胞表达吲哚胺2,3双加氧酶抑制T细胞增殖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵军; 刘璐; 商昌珍; 王捷; 万云乐; 罗兴喜; 陈亚进; 陈积圣

    2009-01-01

    目的 观察丁酸钠诱导的不成熟树突状细胞(DCs)吲哚胺2,3双加氧酶(IDO)的表达及其在抑制T细胞免疫反应中的作用.方法 用重组人粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子(GM-CSF)和白细胞介素(IL)-4诱导人单个核细胞来源的未成熟DCs,6 d后分别加入丁酸钠、脂多糖(LPS)和多细胞因子鸡尾酒组合[肿瘤坏死因子(TNF)-α、IL-6、IL-1β、前列腺腺素E2(PGE2)],24h后收集DCs;流式细胞仪检测Des表型,逆转录-聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)和实时荧光定量PCR检测IDO mRNA的表达,酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)检测IL-12分泌;混合淋巴细胞培养(MLR)检测各组DCs对同种异体T淋巴细胞增殖的影响.结果 丁酸钠诱导的DCs呈现典型未成熟DCs的特征,低表达CD83、CD80和HLA-DR,分泌IL-12水平低.与对照组比较,丁酸钠组和LPS组DCs的IDO mRNA的表达分别升高了(32.03±4.02)倍和(1.01±0.43)倍,而鸡尾酒组则降低(3.31±1.07)倍,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);丁酸钠诱导的未成熟DCs采用IDO抑制剂1-甲基色氨酸(1-MT)处理后,可以有效刺激T细胞增殖,但其能力仍低于LPS或鸡尾酒法诱导的成熟DCs.结论 丁酸钠可显著增强未成熟DCs的表达IDO,并且IDO过表达在其抑制T细胞增殖中起重要作用.%Objective To investigate the expression of IDO in immature dendritic cells (DCs) induced by sodium butyrate and its effects on T cells immune reaction in vitro. Methods Human mono-cyte-derived immature DCs were induced with GM-CSF and IL-4 for 6 days,then supplemented with sodi-um butyrate, LPS and cytokines cocktail (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, PGE2) respectively. DCs were harvested af-ter incubation for 24 h. The phenotype of DCs was detected by FCM, IDO mRNA expression by RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR,and IL-12 production by ELISA. Mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) be-tween DCs and allogeneic lymphocytes were performed to analyze the proliferative response of T cells. Re-suits The DCs induced by

  18. Injectable, Pore-Forming Hydrogels for In Vivo Enrichment of Immature Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Catia S; Mooney, David J

    2015-12-01

    Biomaterials-based vaccines have emerged as a powerful method to evoke potent immune responses directly in vivo, without the need for ex vivo cell manipulation, and modulating dendritic cell (DC) responses in a noninflammatory context could enable the development of tolerogenic vaccines to treat autoimmunity. This study describes the development of a noninflammatory, injectable hydrogel system to locally enrich DCs in vivo without inducing their maturation or activation, as a first step toward this goal. Alginate hydrogels that form pores in situ are characterized and used as a physical scaffold for cell infiltration. These gels are also adapted to control the release of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a potent inducer of DC recruitment and proliferation. In vivo, sustained release of GM-CSF from the pore-forming gels leads to the accumulation of millions of cells in the material. These cells are highly enriched in CD11b(+) CD11c(+) DCs, and further analysis of cell surface marker expression indicates these DCs are immature. This study demonstrates that a polymeric delivery system can mediate the accumulation of a high number and percentage of immature DCs, and may provide the basis for further development of materials-based, therapeutic vaccines.

  19. The Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS on Multitasking Throughput Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Nelson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multitasking has become an integral attribute associated with military operations within the past several decades. As the amount of information that needs to be processed during these high level multitasking environments exceeds the human operators’ capabilities, the information throughput capacity reaches an asymptotic limit. At this point, the human operator can no longer effectively process and respond to the incoming information resulting in a plateau or decline in performance. The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-invasive brain stimulation technique known as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS applied to a scalp location over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (lDLPFC to improve information processing capabilities during a multitasking environment. Methods: The study consisted of 20 participants from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (16 male and 4 female with an average age of 31.1 (SD = 4.5. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups, each consisting of eight males and two females. Group one received 2mA of anodal tDCS and group two received sham tDCS over the lDLPFC on their testing day. Results: The findings indicate that anodal tDCS significantly improves the participants’ information processing capability resulting in improved performance compared to sham tDCS. For example, the multitasking throughput capacity for the sham tDCS group plateaued near 1.0 bits/s at the higher baud input (2.0 bits/s whereas the anodal tDCS group plateaued near 1.3 bits/s. Conclusion: The findings provided new evidence that tDCS has the ability to augment and enhance multitasking capability in a human operator. Future research should be conducted to determine the longevity of the enhancement of transcranial direct current stimulation on multitasking performance, which has yet to be accomplished.

  20. Nocardia farcinica Activates Human Dendritic Cells and Induces Secretion of Interleukin-23 (IL-23) Rather than IL-12p70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenblätter, Martin; Buchal, Ariane; Gayum, Hermine; Jasny, Edith; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Ulrichs, Timo; Schneider, Thomas; Schumann, Ralf R.; Zweigner, Janine

    2012-01-01

    Studying the interaction of dendritic cells (DCs) with bacteria controlled by T-cell-mediated immune responses may reveal novel adjuvants for the induction of cellular immunity. Murine studies and the observation that nocardias infect predominantly immunosuppressed patients have suggested that these bacteria may possess an adjuvant potential. Moreover, adjuvants on the basis of the nocardial cell wall have been applied in clinical studies. Since the handling of adjuvants by DCs may determine the type of immune responses induced by a vaccine, the present study aimed at investigating the interaction of immature human monocyte-derived DCs with live or inactivated Nocardia farcinica in vitro and determining the cellular phenotypic changes as well as alterations in characteristic functions, such as phagocytosis, induction of T-cell proliferation, and cytokine secretion. Human DCs ingested N. farcinica and eradicated the bacterium intracellularly. DCs exposed to inactivated N. farcinica were activated, i.e., they developed a mature phenotype, downregulated their phagocytic capacity, and stimulated allogeneic T cells in mixed leukocyte reactions. Soluble factors were not involved in this process. To elucidate the potential adjuvant effect of N. farcinica on the induction of T-cell-mediated immune responses, we characterized the cytokines produced by nocardia-exposed DCs and detected substantial amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-12 p40 (IL-12p40). However, nocardia-treated DCs secreted only small amounts of IL-12p70, which were significantly smaller than the amounts of IL-23. Thus, N. farcinica activates DCs, but adjuvants based on this bacterium may have only a limited capacity to induce Th1 immune responses. PMID:22988018

  1. Induction of visual dream reports after transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCs) during Stage 2 sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobson, Antonia J; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Conduit, Russell

    2012-08-01

    REM sleep is a unique brain state characterized by frontal deactivation alongside activation of the posterior association and limbic cortices. Human brain lesion studies have found that the loss of dreaming is characterized by damage to the frontal and posterior parieto-temporo-occipital association cortex. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that the function of these brain regions might encapsulate the neural processes of dreaming. The aim of the following two experiments was to investigate the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCs), applied simultaneously to the frontal and right posterior parietal cortex during Stage 2 sleep, on dreaming. In Experiment 1, 17 healthy participants received tDCs (cathodal-frontal, anodal-parietal) and low-intensity tDCs as well as no tDCs (blank control) during Stage 2 sleep in a counterbalanced order across the night. Dream reports were collected upon awakening after each of the three conditions. In Experiment 2, 10 participants received tDCs (cathodal-frontal, anodal-parietal), no tDCs (blank control) and two additional control conditions (reversed polarity and other-cephalic tDCs). In both experiments a significantly greater number of imagery reports were found on awakening after tDCs (cathodal-frontal, anodal-parietal), compared to the blank control conditions. However, in Experiment 2 the frequency of imagery reports from the tDCs (cathodal-frontal, anodal-parietal) was not significantly different from the other two tDC conditions, suggesting a non-specific effect of tDCs. Overall, it was concluded that tDCs (cathodal-frontal, anodal-parietal) increased the frequency of dream reports with visual imagery, possibly via a general arousing effect and/or recreating specific cortical neural activity involved in dreaming. © 2012 European Sleep Research Society.

  2. Frequent infiltration of S-100 protein+ CCR5+ immature dendritic cells in damaged bile ducts of primary biliary cirrhosis compared to cholangiocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsui H

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hiroko Mitsui,1,2 Hiroya Ohtake,1 Rintaro Ohe,1 Mitsunori Yamakawa1 1Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan Abstract: Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen presenting cells that initiate immune responses. We evaluated the relationship between DC infiltration, chemokines/chemokine receptors, and bile duct damage in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, compared to cases of cholangiocellular carcinoma arising from the bile duct. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly more S-100 protein+ DCs infiltrating the epithelial layer of bile ducts in PBC than in chronic hepatitis C or control neonatal livers. Furthermore, a higher number of S-100 protein+ DCs, but not fascin+ or DC lysosomal associated membrane protein+ mature DCs, were found in the epithelial layer of the damaged bile ducts of the PBC liver. CC-chemokine receptor (CCR 5+ immature DCs frequently accumulated in the portal area in PBC. CCR5 mRNA was also detected in liver tissues from PBC patients by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In situ hybridization revealed the expression of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1α and MIP-1ß mRNA in the epithelial cells of damaged bile ducts. However, no CD1a+ immature DCs were found in any of the PBC or chronic hepatitis C specimens or in neonatal liver, whereas they occurred frequently in the cancer nests of cholangiocellular carcinoma, which expressed MIP-3α and were frequently infiltrated by CCR6+ DCs. These results indicate that bile ducts damaged by PBC secrete MIP-1α and MIP-1ß, while neoplastic ones secrete MIP-3α. They also suggest that CCR5+ immature DCs attracted by MIP-1α and MIP-1ß may play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic nonsuppurative destructive cholangitis in PBC. Keywords: chemokines, cholangiocellular carcinoma, chronic nonsuppurative destructive cholangitis, dendritic cell, primary biliary

  3. Effect of tDCS with an extracephalic reference electrode on cardio-respiratory and autonomic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamart Jacques

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is used in human physiological studies and for therapeutic trials in patients with abnormalities of cortical excitability. Its safety profile places tDCS in the pole-position for translating in real-world therapeutic application. However, an episode of transient respiratory depression in a subject receiving tDCS with an extracephalic electrode led to the suggestion that such an electrode montage could modulate the brainstem autonomic centres. We investigated whether tDCS applied over the midline frontal cortex in 30 healthy volunteers (sham n = 10, cathodal n = 10, anodal n = 10 with an extracephalic reference electrode would modulate brainstem activity as reflected by the monitoring and stringent analysis of vital parameters: heart rate (variability, respiratory rate, blood pressure and sympatho-vagal balance. We reasoned that this study could lead to two opposite but equally interesting outcomes: 1 If tDCS with an extracephalic electrode modulated vital parameters, it could be used as a new tool to explore the autonomic nervous system and, even, to modulate its activity for therapeutic purposes. 2 On the opposite, if applying tDCS with an extracephalic electrode had no effect, it could thus be used safely in healthy human subjects. This outcome would significantly impact the field of non-invasive brain stimulation with tDCS. Indeed, on the one hand, using an extracephalic electrode as a genuine neutral reference (as opposed to the classical "bi-cephalic" tDCS montages which deliver bi-polar stimulation of the brain would help to comfort the conclusions of several modern studies regarding the spatial location and polarity of tDCS. On the other hand, using an extracephalic reference electrode may impact differently on a given cortical target due to the change of direct current flow direction; this may enlarge the potential interventions with tDCS. Results Whereas the respiratory

  4. Diverse HLA-I Peptide Repertoires of the APC Lines MUTZ3-Derived Immature and Mature Dendritic Cells and THP1-Derived Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambura, Lydon Wainaina; Jarmalavicius, Saulius; Baleeiro, Renato Brito; Walden, Peter

    2016-09-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are specialized APCs that process and present self-Ags for induction of tolerance and foreign Ags to initiate T cell-mediated immunity. Related to differentiation states they have specific phenotypes and functions. However, the impact of these differentiations on Ag processing and presentation remains poorly defined. To gain insight into this, we analyzed and compared the HLA-I peptidomes of MUTZ3-derived human immature and mature DC lines and THP1-derived macrophages by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We found that the HLA-I peptidomes were heterogeneous and individualized and were dominated by nonapeptides with similar HLA-I binding affinities and anchor residues. MUTZ3-derived DCs and THP1-derived macrophages were able to sample peptides from source proteins of almost all subcellular locations and were involved in various cellular functions in similar proportion, with preference to proteins involved in cell communication, signal transduction, protein metabolism, and transcription factor/regulator activity.

  5. tDCS-enhanced motor and cognitive function in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöel, Agnes

    2014-01-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation tool that is now being widely used in neuroscientific and clinical research in humans. While initial studies focused on modulation of cortical excitability, the technique quickly progressed to studies on motor and cognitive functions in healthy humans and in patients with neurological diseases. In the present review we will first provide the reader with a brief background on the basic principles of tDCS. In the main part, we will outline recent studies with tDCS that aimed at enhancing behavioral outcome or disease-specific symptoms in patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, and epilepsy, or persistent deficits after stroke. The review will close with a summary statement on the present use of tDCS in the treatment of neurological disorders, and an outlook to further developments in this realm. tDCS may be an ideal tool to be administered in parallel to intensive cognitive or motor training in neurological disease, but efficacy for the areas of activities and participation still needs to be established in controlled randomized trials. Its use in reducing disease-specific symptoms like dystonia or epileptic seizures is still unclear.

  6. 正畸治疗的年轻恒牙和成熟恒牙的牙髓组织中VEGF水平比较%Expression of VEGF in dental pulp of immature and mature permanent teeth of human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘高成; 吴佩玲; 步江; 白新华

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨正畸治疗的年轻恒牙和成熟恒牙的牙髓组织中血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)水平及其临床意义。方法收集2010年6月-2013年10月在新疆医科大学第二附院口腔科行正畸治疗拔除的无龋健康的第一前磨牙56颗,包括年轻恒牙30颗和成熟恒牙26颗,采用常规免疫组化链酶亲和素-生物素-过氧化物酶复合物(srteptvadin-bitin complex,SABC)法比较年轻恒牙和成熟恒牙牙髓标本中血管内皮生长因子(vascular endothelial growth factor,VEGF)的表达。结果年轻恒牙牙髓成纤维细胞中的 VEGF呈强阳性表达,向冠部和根部表达逐渐减弱;成熟恒牙牙髓成纤维细胞中的 VEGF呈阳性表达,向冠部和根部表达逐渐减弱。与年轻恒牙比,成熟恒牙牙髓成纤维细胞中的 VEGF表达较弱,在冠部和根部的表达较弱。结论 VEGF在人年轻恒牙和成熟恒牙牙髓组织中表达有差异,VEGF 参与恒牙牙根的发育与成熟。%Objective To investigate the expressions and distributions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)in dental pulps of immature and mature permanent teeth of human.Methods The normal teeth, extracted for orthodontic from the Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical Uni versity,including 30 cases of immature permanent teeth and 26 cases of mature permanent teeth,from 2010.6-2013.10,were examined by Srteptvadin-bitin Complex (SABC)to determine the expressions of VEGF in their dental pulps.Results The expression of VEGF was strongly positive in the pulp fibroblasts of immature perma-nent teeth (P <0.05),but gradually weakened in the crown and root canal.The expression of VEGF was positive in the pulp fibroblasts of mature permanent teeth (P <0.05 ),but gradually weakened in the crown and root canal.Compared with mature permanent teeth,the expression of VEGF was stronger in the pulp fibroblasts of immature permanent teeth,weakened in the crown and root canal (P

  7. The timing of cognitive plasticity in physiological aging: a tDCS study of naming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eFertonani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS on physiologically aging adults performing a naming task. tDCS is a method that modulates human cortical excitability. Neuroplasticity is considered to have its foundation in cortical excitability as a property that adjusts the connection strength between neurons in the brain. Language efficiency, as all functions, relies on integration of information (i.e., effectiveness of connectivity through neurons in the brain. So the use of tDCS, to modulate cortical excitability, can help to define the state of cognitive plasticity in the aging brain. Based on Hebb’s rule, an increase in synaptic efficacy does not rely only on the increase of excitability but also on the timing of activation. Therefore, a key issue in this study is the timing of tDCS application in relation to a task: When to deliver tDCS to induce modulatory effects on task execution to facilitate naming.Anodal tDCS was applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of older and young adults before and during a naming task.In older adults, tDCS improved naming performance and decreased the verbal reaction times only if it was applied during the task execution, whereas in young subjects both stimulation conditions improved naming performance.These findings highlight that in healthy aging adults, the cerebral network dedicated to lexical retrieval processing may be facilitated only if stimulation is applied to an active neural network. We hypothesise that this change is due to the neuronal synaptic changes, in the aging brain, which reduce the window of when cortical excitability can facilitate synaptic efficacy and therefore plasticity.

  8. Acetylated Rhamnogalacturonans from Immature Fruits of Abelmoschus esculentus Inhibit the Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Human Gastric Cells by Interaction with Outer Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Thöle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharide containing extracts from immature fruits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus are known to exhibit antiadhesive effects against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori to stomach tissue. The present study investigates structural and functional features of polymers responsible for this inhibition of bacterial attachment to host cells. Ammonium sulfate precipitation of an aqueous extract yielded two fractions at 60% and 90% saturation with significant antiadhesive effects against H. pylori, strain J99, (FE60% 68% ± 15%; FE90% 75% ± 11% inhibition rates after preincubation of the bacteria at 1 mg/mL. Sequential extraction of okra fruits yielded hot buffer soluble solids (HBSS with dose dependent antiadhesive effects against strain J99 and three clinical isolates. Preincubation of H. pylori with HBSS (1 mg/mL led to reduced binding to 3ʹ-sialyl lactose, sialylated Lea and Lex. A reduction of bacterial binding to ligands complementary to BabA and SabA was observed when bacteria were pretreated with FE90%. Structural analysis of the antiadhesive polysaccharides (molecular weight, monomer composition, linkage analysis, stereochemistry, and acetylation indicated the presence of acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-I polymers, decorated with short galactose side chains. Deacetylation of HBSS and FE90% resulted in loss of the antiadhesive activity, indicating esterification being a prerequisite for antiadhesive activity.

  9. Multi-session transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS elicits inflammatory and regenerative processes in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Adele Rueger

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is increasingly being used in human studies as an adjuvant tool to promote recovery of function after stroke. However, its neurobiological effects are still largely unknown. Electric fields are known to influence the migration of various cell types in vitro, but effects in vivo remain to be shown. Hypothesizing that tDCS might elicit the recruitment of cells to the cortex, we here studied the effects of tDCS in the rat brain in vivo. Adult Wistar rats (n = 16 were randomized to either anodal or cathodal stimulation for either 5 or 10 consecutive days (500 µA, 15 min. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU was given systemically to label dividing cells throughout the experiment. Immunohistochemical analyses ex vivo included stainings for activated microglia and endogenous neural stem cells (NSC. Multi-session tDCS with the chosen parameters did not cause a cortical lesion. An innate immune response with early upregulation of Iba1-positive activated microglia occurred after both cathodal and anodal tDCS. The involvement of adaptive immunity as assessed by ICAM1-immunoreactivity was less pronounced. Most interestingly, only cathodal tDCS increased the number of endogenous NSC in the stimulated cortex. After 10 days of cathodal stimulation, proliferating NSC increased by ∼60%, with a significant effect of both polarity and number of tDCS sessions on the recruitment of NSC. We demonstrate a pro-inflammatory effect of both cathodal and anodal tDCS, and a polarity-specific migratory effect on endogenous NSC in vivo. Our data suggest that tDCS in human stroke patients might also elicit NSC activation and modulate neuroinflammation.

  10. Expression of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin on dendritic cells generated from human peripheral blood monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li; Zhi-Hua Feng; Guang-Yu Li; Dan-Lei Mou; Qing-He Nie

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To generate dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood and to detect the expression of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN; CD209) for the further study of DC-SIGN in hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission.METHODS: Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from blood of healthy individuals by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation and cultured in complete medium containing rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4. Cells were cultured for seven days, with cytokine addition every two days to obtain immature DCs. Characteristics of the cultured cells were observed under light and scanning microscope, and the expression of DC-SIGN was detected by immunofluorescence staining.RESULTS: After seven-day culture, a large number of cells with typical characteristics of DCs appeared. Their characteristics were observed under light and scanning electron microscope. These cells had a variety of cell shapes such as those of bipolar elongate cells, elaborate stellate cells and DCs. DC-SIGN was detected by immunofluorescence staining and its expression level on cultivated dendritic cells was high.CONCLUSION: DCs with a high expression of DC-SIGN can be generated from human peripheral blood monocytes in complete medium containing rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4.

  11. Shedding of immature germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariagno, J; Curi, S; Mendeluk, G; Grinspon, D; Repetto, H; Chenlo, P; Pugliese, N; Sardi, M; Blanco, A M

    2002-01-01

    The immature germ cells (IGC) constitute the highest percentage (90%) of nonsperm cells (NSpC) in ejaculates from fertile or infertile men. The objective of this study was to evaluate IGC concentration and the IGC/(IGC + Sp) ratio, in normozoospermia and dispermia. Normozoospermia from men with proven fertility (NPF). nonproven fertility (NNPF). dispermia (D) and semen samples with excessive shedding of immature germ cells (GI 1.7 x 10(6) to 5 x 10(6) IGC/mL and GII > 5.0 x 10(6) IGC/mL) were used in this study. The mean value +2 SD for the NNPF (1.7 x 10(6)/mL) and the value proposed by WHO (5 x 10(6)/mL) were employed to define GI and GII groups. IGC concentration is statistically different in the studied groups. The IGC/Sp ratio showed a significant difference only between the NNPF and the D. When comparing semen parameters (Sp/ejaculate. grade (a) motility and morphology) there was a highly significant difference between NNPF and GI and GII: no difference was found between GI and GII. While studying 200 cases of dispermias 83% showed a high shedding of immature germ cells. The cytological study of nonsperm cells and the count and identification of the immature germ cells could be used to evaluate the dispermic disorders.

  12. Neonatal plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs display subset variation but can elicit potent anti-viral innate responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Zhang

    Full Text Available Neonates are highly susceptible to infectious diseases and defective antiviral pDC immune responses have been proposed to contribute to this phenomenon. Isolated cord blood pDCs innately responded to a variety of TLR7 and TLR9 dependent viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV or herpes-simplex virus (HSV by efficiently producing IFN-α, TNF-α as well as chemokines. Interestingly, following activation by CpGA, but not viruses, cord pDCs tend to survive less efficiently. We found that a hallmark of pDCs in neonates is an extended CD2+pDCs compartment compared to adult pDCs without affecting the antiviral IFN-α response. Within CD2+pDCs, we identified a subpopulation expressing CD5 and responsible for IL-12p40 production, however this population is significantly decreased in cord blood compared to adult blood. Therefore, neonatal pDCs clearly display variation in phenotype and subset composition, but without major consequences for their antiviral responses.

  13. Genomics and proteomics of immune modulatory effects of a butanol fraction of echinacea purpurea in human dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Pei-Ing

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echinacea spp. extracts and the derived phytocompounds have been shown to induce specific immune cell activities and are popularly used as food supplements or nutraceuticals for immuno-modulatory functions. Dendritic cells (DCs, the most potent antigen presenting cells, play an important role in both innate and adaptive immunities. In this study, we investigated the specific and differential gene expression in human immature DCs (iDCs in response to treatment with a butanol fraction containing defined bioactive phytocompounds extracted from stems and leaves of Echinacea purpurea, that we denoted [BF/S+L/Ep]. Results Affymetrix DNA microarray results showed significant up regulation of specific genes for cytokines (IL-8, IL-1β, and IL-18 and chemokines (CXCL 2, CCL 5, and CCL 2 within 4 h after [BF/S+L/Ep] treatment of iDCs. Bioinformatics analysis of genes expressed in [BF/S+L/Ep]-treated DCs revealed a key-signaling network involving a number of immune-modulatory molecules leading to the activation of a downstream molecule, adenylate cyclase 8. Proteomic analysis showed increased expression of antioxidant and cytoskeletal proteins after treatment with [BF/S+L/Ep] and cichoric acid. Conclusion This study provides information on candidate target molecules and molecular signaling mechanisms for future systematic research into the immune-modulatory activities of an important traditional medicinal herb and its derived phytocompounds.

  14. Test System for Standard ALICE DCS Components

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160773

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the ALICE DCS project is supervising equipment installed in the ALICE experiment site at CERN. Hence, the aim of this project was to provide a test bench in the DCS lab, where a real equipment and software tools will be deployed. Using this test bench, test procedures which exercise the devices under the test in a configurable way and provide logging and trending of the acquired data were implemented. The setup was devised using the ALICE software framework and Siemens SCADA system WINCC OA, providing the same functionality as the systems installed in ALICE, and will be used for the commissioning of the new software and hardware, burn-in tests of new modules and log-term stability tests of ALICE hardware.

  15. Efficacy and Interindividual Variability in Motor-Cortex Plasticity following Anodal tDCS and Paired-Associative Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Strube; Tilmann Bunse; Berend Malchow; Alkomiet Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Interindividual response variability to various motor-cortex stimulation protocols has been recently reported. Comparative data of stimulation protocols with different modes of action is lacking. We aimed to compare the efficacy and response variability of two LTP-inducing stimulation protocols in the human motor cortex: anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) and paired-associative stimulation (PAS25). In two experiments 30 subjects received 1mA a-tDCS and PAS25. Data analysi...

  16. Regulatory Considerations for the Clinical and Research Use of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): review and recommendations from an expert panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregni, F; Nitsche, MA; Loo, C.K.; Brunoni, AR; Marangolo, P; Leite, J; Carvalho, S; Bolognini, N; Caumo, W; Paik, NJ; Simis, M; Ueda, K; Ekhitari, H; Luu, P; Tucker, DM; Tyler, WJ; Brunelin, J; Datta, A; Juan, CH; Venkatasubramanian, G; Boggio, PS; Bikson, M

    2014-01-01

    The field of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) has experienced significant growth in the past 15 years. One of the tES techniques leading this increased interest is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Significant research efforts have been devoted to determining the clinical potential of tDCS in humans. Despite the promising results obtained with tDCS in basic and clinical neuroscience, further progress has been impeded by a lack of clarity on international regulatory pathways. We therefore convened a group of research and clinician experts on tDCS to review the research and clinical use of tDCS. In this report, we review the regulatory status of tDCS, and we summarize the results according to research, off-label and compassionate use of tDCS in the following countries: Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, India, Iran, Italy, Portugal, South Korea, Taiwan and United States. Research use, off label treatment and compassionate use of tDCS are employed in most of the countries reviewed in this study. It is critical that a global or local effort is organized to pursue definite evidence to either approve and regulate or restrict the use of tDCS in clinical practice on the basis of adequate randomized controlled treatment trials. PMID:25983531

  17. ATLAS Muon DCS Upgrades and Optimizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bakalis, Christos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Muon subsystem is comprised of four detector types: Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) and Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) for trigger purposes, and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) and Muon Drift Tubes (MDT) for muon track reconstruction. The MDTs cover a large area at the outer part of the detector. In total, there are over a 1’000 MDT chambers, which are made of about 350’000 tubes. The luminosity upgrade of the HL-LHC is expected to pose a serious challenge to the MDTs. The expected increase of particle flux will set new, higher standards regarding the operation and control of the chambers. A step towards optimizing the ATLAS Muon Detector Control System (DCS) was to develop several DCS tools, namely a High Luminosity vs Trip Limit panel with its accompanying scripts and managers. The ultimate goal of this tool is to protect the MDT chambers from the rising particle flux and its associated increase in chamber current. In addition to optimizing the ATLAS Muon DCS, several tasks to accommodate the newly installed B...

  18. Reprint of: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) - Application in neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Il; Foerster, Águida; Nitsche, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation is a versatile tool to modulate psychological processes via alterations of brain activity, and excitability. It is applied to explore the physiological basis of cognition and behavior, as well as to reduce clinical symptoms in neurological and psychiatric diseases. Neuromodulatory brain stimulation via transcranial direct currents (tDCS) has gained increased attention recently. In this review we will describe physiological mechanisms of action of tDCS, and summarize its application to modulate psychological processes in healthy humans and neuropsychiatric diseases. Furthermore, beyond giving an overview of the state of the art of tDCS, including limitations, we will outline future directions of research in this relatively young scientific field.

  19. Cerebellar tDCS Effects on Conditioned Eyeblinks using Different Electrode Placements and Stimulation Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Linda; Batsikadze, Giorgi; Timmann, Dagmar; Gerwig, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    There is good evidence that the human cerebellum is involved in the acquisition and timing of classically conditioned eyeblink responses (CRs). Animal studies suggest that the cerebellum is also important in CR extinction and savings. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was reported to modulate CR acquisition and timing in a polarity dependent manner. To extent previous findings three experiments were conducted using standard delay eyeblink conditioning. In a between-group design, effects of tDCS were assessed with stimulation over the right cerebellar hemisphere ipsilaterally to the unconditioned stimulus (US). An extracephalic reference electrode was used in Experiment 1 and a cephalic reference in Experiment 2. In both parts the influence on unconditioned eyeblink responses (UR) was investigated by starting stimulation in the second half of the pseudoconditioning phase lasting throughout the first half of paired trials. In a third experiment, effects of cerebellar tDCS during 40 extinction trials were assessed on extinction and reacquisition on the next day. In each experiment, 30 subjects received anodal, cathodal or sham stimulation in a double-blinded fashion. Using the extracephalic reference electrode, no significant effects on CR incidences comparing stimulation groups were observed. Using the cephalic reference anodal as well as cathodal cerebellar tDCS increased CR acquisition compared to sham only on a trend level. Analysis of timing parameters did not reveal significant effects on CR onset and peaktime latencies nor on UR timing. In the third experiment, cerebellar tDCS during extinction trials had no significant effect on extinction and savings on the next day. The present study did not reveal clear polarity dependent effects of cerebellar tDCS on CR acquisition and timing as previously described. Weaker effects may be explained by start of tDCS before the learning phase i.e., offline, individual thresholds and current flow based

  20. Cerebellar tDCS Effects on Conditioned Eyeblinks using Different Electrode Placements and Stimulation Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Linda; Batsikadze, Giorgi; Timmann, Dagmar; Gerwig, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    There is good evidence that the human cerebellum is involved in the acquisition and timing of classically conditioned eyeblink responses (CRs). Animal studies suggest that the cerebellum is also important in CR extinction and savings. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was reported to modulate CR acquisition and timing in a polarity dependent manner. To extent previous findings three experiments were conducted using standard delay eyeblink conditioning. In a between-group design, effects of tDCS were assessed with stimulation over the right cerebellar hemisphere ipsilaterally to the unconditioned stimulus (US). An extracephalic reference electrode was used in Experiment 1 and a cephalic reference in Experiment 2. In both parts the influence on unconditioned eyeblink responses (UR) was investigated by starting stimulation in the second half of the pseudoconditioning phase lasting throughout the first half of paired trials. In a third experiment, effects of cerebellar tDCS during 40 extinction trials were assessed on extinction and reacquisition on the next day. In each experiment, 30 subjects received anodal, cathodal or sham stimulation in a double-blinded fashion. Using the extracephalic reference electrode, no significant effects on CR incidences comparing stimulation groups were observed. Using the cephalic reference anodal as well as cathodal cerebellar tDCS increased CR acquisition compared to sham only on a trend level. Analysis of timing parameters did not reveal significant effects on CR onset and peaktime latencies nor on UR timing. In the third experiment, cerebellar tDCS during extinction trials had no significant effect on extinction and savings on the next day. The present study did not reveal clear polarity dependent effects of cerebellar tDCS on CR acquisition and timing as previously described. Weaker effects may be explained by start of tDCS before the learning phase i.e., offline, individual thresholds and current flow based

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of intracranial immature teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is toexplore the clinical features, treatment and prognosis of intracranial immature teratomas. The clinical data, serum levels of tumor markers, treatment regimens and prognosis of 15 patients with intracranial immature teratomas were reviewed retrospectively. In patients whose plasma alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-HCG) were determined, AFP and beta-HCG were elevated in 57.1 and 16.7% of the cases, respectively. All patients received surgical treatment. The tumor was totally removed in 12 cases, subtotally in 2, and partially in 1 case. After surgery, of the 15 patients, 9 received radiotherapy, 4 gamma knife surgery and 7 chemotherapy. Thirteen patients were followed up. Compared to the common 5-year survival rate of 40%, in patients who received gamma knife surgery, the 5-year survival rate after surgery was 100%, which is better than the 5-year survival rate of patients who did not receive gamma knife surgery (p = 0.0049). Postoperative radiotherapy and chemical therapy had no significant impact on the 5-year survival rate (p > 0.05). The prognosis of intracranial immature teratomas is poor. The detection of their clinical manifestation, the analysis of imaging features and the serum levels of tumor markers are helpful in diagnosing intracranial teratomas. The total removal of the tumor is important to cure the disease. We did not see a difference in outcome between patients who received postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy and those who did not. Regular follow-up MRI examinations are necessary so that the conditions of the patients can be closely monitored. If a patient has residual or recurrent tumor after surgery, gamma knife surgery can be effective. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Fast diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for non-invasive measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzam, Parisa; Sutin, Jason; Wu, Kuan-Cheng; Zimmermann, Bernhard B.; Tamborini, Davide; Dubb, Jay; Boas, David A.; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2017-02-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has a key role in the management of neurosurgical and neurological injuries. Currently, the standard clinical monitoring of ICP requires an invasive transducer into the parenchymal tissue or the brain ventricle, with possibility of complications such as hemorrhage and infection. A non-invasive method for measuring ICP, would be highly preferable, as it would allow clinicians to promptly monitor ICP during transport and allow for monitoring in a larger number of patients. We have introduced diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) as a non-invasive ICP monitor by fast measurement of pulsatile cerebral blood flow (CBF). The method is similar to Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), which derives ICP from the amplitude of the pulsatile cerebral blood flow velocity, with respect to the amplitude of the pulsatile arterial blood pressure. We believe DCS measurement is superior indicator of ICP than TCD estimation because DCS directly measures blood flow, not blood flow velocity, and the small cortical vessels measured by DCS are more susceptible to transmural pressure changes than the large vessels. For fast DCS measurements to recover pulsatile CBF we have developed a custom high-power long-coherent laser and a strategy for delivering it to the tissue within ANSI standards. We have also developed a custom FPGA-based correlator board, which facilitates DCS data acquisitions at 50-100 Hz. We have tested the feasibility of measuring pulsatile CBF and deriving ICP in two challenging scenarios: humans and rats. SNR is low in human adults due to large optode distances. It is similarly low in rats because the fast heart rate in this setting requires a high repetition rate.

  3. In vitro interactions of Candida parapsilosis wild type and lipase deficient mutants with human monocyte derived dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vágvölgyi Csaba

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida parapsilosis typically is a commensal of human skin. However, when host immune defense is compromised or the normal microflora balance is disrupted, C. parapsilosis transforms itself into an opportunistic pathogen. Candida-derived lipase has been identified as potential virulence factor. Even though cellular components of the innate immune response, such as dendritic cells, represent the first line of defense against invading pathogens, little is known about the interaction of these cells with invading C. parapsilosis. Thus, the aim of our study was to assess the function of dendritic cells in fighting C. parapsilosis and to determine the role that C. parapsilosis-derived lipase plays in the interaction with dendritic cells. Results Monocyte-derived immature and mature dendritic cells (iDCs and mDCs, respectively co-cultured with live wild type or lipase deficient C. parapsilosis strains were studied to determine the phagocytic capacity and killing efficiency of host cells. We determined that both iDCs and mDCs efficiently phagocytosed and killed C. parapsilosis, furthermore our results show that the phagocytic and fungicidal activities of both iDCs and mDCs are more potent for lipase deficient compared to wild type yeast cells. In addition, the lipase deficient C. parapsilosis cells induce higher gene expression and protein secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in both DC types relative to the effect of co-culture with wild type yeast cells. Conclusions Our results show that DCs are activated by exposure to C. parapsilosis, as shown by increased phagocytosis, killing and proinflammatory protein secretion. Moreover, these data strongly suggest that C. parapsilosis derived lipase has a protective role during yeast:DC interactions, since lipase production in wt yeast cells decreased the phagocytic capacity and killing efficiency of host cells and downregulated the expression of host effector molecules.

  4. Immune tolerance induced by intravenous transfer of immature dendritic cells via up-regulating numbers of suppressive IL-10(+) IFN-γ(+)-producing CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Ciric, Bogoljub; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2013-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) regulate immunity and immune tolerance in vivo. However, the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that intravenous (i.v.) transfer of bone marrow-derived DCs pulsed with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide blocks the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6J mice. i.v. transfer of MOG-pulsed DCs leads to the down-regulation of the production of IL-17A and IFN-γ and up-regulation of IL-10 secretion. The development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is facilitated via up-regulation of FoxP3 expression and production of IL-10. The number of suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells is also improved. The expression of OX40, CD154, and CD28 is down-regulated, but the expression of CD152, CD80, PD-1, ICOS, and BTLA is up-regulated on CD4(+) T cells after i.v. transfer of immature DCs. The expression of CCR4, CCR5, and CCR7 on CD4(+) T cells is also improved. Our results suggest that immature DCs may induce tolerance via facilitating the development of CD4(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs and suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells in vivo.

  5. The closely related CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) and lymphoid-resident CD8+ DCs differ in their inflammatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zhijun; Bedoui, Sammy; Brady, Jamie L; Walter, Anne; Chopin, Michael; Carrington, Emma M; Sutherland, Robyn M; Nutt, Stephen L; Zhang, Yuxia; Ko, Hyun-Ja; Wu, Li; Lew, Andrew M; Zhan, Yifan

    2014-01-01

    Migratory CD103+ and lymphoid-resident CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs) share many attributes, such as dependence on the same transcription factors, cross-presenting ability and expression of certain surface molecules, such that it has been proposed they belong to a common sub-lineage. The functional diversity of the two DC types is nevertheless incompletely understood. Here we reveal that upon skin infection with herpes simplex virus, migratory CD103+ DCs from draining lymph nodes were more potent at inducing Th17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells than CD8+ DCs. This superior capacity to drive Th17 responses was also evident in CD103+ DCs from uninfected mice. Their differential potency to induce Th17 differentiation was reflected by higher production of IL-1β and IL-6 by CD103+ DCs compared with CD8+ DCs upon stimulation. The two types of DCs from isolated lymph nodes also differ in expression of certain pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, elevated levels of GM-CSF, typical of those found in inflammation, substantially increased the pool size of CD103+ DCs in lymph nodes and skin. We argue that varied levels of GM-CSF may explain the contrasting reports regarding the positive role of GM-CSF in regulating development of CD103+ DCs. Together, we find that these two developmentally closely-related DC subsets display functional differences and that GM-CSF has differential effect on the two types of DCs.

  6. The closely related CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs and lymphoid-resident CD8+ DCs differ in their inflammatory functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Jiao

    Full Text Available Migratory CD103+ and lymphoid-resident CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs share many attributes, such as dependence on the same transcription factors, cross-presenting ability and expression of certain surface molecules, such that it has been proposed they belong to a common sub-lineage. The functional diversity of the two DC types is nevertheless incompletely understood. Here we reveal that upon skin infection with herpes simplex virus, migratory CD103+ DCs from draining lymph nodes were more potent at inducing Th17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells than CD8+ DCs. This superior capacity to drive Th17 responses was also evident in CD103+ DCs from uninfected mice. Their differential potency to induce Th17 differentiation was reflected by higher production of IL-1β and IL-6 by CD103+ DCs compared with CD8+ DCs upon stimulation. The two types of DCs from isolated lymph nodes also differ in expression of certain pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, elevated levels of GM-CSF, typical of those found in inflammation, substantially increased the pool size of CD103+ DCs in lymph nodes and skin. We argue that varied levels of GM-CSF may explain the contrasting reports regarding the positive role of GM-CSF in regulating development of CD103+ DCs. Together, we find that these two developmentally closely-related DC subsets display functional differences and that GM-CSF has differential effect on the two types of DCs.

  7. System Control for the Transitional DCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    Hour Display 94 3-9 Trunk Status Summary Display 95 3-10 Routing Control Display for Hillingdon 95 4-1 CRU in the DCS Multiplex Hierarchy 109 4-2 CRU...SUMMARY Figure 3-10. Routing Control Display for Hillingdon 95 route and typing over it with the name of another route. If the controller simply wants...Control Functions for Croughton and Hillingdon , " Contract No. F1 9628- 73-C- 0220, Maclean, Virginia, March 1974.1. 11.* GTE Sylvania, "Digital Network

  8. Modulation of Total Sleep Time by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase, Lukas; Piosczyk, Hannah; Zittel, Sulamith; Jahn, Friederike; Selhausen, Peter; Krone, Lukas; Feige, Bernd; Mainberger, Florian; Maier, Jonathan G; Kuhn, Marion; Klöppel, Stefan; Normann, Claus; Sterr, Annette; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Riemann, Dieter; Nitsche, Michael A; Nissen, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Arousal and sleep are fundamental physiological processes, and their modulation is of high clinical significance. This study tested the hypothesis that total sleep time (TST) in humans can be modulated by the non-invasive brain stimulation technique transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting a 'top-down' cortico-thalamic pathway of sleep-wake regulation. Nineteen healthy participants underwent a within-subject, repeated-measures protocol across five nights in the sleep laboratory with polysomnographic monitoring (adaptation, baseline, three experimental nights). tDCS was delivered via bi-frontal target electrodes and bi-parietal return electrodes before sleep (anodal 'activation', cathodal 'deactivation', and sham stimulation). Bi-frontal anodal stimulation significantly decreased TST, compared with cathodal and sham stimulation. This effect was location specific. Bi-frontal cathodal stimulation did not significantly increase TST, potentially due to ceiling effects in good sleepers. Exploratory resting-state EEG analyses before and after the tDCS protocols were consistent with the notion of increased cortical arousal after anodal stimulation and decreased cortical arousal after cathodal stimulation. The study provides proof-of-concept that TST can be decreased by non-invasive bi-frontal anodal tDCS in healthy humans. Further elucidating the 'top-down' pathway of sleep-wake regulation is expected to increase knowledge on the fundamentals of sleep-wake regulation and to contribute to the development of novel treatments for clinical conditions of disturbed arousal and sleep.

  9. Investigating the cortical regions involved in MEP modulation in tDCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo eSalvador

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is used in several studies to evaluate cortical excitability changes induced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS of the primary motor cortex. Interpretation of these results, however, is hindered by the very different spatial distribution of the electric field (E-field induced by the two techniques and by the different target neurons that they might act upon. In this study we used the finite element method to calculate the E-field distribution induced by TMS and tDCS in a realistically shaped model of a human head. A model of a commercially available figure-8 coil was placed over a position above the identified hand knob (HK region. We also modelled two configurations of bipolar tDCS montages with one of the electrodes placed over the HK and a return electrode over the contralateral orbital region. The electrodes over the HK were either rectangular in shape, with an area of 35cm2 or cylindrical with an area of π cm2 (1 cm radius. To compare the E-field distribution in TMS and the two tDCS models, average values of the E-field’s magnitude as well as the polar and azimuthal angle were investigated in the HK region and premotor areas. The results show that both techniques induce fields with different magnitudes and directions in the HK: the field in tDCS is predominantly perpendicular to the cortical surface, contrary to what happens in TMS where the field is mostly parallel to it. In the premotor areas, the magnitude of the E-field induced in TMS was well below the accepted threshold for MEP generation, 100 V/m. In tDCS, the magnitude of the field in these areas was comparable to that induced at the HK with a significant component perpendicular to the cortical surface. These results indicate that tDCS and TMS target preferentially different neuronal structures at the HK. Besides, they show that premotor areas may play a role in the tDCS-induced after effects on motor cortex excitability.

  10. Immature dendritic cell-derived exosomes: a promise subcellular vaccine for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weifan; Ouyang, Song; Li, Yi; Xiao, Bo; Yang, Huan

    2013-02-01

    Exosomes, 60-90-nm-sized vesicles, are produced by a large number of cell types, including tumor cells, neurons, astrocytes, hemocytes, intestinal epithelial cells, and so on. Dendritic cell (DC), the most potent professional antigen-presenting cell in the immune system, produces exosomes in the course of maturation. Mature DCs produce exosomes with the ability to elicit potent immunoactivation, resulting in tumor eradication and bacterial or virus elimination. Given the notion that exosomes are stable and easy to be modified artificially, autologous mature DC-derived exosomes have been vaccinated into patients with malignant diseases. In clinical trials utilizing exosomes as therapeutic approaches, researchers observed considerable curative effect with little side effect. However, immature or suppressive DC-derived exosomes harbor anti-inflammatory properties distinct from mature DC-derived exosomes. In murine models of autoimmune disease and transplantation, immature DC-derived exosomes reduced T cell-dependent immunoactivation, relieved clinical manifestation of autoimmune disease, and prolonged survival time of transplantation. Although the exact mechanism of how immature DC-derived exosomes function in vivo is still unclear, and there are no clinical trials regarding application of exosome vaccine into patients with autoimmune disease, we will analyze the promise of immature DC-derived exosomes as a subcellular vaccine in autoimmunity in this review.

  11. Using geographically weighted regression (GWR) to explore spatial varying relationships of immature mosquitoes and human densities with the incidence of dengue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Wen, Tzai-Hung

    2011-01-01

    of entomology and dengue cases in the cities of Kaohsiung and Fengshan in 2002. Our findings indicate that dengue-mosquito and dengue-human relationships were significantly spatially non-stationary. This means that in some areas higher dengue incidences were associated with higher vector/host densities...

  12. Enhancing performance in numerical magnitude processing and mental arithmetic using transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias U. Hauser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to accurately process numerical magnitudes and solve mental arithmetic is of highest importance for schooling and professional career. Although impairments in these domains in disorders such as developmental dyscalculia (DD are highly detrimental, remediation is still sparse. In recent years, transcranial brain stimulation methods such as transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS have been suggested as a treatment for various neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC is known to be crucially involved in numerical magnitude processing and mental arithmetic. In this study, we evaluated whether tDCS has a beneficial effect on numerical magnitude processing and mental arithmetic. Due to the unclear lateralization, we stimulated the left, right as well as both hemispheres simultaneously in two experiments. We found that left anodal tDCS significantly enhanced performance in a number comparison and a subtraction task, while bilateral and right anodal tDCS did not induce any improvements compared to sham. Our findings demonstrate that the left PPC is causally involved in numerical magnitude processing and mental arithmetic. Furthermore, we show that these cognitive functions can be enhanced by means of tDCS. These findings encourage to further investigate the beneficial effect of tDCS in the domain of mathematics in healthy and impaired humans.

  13. Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS): A Novel Approach to Understanding Cerebellar Function in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Argyropoulos, Georgios P; Bastian, Amy; Cortes, Mar; Davis, Nicholas J; Edwards, Dylan J; Ferrucci, Roberta; Fregni, Felipe; Galea, Joseph M; Hamada, Masahi; Manto, Mario; Miall, R Chris; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Pope, Paul A; Priori, Alberto; Rothwell, John; Tomlinson, S Paul; Celnik, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    The cerebellum is critical for both motor and cognitive control. Dysfunction of the cerebellum is a component of multiple neurological disorders. In recent years, interventions have been developed that aim to excite or inhibit the activity and function of the human cerebellum. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the cerebellum (ctDCS) promises to be a powerful tool for the modulation of cerebellar excitability. This technique has gained popularity in recent years as it can be used to investigate human cerebellar function, is easily delivered, is well tolerated, and has not shown serious adverse effects. Importantly, the ability of ctDCS to modify behavior makes it an interesting approach with a potential therapeutic role for neurological patients. Through both electrical and non-electrical effects (vascular, metabolic) ctDCS is thought to modify the activity of the cerebellum and alter the output from cerebellar nuclei. Physiological studies have shown a polarity-specific effect on the modulation of cerebellar-motor cortex connectivity, likely via cerebellar-thalamocortical pathways. Modeling studies that have assessed commonly used electrode montages have shown that the ctDCS-generated electric field reaches the human cerebellum with little diffusion to neighboring structures. The posterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum (i.e., lobules VI-VIII) seem particularly susceptible to modulation by ctDCS. Numerous studies have shown to date that ctDCS can modulate motor learning, and affect cognitive and emotional processes. Importantly, this intervention has a good safety profile; similar to when applied over cerebral areas. Thus, investigations have begun exploring ctDCS as a viable intervention for patients with neurological conditions.

  14. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-06-17

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss.

  15. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1−/− mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0–P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner’s membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1−/− mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. PMID:26084842

  16. Long-Term Effects of Serial Anodal tDCS on Motion Perception in Subjects with Occipital Stroke Measured in the Unaffected Visual Hemifield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olma, M. C.; Dargie, R. A.; Behrens, J. R.; Kraft, A.; Irlbacher, K.; Fahle, M.; Brandt, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a novel neuromodulatory tool that has seen early transition to clinical trials, although the high variability of these findings necessitates further studies in clinically relevant populations. The majority of evidence into effects of repeated tDCS is based on research in the human motor system, but it is unclear whether the long-term effects of serial tDCS are motor-specific or transferable to other brain areas. This study aimed to examine whether serial anodal tDCS over the visual cortex can exogenously induce long-term neuroplastic changes in the visual cortex. However, when the visual cortex is affected by a cortical lesion, up-regulated endogenous neuroplastic adaptation processes may alter the susceptibility to tDCS. To this end, motion perception was investigated in the unaffected hemifield of subjects with unilateral visual cortex lesions. Twelve subjects with occipital ischemic lesions participated in a within-subject, sham-controlled, double-blind study. MRI-registered sham or anodal tDCS (1.5 mA, 20 min) was applied on five consecutive days over the visual cortex. Motion perception was tested before and after stimulation sessions and at 14- and 28-day follow-up. After a 16-day interval an identical study block with the other stimulation condition (anodal or sham tDCS) followed. Serial anodal tDCS over the visual cortex resulted in an improvement in motion perception, a function attributed to MT/V5. This effect was still measurable at 14- and 28-day follow-up measurements. Thus, this may represent evidence for long-term tDCS-induced plasticity and has implications for the design of studies examining the time course of tDCS effects in both the visual and motor systems. PMID:23805097

  17. Long-term effects of serial anodal tDCS on motion perception in subjects with occipital stroke measured in the unaffected visual hemifield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel C Olma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a novel neuromodulatory tool that has seen early transition to clinical trials, although the high variability of these findings necessitates further studies in clincally-relevant populations. The majority of evidence into effects of repeated tDCS is based on research in the human motor system, but it is unclear whether the long-term effects of serial tDCS are motor-specific or transferable to other brain areas. This study aimed to examine whether serial anodal tDCS over the visual cortex can exogenously induce long-term neuroplastic changes in the visual cortex. However, when the visual cortex is affected by a cortical lesion, up-regulated endogenous neuroplastic adaptation processes may alter the susceptibility to tDCS. To this end, motion perception was investigated in the unaffected hemifield of subjects with unilateral visual cortex lesions. Twelve subjects with occipital ischaemic lesions participated in a within-subject, sham-controlled, double-blind study. MRI-registered sham or anodal tDCS (1.5 mA, 20 minutes was applied on five consecutive days over the visual cortex. Motion perception was tested before and after stimulation sessions and at 14- and 28-day follow-up. After a 16-day interval an identical study block with the other stimulation condition (anodal or sham tDCS followed. Serial anodal tDCS over the visual cortex resulted in an improvement in motion perception, a function attributed to MT/V5. This effect was still measurable at 14- and 28-day follow-up measurements. Thus, this may represent evidence for long-term tDCS-induced plasticity and has implications for the design of studies examining the time course of tDCS effects in both the visual and motor systems.

  18. The stereoisomers of 17{alpha}-[{sup 123}I]iodovinyloestradiol and its 11{beta}-methoxy derivative evaluated for their oestrogen receptor binding in human MCF-7 cells and rat uterus, and their distribution in immature rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijks, L.J.M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boer, G.J. [Netherlands Institute for Brain Research, Meibergdreef 33, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Endert, E. [Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bruin, K. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bos, J.C. van den [Cygne BV and Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Doremalen, P.A.P.M. van [Cygne BV and Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Schoonen, W.G.E.J. [Department of Endocrinology, NV Organon, P.O. Box 20, 5340 BH Oss (Netherlands); Janssen, A.G.M. [Cygne BV and Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Royen, E.A. van [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1996-03-01

    We studied the potential of both stereoisomers of 17{alpha}-[{sup 123}I]iodovinyloestradiol (E- and Z-[{sup 123}I]IVE) and of 11{beta}-methoxy-17{alpha}-[{sup 123}I]iodovinyloestradiol (E- and Z-[{sup 123}I]MIVE) as suitable radioligands for the imaging of oestrogen receptor(ER)-positive human breast tumours. The 17{alpha}-[{sup 123}I]iodovinyloestradiols were prepared stereospecifically by oxidative radio-iododestannylation of the corresponding 17{alpha}-tri-n-butylstannylvinyloestradiol precursors. Competitive binding studies were performed in order to determine the relative binding affinity (RBA) of the unlabelled 17{alpha}-iodovinyloestradiols for the ER in both human MCF-7 breast tumour cells and rat uterine tissue, compared with that of diethylstilboestrol (DES). Target tissue uptake, retention and uptake selectivity of their {sup 123}I-labelled analogues were studied in immature female rats. All four 17{alpha}-iodovinyloestradiols showed high affinity for the ER in human MCF-7 cells, as well as rat uterus. Their RBA for the ER showed the following order of decreasing potency: RBA of DES >Z-IVE >Z-MIVE >E-MIVE {>=}E-IVE. Neither of these 17{alpha}-iodovinyloestradiols showed any significant binding to the sex hormone binding globulin in human plasma. The biodistribution studies showed ER-mediated uptake in the uterus, ovaries and pituitary, that of E- and Z-[{sup 123}I]MIVE being higher than that of E- and Z-[{sup 123}I]IVE. High target-to-non-target tissue uptake ratios, especially at longer periods after injection (up to 24 h), were exhibited by both isomers of [{sup 123}I]MIVE. The uterus-to-blood uptake ratio was higher for E-[{sup 123}I]MIVE. However, the uterus-to-fat uptake ratio appeared to be higher for the Z-isomer of [{sup 123}I]MIVE, especially at 24 h after injection. (orig./MG). With 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Augmenting Visual Search Performance with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    used for patients undergoing treatment for major depressive disorders (Mar- tin et al., 2011), stroke rehabilitation (Fusco et al., 2013), and...improve human performance and cognition. The application of tDCS has been administered over the prefrontal cortex to improve working memory and accel...derhasselt (2014) confirms that the application of the anodal electrode over the scalp will slightly depolarizes the membrane potential of the

  20. Psychological characteristics of juvenile offenders with personal immaturity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E.G. Dozortseva; A.A. Fedonkina

    2013-01-01

    .... We describe the prevalence of personal immaturity among juvenile offenders. We analyze individual psychological characteristics specific to the minors with personal immaturity and characterize the phenomenon of personal immaturity itself...

  1. New cooling regulation technology of secondary cooling station in DCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan; Yan, Jun-wei; Zhu, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fei-long; Lei, Jun-xi [The Key Lab of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Liang, Lie-quan [The Key Lab of E-Commerce Market Application Technology of Guangdong Province, Guangdong University of Business Studies, Guangzhou 510320 (China)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, a kind of new control technology of secondary cooling station (constant flow rate/variable temperature difference) in district cooling system (DCS) is proposed in view of serial consequences including low efficiency and high operating cost caused by low temperature of supply water in DCS. This technology has been applied in DCS of Guangzhou University City. The result has already indicated that such technology can increase the supply and return temperatures of buildings, return water temperature of primary side in the plate heat exchanger unit, moreover, the efficiency of both the chiller and the whole system are improved significantly. (author)

  2. prM-antibody renders immature West Nile virus infectious in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela; Moesker, Bastiaan; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol; Smit, Jolanda M

    2011-10-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a member of the family Flaviviridae and is a neurotropic pathogen responsible for severe human disease. Flavivirus-infected cells release virus particles that contain variable numbers of precursor membrane (prM) protein molecules at the viral surface. Consequently, antibodies are produced against the prM protein. These antibodies have been shown to activate the infectious potential of fully immature flavivirus particles in vitro. Here, we provide in vivo proof that prM antibodies render immature WNV infectious. Infection with antibody-opsonized immature WNV particles caused disease and death of mice, and infectious WNV was found in the brains and sera.

  3. Phaseolus immature embryo rescue technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Pascal; Toussaint, André; Mergeai, Guy; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Predominant among the production constraints of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris are infestation of Ascochyta blight, Bean Golden Mosaic virus (BGMV), and Bean Fly. Interbreeding with Phaseolus -coccineus L. and/or Phaseolus polyanthus Greenm has been shown to provide P. vulgaris with greater resistance to these diseases. For interspecific crosses to be successful, it is important to use P. coccineus and P. polyanthus as female parents; this prevents rapid reversal to the recurrent parent P. vulgaris. Although incompatibility barriers are post-zygotic, early hybrid embryo abortion limits the success of F1 crosses. While rescue techniques for globular and early heart-shaped embryos have improved in recent years, -success in hybridization remains very low. In this study, we describe six steps that allowed us to rescue 2-day-old P. vulgaris embryos using a pod culture technique. Our methods consisted of (i) pod culture, (ii) extraction and culture of immature embryos, (iii) dehydration of embryos, (iv) germination of embryos, (v) rooting of developed shoots, and (vi) hardening of plantlets.

  4. The HLT, DAQ and DCS TDR

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F. J

    At the end of June the Trigger-DAQ community achieved a major milestone with the submission to the LHCC of the Technical Design Report (TDR) for DAQ, HLT and DCS. The first unbound copies were handed to the LHCC referees on the scheduled date of 30th June, this was followed a few days later by a limited print run which produced the first bound copies (see Figure 1). As had previously been announced both to the LHCC and the ATLAS Collaboration it was not possible on this timescale to give a complete validation of all of the aspects of the architecture in the TDR. So it had been agreed that further work would continue over the summer to provide more complete results for the formal review by the LHCC of the TDR in September. Thus there followed an intense programme of measurements and analysis: especially to provide results for HLT both in testbeds and for the event selection software itself; to provide additional information on scaling of the dataflow aspects; to provide first results on the new prototype ROBin...

  5. Efficacy and interindividual variability in motor-cortex plasticity following anodal tDCS and paired-associative stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strube, Wolfgang; Bunse, Tilmann; Malchow, Berend; Hasan, Alkomiet

    2015-01-01

    Interindividual response variability to various motor-cortex stimulation protocols has been recently reported. Comparative data of stimulation protocols with different modes of action is lacking. We aimed to compare the efficacy and response variability of two LTP-inducing stimulation protocols in the human motor cortex: anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) and paired-associative stimulation (PAS25). In two experiments 30 subjects received 1mA a-tDCS and PAS25. Data analysis focused on motor-cortex excitability change and response defined as increase in MEP applying different cut-offs. Furthermore, the predictive pattern of baseline characteristics was explored. Both protocols induced a significant increase in motor-cortical excitability. In the PAS25 experiments the likelihood to develop a MEP response was higher compared to a-tDCS, whereas for intracortical facilitation (ICF) the likelihood for a response was higher in the a-tDCS experiments. Baseline ICF (12 ms) correlated positively with an increase in MEPs only following a-tDCS and responders had significantly higher ICF baseline values. Contrary to recent studies, we showed significant group-level efficacy following both stimulation protocols confirming older studies. However, we also observed a remarkable amount of nonresponders. Our findings highlight the need to define sufficient physiological read-outs for a given plasticity protocol and to develop predictive markers for targeted stimulation.

  6. Emotional distraction and bodily reaction: Modulation of autonomous responses by anodal tDCS to the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Alexander Schroeder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prefrontal electric stimulation has been demonstrated to effectively modulate cognitive processing. Specifically, the amelioration of cognitive control over emotional distraction by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS points towards targeted therapeutic applications in various psychiatric disorders. In addition to behavioral measures, autonomous nervous system (ANS responses are fundamental bodily signatures of emotional information processing. However, interactions between the modulation of cognitive control by tDCS and ANS responses have received limited attention. We here report on ANS data gathered in healthy subjects that performed an emotional cognitive control task parallel to the modulation of left prefrontal cortical activity by 1mA anodal or sham tDCS. Skin conductance responses (SCRs to negative and neutral pictures of human scenes were reduced by anodal as compared to sham tDCS. Individual SCR amplitude variations were associated with the amount of distraction. Moreover, the stimulation-driven performance- and SCR-modulations were related in form of a quadratic, inverse-U function. Thus, our results indicate that non-invasive brain stimulation (i.e., anodal tDCS can modulate autonomous responses synchronous to behavioral improvements, but the range of possible concurrent improvements from prefrontal stimulation is limited. Interactions between cognitive, affective, neurophysiological, and vegetative responses to emotional content can shape brain stimulation effectiveness and require theory-driven integration in potential treatment protocols.

  7. Dcs Data Viewer, an Application that Accesses ATLAS DCS Historical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarouchas, C.; Schlenker, S.; Dimitrov, G.; Jahn, G.

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is one of the four Large Hadron Collider experiments. The Detector Control System (DCS) of ATLAS is responsible for the supervision of the detector equipment, the reading of operational parameters, the propagation of the alarms and the archiving of important operational data in a relational database (DB). DCS Data Viewer (DDV) is an application that provides access to the ATLAS DCS historical data through a web interface. Its design is structured using a client-server architecture. The pythonic server connects to the DB and fetches the data by using optimized SQL requests. It communicates with the outside world, by accepting HTTP requests and it can be used stand alone. The client is an AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) interactive web application developed under the Google Web Toolkit (GWT) framework. Its web interface is user friendly, platform and browser independent. The selection of metadata is done via a column-tree view or with a powerful search engine. The final visualization of the data is done using java applets or java script applications as plugins. The default output is a value-over-time chart, but other types of outputs like tables, ascii or ROOT files are supported too. Excessive access or malicious use of the database is prevented by a dedicated protection mechanism, allowing the exposure of the tool to hundreds of inexperienced users. The current configuration of the client and of the outputs can be saved in an XML file. Protection against web security attacks is foreseen and authentication constrains have been taken into account, allowing the exposure of the tool to hundreds of users world wide. Due to its flexible interface and its generic and modular approach, DDV could be easily used for other experiment control systems.

  8. Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia A. Casari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. Larva and pupa of Eutrypanus dorsalis (Germar, 1928, collected in trunks of Pinus elliottii Engelm., and Paratenthras martinsi Monné, 1998, collected in spathes of Scheelea phalerata (Mart. ex Spreng. Burret, are described and illustrated. Larva and pupa of Lophopoeum timbouvae Lameere, 1884, collected in Hymenaea corbaril L., Enterolobium contortisiliquum (Vell. Morong and Pterogyne nitens Tul., are redescribed and illustrated. A table with all described immatures of Lamiinae, and a comparison among the immatures of Acanthocinini are presented. Biological notes and new records are also included.

  9. Protein-induced changes during the maturation process of human dendritic cells: A 2-D DIGE approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Gb; Overbergh, L; Hansen, Kasper Lage

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are unique antigen presenting cells, which upon maturation change from a specialized antigen-capturing cell towards a professional antigen presenting cells. In this study, a 2-D DIGE analysis of immature and mature DCs was performed, to identify proteins changing in expressi...

  10. Tolerogenic pDCs: spotlight on Foxo3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, Vincenzo

    2011-04-01

    Cancer creates a peculiar inflammatory environment enriched for transcription factors with a negative influence on adaptive immunity. In this issue of the JCI, Watkins and colleagues identify Foxo3 as a master regulator of the tolerogenic program in tumor-associated, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Foxo3 enables pDCs to induce tolerance in tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, turning them into regulatory lymphocytes capable of inhibiting nearby CD8+ T lymphocytes. Provision of tumor-specific CD4+ T helper cells interrupts this circuit by inhibiting Foxo3 expression and fully licensing the antigen-presenting ability of pDCs. These data identify a new target for therapeutic intervention and provide insight into the transcription factor interplay in myeloid cells recruited to the cancer microenvironment.

  11. Rapamycin combined with allogenic immature dendritic cells selectively expands CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-YingWang; QiZhang; YangYang; Wen-JieChen; WeiLiu; NanJiang; Gui-HuaChen

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendriticcells(DCs)caninitiatetheexpansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play an indispensable role in inducing transplantation tolerance. Some studies have investigated the effect of the immunosuppressant rapamycin (Rapa) on Tregs in vitro. However, the in vivo effect of Rapa combined with immature DCs (iDCs) on Tregs is unknown. This study was undertaken to determine whether allogenic iDCs combined with a short course of Rapa have the ability to selectivelyexpandtheCD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregsinarat model. METHODS: Brown Norway rats were injected intravenously with 2×106 Lewis iDCs followed by 1 mg/kg per day Rapa intraperitoneally for 7 consecutive days. On day 8, the levels of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells in peripheral blood and spleen cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. IL-2, IL-4, TGF-β1, and IFN-γ levels in serum were assessed by ELISA. The experimental animals were divided into four groups: control, Rapa-treated, iDC-treated,andcombination-treated. RESULTS: CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs comprised 7%-8% of CD4+T cells in control rats. Rapa combined with iDCs enhanced this percentage in the peripheral blood and spleen. However, the levels of Tregs did not significantly change after treatment with Rapa or iDCs alone. The levels of CD4+CD25-Foxp3+ T cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3- T cells in CD4+ T cells did not significantly change in the combined group. The TGF-β1 level in serum from the combined group increased significantly compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: A significantly higher percentage of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs was found in rats treated with allogenic iDCs and a short course of Rapa, along with an increase in the TGF-β1 level in serum. This improved protocol may be a promising therapeutic strategy to increase Tregs, which are beneficial to the induction of peritransplant tolerance.

  12. Immature dendritic cells in multiple myeloma are prone to osteoclast-like differentiation through interleukin-17A stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Marco; Stucci, Stefania; Savonarola, Annalisa; Ciavarella, Sabino; Cafforio, Paola; Dammacco, Franco; Silvestris, Franco

    2013-06-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL17A), a cytokine involved in allergy, inflammation and osteoclastogenesis, was investigated in multiple myeloma (MM) to assess its role in the osteoclast (OC)-like activity of marrow immature dendritic cells (iDCs). Comparing nine MM patients with control subjects affected by monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, we found high IL17A expression in the marrow plasma of MM patients in parallel with its deposits within the stromal matrix. Increased expression of the IL17A receptor (IL17RA) was also found in primary myeloma iDCs, which underwent OC-like transdifferentiation after IL17A stimulation. To assess the role of IL17A, we measured the activity of the IL17/IL17RA pathway in IL17A-transdifferentiated iDCs and the expression of functional OC genes by Western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. These cells showed increased RNA transcription of genes enrolled in the maturation of OCs, while NFATC1 and FOS were induced by IL17A, independently of NFKB1 phosphorylation. Moreover, the concurrent phosphorylation of the Lip isoform of CEBPB and the down-regulation of MAFB supported the activation of IL17RA pathway in OC-like transdifferentiated iDCs that was apparently unrelated to TNFRSF11A signalling. These data emphasize the involvement of iDCs in MM hyperactive osteoclastogenesis and suggest that their bone resorption activity is also regulated, at least in vitro, by IL17RA. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Longitudinal tDCS: Consistency across Working Memory Training Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian E. Berryhill

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest in enhancing and maintaining cognitive function. In recent years, advances in noninvasive brain stimulation devices, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, have targeted working memory in particular. Despite controversy surrounding outcomes of single-session studies, a growing field of working memory training studies incorporate multiple sessions of tDCS. It is useful to take stock of these findings because there is a diversity of paradigms employed and the outcomes observed between research groups. This will be important in assessing cognitive training programs paired with stimulation techniques and identifying the more useful and less effective approaches. Here, we treat the tDCS+ working memory training field as a case example, but also survey training benefits in other neuromodulatory techniques (e.g., tRNS, tACS. There are challenges associated with the broad parameter space including: individual differences, stimulation intensity, duration, montage, session number, session spacing, training task selection, timing of follow up testing, near and far transfer tasks. In summary, although the field of assisted cognitive training is young, some design choices are more favorable than others. By way of heuristic, the current evidence supports including more training/tDCS sessions (5+, applying anodal tDCS targeting prefrontal regions, including follow up testing on trained and transfer tasks after a period of no contact. What remains unclear, but important for future translational value is continuing work to pinpoint optimal values for the tDCS parameters on a per cognitive task basis. Importantly the emerging literature shows notable consistency in the application of tDCS for WM across various participant populations compared to single session experimental designs.

  14. Polarity-Dependent Misperception of Subjective Visual Vertical during and after Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiza E G Santos-Pontelli

    Full Text Available Pathologic tilt of subjective visual vertical (SVV frequently has adverse functional consequences for patients with stroke and vestibular disorders. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the supramarginal gyrus can produce a transitory tilt on SVV in healthy subjects. However, the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS on SVV has never been systematically studied. We investigated whether bilateral tDCS over the temporal-parietal region could result in both online and offline SVV misperception in healthy subjects. In a randomized, sham-controlled, single-blind crossover pilot study, thirteen healthy subjects performed tests of SVV before, during and after the tDCS applied over the temporal-parietal region in three conditions used on different days: right anode/left cathode; right cathode/left anode; and sham. Subjects were blind to the tDCS conditions. Montage-specific current flow patterns were investigated using computational models. SVV was significantly displaced towards the anode during both active stimulation conditions when compared to sham condition. Immediately after both active conditions, there were rebound effects. Longer lasting after-effects towards the anode occurred only in the right cathode/left anode condition. Current flow models predicted the stimulation of temporal-parietal regions under the electrodes and deep clusters in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. The present findings indicate that tDCS over the temporal-parietal region can significantly alter human SVV perception. This tDCS approach may be a potential clinical tool for the treatment of SVV misperception in neurological patients.

  15. Simultaneous transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG): Assessing the impact of tDCS on slow cortical magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Cossio, E.; Witkowski, M.; Robinson, S.E.; Cohen, L.G.; Birbaumer, N.; Soekadar, S.R.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can influence cognitive, affective or motor brain functions. Whereas previous imaging studies demonstrated widespread tDCS effects on brain metabolism, direct impact of tDCS on electric or magnetic source activity in task-related brain areas could not b

  16. Enhanced effect of CD8++ T cells activated by tumor lysate -pulsed DCs on killing autologous tumor cells%通过肿瘤致敏的DCs活化的CD8+T细胞可有效地杀死肿瘤细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐小龙; 江振友; 蔡淑玉

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor lysate to initiate cell mediated immune responses by stimulating naive T cells, and the efficiency of activated T cells to kill autologous tumor cells in vitro. METHODS: The peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes were obtained from the advanced renal cell carcinoma patient by eonglutination method. The immature dendritic cells were generated in the presence of interleukin -4(IL-4) and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from monocytes of healthy individuals.These cells were pulsed with tumor lysate or not. Induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes(CTLs) response by mature dendritic cells (mDCs) was evaluated by the CD95(Fas) expression assay through FCM and the cytotoxic assay a gninst autolognns human tumor cells. RESULTS: Human immature dendritic cells and T cells obtained from healthy donors were stimulated with tumor- pulsed dendritic cells. The immature dendritic cells were applied to the cytotoxicity assay a gainst target autologons tumor cells. The CD95 (Fas) expression, IFN-γ, and TNF -α secreted by the CTLs in tumor lysate-plused DC group were higher than those of other groups. The capacity of the CTLs to kill autolognns tumor cells was significantly different(P<0. 05). Antigen-specific DCs vaccine can induce T cells activation and proliferation, thus we can obtain higher proportion of tumor specific cytotoxic T cells(CTLs), and enhance the CTLs to secret IFN-γ and TNF-α. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that monocyte-derived human dendritic cells pulsed with tumor lysate could in duce the specific antitumor effect against autologons tumors. This in vitro model offers a new and simple approach to the development of DC + CTL - based immunotherapy.%目的:探索肿瘤裂解物负载的DCs诱导活化的初始T细胞介导细胞免疫及活化的T细胞杀死肿瘤细胞的能力.方法:应用黏附法分离外周血中的淋巴细胞

  17. Helminth-excreted/secreted products are recognized by multiple receptors on DCs to block the TLR response and bias Th2 polarization in a cRAF dependent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, César A.; Alcántara-Hernández, Marcela; Bonifaz, Laura; Terrazas, Luis I.; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) recognize pathogens and initiate the T-cell response. The DC-helminth interaction induces an immature phenotype in DCs; as a result, these DCs display impaired responses to TLR stimulation and prime Th2-type responses. However, the DC receptors and intracellular pathways targeted by helminth molecules and their importance in the initiation of the Th2 response are poorly understood. In this report, we found that products excreted/secreted by Taenia crassiceps (TcES) triggered cRAF phosphorylation through MGL, MR, and TLR2. TcES interfered with the LPS-induced NFκB p65 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. In addition, TcES-induced cRAF signaling pathway was critical for down-regulation of the TLR-mediated DC maturation and secretion of IL-12 and TNF-α. Finally, we show for the first time that blocking cRAF in DCs abolishes their ability to induce Th2 polarization in vitro after TcES exposure. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism by which helminths target intracellular pathways to block DC maturation and efficiently program Th2 polarization.—Terrazas, C. A., Alcántara-Hernández, M., Bonifaz, L., Terrazas, L. I., Satoskar, A. R. Helminth-excreted/secreted products are recognized by multiple receptors on DCs to block the TLR response and bias Th2 polarization in a cRAF dependent pathway. PMID:23907435

  18. Does Male Care, Provided to Immature Individuals, Influence Immature Fitness in Rhesus Macaques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Langos

    Full Text Available Among many mammals, maternal care strongly impacts infant survival; however, less is known about whether adult males also affect infant fitness. Paternal care is expected when providing care enhances offspring survival and reproduction, which likewise increases fathers' fitness. Males might also care for unrelated immature individuals to increase their mating probability with the immature individuals' mothers. Studies in multimale primate groups showed that sires enhance food access for offspring and provide protection in conflicts. Furthermore, fathers' presence during infancy has been suggested to accelerate offspring sexual maturation. However, no study has yet directly linked the degree of father-offspring bonds to offspring fitness in primates. We previously reported father-offspring affiliation in rhesus macaques, pronounced during early infancy and independent of mothers' presence. The present study aims at investigating whether affiliation with fathers or other males affects proxies of immature fitness (body mass gain, body fat and testis size. First, we combined behavioral, genetic and morphometric data from 55 subjects of one group. Second, using demographic and genetic data, we investigated for 92 individuals of the population whether mother- and father-offspring co-residence during immaturity influenced offspring lifetime reproductive success (LRS. Our results show that focal rank and higher amounts of affiliation with high-ranking males during infancy tend to positively impact body mass gain of female, but not male focal animals. In contrast, body mass gain of male focal individuals, but not females', appeared to be higher when affiliation of male immature individuals was evenly distributed across their adult male partners. Moreover, we found mothers', but not fathers', presence during immaturity to predict offspring LRS. Our results suggest that male-immature affiliation, but not father-offspring co-residence, potentially impacts

  19. Organic Petrological Studies on Immature Source Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贤庆; 熊波; 钟宁宁; 马安来; 王铁冠; 张爱云

    2004-01-01

    Organic petrology is a marginal science that is quite practicable. At present, it has developed into a routine research tool that is widely applied in petroleum exploration and assessment. Based on several years' research of the authors, this paper presents the advances in organic petrological studies on immature source rocks, including the classification and characteristics of macerals, the composition of macerals and types of organic matter, the abundance and evolution of organic matter, oil-prone macerals, hydrocarbon generation and expulsion. All these results show that organic petrology is of considerable value pertaining to its application in the assessment of immature oil and gas. The immature source rocks consist of various macerals with obvious heterogeneity, contain different hydrocarbon-generating macerals with different oil thresholds and oil peaks, and show a two-staged evolutionary pattern of organic matter.

  20. Understanding public (misunderstanding of tDCS for enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yenisa Cabrera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to gain insight into the public’s perspective on using the minimally invasive technique transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS as an enhancement tool, we analyzed and compared online comments in key popular press articles from two different periods (pre-commercialization and post-commercialization. The main conclusion drawn from this exploratory investigation is that public perception regarding tDCS has shifted from misunderstanding to cautionary realism. This change in attitude can be explained as moving from a focus on an emergent technology to a focus on its applications, benefits, and risks as the technology becomes more grounded within the public domain. Future governance of tDCS should include the concerns and enthusiasms of the public.Keywords: cognitive enhancement, neuroethics, public understanding, transcranial direct current stimulation, brain stimulation, public policy.

  1. CD56 marks human dendritic cell subsets with cytotoxic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roothans, D.; Smits, E.; Lion, E.; Tel, J.; Anguille, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), when appropriately stimulated, can express the archetypal natural killer (NK)-cell surface marker CD56. In addition to classical DC functions, CD56+ DCs are endowed with an unconventional cytotoxic capacity.

  2. Communication between Trigger/DAQ and DCS in ATLAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Burckhart; R.Hart; 等

    2001-01-01

    Within the ATLAS experiment Trigger/DAQ and DCS are both logically and physically separated.Nevertheless there is a need to communicate.The initial problem definition and analysis suggested three subsystems the Trigger/DAQ DCS Communication (DDC) project should support the ability to :1.exchange data between Trigger/DAQ and DCS;2.send alarm messages from DCS to Trigger/DAQ;3.issue commands to DCS from Trigger/DAQ.Each subsystem is developed and implemented independently using a common software infrastructure.Among the various subsystems of the ATLAS Trigger/DAQ the Online is responsible for the control and configuration.It is the glue connecting the different systems such as data flow.level 1 and high-level triggers.The DDC uses the various Online components as an interface point on the Trigger/DAQ side with the PVSS II SCADA system on the DCS side and addresses issues such as partitioning,time stamps,event numbers,hierarchy,authorization and security,PVSS II is a commercial product chosen by CERN to be the SCADA system for all LHC experiments,Its API provides full access to its database,which is sufficient to implement the 3 subsystems of the DDC software,The DDC project adopted the Online Software Process,which recommends a basic software life-cycle:problem statement,analysis,design,implementation and testing.Each phase results in a corresponding document or in the case of the implementation and testing,a piece of code,Inspection and review take a major role in the Online software process,The DDC documents have been inspected to detect flaws and resulted in a improved quality.A first prototype of the DDC is ready and foreseen to be used at the test-beam during summer 2001.

  3. Co-culture of apoptotic breast cancer cells with immature dendritic cells: a novel approach for DC-based vaccination in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jin [Department of Oncology, State Key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Liu, Qiang [Department of Hematology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, Jiandong [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Ren, Qinyou [Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Cao, Wei [Department of Interventional Radiology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, Jingyue; Yu, Zhaocai [Department of Oncology, State Key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yu, Fang [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Wu, Yanlan [Department of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Shi, Hengjun [Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Liu, Wenchao [Department of Oncology, State Key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2012-04-27

    A dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine strategy could reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of breast cancer patients. However, while therapy-induced apoptosis of hepatocellular and colorectal carcinoma cells can enhance maturation and antigen presentation of DCs, whether this effect occurs in breast cancer is currently unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of doxorubicin (ADM)-induced apoptotic MCF-7 breast cancer cells on the activation of DCs. ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells could effectively induce immature DC (iDC) maturation. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of DC maturity marker CD83 was 23.3 in the ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cell group compared with 8.5 in the MCF-7 cell group. The MFI of DC co-stimulatory marker CD86 and HLA-DR were also increased after iDCs were treated with ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the proliferating autologous T-lymphocytes increased from 14.2 to 40.3% after incubated with DCs induced by apoptotic MCF-7 cells. The secretion of interferon-γ by these T-lymphocytes was also increased. In addition, cell-cell interaction between apoptotic MCF-7 cells and iDCs, but not soluble factors released by apoptotic MCF-7 cells, was crucial for the maturation of iDCs. These findings constitute a novel in vitro DC-based vaccine strategy for the treatment of breast cancer by ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells.

  4. Co-culture of apoptotic breast cancer cells with immature dendritic cells: a novel approach for DC-based vaccination in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A dendritic cell (DC-based vaccine strategy could reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of breast cancer patients. However, while therapy-induced apoptosis of hepatocellular and colorectal carcinoma cells can enhance maturation and antigen presentation of DCs, whether this effect occurs in breast cancer is currently unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of doxorubicin (ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 breast cancer cells on the activation of DCs. ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells could effectively induce immature DC (iDC maturation. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of DC maturity marker CD83 was 23.3 in the ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cell group compared with 8.5 in the MCF-7 cell group. The MFI of DC co-stimulatory marker CD86 and HLA-DR were also increased after iDCs were treated with ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the proliferating autologous T-lymphocytes increased from 14.2 to 40.3% after incubated with DCs induced by apoptotic MCF-7 cells. The secretion of interferon-γ by these T-lymphocytes was also increased. In addition, cell-cell interaction between apoptotic MCF-7 cells and iDCs, but not soluble factors released by apoptotic MCF-7 cells, was crucial for the maturation of iDCs. These findings constitute a novel in vitro DC-based vaccine strategy for the treatment of breast cancer by ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells.

  5. On the immature dress of Microglossus aterrimus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büttikofer, J.

    1895-01-01

    Amongst a small number of birds, recently presented to the Leyden Museum by Mr. J. Bensbach, of late Resident at Ternate, I found a very interesting specimen of the Great Black Cockatoo from the Arfak Mountains, New Guinea, a specimen which I consider to be immature on account of the great extent of

  6. Immature ovarian teratoma in a postmenopausal woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornvold, K; Detlefsen, G U; Horn, T

    1987-01-01

    We report the first case of immature ovarian teratoma occurring after menopause in a 57-year-old, 3 years postmenopausal woman. Within one year after resection of the teratoma she developed peritoneal botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma, which probably originated from initially unrecognized rhabdomyoblasts...

  7. CD45 ligation expands Tregs by promoting interactions with DCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camirand, Geoffrey; Wang, Ying; Lu, Yuning; Wan, Yisong Y; Lin, Yan; Deng, Songyan; Guz, Galip; Perkins, David L; Finn, Patricia W; Farber, Donna L; Flavell, Richard A; Shlomchik, Warren D; Lakkis, Fadi G; Rudd, Christopher E; Rothstein, David M

    2014-10-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which express CD4 and FOXP3, are critical for modulating the immune response and promoting immune tolerance. Consequently, methods to expand Tregs for therapeutic use are of great interest. While transfer of Tregs after massive ex vivo expansion can be achieved, in vivo expansion of Tregs would be more practical. Here, we demonstrate that targeting the CD45 tyrosine phosphatase with a tolerogenic anti-CD45RB mAb acutely increases Treg numbers in WT mice, even in absence of exogenous antigen. Treg expansion occurred through substantial augmentation of homeostatic proliferation in the preexisting Treg population. Moreover, anti-CD45RB specifically increased Treg proliferation in response to cognate antigen. Compared with conventional T cells, Tregs differentially regulate their conjugation with DCs. Therefore, we determined whether CD45 ligation could alter interactions between Tregs and DCs. Live imaging showed that CD45 ligation specifically reduced Treg motility in an integrin-dependent manner, resulting in enhanced interactions between Tregs and DCs in vivo. Increased conjugate formation, in turn, augmented nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and Treg proliferation. Together, these results demonstrate that Treg peripheral homeostasis can be specifically modulated in vivo to promote Treg expansion and tolerance by increasing conjugation between Tregs and DCs.

  8. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter DCS for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Pedro Martins, Filipe Manuel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    TileCal is one of the ATLAS subdetectors operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is taking data since 2010. Seventy thousand (70000) parameters are used for control and monitoring purposes, requiring an automated system. The Detector Control System (DCS) was developed to ensure the coherent and safe operation of the whole ATLAS detector. The TileCal DCS is mainly responsible for the control and monitoring of the high and low voltage systems but it also supervises the detector infrastructure (cooling and racks), calibration systems, data acquisition and safety. During the first period of data taking (Run 1, 2010-12) the TileCal DCS allowed a smooth detector operation and should continue to do so for the second period (Run 2) that started in 2015. The TileCal DCS was updated in order to cope with the hardware and software requirements for Run 2 operation. These updates followed the general ATLAS guidelines on the software and hardware upgrade but also the new requirements from the TileCal detector. ...

  9. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter DCS for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Pedro Martins, Filipe Manuel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    TileCal is one of the ATLAS sub-detectors operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is taking data since 2010. The Detector Control System (DCS) was developed to ensure the coherent and safe operation of the whole ATLAS detector. Seventy thousand (70000) parameters are used for control and monitoring purposes of TileCal, requiring an automated system. The TileCal DCS is mainly responsible for the control and monitoring of the high and low voltage systems but it also supervises the detector infrastructure (cooling and racks), calibration systems, data acquisition and safety. During the first period of data taking (Run 1, 2010-12) the TileCal DCS allowed a smooth detector operation and should continue to do so for the second period (Run 2) that started in 2015. The TileCal DCS was updated in order to cope with the hardware and software requirements for Run 2 operation. These updates followed the general ATLAS guidelines on the software and hardware upgrade but also the new requirements from the TileCa...

  10. Dynamic populations of dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin-positive immature dendritic cells and liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin-positive endothelial cells in the outer zones of the paracortex of human lymph nodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engering, A.J.; Vliet, van SJ; Hebeda, K; Jackson, DG; Prevo, R; Singh, SK; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Krieken, van H; Kooijk, van Y.

    2004-01-01

    In the paracortex of lymph nodes, cellular immune responses are generated against antigens captured in peripheral tissues by dendritic cells (DCs). DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin), a C-type lectin exclusively expressed by DCs, functions as an antigen receptor as well as

  11. Psychological characteristics of juvenile offenders with personal immaturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Dozortseva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the psychological characteristics of juveniles with personal immaturity who committed socially dangerous actions. We present conceptual psychological approaches to the concepts of “maturity” and “immaturity”, manifestations of maturity and immaturity in adolescents. We describe the prevalence of personal immaturity among juvenile offenders. We analyze individual psychological characteristics specific to the minors with personal immaturity and characterize the phenomenon of personal immaturity itself. We compare the parameters studied in samples of juvenile offenders with personal immaturity and offenders with no personality immaturity, undergoing a comprehensive forensic psychological and psychiatric examination. We describe the main clusters of indices that together represent a psychological symptom of personal immaturity

  12. Canine-DCs using different serum-free methods as an approach to provide an animal-model for immunotherapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bund, Dagmar; Buhmann, Raymund; Gökmen, Füsun; Kremser, Andreas; Dreyssig, Julia; Kolb, Hans Jochem; Schmetzer, Helga Maria

    2010-01-01

    Animal-models are the basis of DC-based human immunotherapies. We describe the standardization of a canine-DC-generation protocol using different cytokines and characterize the quality and functional repertoire of the obtained canine-DCs. DCs were generated from healthy dog-PBMCs under serum-free and serum-containing conditions. DC-quality and -quantity was determined by FACS studying the expression-profiles of DC-/costimulatory- and maturation-antigens before/after culture with canine and human monoclonal-antibodies (cmabs/hmabs). Individual DCAgs-(DC-antigens)-expression-profiles were found before and after culture depending on the agents' mode-of-action. With at least one of three serum-free methods (Ca-Ionophore, Picibanil, Cytokines) sufficient DC-amounts were generated. So, canine-DCs can be regularly generated under serum-free conditions and hmabs additionally to cmabs qualify for staining/quantification of canine-cells/DCs. The canine-DCs were functional, shown by T-cell-activation, -proliferation and antigen-specific CTL-responses. In summary, successful, quantitative DC-generation is possible with serum-free methods. DC-based T-cell-vaccination-strategies evaluated for e.g. AML-patients can be tested in the dog and estimated in clinical studies for DC-vaccination-strategies.

  13. Persistent Gut Microbiota Immaturity in Malnourished Bangladeshi Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sathish; Huq, Sayeeda; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Haque, Rashidul; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Alam, Mohammed A.; Benezra, Amber; DeStefano, Joseph; Meier, Martin F.; Muegge, Brian D.; Barratt, Michael J.; VanArendonk, Laura G.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Province, Michael A.; Petri, William A.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic food interventions have reduced mortality in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) but incomplete restoration of healthy growth remains a major problem1,2. The relationships between the type of nutritional intervention, the gut microbiota, and therapeutic responses are unclear. In the current study, bacterial species whose proportional representation define a healthy gut microbiota as it assembles during the first two postnatal years were identified by applying a machine-learning-based approach to 16S rRNA datasets generated from monthly fecal samples obtained from a birth-cohort of children, living in an urban slum of Dhaka, Bangladesh, who exhibited consistently healthy growth. These age-discriminatory bacterial species were incorporated into a model that computes a ‘relative microbiota maturity index’ and ‘microbiota-for-age Z-score’ that compare development (defined here as maturation) of a child’s fecal microbiota relative to healthy children of similar chronologic age. The model was applied to twins and triplets (to test for associations of these indices with genetic and environmental factors including diarrhea), children with SAM enrolled in a randomized trial of two food interventions, and children with moderate acute malnutrition. Our results indicate that SAM is associated with significant relative microbiota immaturity that is only partially ameliorated following two widely used nutritional interventions. Immaturity is also evident in less severe forms of malnutrition and correlates with anthropometric measurements. Microbiota maturity indices provide a microbial measure of human postnatal development, a way of classifying malnourished states, and a parameter for judging therapeutic efficacy. More prolonged interventions with existing or new therapeutic foods and/or addition of gut microbes may be needed to achieve enduring repair of gut microbiota immaturity in childhood malnutrition and improve clinical outcomes. PMID

  14. Tumor-derived heat shock protein 70 peptide complexes are cross-presented by human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noessner, Elfriede; Gastpar, Robert; Milani, Valeria; Brandl, Anna; Hutzler, Peter J S; Kuppner, Maria C; Roos, Miriam; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Asea, Alexzander; Calderwood, Stuart K; Issels, Rolf D

    2002-11-15

    Our study demonstrates that tumor-derived heat shock protein (HSP)70 chaperones a tyrosinase peptide and mediates its transfer to human immature dendritic cells (DCs) by receptor-dependent uptake. Human tumor-derived HSP70 peptide complexes (HSP70-PC) thus have the immunogenic potential to instruct DCs to cross-present endogenously expressed, nonmutated, and tumor antigenic peptides that are shared among tumors of the melanocytic lineage for T cell recognition. T cell stimulation by HSP70-instructed DCs is dependent on the Ag bound to HSP70 in that only DCs incubated with HSP70-PC purified from tyrosinase-positive (HSP70-PC/tyr(+)) but not from tyrosinase-negative (HSP70-PC/tyr(-)) melanoma cells resulted in the specific activation of the HLA-A*0201-restricted tyrosinase peptide-specific cytotoxic T cell clone. HSP70-PC-mediated T cell stimulation is very efficient, delivering the tyrosinase peptide at concentrations as low as 30 ng/ml of HSP70-PC for T cell recognition. Receptor-dependent binding of HSP70-PC and active cell metabolism are prerequisites for MHC class I-restricted cross-presentation and T cell stimulation. T cell stimulation does not require external DC maturation signals (e.g., exogenously added TNF-alpha), suggesting that signaling DC maturation is an intrinsic property of the HSP70-PC itself and related to receptor-mediated binding. The cross-presentation of a shared human tumor Ag together with the exquisite efficacy are important new aspects for HSP70-based immunotherapy in clinical anti-cancer vaccination strategies, and suggest a potential extension of HSP70-based vaccination protocols from a patient-individual treatment modality to its use in an allogeneic setting.

  15. Research on the Effects of the Fluconazole resistance and Fluconazole susceptible Candida Albicans Strains in RVVC on the Shapes and the Surface Molecules of the Human Peripheral Blood Monocyte-Derived DCs%RVVC白念珠菌氟康唑敏感株和耐药株对外周血DCs分化成熟的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣晓梅; 刘静; 沈丽; 刘瑞琴; 李艳佳; 刘丽娟; 李英涛; 于亮

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨复发性外阴阴道念珠菌病(RVVC)患者阴道白念珠菌对氟康唑敏感情况及其对人外周血单核细胞源树突状细胞(DCs)形态及表面分子的影响.方法 科玛嘉念珠菌显色培养基及芽管试验分离、鉴定白念珠菌;MIC法判断敏感菌及耐药菌;体外培养正常人外周血单核细胞源DCs,实验组以不同剂量氟康唑敏感菌悬液、耐药菌悬液刺激,对照组以同等剂量标准菌悬液刺激后,倒置显微镜观察细胞形态变化,流式细胞仪检测细胞表面分子的表达.结果 RVVC患者阴道分泌物共分离出白念珠菌108株,其中对氟康唑敏感67株(62.04%),耐药41株(37.96%);各实验组与对照组DCs细胞形态无明显差别.DCs表面分子CD80,CD86表达量均与白念珠菌悬液剂量呈正相关;加入标准菌株悬液的对照组DCs表面分子CD80,CD86表达明显高于同等剂量加入敏感菌悬液和耐药菌悬液的实验组,且加入敏感菌悬液的实验1组DCs表面分子CD80,CD86表达明显高于同等剂量加入耐药菌悬液的实验2组.结论 在一定剂量范围内,白念珠菌可促进DCs表面分子CD80,CD86表达,使DCs进一步成熟,氟康唑敏感菌株优于耐药菌株,但两者均不及标准菌株.%Objective To investigate the effects of the fluconazole resistance and fluconazole susceptible Candida albicans strains in recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis( RVVC) on the Shapes and the Surface Molecules of the Human Peripheral Blood Monocyte-Derived dendritic cells ( DCs ). Methods Candida albicans in RVVC were separated and were judged by the CHROMagar Monilia colouration nutritive medium and the genn-tube-formming tests, and then were judged the fluconazole-resistance or fluconazole-usceptible strains by MIC tests. The dendritic cells were obtained by culture in vitro. Then after they were stimulated by the different doses of Candida albicans including the fluconazole-esistance and fluconazole-usceptible strains

  16. Rare Case of Immature Gastric Teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivascu M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Teratomas are rare and complex tumors with components from more than one of the three germ cell layers. Teratomas range from benign, well-differentiated (mature cystic lesions to those that are solid and malignant (immature. The incidence of all teratomas is estimated at 1:10,000-1:20,000 newborns. Gastric teratomas represent only 1-2% of all teratomas.

  17. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  18. Helminth-excreted/secreted products are recognized by multiple receptors on DCs to block the TLR response and bias Th2 polarization in a cRAF dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, César A; Alcántara-Hernández, Marcela; Bonifaz, Laura; Terrazas, Luis I; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2013-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) recognize pathogens and initiate the T-cell response. The DC-helminth interaction induces an immature phenotype in DCs; as a result, these DCs display impaired responses to TLR stimulation and prime Th2-type responses. However, the DC receptors and intracellular pathways targeted by helminth molecules and their importance in the initiation of the Th2 response are poorly understood. In this report, we found that products excreted/secreted by Taenia crassiceps (TcES) triggered cRAF phosphorylation through MGL, MR, and TLR2. TcES interfered with the LPS-induced NFκB p65 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. In addition, TcES-induced cRAF signaling pathway was critical for down-regulation of the TLR-mediated DC maturation and secretion of IL-12 and TNF-α. Finally, we show for the first time that blocking cRAF in DCs abolishes their ability to induce Th2 polarization in vitro after TcES exposure. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism by which helminths target intracellular pathways to block DC maturation and efficiently program Th2 polarization.

  19. Transcriptomic immaturity of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in patients with alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murano, Tomoyuki; Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Hagihara, Hideo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Alcoholism, which is defined as the recurring harmful use of alcohol despite its negative consequences, has a lifetime prevalence of 17.8%. Previous studies have shown that chronic alcohol consumption disrupts various brain functions and behaviours. However, the precise mechanisms that underlie alcoholism are currently unclear. Recently, we discovered “pseudo-immature” brain cell states of the dentate gyrus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) in mouse models of psychotic disorders and epileptic seizure. Similar pseudo-immaturity has been observed in patients with psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Patients with alcoholism occasionally exhibit similar psychological symptoms, implying shared molecular and cellular mechanisms between these diseases. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to compare microarray data from the hippocampi/PFCs of the patients with alcoholism to data from these regions in developing human brains and mouse developmental data for specific cell types. We identified immature-like gene expression patterns in post-mortem hippocampi/PFCs of alcoholic patients and the dominant contributions of fast-spiking (FS) neurons to their pseudo-immaturity. These results suggested that FS neuron dysfunction and the subsequent imbalance between excitation and inhibition can be associated with pseudo-immaturity in alcoholism. These immaturities in the hippocampi/PFCs and the underlying mechanisms may explain the psychotic symptom generation and pathophysiology of alcoholism. PMID:28295046

  20. Corticospinal excitability changes to anodal tDCS elucidated with NIRS-EEG joint-imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jindal, Utkarsh; Sood, Mehak; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy;

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate corticospinal excitability. We used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) - electroencephalography (EEG) joint-imaging during and after anodal tDCS to measure changes in mean cerebral haemoglobin oxygen saturation (rSO2) along...... with changes in the log-transformed mean-power of EEG within 0.5 Hz - 11.25 Hz. In two separate studies, we investigated local post-tDCS alterations from baseline at the site of anodal tDCS using NIRS-EEG/tDCS joint-imaging as well as local post-tDCS alterations in motor evoked potentials (MEP...... that the innovative technologies for portable NIRS-EEG neuroimaging may be leveraged to objectively quantify the progress (e.g., corticospinal excitability alterations) and dose tDCS intervention as an adjuvant treatment during neurorehabilitation....

  1. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference of DC-SIGN expression inhibits human immunodeficiency virus transmission from dendritic cells to T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Pion, Marjorie; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B; Garcia, Eduardo; Abraham, Shahnaz; Leuba, Florence; Dutoit, Valérie; Ducrey-Rundquist, Odile; van Kooyk, Yvette; Trono, Didier; Piguet, Vincent

    2004-10-01

    In the early events of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, immature dendritic cells (DCs) expressing the DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) receptor capture small amounts of HIV-1 on mucosal surfaces and spread viral infection to CD4(+) T cells in lymph nodes (22, 34, 45). RNA interference has emerged as a powerful tool to gain insight into gene function. For this purpose, lentiviral vectors that express short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) into mammalian cells represent a powerful tool to achieve stable gene silencing. In order to interfere with DC-SIGN function, we developed shRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors capable of conditionally suppressing DC-SIGN expression. Selectivity of inhibition of human DC-SIGN and L-SIGN and chimpanzee and rhesus macaque DC-SIGN was obtained by using distinct siRNAs. Suppression of DC-SIGN expression inhibited the attachment of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 to DC-SIGN transfectants, as well as transfer of HIV-1 to target cells in trans. Furthermore, shRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors were capable of efficiently suppressing DC-SIGN expression in primary human DCs. DC-SIGN-negative DCs were unable to enhance transfer of HIV-1 infectivity to T cells in trans, demonstrating an essential role for the DC-SIGN receptor in transferring infectious viral particles from DCs to T cells. The present system should have broad applications for studying the function of DC-SIGN in the pathogenesis of HIV as well as other pathogens also recognized by this receptor.

  2. Projected current density comparison in tDCS block and smooth FE modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2016-08-01

    Current density distribution and projected current density calculation following transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) forward model in a human head were compared between two modeling pipelines: block and smooth. Block model was directly constructed from MRI voxel resolution and simulated in C. Smooth models underwent a boundary smoothing process by applying recursive Gaussian filters and simulated in COMSOL. Three smoothing levels were added to determine their effects on current density distribution compared to block models. Median current density percentage differences were calculated in anterior superior temporal gyrus (ASTG), hippocampus (HIP), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), occipital lobes (OCC) and precentral gyrus (PRC) and normalized against a baseline value. A maximum of + 20% difference in median current density was found for three standard electrode montages: F3-RS, T7-T8 and Cz-Oz. Furthermore, median current density percentage differences in each montage target brain structures were found to be within + 7%. Higher levels of smoothing increased median current density percentage differences in T7-T8 and Cz-Oz target structures. However, while demonstrating similar trends in each montage, additional smoothing levels showed no clear relationship between their smoothing effects and calculated median current density in the five cortical structures. Finally, relative L2 error in reconstructed projected current density was found to be 17% and 21% for block and smooth pipelines, respectively. Overall, a block model workflow may be a more attractive alternative for simulating tDCS stimulation because involves a shorter modeling time and independence from commercial modeling platforms.

  3. DCS: A Case Study of Identification of Knowledge and Disposition Gaps Using Principles of Continuous Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Jason; Steinberg, Susan; Kundrot, Craig; Charles, John

    2011-01-01

    The Human Research Program (HRP) is formulated around the program architecture of Evidence-Risk-Gap-Task-Deliverable. Review of accumulated evidence forms the basis for identification of high priority risks to human health and performance in space exploration. Gaps in knowledge or disposition are identified for each risk, and a portfolio of research tasks is developed to fill them. Deliverables from the tasks inform the evidence base with the ultimate goal of defining the level of risk and reducing it to an acceptable level. A comprehensive framework for gap identification, focus, and metrics has been developed based on principles of continuous risk management and clinical care. Research towards knowledge gaps improves understanding of the likelihood, consequence or timeframe of the risk. Disposition gaps include development of standards or requirements for risk acceptance, development of countermeasures or technology to mitigate the risk, and yearly technology assessment related to watching developments related to the risk. Standard concepts from clinical care: prevention, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, rehabilitation, and surveillance, can be used to focus gaps dealing with risk mitigation. The research plan for the new HRP Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS) used the framework to identify one disposition gap related to establishment of a DCS standard for acceptable risk, two knowledge gaps related to DCS phenomenon and mission attributes, and three mitigation gaps focused on prediction, prevention, and new technology watch. These gaps were organized in this manner primarily based on target for closure and ease of organizing interim metrics so that gap status could be quantified. Additional considerations for the knowledge gaps were that one was highly design reference mission specific and the other gap was focused on DCS phenomenon.

  4. Sugar-binding proteins potently inhibit dendritic cell human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and dendritic-cell-directed HIV-1 transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turville, Stuart G; Vermeire, Kurt; Balzarini, Jan; Schols, Dominique

    2005-11-01

    Both endocytic uptake and viral fusion can lead to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes, either through directional regurgitation (infectious transfer in trans [I-IT]) or through de novo viral production in dendritic cells (DCs) resulting in a second-phase transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes (infectious second-phase transfer [I-SPT]). We have evaluated in immature monocyte-derived DCs both pathways of transfer with regard to their susceptibilities to being blocked by potential microbicidal compounds, including cyanovirin (CNV); the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, Urtica dioica agglutinin, and Cymbidium hybrid agglutinin; and the glycan mannan. I-IT was a relatively inefficient means of viral transfer compared to I-SPT at both high and low levels of the viral inoculum. CNV was able to completely block I-IT at 15 microg/ml. All other compounds except mannan could inhibit I-IT by at least 90% when used at doses of 15 microg/ml. In contrast, efficient inhibition of I-SPT was remarkably harder to achieve, as 50% effective concentration levels for plant lectins and CNV to suppress this mode of HIV-1 transfer increased significantly. Thus, our findings indicate that I-SPT may be more elusive to targeting by antiviral drugs and stress the need for drugs affecting the pronounced inhibition of the infection of DCs by HIV-1.

  5. E6 and E7 fusion immunoglobulin from human papilloma virus 16 induces dendritic cell maturation and antigen specific activation of T helper 1 response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Hur, Yu Jin; Lee, Suk Jun; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Chung-Gyu; Oh, Yu-Koung; Jung, Woon-Won; Seo, Jong Bok; Nam, Myung Hee; Choi, Inho; Chun, Taehoon

    2011-04-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 causes cervical cancer. Induction of oncogenesis by HPV 16 is primarily dependent on the function of E6 and E7 proteins, which inactivate the function of p53 and pRB, respectively. Thus, blocking the activity of the E6 and E7 proteins from HPV 16 is critical to inhibiting oncogenesis during infection. We have expressed and purified soluble HPV 16 E6 and E7 fusion immunoglobulin (Ig), which were combined with the constant region of an Ig heavy chain, in a mammalian system. To assess whether soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs induce effective cellular immune responses, immature dendritic cells (DCs) were treated with these fusion proteins. Soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs effectively induced maturation of DCs. Furthermore, immunization with soluble E6 and E7 fusion Igs in mice resulted in antigen-specific activation of T helper 1 (Th1) cells. This is the first comprehensive study to show the molecular basis of how soluble HPV 16 E6 or E7 fusion Igs induces Th1 responses through the maturation of DCs. In addition, we show that DC therapy using soluble HPV E6 and E7 fusion Igs may be a valuable tool for controlling the progress of cervical cancer.

  6. The use of platelet rich plasma in the treatment of immature tooth with periapical lesion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günseli Güven Polat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the treatment of an immature permanent tooth with periapical lesion which was treated with regenerative approach using platelet rich plasma (PRP. The root canal of immature human permanent tooth with periapical lesion was gently debrided of necrotic tissue and disinfected with 2.5% NaOCl, and then medicated with triple antibiotic paste comprised of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and tetracycline. When the tooth was asymptomatic, PRP and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA were placed into the root canal. Six months after PRP treatment, radiographical examination revealed resolution of the radiolucency and progressive thickening of the root wall and apical closure. Our findings suggest that PRP can be used for the treatment of immature permanent teeth with periapical lesion, as part of a regenerative endodontic treatment procedure. Keywords: Immature permanent tooth; Periapical lesions; Platelet rich plasma

  7. Immatures of Epilachna Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Epilachninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia A. Casari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Description of the pupa and redescription of the larva of Epilachna vigintioctopunctata (Fabricius, collected for the first time on Brugmansia suaveoleus (Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd. Bercht. and J. Presl (Solanaceae (trombeteiro, in the state of São Paulo (Brazil, is presented. The diagnoses of the described pupae of E. clandestina (Mulsant, E. paenulata (Germar and E. spreta (Mulsant, based on specimens examined, and that of E. cacica Guérin, based on the literature, are presented. A comparison among the known larvae and pupae of this genus is also presented. This is the first description of immatures of E. vigintioctopunctata from the Western Hemisphere.

  8. The Maturely, Immature Orientale Impact Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, J. T.; Lawrence, D. J.; Stickle, A. M.; Delen, O.; Patterson, G.; Greenhagen, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Lunar surface maturity is consistently examined using the NIR optical maturity parameter (OMAT) [1]. However, the NIR only provides a perspective of the upper microns of the lunar surface. Recent studies of Lunar Prospector (LP) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter data sets are now demonstrating additional measures of maturity with sensitivities to greater depths (~2 m) in the regolith. These include thermal infrared, S-band radar, and epithermal neutron data sets [2-4]. Interestingly, each of these parameters is directly comparable to OMAT despite each measuring slightly different aspects of the regolith. This is demonstrated by Lawrence et al. [3] where LP-measured non-polar highlands epithermal neutrons trend well with albedo, OMAT, and the Christensen Feature (CF). Lawrence et al. [3] used these data to derive and map highlands hydrogen (H) which is dominantly a function of H-implantation. With this in mind, areas of enriched-H are mature, while areas of depleted H are immature. Surface roughness as measured by S-band radar [4], also provides a measure of maturity. In this case, the circular polarization ratio (CPR) is high when rough and immature, and low when smooth and mature. Knowing this, one can recognize areas in the non-polar lunar highlands that show contradictory measures of maturity. For example, while many lunar localities show consistently immature albedo, OMAT, CF, CPR, and H concentrations (e.g., Tycho), others do not. Orientale basin is the most prominent example, shown to have immature CPR, CF, and H concentrations despite a relatively mature albedo and OMAT values as well as an old age determination (~3.8 Ga). To better understand how the lunar regolith is weathering in the upper 1-2 m of regolith with time we examine the Orientale basin relative to other highlands regions. [1] Lucey et al. (2000) JGR, 105, 20377; [2] Lucey et al. (2013) LPSC, 44, 2890; [3] Lawrence et al. (2015) Icarus, j.icarus.2015.01.005; [4] Neish et al. (2013) JGR, 118

  9. Effect of a tDCS electrode montage on implicit motor sequence learning in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Eun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that a combination of excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to the contralateral motor cortex and inhibitory cathodal tDCS to the ipsilateral motor cortex of the motor performing hand (Bi-tDCS would elicit more implicit motor sequence learning than anodal tDCS applied to the contralateral motor cortex alone (Uni-tDCS. Methods Eleven healthy right-handed adults underwent a randomized crossover experiment of Uni-tDCS, Bi-tDCS, or sham stimulation. Subjects performed a 12-digit finger sequence serial reaction time task with the right hand at baseline (Pre, at immediately (Post 1, and 24 hours after stimulation (Post 2. The ratios of reaction times of predetermined repeating sequence versus random sequence were subjected to statistical analysis. Results The paired t test showed that reaction time ratios were significant decreased by all stimulation types at Post 1 versus Pre (P Conclusions No significant difference was found between Uni-tDCS and Bi-tDCS in terms of induced implicit motor sequence learning, but tDCS led to greater consolidation of the learned motor sequence than sham stimulation. These findings need to be tested in the context of stroke hand motor rehabilitation.

  10. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in an immature Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Christopher J; Lewandowski, Albert H; Skowronek, Anthony J

    2007-03-01

    An immature Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) with a history of seizure-like episodes developed signs of respiratory disease. The initial clinical diagnosis was pneumonia, and antibiotic therapy was started. The animal failed to improve after 14 days of therapy and developed unilateral, bloody nasal discharge. Endoscopic examination and radiography revealed a soft tissue mass in the nasopharynx depressing the soft palate. The tapir died 32 days after initial presentation. Histologic examination of the mass demonstrated a mesenchymal tumor composed of spindle cells with elongate nuclei forming densely packed fascicles. The neoplastic spindle cells showed prominent cross-striations. Immunohistochemistry revealed the cells to be positive for desmin and myoglobin, but negative for smooth muscle actin, confirming diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common nasopharyngeal soft tissue tumor of humans, and it has been reported infrequently in dogs, horses, and pigs. Neoplasia should be a differential diagnosis in cases of unilateral nasal discharge and inspiratory stridor, even in young animals.

  11. Knockdown of Immature Colon Carcinoma Transcript 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiling; He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhiyu; Wu, Xintian

    2016-07-13

    Non-small cell lung cancer, as the most frequent type lung cancer, has lower survival rate of 5 years, despite improvements in surgery and chemotherapy. Previous studies showed immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 is closely related to tumorigenesis of human cancer cells. In the present study, we found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues using Oncomine database mining, and the biological effect of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was investigated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines 95D and A549. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference was used to knock down immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 expression in 95D and A549 cells in vitro, and the knockdown efficiency was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay. Knockdown of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 significantly suppressed non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and colony formation ability confirmed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assay. Flow cytometry was applied to measure cell cycle arrest, and the result showed the cell cycle arrested in G2/M phase in 95D cells and arrested in G0/G1 phase in A549 cells. Furthermore, we measured the levels of cell cycle-associated proteins by Western blot analysis and found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1-mediated cell proliferation inhibition appeared due to downregulation of cell cycle activator cyclin D1 and upregulation of cell cycle inhibitor p21. In addition, immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 silencing significantly induced non-small cell lung cancer cell apoptosis by annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin D double-staining assay. All our data suggest that immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 may play an important role for non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and could be a potential molecular target for diagnosing and treating human non-small cell lung cancer.

  12. Immature rats show ovulatory defects similar to those in adult rats lacking prostaglandin and progesterone actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Criado Jose E

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gonadotropin-primed immature rats (GPIR constitute a widely used model for the study of ovulation. Although the equivalence between the ovulatory process in immature and adult rats is generally assumed, the morphological and functional characteristics of ovulation in immature rats have been scarcely considered. We describe herein the morphological aspects of the ovulatory process in GPIR and their response to classical ovulation inhibitors, such as the inhibitor of prostaglandin (PG synthesis indomethacin (INDO and a progesterone (P receptor (PR antagonist (RU486. Immature Wistar rats were primed with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG at 21, 23 or 25 days of age, injected with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG 48 h later, and sacrificed 16 h after hCG treatment, to assess follicle rupture and ovulation. Surprisingly, GPIR showed age-related ovulatory defects close similar to those in adult rats lacking P and PG actions. Rats primed with eCG at 21 or 23 days of age showed abnormally ruptured corpora lutea in which the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC was trapped or had been released to the ovarian interstitum, invading the ovarian stroma and blood and lymphatic vessels. Supplementation of immature rats with exogenous P and/or PG of the E series did not significantly inhibit abnormal follicle rupture. Otherwise, ovulatory defects were practically absent in rats primed with eCG at 25 days of age. GPIR treated with INDO showed the same ovulatory alterations than vehicle-treated ones, although affecting to a higher proportion of follicles. Blocking P actions with RU486 increased the number of COC trapped inside corpora lutea and decreased ovulation. The presence of ovulatory defects in GPIR, suggests that the capacity of the immature ovary to undergo the coordinate changes leading to effective ovulation is not fully established in Wistar rats primed with eCG before 25 days of age.

  13. "Young at heart": Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Renata S M; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (>8weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism.

  14. Controlling the Anchoring Effect through Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS to the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbiao Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Selective accessibility mechanisms indicate that anchoring effects are results of selective retrieval of working memory. Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC is closely related to memory retrieval and performance. However, no research has investigated the effect of changing the cortical excitability in right DLPFC on anchoring effects. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS can modulate the excitability of the human cerebral cortex, while anodal and cathodal tDCS are postulated to increase or decrease cortical activity, respectively. In this study, we used tDCS to investigate whether effects of increased or decreased right DLPFC excitability influence anchoring effects in willingness to pay (WTP experiments. Ninety participants were first randomly assigned to receive either anodal, cathodal, or sham stimulation of 15 min, then they performed a valuation task regarding WTP. The results showed that anchoring effects were negatively related to activities of right DLPFC: the anodal stimulation diminished anchoring effects while the cathodal stimulation increased anchoring effects. These outcomes provide one of the first instances of neural evidence for the role of the right DLPFC in anchoring effects and support psychological explanations of the selective accessibility mechanisms and cognitive sets.

  15. The role of the right parietal lobe in the perception of causality: a tDCS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Benjamin; Wolk, David; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2011-12-01

    Inferring causality is a fundamental feature of human cognition that allows us to predict outcomes in everyday events. Here, we use direct current stimulation (tDCS) to investigate the role of the right parietal lobe in the perception of causal events. Based on the results of a previous fMRI investigation, we hypothesized that the right parietal lobe plays a specific role in the processing of spatial attributes that contribute to judgments of causality. In line with our hypothesis, we found polarization-dependent modulation of causal judgments and corresponding reaction times (RTs) for trials with increasing violation of spatial contiguity in launching events. This effect was further modulated by temporal violations, as the effect of tDCS on the use of spatial information for causality judgements was strongest for trials with high temporal violations. Thus, especially for ambiguous trials with regard to temporal patterns, cathodal stimulation led to more liberal causality judgments for trials with high angles in movement trajectory. Furthermore, we found faster RTs after anodal stimulation of the right parietal lobe. These findings suggest a reduced influence of spatial attributes on the perception of causality after cathode stimulation of the right parietal lobe and an increased processing efficiency after anodal stimuli of the same region. These data demonstrate polarization-dependent tDCS modulation of spatial processing mechanisms within the right parietal lobe that contribute to the perception of causality.

  16. Canine Recombinant Adenovirus Vector Induces an Immunogenicity-Related Gene Expression Profile in Skin-Migrated CD11b+ -Type DCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickael; Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Bonneau, Michel; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of the blood cell response induced early after vaccination has previously been demonstrated to predict the immunogenicity of vaccines. In this study, we evaluated whether the analysis of the gene expression profile of skin-migrated dendritic cells (DCs) could be informative for the in vitro prediction of immunogenicity of vaccine, using canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV2) as vaccine vector. CAV2 has been shown to induce immunity to transgenes in several species including sheep and is an interesting alternative to human adenovirus-based vectors, based on the safety records of the parental strain in dogs and the lack of pre-existing immunity in non-host species. Skin-migrated DCs were collected from pseudo-afferent lymph in sheep. Both the CD11b+ -type and CD103+ -type skin-migrated DCs were transduced by CAV2. An analysis of the global gene response to CAV2 in the two skin DC subsets showed that the gene response in CD11b+ -type DCs was far higher and broader than in the CD103+ -type DCs. A newly released integrative analytic tool from Ingenuity systems revealed that the CAV2-modulated genes in the CD11b+ -type DCs clustered in several activated immunogenicity-related functions, such as immune response, immune cell trafficking and inflammation. Thus gene profiling in skin-migrated DC in vitro indicates that the CD11b+ DC type is more responsive to CAV2 than the CD103+ DC type, and provides valuable information to help in evaluating and possibly improving viral vector vaccine effectiveness. PMID:23300693

  17. Canine recombinant adenovirus vector induces an immunogenicity-related gene expression profile in skin-migrated CD11b⁺ -type DCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Contreras

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling of the blood cell response induced early after vaccination has previously been demonstrated to predict the immunogenicity of vaccines. In this study, we evaluated whether the analysis of the gene expression profile of skin-migrated dendritic cells (DCs could be informative for the in vitro prediction of immunogenicity of vaccine, using canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV2 as vaccine vector. CAV2 has been shown to induce immunity to transgenes in several species including sheep and is an interesting alternative to human adenovirus-based vectors, based on the safety records of the parental strain in dogs and the lack of pre-existing immunity in non-host species. Skin-migrated DCs were collected from pseudo-afferent lymph in sheep. Both the CD11b(+ -type and CD103(+ -type skin-migrated DCs were transduced by CAV2. An analysis of the global gene response to CAV2 in the two skin DC subsets showed that the gene response in CD11b(+ -type DCs was far higher and broader than in the CD103(+ -type DCs. A newly released integrative analytic tool from Ingenuity systems revealed that the CAV2-modulated genes in the CD11b(+ -type DCs clustered in several activated immunogenicity-related functions, such as immune response, immune cell trafficking and inflammation. Thus gene profiling in skin-migrated DC in vitro indicates that the CD11b(+ DC type is more responsive to CAV2 than the CD103(+ DC type, and provides valuable information to help in evaluating and possibly improving viral vector vaccine effectiveness.

  18. Fibroadenoma with "immature-like" type of usual ductal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezić, Joško; Karaman, Ivana; Kunac, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of the breast fibroadenoma with foci of so-called immature variant of the conventional ductal hyperplasia. This type of usual ductal hyperplasia is histologically characterised by encircling intraductal proliferation of large cells with pale to amphophilic cytoplasm and large nuclei which vary in shape and in staining quality of the chromatin. We showed here, using the cytokeratin immunohistochemistry, that the proliferating cells were not of immature but rather mature immunohistochemical phenotype. Because of the presented discordance between immature histology and mature immunohistological profile we suggest that this rare type of usual ductal hyperplasia should be called "immature-like".

  19. Evaluation of DCS III Transmission Alternatives. Phase 1A Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-26

    Waves . . . . ... . 3-13 3.4 EHF Satellite Communicatins ... 3-15 *3.5 Optical Fibers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17 3.5.1 Optical Fiber...Defense and Space Systems Group, TRW Inc. and by TRW’s subcontractor, Page Communications Engineers, Inc., Northrop Corporation . 1.1 Purpose of the DCS III...tactical and long haul communicatins systems study have been sponsored by the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy also is working on submarine fiber optics

  20. Mature dendritic cells derived from human monocytes within 48 hours: a novel strategy for dendritic cell differentiation from blood precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Marc; Obermaier, Bianca; Herten, Jan; Haerle, Carola; Pohl, Katrin; Rothenfusser, Simon; Schnurr, Max; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2003-04-15

    It is widely believed that generation of mature dendritic cells (DCs) with full T cell stimulatory capacity from human monocytes in vitro requires 5-7 days of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by 2-3 days of activation. Here, we report a new strategy for differentiation and maturation of monocyte-derived DCs within only 48 h of in vitro culture. Monocytes acquire immature DC characteristics by day 2 of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4; they down-regulate CD14, increase dextran uptake, and respond to the inflammatory chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. To accelerate DC development and maturation, monocytes were incubated for 24 h with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by activation with proinflammatory mediators for another 24 h (FastDC). FastDC expressed mature DC surface markers as well as chemokine receptor 7 and secreted IL-12 (p70) upon CD40 ligation in the presence of IFN-gamma. The increase in intracellular calcium in response to 6Ckine showed that chemokine receptor 7 expression was functional. When FastDC were compared with mature monocyte-derived DCs generated by a standard 7-day protocol, they were equally potent in inducing Ag-specific T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production as well as in priming autologous naive T cells using tetanus toxoid as a model Ag. These findings indicate that FastDC are as effective as monocyte-derived DCs in stimulating primary, Ag-specific, Th 1-type immune responses. Generation of FastDC not only reduces labor, cost, and time required for in vitro DC development, but may also represent a model more closely resembling DC differentiation from monocytes in vivo.

  1. Role of DC-SIGN in Lassa virus entry into human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Ana-Rita; Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pasquato, Antonella; Helenius, Ari; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    The arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans. Antigen-presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DCs), are early and preferred targets of LASV, and their productive infection contributes to the virus-induced immunosuppression observed in fatal disease. Here, we characterized the role of the C-type lectin DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in LASV entry into primary human DCs using a chimera of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) expressing the LASV glycoprotein (rLCMV-LASVGP). We found that differentiation of human primary monocytes into DCs enhanced virus attachment and entry, concomitant with the upregulation of DC-SIGN. LASV and rLCMV-LASVGP bound to DC-SIGN via mannose sugars located on the N-terminal GP1 subunit of LASVGP. We provide evidence that DC-SIGN serves as an attachment factor for rLCMV-LASVGP in monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells (MDDC) and can accelerate the capture of free virus. However, in contrast to the phlebovirus Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), which uses DC-SIGN as an authentic entry receptor, productive infection with rLCMV-LASVGP was less dependent on DC-SIGN. In contrast to the DC-SIGN-mediated cell entry of UUKV, entry of rLCMV-LASVGP in MDDC was remarkably slow and depended on actin, indicating the use of different endocytotic pathways. In sum, our data reveal that DC-SIGN can facilitate cell entry of LASV in human MDDC but that its role seems distinct from the function as an authentic entry receptor reported for phleboviruses.

  2. Anatomical Parameters of tDCS to Modulate the Motor System after Stroke: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Stephanie; Liew, Sook-Lei

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation method to modulate the local field potential in neural tissue and consequently, cortical excitability. As tDCS is relatively portable, affordable, and accessible, the applications of tDCS to probe brain–behavior connections have rapidly increased in the last 10 years. One of the most promising applications is the use of tDCS to modulate excitability in the motor cortex after stroke and promote motor recovery. However, the results of clinical studies implementing tDCS to modulate motor excitability have been highly variable, with some studies demonstrating that as many as 50% or more of patients fail to show a response to stimulation. Much effort has therefore been dedicated to understand the sources of variability affecting tDCS efficacy. Possible suspects include the placement of the electrodes, task parameters during stimulation, dosing (current amplitude, duration of stimulation, frequency of stimulation), individual states (e.g., anxiety, motivation, attention), and more. In this review, we first briefly review potential sources of variability specific to stroke motor recovery following tDCS. We then examine how the anatomical variability in tDCS placement [e.g., neural target(s) and montages employed] may alter the neuromodulatory effects that tDCS exerts on the post-stroke motor system. PMID:28232816

  3. Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS to study and treat aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazbanou Nozari

    2014-04-01

    - What are the challenges of using tDCS for hypothesis testing and how can I reduce the risk of misinterpreting my results? In summary, the symposium is designed to (a promote the theoretical understanding of the basic science of tDCS, and (b to tackle several pragmatic issues when designing tDCS studies, with the ultimate goal of cultivating higher standards for using a potentially invaluable technique for both clinical and research purposes. Given the growing interest in the aphasia community for using tDCS and the sophistication of the audience, we believe that the Academy’s annual meeting is the ideal venue for this symposium.

  4. A technical guide to tDCS, and related non-invasive brain stimulation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, AJ; Antal, A; Bikson, M; Boggio, PS; Brunoni, AR; Celnik, P; Cohen, LG; Fregni, F; Herrmann, CS; Kappenman, ES; Knotkova, H; Liebetanz, D; Miniussi, C; Miranda, PC; Paulus, W; Priori, A; Reato, D; Stagg, C; Wenderoth, N; Nitsche, MA

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), including transcranial direct and alternating current stimulation (tDCS, tACS) are non-invasive brain stimulation techniques increasingly used for modulation of central nervous system excitability in humans. Here we address methodological issues required for tES application. This review covers technical aspects of tES, as well as applications like exploration of brain physiology, modelling approaches, tES in cognitive neurosciences, and interventional approaches. It aims to help the reader to appropriately design and conduct studies involving these brain stimulation techniques, understand limitations and avoid shortcomings, which might hamper the scientific rigor and potential applications in the clinical domain. PMID:26652115

  5. Pulp revascularization of immature maxillary first premolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha S Al-Ghamdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An immature maxillary first premolar in an 8-year-old female was treated using a regenerative approach. The root canal was gently irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite without instrumentation under aseptic conditions and then medicated with calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH] 2 for 3 weeks. The Ca(OH 2 was removed, and bleeding was initiated mechanically using a hand file to form an intracanal blood clot. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed over the blood clot, and the access cavity was sealed with a double filling. Increases in root length and width were radiographically evident, at the 6-month follow-up exam. The case was followed for 3 years. The development of 3 roots with complete apical closure was confirmed using cone beam computed tomography.

  6. Hand motor control: maturing an immature science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kelly J

    2015-04-01

    In the target article Mark Latash has argued that there is but a single bona-fide theory for hand motor control (referent configuration theory). If this is true, and research is often phenomenological, then we must admit that the science of hand motor control is immature. While describing observations under varying conditions is a crucial (but early) stage of the science of any field, it is also true that the key to maturing any science is to vigorously subject extant theories and budding laws to critical experimentation. If competing theories are absent at the present time is it time for scientists to focus their efforts on maturing the science of hand motor control through critical testing of this long-standing theory (and related collections of knowledge such as the uncontrolled manifold)?

  7. Key role of splenic myeloid DCs in the IFN-alphabeta response to adenoviruses in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Fejer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The early systemic production of interferon (IFN-alphabeta is an essential component of the antiviral host defense mechanisms, but is also thought to contribute to the toxic side effects accompanying gene therapy with adenoviral vectors. Here we investigated the IFN-alphabeta response to human adenoviruses (Ads in mice. By comparing the responses of normal, myeloid (mDC- and plasmacytoid (pDC-depleted mice and by measuring IFN-alphabeta mRNA expression in different organs and cells types, we show that in vivo, Ads elicit strong and rapid IFN-alphabeta production, almost exclusively in splenic mDCs. Using knockout mice, various strains of Ads (wild type, mutant and UV-inactivated and MAP kinase inhibitors, we demonstrate that the Ad-induced IFN-alphabeta response does not require Toll-like receptors (TLR, known cytosolic sensors of RNA (RIG-I/MDA-5 and DNA (DAI recognition and interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3, but is dependent on viral endosomal escape, signaling via the MAP kinase SAPK/JNK and IRF-7. Furthermore, we show that Ads induce IFN-alphabeta and IL-6 in vivo by distinct pathways and confirm that IFN-alphabeta positively regulates the IL-6 response. Finally, by measuring TNF-alpha responses to LPS in Ad-infected wild type and IFN-alphabetaR(-/- mice, we show that IFN-alphabeta is the key mediator of Ad-induced hypersensitivity to LPS. These findings indicate that, like endosomal TLR signaling in pDCs, TLR-independent virus recognition in splenic mDCs can also produce a robust early IFN-alphabeta response, which is responsible for the bulk of IFN-alphabeta production induced by adenovirus in vivo. The signaling requirements are different from known TLR-dependent or cytosolic IFN-alphabeta induction mechanisms and suggest a novel cytosolic viral induction pathway. The hypersensitivity to components of the microbial flora and invading pathogens may in part explain the toxic side effects of adenoviral gene therapy and contribute to the

  8. Cryopreservation of immature seeds of Bletilla striata by vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, T; Godo, T; Mii, M; Ishikawa, K

    2005-01-01

    An efficient protocol was established for the cryopreservation of immature seeds of a terrestrial orchid, Bletilla striata. Immature seeds collected 2-4 months after pollination (MAP) were treated using three different cryogenic procedures: (1) direct plunging into liquid nitrogen, (2) vitrification, and (3) vitrification with preculture. When immature seeds collected 3 MAP and 4 MAP were precultured for 3 days on New Dogashima medium supplemented with 0.3 M sucrose and cryopreserved by vitrification, the survival rate after preservation, as assessed by staining with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride, was 92% and 81%, respectively. Immature seeds thus treated showed no decrease in germination rate relative to untreated immature seeds, and they developed into normal plantlets in vitro.

  9. 化工企业 DCS 与 SIS 一体化分析与探讨%Analysis and Discussion of DCS and SIS for Chemical Enterprise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳松

    2016-01-01

    根据作者的多年实践,目前有为数不少的化工企业在如何保证工艺过程控制系统与 SIS 系统的独立性及可靠性方面存在困惑。本文以 DCS 系统为例,探讨了在本质安全的前提下,实现 DCS 与 SIS 一体化的可行性与设计构想。%According to the author ˊs years of practice,a number of chemical enterprise are confused on how to ensure the independence and reliability of the process control system and SIS. Based on DCS system as an example,this paper achieve the integration of DCS and SIS feasibility and design idea based on the intrinsically safe premise.

  10. Coordinate expression of NADPH-dependent flavin reductase, Fre-1, and Hint-related 7meGMP-directed hydrolase, DCS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnicka, Dorota A; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Thacker, Colin; Brenner, Charles; Vincent, Steven R

    2003-10-03

    A novel human cytosolic flavin reductase, Nr1, was recently described that contains FMN, FAD, and NADPH cofactors. Though the targets of the related NADPH-dependent flavoprotein reductases, cytochrome P450 reductase, methionine synthase reductase, and nitric oxide synthase, are known, the cellular function of Nr1 is not clear. To explore expression and regulation of Nr1, we cloned fre-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of Nr1, and discovered that it is transcribed as a bicistronic pre-mRNA together with dcs-1, the ortholog of the recently described scavenger mRNA decapping enzyme. We used the novel substrate, 7meGpppBODIPY, to demonstrate that DCS-1 has low micromolar specificity for guanine ribonucleotides with the 7me modification, whereas trimethylated G substrates are poor competitors. Contrary to earlier classification, DCS-1 is not a pyrophosphatase but a distant member of the Hint branch of the histidine triad superfamily of nucleotide hydrolases and transferases. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that DCS-1 homologs may function in the metabolism of capped oligonucleotides generated following exosome-dependent degradation of short-lived mRNA transcripts. We find that fre-1 and dcs-1 are coordinately expressed through worm development, are induced by heat shock, and have a nearly identical expression profile in human tissues. Furthermore, immunocytochemical analysis of the endogenous proteins in COS cells indicates that both are present in the nucleus and concentrated in a distinct perinuclear structure. Though no connection between these enzymes had been anticipated, our data and data from global expression and protein association studies suggest that the two enzymes jointly participate in responses to DNA damage, heat shock, and other stresses.

  11. tDCS for the treatment of depression: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Ulrich; Hasan, Alkomiet; Strube, Wolfgang; Padberg, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been investigated for the treatment of major depressive disorders in recent years. Here, we review the implications of current research for the clinical use of tDCS in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Meta-analyses, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, open-label trials, case reports and review articles were identified through a systematic search of the literature database of the National Institutes of Health (USA). Available articles were evaluated with regard to their clinical relevance. Results of tDCS efficacy are inconsistent due to the small sample sizes, the heterogeneous patient samples and the partially high treatment resistance in some studies. Overall, tDCS has very low side effects. Meta-analyses suggest some efficacy of tDCS in the treatment of acute depressive disorder with moderate effect size, and low efficacy in treatment-resistant depression. A general statement about the efficacy of tDCS as a therapeutic tool in major depression seems to be premature. tDCS is considered as a safe therapeutic option and is associated with only minor side effects. The effectiveness of tDCS decreases with resistance to treatment. Psychotropic drugs may attenuate or amplify its effects. The use of 2 mA current strength over 20 min per day over a short time span can be considered as safe.

  12. Electrifying the motor engram: effects of tDCS on motor learning and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Xivry, Jean-Jacques Orban; Shadmehr, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Learning to control our movements accompanies neuroplasticity of motor areas of the brain. The mechanisms of neuroplasticity are diverse and produce what is referred to as the motor engram, i.e. the neural trace of the motor memory. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) alters the neural and behavioral correlates of motor learning, but its precise influence on the motor engram is unknown. In this review, we summarize the effects of tDCS on neural activity and suggest a few key principles: 1) firing rates are increased by anodal polarization and decreased by cathodal polarization, 2) anodal polarization strengthens newly formed associations, and 3) polarization modulates the memory of new/preferred firing patterns. With these principles in mind, we review the effects of tDCS on motor control, motor learning, and clinical applications. The increased spontaneous and evoked firing rates may account for the modulation of dexterity in non-learning tasks by tDCS. The facilitation of new association may account for the effect of tDCS on learning in sequence tasks while the ability of tDCS to strengthen memories of new firing patterns may underlie the effect of tDCS on consolidation of skills. We then describe the mechanisms of neuroplasticity of motor cortical areas and how they might be influenced by tDCS. We end with current challenges for the fields of brain stimulation and motor learning. PMID:25200178

  13. Enhancement of selective attention by tDCS: Interaction with interference in a Sternberg task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; Uyl, T. den; Fregni, F.F.; Wiers, R.W.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) enhances performance on working memory tasks. However, such effects may be dependent on modulation of specific aspects of working memory. We therefore tested the hypothesis that tDCS improves selective attention in the context of a Sternberg task. Subje

  14. Effects of different language and tDCS interventions in PPA and their neural correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrana Tsapkini

    2015-05-01

    Results: First, we replicated our previous results obtained with fewer participants: all improved in both tDCS and sham conditions on trained items. Generalization of treatment on untrained items was significant only in tDCS condition. Therapy gains lasted longer in tDCS condition as well. Second, preliminary analyses of rs-fMRI show changes of functional connectivity between written language areas in the tDCS and sham conditions. Conclusions: tDCS represents an increasingly valuable treatment option in language rehabilitation even in neurodegeneration. Late intervention is as beneficial as early intervention but improvement seems more dramatic in early cases. Different possibilities are discussed: tDCS may indeed change the course of the disease, i.e., it may slow down the rate of decline or, language improvement due to tDCS (or delay in language deterioration due to the course of the disease may hold the spread of decline in other cognitive functions, thus, early interventions appear more beneficial. The correlation between functional connectivity and language production outcomes is expected to shed light on how tDCS works in the brains of people with a neurodegenerative disease. Implications of functional connectivity changes between language areas involved in the targeted language function will inform further interventions.

  15. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Behaviour and Electrophysiology of Language Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Miranka; Rahman, Rasha Abdel; Kuenecke, Janina; Koenig, Thomas; Horn, Helge; Sommer, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (A-tDCS) over the left dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC) has been shown to improve language production. The present study examined neurophysiological underpinnings of this effect. In a single-blinded within-subject design, we traced effects of A-tDCS compared to sham stimulation over the left…

  16. Enhancement of selective attention by tDCS: interaction with interference in a Sternberg task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; den Uyl, T.E.; Fregni, F.F.; Wiers, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) enhances performance on working memory tasks. However, such effects may be dependent on modulation of specific aspects of working memory. We therefore tested the hypothesis that tDCS improves selective attention in the context of a Sternberg task.

  17. Enhancement of selective attention by tDCS: interaction with interference in a Sternberg task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; den Uyl, T.E.; Fregni, F.F.; Wiers, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) enhances performance on working memory tasks. However, such effects may be dependent on modulation of specific aspects of working memory. We therefore tested the hypothesis that tDCS improves selective attention in the context of a Sternberg task. Subje

  18. Natural mannosylation of HIV-1 gp120 imposes no immunoregulatory effects in primary human plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sondergaard, J.N.; Vinner, L.; Brix, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a vital role in activation of anti-HIV-1 immunity, and suppression of pDCs might mitigate immune responses against HIV-1. HIV-1 gp120 high-mannose has been attributed immunosuppressive roles in human myeloid DCs, but no receptors for high-mannose have so far

  19. Vertical root fracture resistance of simulated immature permanent teeth filled with MTA using different vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerbeyli-Örs, Sevinc; Deniz-Sungur, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to evaluate the resistance vertical root fracture (VRF) of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) filled-immature permanent roots by using three different vehicles. Material and Methods Forty-extracted human single-rooted mandibular premolars were selected and the root length was standardized to the length of 9 mm. For simulation of immature tooth apices, peeso reamers were introduced into the root canals and the prepared roots were assigned into three experimental groups according the used vehicle (distilled water-DW, prophylene glycol-PG, chlorhexidine-CHX) and control group (n=10). To simulate a periodontal membrane, the apical 7 mm of all roots was covered with wax to obtain a 0.2- to 0.3-mm-thick layer before embedding the roots into acrylic cylinders. A vertical force was applied (1mm/min) using a universal testing machine and the maximum load (F-max) that fracture occurred and the fracture mode (splint or comminuted) was recorded. Data were presented as mean and standard deviations. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U Test was used for multiple comparisons. Results There were significant differences between fracture strength of experimental groups with that of control group (p0.05). In all groups, split fracture was the most common fracture mode. Conclusions MTA increases resistance of immature permanent teeth to VRF. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that mixing MTA with CHX or PG as the vehicle do not alter VRF resistance of simulated immature permanent roots. Key words:Immature teeth, MTA, vehicle, vertical root fracture. PMID:28210431

  20. Immaturity of Visual Fixations in Dyslexic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiadi, Aimé; Gérard, Christophe-Loïc; Peyre, Hugo; Bui-Quoc, Emmanuel; Bucci, Maria Pia

    2016-01-01

    To our knowledge, behavioral studies recording visual fixations abilities in dyslexic children are scarce. The object of this article is to explore further the visual fixation ability in dyslexics compared to chronological age-matched and reading age-matched non-dyslexic children. Fifty-five dyslexic children from 7 to 14 years old, 55 chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children and 55 reading age-matched non-dyslexic children participated to this study. Eye movements from both eyes were recorded horizontally and vertically by a video-oculography system (EyeBrain(®) T2). The fixation task consisted in fixating a white-filled circle appearing in the center of the screen for 30 s. Results showed that dyslexic children produced a significantly higher number of unwanted saccades than both groups of non-dyslexic children. Moreover, the number of unwanted saccades significantly decreased with age in both groups of non-dyslexic children, but not in dyslexics. Furthermore, dyslexics made more saccades during the last 15 s of fixation period with respect to both groups of non-dyslexic children. Such poor visual fixation capability in dyslexic children could be due to impaired attention abilities, as well as to an immaturity of the cortical areas controlling the fixation system.

  1. Immaturity of Visual Fixations in Dyslexic Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIADI eBi Kuyami Guy Aimé

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, behavioral studies recording visual fixations abilities in dyslexic children are scarce. The object of this paper is to explore further the visual fixation ability in dyslexics compared to chronological age-matched and reading age-matched non-dyslexic children. Fifty-five dyslexic children from 7 to 14 years old, fifty-five chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children and fifty-five reading age-matched non-dyslexic children participated to this study. Eye movements from both eyes were recorded horizontally and vertically by a video-oculography system (EyeBrain® T2. The fixation task consisted in fixating a white-filled circle appearing in the centre of the screen for 30 seconds. Results showed that dyslexic children produced a significantly higher number of unwanted saccades than both groups of non-dyslexic children. Moreover, the number of unwanted saccades significantly decreased with age in both groups of non-dyslexic children, but not in dyslexics. Furthermore, dyslexics made more saccades during the last 15 sec of fixation period with respect to both groups of non-dyslexic children. Such poor visual fixation capability in dyslexic children could be due to impaired attention abilities, as well as to an immaturity of the cortical areas controlling the fixation system.

  2. Sex Differences in Object Manipulation in Wild Immature Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii and Bonobos (Pan paniscus: Preparation for Tool Use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathelijne Koops

    Full Text Available Sex differences in immatures predict behavioural differences in adulthood in many mammal species. Because most studies have focused on sex differences in social interactions, little is known about possible sex differences in 'preparation' for adult life with regards to tool use skills. We investigated sex and age differences in object manipulation in immature apes. Chimpanzees use a variety of tools across numerous contexts, whereas bonobos use few tools and none in foraging. In both species, a female bias in adult tool use has been reported. We studied object manipulation in immature chimpanzees at Kalinzu (Uganda and bonobos at Wamba (Democratic Republic of Congo. We tested predictions of the 'preparation for tool use' hypothesis. We confirmed that chimpanzees showed higher rates and more diverse types of object manipulation than bonobos. Against expectation, male chimpanzees showed higher object manipulation rates than females, whereas in bonobos no sex difference was found. However, object manipulation by male chimpanzees was play-dominated, whereas manipulation types of female chimpanzees were more diverse (e.g., bite, break, carry. Manipulation by young immatures of both species was similarly dominated by play, but only in chimpanzees did it become more diverse with age. Moreover, in chimpanzees, object types became more tool-like (i.e., sticks with age, further suggesting preparation for tool use in adulthood. The male bias in object manipulation in immature chimpanzees, along with the late onset of tool-like object manipulation, indicates that not all (early object manipulation (i.e., object play in immatures prepares for subsistence tool use. Instead, given the similarity with gender differences in human children, object play may also function in motor skill practice for male-specific behaviours (e.g., dominance displays. In conclusion, even though immature behaviours almost certainly reflect preparation for adult roles, more detailed

  3. Immature transformed rat islet beta-cells differentially express C-peptides derived from the genes coding for insulin I and II as well as a transfected human insulin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Petersen, J S; Andersen, L C;

    1992-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing unique sequences in rat proinsulin C-peptide I and II were used to generate highly specific antisera, which, when applied on sections of normal rat pancreas, confirm a homogeneous coexpression of the two C-peptides in all islet beta-cells. Insulin gene expression...... is induced in the transformed heterogeneous rat islet cell clone, NHI-6F, by transient in vivo passage. During this process a transfected human insulin gene is coactivated with the endogenous nonallelic rat insulin I and II genes. Newly established cultures from NHI-6F insulinomas having a high frequency...

  4. MiR-34a promotes DCs development and inhibits their function on T cell activation by targeting WNT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Xia, Fei; Sun, Di; Fang, Deyu; Xiong, Sidong; Jin, Liping; Zhang, Jinping

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs serve important functions in numerous biological processes. Whether microRNAs also act on dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and function remains unclear. In this study, both conventional DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) were increased in miR-34a overexpressing bone marrow chimeric and transgenic (TG) mice. Further experiments showed that miR-34a promoted preDC differentiated into cDCs and pDCs without affecting the proliferation and apoptosis of DCs. Luciferase report assay and Western blot experiments demonstrated that WNT1 is the direct target of miR-34a in DCs. Interestingly, miR-34a overexpressing cDCs also produced a large amount of IL-17a and suppressed T cell activation because of the inhibition of TCF1 expression, thus increasing RORγT expression. Taken together, miR-34a promotes preDC to differentiate into cDCs and pDCs, as well as inhibits the function of cDCs on the activation of CD4+ T cells by producing IL-17a. PMID:28199987

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in a realistic head model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Rosalind J; Vannorsdall, Tracy D; Schretlen, David J; Gordon, Barry

    2010-07-15

    Distributions of current produced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in humans were predicted by a finite-element model representing several individual and collective refinements over prior efforts. A model of the entire human head and brain was made using a finely meshed (1.1x1.1x1.4mm(3) voxel) tissue dataset derived from the MRI data set of a normal human brain. The conductivities of ten tissues were simulated (bone, scalp, blood, CSF, muscle, white matter, gray matter, sclera, fat, and cartilage). We then modeled the effect of placing a "stimulating" electrode with a saline-like conductivity over F3, and a similar "reference" electrode over a right supraorbital (RS) location, as well as the complements of these locations, to compare expectations derived from the simulation with experimental data also using these locations in terms of the presence or absence of subjective and objective effects. The sensitivity of the results to changes in conductivity values were examined by varying white matter conductivity over a factor of ten. Our simulations established that high current densities were found directly under the stimulating and reference electrodes, but values of the same order of magnitude occurred in other structures, and many areas of the brain that might be behaviorally active were also subjected to what may be substantial amounts of current. The modeling also suggests that more targeted stimulations might be achieved by different electrode topologies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metaplastic thymoma with myasthenia gravis presumably caused by an accumulation of intratumoral immature T cells: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Shogo; Yanagiya, Masahiro; Sato, Masaaki; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Among human neoplasms, thymomas are well known for their association with paraneoplastic autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis. However, regarding rare metaplastic thymoma, only one case of an association with myasthenia gravis has been reported. Here, we present the second case of a 44-year-old woman with metaplastic thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. In metaplastic thymoma, intratumoral terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-positive T-cells (immature T-cells) are generally scarce, while they were abundant in the present case. We believe that these immature T-cells could be related to the occurrence of myasthenia gravis.

  7. An adjuvant role of in situ dendritic cells (DCs) in linking innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kanako; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2008-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) work as a natural adjuvant to elicit T cell immunity. Though DCs have been widely used in immunotherapy, little is known about their number and function in patients with cancer or autoimmune disease. In recent studies, antigen has been targeted to DCs through DC-specific receptors, such as DEC205, the mannose receptor and dying cell receptors. However, antigen captured by DCs in the absence of danger signals induces tolerance. Therefore, the duration and/or magnitude of danger signals plays a crucial role in generating an immunogeneic response. Various danger signals, i.e., pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) and the activation of innate lymphocytes, serve as maturation signals for DCs. An immunotherapeutic approach which delivers both maturation signals and antigen to DCs would link the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system for a more effective and global immune response. It is therefore crucial to determine optimal conditions for antigen delivery to DCs in an environment suited to maximally stimulate the immune system.

  8. Impact of antipsychotic medication on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) effects in schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sri Mahavir; Bose, Anushree; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Chhabra, Harleen; Kalmady, Sunil V; Varambally, Shivarama; Nitsche, Michael A; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2016-01-30

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has generated interest as a treatment modality for schizophrenia. Dopamine, a critical pathogenetic link in schizophrenia, is also known to influence tDCS effects. We evaluated the influence of antipsychotic drug type (as defined by dopamine D2 receptor affinity) on the impact of tDCS in schizophrenia. DSM-IV-TR-diagnosed schizophrenia patients [N=36] with persistent auditory hallucinations despite adequate antipsychotic treatment were administered add-on tDCS. Patients were divided into three groups based on the antipsychotic's affinity to D2 receptors. An auditory hallucinations score (AHS) was measured using the auditory hallucinations subscale of the Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales (PSYRATS). Add-on tDCS resulted in a significant reduction inAHS. Antipsychotic drug type had a significant effect on AHS reduction. Patients treated with high affinity antipsychotics showed significantly lesser improvement compared to patients on low affinity antipsychotics or a mixture of the two. Furthermore, a significant sex-by-group interaction occurred; type of medication had an impact on tDCS effects only in women. Improvement differences could be due to the larger availability of the dopamine receptor system in patients taking antipsychotics with low D2 affinity. Sex-specific differences suggest potential estrogen-mediated effects. This study reports a first-time observation on the clinical utility of antipsychotic drug type in predicting tDCS effects in schizophrenia.

  9. Structure of the immature HIV-1 capsid in intact virus particles at 8.8 Å resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Florian K. M.; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, Tomáš; Müller, Barbara; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) assembly proceeds in two stages. First, the 55 kilodalton viral Gag polyprotein assembles into a hexameric protein lattice at the plasma membrane of the infected cell, inducing budding and release of an immature particle. Second, Gag is cleaved by the viral protease, leading to internal rearrangement of the virus into the mature, infectious form. Immature and mature HIV-1 particles are heterogeneous in size and morphology, preventing high-resolution analysis of their protein arrangement in situ by conventional structural biology methods. Here we apply cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging methods to resolve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature HIV-1 particles at subnanometre resolution, allowing unambiguous positioning of all α-helices. The resulting model reveals tertiary and quaternary structural interactions that mediate HIV-1 assembly. Strikingly, these interactions differ from those predicted by the current model based on in vitro-assembled arrays of Gag-derived proteins from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. To validate this difference, we solve the structure of the capsid lattice within intact immature Mason-Pfizer monkey virus particles. Comparison with the immature HIV-1 structure reveals that retroviral capsid proteins, while having conserved tertiary structures, adopt different quaternary arrangements during virus assembly. The approach demonstrated here should be applicable to determine structures of other proteins at subnanometre resolution within heterogeneous environments.

  10. Immature Gastric Teratoma in a Newborn: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A case of immature gastric teratoma in a neonate is being reported here. The neonate was presented with abdominal mass and distension and managed with excision of mass; the patient is doing fine postoperatively.

  11. Immature Gastric Teratoma in a Newborn: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Yadav, Hemant; Rattan, Kamal Nain; Srivastava, Divya; Chandana, Abha; Prakash, Sant

    2016-01-01

    A case of immature gastric teratoma in a neonate is being reported here. The neonate was presented with abdominal mass and distension and managed with excision of mass; the patient is doing fine postoperatively. PMID:27123405

  12. [Immature stages of Caligo illioneus illioneus (Cramer) (Nymphalidae: Morphinae: Brassolini)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Maria J S; Paluch, Márlon

    2009-01-01

    The biology and external morphology of the immature stages of Caligo illioneus illioneus (Cramer) are described from ovipositions collected on leaves of Heliconia velloziana (Heliconiaceae) in the Atlantic Forest in Pernambuco state, Brazil.

  13. Hits and Misses: Leveraging tDCS to Advance Cognitive Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian E Berryhill

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in basic, commercial, and applied settings grew tremendously over the last decade. Here, we focus on one popular neurostimulation method: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. Many assumptions regarding the outcomes of tDCS are based on the results of stimulating motor cortex. For instance, the primary motor cortex is predictably suppressed by cathodal tDCS or made more excitable by anodal tDCS. However, wide-ranging studies testing cognition provide more complex and sometimes paradoxical results that challenge this heuristic. Here, we first summarize successful efforts in applying tDCS to cognitive questions, with a focus on working memory. These recent findings indicate that tDCS can result in cognitive task improvement or impairment regardless of stimulation site or direction of current flow. We then report working memory and response inhibition studies that failed to replicate and/or extend previously reported effects. From these opposing outcomes, we present a series of factors to consider that are intended to facilitate future use of tDCS when applied to cognitive questions. In short, common pitfalls include testing too few participants, using insufficiently challenging tasks, using heterogeneous participant populations, and including poorly motivated participants. Furthermore, the poorly understood underlying mechanism for long-lasting tDCS effects make it likely that other important factors predict responses. In conclusion, we argue that although tDCS can be used experimentally to understand brain function its greatest potential may be in applied or translational research.

  14. Two Opposed Ideas As Immature Ambivalence In The Greatk Gatsby

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuZhu

    1999-01-01

    The Great Gatsby narrates a symbolist tragedy in a transitional era.It's ambivalent characterization and themes find justifications in the writer's own ideology of two opposed ideas,and in his efforts to define and judge subjects of social problems.The ambivalent characterization concerns the writer's dual response to the protagonist's corruption and innocence respectively.Ultimately the writer is convinced that both the corruption and mnocence are justifiable in the morality of his protagonist.Whereas the ambivalent themes dealing with the American dream attach importance to the social class perspectives and the vision of history.undoubtedly the writer slides into a compromise with his themes:repudation and approval.Because of the equally strong interplay of two opposed ideas,the writer fails to locate a definite position and scale,which results in his immature control in the art of the work.The writer's characteristic code and achievement are significant because they genuinely reveal human being's fundamental dilemma in social life.

  15. Immature Oils in China and Their Genetic Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Immature crude oils are a kind of unconventional petroleum resources. They are generated through early low-temperature biochemical/chemical reactions of some specific organic matter. Their geological reserves explored are as high as several hundred million tons in China. Based on a detailed organic geochemical study, five genetic mechanisms of immature oils have been proposed in this paper for early hydrocarbon generation from suberinite, resinite, bacteria-reworked terrestrial organic matter, biolipids and sulphur-rich macromolecules respectively.

  16. Modeling Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease with Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Immature Hepatocyte-Like Cells Reveals Activation of PLIN2 and Confirms Regulatory Functions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffmann, Nina; Ring, Sarah; Kawala, Marie-Ann; Wruck, Wasco; Ncube, Audrey; Trompeter, Hans-Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD/steatosis) is a metabolic disease characterized by the incorporation of fat into hepatocytes. In this study, we developed an in vitro model for NAFLD based on hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells. We induced fat storage in these HLCs and detected major expression changes of metabolism-associated genes, as well as an overall reduction of liver-related microRNAs. We observed an upregulation of the lipid droplet coating protein Perilipin 2 (PLIN2), as well as of numerous genes of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pathway, which constitutes a regulatory hub for metabolic processes. Interference with PLIN2 and PPARα resulted in major alterations in gene expression, especially affecting lipid, glucose, and purine metabolism. Our model recapitulates many metabolic changes that are characteristic for NAFLD. It permits the dissection of disease-promoting molecular pathways and allows us to investigate the influences of distinct genetic backgrounds on disease progression. PMID:27308945

  17. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) study of blood flow changes during low level laser therapy (LLLT): a preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sagar; Wang, Xinlong; Liu, Hanli; Tian, Fenghua

    2017-02-01

    Photobiomodulation with low-power, high-fluence light in the near-infrared range (600-1100nm), also known as low level laser therapy (LLLT), has been used for promoting healing of wounds, reducing pain, and so on. Understanding its physiological effect is essential for treatment optimization and evaluation. In this study, we used diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to investigate the changes of regional blood flow in skeletal muscle induced by a single session of LLLT. DCS is an emerging optical modality to probe microvascular blood flow in human tissues in vivo. We have developed a software-based autocorrelator system with the benefits such as flexibility in raw photon count data processing, portability and low cost. LLLT was administered at the human forearm with a 1064-nm, continuous-wave laser. The emitting power was 3.4 W in an area of 13.6 cm2, corresponding to 0.25W/cm2 irradiance. The emitting duration was 10 minutes. Eight healthy adults of any ethnic background, in an age range of 18-40 years old were included. The results indicate that LLLT causes reliable changes in regional blood flow. However, it remains unclear whether these changes are physiological or attributed to the heating effect of the stimulation laser.

  18. Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Antal, Andrea; Ayache, Samar S; Benninger, David H; Brunelin, Jérôme; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Cotelli, Maria; De Ridder, Dirk; Ferrucci, Roberta; Langguth, Berthold; Marangolo, Paola; Mylius, Veit; Nitsche, Michael A; Padberg, Frank; Palm, Ulrich; Poulet, Emmanuel; Priori, Alberto; Rossi, Simone; Schecklmann, Martin; Vanneste, Sven; Ziemann, Ulf; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Paulus, Walter

    2017-01-01

    A group of European experts was commissioned by the European Chapter of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology to gather knowledge about the state of the art of the therapeutic use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) from studies published up until September 2016, regarding pain, Parkinson's disease, other movement disorders, motor stroke, poststroke aphasia, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, consciousness disorders, Alzheimer's disease, tinnitus, depression, schizophrenia, and craving/addiction. The evidence-based analysis included only studies based on repeated tDCS sessions with sham tDCS control procedure; 25 patients or more having received active treatment was required for Class I, while a lower number of 10-24 patients was accepted for Class II studies. Current evidence does not allow making any recommendation of Level A (definite efficacy) for any indication. Level B recommendation (probable efficacy) is proposed for: (i) anodal tDCS of the left primary motor cortex (M1) (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in fibromyalgia; (ii) anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in major depressive episode without drug resistance; (iii) anodal tDCS of the right DLPFC (with left DLPFC cathode) in addiction/craving. Level C recommendation (possible efficacy) is proposed for anodal tDCS of the left M1 (or contralateral to pain side, with right orbitofrontal cathode) in chronic lower limb neuropathic pain secondary to spinal cord lesion. Conversely, Level B recommendation (probable inefficacy) is conferred on the absence of clinical effects of: (i) anodal tDCS of the left temporal cortex (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in tinnitus; (ii) anodal tDCS of the left DLPFC (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in drug-resistant major depressive episode. It remains to be clarified whether the probable or possible therapeutic effects of tDCS are clinically meaningful and how to optimally perform tDCS

  19. Cyber security risk assessment for SCADA and DCS networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, P A S; Graham, J H; Hieb, J L

    2007-10-01

    The growing dependence of critical infrastructures and industrial automation on interconnected physical and cyber-based control systems has resulted in a growing and previously unforeseen cyber security threat to supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and distributed control systems (DCSs). It is critical that engineers and managers understand these issues and know how to locate the information they need. This paper provides a broad overview of cyber security and risk assessment for SCADA and DCS, introduces the main industry organizations and government groups working in this area, and gives a comprehensive review of the literature to date. Major concepts related to the risk assessment methods are introduced with references cited for more detail. Included are risk assessment methods such as HHM, IIM, and RFRM which have been applied successfully to SCADA systems with many interdependencies and have highlighted the need for quantifiable metrics. Presented in broad terms is probability risk analysis (PRA) which includes methods such as FTA, ETA, and FEMA. The paper concludes with a general discussion of two recent methods (one based on compromise graphs and one on augmented vulnerability trees) that quantitatively determine the probability of an attack, the impact of the attack, and the reduction in risk associated with a particular countermeasure.

  20. LHCb Silicon Tracker DAQ and DCS Online Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Esperante-Pereira, D; Büchler, A; Keune, A; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Bettler, M O; Conti, G; Fave, V; Frei, R; Perrin, A; Potterat, C; Schneider, O; Tran, M; Bauer, C; Britsch, M; Hofmann, W; Maciuc, F; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Straumann, U; Anderson, J; Chiapolini, N; Hangartner, V; Salzmann, S; Steiner, A; Steinkamp, O; Van Tilburg, J; Tobin, M; Vollhardt, A; Adeva, B; Fungueirino Pazos, A; Gallas, A; Pazos-Alvarez, A; Pérez-Trigo, E; Pló Casasús, M; Saborido, J; Vázquez, P; Gong, A; Iavenko, V; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva Switzerland is specialized on precision measurements of b quark decays. The Silicon Tracker (ST) contributes a crucial part in tracking the particle trajectories and consists of two silicon micro-strip detectors, the Tracker Turicensis upstream of the LHCb magnet and the Inner Tracker downstream. The radiation and the magnetic field represent new challenges for the implementation of a Detector Control System (DCS) and the data acquisition (DAQ). The DAQ has to deal with more than 270K analog readout channels, 2K readout chips and real time DAQ at a rate of 1.1 MHz with data processing at TELL1 level. The TELL1 real time algorithms for clustering thresholds and other computations run on dedicated FPGAs that implement 13K configurable parameters per board, in total 1.17 K parameters for the ST. After data processing the total throughput amounts to about 6.4 Gbytes from an input data rate of around ~337 Gbytes per second. A finite state mac...

  1. LHCb Silicon Tracker DAQ and DCS Online Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Buechler, A; Rodriguez, P

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva Switzerland is specialized on precision measurements of b quark decays. The Silicon Tracker (ST) contributes a crucial part in tracking the particle trajectories and consists of two silicon micro-strip detectors, the Tracker Turicensis upstream of the LHCb magnet and the Inner Tracker downstream. The radiation and the magnetic field represent new challenges for the implementation of a Detector Control System (DCS) and the data acquisition (DAQ). The DAQ has to deal with more than 270K analog readout channels, 2K readout chips and real time DAQ at a rate of 1.1 MHz with data processing at TELL1 level. The TELL1 real time algorithms for clustering thresholds and other computations run on dedicated FPGAs that implement 13K configurable parameters per board, in total 1.17 K parameters for the ST. After data processing the total throughput amounts to about 6.4 Gbytes from an input data rate of around ~337 Gbytes per second. A finite state ma...

  2. Cooperation Not Competition: Bihemispheric tDCS and fMRI Show Role for Ipsilateral Hemisphere in Motor Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sheena; Wiestler, Tobias; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2017-08-02

    What is the role of ipsilateral motor and premotor areas in motor learning? One view is that ipsilateral activity suppresses contralateral motor cortex and, accordingly, that inhibiting ipsilateral regions can improve motor learning. Alternatively, the ipsilateral motor cortex may play an active role in the control and/or learning of unilateral hand movements. We approached this question by applying double-blind bihemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over both contralateral and ipsilateral motor cortex in a between-group design during 4 d of unimanual explicit sequence training in human participants. Independently of whether the anode was placed over contralateral or ipsilateral motor cortex, bihemispheric stimulation yielded substantial performance gains relative to unihemispheric or sham stimulation. This performance advantage appeared to be supported by plastic changes in both hemispheres. First, we found that behavioral advantages generalized strongly to the untrained hand, suggesting that tDCS strengthened effector-independent representations. Second, functional imaging during speed-matched execution of trained sequences conducted 48 h after training revealed sustained, polarity-independent increases in activity in both motor cortices relative to the sham group. These results suggest a cooperative rather than competitive interaction of the two motor cortices during skill learning and suggest that bihemispheric brain stimulation during unimanual skill learning may be beneficial because it harnesses plasticity in the ipsilateral hemisphere.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many neurorehabilitation approaches are based on the idea that is beneficial to boost excitability in the contralateral hemisphere while attenuating that of the ipsilateral cortex to reduce interhemispheric inhibition. We observed that bihemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with the excitatory anode either over contralateral or ipsilateral motor cortex

  3. Modulation of selective attention by polarity-specific tDCS effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchinenda, Anna; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Lavidor, Michal

    2015-02-01

    Selective attention relies on working memory to maintain an attention set of task priorities. Consequently, selective attention is more efficient when working memory resources are not depleted. However, there is some evidence that distractors are processed even when working memory load is low. We used tDCS to assess whether boosting the activity of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex (DLPFC), involved in selective attention and working memory, would reduce interference from emotional distractors. Findings showed that anodal tDCS over the DLPFC was not sufficient to reduce interference from angry distractors. In contrast, cathodal tDCS over the DLPFC reduced interference from happy distractors. These findings show that altering the DLPFC activity is not sufficient to establish top-down control and increase selective attention efficiency. Although, when the neural signal in the DLPFC is altered by cathodal tDCS, interference from emotional distractors is reduced, leading to an improved performance.

  4. Impact of Ultra Wide Band (UWB on Macrocell Downlink of DCS-1800 and GSM-900 Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Haro-Ariet

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of UWB interference on the DCS-1800 and GSM-900 downlink is studied for different UWB power density. For high UWB power density (-70 dBm/MHz, the effect of UWB signals is very high when the distance between UWB transmitter and DCS-1800 receiver is less than 1 m. For low UWB power density (-100 dBm/MHz, the effect of the UWB signals is quasi null even if the distance between the UWB transmitter and the DCS-1800 receiver is 0.5 m. It is found that the spectrum mask proposed by the FCC for indoor application (-53 dBm/MHz in the DCS-1800 band and -41 dBm/MHz in the GSM-900 band is very high to be tolerated by the two mobile systems and we have to propose another spectrum mask with lower UWB power density.

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for improving aphasia in patients with aphasia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Bernhard; Kugler, Joachim; Pohl, Marcus; Mehrholz, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide and aphasia among survivors is common. Current speech and language therapy (SLT) strategies have only limited effectiveness in improving aphasia. A possible adjunct to SLT for improving SLT outcomes might be non-invasive brain stimulation by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to modulate cortical excitability and hence to improve aphasia. To assess the effects of tDCS for improving aphasia in people who have had a stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (November 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, November 2014), MEDLINE (1948 to November 2014), EMBASE (1980 to November 2014), CINAHL (1982 to November 2014), AMED (1985 to November 2014), Science Citation Index (1899 to November 2014) and seven additional databases. We also searched trials registers and reference lists, handsearched conference proceedings and contacted authors and equipment manufacturers. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and randomised controlled cross-over trials (from which we only analysed the first period as a parallel group design) comparing tDCS versus control in adults with aphasia due to stroke. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and risk of bias, and extracted data. If necessary, we contacted study authors for additional information. We collected information on dropouts and adverse events from the trials. We included 12 trials involving 136 participants for qualitative assessment. None of the included studies used any formal outcome measure for our primary outcome measure of functional communication - that is, measuring aphasia in a real-life communicative setting. We did a meta-analysis of six trials with 66 participants of correct picture naming as our secondary outcome measure, which demonstrated that tDCS may not enhance SLT outcomes (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.37, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.92; P

  6. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Display and Shed B Cell Maturation Antigen upon TLR Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Elisabeth; Musumeci, Andrea; Thaler, Franziska S; Laurent, Sarah; Ellwart, Joachim W; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Krug, Anne; Meinl, Edgar

    2017-04-15

    The BAFF-APRIL system is best known for its control of B cell homeostasis, and it is a target of therapeutic intervention in autoimmune diseases and lymphoma. By analyzing the expression of the three receptors of this system, B cell maturation Ag (BCMA), transmembrane activator and CAML interactor, and BAFF receptor, in sorted human immune cell subsets, we found that BCMA was transcribed in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in both blood and lymphoid tissue. Circulating human pDCs contained BCMA protein without displaying it on the cell surface. After engagement of TLR7/8 or TLR9, BCMA was detected also on the cell surface of pDCs. The display of BCMA on the surface of human pDCs was accompanied by release of soluble BCMA (sBCMA); inhibition of γ-secretase enhanced surface expression of BCMA and reduced the release of sBCMA by pDCs. In contrast with human pDCs, murine pDCs did not express BCMA, not even after TLR9 activation. In this study, we extend the spectrum of BCMA expression to human pDCs. sBCMA derived from pDCs might determine local availability of its high-affinity ligand APRIL, because sBCMA has been shown to function as an APRIL-specific decoy. Further, therapeutic trials targeting BCMA in patients with multiple myeloma should consider possible effects on pDCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor Induces Developmental Stage-Dependent Structural Changes in the Immature Small Intestine

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    Kathryn S. Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Premature infants are commonly subject to intestinal inflammation. Since the human small intestine does not reach maturity until term gestation, premature infants have a unique challenge, as either acute or chronic inflammation may alter the normal development of the intestinal tract. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF has been shown to acutely alter goblet cell numbers and villus length in adult mice. In this study we tested the effects of TNF on villus architecture and epithelial cells at different stages of development of the immature small intestine. Methods. To examine the effects of TNF-induced inflammation, we injected acute, brief, or chronic exposures of TNF in neonatal and juvenile mice. Results. TNF induced significant villus blunting through a TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1 mediated mechanism, leading to loss of villus area. This response to TNFR1 signaling was altered during intestinal development, despite constant TNFR1 protein expression. Acute TNF-mediated signaling also significantly decreased Paneth cells. Conclusions. Taken together, the morphologic changes caused by TNF provide insight as to the effects of inflammation on the developing intestinal tract. Additionally, they suggest a mechanism which, coupled with an immature immune system, may help to explain the unique susceptibility of the immature intestine to inflammatory diseases such as NEC.

  8. Formation of cortical plasticity in older adults following tDCS and motor training.

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    Alicia M Goodwill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration accompanies the process of natural ageing, reducing the ability to perform functional daily activities. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS alters neuronal excitability and motor performance; however its beneficial effect on the induction of primary motor cortex (M1 plasticity in older adults is unclear. Moreover, little is known as to whether the tDCS electrode arrangement differentially affects M1 plasticity and motor performance in this population. In a double-blinded, cross-over trial, we compared unilateral, bilateral and sham tDCS combined with visuomotor tracking, on M1 plasticity and motor performance of the non-dominant upper limb, immediately post and 30 minutes following stimulation. We found (a unilateral and bilateral tDCS decreased tracking error by 12-22% at both time points; with sham decreasing tracking error by 10% at 30 minutes only, (b at both time points, motor evoked potentials (MEPs were facilitated (38-54% and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI was released (21-36% for unilateral and bilateral conditions relative to sham, (c there were no differences between unilateral and bilateral conditions for any measure. These findings suggest that tDCS modulated elements of M1 plasticity, which improved motor performance irrespective of the electrode arrangement. The results provide preliminary evidence indicating that tDCS is a safe non-invasive tool to preserve or improve neurological function and motor control in older adults.

  9. Formation of cortical plasticity in older adults following tDCS and motor training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Alicia M; Reynolds, John; Daly, Robin M; Kidgell, Dawson J

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegeneration accompanies the process of natural aging, reducing the ability to perform functional daily activities. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) alters neuronal excitability and motor performance; however its beneficial effect on the induction of primary motor cortex (M1) plasticity in older adults is unclear. Moreover, little is known as to whether the tDCS electrode arrangement differentially affects M1 plasticity and motor performance in this population. In a double-blinded, cross-over trial, we compared unilateral, bilateral and sham tDCS combined with visuomotor tracking, on M1 plasticity and motor performance of the non-dominant upper limb, immediately post and 30 min following stimulation. We found (a) unilateral and bilateral tDCS decreased tracking error by 12-22% at both time points; with sham decreasing tracking error by 10% at 30 min only, (b) at both time points, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were facilitated (38-54%) and short-interval intracortical inhibition was released (21-36%) for unilateral and bilateral conditions relative to sham, (c) there were no differences between unilateral and bilateral conditions for any measure. These findings suggest that tDCS modulated elements of M1 plasticity, which improved motor performance irrespective of the electrode arrangement. The results provide preliminary evidence indicating that tDCS is a safe non-invasive tool to preserve or improve neurological function and motor control in older adults.

  10. tDCS over the left inferior frontal cortex improves speech production in aphasia

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    Paola eMarangolo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the combined effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS and an intensive Conversational therapy treatment on discourse skills in twelve persons with chronic aphasia. Six short videoclips depicting everyday life contexts were prepared. Three videoclips were used to elicit spontaneous conversation during treatment. The remaining three were presented only before and after the therapy. Participants were prompted to talk about the contents of each videoclip while stimulated with tDCS (20 minutes, 1mA over the left hemisphere in three conditions: anodic tDCS over the Broca’s area, anodic tDCS over the Wernicke’s area, and a sham condition. Each experimental condition was performed for ten consecutive daily sessions with 14 days of intersession interval. After stimulation over Broca’s area, the participants produced more Content Units, verbs and sentences than in the remaining two conditions. Importantly, this improvement was still detectable one month after the end of treatment and its effects were generalized also to the three videoclips that had been administered at the beginning and at the end of the therapy sessions. In conclusion, anodic tDCS applied over the left Broca’s area together with an intensive Conversational Therapy treatment improves informative speech in persons with chronic aphasia. We believe that positive tDCS effects may be further extended to other language domains, such as the recovery of speech production.

  11. Cerebellar tDCS: A Novel Approach to Augment Language Treatment Post-stroke.

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    Sebastian, Rajani; Saxena, Sadhvi; Tsapkini, Kyrana; Faria, Andreia V; Long, Charltien; Wright, Amy; Davis, Cameron; Tippett, Donna C; Mourdoukoutas, Antonios P; Bikson, Marom; Celnik, Pablo; Hillis, Argye E

    2016-01-01

    People with post-stroke aphasia may have some degree of chronic deficit for which current rehabilitative treatments are variably effective. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be useful for enhancing the effects of behavioral aphasia treatment. However, it remains unclear which brain regions should be stimulated to optimize effects on language recovery. Here, we report on the therapeutic potential of right cerebellar tDCS in augmenting language recovery in SMY, who sustained bilateral MCA infarct resulting in aphasia and anarthria. We investigated the effects of 15 sessions of anodal cerebellar tDCS coupled with spelling therapy using a randomized, double-blind, sham controlled within-subject crossover trial. We also investigated changes in functional connectivity using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging before and 2 months post-treatment. Both anodal and sham treatments resulted in improved spelling to dictation for trained and untrained words immediately after and 2 months post-treatment. However, there was greater improvement with tDCS than with sham, especially for untrained words. Further, generalization to written picture naming was only noted during tDCS but not with sham. The resting state functional connectivity data indicate that improvement in spelling was accompanied by an increase in cerebro-cerebellar network connectivity. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of right cerebellar tDCS to augment spelling therapy in an individual with large bilateral chronic strokes.

  12. Functional connectivity substrates for tDCS response in Minimally Conscious State patients

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    Carlo Cavaliere

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a non-invasive technique recently employed in disorders of consciousness, and determining a transitory recovery of signs of consciousness in almost half of minimally conscious state (MCS patients. Although the rising evidences about its possible role in the treatment of many neurological and psychiatric conditions, no evidences exist about brain functional connectivity substrates underlying tDCS response. We retrospectively evaluated resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI of 16 sub-acute and chronic MCS patients (6 tDCS responders who successively received a single left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC tDCS in a double-blind randomized cross-over trial. A seed-based approach for regions of left extrinsic control network and default-mode network was performed.TDCS responders showed an increased left intra-network connectivity for regions co-activated with left DLPFC, and significantly with left inferior frontal gyrus. Non-responders MCS patients showed an increased connectivity between left DLPFC and midline cortical structures, including anterior cingulate cortex and precuneus.Our findings suggest that a prior high connectivity with regions belonging to extrinsic control network can facilitate transitory recovery of consciousness in a subgroup of MCS patients that underwent tDCS treatment. Therefore, resting state-fMRI could be very valuable in detecting the neuronal conditions necessary for tDCS to improve behavior in MCS.

  13. Delayed plastic responses to anodal tDCS in older adults

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    Hakuei eFujiyama

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundance of research reporting the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS in healthy young adults and clinical populations, the extent of potential neuroplastic changes induced by tDCS in healthy older adults is not well understood. The present study compared the extent and time course of anodal tDCS-induced plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1 in young and older adults. Furthermore, as it has been suggested that neuroplasiticity and associated learning depends on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene polymorphisms, we also assessed the impact of BDNF polymorphism on these effects. Corticospinal excitability was examined using transcranial magnetic stimulation before and following (0, 10, 20, 30 min anodal tDCS (30 min, 1 mA or sham in young and older adults. While the overall extent of increases in corticospinal excitability induced by anodal tDCS did not vary reliably between young and older adults, older adults exhibited a delayed response; the largest increase in corticospinal excitability occurred 30 min following stimulation for older adults, but immediately post-stimulation for the young group. BDNF genotype did not result in significant differences in the observed excitability increases for either age group. The present study suggests that tDCS-induced plastic changes are delayed as a result of healthy aging, but that the overall efficacy of the plasticity mechanism remains unaffected.

  14. Cerebellar tDCS: A Novel Approach to Augment Language Treatment Post-stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Rajani; Saxena, Sadhvi; Tsapkini, Kyrana; Faria, Andreia V.; Long, Charltien; Wright, Amy; Davis, Cameron; Tippett, Donna C.; Mourdoukoutas, Antonios P.; Bikson, Marom; Celnik, Pablo; Hillis, Argye E.

    2017-01-01

    People with post-stroke aphasia may have some degree of chronic deficit for which current rehabilitative treatments are variably effective. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be useful for enhancing the effects of behavioral aphasia treatment. However, it remains unclear which brain regions should be stimulated to optimize effects on language recovery. Here, we report on the therapeutic potential of right cerebellar tDCS in augmenting language recovery in SMY, who sustained bilateral MCA infarct resulting in aphasia and anarthria. We investigated the effects of 15 sessions of anodal cerebellar tDCS coupled with spelling therapy using a randomized, double-blind, sham controlled within-subject crossover trial. We also investigated changes in functional connectivity using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging before and 2 months post-treatment. Both anodal and sham treatments resulted in improved spelling to dictation for trained and untrained words immediately after and 2 months post-treatment. However, there was greater improvement with tDCS than with sham, especially for untrained words. Further, generalization to written picture naming was only noted during tDCS but not with sham. The resting state functional connectivity data indicate that improvement in spelling was accompanied by an increase in cerebro-cerebellar network connectivity. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of right cerebellar tDCS to augment spelling therapy in an individual with large bilateral chronic strokes. PMID:28127284

  15. Enhancing the Activity of the DLPFC with tDCS Alters Risk Preference without Changing Interpersonal Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haoli; Wang, Siqi; Guo, Wenmin; Chen, Shu; Luo, Jun; Ye, Hang; Huang, Daqiang

    2017-01-01

    Interpersonal trust plays an essential role in economic interactions and social development. Extensive behavioral experiments have examined the nature of trust, particularly the question of whether trusting decisions are connected to risk preferences or risk attitudes. Various laboratory observations have been reported regarding the difference between trust and risk, and neural imaging studies have demonstrated that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rDLPFC) is more activated when individuals decide to trust other human beings compared with individuals decide to invest in a non-social risk condition. Moreover, the rDLPFC has been found to exhibit an intimate relationship with risk preference in previous neuroscience studies. However, the causal relationship between the rDLPFC and trust has rarely been revealed. Whether modulating the excitability of the rDLPFC, which shares roles in both trust and risk decisions, alters the trust or risk preference of participants remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to provide evidence of a direct link between the neural and behavioral results through the application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the rDLPFC. We found that activating the rDLPFC altered the risk preferences of our participants, whereas no such significant effect over interpersonal trust was observed. Our findings indicate that enhancing the excitability of the rDLPFC using tDCS leads to more conservative decision-makings in a risk game, and this effect is specific to non-social risk rather than social-related trust.

  16. Mechanisms and effects of seizures in the immature brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardou, Romain; Ferrari, Diana C; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2013-08-01

    The developing immature brain is not simply a small adult brain but rather possesses unique physiological properties. These include neuronal ionic currents that differ markedly from those in the adult brain, typically being longer-lasting and less selective. This enables immature heterogeneous neurons to connect and fire together but at the same time, along with other features may contribute to the enhanced propensity of the developing brain to become epileptic. Indeed, immature neurons tend to readily synchronize and thus generate seizures. Here, we review the differences between the immature and adult brain, with particular focus on the developmental sequence of γ-aminobutyric acid that excites immature neurons while being inhibitory in the normal adult brain. We review the mechanisms underlying the developmental changes to intracellular chloride levels, as well as how epileptiform activity can drive pathologic changes to chloride balance in the brain. We show that regulation of intracellular chloride is one important factor that underlies both the ease with which seizures can be generated and the facilitation of further seizures. We stress in particular the importance of understanding normal developmental sequences and how they are interrupted by seizures and other insults, and how this knowledge has led to the identification of potential novel treatments for conditions such as neonatal seizures.

  17. Development of frozen-thawed embryos derived from immature human oocytes following in-vitro maturation and fertilization in women with PCOS%多囊卵巢综合征妇女体外成熟卵母细胞胚胎慢速冷冻复苏移植结局分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑晓英; 刘平; 王丽娜; 廉颖; 吴昱琪; 陈媛

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the development of frozen - thawed embryos derived from immature human oocytes following in - vitro maturation and fertilization in women with PCOS. Methods 385 PCOS women underwent frozen- thawed embryo transfer cycles between Jan. 2006 to Dec. 2010 in Peking University Third Hospital. The frozen embryos derived from in vitro maturation of immature oocytes (IVM group) or mature oocytes of routine IVF cycles (IVF group). All embryos were cryopreserved using slow- freeze protocol. The frozen embryos were thawed and transferred for assessment the survival, clinical pregnancy and implantation rates. Results 243 embryos were thawed and 162 embryos were survived in IVM group, The survival rate of IVM group (66. 67%) was comparable to IVF group (67.41%, P>0. 05). However, the clinical pregnancy and implantation rates of embryos cryopreserved in IVM group were significantly lower than that in IVF group (19. 30% vs 45. 45%, 10. 61% vs 26.14%; P<0. 05)). Conclusion Cleavage embryo slow - freeze programe may not be as efficient in IVM as in that in standard IVF. It implies the inferior development potential of IVM derived embryos before frozen.%目的 评价未成熟卵母细胞体外成熟(IVM)后形成的卵裂期胚胎经慢速冷冻-解冻后的发育能力.方法 将2006年1月至2010年12月北京大学第三医院因多囊卵巢综合征(PCOS)合并不孕症行卵裂期胚胎复苏移植的385例患者分为两组:复苏胚胎来源于体外成熟的卵母细胞组(IVM组,46例)和复苏胚胎来源于常规体内成熟的卵母细胞组(IVF组,339例).采用慢冻速溶法解冻移植后比较两组患者的临床结局.结果 IVM组复苏胚胎243枚,复苏后存活162枚,复苏率为66.67%;IVF组复苏胚胎1 605枚,复苏后存活1 082枚,复苏率为67.41%,两组比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).IVM组患者的临床妊娠率和着床率分别为19.30% (11/57)和10.61% (14/132),明显低于IVF组临床妊娠率(45.45%,175

  18. Active dissemination of cellular antigens by DCs facilitates CD8(+) T-cell priming in lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Irina; Feferman, Tali; Milo, Idan; Tal, Orna; Golani, Ofra; Drexler, Ingo; Shakhar, Guy

    2017-09-05

    Antigen (Ag)-specific activation of naïve T cells by migrating dendritic cells (DCs) is a highly efficient process, although the chances for their co-localization in lymph nodes (LNs) appear low. Ag presentation may be delegated from Ag-donor DCs to the abundant resident DCs, but the routes of Ag transfer and how it facilitates T-cell activation remain unclear. We visualized CD8(+) T cell-DC interactions to study the sites, routes and cells mediating Ag transfer in mice. In vitro, Ag transfer from isolated ovalbumin (OVA)(+) bone marrow (BM)-DCs triggered widespread arrest, Ca(2+) flux and CD69 upregulation in OT-I T cells contacting recipient DCs. Intravital two-photon imaging revealed that survival of Ag-donor DCs in LNs was required for Ag dissemination among resident CD11c(+) DCs. Upon interaction with recipient DCs, CD8(+) T cells clustered, upregulated CD69, proliferated and differentiated into effectors. Few DCs sufficed for activation, and for efficient Ag dissemination LFA-1 expression on recipient DCs was essential. Similar findings characterized DCs infected with a replication-deficient OVA-expressing Vaccinia virus known to downregulate MHC-I. Overall, active Ag dissemination from live incoming DCs helped activate CD8(+) T cells by increasing the number of effective presenting cells and salvaged T-cell priming when Ag-donor DCs could not present Ag. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Immature hematopoietic stem cells undergo maturation in the fetal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieusseian, Aurelie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2012-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are defined by their capacity to reconstitute adult conventional mice, are first found in the dorsal aorta after 10.5 days post coitus (dpc) and in the fetal liver at 11 dpc. However, lympho-myeloid hematopoietic progenitors are detected in the dorsal aorta from 9 dpc, raising the issue of their role in establishing adult hematopoiesis. Here, we show that these progenitors are endowed with long-term reconstitution capacity, but only engraft natural killer (NK)-deficient Rag2γc(-/-) mice. This novel population, called here immature HSCs, evolves in culture with thrombopoietin and stromal cells, into HSCs, defined by acquisition of CD45 and MHC-1 expression and by the capacity to reconstitute NK-competent mice. This evolution occurs during ontogeny, as early colonization of fetal liver by immature HSCs precedes that of HSCs. Moreover, organ culture experiments show that immature HSCs acquire, in this environment, the features of HSCs.

  20. The Category of Immaturity in a Legal Context

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    Fedonkina A.A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We presented psychological and legal approaches to the concept of immaturity, and the definition of the perpetrator. We analyzed the differences of age aspects of the subject of crime in different countries, the criteria for establishing a minimum age of criminal responsibility. We discuss the problem of the possibility of lowering the age of criminal responsibility in the Russian Federation from the point of view of psychological science. We considered the legal category of "mental retardation not associated with mental illness" and its psychological equivalent - "personal immaturity". We describe the main problems arising in the course of the complex judicial, psychological and psychiatric examination for the presence of a mental retardation not associated with mental illness in minor. We presented psychological approaches to the concept of "personal immaturity", described the concept of "mature personality".

  1. Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Skeletally Immature Patients

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    Joshua L. Hudgens

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ACL tears is rising in the pediatric and adolescent populations as these individuals succumb to traumatic and nontraumatic athletic injuries. Management of this condition in the skeletally immature patient poses a challenge and is controversial. Operative reconstruction carries the concern for damage to the physis with resultant limb length inequality and angular joint deformity but provides stability to the knee and allows return of function in most patients. On the other hand, nonoperative treatment has been shown to carry an increased risk of meniscal and articular cartilage damage and is difficult from a compliance standpoint in this demographic. For the majority of skeletally immature patients, operative treatment is recommended as it has shown good clinical and functional results with minimal risk of growth disturbance. This paper aims to address the natural course of ACL injuries in the skeletally immature patient, treatment options with associated complications, and current preventative strategies.

  2. Influence of the oncolytic parvovirus H-1, CTLA-4 antibody tremelimumab and cytostatic drugs on the human immune system in a human in vitro model of colorectal cancer cells

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    Heinrich B

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Bernd Heinrich,* Katrin Goepfert,* Maike Delic, Peter R Galle, Markus MoehlerUniversity Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, Langenbeckstrasse, Mainz, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this workIntroduction: Tumor-directed and immune-system-stimulating therapies are of special interest in cancer treatment. Here, we demonstrate the potential of parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV to efficiently kill colorectal cancer cells and induce immunogenicity of colorectal tumors by inducing maturation of dendritic cells (DCs alone and also in combination with cytostatic drugs in vitro. Using our cell culture model, we have additionally investigated the effects of anti-CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 receptor antibody tremelimumab on this process.Materials and methods: Colon carcinoma cell lines were treated with different concentrations of cytostatic drugs or tremelimumab or were infected with H-1PV in different multiplicities of infection (MOIs, and viability was determined using MTT assays. Expression of CTLA-4 in colon carcinoma cell lines was measured by FACScan™. For the coculture model, we isolated monocytes using adherence, and differentiation into immature DCs (iDCs was stimulated using interleukin-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Maturation of iDCs into mature DCs (mDCs was induced by a cytokine cocktail. SW480 colon carcinoma cells were infected with H-1PV or treated with cytostatic drugs. Drug treated and H-1PV-infected SW480 colon carcinoma cells were cocultured with iDCs and expression of maturation markers was measured using FACScan™. Cytokine measurements were performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: Colon carcinoma cells SW480 were potently infected and killed by H-1PV. CTLA-4 expression in SW480 cells increased after infection with H-1PV and also after treatment with cytostatic drugs. Tremelimumab had no influence on

  3. Revitalization of traumatized immature tooth with platelet-rich fibrin

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    Umrana Faizuddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic treatment options for immature, nonvital teeth conventionally include surgical endodontics, apexification with calcium hydroxide, or single visit mineral trioxide aggregate plug. Regeneration is a new concept which is been introduced in the treatment of traumatized open apex tooth. Regeneration of pulp-dentin complex in an infected necrotic tooth with an open apex is possible if the canal is effectively disinfected. The purpose of this case report is to add a new vista in regenerative, endodontic therapy by using platelet-rich fibrin for revitalization of immature nonvital tooth.

  4. Revitalization of traumatized immature tooth with platelet-rich fibrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizuddin, Umrana; Solomon, Raji Viola; Mattapathi, Jayadev; Guniganti, Sushma Shravani

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic treatment options for immature, nonvital teeth conventionally include surgical endodontics, apexification with calcium hydroxide, or single visit mineral trioxide aggregate plug. Regeneration is a new concept which is been introduced in the treatment of traumatized open apex tooth. Regeneration of pulp-dentin complex in an infected necrotic tooth with an open apex is possible if the canal is effectively disinfected. The purpose of this case report is to add a new vista in regenerative, endodontic therapy by using platelet-rich fibrin for revitalization of immature nonvital tooth. PMID:26681870

  5. Immature condensate from southeastern Mediterranean coastal plain, Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissenbaum, A.; Aizenshtat, Z.; Goldberg, M.

    1985-06-01

    A highly unsaturated, sulfur-rich, naphthenic condensate was discovered in association with dry biogenic gas in the upper Tertiary of the southeastern Mediterranean coastal plain of Israel. Geologic and geochemical evidence suggests that this condensate was generated in thermally immature rocks. Similar material has been reported from the upper Tertiary of the western Mediterranean. We suggest that the immature condensates were formed from resin-rich, terrestrially derived organic matter. Under an equivalent thermal regime, marine material derived primarily from algae and bacteria will produce heavy crude, rich in asphaltenes.

  6. tDCS over the left prefrontal cortex enhances cognitive control for positive affective stimuli.

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    Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt

    Full Text Available Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS is a neuromodulation technique with promising results for enhancing cognitive information processes. So far, however, research has mainly focused on the effects of tDCS on cognitive control operations for non-emotional material. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects on cognitive control considering negative versus positive material. For this sham-controlled, within-subjects study, we selected a homogeneous sample of twenty-five healthy participants. By using behavioral measures and event related potentials (ERP as indexes, we aimed to investigate whether a single session of anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC would have specific effects in enhancing cognitive control for positive and negative valenced stimuli. After tDCS over the left DLPFC (and not sham control stimulation, we observed more negative N450 amplitudes along with faster reaction times when inhibiting a habitual response to happy compared to sad facial expressions. Gender did not influence the effects of tDCS on cognitive control for emotional information. In line with the Valence Theory of side-lateralized activity, this stimulation protocol might have led to a left dominant (relative to right prefrontal cortical activity, resulting in augmented cognitive control specifically for positive relative to negative stimuli. To verify that tDCS induces effects that are in line with all aspects of the well known Valence Theory, future research should investigate the effects of tDCS over the left vs. right DLPFC on cognitive control for emotional information.

  7. Biodiversity and Temporal Distribution of Immature Culicidae in the Atlantic Forest, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

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    de Mello, Cecília Ferreira; Guimarães, Anthony Érico; Gil-Santana, Hélcio R.; Gleiser, Raquel M.

    2016-01-01

    To increase the knowledge of biodiversity and identify larval habitats used by immature mosquitoes in the Atlantic Forest, we conducted a study in areas with various stages of preservation within the Guapiaçu Ecological Reserve in Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro state. The Culicidae fauna were sampled during February, April, June, August, October, and December 2012; February, March, April, May, June, August, October, and December 2013; and January and March 2014. Immature mosquitoes were collected with dippers and suction tubes (mouth aspirators). Over the sampling period, 2697 larvae of 56 species were collected, some of which are recognized vectors of human diseases. The larval mosquito community found in artificial habitats, temporary ground water, and phytotelmata differed between sites, except for the mosquito fauna in bromeliads, which were almost 80% similar. Species segregation was more evident between larval habitats than between sites. Culex usquatus was the dominant species and colonized the highest number of larval habitats. The artificial larval habitats found in REGUA were colonized by a great diversity of species and high abundance as well, thus human artifacts left by the public in the area that collect water may promote an increase in mosquito populations. Among the species collected, some are known or suspected vectors of pathogens to humans and/or veterinary relevance, and their medical relevance is discussed. PMID:27404496

  8. Biodiversity and Temporal Distribution of Immature Culicidae in the Atlantic Forest, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Jeronimo; de Mello, Cecília Ferreira; Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maués; Guimarães, Anthony Érico; Gil-Santana, Hélcio R; Gleiser, Raquel M

    2016-01-01

    To increase the knowledge of biodiversity and identify larval habitats used by immature mosquitoes in the Atlantic Forest, we conducted a study in areas with various stages of preservation within the Guapiaçu Ecological Reserve in Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro state. The Culicidae fauna were sampled during February, April, June, August, October, and December 2012; February, March, April, May, June, August, October, and December 2013; and January and March 2014. Immature mosquitoes were collected with dippers and suction tubes (mouth aspirators). Over the sampling period, 2697 larvae of 56 species were collected, some of which are recognized vectors of human diseases. The larval mosquito community found in artificial habitats, temporary ground water, and phytotelmata differed between sites, except for the mosquito fauna in bromeliads, which were almost 80% similar. Species segregation was more evident between larval habitats than between sites. Culex usquatus was the dominant species and colonized the highest number of larval habitats. The artificial larval habitats found in REGUA were colonized by a great diversity of species and high abundance as well, thus human artifacts left by the public in the area that collect water may promote an increase in mosquito populations. Among the species collected, some are known or suspected vectors of pathogens to humans and/or veterinary relevance, and their medical relevance is discussed.

  9. Motor cortex tDCS does not improve strength performance in healthy subjects

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    Rafael Montenegro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS upon maximal strength performance in exercises recruiting large muscle mass has not been established in healthy populations. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anodal tDCS was able to increase the performance during maximal strength exercise (MSEX in healthy subjects. Fourteen volunteers (age: 26 ± 4 yrs performed two MSEX after anodal or sham tDCS (2mA; 20min prior MSEX, involving knee extensors and flexors in concentric isokinetic muscle actions of the dominant limb (3 sets of 10 repetitions. The electrical muscle activity (sEMG of four recruited muscles was recorded during MSEX. Anodal tDCS was not able to improve force production (i.e., total work and peak torque, fatigue resistance, or electromyographic activity during MSEX when compared to sham condition. In conclusion, anodal tDCS applied upon the contralateral motor cortex was not capable of increasing the strength performance of knee extensors and flexors in young healthy subjects.

  10. Type I IFN signaling in CD8– DCs impairs Th1-dependent malaria immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Ashraful; Best, Shannon E.; Montes de Oca, Marcela; James, Kylie R.; Ammerdorffer, Anne; Edwards, Chelsea L.; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Sheel, Meru; Sebina, Ismail; Koyama, Motoko; Varelias, Antiopi; Hertzog, Paul J.; Kalinke, Ulrich; Gun, Sin Yee; Rénia, Laurent; Ruedl, Christiane; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and protozoan parasites, suppress cellular immune responses through activation of type I IFN signaling. Recent evidence suggests that immune suppression and susceptibility to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium, is mediated by type I IFN; however, it is unclear how type I IFN suppresses immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium parasites. During experimental severe malaria, CD4+ Th cell responses are suppressed, and conventional DC (cDC) function is curtailed through unknown mechanisms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that type I IFN signaling directly impairs cDC function during Plasmodium infection in mice. Using cDC-specific IFNAR1-deficient mice, and mixed BM chimeras, we found that type I IFN signaling directly affects cDC function, limiting the ability of cDCs to prime IFN-γ–producing Th1 cells. Although type I IFN signaling modulated all subsets of splenic cDCs, CD8– cDCs were especially susceptible, exhibiting reduced phagocytic and Th1-promoting properties in response to type I IFNs. Additionally, rapid and systemic IFN-α production in response to Plasmodium infection required type I IFN signaling in cDCs themselves, revealing their contribution to a feed-forward cytokine-signaling loop. Together, these data suggest abrogation of type I IFN signaling in CD8– splenic cDCs as an approach for enhancing Th1 responses against Plasmodium and other type I IFN–inducing pathogens. PMID:24789914

  11. Anodal tDCS targeting the right orbitofrontal cortex enhances facial expression recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Megan L; Murphy, Jillian M; Ridley, Nicole J; Vercammen, Ans

    2015-12-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been implicated in the capacity to accurately recognise facial expressions. The aim of the current study was to determine if anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting the right OFC in healthy adults would enhance facial expression recognition, compared with a sham condition. Across two counterbalanced sessions of tDCS (i.e. anodal and sham), 20 undergraduate participants (18 female) completed a facial expression labelling task comprising angry, disgusted, fearful, happy, sad and neutral expressions, and a control (social judgement) task comprising the same expressions. Responses on the labelling task were scored for accuracy, median reaction time and overall efficiency (i.e. combined accuracy and reaction time). Anodal tDCS targeting the right OFC enhanced facial expression recognition, reflected in greater efficiency and speed of recognition across emotions, relative to the sham condition. In contrast, there was no effect of tDCS to responses on the control task. This is the first study to demonstrate that anodal tDCS targeting the right OFC boosts facial expression recognition. This finding provides a solid foundation for future research to examine the efficacy of this technique as a means to treat facial expression recognition deficits, particularly in individuals with OFC damage or dysfunction.

  12. Time- but not sleep-dependent consolidation of tDCS-enhanced visuomotor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Janine; Fischer, Jan Torben; Prichard, George; Weiller, Cornelius; Cohen, Leonardo G; Fritsch, Brita

    2015-01-01

    Consolidation of motor skills after training can occur in a time- or sleep-dependent fashion. Recent studies revealed time-dependent consolidation as a common feature of visuomotor tasks. We have previously shown that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in combination with repeated motor training benefits consolidation by the induction of offline skill gains in a complex visuomotor task, preventing the regular occurrence of skill loss between days. Here, we asked 2 questions: What is the time course of consolidation between days for this task and do exogenously induced offline gains develop as a function of time or overnight sleep? We found that both the development of offline skill loss in sham-stimulated subjects and offline skill gains induced by anodal tDCS critically depend on the passage of time after training, but not on overnight sleep. These findings support the view that tDCS interacts directly with the physiological consolidation process. However, in a control experiment, anodal tDCS applied after the training did not induce skill gains, implying that coapplication of tDCS and training is required to induce offline skill gains, pointing to the initiation of consolidation already during training.

  13. Facilitative effects of bi-hemispheric tDCS in cognitive deficits of Parkinson disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Jorge; Gonçalves, Oscar F; Carvalho, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily characterized by motor symptoms such as tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, stiffness, slowness and impaired equilibrium. Although the motor symptoms have been the focus in PD, slight cognitive deficits are commonly found in non-demented and non-depressed PD patients, even in early stages of the disease, which have been linked to the subsequent development of pathological dementia. Thus, strongly reducing the quality of life (QoL). Both levodopa therapy and deep brain stimulation (DBS) have yield controversial results concerning the cognitive symptoms amelioration in PD patients. That does not seems to be the case with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), although better stimulation parameters are needed. Therefore we hypothesize that simultaneously delivering cathodal tDCS (or ctDCS), over the right prefrontal cortex delivered with anodal tDCS (or atDCS) to left prefrontal cortex could be potentially beneficial for PD patients, either by mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity and by increases in the extracellular dopamine levels over the striatum.

  14. tDCS stimulation segregates words in the brain: evidence from aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eFiori

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have already shown that modulating cortical activity by means of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS improves noun or verb naming in aphasic patients. However, it is not yet clear whether these effects are equally obtained through stimulation over the frontal or the temporal regions. In the present study, the same group of aphasic subjects participated in two randomized double-blind experiments involving two intensive language treatments for their noun and verb retrieval difficulties. During each training, each subject was treated with tDCS (20 min., 1mA over the left hemisphere in three different conditions: anodic tDCS over the temporal areas, anodic tDCS over the frontal areas and sham stimulation, while they performed a noun and an action naming tasks. Each experimental condition was run in five consecutive daily sessions over three weeks with 6 days of intersession interval. The order of administration of the two language trainings was randomly assigned to all patients. Overall, with respect to the other two conditions, results showed a significant greater improvement in noun naming after stimulation over the temporal region, while verb naming recovered significantly better after stimulation of the frontal region. These improvements persisted at one month after the end of each treatment suggesting a long-term effect on recovery of the patients’ noun and verb difficulties. These data clearly suggest that the mechanisms of recovery for naming can be segregated coupling tDCS with an intensive language training.

  15. No significant effect of prefrontal tDCS on working memory performance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna eNilsson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been put forward as a non-pharmacological alternative for alleviating cognitive decline in old age. Although results have shown some promise, little is known about the optimal stimulation parameters for modulation in the cognitive domain. In this study, the effects of tDCS over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC on working memory performance were investigated in thirty older adults. An N-back task assessed working memory before, during and after anodal tDCS at a current strength of 1mA and 2mA, in addition to sham stimulation. The study used a single-blind, cross-over design. The results revealed no significant effect of tDCS on accuracy or response times during or after stimulation, for any of the current strengths. These results suggest that a single session of tDCS over the dlPFC is unlikely to improve working memory, as assessed by an N-back task, in old age.

  16. Study on Immature and Low Mature Oil in Huanghua Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Qianjin; Yu Junli; Liu Yujin; Li Jun

    1996-01-01

    @@ In recent years many types of immature and low mature oil reservoirs have been discovered in the Huanghua depression, especially distributed in the maior oil producing area - South Kongdian. It has been proved that this kind of resources makes up over 60 percent of all.

  17. Hitachi's proposed DCS solution for new build CANDU EC6 using the G-HIACS unified platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, D.; Ishii, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Uemura, K., E-mail: daisuke.tan.ye@hitachi.com [Hitachi Ltd., Infrastructure Systems Co., Ibaraki (Japan); Marko, P.E. [Hitachi Power Systems Canada Ltd., Power and Industry Div., Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Hitachi Ltd. has developed the safe and secure functional safety DCS controller for potential new build NPP projects in the global market. Hitachi has improved the availability, maintainability, and reliability for its latest DCS systems named G-HIACS. In this latest paper on its DCS product development program, Hitachi would like to report a proposed DCS solution for new build CANDU NSP and BOP based on the G-HIACS Unified Architecture (R800FS/HSC800FS vSAFE Functional Safety Controller and R900/HSC900 General Purpose Controller) hybrid control system. (author)

  18. Spatial and polarity precision of concentric high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mahtab; Truong, Dennis Q.; Khadka, Niranjan; Bikson, Marom

    2016-06-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique that applies low amplitude current via electrodes placed on the scalp. Rather than directly eliciting a neuronal response, tDCS is believed to modulate excitability—enhancing or suppressing neuronal activity in regions of the brain depending on the polarity of stimulation. The specificity of tDCS to any therapeutic application derives in part from how electrode configuration determines the brain regions that are stimulated. Conventional tDCS uses two relatively large pads (>25 cm2) whereas high-definition tDCS (HD-tDCS) uses arrays of smaller electrodes to enhance brain targeting. The 4  ×  1 concentric ring HD-tDCS (one center electrode surrounded by four returns) has been explored in application where focal targeting of cortex is desired. Here, we considered optimization of concentric ring HD-tDCS for targeting: the role of electrodes in the ring and the ring’s diameter. Finite element models predicted cortical electric field generated during tDCS. High resolution MRIs were segmented into seven tissue/material masks of varying conductivities. Computer aided design (CAD) model of electrodes, gel, and sponge pads were incorporated into the segmentation. Volume meshes were generated and the Laplace equation (\

  19. Motor Sequence Learning in Healthy Older Adults Is Not Necessarily Facilitated by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

    OpenAIRE

    Raw, RK; Allen, RJ; Mon-Williams, M; Wilkie, RM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) can modulate neuronal activity, and improve performance of basic motor tasks. The possibility that tDCS could assist in rehabilitation (e.g., for paresis post-stroke) offers hope but the evidence base is incomplete, with some behavioural studies reporting no effect of tDCS on complex motor learning. Older adults who show age-related decline in movement and learning (skills which tDCS could potentially ...

  20. Galeazzi semitendinosus tenodesis for patellofemoral instability in skeletally immature patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannatt, Kathryn; Heyworth, Benton E; Ogunwole, Olabode; Micheli, Lyle J; Kocher, Mininder S

    2012-09-01

    Numerous surgical treatments have been described to address subluxation or dislocation of the patella, but many are not suitable for the skeletally immature patient, as they risk injury to the proximal tibial physis or tibial tubercle apophysis. The Galeazzi semitendinosus tenodesis is a soft-tissue reconstruction technique designed to stabilize the patella without altering the femoral or the bony structures about the knee. We sought to determine if this semitendinosus tenodesis is a safe and effective treatment for patellofemoral instability in skeletally immature patients. We retrospectively analyzed the records of a population of skeletally immature patients who underwent semitendinosus tenodesis for patellofemoral instability at our institution from 1990 to 2006. Condition-specific outcome and function were prospectively collected, including the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Kujala Score, and Marx Activity Scale. Recurrent instability was defined as patient-reported postoperative subluxation, dislocation, or both. Twenty-eight patients (34 total knees) were included in the study. Average follow-up was 70 months (range, 27 to 217 mo). Patients reported recurrent instability in 28 of the 34 knees (82%). Overall, 41% of patients had IKDC scores Galeazzi semitendinosus tenodesis is a safe procedure for patellofemoral instability in skeletally immature patients, but our long-term data suggest it may not be as successful as previously reported. Approximately 82% of patients experienced recurrent subluxation or dislocation despite surgical intervention, which may be due in large part to various predisposing factors, and there was a 35% rate of second surgeries. However, given the variability in techniques and reported results of patellofemoral stabilizing procedures in skeletally immature patients, the Galeazzi procedure may still be a reasonable way to temporize the difficult problem of patellar instability until patients reach skeletal

  1. The Integration of DCS I/O to an Existing PLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Debashis; Mihevic, John

    2013-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Existing Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) I/O was replaced with Distributed Control System (DCS) I/O, while keeping the existing PLC sequence Logic. The reason for integration of the PLC logic and DCS I/O, along with the evaluation of the resulting system is the subject of this paper. The pros and cons of the old system and new upgrade are described, including operator workstation screen update times. Detail of the physical layout and the communication between the PLC, the DCS I/O and the operator workstations are illustrated. The complex characteristics of a central process control system and the plan to remove the PLC processors in future upgrades is also discussed.

  2. Impact of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS on neuronal functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Das

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, a noninvasive brain stimulation technique, modulates neuronal excitability by the application of a small electrical current. The low cost and ease of the technique has driven interest in potential clinical applications. However, outcomes are highly sensitive to stimulation parameters, leading to difficulty maximizing the technique’s effectiveness. Although reversing the polarity of stimulation often causes opposite effects, this is not always the case. Effective clinical application will require an understanding of how tDCS works; how it modulates a neuron; how it affects the local network; and how it alters inter-network signaling. We have summarized what is known regarding the mechanisms of tDCS from sub-cellular processing to circuit level communication with a particular focus on what can be learned from the polarity specificity of the effects.

  3. Lentiviral-mediated gene delivery in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells: optimized design and procedures for highly efficient transduction compatible with clinical constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouas, Redouane; Uch, Rathviro; Cleuter, Yvette; Jordier, François; Bagnis, Claude; Mannoni, Patrice; Lewalle, Philippe; Martiat, Philippe; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2002-09-01

    Gene delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) could represent a powerful method of inducing potent, long-lasting immunity. Although recent studies underline the intense interest in lentiviral vector-mediated monocyte-derived DC transduction, efficient gene transfer methods currently require high multiplicities of infection and are not compatible with clinical constraints. We have designed a strategy to optimize the efficiency and clinical relevance of this approach. Initially, using a third generation lentiviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein, we found that modifying the vector design, the DC precursor cell type, and the DC differentiation stage for transduction results in sustained transgene expression in 75-85% of immature DCs (transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 8). This high efficiency was reproducible among different donors irrespective of whether DCs were expanded from fresh or cryopreserved CD14(+) precursors. We then developed procedures that bypass the need for highly concentrated lentiviral preparations and the addition of polybrene to achieve efficient transduction. DCs transduced under these conditions retain their immature phenotype and immunostimulatory potential in both autologous and allogeneic settings. Furthermore, genetically modified DCs maintain their ability to respond to maturation signals and secrete bioactive IL-12, indicating that they are fully functional. Finally, the level of transgene expression is preserved in the therapeutically relevant mature DCs, demonstrating that there is neither promoter-silencing nor loss of transduced cells during maturation. The novel approach described should advance lentiviral-mediated monocyte-derived DC transduction towards a clinical reality.

  4. No Effects of Bilateral tDCS over Inferior Frontal Gyrus on Response Inhibition and Aggression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Dambacher

    Full Text Available Response inhibition is defined as the capacity to adequately withdraw pre-planned responses. It has been shown that individuals with deficits in inhibiting pre-planned responses tend to display more aggressive behaviour. The prefrontal cortex is involved in both, response inhibition and aggression. While response inhibition is mostly associated with predominantly right prefrontal activity, the neural components underlying aggression seem to be left-lateralized. These differences in hemispheric dominance are conceptualized in cortical asymmetry theories on motivational direction, which assign avoidance motivation (relevant to inhibit responses to the right and approach motivation (relevant for aggressive actions to the left prefrontal cortex. The current study aimed to directly address the inverse relationship between response inhibition and aggression by assessing them within one experiment. Sixty-nine healthy participants underwent bilateral transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS to the inferior frontal cortex. In one group we induced right-hemispheric fronto-cortical dominance by means of a combined right prefrontal anodal and left prefrontal cathodal tDCS montage. In a second group we induced left-hemispheric fronto-cortical dominance by means of a combined left prefrontal anodal and right prefrontal cathodal tDCS montage. A control group received sham stimulation. Response inhibition was assessed with a go/no-go task (GNGT and aggression with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (TAP. We revealed that participants with poorer performance in the GNGT displayed more aggression during the TAP. No effects of bilateral prefrontal tDCS on either response inhibition or aggression were observed. This is at odds with previous brain stimulation studies applying unilateral protocols. Our results failed to provide evidence in support of the prefrontal cortical asymmetry model in the domain of response inhibition and aggression. The absence of tDCS

  5. Monitoring cognitive function and need with the automated neuropsychological assessment metrics in Decompression Sickness (DCS) research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesthus, Thomas E.; Schiflett, Sammuel G.

    1993-01-01

    Hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) research presents the medical monitor with the difficult task of assessing the onset and progression of DCS largely on the basis of subjective symptoms. Even with the introduction of precordial Doppler ultrasound techniques for the detection of venous gas emboli (VGE), correct prediction of DCS can be made only about 65 percent of the time according to data from the Armstrong Laboratory's (AL's) hypobaric DCS database. An AL research protocol concerned with exercise and its effects on denitrogenation efficiency includes implementation of a performance assessment test battery to evaluate cognitive functioning during a 4-h simulated 30,000 ft (9144 m) exposure. Information gained from such a test battery may assist the medical monitor in identifying early signs of DCS and subtle neurologic dysfunction related to cases of asymptomatic, but advanced, DCS. This presentation concerns the selection and integration of a test battery and the timely graphic display of subject test results for the principal investigator and medical monitor. A subset of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) developed through the Office of Military Performance Assessment Technology (OMPAT) was selected. The ANAM software provides a library of simple tests designed for precise measurement of processing efficiency in a variety of cognitive domains. For our application and time constraints, two tests requiring high levels of cognitive processing and memory were chosen along with one test requiring fine psychomotor performance. Accuracy, speed, and processing throughout variables as well as RMS error were collected. An automated mood survey provided 'state' information on six scales including anger, happiness, fear, depression, activity, and fatigue. An integrated and interactive LOTUS 1-2-3 macro was developed to import and display past and present task performance and mood-change information.

  6. Applying anodal tDCS during tango dancing in a patient with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, D; Allum, J H; Bronstein, A M; Dominguez, R O

    2014-05-07

    Gait disturbance in patients with Parkinson's disease remains a therapeutic challenge, given its poor response to levodopa. Dance therapy is of recognised benefit in these patients, particularly partnered dance forms such as the tango. In parallel, non-invasive brain stimulation has begun to show promise for the rehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's disease, although effects on gait, compared to upper limbs, have been less well defined. We applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in a 79 year old male patient with moderate Parkinson's disease during tango dancing to assess its effect on trunk motion and balance. The patient performed a total of four dances over two days, two 'tango+tDCS' and two 'tango+sham' in a randomised double-blind fashion. In a separate experimental session we also assessed the isolated effect of tDCS (and sham) on gait without tango dancing. For the dance session, trunk peak velocity during tango was significantly greater during tDCS compared to sham stimulation. In the gait experiments we observed a modest but significant reduction in the time taken to complete the 3m 'timed up and go' and 6m walk, and an increase in overall gait velocity and peak pitch trunk velocity with tDCS compared to sham. Our findings suggest that tDCS may be a useful adjunct to gait rehabilitation for patients with PD, although studies in a larger group of patients are needed to evaluate the therapeutic use of non-invasive brain stimulation during dance therapy.

  7. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of frontal cortex decreases performance on the WAIS-IV intelligence test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Kristin K; Mellin, Juliann M; Lustenberger, Caroline M; Boyle, Michael R; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-09-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates excitability of motor cortex. However, there is conflicting evidence about the efficacy of this non-invasive brain stimulation modality to modulate performance on cognitive tasks. Previous work has tested the effect of tDCS on specific facets of cognition and executive processing. However, no randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study has looked at the effects of tDCS on a comprehensive battery of cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to test if tDCS had an effect on performance on a comprehensive assay of cognitive processes, a standardized intelligence quotient (IQ) test. The study consisted of two substudies and followed a double-blind, between-subjects, sham-controlled design. In total, 41 healthy adult participants were included in the final analysis. These participants completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) as a baseline measure. At least one week later, participants in substudy 1 received either bilateral tDCS (anodes over both F4 and F3, cathode over Cz, 2 mA at each anode for 20 min) or active sham tDCS (2 mA for 40 s), and participants in substudy 2 received either right or left tDCS (anode over either F4 or F3, cathode over Cz, 2 mA for 20 min). In both studies, the WAIS-IV was immediately administered following stimulation to assess for performance differences induced by bilateral and unilateral tDCS. Compared to sham stimulation, right, left, and bilateral tDCS reduced improvement between sessions on Full Scale IQ and the Perceptual Reasoning Index. This demonstration that frontal tDCS selectively degraded improvement on specific metrics of the WAIS-IV raises important questions about the often proposed role of tDCS in cognitive enhancement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 新型GSM/DCS1800双模系统天线推出

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    融合了50年天线生产经验的美国亚伦电信公司Decibel Producis分部最近推出了同时支持GSM与DCS1800系统的双模板状天线DB762/DB764系列。因而在CSM与DCS1800系统共存的情况下,只需采用这一种天线而无需分别采用两个频段的天线。

  9. The Relevance of Patent Foramen Ovale to Type II DCS: An Overview of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO 11062 TITLE: The Relevance of Patent Foramen Ovale to Type 11 DCS: An...Relevance of Patent Foramen Ovale to Type II DCS: An Overview of the Literature Joan Saary, MD, MSc and Gary Gray, MD, PhD Division of Occupational...ON Toronto, ON Canada, M5B 1W8 Canada M3M 3B9 joan.saary(autoronto.ca 2ary.2ray(aidciem.dnd.ca The significance of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in the

  10. Ultrastructure of immature stages of the black dump fly: Ophyra aenescens (Wiedemann, 1830) (Diptera: Muscidae: Azeliinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinhas, Lucas Barbosa; Mendonça, Paloma Martins; Barbosa, Rodrigo Rocha; Queiroz, Margareth Maria de Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    Ophyra aenescens (black dump fly) originally belonged to the New World, however, now it is spread worldwide. This fly is a mechanical vector of some pathogenic microorganisms and eggs of the human botfly (Dermatobia hominis). The adults are associated with decaying matter and the immature stages colonize animal and human corpses. It is considered an important muscid species for forensic entomology. The aim of this study was to describe the morphology of the eggs, the three larval instars and the puparia of O. aenescens using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The spiracular opening of the first instar has an interruption in the middle of its length. Comparing to the other instar, the ventral tubercles are only developed in the first instar. The anterior spiracles have a variation in the numbers of spiracular ramification. The puparia morphology is similar to the third instar larvae, however the cephalic region is retracted and on the third thoracic segment, a respiratory structure is present. In conclusion, the SEM technique used and the results obtained are helpful to describe and differentiate the immature stages of O. aenescens and consequently support forensic and medical entomology.

  11. Anthrax lethal toxin-mediated killing of human and murine dendritic cells impairs the adaptive immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkrim Alileche

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogens have acquired strategies to combat the immune response. Bacillus anthracis interferes with host defenses by releasing anthrax lethal toxin (LT, which inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, rendering dendritic cells (DCs and T lymphocytes nonresponsive to immune stimulation. However, these cell types are considered resistant to killing by LT. Here we show that LT kills primary human DCs in vitro, and murine DCs in vitro and in vivo. Kinetics of LT-mediated killing of murine DCs, as well as cell death pathways induced, were dependent upon genetic background: LT triggered rapid necrosis in BALB/c-derived DCs, and slow apoptosis in C57BL/6-derived DCs. This is consistent with rapid and slow killing of LT-injected BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, respectively. We present evidence that anthrax LT impairs adaptive immunity by specifically targeting DCs. This may represent an immune-evasion strategy of the bacterium, and contribute to anthrax disease progression. We also established that genetic background determines whether apoptosis or necrosis is induced by LT. Finally, killing of C57BL/6-derived DCs by LT mirrors that of human DCs, suggesting that C57BL/6 DCs represent a better model system for human anthrax than the prototypical BALB/c macrophages.

  12. Human dendritic cells in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model: their potentiating role in the allergic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, H; Duez, C; Fahy, O; Tsicopoulos, A; André, C; Wallaert, B; Lebecque, S; Tonnel, A B; Pestel, J

    2000-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the lungs and airways of healthy and allergic subjects where they are exposed to inhaled antigens. After the uptake of antigens, DCs migrate to lymphoid organs where T cells initiate and control the immune response. The migratory properties of DCs are an essential component of their function but remain unclear in the situation of allergic diseases. To better understand the role of DCs in response to allergens, we first investigated their presence in an original experimental model of allergic asthma: the humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients sensitive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt). Human DCs were detected in lungs of mice developing an inflammatory pulmonary infiltrate and appeared to be mainly located in the alveolar spaces. In a second step, human DCs were generated in vitro from monocytes and injected into naive SCID mice exposed or not exposed to Dpt aerosols. Their migratory behavior was explored, as well as their potential role in modulating the IgE production after exposure to Dpt. After exposure to Dpt, the number of DCs present in airways decreased, while it increased into the spleen and thymus of the mice. The IgE production increased in the presence of DCs as compared with mice not injected with DCs. These results suggest that DCs may play a role in the pulmonary allergic reaction developed in response to Dpt in SCID mice.

  13. A Fusion-Loop Antibody Enhances the Infectious Properties of Immature Flavivirus Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Moesker, Bastiaan; Voorham, Julia M. da Silva; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Diamond, Michael S.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2011-01-01

    Flavivirus-infected cells secrete a mixture of mature, partially immature, and fully immature particles into the extracellular space. Although mature virions are highly infectious, prM-containing fully immature virions are noninfectious largely because the prM protein inhibits the cell attachment an

  14. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) decreases the amplitudes of long-latency stretch reflexes in cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that the neuromodulation of the cerebellum using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could represent a new therapeutic strategy for the management of cerebellar disorders. Anodal tDCS of the cerebellum increases the excitability of the cerebellar cortex. We tested the effects of anodal tDCS applied over the cerebellum in ataxic patients. We studied (a) stretch reflexes (SR) in upper limb (SLSR: short-latency stretch reflexes; LLSR: long-latency stretch reflexes), (b) a coordination functional task in upper limbs based on mechanical counters (MCT: mechanical counter test), and (c) computerized posturography. tDCS did not change the amplitude of SLSR, but reduced significantly the amplitudes of LLSR. tDCS did not improve the MCT scores and did not modify posture. We suggest that anodal tDCS of the cerebellum reduces the amplitudes of LLSR by increasing the inhibitory effect exerted by the cerebellar cortex upon cerebellar nuclei. The absence of effect upon upper limb coordination and posture suggests that the cerebello-cerebral networks subserving these functions are less responsive to anodal tDCS of the cerebellum. Anodal tDCS of the cerebellum represents a novel experimental tool to investigate the effects of the cerebellar cortex on the modulation of the amplitudes of LLSR.

  15. Impact of tDCS on Performance and Learning of Target Detection: Interaction with Stimulus Characteristics and Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, B. A.; Trumbo, M. C.; Flores, R. A.; Garcia, C. M.; van der Merwe, A. J.; Wassermann, E. M.; Weisend, M. P.; Clark, V. P.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously found that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over right inferior frontal cortex (RIFC) enhances performance during learning of a difficult visual target detection task (Clark et al., 2012). In order to examine the cognitive mechanisms of tDCS that lead to enhanced performance, here we analyzed its differential…

  16. DMPD: RAPping production of type I interferon in pDCs through mTOR. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18800159 RAPping production of type I interferon in pDCs through mTOR. Costa-Mattio...li M, Sonenberg N. Nat Immunol. 2008 Oct;9(10):1097-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show RAPping production... of type I interferon in pDCs through mTOR. PubmedID 18800159 Title RAPping production of type I interferon

  17. Ketamine selectively suppresses synchronized afterdischarges in immature hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, R J; Swann, J W

    1986-08-29

    The role of excitatory amino acid neurotransmission in epileptogenesis was investigated in the developing hippocampus. Bath application of ketamine blocked penicillin-induced, synchronized afterdischarges in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons. Ketamine also decreased the duration of the preceding intracellularly recorded depolarization shift but had no measurable effect on the resting membrane potential or input impedance of pyramidal cells. Concentrations of ketamine that blocked afterdischarge generation dramatically depressed intracellular depolarizations produced by iontophoretic application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) but not quisqualate. The effects of the NMDA antagonist 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid on epileptiform discharges were identical to those of ketamine. These results suggest that an endogenous excitatory amino acid acting on an NMDA receptor plays a key role in the pronounced capacity of immature hippocampus for seizures.

  18. Toxicity of injected radium-226 in immature dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C. [and others

    1995-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the toxicity of injected {sup 226}Ra in immature dogs and to compare the results with those from studies of injected {sup 226}Ra in young adult dogs. An historic objective of these studies, initiated at the University of Utah and continued at ITRI, was to compare the results in dogs to the population of dial painters who ingested {sup 226}Ra as young adults. Age at the time of exposure is considered to be an important factor in dosimetry and risk of developing radiation-induced disease, particularly bone cancer. In summary, dogs injected with {sup 226}Ra when immature had increased occurrences of bone tumors in a dose-related fashion.

  19. Jefferson fractures of the immature spine. Report of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AuYong, Nicholas; Piatt, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Jefferson fractures of the immature spine have received little attention in the study of pediatric spinal trauma. Fractures through synchondroses are a possibility in the immature spine, in addition to fractures through osseous portions of the vertebral ring, and they create opportunities for misinterpretation of diagnostic imaging. The authors describe 3 examples of Jefferson fractures in young children. All 3 cases featured fractures through an anterior synchondrosis in association with persistence of the posterior synchondrosis or a fracture of the posterior arch. The possibility of a Jefferson fracture should be considered for any child presenting with neck pain, cervical muscle spasm, or torticollis following a head injury, despite a seemingly normal cervical spine study. Jefferson fractures in young children are probably much more common than previously recognized.

  20. Efficacy of extracts of immature mango on ovine gastrointestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Patrícia S; Nogueira, Flávia A; Oliveira, Neide J F; Martins, Ernane R; Duarte, Eduardo R

    2012-12-01

    The principal health problem in small ruminants is helminthiasis and the rapid development of nematode resistance to anthelminthics has limited the success of control in several countries, stimulating the search for alternatives. In this study, extracts of immature fruits of the mango Mangifera indica L. var Ubá were evaluated for inhibition of larval development and fecal egg count reduction in sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. In the phytochemical analyses, tannins and flavonoids were the metabolites identified. Aqueous extracts of immature fruits at 100 mg ml(-1) showed 100 % inhibition of larval development. The LC(90) of the extract was 35.9 mg ml(-1) and the in vivo anthelminthic efficacy at 0.740 g kg(-1) (BW, orally) was 53 %. The identification of larvae showed that 99.8 % were Haemonchus spp. In vitro and in vivo results indicate that this fruit could assist ovine nematode control.

  1. Clear cell chondrosarcoma mimicking chondroblastoma in a skeletally immature patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Christopher P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Madigan Army Medical Center, Ft. Lewis, WA (United States); Nelson, Scott D. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, CA (United States); Seeger, Leanne L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, CA (United States); Eckardt, Jeffrey J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, CA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    We report the case of a clear cell chondrosarcoma (CCCS) occurring in the femoral head of a 14-year-old skeletally immature boy. Radiographic examination revealed a well-defined, osteolytic lesion in the epiphysis of the femoral head. Given the patient's age and the radiographic appearance of the lesion, chondroblastoma was high on the differential diagnosis. A frozen section was performed at the time of open biopsy was felt to be consistent with either chondroblastoma or CCCS. CCCS in a skeletally immature patient was felt to be unlikely, so curettage and bone grafting was performed. Final pathology review, however, confirmed the diagnosis of CCCS. The patient was taken back to surgery 4 weeks later for a wide resection and hemiarthroplasty. (orig.)

  2. Regeneration of Pharbitis nil from immature embryos by somatic embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Trejgell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immature embryos of Pharbitis nil Chois. were used for the study. They were isolated from previously sterilized fruits and afterwards transferred to Murashige and Skoog (MS growth medium with 0.8% agar. Immature embryos were cut across their axis. After 6-8 weeks of cultivation in the injury place (hypocotyl-root region somatic embryos were formed. These embryos were isolated and each of them was transferred into a separate tube containing MS supplemented with naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA; in concentration 0.1 mg•dm-3 and gibberellic acid (GA3; in concentration 0.5 mg•dm-3. Under these conditions about 26% of somatic embryos regenerated into complete plants. Two-three weeks after the photoperiodic induction flowers appeared on these plants. A few weeks after pollination normal seeds were developed from these flowers.

  3. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Power Spectral Parameters: a tDCS/EEG co-registration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lisa Mangia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS delivers low electric currents to the brain through the scalp. Constant electric currents induce shifts in neuronal membrane excitability, resulting in secondary changes in cortical activity. Concomitant electroencephalography (EEG monitoring during tDCS can provide valuable information on the tDCS mechanisms of action. This study examined the effects of anodal tDCS on spontaneous cortical activity in a resting brain to disclose possible modulation of spontaneous oscillatory brain activity. EEG activity was measured in ten healthy subjects during and after a session of anodal stimulation of the postero-parietal cortex to detect the tDCS-induced alterations. Changes in the theta, alpha, beta and gamma power bands were investigated. Three main findings emerged: 1 an increase in theta band activity during the first minutes of stimulation; 2 an increase in alpha and beta power during and after stimulation; 3 a widespread activation in several brain regions.

  4. Natural Chlorinated Auxins Labeled with Radioactive Chloride in Immature Seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1975-01-01

    Immature seeds were harvested from 15 species grown in perlite/vermiculite containing 36Cl-, but with very low levels of cold Cl-. Autoradiograms of one- and two-dimensional thin layer chromatograms of butanol extracts of lyophilized seeds indicated several radioactive compounds besides the 36Cl......- in many species. In pea the radioactivity cochromatographed with 4-(or 6-)chloroindolyl-3-acetic acid and its methyl ester; in other species radioactivity was found near these chlorinated indolyl-acetic acid markers....

  5. Genomics of mature and immature olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Melissa D; Breheny, Patrick; Stromberg, Arnold J; McClintock, Timothy S

    2012-08-15

    The continuous replacement of neurons in the olfactory epithelium provides an advantageous model for investigating neuronal differentiation and maturation. By calculating the relative enrichment of every mRNA detected in samples of mature mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), immature OSNs, and the residual population of neighboring cell types, and then comparing these ratios against the known expression patterns of >300 genes, enrichment criteria that accurately predicted the OSN expression patterns of nearly all genes were determined. We identified 847 immature OSN-specific and 691 mature OSN-specific genes. The control of gene expression by chromatin modification and transcription factors, and neurite growth, protein transport, RNA processing, cholesterol biosynthesis, and apoptosis via death domain receptors, were overrepresented biological processes in immature OSNs. Ion transport (ion channels), presynaptic functions, and cilia-specific processes were overrepresented in mature OSNs. Processes overrepresented among the genes expressed by all OSNs were protein and ion transport, ER overload response, protein catabolism, and the electron transport chain. To more accurately represent gradations in mRNA abundance and identify all genes expressed in each cell type, classification methods were used to produce probabilities of expression in each cell type for every gene. These probabilities, which identified 9,300 genes expressed in OSNs, were 96% accurate at identifying genes expressed in OSNs and 86% accurate at discriminating genes specific to mature and immature OSNs. This OSN gene database not only predicts the genes responsible for the major biological processes active in OSNs, but also identifies thousands of never before studied genes that support OSN phenotypes.

  6. [Postnatal corticosteroids in preterm infants with immature lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinriksdottir, Erna; Brynjarsson, Hrolfur; Thorkelsson, Thordur

    2016-05-01

    Corticosteroids have been used in preterm infants with immature lungs to decrease their need for supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation. Whether the benefits of the treatment outweigh possible adverse effects remains controversial. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of intravenous and inhalation corticosteroids on preterm infants' need for supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation and potential adverse effects. This was a retrospective cohort study on preterm infants at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Children's Hospital Iceland, born between 2000-2014 and treated with intravenous (n=28) or inhalation (n=30) corticosteroids for immature lung disease. For each infant receiving steriods one infant who did not receive steriods was selected as control, matched on gestational age. There was a significant decrease in the need for supplemental oxygen following intravenous and inhalation corticosteroids administration, and a significant decrease in the need for mechanical ventilation following intravenous corticosteroids administration, but not in controls. Infants receiving intravenous corticosteroids gained significantly less weight than controls during treatment, but no significant difference in weight between groups was found at 35 weeks postmenstrual age, or in other possible adverse effects such as the prevalence of cerebral palsy. Intravenous and inhalation corticosteroids decrease the need for supplemental oxygen in preterm infants with immature lung disease and intravenous steriods facilitate earlier weaning from mechanical ventilation, without significant adverse effects. Therefore, it seems justifiable in selected cases to use corticosteroids in treatment of preterm infants with severe immature lung disease. Corticosteroids, preterm infants, chronic lung disease, mechanical ventilation. Correspondence: Thorður Thorkelsson, thordth@landspitali.is.

  7. Maturogenesis by revascularization in an infected immature permanent tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Vanka; Jain, Ankur; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Bhat, Manohar

    2014-01-01

    Root canal treatment in teeth with incomplete root formation is a challenge. A case of maturogenesis in an immature infected tooth along with probable factors needed for success is discussed. Although clinical and radiographic evidence points to healing and root development, the long-term prognosis and the behavior of tissue occupying the canal space needs further investigation before the procedure can be adopted into routine clinical practice.

  8. Maturogenesis by revascularization in an infected immature permanent tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanka Amit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Root canal treatment in teeth with incomplete root formation is a challenge. A case of maturogenesis in an immature infected tooth along with probable factors needed for success is discussed. Although clinical and radiographic evidence points to healing and root development, the long-term prognosis and the behavior of tissue occupying the canal space needs further investigation before the procedure can be adopted into routine clinical practice.

  9. Revascularization of immature permanent incisors after severe extrusive luxation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehreli, Zafer C; Sara, Sezgi; Aksoy, Burak

    2012-07-01

    Pulp necrosis is an uncommon sequel to extrusive luxation in immature teeth with incomplete apical closure. In this report, we describe the management of severely extruded immature maxillary incisors and the outcome of revascularization to treat subsequent pulp necrosis. An 8.5-year-old boy with severe dentoalveolar trauma to the anterior maxillary region as a result of a fall was provided emergency treatment consisting of reduction of the dislodged labial cortical bone and repositioning of the central incisors, which had suffered extrusive luxation. When he presented with spontaneous pain involving the traumatized incisors a week later, the teeth were treated via a revascularization protocol using sodium hypochlorite irrigation followed by 3 weeks of intracanal calcium hydroxide, then a coronal seal of mineral trioxide aggregate and resin composite. Complete periradicular healing was observed after 3 months, followed by progressive thickening of the root walls and apical closure. Follow-up observations confirmed the efficacy of the regenerative treatment as a viable alternative to conventional apexification in endodontically involved, traumatized immature teeth.

  10. Pulp revascularization of immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Blayne; Teixeira, Fabricio; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Caplan, Daniel J; Trope, Martin

    2007-06-01

    This study examined the ability of a collagen solution to aid revascularization of necrotic-infected root canals in immature dog teeth. Sixty immature teeth from 6 dogs were infected, disinfected, and randomized into experimental groups: 1: no further treatment; 2: blood in canal; 3: collagen solution in canal, 4: collagen solution + blood, and 5: negative controls (left for natural development). Uncorrected chi-square analysis of radiographic results showed no statistical differences (p >or= 0.05) between experimental groups regarding healing of radiolucencies but a borderline statistical difference (p = 0.058) for group 1 versus group 4 for radicular thickening. Group 2 showed significantly more apical closure than group 1 (p = 0.03) and a borderline statistical difference (p = 0.051) for group 3 versus group 1. Uncorrected chi-square analysis revealed that there were no statistical differences between experimental groups for histological results. However, some roots in each of groups 1 to 4 (previously infected) showed positive histologic outcomes (thickened walls in 43.9%, apical closure in 54.9%, and new luminal tissue in 29.3%). Revascularization of disinfected immature dog root canal systems is possible.

  11. Potentials and limits to enhance cognitive functions in healthy and pathological aging by tDCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin ePrehn

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that is increasingly used in research and clinical settings to enhance the effects of cognitive training. In our present review, we will first summarize studies using tDCS alone and in combination with cognitive training in older adults and patients with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD. We will also review one study (Meinzer et al., 2014 that showed an improvement in cognitive performance during anodal tDCS over the left inferior frontal cortex in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, which is regarded as a prodromal stage of AD. Although promising short-term results have been reported, evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs with sufficient sample sizes is scarce. In addition, stimulation protocols (in terms of intensity, duration, and repetition of stimulation that lead to sustained improvements in outcome measures relevant for daily life still remain to be established. Following, we will discuss modulating factors such as technical parameters as well as the question if there are specific cognitive functions (e.g., learning, memory consolidation, executive control which are more amenable to tDCS enhancement than others. Finally, we will highlight future directions and limitations in this field and emphasize the need to conduct RCTs to establish efficacy of interventions for activities of daily life for a given patient population.

  12. Anodal tDCS of dorsolateral prefontal cortex during an Implicit Association Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; den Uyl, T.E.; Wiers, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Anodal stimulation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex by transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to enhance performance on working memory tasks. However, it is not yet known precisely which aspects of working memory - a broad theoretical concept including short-term memory and v

  13. Effects of tDCS on executive function in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doruk, Deniz; Gray, Zachary; Bravo, Gabriela L; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Fregni, Felipe

    2014-10-17

    Non-motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are often poorly recognized, significantly impair quality of life and cause severe disability. Currently, there is limited evidence to guide treatment of associated psychiatric and cognitive problems. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques have emerged as non-pharmacological alternatives to target cognitive symptoms without worsening motor function. In this context, we conducted a multicenter, sham controlled, double-blinded study to assess the immediate and long-term effects of ten consecutive sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the anode on the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (n=5), left DLPFC (n=6) or sham (n=7). We assessed cognitive functions, depressive symptoms and motor functions in 18 PD patients at baseline, at the end of the 2-week stimulation sessions and at 1-month follow-up. Our results showed that active stimulation of both left and right DLPFC resulted in prolonged improvements in Trail Making Test B, an established test to measure executive function, compared to sham tDCS at the 1-month follow-up. These results suggest the existence of a beneficial long-term effect on executive functions in PD patients following active tDCS over the DLPFC. Thus, our findings encourage further investigation exploring tDCS as an adjuvant therapy for cognitive and behavioral treatment in PD.

  14. Semantic Feature Training in Combination with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS for Progressive Anomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyi Hung

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effectiveness of a 2-week regimen of a semantic feature training in combination with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS for progressive naming impairment associated with primary progressive aphasia (N = 4 or early onset Alzheimer’s Disease (N = 1. Patients received a 2-week regimen (10 sessions of anodal tDCS delivered over the left temporoparietal cortex while completing a language therapy that consisted of repeated naming and semantic feature generation. Therapy targets consisted of familiar people, household items, clothes, foods, places, hygiene implements, and activities. Untrained items from each semantic category provided item level controls. We analyzed naming accuracies at multiple timepoints (i.e., pre-, post-, 6-month follow-up via a mixed effects logistic regression and individual differences in treatment responsiveness using a series of non-parametric McNemar tests. Patients showed advantages for naming trained over untrained items. These gains were evident immediately post tDCS. Trained items also showed a shallower rate of decline over 6-months relative to untrained items that showed continued progressive decline. Patients tolerated stimulation well, and sustained improvements in naming accuracy suggest that the current intervention approach is viable. Future implementation of a sham control condition will be crucial toward ascertaining whether neurostimulation and behavioral treatment act synergistically or alternatively whether treatment gains are exclusively attributable to either tDCS or the behavioral intervention.

  15. Multisession Anodal tDCS Protocol Improves Motor System Function in an Aging Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dumel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effects of five consecutive, daily 20-minute sessions of M1 a-tDCS on motor learning in healthy, cognitively intact, aging adults. Design. A total of 23 participants (51 to 69 years old performed five consecutive, daily 20-minute sessions of a serial reaction time task (SRT task concomitant with either anodal (n=12 or sham (n=11 M1 a-tDCS. Results. We found a significant group × training sessions interaction, indicating that whereas aging adults in the sham group exhibited little-to-no sequence-specific learning improvements beyond the first day of training, reproducible improvements in the ability to learn new motor sequences over 5 consecutive sessions were the net result in age-equivalent participants from the M1 a-tDCS group. A significant main effect of group on sequence-specific learning revealed greater motor learning for the M1 a-tDCS group when the five learning sessions were averaged. Conclusion. These findings raise into prominence the utility of multisession anodal TDCS protocols in combination with motor training to help prevent/alleviate age-associated motor function decline.

  16. Anodal tDCS of dorsolateral prefontal cortex during an Implicit Association Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; den Uyl, T.E.; Wiers, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Anodal stimulation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex by transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to enhance performance on working memory tasks. However, it is not yet known precisely which aspects of working memory - a broad theoretical concept including short-term memory and v

  17. Impact of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on neuronal functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, S. (Suman); P. Holland (Peter); M.A. Frens (Maarten); O. Donchin (Opher)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive brain stimulation technique, modulates neuronal excitability by the application of a small electrical current. The low cost and ease of the technique has driven interest in potential clinical applications. However, outcomes a

  18. Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesins Contribute to Streptococcus gordonii-Induced Maturation of Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun Byeol; Kim, Sun Kyung; Seo, Ho Seong; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the induction of immunity by recognition, capture, process, and presentation of antigens from infectious microbes. Streptococcus gordonii is able to cause life-threatening systemic diseases such as infective endocarditis. Serine-rich repeat (SRR) glycoproteins of S. gordonii are sialic acid-binding adhesins mediating the bacterial adherence to the host and the development of infective endocarditis. Thus, the SRR adhesins are potentially involved in the bacterial adherence to DCs and the maturation and activation of DCs required for the induction of immunity to S. gordonii. Here, we investigated the phenotypic and functional changes of human monocyte-derived DCs treated with wild-type S. gordonii or the SRR adhesin-deficient mutant. The mutant poorly bound to DCs and only weakly increased the expression of CD83, CD86, MHC class II, and PD-L1 on DCs compared with the wild-type. In addition, the mutant induced lower levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 than the wild-type in DCs. When DCs sensitized with the mutant were co-cultured with autologous T cells, they induced weaker proliferation and activation of T cells than DCs stimulated with the wild-type. Blockade of SRR adhesin with 3′-sialyllactose markedly reduced S. gordonii binding and internalization, causing attenuation of the bacterial immunostimulatory potency in DC maturation. Collectively, our results suggest that SRR adhesins of S. gordonii are important for maturation and activation of DCs.

  19. Cumulative effects of anodal and priming cathodal tDCS on pegboard test performance and motor cortical excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, Monica; Rafolt, Dietmar; Gallasch, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) protocols applied over the primary motor cortex are associated with changes in motor performance. This transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study examines whether cathodal tDCS prior to motor training, combined with anodal tDCS during motor training improves motor performance and off-line learning. Three study groups (n=36) were trained on the grooved pegboard test (GPT) in a randomized, between-subjects design: SHAM-sham stimulation prior and during training, STIM1-sham stimulation prior and atDCS during training, STIM2-ctDCS stimulation prior and atDCS during training. Motor performance was assessed by GPT completion time and retested 14 days later to determine off-line learning. Cortical excitability was assessed via TMS at baseline (T0), prior training (T1), after training (T2), and 60 min after training (T3). Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were recorded from m. abductor pollicis brevis of the active left hand. GPT completion time was reduced for both stimulated groups compared to SHAM. For STIM2 this reduction in time was significantly higher than for STIM1 and further off-line learning occurred after STIM2. After ctDCS at T1, MEP amplitude and intracortical facilitation was decreased and intracortical inhibition was increased. After atDCS at T2, an opposite effect was observed for STIM1 and STIM2. For STIM2 these neuromodulatory effects were retained until T3. It is concluded that application of atDCS during the training improves pegboard performance and that additional priming with ctDCS has a positive effect on off-line learning. These cumulative behavioral gains were indicated by the preceding neuromodulatory changes.

  20. Remotely-Supervised Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS for Clinical Trials: Guidelines for Technology and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh E Charvet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is cumulative. Treatment protocols typically require multiple consecutive sessions spanning weeks or months. However, traveling to clinic for a tDCS session can present an obstacle to subjects and their caregivers. With modified devices and headgear, tDCS treatment can be administered remotely under clinical supervision, potentially enhancing recruitment, throughput, and convenience. Here we propose standards and protocols for clinical trials utilizing remotely-supervised tDCS with the goal of providing safe, reproducible and well-tolerated stimulation therapy outside of the clinic. The recommendations include: 1 training of staff in tDCS treatment and supervision, 2 assessment of the user’s capability to participate in tDCS remotely, 3 ongoing training procedures and materials including assessments of the user and/or caregiver, 4 simple and fail-safe electrode preparation techniques and tDCS headgear, 5 strict dose control for each session, 6 ongoing monitoring to quantify compliance (device preparation, electrode saturation/placement, stimulation protocol, with corresponding corrective steps as required, 7 monitoring for treatment-emergent adverse effects, 8 guidelines for discontinuation of a session and/or study participation including emergency failsafe procedures tailored to the treatment population’s level of need. These guidelines are intended to provide a minimal level of methodological rigor for clinical trials seeking to apply tDCS outside a specialized treatment center. We outline indication-specific applications (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Depression, Multiple Sclerosis, Palliative Care following these recommendations that support a standardized framework for evaluating the tolerability and reproducibility of remote-supervised tDCS that, once established, will allow for translation of tDCS clinical trials to a greater size and range of patient populations.

  1. tDCS for Memory Enhancement: Analysis of the Speculative Aspects of Ethical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voarino, Nathalie; Dubljević, Veljko; Racine, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising technology to enhance cognitive and physical performance. One of the major areas of interest is the enhancement of memory function in healthy individuals. The early arrival of tDCS on the market for lifestyle uses and cognitive enhancement purposes lead to the voicing of some important ethical concerns, especially because, to date, there are no official guidelines or evaluation procedures to tackle these issues. The aim of this article is to review ethical issues related to uses of tDCS for memory enhancement found in the ethics and neuroscience literature and to evaluate how realistic and scientifically well-founded these concerns are? In order to evaluate how plausible or speculative each issue is, we applied the methodological framework described by Racine et al. (2014) for “informed and reflective” speculation in bioethics. This framework could be succinctly presented as requiring: (1) the explicit acknowledgment of factual assumptions and identification of the value attributed to them; (2) the validation of these assumptions with interdisciplinary literature; and (3) the adoption of a broad perspective to support more comprehensive reflection on normative issues. We identified four major considerations associated with the development of tDCS for memory enhancement: safety, autonomy, justice and authenticity. In order to assess the seriousness and likelihood of harm related to each of these concerns, we analyzed the assumptions underlying the ethical issues, and the level of evidence for each of them. We identified seven distinct assumptions: prevalence, social acceptance, efficacy, ideological stance (bioconservative vs. libertarian), potential for misuse, long term side effects, and the delivery of complete and clear information. We conclude that ethical discussion about memory enhancement via tDCS sometimes involves undue speculation, and closer attention to scientific and social facts would

  2. Immature mice are more susceptible than adult mice to acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose induces acute liver injury. The aim of the present study was to analyze the difference of susceptibility between immature and adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. Weanling immature and adult mice were injected with APAP (300 mg/kg). As expected, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. APAP-evoked hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation was stronger in immature mice than in adult mice. Hepatic receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 was obviously activated at APAP-exposed immature and adult mice. Interestingly, hepatic RIP3 activation was more obvious in APAP-treated immature mice than adult mice. Although there was no difference on hepatic GSH metabolic enzymes between immature and adult mice, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced hepatic GSH depletion. Of interest, immature mice expressed a much higher level of hepatic Cyp2e1 and Cyp3a11 mRNAs than adult mice. Correspondingly, immature mice expressed a higher level of hepatic CYP2E1, the key drug metabolic enzyme that metabolized APAP into the reactive metabolite NAPQI. These results suggest that a higher level of hepatic drug metabolic enzymes in immature mice than adult mice might contribute to the difference of susceptibility to APAP-induced acute liver injury. PMID:28205631

  3. Inhibition of human dendritic cell activation by hydroethanolic but not lipophilic extracts of turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasovsky, Joseph; Chang, David H; Deng, Gary; Yeung, Simon; Lee, Mavis; Leung, Ping Chung; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Cassileth, Barrie; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2009-03-01

    Turmeric has been extensively utilized in Indian and Chinese medicine for its immune-modulatory properties. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells specialized to initiate and regulate immunity. The ability of DCs to initiate immunity is linked to their activation status. The effects of turmeric on human DCs have not been studied. Here we show that hydroethanolic (HEE) but not lipophilic "supercritical" extraction (SCE) of turmeric inhibits the activation of human DCs in response to inflammatory cytokines. Treatment of DCs with HEE also inhibits the ability of DCs to stimulate the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Importantly, the lipophilic fraction does not synergize with the hydroethanolic fraction for the ability of inhibiting DC maturation. Rather, culturing of DCs with the combination of HEE and SCE leads to partial abrogation of the effects of HEE on the MLR initiated by DCs. These data provide a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric. However, they suggest that these extracts are not synergistic and may contain components with mutually antagonistic effects on human DCs. Harnessing the immune effects of turmeric may benefit from specifically targeting the active fractions.

  4. Spatial accumulation pattern of citrulline and other nutrients in immature and mature watermelon fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Kinya; Mifune, Yuki; Morita, Kaori; Ishitsuka, Souichi; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Ishihara, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.) originates from arid regions of southern Africa, and its fruit contains a large amount of the amino acid citrulline, an efficient hydroxyl radical scavenger. Citrulline is implicated in the production of nitric oxide in human endothelium, and potential health benefits including vasodilatation and antioxidant functions have been suggested. However, citrulline metabolism in watermelon fruits is poorly understood. This study examined the accumulation pattern of citrulline and other nutrients in immature and mature watermelon fruits. In mature fruits, highest citrulline concentration was observed in the outer peel, followed by the central portion of the flesh and inner rinds, whereas the level was lower in the peripheral portion of the flesh. Citrulline content was generally low in immature fruits. Spatial and developmental patterns of citrulline accumulation were largely different from those of the antioxidant lycopene, total proteins, and soluble sugars such as glucose, fructose, and sucrose. Principal component analysis suggested a clear distinction of the central flesh and outer peels in mature fruits from other tissues in terms of the levels of major nutrients. These observations suggested that citrulline accumulation may be regulated in a distinct manner from other nutrients during watermelon fruit maturation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Olfactory experience modulates immature neuron development in postnatal and adult guinea pig piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X; Zhang, X-M; Wu, J; Fu, J; Mou, L; Lu, D-H; Cai, Y; Luo, X-G; Pan, A; Yan, X-X

    2014-02-14

    Immature neurons expressing doublecortin (DCX+) are present around cortical layer II in various mammals including guinea pigs and humans, especially enriched in the paleocortex. However, little is known whether and how functional experience affects the development of this population of neurons. We attempted to explore a modulation by experience to layer II DCX+ cells in the primary olfactory cortex in postnatal and adult guinea pigs. Neonatal and 1-year-old guinea pigs were subjected to unilateral naris-occlusion, followed 1 and 2months later by morphometry of DCX+ cells in the piriform cortex. DCX+ somata and processes were reduced in the deprived relative to the non-deprived piriform cortex in both age groups at the two surviving time points. The number of DCX+ cells was decreased in the deprived side relative to internal control at 1 and 2months in the youths and at 2months in the adults post-occlusion. The mean somal area of DCX+ cells showed a trend of decrease in the deprived side relative to the internal control in the youths. In addition, DCX+ cells in the deprived side exhibited a lower frequency of colocalization with the neuron-specific nuclear antigen (NeuN) relative to counterparts. These results suggest that normal olfactory experience is required for the maintenance and development of DCX+ immature neurons in postnatal and adult guinea pig piriform cortex.

  6. Fracture resistance of immature teeth filled with mineral trioxide aggregate, bioaggregate, and biodentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Emre; Bayram, Huda Melike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of teeth with immature apices treated with coronal placement of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), bioaggregate (BA), and Biodentine. Materials and Methods: Forty-one freshly extracted, single-rooted human premolar teeth were used for the study. At first, the root length was standardized to 9 mm. The crown-down technique was used for the preparation of the root canals using the rotary ProTaper system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) of F3 (30). Peeso reamer no. 6 was stepped out from the apex to simulate an incompletely formed root. The prepared roots were randomly assigned to one control (n = 5) and three experimental (n = 12) groups, as described below. Group 1: White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was prepared as per the manufacturer's instructions and compacted into the root canal using MAP system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and condensed by pluggers (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil). Group 2: The canals were filled with DiaRoot-BA (DiaDent Group International, Canada). Group 3: Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France) solution was mixed with the capsule powder and condensed using pluggers. Instron was used to determine the maximum horizontal load to fracture the tooth, placing the tip 3 mm incisal to the cementoenamel junction. Mean values of the fracture strength were compared by ANOVA followed by a post hoc test. P biodentine experimental groups. Conclusion: All the three materials tested, may be used as effective strengthening agents for immature teeth. PMID:27095900

  7. Changes in corticomotor excitability and intracortical inhibition of the primary motor cortex forearm area induced by anodal tDCS.

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    Xue Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have investigated how tDCS over the primary motor cortex modulates excitability in the intrinsic hand muscles. Here, we tested if tDCS changes corticomotor excitability and/or cortical inhibition when measured in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR and if these aftereffects can be successfully assessed during controlled muscle contraction. METHODS: We implemented a double blind cross-over design in which participants (n = 16 completed two sessions where the aftereffects of 20 min of 1 mA (0.04 mA/cm2 anodal vs sham tDCS were tested in a resting muscle, and two more sessions where the aftereffects of anodal vs sham tDCS were tested in an active muscle. RESULTS: Anodal tDCS increased corticomotor excitability in ECR when aftereffects were measured with a low-level controlled muscle contraction. Furthermore, anodal tDCS decreased short interval intracortical inhibition but only when measured at rest and after non-responders (n = 2 were removed. We found no changes in the cortical silent period. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that targeting more proximal muscles in the upper limb with anodal tDCS is achievable and corticomotor excitability can be assessed in the presence of a low-level controlled contraction of the target muscle.

  8. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the supplementary motor area (SMA) influences performance on motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupfeld, K E; Ketcham, C J; Schneider, H D

    2017-03-01

    The supplementary motor area (SMA) is believed to be highly involved in the planning and execution of both simple and complex motor tasks. This study aimed to examine the role of the SMA in planning the movements required to complete reaction time, balance, and pegboard tasks using anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), which passes a weak electrical current between two electrodes, in order to modulate neuronal activity. Twenty healthy adults were counterbalanced to receive either tDCS (experimental condition) or no tDCS (control condition) for 3 days. During administration of tDCS, participants performed a balance task significantly faster than controls. After tDCS, subjects significantly improved their simple and choice reaction time. These results demonstrate that the SMA is highly involved in planning and executing fine and gross motor skill tasks and that tDCS is an effective modality for increasing SMA-related performance on these tasks. The findings may be generalizable and therefore indicate implications for future interventions using tDCS as a therapeutic tool.

  9. Maturation and upregulation of functions of murine dendritic cells (DCs) under the influence of purified aromatic-turmerone (AR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonggang, Tan; Yiming, Meng; Heying, Zhang; Cheng, Sun; Qiushi, Wang; Xianghong, Yang; Wei, Zheng; Huawei, Zhou; Shan, Fengping

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of purified aromatic-turmerone (ar-turmerione, AR) on murine dendritic cells (DCs). These impacts of AR on DCs from bone marrow derived DCs(BMDCs) were assessed with use of conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cytochemistry assay, FITC-dextran, bio-assay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that AR induced phenotypic maturation as evidenced by increased expression of CD86, CD40, CD83, CD80 and major histocompatibility complex II (MHC II). The functional tests showed the activity of acidic phosphatase (ACP) inside the DCs were downregulated after treatment with AR (which occurs when phagocytosis of DCs were decreased). Finally, we proved that AR increased the production of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). These data suggested that AR could promote phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs and this adjuvant-like activity may have potential therapeutic value. It is therefore concluded that AR could exert positive modulation on murine DCs.

  10. Flow cytometry assay of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) in peripheral blood during acute hepatitis C: Possible pathogenetic mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessandro Perrella; Oreste Perrella; Luigi Atripaldi; Pasquale Bellopede; Tommaso Patarino; Costanza Sbreglia; Giovanni Tarantino; Paolo Sorrentino; Paolo Conca; Luca Ruggiero

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To asses the expression of myeloid dendritic cells (CD11c+) subset during acute HCV hepatitis and its possible involvement in natural history of the infection.METHODS: We enrolled 11 patients with acute hepatitis C (AHC) (Group A), 10 patients with acute hepatitis A (AHA) (as infective control-Group B) and 10 healthy donors (group C) in this study. All patients underwent selective flow cytometry gating strategies to assess the peripheral number of the myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs)to understand the possible role and differences during acute hepatitis.RESULTS: Eight of 11 patients with acute HCV hepatitis did not show any increase of mDCs compared to healthy individuals, while a significant decrease of mDCs was found in absolute cell count (z=-2.37; P<0.05) and percentage (z=-2.30; P<0.05) as compared with AHA.On the contrary, The remaining three patients of the group A had a higher mDCs number and percentage as occur in group B. Interestingly, after six months, those patients did not show any increase of mDCs subset were chronically infected. while the three subjects with an increase of peripheral mDCs, as in HAV acute infection,resolved the illness.CONCLUSION: The lack of increase of mDCs during acute hepatitis C might be an important factor involved in chronicization of the infection.

  11. Alpha-CaMKII deficiency causes immature dentate gyrus, a novel candidate endophenotype of psychiatric disorders

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    Yamasaki Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elucidating the neural and genetic factors underlying psychiatric illness is hampered by current methods of clinical diagnosis. The identification and investigation of clinical endophenotypes may be one solution, but represents a considerable challenge in human subjects. Here we report that mice heterozygous for a null mutation of the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII+/- have profoundly dysregulated behaviours and impaired neuronal development in the dentate gyrus (DG. The behavioral abnormalities include a severe working memory deficit and an exaggerated infradian rhythm, which are similar to symptoms seen in schizophrenia, bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric disorders. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampus of these mutants revealed that the expression levels of more than 2000 genes were significantly changed. Strikingly, among the 20 most downregulated genes, 5 had highly selective expression in the DG. Whereas BrdU incorporated cells in the mutant mouse DG was increased by more than 50 percent, the number of mature neurons in the DG was dramatically decreased. Morphological and physiological features of the DG neurons in the mutants were strikingly similar to those of immature DG neurons in normal rodents. Moreover, c-Fos expression in the DG after electric footshock was almost completely and selectively abolished in the mutants. Statistical clustering of human post-mortem brains using 10 genes differentially-expressed in the mutant mice were used to classify individuals into two clusters, one of which contained 16 of 18 schizophrenic patients. Nearly half of the differentially-expressed probes in the schizophrenia-enriched cluster encoded genes that are involved in neurogenesis or in neuronal migration/maturation, including calbindin, a marker for mature DG neurons. Based on these results, we propose that an "immature DG" in adulthood might induce alterations in behavior and

  12. Assessment of anodal and cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on MMN-indexed auditory sensory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, Danielle; de la Salle, Sara; Knott, Verner

    2016-06-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive form of brain stimulation which uses a very weak constant current to temporarily excite (anodal stimulation) or inhibit (cathodal stimulation) activity in the brain area of interest via small electrodes placed on the scalp. Currently, tDCS of the frontal cortex is being used as a tool to investigate cognition in healthy controls and to improve symptoms in neurological and psychiatric patients. tDCS has been found to facilitate cognitive performance on measures of attention, memory, and frontal-executive functions. Recently, a short session of anodal tDCS over the temporal lobe has been shown to increase auditory sensory processing as indexed by the Mismatch Negativity (MMN) event-related potential (ERP). This preliminary pilot study examined the separate and interacting effects of both anodal and cathodal tDCS on MMN-indexed auditory pitch discrimination. In a randomized, double blind design, the MMN was assessed before (baseline) and after tDCS (2mA, 20min) in 2 separate sessions, one involving 'sham' stimulation (the device is turned off), followed by anodal stimulation (to temporarily excite cortical activity locally), and one involving cathodal stimulation (to temporarily decrease cortical activity locally), followed by anodal stimulation. Results demonstrated that anodal tDCS over the temporal cortex increased MMN-indexed auditory detection of pitch deviance, and while cathodal tDCS decreased auditory discrimination in baseline-stratified groups, subsequent anodal stimulation did not significantly alter MMN amplitudes. These findings strengthen the position that tDCS effects on cognition extend to the neural processing of sensory input and raise the possibility that this neuromodulatory technique may be useful for investigating sensory processing deficits in clinical populations.

  13. Time-course of corticospinal excitability and autonomic function interplay during and following monopolar tDCS

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    Emiliano eSantarnecchi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While polarity-specific after-effects of monopolar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS on cortico-spinal excitability are well-documented, modulation of vital parameters due to current spread through the brainstem is still a matter of debate, raising potential concerns about its use through the general public, as well as for neurorehabilitation purposes. We monitored online and after-effects of monopolar tDCS (primary motor cortex in ten healthy subjects by adopting a neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS/tDCS combined protocol. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs together with vital parameters (e.g. blood pressure, heart-rate variability and sympathovagal balance were recorded and monitored before, during and after anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS. Ten MEPs every 2.5-minute time windows were recorded from the right First Dorsal Interosseus (FDI, while 5-minute epochs were used to record vital parameters. The protocol included 15 minutes of pre-tDCS and of online-tDCS, (anodal, cathodal or sham. After effects were recorded for 30 minutes. We showed a polarity-independent stabilization of cortical excitability level, a polarity-specific after-effects for cathodal and anodal stimulation, and an absence of persistent excitability changes during online stimulation. No significant effects on vital parameters emerged both during and after tDCS, while a linear increase in systolic/diastolic blood pressure and heart-rate variability was observed during each tDCS condition, as a possible unspecific response to experimental demands. Taken together, current findings provide new insights on the safety of monopolar tDCS, promoting its application both in research and clinical settings.

  14. The effects of tDCS across the Spatial Frequencies and Orientations that comprise the Contrast Sensitivity Function

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    Bruno eRichard

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Trans-cranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS has recently been employed in traditional psychophysical paradigms in an effort to measure direct manipulations on spatial frequency channel operations in the early visual system. However, the effects of tDCS on contrast sensitivity have only been measured at a single spatial frequency and orientation. Since contrast sensitivity is known to depend on spatial frequency and orientation, we ask how the effects of anodal and cathodal tDCS may vary according to these dimensions. We measured contrast sensitivity with sinusoidal gratings at four different spatial frequencies (0.5, 4, 8, and 12 cycles/°, two orientations (45° Oblique and Horizontal, and for two stimulus size conditions [fixed size (3 degrees and fixed period (1.5 cycles]. The results showed that only contrast sensitivity measured with a 45° oblique grating with a spatial frequency of 8 cycles/° (period = 1.5 cycles demonstrated clear polarity specific effects of tDCS, whereby cathodal tDCS increased, and anodal tDCS decreased contrast sensitivity. Overall, effects of tDCS were largest for oblique stimuli presented at high spatial frequencies (i.e., 8 and 12 cycles/°, and were absent at lower spatial frequencies. Further, the modulatory effects of tDCS were dependent on the sensitivity of the observer to the stimulus, and its spatial characteristics. It therefore seems that the effects of tDCS are only found for high spatial frequency stimuli that generally elicit lower contrast sensitivity, while the effects are diminished, or absent to stimuli that elicit higher contrast sensitivity.

  15. A Fusion-Loop Antibody Enhances the Infectious Properties of Immature Flavivirus Particles ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Moesker, Bastiaan; da Silva Voorham, Júlia M.; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Diamond, Michael S.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2011-01-01

    Flavivirus-infected cells secrete a mixture of mature, partially immature, and fully immature particles into the extracellular space. Although mature virions are highly infectious, prM-containing fully immature virions are noninfectious largely because the prM protein inhibits the cell attachment and fusogenic properties of the virus. If, however, cell attachment and entry are facilitated by anti-prM antibodies, immature flavivirus becomes infectious after efficient processing of the prM protein by the endosomal protease furin. A recent study demonstrated that E53, a cross-reactive monoclonal antibody (MAb) that engages the highly conserved fusion-loop peptide within the flavivirus envelope glycoprotein, preferentially binds to immature flavivirus particles. We investigated here the infectious potential of fully immature West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) particles opsonized with E53 MAb and observed that, like anti-prM antibodies, this anti-E antibody also has the capacity to render fully immature flaviviruses infectious. E53-mediated enhancement of both immature WNV and DENV depended on efficient cell entry and the enzymatic activity of the endosomal furin. Furthermore, we also observed that E53-opsonized immature DENV particles but not WNV particles required a more acidic pH for efficient cleavage of prM by furin, adding greater complexity to the dynamics of antibody-mediated infection of immature flavivirus virions. PMID:21880758

  16. Oncostatin M production by human dendritic cells in response to bacterial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo; Todate, Akihito; Ide, Kyotaro; Asada, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suzuki, Kenichiro; Kuwata, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2002-03-21

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a pleiomorphic cytokine that belongs to the IL-6 cytokine family. It is produced by activated T cells and monocytes/macrophages and plays an important role in the process of inflammatory responses. Although dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to secrete a variety of cytokines, it is not elucidated whether DCs are able to produce OSM. To clarify this, using human DCs derived from peripheral blood cells, we measured the protein levels of OSM in the supernatants of DC cultures by ELISA and examined the expression of OSM mRNA by RT-PCR after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or fixed Staphylococcus aureus (SACS). Upon stimulation with bacterial products, DCs secreted a large amount of OSM protein in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the expression of OSM mRNA by DCs was markedly up-regulated. Compared the ability of DCs to produce OSM with that of monocytes, which are major producers of OSM, DCs released significantly higher amounts of OSM protein in the culture supernatants than monocytes. These findings indicate for the first time that human monocyte-derived DCs can synthesize and secrete large amounts of OSM in response to bacterial products, suggesting that OSM produced by DCs at infectious sites may play a role in modulating inflammatory responses.

  17. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

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    Bogdan Aurel Sava

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-GFP transgenic mice (postnatal days 2-4. In 46 % of the pyramidal neurons bath-application of taurine at concentrations ≥ 300 mM significantly enhanced the frequency of postsynaptic currents (PSCs by 744.3 ± 93.8 % (n = 120 cells. This taurine-induced increase of PSC frequency was abolished by 0.2 mM tetrodotoxine, 1 mM strychnine or 3 mM gabazine, but was unaffected by the glutamatergic antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX and (± R(--3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, suggesting that taurine specifically activates GABAergic network activity projecting to pyramidal neurons. Cell-attached recordings revealed that taurine enhanced the frequency of action potentials in pyramidal neurons, indicating an excitatory action of the GABAergic PSCs. In order to identify the presynaptic targets of taurine we demonstrate that bath application of taurine induced in GAD67-GFP labeled interneurons an inward current that is mainly mediated by glycine receptors and can generate action potentials in these cells. We conclude from these results that taurine can enhance network excitability in the immature neocortex by selectively activating GABAergic interneurons via interactions with glycine receptors.

  18. tDCS and Robotics on Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation: Effect Modification by Stroke Duration and Type of Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Sofia Straudi; Felipe Fregni; Carlotta Martinuzzi; Claudia Pavarelli; Stefano Salvioli; Nino Basaglia

    2016-01-01

    Objective:. The aim of this exploratory pilot study is to test the effects of bilateral tDCS combined with upper extremity robot-assisted therapy (RAT) on stroke survivors. Methods. We enrolled 23 subjects who were allocated to 2 groups: RAT + real tDCS and RAT + sham-tDCS. Each patient underwent 10 sessions (5 sessions/week) over two weeks. Outcome measures were collected before and after treatment: (i) Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity (FMA-UE), (ii) Box and Block Test (BBT), and (iii) ...

  19. Spatial and polarity precision of concentric high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mahtab; Truong, Dennis Q; Khadka, Niranjan; Bikson, Marom

    2016-06-21

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique that applies low amplitude current via electrodes placed on the scalp. Rather than directly eliciting a neuronal response, tDCS is believed to modulate excitability-enhancing or suppressing neuronal activity in regions of the brain depending on the polarity of stimulation. The specificity of tDCS to any therapeutic application derives in part from how electrode configuration determines the brain regions that are stimulated. Conventional tDCS uses two relatively large pads (>25 cm(2)) whereas high-definition tDCS (HD-tDCS) uses arrays of smaller electrodes to enhance brain targeting. The 4  ×  1 concentric ring HD-tDCS (one center electrode surrounded by four returns) has been explored in application where focal targeting of cortex is desired. Here, we considered optimization of concentric ring HD-tDCS for targeting: the role of electrodes in the ring and the ring's diameter. Finite element models predicted cortical electric field generated during tDCS. High resolution MRIs were segmented into seven tissue/material masks of varying conductivities. Computer aided design (CAD) model of electrodes, gel, and sponge pads were incorporated into the segmentation. Volume meshes were generated and the Laplace equation ([Formula: see text] · (σ [Formula: see text] V)  =  0) was solved for cortical electric field, which was interpreted using physiological assumptions to correlate with stimulation and modulation. Cortical field intensity was predicted to increase with increasing ring diameter at the cost of focality while uni-directionality decreased. Additional surrounding ring electrodes increased uni-directionality while lowering cortical field intensity and increasing focality; though, this effect saturated and more than 4 surround electrode would not be justified. Using a range of concentric HD-tDCS montages, we showed that cortical region of influence can be

  20. Education to Immaturity, or from Biopolitics to Psychopower

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    Arkadiusz Żychliński

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infantia, or immaturity, is one of the cha-racteristic “postmodern maladies”. Such a diagnosebecomes easier to comprehend if one considers an essen-tial change: while from Michel Foucalt’s perspective theclassical biopolitics comes down to biopower, exercisedover societies in order to instrumentalize them as “pro-duction machines”, from Bernard Stiegler’s point ofview biopolitics has been replaced these days in Westernsocieties with psychopower, instrumentalizing com-munities as “consuming machines”. ~e aim of mypaper is to reconstruct the main forms of the realizationand the consequences of that postmodern psychopowerand to outline ways to counteract it.

  1. Cyclophosphamide and IL-12-transduced DCs enhance the antitumor activity of tumor antigen-stimulated DCs and reduce Tregs and MDSCs number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossowska, Joanna; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elżbieta; Anger, Natalia; Wojas-Turek, Justyna; Kicielińska, Jagoda; Piasecki, Egbert; Duś, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    A hostile tumor microenvironment, characterized by an abundance of T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), considerably limits the efficacy of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines. The intention of this study was to enhance the antitumor activity of vaccines consisting of bone marrow-derived DCs stimulated with TAg (BMDC/TAg) via single administration of cyclophosphamide and multiple injections of interleukin (IL)-12-transduced DCs (BMDC/IL-12). The combined chemoimmunotherapy was applied in the treatment of mice with subcutaneously (SC) growing, advanced MC38 colon carcinoma. The highest level of tumor growth inhibition, accompanied by high cytotoxic activity of effector cells, and their increased influx into tumor tissue, was observed after application of cyclophosphamide in combination with BMDC/TAg and BMDC/IL-12. The effect was probably associated with the elimination of T regulatory cells from spleens and tumors, but most of all with changes in the number and differentiation stage of MDSCs. After the therapy, the percentage of granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs in spleens was significantly lower than in the control group. Moreover, MDSCs derived from spleens and tumors showed increased expression of MHC class II, which may indicate the higher maturation stage of the myeloid cells as well as their enhanced capacity toward antigen presentation. The obtained data indicate that the optimal composition of antitumor vaccines able to limit the suppressor activity of MDSCs is essential to enhance the elimination of tumor cells and to achieve an optimal therapeutic effect.

  2. Mandibular periostitis ossificans in immature large breed dogs: 5 cases (1999-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejewski, Stanley W; Lewis, John R; Gracis, Margherita; Woodward, Tony M; LeVan, Laura M; Ross, Donald L; Reiter, Alexander M

    2010-01-01

    This case series describes clinical, radiographic, and histopathological features of mandibular swellings in 5 immature, large breed dogs. The dogs originated from different regions of the United States. In each case, intraoral dental radiography of the jaw swelling revealed a two-layered (double) ventral mandibular cortex. Biopsy was performed in 4 of the 5 puppies, revealing periosteal new bone formation. Resolution of the mandibular swelling was spontaneous in the 4 dogs available for follow-up examination. The authors postulate that the clinical, radiographic, and histopathological presentation of mandibular swelling in these 5 dogs is a distinct pathological entity consistent with an inflammatory condition of the maturing human mandible known as periostitis ossificans.

  3. PDPN gene promotes the proliferation of immature Bovine Sertoli cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Qin, Lihong; Yang, Yuwei; Dong, Xue; Zhao, Zijiao; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhao, Zhihui

    2017-04-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane receptor which is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, such as cell motility, invasion, tumor metastasis and blood vessels formation. Although there are reports on the involvement of PDPN in Sertoli cells in human and mice, the role of PDPN on the development of bovine Sertoli cells has not been reported. In the present study, Sertoli cells were isolated from 1-day-old bovine testes by two steps enzyme digestion method. Feulgen staining of satellite karyosomes and inhibin immunofluorescence staining suggested that the isolated immature Sertoli cells were very pure. Transfection with overexpression plasmid pBI-CMV3-PDPN and interference shRNA plasmid indicated that PDPN could significantly promote Sertoli cells cycle progression, cells proliferation and androgen-binding protein (ABP) production. Our results indicated that PDPN gene plays a significant role in the proliferation and maturation of bovine Sertoli cells.

  4. SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 infection in dendritic cells (DCs by dNTP depletion, but its expression in DCs and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes cannot be upregulated by interferons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St Gelais Corine

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SAMHD1 is an HIV-1 restriction factor in non-dividing monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages, and resting CD4+ T-cells. Acting as a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP triphosphohydrolase, SAMHD1 hydrolyzes dNTPs and restricts HIV-1 infection in macrophages and resting CD4+ T-cells by decreasing the intracellular dNTP pool. However, the intracellular dNTP pool in DCs and its regulation by SAMHD1 remain unclear. SAMHD1 has been reported as a type I interferon (IFN-inducible protein, but whether type I IFNs upregulate SAMHD1 expression in primary DCs and CD4+ T-lymphocytes is unknown. Results Here, we report that SAMHD1 significantly blocked single-cycle and replication-competent HIV-1 infection of DCs by decreasing the intracellular dNTP pool and thereby limiting the accumulation of HIV-1 late reverse transcription products. Type I IFN treatment did not upregulate endogenous SAMHD1 expression in primary DCs or CD4+ T-lymphocytes, but did in HEK 293T and HeLa cell lines. When SAMHD1 was over-expressed in these two cell lines to achieve higher levels than that in DCs, no HIV-1 restriction was observed despite partially reducing the intracellular dNTP pool. Conclusions Our results suggest that SAMHD1-mediated reduction of the intracellular dNTP pool in DCs is a common mechanism of HIV-1 restriction in myeloid cells. Endogenous expression of SAMHD1 in primary DCs or CD4+ T-lymphocytes is not upregulated by type I IFNs.

  5. Preliminary study on dental pulp stem cell-mediated pulp regeneration in canine immature permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yuming; Jia, Weiqian; Yang, Jie; Ge, Lihong

    2013-02-01

    The health of human teeth depends on the integrity of the hard tissue and the activity of the pulp and periodontal tissues, which are responsible for nutritional supply. Without the nourishing of the pulp tissue, the possibility of tooth fracture can increase. In immature permanent teeth, root development may be influenced as well. This study explored the potential of using autologous dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to achieve pulp regeneration in a canine pulpless model. The establishment of the pulpless animal model involved pulp extirpation and root canal preparation of young permanent incisor teeth in beagles. Autologous DPSCs were obtained from extracted first molars and expanded ex vivo to obtain a larger number of cells. The biological characteristics of canine DPSCs (cDPSCs) were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo by using the same method as used in human DPSCs. cDPSCs were transplanted into the pulpless root canal with Gelfoam as the scaffold, and root development was evaluated by radiographic and histologic analyses. cDPSCs with rapid proliferation, multiple differentiation capacity, and development potential were successfully isolated and identified both in vitro and in vivo. After they were transplanted into the pulpless root canal with Gelfoam as the scaffold, DPSCs were capable of generating pulp-like tissues containing blood vessels and dentin-like tissue. Thickening of the root canal wall was also observed. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using stem cell-mediated tissue engineering to realize pulp regeneration in immature teeth. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Decapping Scavenger Enzyme DCS-1 Controls MicroRNA Levels in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In metazoans, microRNAs play a critical role in the post-transcriptional regulation of genes required for cell proliferation and differentiation. microRNAs themselves are regulated by a multitude of mechanisms influencing their transcription and post-transcriptional maturation. However, there is only sparse knowledge on pathways regulating the mature, functional form of a microRNA. Here, we identify a new player in the control of microRNA turnover, the decapping scavenger protein DCS-1. In Ca...

  7. Fear Erasure Facilitated by Immature Inhibitory Neuron Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wu-Zhou; Liu, Ting-Ting; Cao, Jun-Wei; Chen, Xuan-Fu; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Min; Su, Xin; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Qiu, Bin-Long; Hu, Wen-Xiang; Liu, Lin-Yun; Ma, Lan; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2016-12-21

    Transplantation of embryonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons has been shown to modify disease phenotypes in rodent models of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. However, whether transplanted interneurons modulate fear memory remains largely unclear. Here, we report that transplantation of embryonic interneurons into the amygdala does not alter host fear memory formation. Yet approximately 2 weeks after transplantation, but not earlier or later, extinction training produces a marked reduction in spontaneous recovery and renewal of fear response. Further analyses reveal that transplanted interneurons robustly form functional synapses with neurons of the host amygdala and exhibit similar developmental maturation in electrophysiological properties as native amygdala interneurons. Importantly, transplanted immature interneurons reduce the expression of perineuronal nets, promote long-term synaptic plasticity, and modulate both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmissions of the host circuits. Our findings demonstrate that transplanted immature interneurons modify amygdala circuitry and suggest a previously unknown strategy for the prevention of extinction-resistant pathological fear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Historical notes on immaturity. Part 2: surviving against the odds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Survivors of immaturity of outstanding intelligence include Fortunio Licetus, born in 1577, and Isaac Newton, born in 1643. Reliable descriptions began appearing around 1820, and over a dozen infants were born weighing under 1000 g and before World War II, who developed normally. From 1876 to 2006, the birth weight at which half of the infants survived dropped from 2200 to 600 g. Statistics depended on how abortion, stillbirth and live birth were defined, which differed greatly from country to country. WHO definitions in 1993 required the registration of all infants weighing 500 g (22 complete weeks) or above. This definition was not universally adopted, resulting in considerable underreporting. Many medical societies issued ethical recommendations concerning the obligatory or optional treatment of immature infants. The "window", at which treatment is optional has been set at 22-23 weeks (Japan, Germany), 23-24 weeks (UK, USA, Canada), or 24-26 weeks (France, Netherlands, Switzerland). Instead of assessing an infant's individual prognosis, and ignoring its gender, co-morbidities, and particular cause of premature delivery, these rules frequently relied on gestational age alone to initiate or withhold life support.

  9. Micropropagation of onion (Allium cepa L.) from immature inflorescences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    In vitro plant production by direct organogenesis from immature flower heads is an ideal approach for clonal propagation of onions (Allium cepa L.). This technique ensures genetic stability, high propagation rate, and maintains donor plant of explants with an advantage over other means of in vitro regeneration. Onion micropropagation is usually applied in breeding programs, maintenance, and multiplication of cytoplasmic-male sterile lines for hybrid production, germplasm conservation, and as a tool for the application of other biotechnologies. For in vitro culture, mature onion bulbs are induced to reproductive phase by vernalization and forced to inflorescence initiation. Immature umbels are dissected from bulbs or cut directly when they appear from the pseudostem among the leaves. Disinfected inflorescences are cultivated in BDS basal medium supplemented with 30 g/L sucrose, 0.1 mg/L naphthalene acetic acid, 1 mg/L N (6)-benzyladenine, and 8 g/L agar, pH 5.5, under 16 h photoperiod white fluorescent light (PPD: 50-70 μmol/m(2)s) for 35 days. The regenerated shoot clumps are divided and subculture under the same conditions. For bulbification phase, the individual shoots are cultured in BDS basal medium containing 90 g/L sucrose, without plant growth regulators, pH 5.5, under 16 h photoperiod. Microbulbs can be directly cultivated ex vitro without acclimation.

  10. Nuclear status of immature and mature stallion spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, G M; Retamal, C A; Tobella, L; Arnholdt, A C V; López, M L

    2006-07-15

    'The highly packed chromatin of mature spermatozoa results from replacement of somatic-like histones by highly basic arginine- and cysteine-rich protamines during spermatogenesis, with additional conformational changes in chromatin structure during epididymal transit. The objective of the present study was to compare the nuclear characteristics of immature and mature epididymal stallion spermatozoa, using a variety of experimental approaches. Resistance to in vitro decondensation of chromatin, following exposure to SDS-DTT and alkaline thioglycolate, increased significantly in mature spermatozoa. Evaluation of the thiol-disulfide status (monobromobimane labeling) demonstrated that immature cells obtained from ductulli efferentes contained mostly thiol groups, whereas these groups were oxidized in mature cells collected from the cauda epididymidis. Based on atomic absorption spectrophotometry, maturation of stallion spermatozoa was accompanied by a 60% reduction in the Zn(2+) content of sperm cells, concomitant with increased concentrations of this ion in epididymal fluid. Furthermore, the degree of disulfide bonding was inversely correlated with susceptibility of chromatin to acid denaturation (SCSA). Collectively, these data were consistent with the hypothesis that maturation of stallion spermatozoa involves oxidation of sulphydryl groups to form intra- and intermolecular disulfide links between adjacent protamines, with loss of zinc as an integral feature. These changes endow mechanical and chemical resistance to the nucleus, ensuring efficient transmission of the paternal genome at fertilization.

  11. Reinforcement of immature roots with a new resin filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Charles H; Schwartz, Scott A; Beeson, Thomas J

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reinforcement and strengthening ability of Resilon, gutta-percha, and a self-curing composite resin (Bisfil 2B) in endodontically treated roots of immature teeth. Sixty single rooted teeth were divided into five groups of 12 teeth each. Teeth in all groups except the negative controls were prepared with a #5 Peeso (1.5 mm) through the apex (simulating immature roots) and root ends were filled with a 4 mm barrier of MTA. After smear layer removal, canals in the three experimental groups were backfilled with gutta-percha, Resilon, or Bisfil 2B. The remaining canal space in the positive control group was left unfilled. Negative controls received no treatment. A horizontal fracture was created in the root of each specimen using an Instron and the mean peak loads to fracture were recorded. ANOVA revealed no significant difference between any of the treatment groups. Based on the results of this study, canal wall reinforcement of teeth with a canal diameter of 1.5 mm or less may not be necessary.

  12. Utility of Immature Granulocyte Percentage in Pediatric Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Eleanor K.; Griffin, Russell L.; Mortellaro, Vincent; Beierle, Elizabeth A.; Harmon, Carroll M.; Chen, Mike K.; Russell, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of abdominal surgery in children. Adjuncts are utilized to help clinicians predict acute or perforated appendicitis, which may affect treatment decisions. Automated hematologic analyzers can perform more accurate automated differentials including immature granulocyte percentages (IG%). Elevated IG% has demonstrated improved accuracy for predicting sepsis in the neonatal population than traditional immature to total neutrophil count (I/T) ratios. We intended to assess the additional discriminatory ability of IG% to traditionally assessed parameters in the differentiation between acute and perforated appendicitis. Materials and Methods We identified all patients with appendicitis from July 2012 to June 2013 by ICD-9 code. Charts were reviewed for relevant demographic, clinical, and outcome data, which were compared between acute and perforated appendicitis groups using Fischer’s exact and t-test for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. We utilized an adjusted logistic regression model utilizing clinical lab values to predict the odds of perforated appendicitis. Results 251 patients were included in the analysis. Those with perforated appendicitis had a higher white blood cell (WBC) count (p=0.0063), C-reactive protein (CRP) (pappendicitis. The c-statistic of the final model was 0.70, suggesting fair discriminatory ability in predicting perforated appendicitis. Conclusions IG% did not provide any additional benefit to elevated CRP and presence of left shift in the differentiation between acute and perforated appendicitis. PMID:24793450

  13. Linking adults and immatures of South African marine fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Dirk; Connell, Allan D; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-11-01

    The early life-history stages of fishes are poorly known, impeding acquisition of the identifications needed to monitor larval recruitment and year-class strength. A comprehensive database of COI sequences, linked to authoritatively identified voucher specimens, promises to change this situation, representing a significant advance for fisheries science. Barcode records were obtained from 2526 early larvae and pelagic eggs of fishes collected on the inshore shelf within 5 km of the KwaZulu-Natal coast, about 50 km south of Durban, South Africa. Barcodes were also obtained from 3215 adults, representing 946 South African fish species. Using the COI reference library on BOLD based on adults, 89% of the immature fishes could be identified to a species level; they represented 450 species. Most of the uncertain sequences could be assigned to a genus, family, or order; only 92 specimens (4%) were unassigned. Accumulation curves based on inference of phylogenetic diversity indicate near-completeness of the collecting effort. The entire set of adult and larval fishes included 1006 species, representing 43% of all fish species known from South African waters. However, this total included 189 species not previously recorded from this region. The fact that almost 90% of the immatures gained a species identification demonstrates the power and completeness of the DNA barcode reference library for fishes generated during the 10 years of FishBOL.

  14. Repulsive guidance molecule a blockade exerts the immunoregulatory function in DCs stimulated with ABP and LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuxu; Gao, Yan; Zhai, Zhiyong; Zhang, Shuo; Shan, Fengping; Feng, Juan

    2016-08-02

    Repulsive guidance molecule a (RGMa) is an axonal guidance molecule that has recently found to exert function in immune system. This study evaluated the function of RGMa in modulation of dendritic cells (DCs) function stimulated with Achyranthes bidentata polysaccharide (ABP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a RGMa-neutralizing antibody. Compared with the Control-IgG/ABP and Control-IgG/LPS groups, DCs in the Anti-RGMa/ABP and Anti-RGMa/LPS groups 1) showed small, round cells with a few cell processes and organelles, and many pinocytotic vesicles; 2) had decreased MHC II, CD86, CD80, and CD40 expression; 3) displayed the decreased IL-12p70, IL-1β and TNF-α levels and increased IL-10 secretion; 4) had a high percentage of FITC-dextran uptake; and 5) displayed a reduced ability to drive T cell proliferation and reinforced T cell polarization toward a Th2 cytokine pattern. We conclude that DCs treated with RGMa-neutralizing antibodies present with tolerogenic and immunoregulatory characteristics, which provides new insights into further understanding of the function of RGMa.

  15. Testing the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in lucid dreaming: a tDCS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumbrys, Tadas; Erlacher, Daniel; Schredl, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that lucid dreaming (awareness of dreaming while dreaming) might be associated with increased brain activity over frontal regions during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. By applying transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), we aimed to manipulate the activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during REM sleep to increase dream lucidity. Nineteen participants spent three consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. On the second and third nights they randomly received either 1 mA tDCS for 10 min or sham stimulation during each REM period starting with the second one. According to the participants' self-ratings, tDCS over the DLPFC during REM sleep increased lucidity in dreams. The effects, however, were not strong and found only in frequent lucid dreamers. While this indicates some preliminary support for the involvement of the DLPFC in lucid dreaming, further research, controlling for indirect effects of stimulation and including other brain regions, is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Effect of tDCS on Cognition and Neurologic Recovery of Rats with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Hun; Park, Seong Doo; Sim, Ki Chel

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of the application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on neurologic recovery and cognitive function of rats with Alzheimer-like dementia induced by scopolamine injections. [Subjects] To create a cognition dysfunction model, intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine was given to Sprague-Dawley rats that subsequently received tDCS for 4 weeks. [Methods] Changes in motor behavior were evaluated by conducting an open field test. Acetylcholine content in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was examined for a biochemical assessment. [Results] With respect to changes in motor behavior, group II showed the most meaningful difference after scopolamine injection, followed by group III. In the biochemical assessment, the results of the examination of acetylcholine content in the tissue of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus on the 14th and 28th days, respectively, showed the most significant increase in group II, followed by group III. [Conclusion] The above findings confirm that tDCS application after the onset of cognitive dysfunction caused by Alzheimer's disease leads to a positive effect on motor behavior and biochemical changes, and this effect is maintained over a specific period of time.

  17. Differential influences of unilateral tDCS over the intraparietal cortex on numerical cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eArtemenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuro-imaging research identified the bilateral intraparietal sulcus (IPS to be a key area associated with number processing. However, causal structure-function relationships are hard to evaluate from neuro-imaging techniques such as fMRI. Nevertheless, brain stimulation methods like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS allow for investigating the functional relevance of the IPS for number processing. Following up on a study using bilateral bi-cephalic tDCS over the IPS, the current study aimed at evaluating the differential lateralized functional contributions of the left and right IPS to number processing using unilateral bi-cephalic tDCS over either the left or right IPS. Results indicated a right lateralization for the processing of the place-value structure of the Arabic number system. Importantly, the processing of number magnitude information was not affected by unilateral IPS corroborating the assumption that number magnitude is processed in the bilateral IPS. Taken together, these data suggest that even though number magnitude is represented bilaterally, the left and right IPS seem to contribute differentially to numerical cognition with respect to the processing of specific other aspects of numerical information.

  18. Cellular and network mechanisms generating spontaneous population events in the immature rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    SipilÀ, Sampsa

    2006-01-01

    Distinct endogenous network events, generated independently of sensory input, are a general feature of various structures of the immature central nervous system. In the immature hippocampus, these type of events are seen as "giant depolarizing potentials" (GDPs) in intracellular recordings in vitro. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the adult brain, has a depolarizing action in immature neurons, and GDPs have been proposed to be driven by GABAergic transmission. Moreover, GDPs ha...

  19. Biology and External Morphology of Immature Stages of the Butterfly, Diaethria candrena candrena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Fernando M.S.; Carneiro, Eduardo; Casagrande, Mirna M.; Mielke, Olaf H.H.

    2012-01-01

    The biology and the external morphology of immature stages of Diaethria candrena candrena (Godart) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Biblidinae) are described. Immature D. c. candrena found on Allophylus spp. (Sapindaceae) were collected in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil and reared in the laboratory. Morphological descriptions and illustrations are given, based on observations using electronic, stereoscopic, and optic microscopes, the latter two attached to camera lucida. Results are compared and discussed with immature stages of other species of Biblidinae described to date. PMID:22943597

  20. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunin, A.; Sisirak, V.; Ghosh, H.S.; Grajkowska, L.T.; Hou, Z.E.; Miron, M.; Yang, C.; Ceribelli, M.; Uetani, N.; Chaperot, L.; Plumas, J.; Hendriks, W.J.; Tremblay, M.L.; Hacker, H.; Staudt, L.M.; Green, P.H.; Bhagat, G.; Reizis, B.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system, re

  1. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-10-22

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines.

  2. The ability of juvenile offenders with personality immaturity to conscious leadership by their actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedonkina A.A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the characteristics of the phenomenon of personality immaturity, stand out its main features, described differences in their quantitative representation of juvenile offenders, clinical features the diagnosis of mental disorders in juvenile offenders with personality immaturity. Special attention is given to how identified characteristics of personality immaturity affects to the ability of juvenile offenders to conscious regulation of their activities, including the potential ability and current ability of minors accused to realize the significance of their actions and control them when they commit socially dangerous acts. The studied parameters are compared in samples of juvenile offenders with personality immaturity and without it.

  3. Impact of DCS-facilitated cue exposure therapy on brain activation to cocaine cues in cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, James J; Myrick, Hugh; Henderson, Scott; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Santa Ana, Elizabeth J; Saladin, Michael E; Brady, Kathleen T

    2013-09-01

    The development of addiction is marked by a pathological associative learning process that imbues incentive salience to stimuli associated with drug use. Recent efforts to treat addiction have targeted this learning process using cue exposure therapy augmented with d-cycloserine (DCS), a glutamatergic agent hypothesized to enhance extinction learning. To better understand the impact of DCS-facilitated extinction on neural reactivity to drug cues, the present study reports fMRI findings from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of DCS-facilitated cue exposure for cocaine dependence. Twenty-five participants completed two MRI sessions (before and after intervention), with a cocaine-cue reactivity fMRI task. The intervention consisted of 50mg of DCS or placebo, combined with two sessions of cocaine cue exposure and skills training. Participants demonstrated cocaine cue activation in a variety of brain regions at baseline. From the pre- to post-study scan, participants experienced decreased activation to cues in a number of regions (e.g., accumbens, caudate, frontal poles). Unexpectedly, placebo participants experienced decreases in activation to cues in the left angular and middle temporal gyri and the lateral occipital cortex, while DCS participants did not. Three trials of DCS-facilitated cue exposure therapy for cocaine dependence have found that DCS either increases or does not significantly impact response to cocaine cues. The present study adds to this literature by demonstrating that DCS may prevent extinction to cocaine cues in temporal and occipital brain regions. Although consistent with past research, results from the present study should be considered preliminary until replicated in larger samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anodal tDCS over the Primary Motor Cortex Facilitates Long-Term Memory Formation Reflecting Use-Dependent Plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orjon Rroji

    Full Text Available Previous research suggests that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the primary motor cortex (M1 modulates NMDA receptor dependent processes that mediate synaptic plasticity. Here we test this proposal by applying anodal versus sham tDCS while subjects practiced to flex the thumb as fast as possible (ballistic movements. Repetitive practice of this task has been shown to result in performance improvements that reflect use-dependent plasticity resulting from NMDA receptor mediated, long-term potentiation (LTP-like processes. Using a double-blind within-subject cross-over design, subjects (n=14 participated either in an anodal or a sham tDCS session which were at least 3 months apart. Sham or anodal tDCS (1 mA was applied for 20 min during motor practice and retention was tested 30 min, 24 hours and one week later. All subjects improved performance during each of the two sessions (p < 0.001 and learning gains were similar. Our main result is that long term retention performance (i.e. 1 week after practice was significantly better when practice was performed with anodal tDCS than with sham tDCS (p < 0.001. This effect was large (Cohen's d=1.01 and all but one subject followed the group trend. Our data strongly suggest that anodal tDCS facilitates long-term memory formation reflecting use-dependent plasticity. Our results support the notion that anodal tDCS facilitates synaptic plasticity mediated by an LTP-like mechanism, which is in accordance with previous research.

  5. Modelling the effect of electrode displacement on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaraju, Sriharsha; Roula, Mohammed Ali; McCarthy, Peter

    2017-09-19

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that delivers a low-intensity, direct current to cortical areas with the purpose of modulating underlying brain activity. Recent studies have reported inconsistencies in tDCS outcomes. The underlying assumption of many tDCS studies has been that replication of electrode montage equates to replicating stimulation conditions. It is possible however that anatomical difference between subjects, as well as inherent inaccuracies in montage placement, could affect current flow to targeted areas. The hypothesis that stimulation of a defined brain region will be stable under small displacements was tested. Approach: Initially, we compared the total simulated current flowing through ten specific brain areas for four commonly used tDCS montages: F3-Fp2, C3-Fp2, Fp1-F4, and P3-P4 using the software tool COMETS. The effect of a slight (~1cm in each of four directions) anode displacement on the simulated regional current density for each of the four tDCS montages was then determined. Current flow was calculated and compared through 10 segmented brain areas to determine the effect of montage type and displacement. The regional currents, as well as the localised current densities, were compared with the original electrode location, for each of these new positions. Results: Recommendations for montages that maximise stimulation current for the ten brain regions are considered. We noted that the extent to which stimulation is affected by electrode displacement varies depending on both area and montage type. The F3-Fp2 montage was found to be the least stable with up to 38% change in average current density in the left frontal lobe while the Fp1-F4 montage was found to the most stable exhibiting only 1% change when electrodes were displaced. Significance: These results indicate that even relatively small changes in stimulation electrode placement appear to result in surprisingly large changes in current

  6. Combined motor point associative stimulation (MPAS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improves plateaued manual dexterity performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Najmeh; Munoz-Rubke, Felipe; Wan, Hsuan-Yu; Block, Hannah J

    2016-10-28

    Motor point associative stimulation (MPAS) in hand muscles is known to modify motor cortex excitability and improve learning rate, but not plateau of performance, in manual dexterity tasks. Central stimulation of motor cortex, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), can have similar effects if accompanied by motor practice, which can be difficult and tiring for patients. Here we asked whether adding tDCS to MPAS could improve manual dexterity in healthy individuals who are already performing at their plateau, with no motor practice during stimulation. We hypothesized that MPAS could provide enough coordinated muscle activity to make motor practice unnecessary, and that this combination of stimulation techniques could yield improvements even in subjects at or near their peak. If so, this approach could have a substantial effect on patients with impaired dexterity, who are far from their peak. MPAS was applied for 30min to two right hand muscles important for manual dexterity. tDCS was simultaneously applied over left sensorimotor cortex. The motor cortex input/output (I/O) curve was assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and manual dexterity was assessed with the Purdue Pegboard Test. Compared to sham or cathodal tDCS combined with MPAS, anodal tDCS combined with MPAS significantly increased the plateau of manual dexterity. This result suggests that MPAS has the potential to substitute for motor practice in mediating a beneficial effect of tDCS on manual dexterity.

  7. Using tDCS to Explore the Role of the Right Temporo-Parietal Junction in Theory of Mind and Cognitive Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Wenli; Hu, Xinmu; Zhen, Zhen; Xu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The right temporo-parietal junction (rTPJ) is thought to be closely related to theory of mind (ToM) and cognitive empathy. In the present study, we investigated whether these socio-cognitive abilities could be modulated with non-invasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the rTPJ. Participants received anodal (excitatory), cathodal (inhibitory), or sham stimulation before performing a social cognitive task which included inferring other's intention (the ToM condition) and inferring other's emotion (the cognitive empathy condition). Our results showed that the accuracy of both ToM and cognitive empathy decreased after receiving the cathodal stimulation, suggesting that altering the cortical excitability in the rTPJ could influence human's socio-cognitive abilities. The results of this study emphasize the critical role of the rTPJ in ToM and cognitive empathy and demonstrate that these socio-cognitive abilities could be modulated by the tDCS.

  8. Di-(2 ethylhexyl phthalate and flutamide alter gene expression in the testis of immature male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Frank H

    2009-09-01

    screen for the anti-androgenic or androgenic effects of EDs. Overall, our results demonstrated that exposure to DEHP, Flu or both EDs resulted in a alteration of gene expression in the testes of immature male rats. Furthermore, the toxicological effects of these EDs on the male reproductive system resulted from their anti-androgenic effects. Taken together, these results provide a new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the detrimental impacts of EDs, in regards to anti-androgenic effects in humans and wildlife.

  9. Differential Activation of Human Monocyte-Derived and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by West Nile Virus Generated in Different Host Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria Carlan; Guerrero-Plata, Antonieta; Gilfoy, Felicia D.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Mason, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in innate immunity and antiviral responses. In this study, we investigated the production of alpha interferon (IFN-α) and inducible chemokines by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) infected with West Nile virus (WNV), an emergent pathogen whose infection can lead to severe cases of encephalitis in the elderly, children, and immunocompromised individuals. Our experiments demonstrated that WNV grown in mammalian cells (WNVVero) was a potent inducer of IFN-α secretion in pDCs and, to a lesser degree, in mDCs. The ability of WNVVero to induce IFN-α in pDCs did not require viral replication and was prevented by the treatment of cells with bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, suggesting that it was dependent on endosomal Toll-like receptor recognition. On the other hand, IFN-α production in mDCs required viral replication and was associated with the nuclear translocation of IRF3 and viral antigen expression. Strikingly, pDCs failed to produce IFN-α when stimulated with WNV grown in mosquito cells (WNVC7/10), while mDCs responded similarly to WNVVero or WNVC7/10. Moreover, the IFN-dependent chemokine IP-10 was produced in substantial amounts by pDCs in response to WNVVero but not WNVC7/10, while interleukin-8 was produced in greater amounts by mDCs infected with WNVC7/10 than in those infected with WNVVero. These findings suggest that cell-specific mechanisms of WNV recognition leading to the production of type I IFN and inflammatory chemokines by DCs may contribute to both the innate immune response and disease pathogenesis in human infections. PMID:17913823

  10. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ling-ling; ZHANG Zhe; ZHENG Jie-sheng; SHENG Ji-fang; LIU Ke-zhou

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed at developing a simple and easy way to generate dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) in vitro. Methods: PBMCs were isolated directly from white blood cell rather than whole blood and purified by patching methods (collecting the attached cell and removing the suspension cell). DCs were then generated by culturing PBMCs for six days with 30 ng/ml recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and 20 ng/ml recombinant human interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) in vitro. On the sixth day, TNF-alpha (TNFα) 30 ng/ml was added into some DC cultures, which were then incubated for two additional days. The morphology was monitored by light microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy, and the phenotypes were determined by flow cytometry. Autologous mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR) were used to characterize DC function after TNFα or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulations for 24 h. Results: After six days of culture, the monocytes developed significant dendritic morphology and a portion of cells expressed CD 1 a, CD80 and CD86, features of DCs. TNFα treatment induced DCs maturation and up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD83. Autologous MLR demonstrated that these DCs possess potent T-cell stimulatory capacity. Conclusion: This study developed a simple and easy way to generate DCs from PBMCs exposed to rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4. The DCs produced by this method acquired morphologic and antigenic characteristics of DCs.

  11. Tensile properties, collagen content, and crosslinks in connective tissues of the immature knee joint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram V Eleswarapu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The major connective tissues of the knee joint act in concert during locomotion to provide joint stability, smooth articulation, shock absorption, and distribution of mechanical stresses. These functions are largely conferred by the intrinsic material properties of the tissues, which are in turn determined by biochemical composition. A thorough understanding of the structure-function relationships of the connective tissues of the knee joint is needed to provide design parameters for efforts in tissue engineering. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective of this study was to perform a comprehensive characterization of the tensile properties, collagen content, and pyridinoline crosslink abundance of condylar cartilage, patellar cartilage, medial and lateral menisci, cranial and caudal cruciate ligaments (analogous to anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments in humans, respectively, medial and lateral collateral ligaments, and patellar ligament from immature bovine calves. Tensile stiffness and strength were greatest in the menisci and patellar ligament, and lowest in the hyaline cartilages and cruciate ligaments; these tensile results reflected trends in collagen content. Pyridinoline crosslinks were found in every tissue despite the relative immaturity of the joints, and significant differences were observed among tissues. Notably, for the cruciate ligaments and patellar ligament, crosslink density appeared more important in determining tensile stiffness than collagen content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine tensile properties, collagen content, and pyridinoline crosslink abundance in a direct head-to-head comparison among all of the major connective tissues of the knee. This is also the first study to report results for pyridinoline crosslink density that suggest its preferential role over collagen in determining tensile stiffness for certain tissues.

  12. Immature B Cell Egress from Bone Marrow Is SOCS3 Independent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Nadrah

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-3 has been suggested to regulate CXCR4 signaling in a variety of human cell lines. In mice, conditional SOCS3 inactivation in hematopoietic cells including B-lineage lymphocytes has been reported to exacerbate CXCR4-signaling and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, which resulted in altered immature B cell distribution in bone marrow (BM due to sustained α4β1 integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrix. However, a recent study examining conditional SOCS3 deletion specifically in B-lineage cells failed to detect significant roles in B-lineage cell retention in BM. In this study we carefully examined the role played by SOCS3 in CXCR4 signaling in developing B cell subsets. We show that in mice conditionally deficient in SOCS3 exclusively in B cells (Socs3fl/fl Mb1cre/+ there was no detectable difference in B cell development in BM and in periphery. We show that SOCS3 deficient and sufficient immature B cell subsets are similarly distributed between BM parenchyma and sinusoids, and are equally competent at exiting BM into peripheral blood. Furthermore, we found no significant differences in CXCR4 desensitization upon ligand exposure in developing B lymphocyte subsets. Consequently, SOCS3-deficient and sufficient B-lineage cell migration towards CXCL12 in vitro was undistinguishable, and B-lineage cell amoeboid motility within BM parenchyma was also unaffected by SOCS3-deficiency. Thus we conclude that SOCS3 has no detectable influence on biological processes known to be controlled by CXCR4 signaling.

  13. Individual-level behavioral responses of immature green turtles to snorkeler disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Lucas P; Brownscombe, Jacob W; Gagné, Tyler O; Wilson, Alexander D M; Cooke, Steven J; Danylchuk, Andy J

    2017-03-01

    Despite many positive benefits of ecotourism, increased human encounters with wildlife may have detrimental effects on wild animals. As charismatic megafauna, nesting and foraging sea turtles are increasingly the focus of ecotourism activities. The purpose of our study was to quantify the behavioral responses of immature green turtles (Chelonia mydas) to disturbance by snorkelers, and to investigate whether turtles have individual-level responses to snorkeler disturbance. Using a standardized disturbance stimulus in the field, we recorded turtle behaviors pre- and post-disturbance by snorkelers. Ninety percent of turtles disturbed by snorkeler (n = 192) initiated their flights at distances of ≤3 m. Using principal component analysis, we identified two distinct turtle personality types, 'bold' and 'timid', based upon 145 encounters of 19 individually identified turtles and five disturbance response variables. There was significant intra-individual repeatability in behavioral responses to disturbance, but bolder turtles had more behavioral plasticity and less consistent responses than more timid individuals. Bolder individuals with reduced evasion responses might be at a higher risk of shark predation, while more timid turtles might have greater energetic consequences due to non-lethal predator effects and repeated snorkeler disturbance. Over the longer term, a turtle population with a mix of bold and timid individuals may promote more resilient populations. We recommend that snorkelers maintain >3 m distance from immature green turtles when snorkeling, and that ecotourism activities be temporally and spatially stratified. Further, turtle watching guidelines need to be communicated to both tour operators and independent snorkelers to reduce the disturbance of turtles.

  14. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K D; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda.

  15. Ischemic preconditioning in immature hearts: mechanism and compatibility with cardioplegia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱斌; 闵苏; 龙村; 叶铁虎

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate (1) whether ischemic preconditioning (IPC) could protect immature rabbit hearts against ischemia-reperfusion injury and (2) the role of KATP channel in the mechanism of myocardial protection. Since cardioplegia is a t raditional and effective cardioprotective measure in clinic, our study is also d esigned to probe the compatibility between IPC and cardioplegia.Results The recovery of CF, HR, LVDP and ±dp/dtmax in preconditioned hearts was b est am ong the four groups. The incidence of arrhythmia was low and less CK-MB leaked out in the IPC group. Myocardial ATP content was better preserved by IPC. Pre treatment with glibenclamide completely abolished the myocardial protection prov ided by IPC, but did not affect ischemia-reperfusion injury.Conclusions While applying cardioplegia, IPC provides significant cardioprotective effects. Activation of KATP channels is involved in the mechanism of IPC-produced cardioprotection.

  16. Small mammals as hosts of immature ixodid ticks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Horak

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and twenty-five small mammals belonging to 16 species were examined for ticks in Free State, Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces, South Africa, and 18 ixodid tick species, of which two could only be identified to genus level, were recovered. Scrub hares, Lepus saxatilis, and Cape hares, Lepus capensis, harboured the largest number of tick species. In Free State Province Namaqua rock mice, Aethomys namaquensis, and four-striped grass mice, Rhabdomys pumilio, were good hosts of the immature stages of Haemaphysalis leachi and Rhipicephalus gertrudae, while in Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces red veld rats, Aethomys chrysophilus, Namaqua rock mice and Natal multimammate mice, Mastomys natalensis were good hosts of H. leachi and Rhipicephalus simus. Haemaphysalis leachi was the only tick recovered from animals in all three provinces.

  17. Small mammals as hosts of immature ixodid ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, I G; Fourie, L J; Braack, L E O

    2005-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty-five small mammals belonging to 16 species were examined for ticks in Free State, Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces, South Africa, and 18 ixodid tick species, of which two could only be identified to genus level, were recovered. Scrub hares, Lepus saxatilis, and Cape hares, Lepus capensis, harboured the largest number of tick species. In Free State Province Namaqua rock mice, Aethomys namaquensis, and four-striped grass mice, Rhabdomys pumilio, were good hosts of the immature stages of Haemaphysalis leachi and Rhipicephalus gertrudae, while in Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces red veld rats, Aethomys chrysophilus, Namaqua rock mice and Natal multimammate mice, Mastomys natalensis were good hosts of H. leachi and Rhipicephalus simus. Haemaphysalis leachi was the only tick recovered from animals in all three provinces.

  18. Oxidative Stress after Surgery on the Immature Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fudulu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric heart surgery is associated with increased inflammation and the production of reactive oxygen species. Use of the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary bypass during correction of congenital heart defects generates reactive oxygen species by various mechanisms: haemolysis, neutrophil activation, ischaemia reperfusion injury, reoxygenation injury, or depletion of the endogenous antioxidants. The immature myocardium is more vulnerable to reactive oxygen species because of developmental differences compared to the adult heart but also because of associated congenital heart diseases that can deplete its antioxidant reserve. Oxidative stress can be manipulated by various interventions: exogenous antioxidants, use of steroids, cardioplegia, blood prime strategies, or miniaturisation of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. However, it is unclear if modulation of the redox pathways can alter clinical outcomes. Further studies powered to look at clinical outcomes are needed to define the role of oxidative stress in paediatric patients.

  19. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K. D.; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  20. Immature seeds and embryos of Medicago truncatula cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochatt, Sergio J

    2011-01-01

    Legumes are an important source of proteins and lipids for food and feed. In addition, they are -environmentally friendly because of their capacity to fix nitrogen through a symbiosis with Rhizobium that permits them to produce abundant proteins even in the absence of nitrogen fertilization. Seed development in plants follows three chronological steps (1) seed coat differentiation, embryo morphogenesis and endosperm development; (2) embryo maturation with storage accumulation and (3) dehydration and the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Finally, germination occurs when the environmental conditions become favourable. Working with the model legume Medicago truncatula, an in vitro protocol was developed for the culture of immature embryos that permits their development in a way comparable to that observed in plants.In this chapter, the usefulness of this system for investigating embryo development in legumes is outlined.

  1. Two ways of plant regeneration from immature cotyledons of pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nadolska-Orczyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different systems of plant regeneration via organogenesis and embryogenesis from immature cotyledons of pea (Pisum sativum L. were developed. The first system was direct multiple shoot regeneration from the proximal to the embryo axis, injured part of cotyledon. The ability of six Polish cultivars to shoot formation was very high. The percent of regenerating cotyledons was from 73 to 86 and mean number of shoots from 3.5 to 9.9 after seven weeks of culture. This multiplification could be prolonged for next several months. The second system was somatic embryogenesis, initiating from the same part of cotyledon simultaneously with slowly proliferating callus. Only three out of six cultivars formed embryoids. The differences of ability to embryo formation ranged between 43% of responding explants for Heiga cultivar to only 6% for Cud Ameryki. The mean number of embryoids was from 4.2 to 2.3.

  2. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of maize (Zea mays) immature embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Zhang, Zhanyuan J

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is one of the most efficient and simple gene delivery systems for genetic improvement and biology studies in maize. This system has become more widely used by both public and private laboratories. However, transformation efficiencies vary greatly from laboratory to laboratory for the same genotype. Here, we illustrate our advanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method in Hi-II maize using simple binary vectors. The protocol utilizes immature embryos as starting explants and the bar gene as a selectable marker coupled with bialaphos as a selective agent. The protocol offers efficient transformation results with high reproducibility, provided that some experimental conditions are well controlled. This transformation method, with minor modifications, can be also employed to transform certain maize inbreds.

  3. Dual-tDCS enhances online motor skill learning and long-term retention in chronic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie eLefebvre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Since motor learning is a key component for stroke recovery, enhancing motor skill learning is a crucial challenge for neurorehabilitation. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a promising approach for improving motor learning. The aim of this trial was to test the hypothesis that dual-tDCS applied bilaterally over the primary motor cortices (M1 improves online motor skill learning with the paretic hand and its long-term retention. Methods Eighteen chronic stroke patients participated in a randomised, cross-over, placebo-controlled, double bind trial. During separate sessions, dual-tDCS or sham dual-tDCS was applied over 30 min while stroke patients learned a complex visuomotor skill with the paretic hand: using a computer mouse to move a pointer along a complex circuit as quickly and accurately as possible. A learning index involving the evolution of the speed/accuracy trade-off was calculated. Performance of the motor skill was measured at baseline, after intervention and one week later. Results After sham dual-tDCS, eight patients showed worsening performance. In contrast, dual-tDCS enhanced the amount and speed of online motor skill learning compared to sham (p < 0.001 in all patients; this superiority was maintained throughout the hour following. The speed/accuracy trade-off was shifted more consistently after dual-tDCS (n=10 than after sham (n=3. More importantly, one week later, online enhancement under dual-tDCS had translated into superior long-term retention (+44% compared to sham (+4%. The improvement generalised to a new untrained circuit and to digital dexterity. Conclusion A single session of dual-tDCS, applied while stroke patients trained with the paretic hand significantly enhanced online motor skill learning both quantitatively and qualitatively, leading to successful long-term retention and generalisation. The combination of motor skill learning and dual-tDCS is promising for improving post

  4. The retrovirus MA and PreTM proteins follow immature MVL cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Bahl

    2013-01-01

    Detergent can dissolve retrovirus, exept the immature core. Here we show that the Matrix protein (MA) and the Transmembrane protein in its immature form (PreTM) bind to the retrovirus core. These attachments explain the attachment in the virus particle and the dynamics of the ability to fuse...

  5. Catalog of known immature stages of Camptosomate leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cryptocephalinae and Lamprosomatinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack of syntheses of knowledge on immature stages of insects impedes accurate understanding of their diversity, biology and evolution. In Chrysomelidae, this information gap undermines basic explanations of this lineage’s radiation. Literature describing and discussing known immature stages of cas...

  6. Movements of immature European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus in tropical Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strandberg, Roine; Hake, Mikael; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.; Alerstam, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Strandberg R., Hake M., Klaassen R.H.G. & Alerstam T. 2012. Movements of immature European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus in tropical Africa. Ardea 100: 157-162. Immature European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus are believed to remain in tropical Africa during the first years of their lives. We studi

  7. Dendritic cells are less susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infection than to HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Duvall (Melody); K. Loré (Karin); H. Blaak (Hetty); D.A. Ambrozak (David); W.C. Adams (William); K. Santos (Kathlyn); C. Geldmacher (Christof); J.R. Mascola (John); A.J. McMichael (Andrew); A. Jaye (Assan); H. Whittle (Hilton); S.L. Rowland-Jones (Sarah); R.A. Koup (Richard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHuman immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of dendritic cells (DCs) has been documented in vivo and may be an important contributor to HIV-1 transmission and pathogenesis. HIV-1-specific CD4+T cells respond to HIV antigens presented by HIV-1-infected DCs and in this process

  8. Modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine dendritic cells (DCs) by purified Achyranthes bidentata polysaccharide (ABP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yaxuan; Meng, Jingjuan; Chen, Wenna; Liu, Jingling; Li, Xuan; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2011-08-01

    There are a large number of interactions at molecular and cellular levels between the plant polysaccharides and immune system. Plant polysaccharides present an interesting effects as immunomodulators, particularly in the induction of the cells both in innate and adaptive immune systems. Activation of DCs could improve antitumoral responses usually diminished in cancer patients, and natural adjuvants provide a possibility of inducing this activation. ABP is a purified polysaccharide isolated from Achyranthes bidentata, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The aim of this study is to investigate modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine DCs by ABP. Both phenotypic and functional activities were assessed with use of conventional scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) for the morphology of the DC, transmitted electron microscopy (TEM) for intracellular lysosomes inside the DC, cellular immunohistochemistry for phagocytosis by the DCs, flow cytometry (FCM) for the changes in key surface molecules, bio-assay for the activity of acidic phosphatases (ACP), and ELISA for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12. In fact, we found that purified ABP induced phenotypic maturation revealed by increased expression of CD86, CD40, and MHC II. Functional experiments showed the down-regulation of ACP inside DCs (which occurs when phagocytosis of DCs is decreased, and antigen presentation increased with maturation). Finally, ABP increased the production of IL-12. These data reveal that ABP promotes effective activation of murine DCs. This adjuvant-like activity may have therapeutic applications in clinical settings where immune responses need boosting. It is therefore concluded that ABP can exert positive modulation to murine DCs.

  9. The effects of 1 Hz rTMS preconditioned by tDCS on gait kinematics in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Papen, Mitra; Fisse, Mirabell; Sarfeld, Anna-Sophia; Fink, Gereon R; Nowak, Dennis A

    2014-07-01

    Hypokinetic gait is a common and very disabling symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the motor cortex has been used with variable effectiveness to treat hypokinesia in PD. Preconditioning rTMS by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may enhance its effectiveness to treat hypokinetic gait in PD. Three-dimensional kinematic gait analysis was performed (1) prior to, (2) immediately after and (3) 30 min after low-frequency rTMS (1 Hz, 900 pulses, 80% of resting motor threshold) over M1 contralateral to the more affected body side preconditioned by (1) cathodal, (2) anodal or (3) sham tDCS (amperage: 1 mA, duration: 10 min) in ten subjects with PD (7 females, mean age 63 ± 9 years) and ten healthy subjects (four females, mean age 50 ± 11 years). The effects of tDCS-preconditioned rTMS on gait kinematics were assessed by the following parameters: number of steps, step length, stride length, double support time, cadence, swing and stance phases. Our data suggest a bilateral improvement of hypokinetic gait in PD after 1 Hz rTMS over M1 of the more affected body side preceded by anodal tDCS. In contrast, 1 Hz rTMS alone (preceded by sham tDCS) and 1 Hz rTMS preceded by cathodal tDCS were ineffective to improve gait kinematics in PD. In healthy subjects, gait kinematics was unaffected by either intervention. Preconditioning motor cortex rTMS by tDCS is a promising approach to treat hypokinetic gait in PD.

  10. Electric fields of motor and frontal tDCS in a standard brain space: A computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Mikkonen, Marko; Koyama, Soichiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-08-15

    The electric field produced in the brain is the main physical agent of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Inter-subject variations in the electric fields may help to explain the variability in the effects of tDCS. Here, we use multiple-subject analysis to study the strength and variability of the group-level electric fields in the standard brain space. Personalized anatomically-accurate models of 62 subjects were constructed from T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The finite-element method was used to computationally estimate the individual electric fields, which were registered to the standard space using surface based registration. Motor cortical and frontal tDCS were modelled for 16 electrode montages. For each electrode montage, the group-level electric fields had a consistent strength and direction in several brain regions, which could also be located at some distance from the electrodes. In other regions, the electric fields were more variable, and thus more likely to produce variable effects in each individual. Both the anode and cathode locations affected the group-level electric fields, both directly under the electrodes and elsewhere. For motor cortical tDCS, the electric fields could be controlled at the group level by moving the electrodes. However, for frontal tDCS, the group-level electric fields were more variable, and the electrode locations had only minor effects on the group average fields. Our results reveal the electric fields and their variability at the group level in the standard brain space, providing insights into the mechanisms of tDCS for plasticity induction. The data are useful for planning, analysing and interpreting tDCS studies.

  11. MIF Promotes Classical Activation and Conversion of Inflammatory Ly6Chigh Monocytes into TipDCs during Murine Toxoplasmosis

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    Juan de Dios Ruiz-Rosado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF mediates immunity against Toxoplasma gondii infection by inducing inflammatory cytokines required to control the parasite replication. However, the role of this inflammatory mediator in the cell-mediated immune response against this infection is still poorly understood. Here, we used T. gondii-infected WT and Mif−/− mice to analyze the role of MIF in the maturation of CD11b+ and CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs. We found that MIF promotes maturation of CD11b+ but not CD8α+ DCs, by inducing IL-12p70 production and CD86 expression. Infected Mif−/− mice showed significantly lower numbers of TNF and inducible nitric oxide synthase- (iNOS- producing DCs (TipDCs compared to infected WT mice. The adoptive transfer of Ly6Chigh monocytes into infected WT or Mif−/− mice demonstrated that MIF participates in the differentiation of Ly6Chigh monocytes into TipDCs. In addition, infected Mif−/− mice display a lower percentage of IFN-γ-producing natural killer (NK cells compared to WT mice, which is associated with reducing numbers of TipDCs in Mif−/− mice. Furthermore, administration of recombinant MIF (rMIF into T. gondii-infected Mif−/− mice restored the numbers of TipDCs and reversed the susceptible phenotype of Mif−/− mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate an important role for MIF inducing cell-mediated immunity to T. gondii infection.

  12. Cryopreservation of immature seeds of Ponerorchis graminifolia var. suzukiana by vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, T; Ishikawa, K; Mii, M

    2005-01-01

    Ponerorchis graminifolia var. suzukiana is a terrestrial orchid that is an endangered species native to Japan, and it germinates more readily in immature seeds than in mature seeds. To preserve this orchid, an efficient protocol was established for the cryopreservation of immature seeds of P. graminifolia var. suzukiana. When immature seeds of 6 weeks after pollination, which showed higher germination and protocorm formation than mature seeds, were precultured on New Dogashima (ND) medium with 0.3M sucrose for 3 days and cryopreserved by vitrification method (treated with PVS2 for 60 min), the viability after preservation as assessed with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining test was about 86%. Immature seeds thus treated showed equal rates of germination and protocorm formation to the untreated control immature seeds, and they developed into normal plantlets on ND medium.

  13. Lesion correlates of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS in chronic nonfluent aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRIYANKA P SHAH

    2014-04-01

    We conclude that patients exhibiting differential patterns of damage involving the frontotemporal language areas may respond to stimulation differently. Integrity of left temporal language areas appears crucial for responsiveness to the anodal or excitatory stimulation of the damaged, left frontal areas. If temporal areas are not spared, extensive damage in specific frontotemporal areas including the surrounding white matter predicts responsiveness to cathodal or inhibitory stimulation of the left frontal areas. We posit that tDCS-induced normalization of the intra-hemispheric inhibition [3] may be the underlying mechanism of improvement in these patients.

  14. On the importance of electrode parameters for shaping electric field patterns generated by tDCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    B. Saturnino, Guilherme; Antunes, André; Thielscher, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) uses electrode pads placed on the head to deliver weak direct current to the brain and modulate neuronal excitability. The effects depend on the intensity and spatial distribution of the electric field. This in turn depends on the geometry and electric...... electrode modeling influences the calculated electric field in the brain. We take into account electrode shape, size, connector position and conductivities of different electrode materials (including saline solutions and electrode gels). These factors are systematically characterized to demonstrate...

  15. Fcγ receptor antigen targeting potentiates cross-presentation by human blood and lymphoid tissue BDCA-3+ dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinsenberg, Thijs W H; Compeer, Ewoud B; Koning, Dan; Klein, Mark; Amelung, Femke J; van Baarle, Debbie; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Boes, Marianne

    2012-12-20

    The reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) poses a serious health threat to immune compromised individuals. As a treatment strategy, dendritic cell (DC) vaccination trials are ongoing. Recent work suggests that BDCA-3(+) (CD141(+)) subset DCs may be particularly effective in DC vaccination trials. BDCA-3(+) DCs had however been mostly characterized for their ability to cross-present antigen from necrotic cells. We here describe our study of human BDCA-3(+) DCs in elicitation of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell clones. We show that Fcgamma-receptor (FcγR) antigen targeting facilitates antigen cross-presentation in several DC subsets, including BDCA-3(+) DCs. FcγR antigen targeting stimulates antigen uptake by BDCA-1(+) rather than BDCA-3(+) DCs. Conversely, BDCA-3(+) DCs and not BDCA-1(+) DCs show improved cross-presentation by FcγR targeting, as measured by induced release of IFNγ and TNF by antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. FcγR-facilitated cross-presentation requires antigen processing in both an acidic endosomal compartment and by the proteasome, and did not induce substantial DC maturation. FcγRII is the most abundantly expressed FcγR on both BDCA-1(+) and BDCA-3(+) DCs. Furthermore we show that BDCA-3(+) DCs express relatively more stimulatory FcγRIIa than inhibitory FcγRIIb in comparison with BDCA-1(+) DCs. These studies support the exploration of FcγR antigen targeting to BDCA-3(+) DCs for human vaccination purposes.

  16. Low Intensity Focused tDCS Over the Motor Cortex Shows Inefficacy to Improve Motor Imagery Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma N. Angulo-Sherman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a brain stimulation technique that can enhance motor activity by stimulating the motor path. Thus, tDCS has the potential of improving the performance of brain-computer interfaces during motor neurorehabilitation. tDCS effects depend on several aspects, including the current density, which usually varies between 0.02 and 0.08 mA/cm2, and the location of the stimulation electrodes. Hence, testing tDCS montages at several current levels would allow the selection of current parameters for improving stimulation outcomes and the comparison of montages. In a previous study, we found that cortico-cerebellar tDCS shows potential of enhancing right-hand motor imagery. In this paper, we aim to evaluate the effects of the focal stimulation of the motor cortex over motor imagery. In particular, the effect of supplying tDCS with a 4 × 1 ring montage, which consists in placing an anode on the motor cortex and four cathodes around it, over motor imagery was assessed with different current densities. Electroencephalographic (EEG classification into rest or right-hand/feet motor imagery was evaluated on five healthy subjects for two stimulation schemes: applying tDCS for 10 min on the (1 right-hand or (2 feet motor cortex before EEG recording. Accuracy differences related to the tDCS intensity, as well as μ and β band power changes, were tested for each subject and tDCS modality. In addition, a simulation of the electric field induced by the montage was used to describe its effect on the brain. Results show no improvement trends on classification for the evaluated currents, which is in accordance with the observation of variable EEG band power results despite the focused stimulation. The lack of effects is probably related to the underestimation of the current intensity required to apply a particular current density for small electrodes and the relatively short inter-electrode distance. Hence, higher current

  17. tDCS and Robotics on Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation: Effect Modification by Stroke Duration and Type of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Straudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this exploratory pilot study is to test the effects of bilateral tDCS combined with upper extremity robot-assisted therapy (RAT on stroke survivors. Methods. We enrolled 23 subjects who were allocated to 2 groups: RAT + real tDCS and RAT + sham-tDCS. Each patient underwent 10 sessions (5 sessions/week over two weeks. Outcome measures were collected before and after treatment: (i Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity (FMA-UE, (ii Box and Block Test (BBT, and (iii Motor Activity Log (MAL. Results. Both groups reported a significant improvement in FMA-UE score after treatment (p<0.01. No significant between-groups differences were found in motor function. However, when the analysis was adjusted for stroke type and duration, a significant interaction effect (p<0.05 was detected, showing that stroke duration (acute versus chronic and type (cortical versus subcortical modify the effect of tDCS and robotics on motor function. Patients with chronic and subcortical stroke benefited more from the treatments than patients with acute and cortical stroke, who presented very small changes. Conclusion. The additional use of bilateral tDCS to RAT seems to have a significant beneficial effect depending on the duration and type of stroke. These results should be verified by additional confirmatory studies.

  18. Allergen uptake, activation, and IL-23 production by pulmonary myeloid DCs drives airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma-susceptible mice.

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    Ian P Lewkowich

    Full Text Available Maladaptive, Th2-polarized inflammatory responses are integral to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. As regulators of T cell activation, dendritic cells (DCs are important mediators of allergic asthma, yet the precise signals which render endogenous DCs "pro-asthmatic", and the extent to which these signals are regulated by the pulmonary environment and host genetics, remains unclear. Comparative phenotypic and functional analysis of pulmonary DC populations in mice susceptible (A/J, or resistant (C3H to experimental asthma, revealed that susceptibility to airway hyperresponsiveness is associated with preferential myeloid DC (mDC allergen uptake, and production of Th17-skewing cytokines (IL-6, IL-23, whereas resistance is associated with increased allergen uptake by plasmacytoid DCs. Surprisingly, adoptive transfer of syngeneic HDM-pulsed bone marrow derived mDCs (BMDCs to the lungs of C3H mice markedly enhanced lung IL-17A production, and rendered them susceptible to allergen-driven airway hyperresponsiveness. Characterization of these BMDCs revealed levels of antigen uptake, and Th17 promoting cytokine production similar to that observed in pulmonary mDCs from susceptible A/J mice. Collectively these data demonstrate that the lung environment present in asthma-resistant mice promotes robust pDC allergen uptake, activation, and limits Th17-skewing cytokine production responsible for driving pathologic T cell responses central to the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

  19. Task-specific effects of tDCS-induced cortical excitability changes on cognitive and motor sequence set shifting performance.

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    Jorge Leite

    Full Text Available In this study, we tested the effects of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS on two set shifting tasks. Set shifting ability is defined as the capacity to switch between mental sets or actions and requires the activation of a distributed neural network. Thirty healthy subjects (fifteen per site received anodal, cathodal and sham stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC or the primary motor cortex (M1. We measured set shifting in both cognitive and motor tasks. The results show that both anodal and cathodal single session tDCS can modulate cognitive and motor tasks. However, an interaction was found between task and type of stimulation as anodal tDCS of DLPFC and M1 was found to increase performance in the cognitive task, while cathodal tDCS of DLPFC and M1 had the opposite effect on the motor task. Additionally, tDCS effects seem to be most evident on the speed of changing sets, rather than on reducing the number of errors or increasing the efficacy of irrelevant set filtering.

  20. tDCS and Robotics on Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation: Effect Modification by Stroke Duration and Type of Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straudi, Sofia; Fregni, Felipe; Martinuzzi, Carlotta; Pavarelli, Claudia; Salvioli, Stefano; Basaglia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this exploratory pilot study is to test the effects of bilateral tDCS combined with upper extremity robot-assisted therapy (RAT) on stroke survivors. Methods. We enrolled 23 subjects who were allocated to 2 groups: RAT + real tDCS and RAT + sham-tDCS. Each patient underwent 10 sessions (5 sessions/week) over two weeks. Outcome measures were collected before and after treatment: (i) Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity (FMA-UE), (ii) Box and Block Test (BBT), and (iii) Motor Activity Log (MAL). Results. Both groups reported a significant improvement in FMA-UE score after treatment (p stroke type and duration, a significant interaction effect (p stroke duration (acute versus chronic) and type (cortical versus subcortical) modify the effect of tDCS and robotics on motor function. Patients with chronic and subcortical stroke benefited more from the treatments than patients with acute and cortical stroke, who presented very small changes. Conclusion. The additional use of bilateral tDCS to RAT seems to have a significant beneficial effect depending on the duration and type of stroke. These results should be verified by additional confirmatory studies.

  1. T Cell Help Amplifies Innate Signals in CD8+ DCs for Optimal CD8+ T Cell Priming

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    Marie Greyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DCs often require stimulation from CD4+ T cells to propagate CD8+ T cell responses, but precisely how T cell help optimizes the priming capacity of DCs and why this appears to differ between varying types of CD8+ T cell immunity remains unclear. We show that CD8+ T cell priming upon HSV-1 skin infection depended on DCs receiving stimulation from both IFN-α/β and CD4+ T cells to provide IL-15. This was not an additive effect but resulted from CD4+ T cells amplifying DC production of IL-15 in response to IFN-α/β. We also observed that increased innate stimulation reversed the helper dependence of CD8+ T cell priming and that the innate stimulus, rather than the CD4+ T cells themselves, determined how “help’” was integrated into the priming response by DCs. These findings identify T cell help as a flexible means to amplify varying suboptimal innate signals in DCs.

  2. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on cognition, symptoms, and smoking in schizophrenia: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert C; Boules, Sylvia; Mattiuz, Sanela; Youssef, Mary; Tobe, Russell H; Sershen, Henry; Lajtha, Abel; Nolan, Karen; Amiaz, Revital; Davis, John M

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by cognitive deficits which persist after acute symptoms have been treated or resolved. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been reported to improve cognition and reduce smoking craving in healthy subjects but has not been as carefully evaluated in a randomized controlled study for these effects in schizophrenia. We conducted a randomized double-blind, sham-controlled study of the effects of 5 sessions of tDCS (2 milliamps for 20minutes) on cognition, psychiatric symptoms, and smoking and cigarette craving in 37 outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were current smokers. Thirty subjects provided evaluable data on the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB), with the primary outcome measure, the MCCB Composite score. Active compared to sham tDCS subjects showed significant improvements after the fifth tDCS session in MCCB Composite score (p=0.008) and on the MCCB Working Memory (p=0.002) and Attention-Vigilance (p=0.027) domain scores, with large effect sizes. MCCB Composite and Working Memory domain scores remained significant at Benjamini-Hochberg corrected significance levels (α=0.05). There were no statistically significant effects on secondary outcome measures of psychiatric symptoms (PANSS scores), hallucinations, cigarette craving, or cigarettes smoked. The positive effects of tDCS on cognitive performance suggest a potential efficacious treatment for cognitive deficits in partially recovered chronic schizophrenia outpatients that should be further investigated.

  3. Up-regulation of EP2 and EP3 receptors in human tolerogenic dendritic cells boosts the immunosuppressive activity of PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez-Grau, Georgina; Cabezón, Raquel; Borgman, Kyra J E; España, Carolina; Lozano, Juan Jose; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are APCs essential in regulating the immune response. PGE2, produced during inflammation, has a pivotal role in the maturation of DCs and, therefore, is vital for the immune response. The large variety of biologic functions governed by PGE2 is mediated by its signaling through 4 distinct E-type prostanoid (EP) receptors. Immunogenic DCs express EP2 and EP4, which mediate the PGE2 signaling. However, the expression and function of EP receptors in human tolerogenic DCs (tol-DCs), which present an inhibitory phenotype, have not yet, to our knowledge, been assessed. To clarify the role of EP receptors in tol-DCs, we examined the expression of different EP receptors and their effect using selective agonists in human cells. We find that EP2 and EP3 expression are up-regulated in in vitro-generated tol-DCs compared with mature DCs (mDCs). Activation of EP2-EP4 has a direct effect on the surface expression of costimulatory molecules and maturation receptors, such as CD80, CD83, and CD86 or MHCII and CCR7 in tol-DCs, the latter being exclusively modulated by PGE2-EP4 signaling. Importantly, we find that EP2 and EP3 receptors are involved in tolerance induction through IL-10 production by tol-DCs. These results are in sharp contrast with the inflammatory role of EP4 Moreover, we show that DCs generated in the presence of agonists for EP receptors, induce naive T cell differentiation toward polarized Th1/Th17 cells. Given the differential effects of EP receptors, our results suggest that EP receptor agonist/antagonists might become relevant novel drug templates to modulate immune response. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  4. Advantages of larval control for African malaria vectors: Low mobility and behavioural responsiveness of immature mosquito stages allow high effective coverage

    OpenAIRE

    Knols Bart GJ; Fillinger Ulrike; Killeen Gerry F

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Based on sensitivity analysis of the MacDonald-Ross model, it has long been argued that the best way to reduce malaria transmission is to target adult female mosquitoes with insecticides that can reduce the longevity and human-feeding frequency of vectors. However, these analyses have ignored a fundamental biological difference between mosquito adults and the immature stages that precede them: adults are highly mobile flying insects that can readily detect and avoid many i...

  5. Dual-hemisphere tDCS facilitates greater improvements for healthy subjects' non-dominant hand compared to uni-hemisphere stimulation

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    Cerruti Carlo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a non-invasive technique that has been found to modulate the excitability of neurons in the brain. The polarity of the current applied to the scalp determines the effects of tDCS on the underlying tissue: anodal tDCS increases excitability, whereas cathodal tDCS decreases excitability. Research has shown that applying anodal tDCS to the non-dominant motor cortex can improve motor performance for the non-dominant hand, presumably by means of changes in synaptic plasticity between neurons. Our previous studies also suggest that applying cathodal tDCS over the dominant motor cortex can improve performance for the non-dominant hand; this effect may result from modulating inhibitory projections (interhemispheric inhibition between the motor cortices of the two hemispheres. We hypothesized that stimultaneously applying cathodal tDCS over the dominant motor cortex and anodal tDCS over the non-dominant motor cortex would have a greater effect on finger sequence performance for the non-dominant hand, compared to stimulating only the non-dominant motor cortex. Sixteen right-handed participants underwent three stimulation conditions: 1 dual-hemisphere – with anodal tDCS over the non-dominant motor cortex, and cathodal tDCS over the dominant motor cortex, 2 uni-hemisphere – with anodal tDCS over the non-dominant motor cortex, and 3 sham tDCS. Participants performed a finger-sequencing task with the non-dominant hand before and after each stimulation. The dependent variable was the percentage of change in performance, comparing pre- and post-tDCS scores. Results A repeated measures ANOVA yielded a significant effect of tDCS condition (F(2,30 = 4.468, p = .037. Post-hoc analyses revealed that dual-hemisphere stimulation improved performance significantly more than both uni-hemisphere (p = .021 and sham stimulation (p = .041. Conclusion We propose that simultaneously applying cathodal tDCS

  6. Phagocytosis of Picornavirus-Infected Cells Induces an RNA-Dependent Antiviral State in Human Dendritic Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Matthijs; Schulte, Barbara M.; Toonen, Liza W. J.; Barral, Paola M.; Fisher, Paul B.; Lanke, Kjerstin H. W.; Galama, Jochem M. D.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Adema, Gosse J.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in instructing antiviral immune responses. DCs, however, can become targeted by different viruses themselves. We recently demonstrated that human DCs can be productively infected with echoviruses (EVs), but not coxsackie B viruses (CVBs), both of which are RNA viruses belonging to the Enterovirus genus of the Picornaviridae family. We now show that phagocytosis of CVB-infected, type I interferon-deficient cells induces an antiviral state in human DCs. Uptake of infected cells increased the expression of the cytoplasmic RNA helicases retinoic acid-inducible gene I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 as well as other interferon-stimulated genes and protected DCs against subsequent infection with EV9. These effects depended on recognition of viral RNA and could be mimicked by exposure to the synthetic double-stranded RNA analogue poly(I:C) but not other Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Blocking endosomal acidification abrogated protection, suggesting a role for TLRs in the acquisition of an antiviral state in DCs. In conclusion, recognition of viral RNA rapidly induces an antiviral state in human DCs. This might provide a mechanism by which DCs protect themselves against viruses when attracted to an environment with ongoing infection. PMID:18184700

  7. Ultrastructure of immature stages of Cochliomyia macellaria (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a fly of medical and veterinary importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Paloma Martins; Barbosa, Rodrigo Rocha; Cortinhas, Lucas Barbosa; dos Santos-Mallet, Jacenir Reis; de Carvalho Queiroz, Margareth Maria

    2014-10-01

    Cochliomyia macellaria (Diptera: Calliphoridae) is known as the secondary screwworm because it causes secondary or facultative myiasis when the larvae feed on necrotic tissues. This fly has a significant medical and veterinary importance since it has been reported to transport eggs of Dermatobia hominis (human botfly), which can cause significant economic losses to livestock. Since this screwworm has been collected colonizing both pig carcasses and human cadavers, it is considered one of the most important species for forensic entomology studies. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gives detailed information on the morphological characteristics which can help identify the immature forms of the flies. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the morphological characteristics of the eggs, all the larval instars, and the puparia of Cochliomyia macellaria using SEM. The egg is ellipsoid and the dorsal surface is concave. The islands inside the median area had no anastomosis, but some perforations could be observed. From the second larval instar onwards, besides the intersegmental spines, other bands of spines were observed at the abdominal segments. Two spiracular openings were visible on the first and second larval instars, which were not expected. These characteristics are specific to Cochliomyia genus. The number and the general aspect of the spine tips in the cephalic region, the intersegmental bands on the abdomen, and the number of the spiracular openings could together help identify C. macellaria.

  8. A comprehensive database of published tDCS clinical trials (2005-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2016-12-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a technique of noninvasive cortical stimulation allowing significant modification of brain functions. Clinical application of this technique was reported for the first time in March 2005. This paper presents a detailed list of the 340 articles (excluding single case reports) which have assessed the clinical effect of tDCS in patients, at least when delivered to cortical targets. The reviewed conditions were: pain syndromes, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, cerebral palsy, post-stroke limb motor impairment, post-stroke neglect, post-stroke dysphagia, post-stroke aphasia, primary progressive aphasia, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, consciousness disorders, Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, tinnitus, depression, auditory hallucinations and negative symptoms of schizophrenia, addiction and craving, autism, and attention disorders. The following data were collected: (i) clinical condition; (ii) study design; (iii) sample size; (iv) anode and cathode locations; (v) stimulation intensity and electrode area; (vi) number and duration of sessions; (vii) clinical outcome measures and results. This article does not include any meta-analysis and aims simply at providing a comprehensive overview of the raw data reported in this field to date, as an aid to researchers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Cathodal tDCS over the left prefrontal cortex diminishes choice-induced preference change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengarelli, Flavia; Spoglianti, Silvia; Avenanti, Alessio; di Pellegrino, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    In everyday life, people often find themselves facing difficult decisions between options that are equally attractive. Cognitive dissonance theory states that after making a difficult choice between 2 equally preferred options, individuals no longer find the alternatives similarly desirable. Rather, they often change their existing preferences to align more closely with the choice they have just made. Despite the relevance of cognitive dissonance in modulating behavior, little is known about the brain processes crucially involved in choice-induced preference change. In the present study, we applied cathodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) with the aim of downregulating the activity of the left or the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during a revised version of Brehm's (in 1956. Post-decision changes in the desirability of alternatives. J Abnorm Soc Psychol. 52:384-389) free-choice paradigm. We found that cathodal tDCS over the left, but not over the right, DLPFC caused a reduction of the typical behavior-induced preference change relative to sham stimulation. Our findings highlight the role of prefrontal cortex in cognitive dissonance and provide evidence that left DLPFC plays a necessary role in the implementation of choice-induced preference change. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Recognition of Immaturity and Emotional Expressions in Blended Faces by Children with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of facial immaturity and emotional expression by children with autism, language disorders, mental retardation, and non-disabled controls was studied in two experiments. Children identified immaturity and expression in upright and inverted faces. The autism group identified fewer immature faces and expressions than control (Exp. 1 &…

  11. Scapular osteomyelitis in an immature domestic shorthair cat

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    Sivert Viskjer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 12-week-old, male, domestic shorthair cat was presented with severe left thoracic limb lameness. Investigation included physical examination, diagnostic imaging with radiography and CT, histopathology and microbiological culture. Physical examination revealed a large, firm mass on the left scapula. Radiography and CT showed a monostotic spherical expansile bone lesion in the infraspinatus fossa of the left scapula. The histopathological description was a central acute suppurative osteomyelitis with reactive fibrosis and new bone formation at the periphery. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were negative and the underlying cause of the osteomyelitis could not be identified. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics for 8 weeks proved effective with full clinical recovery and no signs of relapse during the follow-up time of 8 months. Relevance and novel information This report describes the management and outcome of a rare case of osteomyelitis with severe deformation of scapular bone morphology in an immature cat that was treated successfully with full recovery of limb function and restored integrity of the scapula.

  12. Catalytic decarboxylations of fatty acids in immature oil source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李哲; 张再龙; 孙燕华; 劳永新; 蔺五正; 吴卫芳

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic decarboxylations of fatty acids in immature oil source rock samples were examined in this study. The rock samples were obtained from seven oil fields in China. In order to clarify the effect of each mineral matter in the rock samples, both the Fe M?ssbauer effect and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to determine the relative content of each mineral in the rock samples, and the catalytic activities of several minerals like clays, carbonates and pyrite were determined. The Fe M?ssbauer effect and the XRD studies show that clays are the main mineral components in the rock samples except for the samples from Biyang and Jianghan in which the main mineral component is ankerite. The other mineral components include calcite, plagioclase, quartz, feldspar, siderite, aragonite, pyrite, analcime, pyroxene and anhydrite. The studies of the catalytic decarboxylations of fatty acids suggest that carbonates and pyrite can make much greater contributions to the catalytic activities of the rock samples than clays. It is found that the overall catalytic activities of the rock samples are well related to the relative contents and the catalytic activities of clays, carbonates and pyrite in the rock samples.

  13. Description of the immatures of Linepithema humile Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Daniel R; Fox, Eduardo G P; Rossi, Mônica L; Bueno, Odair C

    2010-01-01

    Linepithema humile Mayr is an ant species originally native to South America that has been spread accidently throughout the globe through international trade. It is a serious urban and crop pest. Despite its economic importance, little is known about the larvae of this species apart from a brief description based on a few specimens. The present investigation is aimed at describing every immature stage of L. humile. Three larval instars were determined through the frequency distribution of the maximum width of head capsules from a sample of 525 larvae. The morphological descriptions were based on 150 eggs, 70 larvae, and 90 pupae examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. Some morphological characteristics reported to be typical of Linepithema Mayr larvae were confirmed--dolichoderoid body shape, presence of dorsal protuberance, sparse simple body hairs, presence of nine pairs of spiracles and dolichoderoid mandibles. We concluded that an earlier published description was based on queen larvae, and that the protuberance is only present in worker larvae. The information provided in this study may aid ant systematics and phylogenetics, as well provide a better understanding of the biology of this species.

  14. Antibodies against the Envelope Glycoprotein Promote Infectivity of Immature Dengue Virus Serotype 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Voorham, Júlia M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda Vanesa; Colpitts, Tonya M.; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Fikrig, Erol; Diamond, Michael S.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-reactive dengue virus (DENV) antibodies directed against the envelope (E) and precursor membrane (prM) proteins are believed to contribute to the development of severe dengue disease by facilitating antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. We and others recently demonstrated that anti-prM antibodies render essentially non-infectious immature DENV infectious in Fcγ-receptor-expressing cells. Immature DENV particles are abundantly present in standard (st) virus preparations due to inefficient processing of prM to M during virus maturation. Structural analysis has revealed that the E protein is exposed in immature particles and this prompted us to investigate whether antibodies to E render immature particles infectious. To this end, we analyzed the enhancing properties of 27 anti-E antibodies directed against distinct structural domains. Of these, 23 bound to immature particles, and 15 enhanced infectivity of immature DENV in a furin-dependent manner. The significance of these findings was subsequently tested in vivo using the well-established West Nile virus (WNV) mouse model. Remarkably, mice injected with immature WNV opsonized with anti-E mAbs or immune serum produced a lethal infection in a dose-dependent manner, whereas in the absence of antibody immature WNV virions caused no morbidity or mortality. Furthermore, enhancement infection studies with standard (st) DENV preparations opsonized with anti-E mAbs in the presence or absence of furin inhibitor revealed that prM-containing particles present within st virus preparations contribute to antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. Taken together, our results support the notion that antibodies against the structural proteins prM and E both can promote pathogenesis by enhancing infectivity of prM-containing immature and partially mature flavivirus particles. PMID:22431958

  15. Antibodies against the envelope glycoprotein promote infectivity of immature dengue virus serotype 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia M da Silva Voorham

    Full Text Available Cross-reactive dengue virus (DENV antibodies directed against the envelope (E and precursor membrane (prM proteins are believed to contribute to the development of severe dengue disease by facilitating antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. We and others recently demonstrated that anti-prM antibodies render essentially non-infectious immature DENV infectious in Fcγ-receptor-expressing cells. Immature DENV particles are abundantly present in standard (st virus preparations due to inefficient processing of prM to M during virus maturation. Structural analysis has revealed that the E protein is exposed in immature particles and this prompted us to investigate whether antibodies to E render immature particles infectious. To this end, we analyzed the enhancing properties of 27 anti-E antibodies directed against distinct structural domains. Of these, 23 bound to immature particles, and 15 enhanced infectivity of immature DENV in a furin-dependent manner. The significance of these findings was subsequently tested in vivo using the well-established West Nile virus (WNV mouse model. Remarkably, mice injected with immature WNV opsonized with anti-E mAbs or immune serum produced a lethal infection in a dose-dependent manner, whereas in the absence of antibody immature WNV virions caused no morbidity or mortality. Furthermore, enhancement infection studies with standard (st DENV preparations opsonized with anti-E mAbs in the presence or absence of furin inhibitor revealed that prM-containing particles present within st virus preparations contribute to antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. Taken together, our results support the notion that antibodies against the structural proteins prM and E both can promote pathogenesis by enhancing infectivity of prM-containing immature and partially mature flavivirus particles.

  16. Time course of the induction of homeostatic plasticity generated by repeated transcranial direct current stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, K; Seeber, A A; Thirugnanasambandam, N; Paulus, W; Nitsche, M A; Rothwell, J C

    2011-03-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed that control the amount of plasticity in neuronal circuits and guarantee dynamic stability of neuronal networks. Homeostatic plasticity suggests that the ease with which a synaptic connection is facilitated/suppressed depends on the previous amount of network activity. We describe how such homeostatic-like interactions depend on the time interval between two conditioning protocols and on the duration of the preconditioning protocol. We used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to produce short-lasting plasticity in the motor cortex of healthy humans. In the main experiment, we compared the aftereffect of a single 5-min session of anodal or cathodal tDCS with the effect of a 5-min tDCS session preceded by an identical 5-min conditioning session administered 30, 3, or 0 min beforehand. Five-minute anodal tDCS increases excitability for about 5 min. The same duration of cathodal tDCS reduces excitability. Increasing the duration of tDCS to 10 min prolongs the duration of the effects. If two 5-min periods of tDCS are applied with a 30-min break between them, the effect of the second period of tDCS is identical to that of 5-min stimulation alone. If the break is only 3 min, then the second session has the opposite effect to 5-min tDCS given alone. Control experiments show that these shifts in the direction of plasticity evolve during the 10 min after the first tDCS session and depend on the duration of the first tDCS but not on intracortical inhibition and facilitation. The results are compatible with a time-dependent "homeostatic-like" rule governing the response of the human motor cortex to plasticity probing protocols.

  17. Diagnosis and management of an immature teratoma during ovarian stimulation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douay-Hauser Nathalie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The discovery of a mature teratoma (dermoid cyst of the ovary during ovarian stimulation is not a rare event. Conversely, we could not find any reported cases of immature teratoma in such a situation. Clinical and ultrasound arguments for this immature form are scarcely or poorly evaluated. Case Presentation We describe the case of a 31-year-old Caucasian woman with primary infertility, who developed an immature teratoma during an in vitro fertilization ovarian stimulation cycle. Conclusions Ultrasound signs of an atypical cyst during ovarian stimulation allowed us to adopt a careful medical attitude and to adapt the required surgical oncological treatment.

  18. Effects of anodal tDCS and occupational therapy on fine motor skill deficits in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Nela V; Dubljanin-Raspopović, Emilija; Nedeljković, Una; Tomanović-Vujadinović, Sanja; Milanović, Sladjan D; Petronić-Marković, Ivana; Ilić, Tihomir V

    2016-11-22

    A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness of using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with chronic hand motor impairment resulting from stroke. In this study, we investigate and compare the combined effects of anodal tDCS and occupational therapy (OT) to sham stimulation with OT (control) on fine motor skill deficits of chronic stroke patients. A total of 26 stroke patients (at ≥ 9 months) were randomly assigned to an active treatment or a control group in a double-blinded, sham-controlled, parallel design study. Each group received OT for 45 min/day (10 sessions for 2 weeks). Treatment was preceded by either 20 minutes of 2 mA anodal tDCS over ipsilesional M1 or sham tDCS. A modified Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (mJTHFT) was administered as primary outcome measure, and handgrip dynamometer and upper limb Fugl-Meyer (ULFM) assessments were performed as secondary outcomes. The assessment was done at baseline (T0), after the interventions on day 1(T1), day 10 (T2) and day 40 (T3). We observed a statistically significant effect in the tDCS group when the results were compared to the sham group. The mJTHFT times were significantly shorter immediately after treatment and at day 40. The intervention had no effect on handgrip strength or ULFM score. Fine motor skill deficits in chronic stroke survivors can be improved when intensive OT is primed with anodal tDCS over the ipsilesional hemisphere.

  19. A systematic review of the clinical efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekic, Maria; Boysen, Elena; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-03-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique, which can be used to selectively disrupt patterns of neural activity that are associated with symptoms of mental illness. tDCS has been implemented in numerous therapeutic trials across a range of patient populations, with a rapidly increasing number of studies being published each year. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of tDCS in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Four electronic databases were searched from inception until December 2015 by two independent reviewers, and 66 eligible studies were identified. Depression was the most extensively researched condition, followed by schizophrenia and substance use disorders. Data on obsessive compulsive disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, and anorexia nervosa were also obtained. The quality of included studies was appraised using a standardised assessment framework, which yielded a median score corresponding to "weak" on the three-point scale. This improved to "moderate" when case reports/series were excluded from the analysis. Overall, data suggested that tDCS interventions comprising multiple sessions can ameliorate symptoms of several major psychiatric disorders, both acutely and in the long-term. Nevertheless, the tDCS field is still in its infancy, and several methodological and ethical issues must be addressed before clinical efficacy can truly be determined. Studies probing the mechanisms of action of tDCS and those facilitating the definition of optimised stimulation protocols are warranted. Furthermore, evidence from large-scale, multi-centre randomised controlled trials is required if the transition of this therapy from the laboratory to the clinic is to be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dendritic Cell Activity Driven by Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Producing Human IL-18, in Healthy BCG Vaccinated Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpakowski, Piotr; Biet, Franck; Locht, Camille; Paszkiewicz, Małgorzata; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Allain, Fabrice; Fol, Marek; Pestel, Joël; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains an enormous global burden, despite wide vaccination coverage with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available against this disease, indicating that BCG-driven immunity is insufficient to protect the human population against tuberculosis. In this study we constructed recombinant BCG producing human IL-18 (rBCGhIL-18) and investigated whether human IL-18 produced by rBCGhIL-18 modulates DC functions and enhances Th1 responses to mycobacterial antigens in humans. We found that the costimulatory CD86 and CD80 molecules were significantly upregulated on rBCGhIL-18-infected DCs, whereas the stimulation of DCs with nonrecombinant BCG was less effective. In contrast, both BCG strains decreased the DC-SIGN expression on human DCs. The rBCGhIL-18 increased IL-23, IL-10, and IP-10 production by DCs to a greater extent than nonrecombinant BCG. In a coculture system of CD4(+) T cells and loaded DCs, rBCGhIL-18 favoured strong IFN-γ but also IL-10 production by naive T cells but not by memory T cells. This was much less the case for nonrecombinant BCG. Thus the expression of IL-18 by recombinant BCG increases IL-23, IP-10, and IL-10 expression by human DCs and enhances their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 expression by naive T cells, without affecting the maturation phenotype of the DCs.

  1. Dendritic Cell Activity Driven by Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Producing Human IL-18, in Healthy BCG Vaccinated Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Szpakowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains an enormous global burden, despite wide vaccination coverage with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG, the only vaccine available against this disease, indicating that BCG-driven immunity is insufficient to protect the human population against tuberculosis. In this study we constructed recombinant BCG producing human IL-18 (rBCGhIL-18 and investigated whether human IL-18 produced by rBCGhIL-18 modulates DC functions and enhances Th1 responses to mycobacterial antigens in humans. We found that the costimulatory CD86 and CD80 molecules were significantly upregulated on rBCGhIL-18-infected DCs, whereas the stimulation of DCs with nonrecombinant BCG was less effective. In contrast, both BCG strains decreased the DC-SIGN expression on human DCs. The rBCGhIL-18 increased IL-23, IL-10, and IP-10 production by DCs to a greater extent than nonrecombinant BCG. In a coculture system of CD4+ T cells and loaded DCs, rBCGhIL-18 favoured strong IFN-γ but also IL-10 production by naive T cells but not by memory T cells. This was much less the case for nonrecombinant BCG. Thus the expression of IL-18 by recombinant BCG increases IL-23, IP-10, and IL-10 expression by human DCs and enhances their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 expression by naive T cells, without affecting the maturation phenotype of the DCs.

  2. Finite element model predicts current density distribution for clinical applications of tDCS and tACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toralf eNeuling

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been applied in numerous scientific studies over the past decade. However, the possibility to apply tDCS in therapy of neuropsychiatric disorders is still debated. While transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS has been approved for treatment of major depression in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA, tDCS is not as widely accepted. One of the criticisms against tDCS is the lack of spatial specificity. Focality is limited by the electrode size (35 cm2 are commonly used and the bipolar arrangement. However, a current flow through the head directly from anode to cathode is an outdated view. Finite element (FE models have recently been used to predict the exact current flow during tDCS. These simulations have demonstrated that the current flow depends on tissue shape and conductivity. Toface the challenge to predict the location, magnitude and direction of the current flow induced by tDCS and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS, we used a refined realistic FE modeling approach. With respect to the literature on clinical tDCS and tACS, we analyzed two common setups for the location of the stimulation electrodes which target the frontal lobe and the occipital lobe, respectively. We compared lateral and medial electrode configuration with regard to theirusability. We were able to demonstrate that the lateral configurations yielded more focused stimulation areas as well as higher current intensities in the target areas. The high resolution of our simulation allows one to combine the modeled current flow with the knowledge of neuronal orientation to predict the consequences of tDCS and tACS. Our results not only offer a basis for a deeper understanding of the stimulation sites currently in use for clinical applications but also offer a better interpretation of observed effects.

  3. DCS (Digital Control System) application of three generations; Aplicacao de um SDCD (Sistemas Digitais de Controle Distribuido) de tres geracoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Celso Roberto Molinaro [PETROBRAS S.A., Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Refinaria Henrique Lage (REVAP)

    2004-07-01

    Digital Control System are three generations of hardware and software platforms in process automation , but DCS is using the same functions and presents the reliability and availability . The challenge in automation has to maintain the old and the newest system operating and integrated perhaps the different times of platforms to guarantee the actual investments and in the future. A new generation of DCS using field equipment to control or the actual architecture with a lot of new information are coming with the technologies. (author)

  4. Effects of frontal transcranial direct current stimulation on emotional processing and mood in healthy humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Nitsche

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The prefrontal cortex is involved in mood and emotional processing. In patients suffering from depression, the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is hypoactive, while activity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is enhanced. Counterbalancing these pathological excitability alterations by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS improves mood in these patients. In healthy subjects, however, rTMS of the same areas has no major effect, and the effects of tDCS are mixed. We aimed to evaluate the effects of prefrontal tDCS on mood and mood-related cognitive processing in healthy humans. In a first study, we administered excitability-enhancing anodal, excitability-diminishing cathodal and placebo tDCS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, combined with antagonistic stimulation of the right frontopolar cortex, and tested acute mood changes by an adjective checklist. Subjective mood was not influenced by tDCS. Emotional face identification, however, which was explored in a second experiment, was subtly improved by a tDCS-driven excitability modulation of the prefrontal cortex, markedly by anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for positive emotional content. We conclude that tDCS of the prefrontal cortex improves mood processing in healthy subjects, but does not influence subjective mood state.

  5. Polarity-specific cortical effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in primary somatosensory cortex of healthy humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eRehmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a noninvasive stimulation method that has been shown to modulate the excitability of the motor and visual cortices in human subjects in a polarity dependent manner in previous studies. The aim of our study was to investigate whether anodal and cathodal tDCS can also be used to modulate the excitability of the human primary somatosensory cortex (S1. We measured paired-pulse suppression (PPS of somatosensory evoked potentials in 36 right-handed volunteers before and after anodal, cathodal or sham stimulation over the right non-dominant S1. Paired-pulse stimulation of the median nerve was performed at the dominant and non-dominant hand. After anodal tDCS, PPS was reduced in the ipsilateral S1 compared to sham stimulation, indicating an excitatory effect of anodal tDCS. In contrast, PPS in the stimulated left hemisphere was increased after cathodal tDCS, indicating an inhibitory effect of cathodal tDCS. Sham stimulation induced no pre-post differences. Thus, tDCS can be used to modulate the excitability of S1 in polarity-dependent manner, which can be assessed by paired-pulse suppression. An interesting topic for further studies could be the investigation of direct correlations between sensory changes and excitability changes induced by tDCS.

  6. HIV-1 gp120 activates the STAT3/interleukin-6 axis in primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cornò, Manuela; Donninelli, Gloria; Varano, Barbara; Da Sacco, Letizia; Masotti, Andrea; Gessani, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are fundamental for the initiation of immune responses and are important players in AIDS immunopathogenesis. The modulation of DC functional activities represents a strategic mechanism for HIV-1 to evade immune surveillance. Impairment of DC function may result from bystander effects of HIV-1 envelope proteins independently of direct HIV-1 infection. In this study, we report that exposure of immature monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to HIV-1 R5 gp120 resulted in the CCR5-dependent production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/NF-κB pathways. IL-6 in turn activated STAT3 by an autocrine loop. Concomitantly, gp120 promoted an early activation of STAT3 that further contributed to IL-6 induction. This activation paralleled a concomitant upregulation of the STAT3 inhibitor PIAS3. Notably, STAT3/IL-6 pathway activation was not affected by the CCR5-specific ligand CCL4. These results identify STAT3 as a key signaling intermediate activated by gp120 in MDDCs and highlight the existence of a virus-induced dysregulation of the IL-6/STAT3 axis. HIV-1 gp120 signaling through STAT3 may provide an explanation for the impairment of DC function observed upon HIV exposure. This study provides new evidence for the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggered by HIV-1 gp120 in human DCs in the absence of productive infection, emphasizing a role of aberrant signaling in early virus-host interaction, contributing to viral pathogenesis. We identified STAT3 as a key component in the gp120-mediated signaling cascade involving MAPK and NF-κB components and ultimately leading to IL-6 secretion. STAT3 now is recognized as a key regulator of DC functions. Thus, the identification of this transcription factor as a signaling molecule mediating some of gp120's biological effects unveils a new mechanism by which HIV-1 may deregulate DC functions and contribute to AIDS pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology

  7. Human tolerogenic dendritic cells produce IL-35 in the absence of other IL-12 family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Karen O; van der Kooij, Sandra W; Vignali, Dario A A; van Kooten, Cees

    2015-06-01

    IL-35 is a cytokine of the IL-12 family, existing as a heterodimer of IL-12p35 and Ebi3. IL-35 has anti-inflammatory properties and is produced by regulatory T cells in humans and mice, where it is required for optimal suppression of immune responses. Distinct from other IL-12 cytokines, the expression of IL-35 has not been described in antigen-presenting cells. In view of the immune-regulatory properties of IL-35, we investigated the expression, regulation, and function of IL-12p35 and Ebi3 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs). These tolDCs do not produce IL-12p70 or the homodimer IL-12p40. We demonstrate that tolDCs completely lack transcriptional expression of IL-12p40. However, tolDCs maintain mRNA expression of IL-12p35 and Ebi3. Using intracellular flow cytometry and Western blot analysis, we show that tolDCs produce Ebi3 and IL-12p35, and both can be enhanced upon stimulation with IFN-γ, LPS, or CD40L. tolDCs supernatants have the capacity to suppress T-cell activation. Using IL12A silencing, we demonstrate that IL-12p35 is required for tolDCs to reach their full suppressive potential. Taken together, our results indicate that tolDCs produce IL-35, providing an additional novel mechanism by which tolDCs elicit their tolerogenic potential.

  8. Optimization of focality and direction in dense electrode array transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Seyhmus; Dannhauer, Moritz; Erem, Burak; Macleod, Rob; Tucker, Don; Turovets, Sergei; Luu, Phan; Erdogmus, Deniz; Brooks, Dana H.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) aims to alter brain function non-invasively via electrodes placed on the scalp. Conventional tDCS uses two relatively large patch electrodes to deliver electrical current to the brain region of interest (ROI). Recent studies have shown that using dense arrays containing up to 512 smaller electrodes may increase the precision of targeting ROIs. However, this creates a need for methods to determine effective and safe stimulus patterns as the number of degrees of freedom is much higher with such arrays. Several approaches to this problem have appeared in the literature. In this paper, we describe a new method for calculating optimal electrode stimulus patterns for targeted and directional modulation in dense array tDCS which differs in some important aspects with methods reported to date. Approach. We optimize stimulus pattern of dense arrays with fixed electrode placement to maximize the current density in a particular direction in the ROI. We impose a flexible set of safety constraints on the current power in the brain, individual electrode currents, and total injected current, to protect subject safety. The proposed optimization problem is convex and thus efficiently solved using existing optimization software to find unique and globally optimal electrode stimulus patterns. Main results. Solutions for four anatomical ROIs based on a realistic head model are shown as exemplary results. To illustrate the differences between our approach and previously introduced methods, we compare our method with two of the other leading methods in the literature. We also report on extensive simulations that show the effect of the values chosen for each proposed safety constraint bound on the optimized stimulus patterns. Significance. The proposed optimization approach employs volume based ROIs, easily adapts to different sets of safety constraints, and takes negligible time to compute. An in-depth comparison study gives

  9. GABA mediated excitation in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, E; Rovira, C; Gaiarsa, J L; Corradetti, R; Ben Ari, Y

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from rat hippocampal neurons in vitro during the first postnatal week revealed the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). These were generated by the synchronous discharge of a population of neurons. GDPs reversed polarity at -27 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl or K-methylsulphate filled electrodes, respectively. GDPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). Iontophoretic or bath applications of GABA (10-300 microM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin (1 microM), induced a membrane depolarization or in voltage clamp experiments an inward current which reversed polarity at the same potential as GDPs. The response to GABA was blocked in a non-competitive manner by bicuculline (10 microM) and did not desensitize. GABA mediated GDPs were presynaptically modulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Their frequency was reduced or blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists and by the rather specific non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). The frequency of GDPs was enhanced by glycine and D-serine (10-30 microM) in a strychnine insensitive manner. This effect was blocked by AP-5, suggesting that it was mediated by the allosteric modulatory site of the NMDA receptor. These observations suggest that most of the 'excitatory' drive in immature neurons is mediated by GABA acting on GABAA receptors; furthermore excitatory amino acids modulate the release of GABA by a presynaptic action on GABAergic interneurons.

  10. Temporal coding at the immature depolarizing GABAergic synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzel Valeeva

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the developing hippocampus, GABA exerts depolarizing and excitatory actions and contributes to the generation of neuronal network driven Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs. Here, we studied spike time coding at immature GABAergic synapses and its impact on synchronization of the neuronal network during GDPs in the neonatal (postnatal days P2-6 rat hippocampal slices. Using extracellular recordings, we found that the delays of action potentials (APs evoked by synaptic activation of GABA(A receptors are long (mean, 65 ms and variable (within a time window of 10-200 ms. During patch-clamp recordings, depolarizing GABAergic responses were mainly subthreshold and their amplification by persistent sodium conductance was required to trigger APs. AP delays at GABAergic synapses shortened and their variability reduced with an increase in intracellular chloride concentration during whole-cell recordings. Negative shift of the GABA reversal potential (EGABA with low concentrations of bumetanide, or potentiation of GABA(A receptors with diazepam reduced GDPs amplitude, desynchronized neuronal firing during GDPs and slowed down GDPs propagation. Partial blockade of GABA(A receptors with bicuculline increased neuronal synchronization and accelerated GDPs propagation. We propose that spike-timing at depolarizing GABA synapses is determined by intracellular chloride concentration. At physiological levels of intracellular chloride GABAergic depolarization does not reach the action potential threshold and amplification of GABAergic responses by non-inactivating sodium conductance is required for postsynaptic AP initiation. Slow and variable excitation at GABAergic synapse determines the level of neuronal synchrony and the rate of GDPs propagation in the developing hippocampus.

  11. Temporal coding at the immature depolarizing GABAergic synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeeva, Guzel; Abdullin, Azat; Tyzio, Roman; Skorinkin, Andrei; Nikolski, Evgeny; Ben-Ari, Yehezkiel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2010-01-01

    In the developing hippocampus, GABA exerts depolarizing and excitatory actions and contributes to the generation of neuronal network driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). Here, we studied spike time coding at immature GABAergic synapses and its impact on synchronization of the neuronal network during GDPs in the neonatal (postnatal days P2-6) rat hippocampal slices. Using extracellular recordings, we found that the delays of action potentials (APs) evoked by synaptic activation of GABA(A) receptors are long (mean, 65 ms) and variable (within a time window of 10-200 ms). During patch-clamp recordings, depolarizing GABAergic responses were mainly subthreshold and their amplification by persistent sodium conductance was required to trigger APs. AP delays at GABAergic synapses shortened and their variability reduced with an increase in intracellular chloride concentration during whole-cell recordings. Negative shift of the GABA reversal potential (E(GABA)) with low concentrations of bumetanide, or potentiation of GABA(A) receptors with diazepam reduced GDPs amplitude, desynchronized neuronal firing during GDPs and slowed down GDPs propagation. Partial blockade of GABA(A) receptors with bicuculline increased neuronal synchronization and accelerated GDPs propagation. We propose that spike timing at depolarizing GABA synapses is determined by intracellular chloride concentration. At physiological levels of intracellular chloride GABAergic depolarization does not reach the action potential threshold and amplification of GABAergic responses by non-inactivating sodium conductance is required for postsynaptic AP initiation. Slow and variable excitation at GABAergic synapse determines the level of neuronal synchrony and the rate of GDPs propagation in the developing hippocampus.

  12. Pollination triggers female gametophyte development in immature Nicotiana tabacum flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Michael S.; Bertolino, Lígia T.; Cossalter, Viviane; Quiapim, Andréa C.; DePaoli, Henrique C.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Teixeira, Simone P.; Goldman, Maria H. S.

    2015-01-01

    In Nicotiana tabacum, female gametophytes are not fully developed at anthesis, but flower buds pollinated 12 h before anthesis produce mature embryo sacs. We investigated several pollination-associated parameters in N. tabacum flower buds to determine the developmental timing of important events in preparation for successful fertilization. First, we performed hand pollinations in flowers from stages 4 to 11 to study at which developmental stage pollination would produce fruits. A Peroxtesmo test was performed to correlate peroxidase activity on the stigma surface, indicative of stigma receptivity, with fruit set. Pollen tube growth and female gametophyte development were microscopically analyzed in pistils of different developmental stages. Fruits were obtained only after pollinations of flower buds at late stage 7 and older; fruit weight and seed germination capacity increased as the developmental stage of the pollinated flower approached anthesis. Despite positive peroxidase activity and pollen tube growth, pistils at stages 5 and 6 were unable to produce fruits. At late stage 7, female gametophytes were undergoing first mitotic division. After 24 h, female gametophytes of unpollinated pistils were still in the end of the first division, whereas those of pollinated pistils showed egg cells. RT-qPCR assay showed that the expression of the NtEC1 gene, a marker of egg cell development, is considerably higher in pollinated late stage 7 ovaries compared with unpollinated ovaries. To test whether ethylene is the signal eliciting female gametophyte maturation, the expression of ACC synthase was examined in unpollinated and pollinated stage 6 and late stage 7 stigmas/styles. Pollination induced NtACS expression in stage 6 pistils, which are unable to produce fruits. Our results show that pollination is a stimulus capable of triggering female gametophyte development in immature tobacco flowers and suggests the existence of a yet undefined signal sensed by the pistil. PMID

  13. AFSC/ABL: Immature chum salmon allozyme ID of mixed stocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Immature chum salmon were collected by the F/V Northwest Explorer between September 5 and October 8, during the 2002 BASIS survey across the eastern Bering Sea shelf...

  14. Investigation of Immature Sea Turtles in the Coastal Waters of West Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To survey immature sea turtles that inhabit the Ten Thousand Islands. Program funding came from South Florida Ecosystem Restoration. This project provided base-line...

  15. [Rearing immature horse flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) by using a substrate of bryophytes and sand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ruth L M; Rafael, José A

    2006-01-01

    A new method for rearing immature horse flies by using a substrate of bryophytes and sand is described and the advantages of such substrate for maintenance of species with long development periods are discussed.

  16. Applying Human Factors Evaluation and Design Guidance to a Nuclear Power Plant Digital Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Ulrich; Ronald Boring; William Phoenix; Emily Dehority; Tim Whiting; Jonathan Morrell; Rhett Backstrom

    2012-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) nuclear industry, like similar process control industries, has moved toward upgrading its control rooms. The upgraded control rooms typically feature digital control system (DCS) displays embedded in the panels. These displays gather information from the system and represent that information on a single display surface. In this manner, the DCS combines many previously separate analog indicators and controls into a single digital display, whereby the operators can toggle between multiple windows to monitor and control different aspects of the plant. The design of the DCS depends on the function of the system it monitors, but revolves around presenting the information most germane to an operator at any point in time. DCSs require a carefully designed human system interface. This report centers on redesigning existing DCS displays for an example chemical volume control system (CVCS) at a U.S. nuclear power plant. The crucial nature of the CVCS, which controls coolant levels and boration in the primary system, requires a thorough human factors evaluation of its supporting DCS. The initial digital controls being developed for the DCSs tend to directly mimic the former analog controls. There are, however, unique operator interactions with a digital vs. analog interface, and the differences have not always been carefully factored in the translation of an analog interface to a replacement DCS. To ensure safety, efficiency, and usability of the emerging DCSs, a human factors usability evaluation was conducted on a CVCS DCS currently being used and refined at an existing U.S. nuclear power plant. Subject matter experts from process control engineering, software development, and human factors evaluated the DCS displays to document potential usability issues and propose design recommendations. The evaluation yielded 167 potential usability issues with the DCS. These issues should not be considered operator performance problems but rather opportunities

  17. Imaging transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the prefrontal cortex-correlation or causality in stimulation-mediated effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörsching, Jana; Padberg, Frank; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Kumpf, Ulrike; Kirsch, Beatrice; Keeser, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Transcranial current stimulation approaches include neurophysiologically distinct non-invasive brain stimulation techniques widely applied in basic, translational and clinical research: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS), transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS). Prefrontal tDCS seems to be an especially promising tool for clinical practice. In order to effectively modulate relevant neural circuits, systematic research on prefrontal tDCS is needed that uses neuroimaging and neurophysiology measures to specifically target and adjust this method to physiological requirements. This review therefore analyses the various neuroimaging methods used in combination with prefrontal tDCS in healthy and psychiatric populations. First, we provide a systematic overview on applications, computational models and studies combining neuroimaging or neurophysiological measures with tDCS. Second, we categorise these studies in terms of their experimental designs and show that many studies do not vary the experimental conditions to the extent required to demonstrate specific relations between tDCS and its behavioural or neurophysiological effects. Finally, to support best-practice tDCS research we provide a methodological framework for orientation among experimental designs.

  18. Immature mosquitoes associated with urban parklands: implications for water and mosquito management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Laura; Fischer, Sylvia; Schweigmann, Nicolás

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare 2 urban habitat types: pools artificially filled with water from damaged or leaking water pipes (AF) and pools naturally filled by rainwater (NF), with regard to their favorability as breeding sites for mosquitoes. Two study areas were analyzed, 1 for 5 months and the other for 9 months, covering the whole period when AF pools contained water. The AF pools held water during the entire study, and showed lower fluctuations in surface area than NF pools. The AF pools showed higher levels of total mosquitoes and of stagnant-water mosquitoes. The floodwater mosquitoes were numerically (but not significantly) more abundant in NF pools. Nine mosquito species were identified. Habitat type, temperature, and season were significant in explaining the variability in species composition according to the canonical correspondence analysis. The most abundant species were Ochlerotatus albifasciatus (= Aedes albifasciatus, predominantly in NF pools), Culex dolosus, and Cx. pipiens (mainly in AF pools). The latter 2 species differed in their temporal dynamics, with Cx. dolosus associated with lower temperatures and Cx. pipiens with higher temperatures. Overall, the results indicate that although both habitat types harbored immature mosquitoes, the AF pools were more favorable than co-occurring rain pools. Easy-to-implement management actions such as the design of adequate drainage systems and the fast repair of broken pipes will be helpful to reduce the risk of human illness associated with mosquitoes in urban green areas.

  19. 25 years of research on global asphyxia in the immature rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, M; van den Hove, D L A; Vles, J S H; Steinbusch, H W M; Kramer, B W; Gavilanes, A W D

    2017-02-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy remains a common cause of brain damage in neonates. Preterm infants have additional complications, as prematurity by itself increases the risk of encephalopathy. Currently, therapy for this subset of asphyxiated infants is limited to supportive care. There is an urgent need for therapies in preterm infants - and for representative animal models for preclinical drug development. In 1991, a novel rodent model of global asphyxia in the preterm infant was developed in Sweden. This method was based on the induction of asphyxia during the birth processes itself by submerging pups, still in the uterine horns, in a water bath followed by C-section. This insult occurs at a time-point when the rodent brain maturity resembles the brain of a 22-32 week old human fetus. This model has developed over the past 25 years as an established model of perinatal global asphyxia in the early preterm brain. Here we summarize the knowledge gained on the short- and long-term neuropathological and behavioral effects of asphyxia on the immature central nervous system.

  20. Contact sensitizers specifically increase MHC class II expression on murine immature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herouet, C; Cottin, M; LeClaire, J; Enk, A; Rousset, F

    2000-01-01

    Contact sensitivity is a T-cell-mediated immune disease that can occur when low-molecular-weight chemicals penetrate the skin. In vivo topical application of chemical sensitizers results in morphological modification of Langerhans cells (LC). Moreover, within 18 h, LC increase their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens expression and migrate to lymph nodes where they present the sensitizer to T lymphocytes. We wanted to determine if such an effect could also be observed in vitro. However, because of the high genetic diversity encountered in humans, assays were performed with dendritic cells (DC) obtained from a Balb/c mouse strain. The capacity of a strong sensitizer, DNBS (2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid), to modulate the phenotype of bone marrow-derived DC in vitro, was investigated. A specific and marked increase of MHC class II molecules expression was observed within 18 h. To eliminate the use of animals in sensitization studies, the XS52 DC line was tested at an immature stage. A 30-min contact with the strong sensitizers DNBS and oxazolone, or the moderate mercaptobenzothiazole, resulted in upregulation of MHC class II molecules expression, analyzed after 18-h incubation. This effect was not observed with irritants (dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium lauryl sulfate) nor with a neutral molecule (sodium chloride). These data suggested the possibility of developing an in vitro model for the identification of the sensitizing potential of chemicals, using a constant and non animal-consuming material.

  1. Ethanolic extract of dandelion (Taraxacum mongolicum) induces estrogenic activity in MCF-7 cells and immature rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Min; Kim, Ha Ryong; Park, Yong Joo; Lee, Yong Hwa; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2015-11-01

    Plants of the genus Taraxacum, commonly known as dandelions, are used to treat breast cancer in traditional folk medicine. However, their use has mainly been based on empirical findings without sufficient scientific evidence. Therefore, we hypothesized that dandelions would behave as a Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and be effective as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the postmenopausal women. In the present study, in vitro assay systems, including cell proliferation assay, reporter gene assay, and RT-PCR to evaluate the mRNA expression of estrogen-related genes (pS2 and progesterone receptor, PR), were performed in human breast cancer cells. Dandelion ethanol extract (DEE) significantly increased cell proliferation and estrogen response element (ERE)-driven luciferase activity. DEE significantly induced the expression of estrogen related genes such as pS2 and PR, which was inhibited by tamoxifen at 1 μmol·L(-1). These results indicated that DEE could induce estrogenic activities mediated by a classical estrogen receptor pathway. In addition, immature rat uterotrophic assay was carried out to identify estrogenic activity of DEE in vivo. The lowest concentration of DEE slightly increased the uterine wet weight, but there was no significant effect with the highest concentration of DEE. The results demonstrate the potential estrogenic activities of DEE, providing scientific evidence supporting their use in traditional medicine.

  2. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity of Soybean Isoflavones to Immature SD Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI GUAN; YU HUANG; ZHEN-YU CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dose-dependent toxic effect of soybean isoflavone extracts (SIE) on reproductive development in immature rats. Methods Growing male and female rats (n=50 each, 4 weeks) were divided into five groups fed with a standard cereal-based diet and gastrogavaged daily with 0, 30, 150, 300, and 600 mg SIE / kg body weight, respectively, for 12 weeks. Body weight, organ weights, and serum level of estrogen and testosterone were measured. Results Oral administration of SIE had no effect on food intake but decreased food efficiency ratio (P<0.01). Suppression on body weight gain by SIE was dose-dependent and the effect was greater on male than on female rats (P<0.01). SIE at high doses exhibited hepatotoxicity by increasing a relative liver weight, and also caused a smaller uterus but a greater relative ovary in female rats,while leading to larger relative testis and epididymis in male rats. SIE could decrease progesterone concentrations in female rats, whereas in male rats it reduced not only total testosterone level but also sperm count compared with the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion SIE at a range of 50-1000 times of human intake level affects not only growth but also development of reproductive system in growing rats.

  3. Biology and External Morphology of Immature Stages of the Butterfly, Diaethria candrena candrena

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando M. S. Dias; Carneiro,Eduardo; Mirna M. Casagrande; Olaf H. H. Mielke

    2012-01-01

    The biology and the external morphology of immature stages of Diaethria candrena candrena (Godart) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Biblidinae) are described. Immature D. c. candrena found on Allophylus spp. (Sapindaceae) were collected in Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil and reared in the laboratory. Morphological descriptions and illustrations are given, based on observations using electronic, stereoscopic, and optic microscopes, the latter two attached to camera lucida. Results are compared and discusse...

  4. Pecular Features of Hematopoiesis in the Liver of Mature and Immature Green Frogs (Pelophylax Esculentus Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akulenko N. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes characteristic features of the hematopoiesis in mature and immature green frogs (Pelophylax esculentus complex. Quantitative differences in liver myelograms were insignificant. However, in a sample of mature animals numerous significant correlations between the number of pigment inclusions in the liver and indicators of erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis were observed. Those correlations were absent in the immature frogs. We concluded that aft er the frogs’ breeding a lack of plastic resources, in particular, hemosiderin remains up to the hibernation.

  5. ERTS-1 DCS technical support provided by Wallops Station. [ground truth stations and DCP repair depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.

    1975-01-01

    Wallops Station accepted the tasks of providing ground truth to several ERTS investigators, operating a DCP repair depot, designing and building an airborne DCP Data Acquisition System, and providing aircraft underflight support for several other investigators. Additionally, the data bank is generally available for use by ERTS and other investigators that have a scientific interest in data pertaining to the Chesapeake Bay area. Working with DCS has provided a means of evaluating the system as a data collection device possibly applicable to ongoing Earth Resources Program activities in the Chesapeake Bay area as well as providing useful data and services to other ERTS investigators. The two areas of technical support provided by Wallops, ground truth stations and repair for DCPs, are briefly discussed.

  6. The Role of the Lactadherin in Promoting Intestinal DCs Development In Vivo and Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactadherin, as one of the immune components in the breast milk, might play a role in the intestinal immune system of newborn. Therefore, we investigated the effect of lactadherin-feeding in early time on the development of intestinal immune system compared with naturally rearing and artificially rearing (non-lactadherin. In the present study, we observed that the Peyer's Patches (PP from the pups of artificially reared group with lactadherin added were characterized by an excess of OX62+CD4+SIRP+ DC cells and a higher expression of CD3+CD4+CD25+T cells. Additionally, this study also demonstrated that IL-10 production was dramatically increased when lactadherin was present in culture medium compared with lactadherin-absent culture. These results suggested that lactadherin could adjust intestinal DCs activity, induce CD3+CD4+CD25+T cell differentiation, and enhance IL-10 production.

  7. Bandwidth optimization of compact microstrip antenna for PCS/DCS/bluetooth application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinod; Ali, Zakir; Ayub, Shahanaz; Singh, Ashutosh

    2014-09-01

    A novel compact broadband microstrip patch antenna is presented for various wireless applications. The proposed antenna has been fabricated and the impedance bandwidth and radiation pattern are measured. The simulated and measured antenna characteristics along with radiation pattern and gain are presented. It is stated that the proposed designed antenna can completely cover the required band widths of Digital communication system (DCS 1.71-1.88 GHz), Personal communication system (PCS 1.85-1.88 GHz) and IEEE 802.11b/g (2.4-2.485 GHz) with satisfactory radiation characteristics. The Experimental result shows that the proposed antenna presents a bandwidth 60.25% covering the range of 1.431-2.665 GHz with the maximum radiation efficiency 90%.

  8. Connectivity between Right Inferior Frontal Gyrus and Supplementary Motor Area Predicts After-Effects of Right Frontal Cathodal tDCS on Picture Naming Speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosso, Charlotte; Valabregue, R.; Arbizy, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the right frontal cortex improves language abilities in post-stroke aphasic patients. Yet little is known about the effects of right frontal cathodal tDCS on normal language function. Objective/hypothesis: To explore...... the cathodal tDCS effects of the right-hemispheric homologue of Broca’s area on picture naming in healthy individuals. We hypothesized that cathodal tDCS improves Picture naming and that this effect is determined by the anatomical and functional connectivity of the targeted region. Methods: Cathodal and sham t......DCS were applied to the right inferior frontal gyrus in 24 healthy subjects before a picture-naming task. All participants were studied with magnetic resonance imaging at pre-interventional baseline. Probabilistic tractography and dynamic causal modeling of functional brain activity during a word...

  9. Closed loop control of ZVS half bridge DC-DC converter with DCS PWM Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANAPATI SIVAVARA PRASAD

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The main drawback of the conventional symmetric control is that both primary switches in the converter operate at hard switching condition. Moreover, during the off-time period of two switches, the oscillation between the transformer leakage inductance and junction capacitance of the switches results in energy dissipation and electromagnetic interference (EMI emissions due to reverse recovery of MOSFETs body diodes. The asymmetric (complementary control was proposed to achieve ZVS operation for HB switches. However, asymmetric stresses distribution on the corresponding components may occur due to the asymmetric duty cycle distribution for the two primary switches. A new control scheme, to be known as duty-cycle shifted PWM (DCS PWM control, is proposed and applied to the conventional HB dc–dc converters to achieve ZVS for both the  switches without adding extra components and without adding asymmetric penalties of the complementary control. The concept of this new control scheme is shifting one of the two symmetric PWM driving signals close to the other, such that ZVS may be achieved for the lagging switch due to the shortened resonant interval. Moreover, based on the DCS PWM control, a new half-bridge topology is proposed to achieve ZVS for both the main switches and auxiliary switch by adding an auxiliary switch and diode in the proposed half bridge. ZVS for the  switch is achieved by utilizing the energy trapped in the leakage inductance. There are two control schemes. One is open loop and the other is closed loop. In open loop scheme, the given dc-dc converter is operating under disturbance. This disturbance effect is eliminated in closed loop scheme.

     

  10. Influence of Skin Epithelial cells and Human Umbilical VEIN CELLS Conditioned Media on Maturation of Type 1 Dendritic Cells(DC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ganjybakhsh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dendritic cells have a high potential in presentation of antigens and can be generated and manipulated in invitro culture conditions. Dendritic cells(DC are therefore used in cancer immunotherapy, in prevention of graft rejection, treatment of allergy, autoimmune diseases and certain infectious diseases. Methods: Dendritic cell was generated in two stages. IN the first stage, monocyte cells were converted to immature DC affected GM-CSF and IL-4 .In the second stage, dendritic cells were maturated in the presence of supernatant skin epithelial cells(A375 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVEC and maturation factors. The ability of phagocytosis, expression phenotype, stimulation of T lymphocytes and cytokines was studied. Results: Mature Dendritic cells decreased their power of phagocytosis and increased expression of their surface markers. The ability of T cells stimulation and cytokine production(IL-12 increased . Conclusion: Mixture condition medium of epithelial cells and human skin umbilical vein endothelium cells induces maturation of monocyte-derived DCs. This condition medium improves their phenotype and their functions. The mentioned condition medium generates DC1 and Th1 in vitro.

  11. In Vitro Generation of Human XCR1(+) Dendritic Cells from CD34(+) Hematopoietic Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Sreekumar; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells which play a key role in orchestrating immune defenses. Most of the information gained on human DC biology was derived from studies conducted with DCs generated in vitro from peripheral blood CD14(+) monocytes (MoDCs) or from CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. Recent advances in the field revealed that these types of in vitro-derived DCs strikingly differ from the DC subsets that are naturally present in human lymphoid organs, in terms of global gene expression, of specialization in the sensing of different types of danger signals, and of the ability to polarize T lymphocytes toward different functions. Major efforts are being made to better characterize the biology and the functions of lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets in humans, as an essential step for designing innovative DC-based vaccines against infections or cancers. However, this line of research is hampered by the low frequency of certain DC subsets in most tissues, their fragility, and the complexity of the procedures necessary for their purification. Hence, there is a need for robust procedures allowing large-scale in vitro generation of human DC subsets, under conditions allowing their genetic or pharmacological manipulation, to decipher their functions and their molecular regulation. Human CD141(+)CLEC9A(+)XCR1(+) DCs constitute a very interesting DC subset for the design of immunotherapeutic treatments against infections by intracellular pathogens or against cancer, because these cells resemble mouse professional cross-presenting CD8α(+)Clec9a(+)Xcr1(+) DCs. Human XCR1(+) DCs have indeed been reported by several teams to be more efficient than other human DC subsets for cross-presentation, in particular of cell-associated antigens but also of soluble antigens especially when delivered into late endosomes or lysosomes. However, human XCR1(+) DCs are the rarest and perhaps the most fragile of the human DC

  12. tDCS of the cerebellum: where do we stand in 2016? Technical issues and critical review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim evan Dun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS is an up-and-coming electrical neurostimulation technique increasingly used both in healthy subjects and in selected groups of patients. Due to the high density of neurons in the cerebellum, its peculiar anatomical organization with the cortex lying superficially below the skull and its diffuse connections with motor and associative areas of the cerebrum, the cerebellum is becoming a major target for neuromodulation of the cerebellocerebral networks. We discuss the recent studies based on cerebellar tDCS with a focus on the numerous technical and open issues which remain to be solved. Our current knowledge of the physiological impacts of tDCS on cerebellar circuitry is criticized. We provide a comparison with transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS, another promising transcranial electrical neurostimulation technique. Although both tDCS and tACS are becoming established techniques to modulate the cerebellocerebral networks, it is surprising that their impacts on cerebellar disorders remains unclear. A major reason is that the literature lacks large trials with a double-blind, sham-controlled and cross-over experimental design in cerebellar patients.

  13. CD40-signalling abrogates induction of RORγt+ Treg cells by intestinal CD103+ DCs and causes fatal colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthels, Christian; Ogrinc, Ana; Steyer, Verena; Meier, Stefanie; Simon, Ferdinand; Wimmer, Maria; Blutke, Andreas; Straub, Tobias; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Lutgens, Esther; Marconi, Peggy; Ohnmacht, Caspar; Garzetti, Debora; Stecher, Bärbel; Brocker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Immune homeostasis in intestinal tissues depends on the generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) acquire microbiota-derived material from the gut lumen for transport to draining lymph nodes and generation of receptor-related orphan γt+ (RORγt+) Helios−-induced Treg (iTreg) cells. Here we show CD40-signalling as a microbe-independent signal that can induce migration of CD103+ DCs from the lamina propria (LP) to the mesenteric lymph nodes. Transgenic mice with constitutive CD11c-specific CD40-signalling have reduced numbers of CD103+ DCs in LP and a low frequency of RORγt+Helios− iTreg cells, exacerbated inflammatory Th1/Th17 responses, high titres of microbiota-specific immunoglobulins, dysbiosis and fatal colitis, but no pathology is detected in other tissues. Our data demonstrate a CD40-dependent mechanism capable of abrogating iTreg cell induction by DCs, and suggest that the CD40L/CD40-signalling axis might be able to intervene in the generation of new iTreg cells in order to counter-regulate immune suppression to enhance immunity. PMID:28276457

  14. Can tDCS enhance item-specific effects and generalization after linguistically motivated aphasia therapy for verbs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Aguiar, Vania; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Capasso, Rita; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Smania, Nicola; Rossi, Giorgio; Miceli, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aphasia therapy focusing on abstract properties of language promotes both item-specific effects and generalization to untreated materials. Neuromodulation with transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to enhance item-specific improvement, but its potential to enhance

  15. Resource Allocation in a Frequency Hopping PCS1900/GSM/DCS1800 Type of Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Toftegaard; Wigard, Jeroen; Michaelsen, Per-Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Resource allocation in a frequency hopping network is even more problematic than in a traditional network. The combined effect from all serving frequencies has to be considered directly in the allocation process. An algorithm doing this for a PCS1900/GSM/DCS1800 type of network is presented...

  16. Focused transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates specific domains of self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pripfl, Jürgen; Lamm, Claus

    2015-02-01

    Recent neuroscience theories suggest that different kinds of self-regulation may share a common psychobiological mechanism. However, empirical evidence for a domain general self-regulation mechanism is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate whether focused anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), facilitating the activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), acts on a domain general self-regulation mechanism and thus modulates both affective and appetitive self-regulation. Twenty smokers participated in this within-subject sham controlled study. Effects of anodal left, anodal right and sham tDCS over the dlPFC on affective picture appraisal and nicotine craving-cue appraisal were assessed. Anodal right tDCS over the dlPFC reduced negative affect in emotion appraisal, but neither modulated regulation of positive emotion appraisal nor of craving appraisal. Anodal left stimulation did not induce any significant effects. The results of our study show that domain specific self-regulation networks are at work in the prefrontal cortex. Focused tDCS modulation of this specific self-regulation network could probably be used during the first phase of nicotine abstinence, during which negative affect might easily result in relapse. These findings have implications for neuroscience models of self-regulation and are of relevance for the development of brain stimulation based treatment methods for neuropsychiatric disorders associated with self-regulation deficits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  17. tDCS of the Cerebellum: Where Do We Stand in 2016? Technical Issues and Critical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dun, Kim; Bodranghien, Florian C A A; Mariën, Peter; Manto, Mario U

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is an up-and-coming electrical neurostimulation technique increasingly used both in healthy subjects and in selected groups of patients. Due to the high density of neurons in the cerebellum, its peculiar anatomical organization with the cortex lying superficially below the skull and its diffuse connections with motor and associative areas of the cerebrum, the cerebellum is becoming a major target for neuromodulation of the cerebellocerebral networks. We discuss the recent studies based on cerebellar tDCS with a focus on the numerous technical and open issues which remain to be solved. Our current knowledge of the physiological impacts of tDCS on cerebellar circuitry is criticized. We provide a comparison with transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS), another promising transcranial electrical neurostimulation technique. Although both tDCS and tACS are becoming established techniques to modulate the cerebellocerebral networks, it is surprising that their impacts on cerebellar disorders remains unclear. A major reason is that the literature lacks large trials with a double-blind, sham-controlled, and cross-over experimental design in cerebellar patients.

  18. A pilot study of the tolerability and effects of high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) on pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Bikson, Marom; Frohman, Heather; Reeves, Scott T; Datta, Abhishek; Bansal, Varun; Madan, Alok; Barth, Kelly; George, Mark S

    2012-02-01

    Several brain stimulation technologies are beginning to evidence promise as pain treatments. However, traditional versions of 1 specific technique, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), stimulate broad regions of cortex with poor spatial precision. A new tDCS design, called high definition tDCS (HD-tDCS), allows for focal delivery of the charge to discrete regions of the cortex. We sought to preliminarily test the safety and tolerability of the HD-tDCS technique as well as to evaluate whether HD-tDCS over the motor cortex would decrease pain and sensory experience. Twenty-four healthy adult volunteers underwent quantitative sensory testing before and after 20 minutes of real (n = 13) or sham (n = 11) 2 mA HD-tDCS over the motor cortex. No adverse events occurred and no side effects were reported. Real HD-tDCS was associated with significantly decreased heat and cold sensory thresholds, decreased thermal wind-up pain, and a marginal analgesic effect for cold pain thresholds. No significant effects were observed for mechanical pain thresholds or heat pain thresholds. HD-tDCS appears well tolerated, and produced changes in underlying cortex that are associated with changes in pain perception. Future studies are warranted to investigate HD-tDCS in other applications, and to examine further its potential to affect pain perception. This article presents preliminary tolerability and efficacy data for a new focal brain stimulation technique called high definition transcranial direct current stimulation. This technique may have applications in the management of pain. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on multiscale complexity of dual-task postural control in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Diange; Zhou, Junhong; Chen, Hu; Manor, Brad; Lin, Jianhao; Zhang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting the prefrontal cortex reduces the size and speed of standing postural sway in younger adults, particularly when performing a cognitive dual task. Here, we hypothesized that tDCS would alter the complex dynamics of postural sway as quantified by multiscale entropy (MSE). Twenty healthy older adults completed two study visits. Center-of-pressure (COP) fluctuations were recorded during single-task (i.e., quiet standing) and dual-task (i.e., standing while performing serial subtractions) conditions, both before and after a 20-min session of real or sham tDCS. MSE was used to estimate COP complexity within each condition. The percentage change in complexity from single- to dual-task conditions (i.e., dual-task cost) was also calculated. Before tDCS, COP complexity was lower (p = 0.04) in the dual-task condition as compared to the single-task condition. Neither real nor sham tDCS altered complexity in the single-task condition. As compared to sham tDCS, real tDCS increased complexity in the dual-task condition (p = 0.02) and induced a trend toward improved serial subtraction performance (p = 0.09). Moreover, those subjects with lower dual-task COP complexity at baseline exhibited greater percentage increases in complexity following real tDCS (R = −0.39, p = 0.05). Real tDCS also reduced the dual-task cost to complexity (p = 0.02), while sham stimulation had no effect. A single session of tDCS targeting the prefrontal cortex increased standing postural sway complexity with concurrent non-postural cognitive task. This form of noninvasive brain stimulation may be a safe strategy to acutely improve postural control by enhancing the system's capacity to adapt to stressors. PMID:25963755

  20. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  1. Self-Administered Domiciliary tDCS Treatment for Tinnitus: A Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petteri Hyvärinen

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has shown potential for providing tinnitus relief, although positive effects have usually been observed only during a short time period after treatment. In recent studies the focus has turned from one-session experiments towards multi-session treatment studies investigating long-term outcomes with double-blinded and sham-controlled study designs. Traditionally, tDCS has been administered in a clinical setting by a healthcare professional but in studies involving multiple treatment sessions, often a trade-off has to be made between sample size and the amount of labor needed to run the trial. Also, as the number of required visits to the clinic increases, the dropout rate is likely to rise proportionally.The aim of the current study was to find out if tDCS treatment for tinnitus could be patient-administered in a domiciliary setting and whether the results would be comparable to those from in-hospital treatment studies. Forty-three patients with chronic (> 6 months tinnitus were involved in the study, and data on 35 out of these patients were included in final analysis. Patients received 20 minutes of left temporal area anodal (LTA or bifrontal tDCS stimulation (2 mA or sham stimulation (0.3 mA for ten consecutive days. An overall reduction in the main outcome measure, Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI, was found (mean change -5.0 points, p < 0.05, but there was no significant difference between active and sham treatment outcomes. Patients found the tDCS treatment easy to administer and they all tolerated it well. In conclusion, self-administered domiciliary tDCS treatment for tinnitus was found safe and feasible and gave outcome results similar to recent randomized controlled long-term treatment trials. The results suggest better overall treatment response-as measured by THI-with domiciliary treatment than with in-hospital treatment, but this advantage is not related to the tDCS variant. The study

  2. Electrodes for high-definition transcutaneous DC stimulation for applications in drug delivery and electrotherapy, including tDCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Preet; Bansal, Varun; Patel, Jinal; Ho, Johnson S; Diaz, Julian; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom

    2010-07-15

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation is applied in a range of biomedical applications including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). tDCS is a non-invasive procedure where a weak direct current (<2 mA) is applied across the scalp to modulate brain function. High-definition tDCS (HD-tDCS) is a technique used to increase the spatial focality of tDCS by passing current across the scalp using <12 mm diameter electrodes. The purpose of this study was to design and optimize "high-definition" electrode-gel parameters for electrode durability, skin safety and subjective pain. Anode and cathode electrode potential, temperature, pH and subjective sensation over time were assessed during application of 2 mA direct current, for up to 22 min on agar gel or subject forearms. A selection of five types of solid-conductors (Ag pellet, Ag/AgCl pellet, rubber pellet, Ag/AgCl ring and Ag/AgCl disc) and seven conductive gels (Signa, Spectra, Tensive, Redux, BioGel, Lectron and CCNY-4) were investigated. The Ag/AgCl ring in combination with CCNY-4 gel resulted in the most favorable outcomes. Under anode stimulations, electrode potential and temperature rises were generally observed in all electrode-gel combinations except for Ag/AgCl ring and disc electrodes. pH remained constant for all solid-conductors except for both Ag and rubber pellet electrodes with Signa and CCNY-4 gels. Sensation ratings were independent of stimulation polarity. Ag/AgCl ring electrodes were found to be the most comfortable followed by Ag, rubber and Ag/AgCl pellet electrodes across all gels.

  3. Can tDCS enhance item-specific effects and generalizion after linguistically motivated aphasia therapy for verbs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia ede Aguiar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aphasia therapy focusing on abstract properties of language promotes both item-specific effects and generalization to untreated materials. Neuromodulation with transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS has been shown to enhance item-specific improvement, but its potential to enhance generalization has not been systematically investigated. Here, we test the efficacy of ACTION (a linguistically motivated protocol and tDCS in producing item-specific and generalized improvement in aphasia.Method. Nine individuals with post-stroke aphasia participated in this study. Participants were pre-tested with a diagnostic language battery and a cognitive screening. Experimental tasks were administered over multiple baselines. Production of infinitives, of finite verbs and of full sentences were assessed before and after each treatment phase. Nonword repetition was used as a control measure. Each subject was treated in two phases. Ten daily 1-hour treatment sessions were provided per phase, in a double-blind, cross-over design. Linguistically-motivated language therapy focusing on verb inflection and sentence construction was provided in both phases. Each session began with 20 minutes of real or sham tDCS. Stimulation site was determined individually, based on MRI scans.Results. Group data showed improved production of treated and untreated verbs, attesting the efficacy of behavioral treatment, and its potential to yield generalization. Each individual showed significant item-specific improvement. Generalization occurred in the first phase of treatment for all subjects, and in the second phase for two subjects. Stimulation effects at the group level were significant for treated and untreated verbs altogether, but a ceiling effect for Sham cannot be excluded, as scores between real tDCS and Sham differed only before treatment.Conclusion. Our data demonstrate the efficacy of ACTION and suggest that tDCS may enhance both item-specific effects and

  4. Task-specificity of unilateral anodal and dual-M1 tDCS effects on motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karok, Sophia; Fletcher, David; Witney, Alice G

    2017-01-08

    Task-specific effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on motor learning were investigated in 30 healthy participants. In a sham-controlled, mixed design, participants trained on 3 different motor tasks (Purdue Pegboard Test, Visuomotor Grip Force Tracking Task and Visuomotor Wrist Rotation Speed Control Task) over 3 consecutive days while receiving either unilateral anodal over the right primary motor cortex (M1), dual-M1 or sham stimulation. Retention sessions were administered 7 and 28 days after the end of training. In the Purdue Pegboard Test, both anodal and dual-M1 stimulation reduced average completion time approximately equally, an improvement driven by online learning effects and maintained for about 1 week. The Visuomotor Grip Force Tracking Task and the Visuomotor Wrist Rotation Speed Control Task were associated with an advantage of dual-M1 tDCS in consolidation processes both between training sessions and when testing at long-term retention; both were maintained for at least 1 month. This study demonstrates that M1-tDCS enhances and sustains motor learning with different electrode montages. Stimulation-induced effects emerged at different learning phases across the tasks, which strongly suggests that the influence of tDCS on motor learning is dynamic with respect to the functional recruitment of the distributed motor system at the time of stimulation. Divergent findings regarding M1-tDCS effects on motor learning may partially be ascribed to task-specific consequences and the effects of offline consolidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The nucleosome (histone-DNA complex is the TLR9-specific immunostimulatory component of Plasmodium falciparum that activates DCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj M Gowda

    Full Text Available The systemic clinical symptoms of Plasmodium falciparum infection such as fever and chills correspond to the proinflammatory cytokines produced in response to the parasite components released during the synchronized rupture of schizonts. We recently demonstrated that, among the schizont-released products, merozoites are the predominant components that activate dendritic cells (DCs by TLR9-specific recognition to induce the maturation of cells and to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We also demonstrated that DNA is the active constituent and that formation of a DNA-protein complex is essential for the entry of parasite DNA into cells for recognition by TLR9. However, the nature of endogenous protein-DNA complex in the parasite is not known. In this study, we show that parasite nucleosome constitute the major protein-DNA complex involved in the activation of DCs by parasite nuclear material. The parasite components were fractionated into the nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The nuclear material was further fractionated into chromatin and the proteins loosely bound to chromatin. Polynucleosomes and oligonucleosomes were prepared from the chromatin. These were tested for their ability to activate DCs obtained by the FLT3 ligand differentiation of bone marrow cells from the wild type, and TLR2(-/-, TLR9(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice. DCs stimulated with the nuclear material and polynucleosomes as well as mono- and oligonucleosomes efficiently induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines in a TLR9-dependent manner, demonstrating that nucleosomes (histone-DNA complex represent the major TLR9-specific DC-immunostimulatory component of the malaria parasite nuclear material. Thus, our data provide a significant insight into the activation of DCs by malaria parasites and have important implications for malaria vaccine development.

  6. Treatment of visuospatial neglect with biparietal tDCS and cognitive training: a single-case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Anna-Katharine; Unterburger, Evelyn; Speight, Irving; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Symptoms of visuospatial neglect occur frequently after unilateral brain damage. Neglect hampers rehabilitation progress and is associated with reduced quality of life. However, existing treatment methods show limited efficacy. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique, which can be used to increase or decrease brain excitability. Its combination with conventional neglect therapy may enhance treatment efficacy. A 72-year-old male with a subacute ischemic stroke of the right posterior cerebral artery suffering from visuospatial neglect, hemianopia, and hemiparesis was treated with biparietal tDCS and cognitive neglect therapy in a double-blind, sham-controlled single-case study. Four weeks of daily treatment sessions (5 days per week, 30 min) were started 26 days post-stroke. During week 1 and 4 the patient received conventional neglect therapy, during week 2, conventional neglect therapy was combined once with sham and once with real biparietal tDCS. Week 3 consisted of daily sessions of real biparietal tDCS (1 mA, 20 min) combined with neglect therapy. Outcome measures were assessed before, immediately after, as well as 1 week and 3 months after the end of treatment. They included subtests of the Test for Attentional Performance (TAP): covert attention (main outcome), alertness, visual field; the Neglect-Test (NET): line bisection, cancelation, copying; and activities of daily living (ADL). After real stimulation, covert attention allocation toward left-sided invalid stimuli was significantly improved, and line bisection and copying improved qualitatively as compared to sham stimulation. ADL were only improved at the 3-month follow-up. This single-case study demonstrates for the first time that combined application of tDCS and cognitive training may enhance training-induced improvements in measures of visuospatial neglect and is applicable in a clinical context.

  7. Treatment of visuospatial neglect with biparietal tDCS and cognitive training: a single-case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Katharine eBrem

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of visuospatial neglect occur frequently after unilateral brain damage. Neglect hampers rehabilitation progress and is associated with reduced quality of life. However, existing treatment methods show limited efficacy. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a neuromodulatory technique, which can be used to increase or decrease brain excitability. Its combination with conventional neglect therapy may enhance treatment efficacy.A 72-year-old male with a subacute ischaemic stroke of the right posterior cerebral artery suffering from visuospatial neglect, hemianopia, and hemiparesis was treated with biparietal tDCS and cognitive neglect therapy in a double-blind, sham-controlled single-case study. Four weeks of daily treatment sessions (5 days per week, 30 min were started 26 days post-stroke. During week 1 and 4 the patient received conventional neglect therapy, during week 2, conventional neglect therapy was combined once with sham and once with real biparietal tDCS. Week 3 consisted of daily sessions of real biparietal tDCS (1 mA, 20 min combined with neglect therapy. Outcome measures were assessed before, immediately after, as well as 1 week and 3 months after the end of treatment. They included subtests of the Test for Attentional Performance (TAP: covert attention (main outcome, alertness, visual field; the Neglect-Test (NET: line bisection, cancellation, copying; and activities of daily living (ADL. After real stimulation, covert attention allocation towards left-sided invalid stimuli was significantly improved, and line bisection and copying improved qualitatively as compared to sham stimulation. ADL were only improved at the 3-month follow-up. This single-case study demonstrates for the first time that combined application of tDCS and cognitive training may enhance training-induced improvements in measures of visuospatial neglect and is applicable in a clinical context.

  8. The right inferior frontal cortex in response inhibition: A tDCS-ERP co-registration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunillera, Toni; Brignani, Debora; Cucurell, David; Fuentemilla, Lluís; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-10-15

    In any given common situation, when an individual controls him/herself or obeys and stops a current action when asked to do, it is because the brain executes an inhibitory process. This ability is essential for adaptive behaviour, and it is also a requirement for accurate performance in daily life. It has been suggested that there are two main inhibitory functions related to behaviour, as inhibition is observed to affect behaviour at different time intervals. Proactive inhibition permits the subject to control his behavioural response over time by creating a response tendency, while reactive inhibition is considered to be a process that usually inhibits an already initiated response. In this context, it has been established that inhibitory function is implemented by specific fronto-basal-ganglia circuits. In the present study, we investigated the role of the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) in response inhibition by combining into a single task the Go-NoGo task and the Stop-Signal task. Concurrently, we applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the IFC and recorded electroencephalography (EEG). Thus, we obtained online EEG measurements of the tDCS-induced modifications in the IFC together with the participant's performance in a response inhibition task. We found that applying bilateral tDCS on the IFC (right anodal/left cathodal) significantly increased proactive inhibition, although the behavioural parameters indicative of reactive inhibition were unaffected by the stimulation. Finally, the inhibitory-P3 component reflected a similar modulation under both inhibitory conditions induced by the stimulation. Our data indicates that an online tDCS-ERP approach is achievable, but that a tDCS bilateral montage may not be the most efficient one for modulating the rIFC.

  9. Simulation experiments for evolution of fatty acids in immature source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The anhydrous, hydrous and bitumen-extrac- ted simulations were carried out for the immature source rocks from the Liaohe sag. It has been shown from the result that with increasing temperature in simulation experiments, the fatty acids content decreased at first and then increased. The decrease of fatty acids in immature rocks is presumably related to alkanes generation in immature oils, whilst the increase may be related to the fact that some additional fatty acids are generated from kerogen and the tightly bound fatty acids in kerogen are released as bound fatty acids in kerogen and unbound fatty acids in bitumen. The fact that the bitumen generated from kerogen contains fatty acids has demonstrated that some bound and tightly bound fatty acids in kerogen can be transferred into bitumen. The preferential fatty acids in the immature source rocks are found to be mono-carboxylic acids with longer chains, whilst krogen contains relatively more di-carboxylic acids. It has been found that the fatty acids in immature source rocks can be changed from that with more longer chains to that with more shorter chains when evolution extent has been increased. Based on simulation results and the fact that the majority of fatty acids in immature oils are those with longer chains, it is inferred that the contribution of fatty acids to forming alkanes in immature oils mainly takes place at the evolution stage with R0 (0.6%. The simulation experiments have also demonstrated that H2O could promote the generation of fatty acids with more di-carboxylic acids and delay alkanes formation from fatty acids.

  10. Pregnancy and fertilization potential of immature oocytes retrieved in intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Duck Sung; Lee, Sun-Hee; Park, Dong-Wook; Yang, Kwang Moon; Lim, Chun Kyu

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the pregnancy potential of immature (metaphase I or germinal vesicle stage) oocytes retrieved in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles. A total of 1,871 couples with infertility underwent 2,984 ICSI cycles. Cycles in which three or fewer oocytes were retrieved were included in this study in order to evaluate the pregnancy potential of immature oocytes. Cycles were divided into five groups (group I-V), according to the maturation status of the oocytes at the time of cumulus cell removal and ICSI. The fertilization and pregnancy rates after ICSI were analyzed and compared among the study groups based on the maturation status of the retrieved oocytes. The retrieval of only immature oocytes was associated with a significant decrease in the fertilization rate (76.1%±37.3% vs. 49.0%±49.1%, 66.7%±48.7%; group I vs. group II, group III, respectively) and the average number of transferred embryos (1.5±0.7 vs. 1.1±0.4, 1.1±0.6). The cycle cancellation rate was significantly higher when only immature oocytes were retrieved. The clinical pregnancy rate decreased significantly when the transferred embryos had originated from immature oocytes (16.9% vs. 10.3%, 1.2%). In ICSI cycles, the fertilization potential and pregnancy potential of the immature oocytes retrieved in ICSI cycles were inferior to those of mature oocytes. Therefore, increasing the number of injectable oocytes and transferrable embryos by using immature oocytes after their spontaneous in vitro maturation does not necessarily improve pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Comparison of fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth with an open apex using Biodentine and composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murtuza Saifuddin Zhabuawala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the fracture resistance in simulated immature teeth that had been backfilled using composite resin and Biodentine after using Biodentine as an apical plug material immediately and after 3 months of aging. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human maxillary central incisors were simulated in an immature open apex. The roots of all the specimens were then standardized to a length of 10 mm and canals were instrumented to obtain the radicular dentin thickness around 1.5 mm. All the specimens were then randomly divided into three groups